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Sample records for men42nidmit2 complex salt

  1. Cooperativity of complex salt bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Gvritishvili, Anzor G.; Gribenko, Alexey V.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2008-01-01

    The energetic contribution of complex salt bridges, in which one charged residue (anchor residue) forms salt bridges with two or more residues simultaneously, has been suggested to have importance for protein stability. Detailed analysis of the net energetics of complex salt bridge formation using double- and triple-mutant cycle analysis revealed conflicting results. In two cases, it was shown that complex salt bridge formation is cooperative, i.e., the net strength of the complex salt bridge...

  2. BAIA VERDE - SLANIC PRAHOVA SALTED LAKES COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica SAVA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Baia Verde – Slanic Prahova Lakes Complex have been formed by water accumulation resulted out of infiltrated salted water from bell shaped surface salt mines dated XVII century (1685. Such lakes, as per their method of formation, can be also found in other places from the SubCarpathians area (Telega – Prahova, Ocnele Mari – Valcea, Transilvanian Depression (Ocna Sibiului, Turda, Sovata, Ocna Dejului, etc.. Water contact with diapires, in the places where have always existed such mining explorations and exploitation, has determined the formation of salted lakes having balneary and therapeutically qualities and sometimes the development of a heliothermic / mezothermic bed. At Slanic – Prahova besides the three lakes known as Baia Verde 1, 2 and 3, there is also the lake Baia Baciului situated at the border of “Salt Mountain” which represented the first objective for capitalization of the balnear and therapeutically potential of the area.

  3. Starch-lipid complexes: Interesting material and applications from amylose-fatty acid salt inclusion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqueous slurries of high amylose starch can be steam jet cooked and blended with aqueous solutions of fatty acid salts to generate materials that contain inclusion complexes between amylose and the fatty acid salt. These complexes are simply prepared on large scale using commercially available steam...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and P-89-577...

  5. Reinecke's Salt Revisited. An Undergraduate Project Involving an Unknown Metal Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Graeme H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes 10 experiments for characterizing the chromium complex Reinecke's Salt. The properties of the complex, experimental procedures, and a discussion are provided. Analyses are presented for chromium, total ammonia, thiocyanate, ammonium ion, and hydrate water. Measurement methods are described. (YP)

  6. Displacement of Drugs From Cyclodextrin Complexes by Bile Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, Rene

    2016-01-01

    of drug from the cyclodextrin cavity by bile salts present in the small intestine. As bile salts in the intestine are present at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration, an understanding of the interaction between cyclodextrins and bile salts at such supramicellar concentrations (SMC...... results and earlier data demonstrated that direct interactions between bile salt micelles and cyclodextrin were negligible. From this knowledge, an extended form of the UCD was suggested to describe the concentration of cyclodextrins to achieve full drug solubilization in the intestine where bile salts......The dosing of drugs in an aqueous cyclodextrin formulation requires sufficient amount of cyclodextrins to fully solubilize the drug, as described by Stella's cyclodextrin utility number (UCD). However, this framework does not take biopharmaceutical elements into account, such as the displacement...

  7. A study of salt effects on the complexation between beta-cyclodextrins and bile salts based on the Hofmeister series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Rene; Schonbeck, Christian; Somprasirt, Pitchayanun

    2014-01-01

    bound drug molecules. The influence of Hofmeister ions on the binding constants of complexes between CDs (β-CD and hydroxypropylated β-CD) and bile salts (glycocholate and glycochenodeoxycholate) were examined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The chaotropic anions tended to weaken these inclusion...

  8. Effect of complexing salt on conductivity of PVC/PEO polymer blend ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-02-28

    ehylene oxide) (PEO) and different lithium salts (LiClO4, LiBF4 and LiCF3SO3) were prepared by the solution casting technique. The effect of complexing salt on the ionic conductivity of the PVC/PEO host polymer is discussed.

  9. 3D Gravity Modeling of Complex Salt Features in the Southern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Nava-Flores

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a three-dimensional (3D gravity modeling and inversion approach and its application to complex geological settings characterized by several allochthonous salt bodies embedded in terrigenous sediments. Synthetic gravity data were computed for 3D forward modeling of salt bodies interpreted from Prestack Depth Migration (PSDM seismic images. Density contrasts for the salt bodies surrounded by sedimentary units are derived from density-compaction curves for the northern Gulf of Mexico’s oil exploration surveys. By integrating results from different shape- and depth-source estimation algorithms, we built an initial model for the gravity anomaly inversion. We then applied a numerically optimized 3D simulated annealing gravity inversion method. The inverted 3D density model successfully retrieves the synthetic salt body ensemble. Results highlight the significance of integrating high-resolution potential field data for salt and subsalt imaging in oil exploration.

  10. Macrocyclic polyether complexes of amino acids and amino acid salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidzilya, V.A.; Oleksenko, LP.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the isolation of the complexes formed between various types of amino acid derivatives and macrocyclic polyethers, and the characterisation of their physical and chemical properties. The study shows that macrocyclic polyethers form 1:1 complexes with amino acids and amino acid derivatives, and that these complexes can be isolated in pure form. Amino acids can be bound to these complexes in their anionic forms, in switterionic forms, as well as in their protonated forms. These types of complexes may be useful for the transport of amino acids or their derivatives across both synthetic and natural membranes

  11. Increased water resistance of paper treated with amylose-fatty ammonium salt inclusion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylose inclusion complexes were prepared from high amylose corn starch and the HCl salts of hexadecylamine and octadecylamine. Solutions of the complexes were applied to paper at concentrations of 2-4%. After the treated papers were dried, sodium hydroxide solution was applied to convert the adsorb...

  12. Speciation of Zinc Mixed Ligand Complexes in Salt Water Systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shifts in half-wave potentials are used to compute metal complex formation constants. The study reveals the existence of various species and a prediction is made of the distribution of the major labile complex species of Zn2+ present in the lake water. The concentration level of Zn2+ ions in the lake seems to play a role in ...

  13. The Effect of Salt on the Complex Coacervation of Vinyl Polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Perry

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex coacervation is an electrostatically-driven phase separation phenomenon that is utilized in a wide range of everyday applications and is of great interest for the creation of self-assembled materials. Here, we utilized turbidity to characterize the effect of salt type on coacervate formation using two vinyl polyelectrolytes, poly(acrylic acid sodium salt (pAA and poly(allylamine hydrochloride (pAH, as simple models for industrial and biological coacervates. We confirmed the dominant role of salt valence on the extent of coacervate formation, while demonstrating the presence of significant secondary effects, which can be described by Hofmeister-like behavior. These results revealed the importance of ion-specific interactions, which are crucial for the informed design of coacervate-based materials for use in complex ionic environments, and can enable more detailed theoretical investigations on the role of subtle electrostatic and thermodynamic effects in complex coacervation.

  14. The Effect of Salt on the Complex Coacervation of Vinyl Polyelectrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Sarah; Li, Yue; Priftis, Dimitrios; Leon, Lorraine; Tirrell, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    Complex coacervation is an electrostatically-driven phase separation phenomenon that is utilized in a wide range of everyday applications and is of great interest for the creation of self-assembled materials. Here, we utilized turbidity to characterize the effect of salt type on coacervate formation using two vinyl polyelectrolytes, poly(acrylic acid sodium salt) (pAA) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (pAH), as simple models for industrial and biological coacervates. We confirmed the dominant role of salt valence on the extent of coacervate formation, while demonstrating the presence of significant secondary effects, which can be described by Hofmeister-like behavior. These results revealed the importance of ion-specific interactions, which are crucial for the informed design of coacervate-based materials for use in complex ionic environments, and can enable more detailed theoretical investigations on the role of subtle electrostatic and thermodynamic effects in complex coacervation.

  15. Enzyme-polyelectrolyte complex: Salt effects on the reaction of urease with polyallylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonenko, S. A.; Saburova, E. A.; Durdenko, E. N.; Sukhorukov, B. I.

    2009-10-01

    The effects of inorganic mono- and divalent salts of different types on how the cation polyelectrolyte polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAA) binds with the oligomer enzyme urease were studied. It was shown that in solutions of the monovalent salts NaCl, KCl, and NH4Cl, polyelectrolyte-protein complexes formed by electrostatic interactions, which decreased monotonically as the salt concentrations increased according to the classic law of statistical physics, correlating the Debye radius with the ionic strength of the solution. In solutions of the divalent salts Na2SO4 and (NH4)2SO4, the efficiency of the formation of the polyelectrolyte-protein complexes changed abruptly (the enzyme was drastically activated) at low salt concentrations (˜0.6-0.8 mM), which was not consistent with the classic theory of charge interactions in solutions with different ionic strengths. Turbidimetric titration at different salt concentrations in the given range revealed a high aggregative ability for sulfates and low ability for chlorides. It was concluded that the anomalies in the concentration dependence of the enzyme activity and aggregative ability were related to the formation of stable bonds PAA to the divalent SO{4/2-} anion, which increased drastically when the ratio of anion concentration to the number of positively charged PAA monomers in solution reached 1: 2.

  16. Speciation of Zinc Mixed Ligand Complexes in Salt Water Systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Half-wave potentials at the actual metal ion concentration in the lake and at a much lower one (10-2 times) were experimentally determined. Shifts in half-wave potentials are used to compute metal complex formation constants. The study reveals the existence of various species and a prediction is made of the distribution of ...

  17. Rare Earth Electrochemical Property Measurements and Phase Diagram Development in a Complex Molten Salt Mixture for Molten Salt Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinsuo; Guo, Shaoqiang

    2018-03-30

    Pyroprocessing is a promising alternative for the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel (UNF) that uses electrochemical methods. Compared to the hydrometallurgical reprocessing method, pyroprocessing has many advantages such as reduced volume of radioactive waste, simple waste processing, ability to treat refractory material, and compatibility with fast reactor fuel recycle. The key steps of the process are the electro-refining of the spent metallic fuel in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, which can be integrated with an electrolytic reduction step for the reprocessing of spent oxide fuels. During the electro-refining process, actinides and active fission products such rare earth (RE) elements are dissolved into the molten salt from the spent fuel at an anode basket. Then U and Pu are electro-deposited on the cathodes while REs with relatively negative reduction potentials are left in the molten salt bath. However, with the accumulation of lanthanides in the salt, the reduction potentials of REs will approach the values for U and Pu, affecting the recovery efficiency of U and Pu. Hence, RE drawdown is necessary to reduce salt waste after uranium and minor actinides recovery, which can also be performed by electrochemical separations. To separate various REs and optimize the drawdown process, physical properties of REs in LiCl-KCl salt and their concentration dependence are essential. Thus, the primary goal of present research is to provide fundamental data of REs and deduce phase diagrams of LiCl-KCl-RECl3 based complex molten salts. La, Nd and Gd are three representative REs that we are particularly interested in due to the high ratio of La and Nd in UNF, highest standard potential of Gd among all REs, and the existing literature data in dilute solution. Electrochemical measurements are performed to study the thermodynamics and transport properties of LaCl3, GdCl3, NdCl3, and NdCl2 in LiCl-KCl eutectic in the temperature range 723-823 K. Test are conducted in LiCl-KCl melt

  18. Studies on cluster, salt and molecular complex of zinc-quinolinate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    127, No. 2, February 2015, pp. 215–223. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0781-6. Studies on cluster, salt and molecular complex of zinc-quinolinate. PRITHIVIRAJ KHAKHLARY and JUBARAJ B BARUAH∗. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039, India.

  19. Effect of complexing salt on conductivity of PVC/PEO polymer blend ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The effect of complexing salt on the ionic conductivity of the PVC/PEO host polymer is discussed. Solid polymer electrolyte films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, TG/DTA and ac impedance spectroscopic studies. ..... The TG curve shows a first degradation at 70°C accom- panied by a weight loss of ...

  20. Salt-Induced Disintegration of Lysozyme-Containing Polyelectrolyte Complex Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhoud, Saskia; Voorhaar, Lenny; de Vries, Renko; Schweins, Ralf; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem

    2009-01-01

    The salt-induced disintegration of lysozyme-filled polyelectrolyte complex micelles, consisting of positively charged homopolymers (PDMAEMA(150)), negatively charged diblock copolymers (PAA(42)-PAAm(417)) and lysozyme, has been Studied with dynamic light scattering (DL) and small-angle neutron

  1. Salt-Induced Disintegration of Lysozyme-Containing Polyelectrolyte Complex Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhoud, S.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Norde, W.; Vries, de R.J.; Schweins, R.; Voorhaar, L.

    2009-01-01

    The salt-induced disintegration of lysozyme-filled polyelectrolyte complex micelles, consisting of positively charged homopolymers (PDMAEMA150), negatively charged diblock copolymers (PAA42-PAAm417), and lysozyme, has been studied with dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle neutron

  2. Studies on cluster, salt and molecular complex of zinc-quinolinate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 2. Studies on cluster, salt and molecular ... Keywords. Zinc-clusters; molecular complex; hydrolytic equilibrium; zinc oxide; porous material. ... Jubaraj B Baruah1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039, India ...

  3. Speciation of cadmium mixed ligand complexes in salt water lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Kituyi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam voltammetry has been used to study heavy metal interaction in model lake water in KNO3 at 23 oC at concentration levels of genuine lake water. The hanging drop amalgam electrode was prepared in situ before exchanging the medium for the sample solution. Half-wave potentials at two metal ion concentrations were measured, one at the actual concentration in the lake while the other at a much lower one. The experimentally determined shifts in half-wave potentials are used to compute several formation constants. At the natural [CO32-] of 0.5 M in the lake, the main contributor to the speciation of cadmium is [Cd(CO3Cl2]2-. At high [Cd2+], the DPASV detects the presence of free Cd2+ ions, hence, potential polluting effect, while the amalgam reports [Cd(CO32Cl] 3- to be dominant above [CO32-] = 0.8 M. There is a variation in the number of complexes detected, their stabilities and percentage distribution in the two methods. Cd2+ ion concentration also affects the number of complexes formed and their stabilities.

  4. In vitro studies on interactions of iron salts and complexes with food-stuffs and medicaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisser, P

    1990-07-01

    It has been shown in the present study that food components such as phytic acid, oxalic acid, tannin, sodium alginate, choline and choline salts, vitamins A, D3 and E, soy oil and soy flour, do not undergo any interactions with iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex (Ferrum Hausmann). Phytic acid, oxalic acid, tannin and sodium alginate, however, react with iron(II) or iron(III)-salts at pH values of 3.0, 5.5 and 8.0, giving rise to iron complexes. Trimethylamine-N-oxide, which is present in fish meal, reacts with iron(II)-sulphate to produce iron(III) reaction products; it does not react with iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex. Special soybean flours show no irreversible adsorption or precipitation with iron(III)-hydroxyide polymaltose complex over the pH range 3.0-8.0, in contrast to iron(II)-sulphate. Antacids containing aluminium hydroxide, talc, ion exchange resins or other unabsorbable, insoluble components absorb iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex in the pH range 3.0-8.0 in a reversible manner, while the strong adsorption or precipitation observed with iron(II)-sulphate at pH 8.0 is irreversible. No interaction was observed between the steroid hormones studied and iron(II)-sulphate or iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex. On the basis of the measured compatibilities, iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex can be administered orally simultaneously with many other drugs, without prejudicing the absorption of iron or of the other drug as is often seen with iron(II) and iron(III) salts.

  5. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R; Grishin, Nick V; Orth, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered that Vibrio parahaemolyticus VtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15718.001 PMID:27377244

  6. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R.; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.

  7. FUNCTION OF MALATDEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX OF MAIZE MESOPHYLL AND BUNDLE SHEATH CELLS UNDER SALT STRESS CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Еprintsev А.Т.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Salt-induced changes in malatdehydrogenase system activity make the essential contribution to cell adaptation to stress condition. The enzyme systems of C4-plants are most interesting due to their ability for adaptation to environment conditions. The role of separate components of malatdehydrogenase complex of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of corn in formation of adaptive reaction in stressful conditions is investigated in presented work.The activation of all enzymes of malatdehydrogenase system and the subsequent decrease in their activity was observed in mesophyll durring the first stage of adaptation to salt influence. In bundle sheath cells such parameters are differed from control less essentially. Fast accumulation of piruvate in cells and malate in both investigated tissues was induced. The further salinity led to falling of concentration this intermediate. The concentration of piruvate was below control level, and it was raised by the end of an exposition.The results show that sodium chloride causes induction of Krebs-cycle in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of corn and intensification of Hatch-Slack cycle. The described differences in function malatdehydrogenase systems of mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of leaves of corn under salinity mainly consist of the activity of enzymes of a studied complex in bundle sheath cells is subject to the minimal changes in comparison with mesophyll. Role of this enzymesystem in mechanisms of adaptive reaction of various tissues of corn to salt stress is discussed.

  8. Sensory attributes of complex tasting divalent salts are mediated by TRPM5 and TRPV1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; Damak, Sami; le Coutre, Johannes

    2009-02-25

    Complex tasting divalent salts (CTDS) are present in our daily diet, contributing to multiple poorly understood taste sensations. CTDS evoking metallic, bitter, salty, and astringent sensations include the divalent salts of iron, zinc, copper, and magnesium. To identify pathways involved with the complex perception of the above salts, taste preference tests (two bottles, brief access) were performed in wild-type (WT) mice and in mice lacking (1) the T1R3 receptor, (2) TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, or (3) the TRPM5 channel, the latter being necessary for the perception of sweet, bitter, and umami tasting stimuli. At low concentrations, FeSO(4) and ZnSO(4) were perceived as pleasant stimuli by WT mice, and this effect was fully reversed in TRPM5 knock-out mice. In contrast, MgSO(4) and CuSO(4) were aversive to WT mice, but for MgSO(4) the aversion was abolished in TRPM5 knock-out animals, and for CuSO(4), aversion decreased in both TRPV1- and TRPM5-deficient animals. Behavioral tests revealed that the T1R3 subunit of the sweet and umami receptors is implicated in the hedonically positive perception of FeSO(4) and ZnSO(4). For high concentrations of CTDS, the omission of TRPV1 reduced aversion. Imaging studies on heterologously expressed TRPM5 and TRPV1 channels are consistent with the behavioral experiments. Together, these results rationalize the complexity of metallic taste by showing that at low concentrations, compounds such as FeSO(4) and ZnSO(4) stimulate the gustatory system through the hedonically positive T1R3-TRPM5 pathway, and at higher concentrations, their aversion is mediated, in part, by the activation of TRPV1.

  9. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Attenuates Salt-Induced Hypertension and Kidney Injury in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikash; Wollner, Clayton; Kurth, Theresa; Bukowy, John D; Cowley, Allen W

    2017-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to explore the protective effects of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) inhibition by rapamycin on salt-induced hypertension and kidney injury in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We have previously demonstrated that H 2 O 2 is elevated in the kidneys of SS rats. The present study showed a significant upregulation of renal mTORC1 activity in the SS rats fed a 4.0% NaCl for 3 days. In addition, renal interstitial infusion of H 2 O 2 into salt-resistant Sprague Dawley rats for 3 days was also found to stimulate mTORC1 activity independent of a rise of arterial blood pressure. Together, these data indicate that the salt-induced increases of renal H 2 O 2 in SS rats activated the mTORC1 pathway. Daily administration of rapamycin (IP, 1.5 mg/kg per day) for 21 days reduced salt-induced hypertension from 176.0±9.0 to 153.0±12.0 mm Hg in SS rats but had no effect on blood pressure salt sensitivity in Sprague Dawley treated rats. Compared with vehicle, rapamycin reduced albumin excretion rate in SS rats from 190.0±35.0 to 37.0±5.0 mg/d and reduced the renal infiltration of T lymphocytes (CD3 + ) and macrophages (ED1 + ) in the cortex and medulla. Renal hypertrophy and cell proliferation were also reduced in rapamycin-treated SS rats. We conclude that enhancement of intrarenal H 2 O 2 with a 4.0% NaCl diet stimulates the mTORC1 pathway that is necessary for the full development of the salt-induced hypertension and kidney injury in the SS rat. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Diazonium salt derivatives of osmium bipyridine complexes: Electrochemical grafting and characterisation of modified surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, David J. [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Jenkins, Peter [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Polson, Matthew I.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Baronian, Keith H.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Downard, Alison J., E-mail: alison.downard@canterbury.ac.n [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2011-02-01

    Osmium bipyridine complexes were directly grafted to carbon electrodes through electroreduction of the diazonium salts [Os(bpy-ph-N{sub 2}{sup +}){sub 3}](PF{sub 6}){sub 5} (1) and [Os(bpy-ph-N{sub 2}{sup +}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}](PF{sub 6}){sub 2} (2). Growth of the films was not self-limiting as is usually found for grafting from diazonium salts. It appears that electron hopping through the bipyridine ligands of the immobilised complexes enables film growth to continue at a constant rate during grafting by potential cycling. The surface concentrations of deposited films were measured electrochemically and the film thicknesses were measured by depth-profiling using the atomic force microscope. Films up to 42 nm thick were prepared with no evidence for slowing of film growth. The grafted films exhibited high stability when repetitively cycled through the Os{sup 2+/3+} couple and electron transfer rate constants of 11.4 s{sup -1} and 35.4 s{sup -1} were measured in ACN and PBS, respectively, for the Os{sup 2+/3+} couple of the film grafted from 1.

  11. On aquifer thicknesses and geological complexity affecting fresh/salt groundwater distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamrsky, Daniel; Oude Essink, Gualbert; Bierkens, Marc

    2017-04-01

    and at equidistant spacing along the global coastline and modeled groundwater flow and salt transport using the SEAWAT code. In such manner, we can evaluate the range in simulated fresh/salt groundwater distribution based on different geological scenarios in which we stepwise increased the geological complexity. This method includes increasing the number of clay layers in the coastal aquifer and hence splitting it in multiple aquifers and aquitards. Our study provides a method and modelling tools that help to investigate the future impacts of climate change or human related risks that loom over coastal aquifer worldwide.

  12. Phosphate buffer and salt medium concentrations affect the inactivation of T4 phage by platinum(II) complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik B.; Josephsen, Jens; Kerszman, Gustaw

    1985-01-01

    -Tris) buffer and HEPES buffer. The phosphate abolishes the antiphage activity of the platinum complexes probably by some sort of complex formation. This together with dimerization reactions qualitatively explains the tailing off of the phage inactivation rate. High concentrations of NaNO3 as the salt medium...

  13. New glyme-cyclic imide lithium salt complexes as thermally stable electrolytes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takashi; Hachida, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazuki; Tachikawa, Naoki; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    New glyme-Li salt complexes were prepared by mixing equimolar amounts of a novel cyclic imide lithium salt LiN(C 2F 4S 2O 4) (LiCTFSI) and a glyme (triglyme (G3) or tetraglyme (G4)). The glyme-Li salt complexes, [Li(G3)][CTFSI] and [Li(G4)][CTFSI], are solid and liquid, respectively, at room temperature. The thermal stability of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is much higher than that of pure G4, and the vapor pressure of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is negligible at temperatures lower than 100 °C. Although the viscosity of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is high (132.0 mPa s at 30 °C), because of its high molar concentration (ca. 3 mol dm -3), its ionic conductivity at 30 °C is relatively high, i.e., 0.8 mS cm -1, which is slightly lower than that of a conventional organic electrolyte solution (1 mol dm -3 LiTFSI dissolved in propylene carbonate). The self-diffusion coefficients of a Li + cation, a CTFSI - anion, and a glyme molecule were measured by the pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR method (PGSE-NMR). The ionicity (dissociativity) of [Li(G4)][CTFSI] at 30 °C is ca. 0.5, as estimated from the PGSE-NMR diffusivity measurements and the ionic conductivity measurements. Results of linear sweep voltammetry revealed that [Li(G4)][CTFSI] is electrochemically stable in an electrode potential range of 0-4.5 V vs. Li/Li +. The reversible deposition-stripping behavior of lithium was observed by cyclic voltammetry. The [LiCoO 2|[Li(G4)][CTFSI]|Li metal] cell showed a stable charge-discharge cycling behavior during 50 cycles, indicating that the [Li(G4)][CTFSI] complex is applicable to a 4 V class lithium secondary battery.

  14. Binding orientation and interaction of bile salt in its ternary complex with pancreatic lipase-colipase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Neshatul; Prakash Prabhu, N

    2018-05-23

    The interfacial activity of pancreatic lipases (PL) depends on the presence of colipase and bile salt. The activity of PL is inhibited by micellar concentrations of bile salt which can be restored by the addition of colipase. Though the formation of 1:1:1 tertiary complex by lipase-colipase-bile salt micelle is well accepted, the residue-level interactions between lipase-colipase and bile salt are yet to be clearly understood. Molecular dynamic simulations of lipase-colipase complex, lipase and colipase were performed in the presence of a model bile salt, sodium taurocholate (NaTC), at its near-CMC and supra-micellar concentrations. From the interactions obtained from the molecular dynamic simulations, the ternary complex was modelled and compared with earlier reports. The analysis suggested that a micelle of NaTC consisting of nine monomers was formed at the concave groove between lipase and colipase chain and it mainly interacted with the fourth finger of colipase. This complex was mainly stabilized by van der Waals interactions. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of lipase which holds the colipase did not show any significant role in formation or stabilization of NaTC micelle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Joint Salt and Pepper Noise Removal and Resolution Enhancement Algorithm in Complex Wavelet Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Salehi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing image resolution enhancement algorithms assume that the image is clean and noise free, but this assumption is not practically valid. One strategy for interpolation of noisy images is to denoise the image first and then interpolate the denoised image. However, this strategy does not lead to satisfying results because denoising may smooth image details and also other artifacts such as blurring and blocking introduced due to image denoising will be amplified in the following interpolation stage. Thus, in this paper we propose a joint salt and pepper noise removal and resolution enhancement algorithm using dual-tree complex wavelet transform and feedforward neural networks. In this algorithm, the wavelet subbands corresponding to noise free high resolution image are estimated from noisy low resolution image by multi-layer perceptron (MLP. Therefore the noise free high resolution image is obtained by complex wavelet reconstruction of the estimated subbands. Takeing advantages of complex wavelet transform such as nearly shift invariance and directional selectivity the subband estimation by neural networks is done with high accuracy. As it is verified in the experimental results, the proposed algorithm has better performance both subjectively and objectively and is able to maintain the image fine structures well.

  16. Structural Characterization of Emeraldine-Salt Polyaniline/Gold Nanoparticles Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Sanches

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs stabilized with polyamidoamine dendrimers (Au-PAMAM or sodium citrate (Au-CITRATE were synthesized and complexed with polyaniline emeraldine-salt form (ES-PANI. The complexes were characterized using structural and morphological techniques, including X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Zeta Potential analyses, and Fourier-Transformed Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. When the Au-CITRATE NPs are added to the polymeric solution, the formation of a precipitate is clearly observed. The precipitate exhibited a different morphology from that found for ES-PANI and Au-CITRATE NPs, suggesting the formation of ES-PANI coating over the surface of Au-CITRATE NPs. On the other hand, when the Au-PAMAM NPs are incorporated into the ES-PANI solution, none interaction was observed, probably due to the repulsive electrostatic interactions, being the organization of the ES-PANI chains unaffected by the presence of the Au-PAMAM NPs.

  17. Whey Peptide-Iron Complexes Increase the Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Comparison to Iron Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Silva, Maria Elisa; Barros Mariutti, Lilian Regina; Bragagnolo, Neura; Bertoldo-Pacheco, Maria Teresa; Netto, Flavia Maria

    2018-02-28

    Food fortification with iron may favor lipid oxidation in both food matrices and the human body. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of peptide-iron complexation on lipid oxidation catalyzed by iron, using oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions as a model system. The extent of lipid oxidation of emulsions containing iron salts (FeSO 4 or FeCl 2 ) or iron complexes (peptide-iron complexes or ferrous bisglycinate) was evaluated during 7 days, measured as primary (peroxide value) and secondary products (TBARS and volatile compounds). Both salts catalyzed lipid oxidation, leading to peroxide values 2.6- to 4.6-fold higher than the values found for the peptide-iron complexes. The addition of the peptide-iron complexes resulted in the formation of lower amounts of secondary volatiles of lipid oxidation (up to 78-fold) than those of iron salts, possibly due to the antioxidant activity of the peptides and their capacity to keep iron apart from the lipid phase, since the iron atom is coordinated and takes part in a stable structure. The peptide-iron complexes showed potential to reduce the undesirable sensory changes in food products and to decrease the side effects related to free iron and the lipid damage of cell membranes in the organism, due to the lower reactivity of iron in the complexed form.

  18. Poly(vinyl alcohol) composite films with high percent elongation prepared from amylose-fatty ammonium salt inclusion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylose inclusion complexes prepared from cationic fatty ammonium salts and jet-cooked high amylose starch were combined with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) to form glycerol-plasticized films. Their tensile properties were compared with similar films prepared previously with analogous anionic fatty acid...

  19. Complex electronic waste treatment - An effective process to selectively recover copper with solutions containing different ammonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z H I; Xiao, Y; Sietsma, J; Agterhuis, H; Yang, Y

    2016-11-01

    Recovery of valuable metals from electronic waste has been highlighted by the EU directives. The difficulties for recycling are induced by the high complexity of such waste. In this research, copper could be selectively recovered using an ammonia-based process, from industrially processed information and communication technology (ICT) waste with high complexity. A detailed understanding on the role of ammonium salt was focused during both stages of leaching copper into a solution and the subsequent step for copper recovery from the solution. By comparing the reactivity of the leaching solution with different ammonium salts, their physiochemical behaviour as well as the leaching efficiency could be identified. The copper recovery rate could reach 95% with ammonium carbonate as the leaching salt. In the stage of copper recovery from the solution, electrodeposition was introduced without an additional solvent extraction step and the electrochemical behaviour of the solution was figured out. With a careful control of the electrodeposition conditions, the current efficiency could be improved to be 80-90% depending on the ammonia salts and high purity copper (99.9wt.%). This research provides basis for improving the recyclability and efficiency of copper recovery from such electronic waste and the whole process design for copper recycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Computational investigation of enthalpy-entropy compensation in complexation of glycoconjugated bile salts with β-cyclodextrin and analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidemand, Kasper D; Schönbeck, Christian; Holm, René; Westh, Peter; Peters, Günther H

    2014-09-18

    The inclusion complexes of glycoconjugated bile salts with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrins (HP-β-CD) in aqueous solution were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations to provide a molecular explanation of the experimentally observed destabilizing effect of the HP substituents. Good agreement with experimental data was found with respect to penetration depths of CDs. An increased degree of HP substitution (DS) resulted in an increased probability of blocking the cavity opening, thereby hindering the bile salt from entering CD. Further, the residence time of water molecules in the cavity increased with the DS. Release of water from the cavity resulted in a positive enthalpy change, which correlates qualitatively with the experimentally determined increase in complexation enthalpy and contributes to the enthalpy-entropy compensation. The positive change in complexation entropy with DS was not able to compensate for this unfavorable change in enthalpy induced by the HP substituents, resulting in a destabilizing effect. This was found to originate from fixation of the HP substituents and decreased free rotation of the bile salts within the CD cavities.

  1. Computational Investigation of Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation in Complexation of Glycoconjugated Bile Salts with β-Cyclodextrin and Analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Kasper Damgaard; Schonbeck, Christian; Holm, Rene

    2014-01-01

    in complexation entropy with DS was not able to compensate for this unfavorable change in enthalpy induced by the HP substituents, resulting in a destabilizing effect. This was found to originate from fixation of the HP substituents and decreased free rotation of the bile salts within the CD cavities....... of water molecules in the cavity increased with the DS. Release of water from the cavity resulted in a positive enthalpy change, which correlates qualitatively with the experimentally determined increase in complexation enthalpy and contributes to the enthalpy-entropy compensation. The positive change...

  2. Structural and Redox Properties of Vanadium Complexes in Molten Salts of Interest for the Catalytic Oxidation of Sulfur Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, S.; Chrissanthopoulos, A.; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    and vibrational properties of the vanadium complexes formed in the molten salt-gas system V2O5-M2S2O7-M2SO4/SO2-O-2 (M = K or Cs). The spectral features and the exploitation of the relative Raman intensities indicate that the (VO)(2)O(SO4)(4)(+) dimeric complex unit which possesses a V-O-V bridge is formed...... in the V2O5-M2S2O7 molten mixtures. Interaction with SO2 or addition of sulfate leads to cleavage of the V-O-V bridge and formation of the (VO)-O-IV(SO4)(2)(2-) or (VO2)-O-V(SO4)(2)(3-) complex units respectively. The most prominent Raman bands due to the V-V and V-IV complexes formed are assigned...

  3. Correction: A binary catalyst system of a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex with an alkali metal salt for selective hydroboration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chee Koon; Wu, Jie; Hor, T S Andy; Luo, He-Kuan

    2016-12-22

    Correction for 'A binary catalyst system of a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex with an alkali metal salt for selective hydroboration of carbon dioxide' by Chee Koon Ng et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 11842-11845.

  4. Hydration Differences Explain the Large Variations in the Complexation Thermodynamics of Modified γ-Cyclodextrins with Bile Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Jonatan; Schönbeck, Jens Christian Sidney; Westh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The structure and thermodynamics of inclusion complexes of seven different γ-cyclodextrins (γCDs) and three biologically relevant bile salts (BS) were investigated in the present study. Natural γCD and six modified γCDs [two methyl-γCDs, one sulfobutyl ether-γCD (SBEγCD), and three 2-hydroxypropyl...... to those with natural γCD; i.e., the modifications of the γCD had limited structural impact on the formation of complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry was carried out over in the temperature interval 5–55 °C to enable the calculation of the stability constant (K) and the thermodynamic parameters......), and 10–15 Å2 (methyl) of the BS surface area, in reasonable agreement with estimates from the molecular dynamics simulations. Combined with earlier investigations on modified βCDs, these results indicate general trends of the substituents on the thermodynamics of complex formation....

  5. Conformational coupling between receptor and kinase binding sites through a conserved salt bridge in a signaling complex scaffold protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi R Ortega

    Full Text Available Bacterial chemotaxis is one of the best studied signal transduction pathways. CheW is a scaffold protein that mediates the association of the chemoreceptors and the CheA kinase in a ternary signaling complex. The effects of replacing conserved Arg62 of CheW with other residues suggested that the scaffold protein plays a more complex role than simply binding its partner proteins. Although R62A CheW had essentially the same affinity for chemoreceptors and CheA, cells expressing the mutant protein are impaired in chemotaxis. Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations (MD, NMR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD, we addressed the role of Arg62. Here we show that Arg62 forms a salt bridge with another highly conserved residue, Glu38. Although this interaction is unimportant for overall protein stability, it is essential to maintain the correct alignment of the chemoreceptor and kinase binding sites of CheW. Computational and experimental data suggest that the role of the salt bridge in maintaining the alignment of the two partner binding sites is fundamental to the function of the signaling complex but not to its assembly. We conclude that a key feature of CheW is to maintain the specific geometry between the two interaction sites required for its function as a scaffold.

  6. Self-Healing of Bulk Polyelectrolyte Complex Material as a Function of pH and Salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Geyunjian; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-10-05

    Self-healing materials are an emerging class of modern materials gaining importance due to environmental and energy concerns. Materials based on the complexation of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, usually in the form of coatings and films, have been shown to have water activated self-healing properties. In this work, the self-healing of bulk branched poly(ethylene imine) and poly(acrylic acid) (BPEI/PAA) complex is studied as a function of the aqueous solutions used to activate the self-healing. Specifically, exposure to different salt solutions and solutions of different pH was examined including sodium and copper ion containing solutions as well as acidic and basic solutions. By applying NaCl treatment, especially followed by exposure to DI water, the self-healing ability of the BPEI/PAA complex was enhanced. In contrast, after treated by CuCl 2 , the BPEI/PAA complex lost its self-healing ability, showing an ability to modulate the ability to self-heal as a function of external stimulus. In addition to improving the ability to self-heal using salt as compared to using DI water alone, acidic and basic solutions can also improve the ability to self-heal. The self-healing is caused by chain mobility at the cut interface of the polyelectrolyte complex material which is controlled by charge density along the polyelectrolyte backbone as well as ionic cross-link density, and correlation between this mobility to rheological behavior is made. Tensile testing and determination of fracture toughness were used to characterize self-healing.

  7. Two-dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE analysis of whole cell lysate protein complexes of rice in response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Amenehsadat; Gharechahi, Javad; Nematzadeh, Ghorbanali; Shekari, Faezeh; Hosseini, Seyed Abdollah; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2016-08-01

    To understand the biology of a plant in response to stress, insight into protein-protein interactions, which almost define cell behavior, is thought to be crucial. Here, we provide a comparative complexomics analysis of leaf whole cell lysate of two rice genotypes with contrasting responses to salt using two-dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE (2D-BN/SDS-PAGE). We aimed to identify changes in subunit composition and stoichiometry of protein complexes elicited by salt. Using mild detergent for protein complex solubilization, we were able to identify 9 protein assemblies as hetero-oligomeric and 30 as homo-oligomeric complexes. A total of 20 proteins were identified as monomers in the 2D-BN/SDS-PAGE gels. In addition to identifying known protein complexes that confirm the technical validity of our analysis, we were also able to discover novel protein-protein interactions. Interestingly, an interaction was detected for glycolytic enzymes enolase (ENO1) and triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) and also for a chlorophyll a-b binding protein and RuBisCo small subunit. To show changes in subunit composition and stoichiometry of protein assemblies during salt stress, the differential abundance of interacting proteins was compared between salt-treated and control plants. A detailed exploration of some of the protein complexes provided novel insight into the function, composition, stoichiometry and dynamics of known and previously uncharacterized protein complexes in response to salt stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of regularities of uranyl salts complexing with neutral bases in nonaqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobets, L.V.; Buchikhin, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    Anhydrous uranyl chloride complexing with neutral oxygen-containing organic bases (sulfoxides, organic phosphates, phosphinates, phosphinoxides, N-oxides) in the acetone medium depending on the donor capacity of neutral molecules is discussed. The constants of 1:1 complexes dissociation are shown to detect no correlation with the donor capacity of neutral bases. At the same time stability constants of complexes increase as the donor capacity of ligands grows. But the dependence is of a complex character and is determined by the nature of neutral molecules. Estimation of uranyl chloride and 0-donor contributions into the values of stability constants and complex formation heats is given

  9. Modeling of Flow, Transport and Controlled Sedimentation Phenomena during Mixing of Salt Solutions in Complex Porous Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Eugene D.; Jaho, Sofia; Pavlakou, Efstathia I.; Sygouni, Varvara; Petsi, Anastasia; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of salts in porous media is a major engineering phenomenon encountered in a plethora of industrial and environmental applications where in some cases is desirable and in other not (oil production, geothermal systems, soil stabilization etc). Systematic approach of these problems requires knowledge of the key mechanisms of precipitating salts within the porous structures, in order to develop new methods to control the process. In this work, the development and the solution of spatiotemporally variable mass balances during salt solution mixing along specific pores were performed. Both analytical models and finite differences CFD models were applied for the study of flow and transport with simultaneous homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation (by crystal growth on the surface of the pores) in simple geometries, while unstructured finite elements and meshless methods were developed and implemented for spatial discretization, reconstruction, and solution of transport equations and homogeneous / heterogeneous reactions in more complex geometries. At initial stages of this work, critical problem parameters were identified, such as the characteristics of the porosity, the number of dissolved components, etc. The parameters were then used for solving problems which correspond to available experimental data. For each combination of ions and materials, specific data and process characteristics were included: (a) crystal kinetics (nucleation, growth rates or reaction surface rates of crystals, critical suspension concentrations), (b) physico-chemical properties (bulk density, dimensions of generated crystals, ion diffusion coefficients in the solution), (c) operating parameters (macroscopic velocity, flow, or pressure gradient of the solution, ion concentration) (d) microfluidic data (geometry, flow area), (e) porosity data in Darcy description (initial porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity). During the modeling of flow and transport in three

  10. The formation processes of oxide phases from polymer-salt complexes of ammonium molybdate and wolframate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, E.; Bogdanov, S.; Pirogov, A.; Teplykh, A.; Ostroushko, A.; Mogilnikov, Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The thermal decomposition processes of the polymer-salt solutions of ammonium molybdate and wolframate are the basic methods to synthesize the powder catalysts MoO 3 and WO 3 . The results of the investigations of these processes by small angle neutron scattering and X-ray diffraction methods are presented. The parameters of the crystal structure of the oxide phase particles, a particle size distribution function, a specific surface and fractal dimension of particles surface, a volume part and mean particle size have been obtained. It is shown that the best catalytic properties are reached by heating initial samples up to 400 deg C. This state is defined by the mean particle size ∼ 15 nm, the specific surface ∼ 10 m 2 /g, the volume concentrations of particles ∼ 5 x 10 -2 and the fractal dimension of particles surface ∼ 2,5. A general mechanism for the formation of the oxide phases from different polymer-salt solution are established. The processes of the oxide phase formations occurs as the phase transition of the first kind, is also shown. This work has partly supported by state program 'Neutron Matter Investigations' (Project N96/104 and 96/305). (author)

  11. Films prepared from poly(vinyl alcohol) and amylose-fatty acid salt inclusion complexes with increased surface hydrophobicity and high elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, water-soluble amylose-inclusion complexes were prepared from high amylose corn starch and sodium salts of lauric, palmitic, and stearic acid by steam jet cooking. Cast films were prepared by combining the amylose complexes with poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVOH) solution at ratios varying from...

  12. Surfactant-free nanoparticle-DNA complexes with ultrahigh stability against salt for environmental and biological sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jun Hyuk; Cho, Hui Hun; Lee, Jung Heon

    2014-11-21

    We report the development of surfactant free-gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-DNA complexes that remained stable in solutions with extremely high ionic strength, using seawater as a model solution. Although the stability of AuNPs can be increased to a certain degree by functionalizing negatively charged DNA strands on their surfaces, they still have limited stability in highly concentrated salt solutions. However, we found that AuNPs functionalized with poly-T bases have exceptional stability in high ionic strength solutions. For example, AuNPs functionalized with a 5T spacer remained highly stable in seawater, with no color change and no red-shift in absorbance spectra for up to 9 days. Using this surprising property of poly-T spacers, we prepared highly stable AuNP-DNA complexes containing random sequences by introducing 5T spacers on the random sequenced DNA strand. The random sequenced AuNP-DNA complexes remained stable in seawater, several molar concentrations of monovalent metal ion solutions (6.1 M Na(+) or 4.8 M K(+)), and millimolar concentrations of diverse divalent metal ions. In addition, the highly stable AuNP-DNA complex maintained biological activity in seawater, which was demonstrated by complementary reaction and aptamer based biosensing. These results provide important insight into NP use for various applications under harsh biological and environmental conditions.

  13. Studies on cluster, salt and molecular complex of zinc-quinolinate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2.2 Synthesis of zinc complexes. To a solution of 8-hydroxyquinoline (0.31 g, 2 mmol) in methanol (20 ml) zinc chloride (0.28 g, 2 mmol) was added and stirred for 15–20 min. A white precip- itate was formed which was filtered and recrystallized from DMF to obtain complex 1. Similar recrystalliza- tion of the white precipitate ...

  14. Particulate Matter in the Air of the Underground Chamber Complex of the Wieliczka Salt Mine Health Resort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogula-Kozłowska, Wioletta; Kostrzon, Magdalena; Rogula-Kopiec, Patrycja; Badyda, Artur J

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates the mass concentration and chemical composition of particulate matter (PM), collected in the chamber complex of the underground health resort located in the Wieliczka Salt Mine in southern Poland. Physical and chemical properties of PM were examined from the standpoint of their possible connection with therapeutic effects of the subterranean air in the mine. We found that in three underground spots we measured the average concentration of PM did not exceed 30 μg/m 3 . Chemical composition of PM was dominated by sodium chloride, making up 88 % of its mass, on average. It was shown that the underground ambient concentration of PM and its chemical composition depended mostly on the nature of the rock material present in the ventilation tunnel of the health resort, filtering the incoming air. The presence and effect of external sources of PM, including patients' activity, also had an impact on the underground PM concentration.

  15. Dissecting the salt dependence of the Tus-Ter protein-DNA complexes by high-throughput differential scanning fluorimetry of a GFP-tagged Tus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Morgane J J; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of the salt dependence of protein-DNA complexes provides useful information about the non-specific electrostatic and sequence-specific parameters driving complex formation and stability. The differential scanning fluorimetry of GFP-tagged protein (DSF-GTP) assay has been geared with an automatic Tm peak recognition system and was applied for the high-throughput (HT) determination of salt-induced effects on the GFP-tagged DNA replication protein Tus in complex with various Ter and Ter-lock sequences. The system was designed to generate two-dimensional heat map profiles of Tus-GFP protein stability allowing for a comparative study of the effect of eight increasing salt concentrations on ten different Ter DNA species at once. The data obtained with the new HT DSF-GTP allowed precise dissection of the non-specific electrostatic and sequence-specific parameters driving Tus-Ter and Tus-Ter-lock complex formation and stability. The major factor increasing the thermal resistance of Tus-Ter-lock complexes in high-salt is the formation of the TT-lock, e.g. a 10-fold higher Kspe was obtained for Tus-GFP:Ter-lockB than for Tus-GFP:TerB. It is anticipated that the system can be easily adapted for the study of other protein-DNA complexes.

  16. Hydration Differences Explain the Large Variations in the Complexation Thermodynamics of Modified γ-Cyclodextrins with Bile Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Køhler, Jonatan; Schönbeck, Christian; Westh, Peter; Holm, René

    2016-01-28

    The structure and thermodynamics of inclusion complexes of seven different γ-cyclodextrins (γCDs) and three biologically relevant bile salts (BS) were investigated in the present study. Natural γCD and six modified γCDs [two methyl-γCDs, one sulfobutyl ether-γCD (SBEγCD), and three 2-hydroxypropyl-γCDs (HPγCD)] and their complexes with BS were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, and molecular dynamics simulations. With the exception of the fully methylated γCD, which did not bind the BSs investigated, all of the γCDs formed 1:1 complexes with the BS, and the structures were similar to those with natural γCD; i.e., the modifications of the γCD had limited structural impact on the formation of complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry was carried out over in the temperature interval 5-55 °C to enable the calculation of the stability constant (K) and the thermodynamic parameters enthalpy (ΔH°), entropy (ΔS°), and heat capacity (ΔCp°). The stability constants decreased with an increased degree of substitution (DS), with methyl substituents having a lower effect on the stability constant than the sulfobutyl ether and hydroxypropyl substituents on the stability constants. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed, since both enthalpy and entropy increased with the degree of substitution, which may reflect dehydration of the hydrophobic surface on both CD and BS. Calculations based on ΔCp° data suggested that each of the substituents dehydrated 10-20 (hydroxypropyl), 22-33 (sulfobutyl ether), and 10-15 Å(2) (methyl) of the BS surface area, in reasonable agreement with estimates from the molecular dynamics simulations. Combined with earlier investigations on modified βCDs, these results indicate general trends of the substituents on the thermodynamics of complex formation.

  17. Affinity capillary electrophoresis method for investigation of bile salts complexation with sulfobutyl ether-ß-cyclodextrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jesper; Jensen, Henrik; Holm, Rene

    2012-01-01

    an influence on the ionic strength of the background electrolyte when the cyclodextrin is used in capillary electrophoresis. Mobility-shift affinity capillary methods for investigation of the complexation of taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate with the negatively charged cyclodextrin derivative applying...... constant power and ionic strength conditions as well as constant voltage and varying ionic strength were investigated. A new approach for the correction of background electrolyte ionic strength was developed. Mobility-shift affinity capillary electrophoresis experiments obtained at constant voltage...

  18. Internal deformation in layered Zechstein-III K-Mg salts. Structures formed by complex deformation and high contrasts in viscosity observed in drill cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Alexander; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-04-01

    During the evaporation of a massive salt body, alternations of interrupted and full evaporation sequences can form a complex layering of different lithologies. Viscosity contrasts of up to five orders of magnitude between these different lithologies are possible in this environment. During the late stage of an evaporation cycle potassium and magnesium (K-Mg) salts are precipitated. These K-Mg salts are of economic interest but also a known drilling hazard due to their very low viscosity. How up to 200m thick layers of these evaporites affect salt deformation at different scales is not well known. A better understanding of salt tectonics with extreme mechanical stratification is needed for better exploration and production of potassium-magnesium salts and to predict the internal structure of potential nuclear waste repositories in salt. To gain a better understanding of the internal deformation of these layers we analyzed K-Mg salt rich drill cores out of the Zechstein III-1b subunit from the Veendam Pillow 10 km southeast of Groningen, near the city Veendam in the NE Netherlands. The study area has a complex geological history with multiple tectonic phases of extension and compression forming internal deformation in the pillow but also conserving most of the original layering. Beside halite the most common minerals in the ZIII-1b are carnallite, kieserite, anhydrite and bischofite alternating in thin layers of simple composition. Seismic interpretation revealed that the internal structure of the Veendam Pillow shows areas, in which the K-Mg salt rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, as a result of salt deformation. The internal structure of the ZIII-1b on the other hand, remains unknown. The core analysis shows a strong strain concentration in the weaker Bischofite (MgCl2*6H20) and Carnallite (KMgCl3*6H20) rich layers producing tectonic breccias and highly strained layers completely overprinting the original layering. Layers formed by alternating beds

  19. Synthesis, characterization and biological activities of copper(II) complex of 2-Benzimidazolyl-urea and the nitrate salt of 2-Benzimidazolyl-urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Mehmet; Sari, Musa; Banti, Christina N.; Hadjikakou, Sotiris K.

    2017-10-01

    The synthesis of the complex {[Cu(BZIMU)2](NO3)2} (1) (BZIMU = 2-Benzimidazolyl-urea) is reported here. The complex 1 was characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance measurements. The crystal structures of 1 and of the nitrate salt of [(BZIMUH+)(NO3)-] (2) were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The copper complex 1 and [(BZIMUH+)(NO3)-] (2) were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activity (cell viability) against human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line and normal human fetal lung fibroblast cells (MRC-5) with SRB assay.

  20. Liquid-liquid phase transfer of uronium salts via complexation by (di)benzo crown ethers : X-ray structure of the benzo-27-crown-9 uronium perchlorate (1:1) complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Veronika M.L.J.; Geevers, Jan; Reinhoudt, David; Lengton, Wim; Bos, M.; Uiterwijk, Jos W.H.M.; Harkema, Sybolt

    1987-01-01

    The complexation of uronium perchlorate with crown ethers of different ringsizes (18–33 ring atoms) has been studied by using two-phase extraction experiments. Crown ethers with 27 or more ring atoms are the best hosts to transfer uronium salts from an aqueous phase to an organic phase. The amount

  1. A binary catalyst system of a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex with an alkali metal salt for selective hydroboration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chee Koon; Wu, Jie; Hor, T S Andy; Luo, He-Kuan

    2016-09-27

    Binary catalyst systems comprising a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex and an alkali metal salt were developed for selective hydroboration of CO 2 utilizing pinacolborane at r.t. and 1 atm CO 2 , with the combination of [Ru(CNC Bn )(CO) 2 (H)][PF 6 ] and KOCO 2 t Bu producing formoxyborane in 76% yield. A bicyclic catalytic mechanism was proposed and discussed.

  2. Salt Damage on the Wall Paintings of the Festival Temple of Thutmosis III, Karnak Temples Complex, Upper Egypt. A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein MAREY MAHMOUD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to characterize the main deterioration mechanisms affecting the wall painting of the festival temple of Thutmosis III, in the Karnak temples complex, Upper Egypt. Several salt encrustations were observed on the painted surfaces, exhibiting different degrees and forms of decay. The morphology and the microanalysis of the contained mineral phases were studied using scanning electron microscopy together with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system (SEM-EDS. The mineralogical characterization was performed using the X-ray powder diffraction method (XRPD. The climatic conditions of the area play an important role in the crystallization/recrystallization cycles of salts, which exerts additional pressure, by producing cracking, powdering and flaking, in addition to pulverization of the pictorial layers. The results showed that sodium chloride (halite, NaCl is the predominant salt species affecting in the site. Furthermore, other salt minerals, such as sylvite (KCl, niter (KNO3, natron (Na2CO3·10H2O, thenardite (Na2SO4, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O, anhydrite (CaSO4 and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O were also found. The obtained results allowed us to determine the main deterioration factors and may be used when applying a conservation plan.

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF ANION NATURE OF ALKALINE METAL SALT ON SPECTRAL-LUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF F-S-HETERONUCLEAR COMPLEXES ON THE BASE OF CROWN-PORPHYRINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Rusakova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The heteronuclear complexes on the base of meso-tetra-crown-ether substituted porphyrins of «sandwich»-type which two ytterbium ions coordinated with porphyrin macrocycles, and four cations of alkaline metals (Na, K, Cs situated between the cavities of benzo-12-crown-4-, benzo-15-crown-5- and benzo-18-crown-6-ethers, respectively, were obtained. The influence of anion nature of salts (bromide, nitrate, thiocyanate on 4f-luminescence of Yb8+ ions in these complexes were analyzed.

  4. New Ru(II)N'NN'-type pincer complexes: synthesis, characterization and the catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 or bicarbonates to formate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zengjin Dai; Qi Luo; Hengjiang Cong; Jing Zhang; Tianyou Peng

    2017-01-01

    [RuCl(L1)(MeCN) 2 ]Cl (1) and [RuCl(L2)(MeCN) 2 ]Cl (2) complexes were prepared through the reaction of [RuCl2(p-cymene)] 2 with 2,6-bis(benzimidazole-2-yl)-4-hydroxy-pyridine (L1) or 2,6-bis(benzimidazole- 2-yl) pyridine (L2) in acetonitrile, respectively. The treatment of [Ru(OTf)(L2)(MeCN) 2 ]OTf (3) with 1 equivalent of PPh 3 in ethanol resulted in the formation of [Ru(L2 -1 )(MeCN)(PPh 3 ) 2 ]OTf (4), in which one of the N-H moieties of L2 is deprotonated to give an anionic ligand (L2 -1 ). It was found that complex 1 can catalyze the hydrogenation of CO 2 to formate salts, producing sodium formate in 34.0% yield with a turnover number (TON) of 407 under the optimized conditions. Further investigations revealed that complexes 1-4 can efficiently catalyze the hydrogenation of sodium bicarbonate to sodium formate, and the catalytic activity follows the order 4 ≥ 1 ≥ 2 ≅ 3. In particular, sodium formate was obtained in good yield (77%) with a high TON (1530) when complex 4 was used as the catalyst. The present results illustrate a new example of Ru(II) complexes bearing a rigid N'NN' framework for the efficient hydrogenation of CO 2 to formate salts in a homogeneous system. (authors)

  5. Enhancement of natural radioactivity in soils and salt-marshes surrounding a non-nuclear industrial complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bologon, J.P.; Garca-Tenorio, R.; Garca-Leon, M.

    1995-01-01

    The existence of a very high extension (about 1000 ha) of phosphogypsum piles, sited in the estuary formed by the mouths of the Tinto and Odiel rivers (SW Spain), produce a quite local, but unambiguous radioactive impact in the surrounding salt-marshes. In these piles the main by-product formed in the manufacture of phosphoric acid is stored. The radioactive impact is generated by the deposition and accumulation of radionuclides from the uranium series that previously had been mainly leached or dissolved from the piles by waters that temporally can cover or cross them. Other means of impact, especially through the atmosphere, have been evaluated as negligible or not detectable

  6. The coordination complex structures and hydrogen bonding in the three-dimensional alkaline earth metal salts (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) of (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2017-01-01

    (4-Aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) is used as an antihelminth in veterinary applications and was earlier used in the monosodium salt dihydrate form as the antisyphilitic drug atoxyl. Examples of complexes with this acid are rare. The structures of the alkaline earth metal (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) complexes with (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) have been determined, viz. hexaaquamagnesium bis[hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonate] tetrahydrate, [Mg(H 2 O) 6 ](C 6 H 7 AsNO 3 )·4H 2 O, (I), catena-poly[[[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ 2 -hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ 2 O:O']-[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ 2 -hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ 2 O:O

  7. Electrolyte salts for nonaqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, Khalil; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Chen, Zonghai

    2012-10-09

    Metal complex salts may be used in lithium ion batteries. Such metal complex salts not only perform as an electrolyte salt in a lithium ion batteries with high solubility and conductivity, but also can act as redox shuttles that provide overcharge protection of individual cells in a battery pack and/or as electrolyte additives to provide other mechanisms to provide overcharge protection to lithium ion batteries. The metal complex salts have at least one aromatic ring. The aromatic moiety may be reversibly oxidized/reduced at a potential slightly higher than the working potential of the positive electrode in the lithium ion battery. The metal complex salts may also be known as overcharge protection salts.

  8. Use of water in aiding olefin/paraffin (liquid + liquid) extraction via complexation with a silver bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu; Thompson, Jillian; Zhou, Jingjing; Goodrich, Peter; Atilhan, Mert; Pensado, Alfonso S.; Kirchner, Barbara; Rooney, David; Jacquemin, Johan; Khraisheh, Majeda

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Silver-based ILs used as olefin extracting agents for olefin/paraffin mixtures. • Each extraction process is based on the olefin complexation and solvation. • The presence of water influences positively each extraction process. • Each extraction process was evaluated by DFT calculations, NMR, IR and Raman. • LLE data were then correlated by using the UNIQUAC model. - Abstract: This paper describes the extraction of C 5 –C 8 linear α-olefins from olefin/paraffin mixtures of the same carbon number via a reversible complexation with a silver salt (silver bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, Ag[Tf 2 N]) to form room temperature ionic liquids [Ag(olefin) x ][Tf 2 N]. From the experimental (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for the olefin/paraffin mixtures and Ag[Tf 2 N], 1-pentene showed the best separation performance while C 7 and C 8 olefins could only be separated from the corresponding mixtures on addition of water which also improves the selectivity at lower carbon numbers like the C 5 and C 6 , for example. Using infrared and Raman spectroscopy of the complex and Ag[Tf 2 N] saturated by olefin, the mechanism of the extraction was found to be based on both chemical complexation and the physical solubility of the olefin in the ionic liquid ([Ag(olefin) x ][Tf 2 N]). These experiments further support the use of such extraction techniques for the separation of olefins from paraffins

  9. Radio elements / bottom salts separation by nano-filtration aided by complexation in a highly saline environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubert, Eric

    1997-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the use of a membrane-based technique, nano-filtration, aided or not by complexation, for the processing of highly saline liquid effluents produced by radio-chemical decontamination. The objective is to separate non-radioactive elements (sodium nitrate) from radio-elements (caesium, strontium and actinides) in order to reduce the volume of wastes. Within the perspective of an industrial application, a system to concentrate the effluent is firstly defined. Different nano-filtration membranes are tested and reveal to be insufficient in highly saline environment. A stage of selective complexation of radio-elements is therefore considered before nano-filtration. The main factors affecting performance of nano-filtration-complexation (for a given membrane system) are identified: ionic force, pH, ligand content, trans-membrane pressure. Finally, a nano-filtration pilot is implemented to perform nano-filtration-complexation operations by remote handling on radioactive substances [fr

  10. Liquid-liquid extraction of ion-association complexes of cobalt(II-4-(2-pyridylazoresorcinol with ditetrazolium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divarova Vidka V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation and liquid-liquid extraction of ion-association complexes between Co(II-4-(2-Pyridylazoresorcinol (PAR anionic chelates and cations of three ditetrazolium chlorides were studied: Blue Tetrazolium chloride (BTC, Neotetrazolium chloride (NTC and Nitro Blue Tetrazolium chloride (NBT. The optimum conditions for the formation and solvent extraction of the ion-association comlpex chelates were determined. It has been found that in the systems of Co(II-PAR-DTS, the reactants are reacted in molar ratios 1:2:1 and the general formula of complexes was suggested. The extraction equilibria were investigated and quantitatively characterized by the equilibrium constants and the recovery factors. The analytical characteristics of the complexes were calculated.

  11. Sea salt

    OpenAIRE

    Galvis-Sánchez, Andrea C.; Lopes, João Almeida; Delgadillo, Ivone; Rangel, António O. S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The geographical indication (GI) status links a product with the territory and with the biodiversity involved. Besides, the specific knowledge and cultural practices of a human group that permit transforming a resource into a useful good is protected under a GI designation. Traditional sea salt is a hand-harvested product originating exclusively from salt marshes from specific geographical regions. Once salt is harvested, no washing, artificial drying or addition of anti-caking agents are all...

  12. Phosphate Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many different combinations of the chemical phosphate with salts and minerals. Foods high in phosphate include dairy products, whole grain cereals, nuts, and certain meats. Phosphates found in dairy products ... People use phosphate salts for medicine. Be careful not to confuse phosphate ...

  13. Use of Iron (II Salts and Complexes for the Production of Soil Amendments from Organic Solid Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amerigo Beneduci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method to obtain rapidly stabilized composts for crops from solid organic wastes is evaluated. Here we used a laboratory scale reaction chamber where solid waste treatment was performed under strictly controlled temperature and pressure conditions. The row organic waste was mixed with acid solutions containing iron (II ions either in the fully hydrated form or in the form of complexes with the diethylentriaminopentaacetic acid. Data from elemental analysis distribution and GC/MS analysis of the polar and non polar dissolved organic matter, clearly showed that Fe(II ions significantly enhance organic substrate oxidation of the initial solid waste, compared to a material obtained without the addition of the Fe(II ions to the raw organic matrix. These results suggest that Fe(II ions might be involved in a catalytic oxidation pathway that would be activated under the experimental conditions used. The extent of the oxidation process was evaluated by the value of the C/N ratio and, qualitatively, by the molecular composition of the dissolved organic matter. After about 6 hours of incubation, dark-brown and dry organic matrices were obtained with C/N ratio as low as 12 and a high degree of oxidative decomposition into low-molecular-weight compounds at high oxidation state.

  14. Copolymerization and terpolymerization of carbon dioxide/propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride using a (salenCo(III complex tethering four quaternary ammonium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Yeob Jeon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The (salenCo(III complex 1 tethering four quaternary ammonium salts, which is a highly active catalyst in CO2/epoxide copolymerizations, shows high activity for propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride (PO/PA copolymerizations and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations. In the PO/PA copolymerizations, full conversion of PA was achieved within 5 h, and strictly alternating copolymers of poly(1,2-propylene phthalates were afforded without any formation of ether linkages. In the PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations, full conversion of PA was also achieved within 4 h. The resulting polymers were gradient poly(1,2-propylene carbonate-co-phthalates because of the drift in the PA concentration during the terpolymerization. Both polymerizations showed immortal polymerization character; therefore, the molecular weights were determined by the activity (g/mol-1 and the number of chain-growing sites per 1 [anions in 1 (5 + water (present as impurity + ethanol (deliberately fed], and the molecular weight distributions were narrow (Mw/Mn, 1.05–1.5. Because of the extremely high activity of 1, high-molecular-weight polymers were generated (Mn up to 170,000 and 350,000 for the PO/PA copolymerization and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerization, respectively. The terpolymers bearing a substantial number of PA units (fPA, 0.23 showed a higher glass-transition temperature (48 °C than the CO2/PO alternating copolymer (40 °C.

  15. Copolymerization and terpolymerization of carbon dioxide/propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride using a (salen)Co(III) complex tethering four quaternary ammonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong Yeob; Eo, Seong Chan; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2014-01-01

    The (salen)Co(III) complex 1 tethering four quaternary ammonium salts, which is a highly active catalyst in CO2/epoxide copolymerizations, shows high activity for propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride (PO/PA) copolymerizations and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations. In the PO/PA copolymerizations, full conversion of PA was achieved within 5 h, and strictly alternating copolymers of poly(1,2-propylene phthalate)s were afforded without any formation of ether linkages. In the PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations, full conversion of PA was also achieved within 4 h. The resulting polymers were gradient poly(1,2-propylene carbonate-co-phthalate)s because of the drift in the PA concentration during the terpolymerization. Both polymerizations showed immortal polymerization character; therefore, the molecular weights were determined by the activity (g/mol-1) and the number of chain-growing sites per 1 [anions in 1 (5) + water (present as impurity) + ethanol (deliberately fed)], and the molecular weight distributions were narrow (M w/M n, 1.05-1.5). Because of the extremely high activity of 1, high-molecular-weight polymers were generated (M n up to 170,000 and 350,000 for the PO/PA copolymerization and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerization, respectively). The terpolymers bearing a substantial number of PA units (f PA, 0.23) showed a higher glass-transition temperature (48 °C) than the CO2/PO alternating copolymer (40 °C).

  16. Salt cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional associated with system and infrastructure management, looking at automated infrastructure and deployments, then this book is for you. No prior experience of Salt is required.

  17. Notable effects of metal salts on UV-vis absorption spectra of α-, β-, γ-, and δ-tocopheroxyl radicals in acetonitrile solution. The complex formation between tocopheroxyls and metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Kazuo; Kohno, Yutaro; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-02

    The measurements of the UV-vis absorption spectra of α-, β-, γ-, and δ-tocopheroxyl (α-, β-, γ-, and δ-Toc(•)) radicals were performed by reacting aroxyl (ArO(•)) radical with α-, β-, γ-, and δ-tocopherol (α-, β-, γ-, and δ-TocH), respectively, in acetonitrile solution including three kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (LiClO(4), NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2)) (MX or MX(2)), using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The maximum wavelengths (λ(max)) of the absorption spectra of the α-, β-, γ-, and δ-Toc(•) located at 425-428 nm without metal salts increased with increasing concentrations of metal salts (0-0.500 M) in acetonitrile and approached some constant values, suggesting (Toc(•)···M(+) (or M(2+))) complex formations. Similarly, the values of the apparent molar extinction coefficient (ε(max)) increased drastically with increasing concentrations of metal salts in acetonitrile and approached some constant values. The result suggests that the formations of Toc(•) dimers were suppressed by the metal ion complex formations of Toc(•) radicals. The stability constants (K) were determined for Li(+), Na(+), and Mg(2+) complexes of α-, β-, γ-, and δ-Toc(•). The K values increased in the order of NaClO(4) metal salt. The alkali and alkaline earth metal salts having a smaller ionic radius of the cation and a larger charge of the cation gave a larger shift of the λ(max) value, a larger ε(max) value, and a larger K value. The result of the DFT molecular orbital calculations indicated that the α-, β-, γ-, and δ-Toc(•) radicals were stabilized by the (1:1) complex formation with metal cations (Li(+), Na(+), and Mg(2+)). Stabilization energy (E(S)) due to the complex formation increased in the order of Na(+) complexes, being independent of the kinds of Toc(•) radicals. The calculated result also indicated that the metal cations coordinate to the O atom at the sixth position of α-, β-, γ-, and δ-Toc(•) radicals.

  18. Phosphorylation of SOS3-LIKE CALCIUM BINDING PROTEIN8 by SOS2 protein kinase stabilizes their protein complex and regulates salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huixin; Yang, Yongqing; Quan, Ruidang; Mendoza, Imelda; Wu, Yisheng; Du, Wenming; Zhao, Shuangshuang; Schumaker, Karen S; Pardo, José M; Guo, Yan

    2009-05-01

    The Salt Overly Sensitive (SOS) pathway plays an important role in the regulation of Na+/K+ ion homeostasis and salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Previously, we reported that the calcium binding proteins SOS3 and SOS3-LIKE CALCIUM BINDING PROTEIN8 (SCaBP8) nonredundantly activate the protein kinase SOS2. Here, we show that SOS2 phosphorylates SCaBP8 at its C terminus but does not phosphorylate SOS3. In vitro, SOS2 phosphorylation of SCaBP8 was enhanced by the bimolecular interaction of SOS2 and SCaBP8 and did not require calcium ions. In vivo, this phosphorylation was induced by salt stress, occurred at the membrane, stabilized the SCaBP8-SOS2 interaction, and enhanced plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchange activity. When a Ser at position 237 in the SCaBP8 protein (the SOS2 phosphorylation target) was mutated to Ala, SCaBP8 was no longer phosphorylated by SOS2 and the mutant protein could not fully rescue the salt-sensitive phenotype of the scabp8 mutant. By contrast, when Ser-237 was mutated to Asp to mimic the charge of a phosphorylated Ser residue, the mutant protein rescued the scabp8 salt sensitivity. These data demonstrate that calcium sensor phosphorylation is a critical component of SOS pathway regulation of salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  19. Bath Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to get the same high, and feel withdrawal symptoms when they stop. People who abuse bath salts may feel driven to do whatever they can to keep getting high, including taking risks. Users can also develop what is called "excited delirium." When this happens, people get dehydrated , their muscle ...

  20. Acute toxicity studies and characterisation of local dietary salts in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The characterization of the salts through infrared spectroscopy showed that both salts had carbonyl groups in the finger print region inferring that the chemical structure may likely be similar. The suggested chemical formula for both salts is a complex inorganic salt which is a combination of carbonates and sulphates. Kanwa ...

  1. Complexability of o-bisguanidinobenzenes with arsenic and phosphoric acids in solution and solid states, and the potential use of their immobilized derivatives as solid base ligands for metal salts and arsenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomoya; Suda, Koji; Kumamoto, Takuya; Nakanishi, Waka; Watanabe, Toshiko; Ishikawa, Tsutomu; Seki, Hiroko; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Ogura, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2010-02-01

    The role of o-bisguanidinobenzenes (BGBs) as new Brønsted base ligands for arsenic and phosphoric acids was examined. In solution state, complexation was evaluated by Job's plot in (1)H NMR experiment, indicating a 1:1 complex formation, whereas in solid state crystalline structures of complexes obtained were addressed by X-ray crystallographic analysis and/or solid state (13)C NMR experiment, in which 1:2 complexes between the BGB and the acid components were normally formed. Based on these results, Merrifield and Hypogel resin-anchored BGBs were designed and prepared as the corresponding polymer-supported host ligands. Evaluation of their coordination ability with metal salts (ZnCl(2) and CoCl(2)) and arsenic acid in aqueous media by ICP-MS showed that the latter Hypogel resin-anchored BGBs acted as effective immobilized base ligands.

  2. Complexation of tauro- and glyco-conjugated bile salts with alpha-cyclodextrin and hydroxypropyl-alpha-cyclodextrin studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis and molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Rene; Schönbeck, Jens Christian Sidney; Askjær, Sune

    2011-01-01

    . The interacting marker was chosen over a non-interacting marker to avoid the difficult validation of the non-interacting properties. The investigated bile salts all interacted with α-cyclodextrin and 2-hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin. Stability constants ranging from 14 to 95 M−1 were obtained with slightly higher...

  3. Novel Paradigms of Salt and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenguang; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Sanders, Paul W

    2017-05-01

    Salt resistance/sensitivity refers specifically to the effect of dietary sodium chloride (salt) intake on BP. Increased dietary salt intake promotes an early and uniform expansion of extracellular fluid volume and increased cardiac output. To compensate for these hemodynamic changes and maintain constant BP in salt resistance, renal and peripheral vascular resistance falls and is associated with an increase in production of nitric oxide. In contrast, the decline in peripheral vascular resistance and the increase in nitric oxide are impaired or absent in salt sensitivity, promoting an increase in BP in these individuals. Endothelial dysfunction may pose a particularly significant risk factor in the development of salt sensitivity and subsequent hypertension. Vulnerable salt-sensitive populations may have in common underlying endothelial dysfunction due to genetic or environmental influences. These individuals may be very sensitive to the hemodynamic stress of increased effective blood volume, setting in motion untoward molecular and biochemical events that lead to overproduction of TGF- β , oxidative stress, and limited bioavailable nitric oxide. Finally, chronic high-salt ingestion produces endothelial dysfunction, even in salt-resistant subjects. Thus, the complex syndrome of salt sensitivity may be a function of the endothelium, which is integrally involved in the vascular responses to high salt intake. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Transition Metal Complexes and Radical Anion Salts of 1,10-Phenanthroline Derivatives Annulated with a 1,2,5-Tiadiazole and 1,2,5-Tiadiazole 1,1-Dioxide Moiety: Multidimensional Crystal Structures and Various Magnetic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Shuku

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the molecular variety and the elucidation of the physical properties of 1,10-phenanthroline annulated with 1,2,5-thiadiazole and 1,2,5-thiadiazole 1,1-dioxide moieties have been achieved, and are described herein. A 1,2,5-thiadiazole compound, [1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-f][1,10]phenanthroline (tdap, was used as a ligand to create multidimensional network structures based on S•••S and S•••N intermolecular interactions. A 1,2,5-thiadiazole 1,1-dioxide compound, [1,2,5] thiadiazolo[3,4-f][1,10]phenanthroline, 1,1-dioxide (tdapO2, was designed to create a stable radical anion, as well as good network structures. Single crystal X-ray structure analyses revealed that transition metal complexes of tdap, and radical anion salts of tdapO2 formed multidimensional network structures, as expected. Two kinds of tdap iron complexes, namely [Fe(tdap2(NCS2] and [Fe(tdap2(NCS2]•MeCN exhibited spin crossover transitions, and their transition temperatures showed a difference of 150 K, despite their similar molecular structures. Magnetic measurements for the tdapO2 radical anion salts revealed that the magnetic coupling constants between neighboring radical species vary from strongly antiferromagnetic (J = −320 K to ferromagnetic (J = 24 K, reflecting the differences in their π overlap motifs.

  5. Salt-Sensitive Hypertension: Perspectives on Intrarenal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Dewan S.A.; Prieto, Minolfa C.; Navar, L Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Salt sensitive hypertension is characterized by increases in blood pressure in response to increases in dietary salt intake and is associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular and renal morbidity. Although researchers have sought for decades to understand how salt sensitivity develops in humans, the mechanisms responsible for the increases in blood pressure in response to high salt intake are complex and only partially understood. Until now, scientists have been unable to explain why some individuals are salt sensitive and others are salt resistant. Although a central role for the kidneys in the development of salt sensitivity and hypertension has been generally accepted, it is also recognized that hypertension is of multifactorial origin and a variety of factors can induce, or prevent, blood pressure responsiveness to the manipulation of salt intake. Excess salt intake in susceptible persons may also induce inappropriate central and sympathetic nervous system responses and increase the production of intrarenal angiotensin II, catecholamines and other factors such as oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. One key factor is the concomitant inappropriate or paradoxical activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, by high salt intake. This is reflected by the increases in urinary angiotensinogen during high salt intake in salt sensitive models. A complex interaction between neuroendocrine factors and the kidney may underlie the propensity for some individuals to retain salt and develop salt-dependent hypertension. In this review, we focus mainly on the renal contributions that provide the mechanistic link between chronic salt intake and the development of hypertension. PMID:26028244

  6. Seismic anisotropy in deforming salt bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasse, P.; Wookey, J. M.; Kendall, J. M.; Dutko, M.

    2017-12-01

    Salt is often involved in forming hydrocarbon traps. Studying salt dynamics and the deformation processes is important for the exploration industry. We have performed numerical texture simulations of single halite crystals deformed by simple shear and axial extension using the visco-plastic self consistent approach (VPSC). A methodology from subduction studies to estimate strain in a geodynamic simulation is applied to a complex high-resolution salt diapir model. The salt diapir deformation is modelled with the ELFEN software by our industrial partner Rockfield, which is based on a finite-element code. High strain areas at the bottom of the head-like strctures of the salt diapir show high amount of seismic anisotropy due to LPO development of halite crystals. The results demonstrate that a significant degree of seismic anisotropy can be generated, validating the view that this should be accounted for in the treatment of seismic data in, for example, salt diapir settings.

  7. Salt bridges: geometrically specific, designable interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Jason E; Kulp, Daniel W; DeGrado, William F

    2011-03-01

    Salt bridges occur frequently in proteins, providing conformational specificity and contributing to molecular recognition and catalysis. We present a comprehensive analysis of these interactions in protein structures by surveying a large database of protein structures. Salt bridges between Asp or Glu and His, Arg, or Lys display extremely well-defined geometric preferences. Several previously observed preferences are confirmed, and others that were previously unrecognized are discovered. Salt bridges are explored for their preferences for different separations in sequence and in space, geometric preferences within proteins and at protein-protein interfaces, co-operativity in networked salt bridges, inclusion within metal-binding sites, preference for acidic electrons, apparent conformational side chain entropy reduction on formation, and degree of burial. Salt bridges occur far more frequently between residues at close than distant sequence separations, but, at close distances, there remain strong preferences for salt bridges at specific separations. Specific types of complex salt bridges, involving three or more members, are also discovered. As we observe a strong relationship between the propensity to form a salt bridge and the placement of salt-bridging residues in protein sequences, we discuss the role that salt bridges might play in kinetically influencing protein folding and thermodynamically stabilizing the native conformation. We also develop a quantitative method to select appropriate crystal structure resolution and B-factor cutoffs. Detailed knowledge of these geometric and sequence dependences should aid de novo design and prediction algorithms. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Complex Formation in a Liquid-Liquid Extraction System Containing Co(II), 4-(2-Thiazolylazo)resorcinol and Monotetrazolium Salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divarova, Vidka; Stojnova, Kirila; Racheva, Petya; Lekova, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    The ion-associated complex formed between anionic chelate of Co(II)-4-(2-Thiazolylazo)resorcinol (TAR) with the monotetrazolium cation of 2-(4-Iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-2H-tetrazolium chloride (INT) in the liquid-liquid extraction system Co(II)-TAR-INT-H(2)O-CHCl(3) was studied by the spectrophotometric method. The optimum extraction conditions of Co(II) were found. The extraction equilibria were studied. The equilibrium constants, the recovery factor and some analytical characteristics were calculated. The validity of Beer's law was checked. The molar ratio of the components in the ternary ion-associated complex Co(II)-TAR-INT was determined. The general formula of the complex was suggested. The effect of various foreign ions and reagents on the process of complex formation in the liquid-liquid extraction system was studied.

  9. Complexation of 1,3-dimorpholinopropane with Hg(II) and Zn(II) salts: Synthese, crystal structures and antibacterial studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goudarziafshar, H.; Yousefi, S.; Abbasityula, Y.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav; Rezaeivala, M.; Özbek, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 6 (2015), s. 1076-1084 ISSN 1001-4861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : crystal structure * 1,3-dimorpholinopropane * antibacterial activity * Hg(II) complex * Zn(II) complex Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.488, year: 2015

  10. Dye-Sensitized Molecular Charge Transfer Complexes: Magnetic and Conduction Properties in the Photoexcited States of Ni(dmit2 Salts Containing Photosensitive Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma Yamamoto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Photosensitive dyes often induce charge transfer (CT between adjacent chemical species and themselves under irradiation of appropriate wavelengths. Because of the reversibility and selectivity of such CT, it is considered to be interesting to utilize such dyes as optically controllable trigger components for conduction and magnetism in the photoexcited states of organic materials. Based on this idea, such a type of new salts, i.e., γ- and δ-DiCC[Ni(dmit2] in addition to DiCC2[Ni(dmit2]3 have been prepared, characterized and their physical and structural properties have been examined both under dark and irradiated conditions (dmit2− = 1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate, DiCC+ = 3,3′-Dihexyloxacarbocyanine monocation. Among them, under UV (254–450 nm irradiation, δ-DiCC[Ni(dmit2] exhibited photoconductivity being six times as high as its dark conductivity at room temperature. The electron spin resonance (ESR spectra have demonstrated that there are photoexcited spins on both DiCC and [Ni(dmit2] species as a result of the CT transition between them, serving as localized spins (DiCC and carriers ([Ni(dmit2], respectively. The results obtained in this work have indicated that the strategy mentioned above is effective in developing organic photoresponsive semiconductors with paramagnetism.

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal characterization of sulpiride complexes of iron, manganese, copper, cobalt, nickel, and zinc salts. Antibacterial and antifungal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Soliman, Madiha H.

    2010-08-01

    Sulpiride (SPR; L) is a substituted benzamide antipsychotic which is reported to be a selective antagonist of central dopamine receptors and claimed to have mood-elevating properties. The ligation behaviour of SPR drug is studied in order to give an idea about its potentiality towards some transition metals in vitro systems. Metal complexes of SPR have been synthesized by reaction with different metal chlorides. The metal complexes of SPR with the formula [MCl 2(L) 2(H 2O) 2]· nH 2O [M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II); n = 0-2] and [FeCl 2(HL)(H 2O) 3]Cl·H 2O have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis (CHN), electronic (infrared, solid reflectance and 1H NMR spectra) and thermal analyses (TG and DTA). The molar conductance data reveal that the bivalent metal chelates are non-electrolytes while Fe(III) complex is 1:1 electrolyte. IR spectra show that SPR is coordinated to the metal ions in a neutral monodentate manner with the amide O. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, octahedral geometry is suggested. The thermal decomposition processes of these complexes were discussed. The correlation coefficient, the activation energies, E*, the pre-exponential factor, A, and the entropies, Δ S*, enthalpies, Δ H*, Gibbs free energies, Δ G*, of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves. The synthesized ligand and its metal complexes were also screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activity against bacterial species ( Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and fungi ( Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The activity data show that the metal complexes are found to have antibacterial and antifungal activity than the parent drug and less than the standard.

  12. Polyelectrolyte complex formation and stability when mixing polyanions and polycations in salted media: A model study related to the case of body fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Etrych, Tomáš; Leclercq, L.; Boustta, M.; Vert, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 25, 1-2 (2005), s. 281-288 ISSN 0928-0987 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyelectrolyte complex * selectivity * light scattering Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.347, year: 2005

  13. The behaviour of salt and salt caverns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokker, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Salts are mined for both storage and extraction purposes, either via dry or solution mining techniques. For operational, environmental and geological purposes, it is important to understand and predict the in situ behaviour of salt, in particular the creep and strength characteristics. A

  14. The titanium tris-anilide cation [Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3](+) stabilized as its perfluoro-tetra-phenylborate salt: structural characterization and synthesis in connection with redox activity of 4,4'-bipyridine dititanium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinney, Heather A; Clough, Christopher R; Cummins, Christopher C

    2015-04-21

    This work explores the reduction of 4,4'-bipyridine using two equivalents of the titanium(iii) complex Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3 resulting in formation of a black, crystalline complex, (4,4'-bipy){Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}2, for which an X-ray structure determination is reported. The neutral, black, 4,4'-bipyridine-bridged bimetallic was found to be redox active, with mono- and di-anions being accessible electrochemically, and with the mono- and di-cations also being accessible chemically, and isolable, at least when using the weakly coordinating anion [B(C6F5)4](-) as the counter-ion. It proved possible to crystallize the salt [(4,4'-bipy){Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}2][B(C6F5)4]2 for a single-crystal X-ray structure investigation; in this instance it was revealed that the aromaticity of the 4,4'-bipyridine ligand, that had been disrupted upon reduction, had been regained. A rare cationic d(0) metal tris-amide complex, shown by X-ray crystallography to contain an intriguing pyramidal TiN3 core geometry, namely {Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}(+), could also be isolated when using [B(C6F5)4] as the essentially non-interacting counter-ion. This highly reactive cation should be considered as a potential intermediate in the plethora of reactions wherein Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3 has been shown to effect the reduction of substrates including halogenated organic molecules, carbonyl compounds, organic nitriles, and metal complexes.

  15. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivit...

  16. The influence of organic complexing agents upon the mobilization and migration of radionuclides from ILW contained in cement and bitumen under nearfield conditions for a repository in a salt dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiling, C.

    1992-01-01

    Within the frame of this project the influence of the synthetic organic complexing agents dibutylphosphate, tributylphosphate, ethylenediamine-tetra acetic acid, citrate and oxalate on the solubilities, the migration and sorption behaviour of the elements iodine, cesium, uranium neptunium, plutonium and americium was investigated in electrolyte solutions, representing the conditions of a near field of a waste repository in a salt dome after an intrusion of brines, considered as a hypothetical scenario. The electrolyte solutions were saturated NaCl solution and Q-brine, which were equilibrated with corrosion products of the matrices Portland 35-F cement and bitumen (Shell Mexphalte R 80-100) before starting the experiments, in order to simulate their influence on the chemical behaviour of the solutions used for the experiments. The temperature, at which the experiments were carried out, was 298 K. After determining the relevant pH- and Eh-values, pH was adapted to 12.3 for saturated NaCl solution equilibrated with cement and to 6.4 for Q-brine also being at equilibrium with cement. The electrolyte systems on the other hand containing bitumen were kept at those pH-values, which resulted from saturation with the complexing agents. 120 tabs., 87 figs., 67 refs

  17. Low-salt diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-sodium diet; Salt restriction ... control many functions. Too much sodium in your diet can be bad for you. For most people, ... you limit salt. Try to eat a balanced diet. Buy fresh vegetables and fruits whenever possible. They ...

  18. Volcano crisis response at Yellowstone volcanic complex - after-action report for exercise held at Salt Lake City, Utah, November 15, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Thomas C.; Driedger, Carolyn L.; Tilling, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    A functional tabletop exercise was run on November 14-15, 2011 in Salt Lake City, Utah, to test crisis response capabilities, communication protocols, and decision-making by the staff of the multi-agency Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) as they reacted to a hypothetical exercise scenario of accelerating volcanic unrest at the Yellowstone caldera. The exercise simulated a rapid build-up of seismic activity, ground deformation, and hot-spring water-chemistry and temperature anomalies that culminated in a small- to moderate-size phreatomagmatic eruption within Yellowstone National Park. The YVO scientific team's responses to the unfolding events in the scenario and to simulated requests for information by stakeholders and the media were assessed by (a) the exercise organizers; (b) several non-YVO scientists, who observed and queried participants, and took notes throughout the exercise; and (c) the participants themselves, who kept logs of their actions during the exercise and later participated in a group debriefing session and filled out detailed questionnaires. These evaluations were tabulated, interpreted, and summarized for this report, and on the basis of this information, recommendations have been made. Overall, the YVO teams performed their jobs very well. The exercise revealed that YVO scientists were able to successfully provide critical hazards information, issue information statements, and appropriately raise alert levels during a fast-moving crisis. Based on the exercise, it is recommended that several measures be taken to increase YVO effectiveness during a crisis: 1. Improve role clarification within and between YVO science teams. 2. Improve communications tools and protocols for data-sharing and consensus-building among YVO scientists, who are geographically and administratively dispersed among various institutions across the United States. 3. Familiarize YVO staff with Incident Command System (ICS) procedures and protocols, and provide more in

  19. Experiments and Modeling in Support of Generic Salt Repository Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourret, Suzanne Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weaver, Douglas James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Otto, Shawn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zyvoloski, George Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johnson, Peter Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-19

    Salt is an attractive material for the disposition of heat generating nuclear waste (HGNW) because of its self-sealing, viscoplastic, and reconsolidation properties (Hansen and Leigh, 2012). The rate at which salt consolidates and the properties of the consolidated salt depend on the composition of the salt, including its content in accessory minerals and moisture, and the temperature under which consolidation occurs. Physicochemical processes, such as mineral hydration/dehydration salt dissolution and precipitation play a significant role in defining the rate of salt structure changes. Understanding the behavior of these complex processes is paramount when considering safe design for disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste (HGNW) in salt formations, so experimentation and modeling is underway to characterize these processes. This report presents experiments and simulations in support of the DOE-NE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for development of drift-scale, in-situ field testing of HGNW in salt formations.

  20. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is designated... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155...

  1. Making Plants Break a Sweat: the Structure, Function, and Evolution of Plant Salt Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Maheshi; Larkin, John C

    2017-01-01

    Salt stress is a complex trait that poses a grand challenge in developing new crops better adapted to saline environments. Some plants, called recretohalophytes, that have naturally evolved to secrete excess salts through salt glands, offer an underexplored genetic resource for examining how plant development, anatomy, and physiology integrate to prevent excess salt from building up to toxic levels in plant tissue. In this review we examine the structure and evolution of salt glands, salt gland-specific gene expression, and the possibility that all salt glands have originated via evolutionary modifications of trichomes. Salt secretion via salt glands is found in more than 50 species in 14 angiosperm families distributed in caryophyllales, asterids, rosids, and grasses. The salt glands of these distantly related clades can be grouped into four structural classes. Although salt glands appear to have originated independently at least 12 times, they share convergently evolved features that facilitate salt compartmentalization and excretion. We review the structural diversity and evolution of salt glands, major transporters and proteins associated with salt transport and secretion in halophytes, salt gland relevant gene expression regulation, and the prospect for using new genomic and transcriptomic tools in combination with information from model organisms to better understand how salt glands contribute to salt tolerance. Finally, we consider the prospects for using this knowledge to engineer salt glands to increase salt tolerance in model species, and ultimately in crops.

  2. Amine-free reversible hydrogen storage in formate salts catalyzed by ruthenium pincer complex without pH control or solvent change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothandaraman, Jotheeswari; Czaun, Miklos; Goeppert, Alain; Haiges, Ralf; Jones, John-Paul; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya; Olah, George A

    2015-04-24

    Due to the intermittent nature of most renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind, energy storage is increasingly required. Since electricity is difficult to store, hydrogen obtained by electrochemical water splitting has been proposed as an energy carrier. However, the handling and transportation of hydrogen in large quantities is in itself a challenge. We therefore present here a method for hydrogen storage based on a CO2 (HCO3 (-) )/H2 and formate equilibrium. This amine-free and efficient reversible system (>90 % yield in both directions) is catalyzed by well-defined and commercially available Ru pincer complexes. The formate dehydrogenation was triggered by simple pressure swing without requiring external pH control or the change of either the solvent or the catalyst. Up to six hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycles were performed and the catalyst performance remained steady with high selectivity (CO free H2 /CO2 mixture was produced). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Not Salt Taste Perception but Self-Reported Salt Eating Habit Predicts Actual Salt Intake

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hajeong; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-01-01

    Excessive dietary salt intake is related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although dietary salt restriction is essential, it is difficult to achieve because of salt palatability. However, the association between salt perception or salt eating habit and actual salt intake remains uncertain. In this study, we recruited 74 healthy young individuals. We investigated their salt-eating habits by questionnaire and salt taste threshold through a rating scale that used serial dilution of a s...

  4. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  5. A history of salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, M; Capasso, G; Di Leo, V A; De Santo, N G

    1994-01-01

    The medical history of salt begins in ancient times and is closely related to different aspects of human history. Salt may be extracted from sea water, mineral deposits, surface encrustations, saline lakes and brine springs. In many inland areas, wood was used as a fuel source for evaporation of brine and this practice led to major deafforestation in central Europe. Salt played a central role in the economies of many regions, and is often reflected in place names. Salt was also used as a basis for population censuses and taxation, and salt monopolies were practised in many states. Salt was sometimes implicated in the outbreak of conflict, e.g. the French Revolution and the Indian War of Independence. Salt has also been invested with many cultural and religious meanings, from the ancient Egyptians to the Middle Ages. Man's innate appetite for salt may be related to his evolution from predominantly vegetarian anthropoids, and it is noteworthy that those people who live mainly on protein and milk or who drink salty water do not generally salt their food, whereas those who live mainly on vegetables, rice and cereals use much more salt. Medicinal use tended to emphasize the positive aspects of salt, e.g. prevention of putrefaction, reduction of tissue swelling, treatment of diarrhea. Evidence was also available to ancient peoples of its relationship to fertility, particularly in domestic animals. The history of salt thus represents a unique example for studying the impact of a widely used dietary substance on different important aspects of man's life, including medical philosophy.

  6. Worth its salt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The idea that all underground salt deposits can serve as storage sites for toxic and nuclear waste does not always hold water—literally. According to Daniel Ronen and Brian Berkowitz of Israel's Weizmann Institute of Science and Yoseph Yechieli of the Geological Survey of Israel, some buried salt layers are in fact highly conductive of liquids, suggesting that wastes buried in their confines could easily leech into groundwater and nearby soil.When drilling three wells into a 10,000-year-old salt layer near the Dead Sea, the researchers found that groundwater had seeped into the layer and had absorbed some of its salt.

  7. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed.

  8. cyclic π-perimeter hydrocarbon ruthenium complexes bearing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6), as their (complexes 1–4, 6) PF6 salt or (complex 5) BF4 salt. The complexes were .... ammonium salt. The solution was concentrated to 2 ml, whereupon addition of excess diethyl ether precipitated the additional complex, which was separated and dried ...... Union Road, Cambridge CB2 1EZ, UK; fax: +44 1223. 336033.

  9. Mitochondrial membranes with mono- and divalent salt: changes induced by salt ions on structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pöyry, Sanja; Róg, Tomasz; Karttunen, Mikko

    2009-01-01

    , and membrane electrostatic potential. The changes induced by salt are more prominent in dynamical properties related to ion binding and formation of ion-lipid complexes and lipid aggregates, as rotational diffusion of lipids is slowed down by ions, especially in the case of CaCl(2). In the same spirit, lateral......We employ atomistic simulations to consider how mono- (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) salt affects properties of inner and outer membranes of mitochondria. We find that the influence of salt on structural properties is rather minute, only weakly affecting lipid packing, conformational ordering...

  10. Catalysts for selective hydrogenation of furfural derived from the double complex salt [Pd(NH 3 ) 4 ](ReO 4 ) 2 on γ-Al 2 O 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Simon T.; Lamb, H. Henry

    2017-06-01

    The double complex salt [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 was employed as precursor of supported bimetallic catalysts for selective hydrogenation of furfural. Direct reduction of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 in flowing H2 at 400 °C yields bimetallic nanoparticles 1–2 nm in size that exhibit significant interaction between the metals, as evidenced by temperature-programmed hydride decomposition (complete suppression of β-PdHx formation), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Pd K and Re LIII edges (PdRe distance = 2.72 Å), and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. In contrast, calcination of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 at 350 °C in air and subsequent reduction in H2 at 400 °C results in metal segregation and formation of large (>50 nm) supported Pd particles; Re species cover the Pd particles and γ-Al2O3 support. A PdRe 1:2 catalyst prepared by sequential impregnation and calcination using HReO4 and [Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2 has a similar morphology. The catalyst derived by direct reduction of [Pd(NH3)4](ReO4)2 on γ-Al2O3 exhibits remarkably high activity for selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol (FAL) at 150 °C and 1 atm. Suppression of H2 chemisorption via elimination of Pd threefold sites, as evidenced by CO diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, correlates with increased FAL selectivity.

  11. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serata, S.; Milnor, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained

  12. [Salt and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnad, Marija

    2010-05-01

    Besides cardiovascular disease, a high salt intake causes other adverse health effects, i.e., gastric and some other cancers, obesity (risk factor for many cancer sites), Meniere's disease, worsening of renal disease, triggering an asthma attack, osteoporosis, exacerbation of fluid retention, renal calculi, etc. Diets containing high amounts of food preserved by salting and pickling are associated with an increased risk of cancers of the stomach, nose and throat. Because gastric cancer is still the most common cancer in some countries (especially in Japan), its prevention is one of the most important aspects of cancer control strategy. Observations among Japanese immigrants in the U.S.A. and Brazil based on the geographic differences, the trend in cancer incidence with time, and change in the incidence patterns indicate that gastric cancer is closely associated with dietary factors such as the intake of salt and salted food. The findings of many epidemiological studies suggest that high dietary salt intake is a significant risk factor for gastric cancer and this association was found to be strong in the presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection with atrophic gastritis. A high-salt intake strips the lining of the stomach and may make infection with H. pylori more likely or may exacerbate the infection. Salting, pickling and smoking are traditionally popular ways of preparing food in Japan and some parts of Asia. In addition to salt intake, cigarette smoking and low consumption of fruit and vegetables increase the risk of stomach cancer. However, it is not known whether it is specifically the salt in these foods or a combination of salt and other chemicals that can cause cancer. One study identified a mutagen in nitrite-treated Japanese salted fish, and chemical structure of this mutagen suggests that it is derived from methionine and that salt and nitrite are precursors for its formation. Working under conditions of heat stress greatly increased the workers

  13. Resedimented salt deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaczka, A.; Kolasa, K. (Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland))

    1988-08-01

    Carparthian foredeep's Wieliczka salt mine, unique gravity deposits were lately distinguished. They are mainly built of salt particles and blocks with a small admixture of fragments of Miocene marls and Carpathian rocks, deposited on precipitated salt. The pattern of sediment distribution is similar to a submarine fan. Gravels are dominant in the upper part and sands in lower levels, creating a series of lobes. Coarse-grained deposits are represented by disorganized, self-supported conglomerates passing into matrix-supported ones, locally with gradation, and pebbly sandstones consisting of salt grains and scattered boulder-size clasts. The latter may show in the upper part of a single bed as indistinct cross-bedding and parallel lamination. These sediments are interpreted as debris-flow and high-density turbidity current deposits. Salt sandstones (saltstones) which build a lower part of the fan often show Bouma sequences and are interpreted as turbidity-current deposits. The fan deposits are covered by a thick series of debrites (olistostromes) which consist of clay matrix with salt grains and boulders. The latter as represented by huge (up to 100,000 m{sup 3}) salt blocks, fragments of Miocene marls and Carpathian rocks. These salt debrites represent slumps and debris-flow deposits. The material for resedimented deposits was derived from the southern part of the salt basin and from the adjacent, advancing Carpathian orogen. The authors believe the distinct coarsening-upward sequence of the series is the result of progressive intensification of tectonic movements with paroxysm during the sedimentation of salt debrites (about 15 Ma).

  14. Water purification using organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  15. A simple, dynamic, hydrological model of a mesotidal salt marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt marsh hydrology presents many difficulties from a modeling standpoint: the bi-directional flows of tidal waters, variable water densities due to mixing of fresh and salt water, significant influences from vegetation, and complex stream morphologies. Because of these difficu...

  16. Effect of salt stress on growth, inorganic ion and proline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inhibitory effect of salt stress in rice is complex and is one of the main reasons for reduction of plant growth and crop productivity. In the present study, the response of rice callus cultivar Khao Dawk Mali 105 (KDML105), commonly known as Thai jasmine rice, to salt stress was examined. Callus cultures of KDML105 rice ...

  17. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  18. Hybrid molecular materials based upon organic pi-electron donors and inorganic metal complexes. Conducting salts of bis(ethylenediseleno)tetrathiafulvalene (BEST) with the octahedral anions hexacyanoferrate(III) and nitroprusside

    CERN Document Server

    Clemente-Leon, M; Galan-Mascaros, J R; Giménez-Saiz, C; Gómez-García, C J; Fabre, J M; Mousdis, G A; Papavassiliou, G C

    2002-01-01

    The synthesis, structure and physical characterization of three new radical salts formed by the organic donor bis(ethylenediseleno)tetrathiafulvalene (BEDS-TTF or BEST) and the paramagnetic hexacyanoferrate(III) anion [Fe(CN) sub 6] sup 3 sup - or the photochromic nitroprusside anion [Fe(CN) sub 5 NO] sup 2 sup - are reported: (BEST) sub 4 [Fe(CN) sub 6] (1), (BEST) sub 3 [Fe(CN) sub 6] sub 2 centre dot H sub 2 O (2) and (BEST) sub 2 [Fe(CN) sub 5 NO] (3). Salts 1 and 3 show a layered structure with alternating organic (beta-type packing) and inorganic slabs. Salt 2 shows an original interpenetrated structure probably due to the unprecedented presence of (BEST) sup 2 sup + dications. The three salts are semiconductors although salt 1 exhibits a high room temperature conductivity and a semiconducting-semiconducting transition at ca. 150 K which has been attributed to a dimerization in the organic sublattice.

  19. Salt Sensitivity: Challenging and Controversial Phenotype of Primary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatrino, Rossella; Manunta, Paolo; Zagato, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Increases in life expectancy and cardiovascular adverse events in patients with hypertension highlight the need for new risk-reduction strategies to reduce the burden of degenerative diseases. Among the environmental factors, high salt consumption is currently considered the most important risk factor of hypertension. However, while high salt intake significantly raises blood pressure in some individuals, others do not show variation or even decrease their blood pressure. This heterogeneity is respectively classified as salt sensitivity and salt resistance. In this review, we propose salt sensitivity as a useful phenotype to unravel the mechanistic complexity of primary hypertension. The individual variability in blood pressure modification in response to salt intake changes derives from the combination of genetic and environmental determinants. This combination of random and non random determinants leads to the development of a personal index of sensitivity to salt. However, those genes involved in susceptibility to salt are still not completely identified, and the triggering mechanisms underlying the following development of hypertension still remain uncovered. One reason might be represented by the absence of a specific protocol, universally followed, for a standard definition of salt sensitivity. Another reason may be linked to the absence of common criteria for patient recruitment during clinical studies. Thus, the generation of a reliable approach for a proper recognition of this personal index of sensitivity to salt, and through it the identification of novel therapeutic targets for primary hypertension, should be one of the aspirations for the scientific community.

  20. What Are Bath Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bath salts can produce: feelings of joy increased social interaction increased sex drive paranoia nervousness hallucinations (see or ... and Addiction Drug Overdoses in Youth Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) and Drug Use Real Questions from Real ...

  1. Mass transport in bedded salt and salt interbeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-08-01

    Salt is the proposed host rock for geologic repositories of nuclear waste in several nations because it is nearly dry and probably impermeable. Although experiments and experience at potential salt sites indicate that salt may contain brine, the low porosity, creep, and permeability of salt make it still a good choice for geologic isolation. In this paper we summarize several mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. The mathematical details are given in our technical reports

  2. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. Emphasize is put essentially on the fuel salt of the primary circuit inside which fission reactions occur. The reasons why the (LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 -UF 4 ) salt was chosen for the M.S.B.R. concept are examined; the physical, physicochemical and chemical properties of this salt are discussed with its interactions with the structural materials and its evolution in time. An important part of this volume is devoted to the continuous reprocessing of the active salt, the project designers having deemed advisable to take advantage at best from the availability of a continuous purification, in a thermal breeding. The problem of tritium formation and distribution inside the reactor is also envisaged and the fundamentals of the chemistry of the secondary coolant salt are given. The solutions proposed are: the hydrogen scavenging of the primary circuit, a reduction in metal permeability by an oxyde layer deposition on the side in contact with the vapor, and tritium absorption through an isotope exchange with the hydroxifluoroborate [fr

  3. Not salt taste perception but self-reported salt eating habit predicts actual salt intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hajeong; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    Excessive dietary salt intake is related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although dietary salt restriction is essential, it is difficult to achieve because of salt palatability. However, the association between salt perception or salt eating habit and actual salt intake remains uncertain. In this study, we recruited 74 healthy young individuals. We investigated their salt-eating habits by questionnaire and salt taste threshold through a rating scale that used serial dilution of a sodium chloride solution. Predicted 24-hr urinary salt excretions using Kawasaki's and Tanaka's equations estimated dietary salt intake. Participants' mean age was 35 yr, and 59.5% were male. Salt sense threshold did not show any relationship with actual salt intake and a salt-eating habit. However, those eating "salty" foods showed higher blood pressure (P for trend=0.048) and higher body mass index (BMI; P for trend=0.043). Moreover, a salty eating habit was a significant predictor for actual salt intake (regression coefficient [β] for Kawasaki's equation 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-2.69, P=0.048; β for Tanaka's equation 0.66, 95% CI 0.01-1.31, P=0.047). In conclusion, a self-reported salt-eating habit, not salt taste threshold predicts actual salt intake.

  4. Students' Understanding of Acid, Base and Salt Reactions in Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kim-Chwee Daniel; Goh, Ngoh-Khang; Chia, Lian-Sai; Treagust, David F.

    2003-01-01

    Uses a two-tier, multiple-choice diagnostic instrument to determine (n=915) grade 10 students' understanding of the acid, base, and salt reactions involved in basic qualitative analysis. Reports that many students did not understand the formation of precipitates and the complex salts, acid/salt-base reactions, and thermal decomposition involved in…

  5. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure >15mmHg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% Females, 16% Blacks, BMI 28.5±4.2 Kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mmHg) as compared to high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mmHg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dl, 10.8±7.3 mIU/L and 2.6±1.9) as compared to high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dl, 9.4±5.8 mIU/L and 2.1±1.4) (p salt sensitive (N=193) versus salt resistant (N=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in HOMA on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt resistant subjects (p=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in HOMA after including age, BMI, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. PMID:25185125

  6. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  7. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  8. Waste salt recovery, recycle, and destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    Starting in 1943 and continuing into the 1970s, radioactive wastes resulting from plutonium processing at Hanford were stored underground in 149 single shell tanks. Of these tanks, 66 are known or believedto be leaking, and over a period are believed to have leaked about 750,000 gal into the surrounding soil. The bulk of the aqueous solution has been removed and transferred to double shell tanks, none of which are leaking. The waste consists of 37 million gallons of salt cake and sludge. Most of the salt cake is sodium nitrate and other sodium salts. A substantial fraction of the sludge is sodium nitrate. Small amounts of the radionuclides are present in the sludge as oxides or hydroxides. In addition, some of the tanks contain organic compounds and ferrocyanide complexes, many of which have undergone radiolytic induced chemical changes during the years of storage. As part of the Hanford site remediation effort, the tank wastes must be removed, treated, and the residuals must be immobilized and disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner. Removal methods of the waste from the tanks fall generally into three approaches: dry removal, slurry removal, and solution removed. The latter two methods are likely to result in some additional leakage to the surrounding soil, but that may be acceptable if the tank can be emptied and remediated before the leaked material permeates deeply into the soil. This effort includes three parts: salt splitting, acid separation, and destruction, with initial emphasis on salt splitting

  9. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  10. Mechanism for salt scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, John J., II

    Salt scaling is superficial damage caused by freezing a saline solution on the surface of a cementitious body. The damage consists of the removal of small chips or flakes of binder. The discovery of this phenomenon in the early 1950's prompted hundreds of experimental studies, which clearly elucidated the characteristics of this damage. In particular it was shown that a pessimum salt concentration exists, where a moderate salt concentration (˜3%) results in the most damage. Despite the numerous studies, the mechanism responsible for salt scaling has not been identified. In this work it is shown that salt scaling is a result of the large thermal expansion mismatch between ice and the cementitious body, and that the mechanism responsible for damage is analogous to glue-spalling. When ice forms on a cementitious body a bi-material composite is formed. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ice is ˜5 times that of the underlying body, so when the temperature of the composite is lowered below the melting point, the ice goes into tension. Once this stress exceeds the strength of the ice, cracks initiate in the ice and propagate into the surface of the cementitious body, removing a flake of material. The glue-spall mechanism accounts for all of the characteristics of salt scaling. In particular, a theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the pessimum concentration is a consequence of the effect of brine pockets on the mechanical properties of ice, and that the damage morphology is accounted for by fracture mechanics. Finally, empirical evidence is presented that proves that the glue-small mechanism is the primary cause of salt scaling. The primary experimental tool used in this study is a novel warping experiment, where a pool of liquid is formed on top of a thin (˜3 mm) plate of cement paste. Stresses in the plate, including thermal expansion mismatch, result in warping of the plate, which is easily detected. This technique revealed the existence of

  11. Salt repository design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a summary discussion of the approaches that have been and will be taken in design of repository facilities for use with disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations. Since specific sites have yet to be identified, the discussion is at a general level, supplemented with illustrative examples where appropriate. 5 references, 1 figure

  12. Crossing the Salt Barrier

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fry. RIVER. To cross the salt barrier is, therefore, an obligatory part of every amphihaline fish cycle. Figure 2a. Life Cycle of. Salmon. Adult salmon migrate from sea towards the river. After reaching their hatching ground, the eggs are laid in the gravel. The spawned fishes are called kelts. Alevin is a stage from hatching to fry.

  13. Molten salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Molten salt reactor is an advanced breeder concept which is suited for the utilization of thorium for nuclear power production. This reactor is based on the use of solutions of uranium or plutonium fluorides in LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 as fuel. Unlike the conventional reactors, no external coolant is used in the reactor core and the fuel salt itself is circulated through heat exchangers to transfer the fission produced heat to a secondary salt (NaF-NaBF 4 ) for steam generation. A part of the fuel stream is continuously processed to isolate 233 Pa, so that it can decay to fissile 233 U without getting converted to 234 Pa, and for the removal of neutron absorbing fission products. This on-line processing scheme makes this reactor concept to achieve a breeding ratio of 1.07 which is the highest for any thermal breeder reactor. Experimental studies at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have established the use of plutonium as fuel for this reactor. This molten salt reactor concept is described and the work conducted at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is summarised. (auth.)

  14. Salt og forbrugervalg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Trine; Grunert, Klaus G

    Linket til højre henviser til rapporten i trykt format til download. Dokumentet over linket er selve leveringen til ministeriet med følgebrev. Viden om forbrugernes holdning til og købsintention for saltreducerede fødevarer er central, i forhold til industriens udvikling af nye produkter og...... af saltreducerede fødevarer og deres købsintention af disse. Dette blev undersøgt ved at måle forbrugerens viden om salt, anvendelse af salt, ønske om reduktion af salt og købsintention af saltreducerede fødevarer i en web-baseret undersøgelse. Efter den web-baserede undersøgelse, blev de samme mål...... undersøgt, men i et supermarked, hvor deltagerne blev inddelt i fire grupper for at undersøge effekten af priming og saltmærkning. Desuden blev der foretaget 15 kvalitative interviews, for at studere hvem og hvad der karakteriserer de deltagere i eksperimentet, som enten ender med ingen salt...

  15. Borehole closure in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1988-12-01

    Constitutive law parameters are determined from salt behavior characterization experiments. The results are applied to predict creep (time-dependent) closure of boreholes in salt specimens subjected to various loading configurations. Rheological models (linear and nonlinear viscoelastic and viscoplastic models), empirical models, and physical theory models have been formulated from the results of uniaxial creep tests, strain and stress rate controlled uniaxial tests, constant strain rate triaxial tests, cyclic loading tests, and seismic velocity measurements. Analytical solutions for a thick-walled cylinder subjected to internal and external pressures and for a circular hole in an infinite plate subjected to a biaxial or uniaxial stressfield have been derived from each of the linear viscoelastic models and from one of the empirical laws. The experimental results indicate that the salt samples behave as an elastic-viscoplastic material. The elastic behavior tends to be linear and time-independent. The plastic deformation is time-dependent. The stress increment to strain rate increment ratio gradually decreases as the stress level increases. The transient potential creep law seems to give the simplest satisfactory governing equation describing the viscoplastic behavior of salt during the transient phase. 204 refs., 27 figs., 29 tabs

  16. Learning SaltStack

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Colton

    2015-01-01

    If you are a system administrator who manages multiple servers, then you know how difficult it is to keep your infrastructure in line. If you've been searching for an easier way, this book is for you. No prior experience with SaltStack is required.

  17. Metals removal from spent salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  18. Actinide removal from spent salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  19. Dietary salt and gastric ulcer.

    OpenAIRE

    Sonnenberg, A

    1986-01-01

    Statistically significant linear correlations between geographic variations in salt consumption and mortality from gastric, but not duodenal ulcer, are reported. It is suggested that dietary consumption of salt is a risk factor in mortality from gastric ulcer.

  20. Should we eat less salt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaye, François

    2013-05-01

    High blood pressure is a major cardiovascular risk factor. There is overwhelming evidence that high salt consumption is a major cause of increased blood pressure. There is also a link between high salt consumption and risk of stroke, left ventricular hypertrophy, renal disease, obesity, renal stones and stomach cancer. Reducing salt consumption leads to a decrease in blood pressure and the incidence of cardiovascular disease. There are no deleterious effects associated with reducing salt consumption and it is also very cost-effective. Many organizations and state governments have issued recommendations regarding the suitable amount of salt consumption. In France, the objective is a salt consumptionsalt comes from manufactured products in developed countries, reduction of salt consumption requires the participation of the food industry. The other tool is consumer information and education. Salt consumption has already decreased in France in recent years, but efforts must continue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Salt ingestion caves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundquist Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Large vertebrate herbivores, when they find a salt-bearing layer of rock, say in a cliff face, can produce sizable voids where, overgenerations, they have removed and consumed salty rock. The cavities formed by this natural animal process constitute a uniqueclass of caves that can be called salt ingestion caves. Several examples of such caves are described in various publications. Anexample in Mississippi U.S.A., Rock House Cave, was visited by the authors in 2000. It seems to have been formed by deer orbison. Perhaps the most spectacular example is Kitum Cave in Kenya. This cave has been excavated to a length over 100 metersby elephants. An ancient example is La Cueva del Milodon in Chile, which is reported to have been excavated by the now extinctmilodon, a giant ground sloth. Still other possible examples can be cited. This class of caves deserves a careful definition. First, thecavity in rock should meet the size and other conventions of the locally accepted definition of a cave. Of course this requirement differsin detail from country to country, particularly in the matter of size. The intent is to respect the local conventions. The characteristicthat human entry is possible is judged to be a crucial property of any recognized cave definition. Second, the cavity should besignificantly the result of vertebrate animal consumption of salt-bearing rock. The defining process is that rock removed to form thecave is carried away in the digestive track of an animal. While sodium salts are expected to be the norm, other salts for which thereis animal hunger are acceptable. Also some other speleogenesis process, such as solution, should not be excluded as long as it issecondary in formation of a cave in question.

  2. N-heterocyclic Carbene Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-06-26

    Jun 26, 2013 ... ABSTRACT. Reaction of imidazole with two equivalent of 2-picolyl chloride afforded bis (2-picolyl) imidazolium salts (1). Treatment of the synthesized imidazolium salt with silver(I) oxide resulted in the formation of bis NHC silver(I) complex (2). The compound was characterized spectroscopically (NMR, ...

  3. The effect of hydrocarbons on the microstructural evolution in rock salt: a case study on hydrocarbon bearing Ara salt from the South Oman Salt Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmatz, Joyce; Urai, Janos L.; Wübbeler, Franziska M. M.; Sadler, Marc

    2014-05-01

    It has been shown that dilatant deformation promotes the incorporation of hydrocarbons into typically low permeable rock salt (Schoenherr et al., 2007). However, there is not much knowledge on subsequent mechanisms related to recrystallization processes, which cause morphological and chemical changes of the carbonic inclusions. This work aims to contribute to an increased understanding of fluid inclusion dynamics related to grain boundary migration recrystallization and hence to facilitate the interpretation of complex microstructures in recrystallized, multiphase salt rocks. In this case study we investigate hydrocarbon-impregnated salt from the Cambrian Ara Group in the South Oman Salt Basin. The samples were cored from cm-m thick anhydrite-salt sequences overlying hydrocarbon bearing carbonate stringers in 3300 m depth. The anhydrite layers consist mainly of fine-grained anhydrite, which contains calcite, dolomite, and olivine inclusions. Solid bitumen and lighter hydrocarbon phases are observed in between the anhydrite grains and along cracks. Anhydrite layers host salt veins, which contain fragments of anhydrite. These fragments do not differ in composition or structure from the host material and the related vein microstructures indicate crack-seal mechanisms. Halite in the salt layers is almost entirely recrystallized with solid inclusions consisting of anhydrite, calcite, dolomite and olivine with hydrocarbon-coatings present inside grains and along grain boundaries. Solid inclusions cause pinning indicated by a decreased recrystallized grain size and by the presence of grains with preserved substructures representing earlier deformation phases. We observe two types of carbonic inclusions: I) solid bitumen coatings along grain boundaries and microcracks, interpreted to be incorporated into the salt in an overpressure state that allowed dilatancy of the salt, and II) less degraded, liquid hydrocarbons along grain boundaries in the vicinity of the anhydrite

  4. The SALT HRS Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyas, Luke Martin Graham

    2012-05-01

    SALT HRS (Southern African Large Telescope High Resolution Échelle Spectrograph) is a high-resolution, high-efficiency spectrograph for the 11m SALT telescope in Sutherland, South Africa. The initial optical design work was performed at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Revisions to the concept, the mechanical design, manufacture, assembly and testing have been handled by the Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, at Durham University in the United Kingdom. SALT HRS is a fibre-fed échelle grating spectrograph with four operational modes: low-, medium- and high-resolution and high-stability modes, having spectral resolutions of R≈16000, 37000, 67000 and 67000 respectively over a wavelength range of 370-890nm. The instrument is of a dual channel, 'white pupil' design, in which the primary mirror acts to collimate light onto a single R4 échelle grating, and also to focus dispersed light to an intermediate focus. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the dispersed light into two separate spectral channels. Spherical pupil mirrors transfer the separated beams via a fold mirror to two wavelength-specific volume-phase holographic gratings (VPHGs) used as cross-dispersers. Cross-dispersed spectra are then imaged by two fully dioptric camera systems onto optimized CCD detectors. This thesis presents the results of the laboratory testing and specification of several critical sub-systems of SALT HRS, as well as the development of key software tools for the design verification and operation at the telescope. In Chapter 1 we first review the technical development of high-resolution spectroscopy and its specific implementation in SALT HRS. In Chapter 2 we develop a comprehensive throughput model of the entire system based on a combination of as-built performance and specific throughput measurements in the laboratory. This is used to make some specific predictions for the on-sky performance of SALT HRS and the magnitude limits for science targets. We also present a

  5. Lysine Rich Proteins in the Salt-Soluble Protein Fraction of Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Køie, B.

    1973-01-01

    Fractionation of the protein complex from Emir barley showed that the salt-soluble fraction accounts for 44% of the total lysine content but only for 2.......Fractionation of the protein complex from Emir barley showed that the salt-soluble fraction accounts for 44% of the total lysine content but only for 2....

  6. Mixed Waste Salt Encapsulation Using Polysiloxane - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.M.; Loomis, G.G.; Prewett, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    A proof-of-concept experimental study was performed to investigate the use of Orbit Technologies polysiloxane grouting material for encapsulation of U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste salts leading to a final waste form for disposal. Evaporator pond salt residues and other salt-like material contaminated with both radioactive isotopes and hazardous components are ubiquitous in the DOE complex and may exceed 250,000,000 kg of material. Current treatment involves mixing low waste percentages (less than 10% by mass salt) with cement or costly thermal treatment followed by cementation to the ash residue. The proposed technology involves simple mixing of the granular salt material (with relatively high waste loadings-greater than 50%) in a polysiloxane-based system that polymerizes to form a silicon-based polymer material. This study involved a mixing study to determine optimum waste loadings and compressive strengths of the resultant monoliths. Following the mixing study, durability testing was performed on promising waste forms. Leaching studies including the accelerated leach test and the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure were also performed on a high nitrate salt waste form. In addition to this testing, the waste form was examined by scanning electron microscope. Preliminary cost estimates for applying this technology to the DOE complex mixed waste salt problem is also given

  7. ESBRI: a web server for evaluating salt bridges in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni; Facchiano, Angelo M

    2008-01-01

    Salt bridges can play important roles in protein structure and function and have stabilizing and destabilizing effects in protein folding. ESBRI is a software available as web tool which analyses the salt bridges in a protein structure, starting from the atomic coordinates. In the case of protein complexes, the salt bridges between protein chains can be evaluated, as well as those among specific charged amino acids and the different protein subunits, in order to obtain useful information regard the protein-protein interaction. The service is available at the URL: http://bioinformatica.isa.cnr.it/ESBRI/

  8. Chapter 6. Uranium extraction possibilities from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition. 6.2. Technology for uranium extraction from brine with a high content of ion-chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to technology for uranium extraction from brine with a high content of ion-chlorine. The content of basic anions and cations in lake waters of Sasik-Kul deposit was defined. Results of X-ray spectral analysis of salt residual after water evaporation from Sasik-Kul lake was discussed. Investigations revealed that uranium extraction from brines containing ion-chlorine is possible. The developed basic process flow diagram of uranium extraction from Sasik-Kul Lake' brine consists of the following basic stages: evaporation, leaching, catching of formed gases (HCl), sorption, desorption, deposition, drying and tempering.

  9. Thermochemical Properties of Nicotine Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggs DM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results presented in this report clearly show that the thermal stability and the endothermic peak nicotine release temperatures are different for different nicotine salts and these temperatures appear to be linked to the general microstructural details of the salt itself. In addition, the peak nicotine release temperatures are highly dependent upon the sample size used. The heat of vaporization for neat (non-protonated nicotine is also sample-size dependent. The TGA data showed that the least stable of the salts tested at elevated temperatures was the liquid salt nicotine triacetate followed by the crystalline materials (e.g., nicotine gallate and finally, the amorphous salts (e.g., nicotine alginate. The DSC results revealed that the liquid and crystalline salts exhibit nicotine release endotherms that are strongly related to the sample weight being tested. The amorphous salts show nicotine endotherm peak temperatures that are nearly independent of the sample weight. The range of peak nicotine release temperatures varied depending upon the specific salts and the sample size from 83 oC to well over 200 oC. Based on these results, the evolution of nicotine from the nicotine salt should be expected to vary based on the composition of the salt, the details of its microstructure, and the amount of nicotine salt tested.

  10. The material flow of salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostick, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Salt (NaCl) is a universal mineral commodity used by virtually every person in the world. Although a very common mineral today, at one time it was considered as precious as gold in certain cultures. This study traces the material flow of salt from its origin through the postconsumer phase of usage. The final disposition of salt in the estimated 14,000 different uses, grouped into several macrocategories, is traced from the dispersive loss of salt into the environment to the ultimate disposal of salt-base products into the waste stream after consumption. The base year for this study is 1990, in which an estimated 196 million short tons of municipal solid waste was discarded by the US population. Approximately three-fourths of domestic salt consumed is released to the environment and unrecovered while about one-fourth is discharged to landfills and incinerators as products derived from salt. Cumulative historical domestic production, trade, and consumption data have been compiled to illustrate the long-term trends within the US salt industry and the cumulative contribution that highway deicing salt has had on the environment. Salt is an important component of drilling fluids in well drilling. It is used to flocculate and to increase the density of the drilling fluid in order to overcome high down-well gas pressures. Whenever drilling activities encounter salt formations, salt is added to the drilling fluid to saturate the solution and minimize the dissolution within the salt strata. Salt is also used to increase the set rate of concrete in cemented casings. This subsector includes companies engaged in oil, gas, and crude petroleum exploration and in refining and compounding lubricating oil. It includes SIC major groups 13 and 29. 13 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Azoniaspiro salts: towards bridging the gap between room-temperature ionic liquids and molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Matthew T; Geyer, Karolin; Hunt, Patricia A; McIntosh, Alastair J S; Rowe, Rebecca; Welton, Tom; White, Andrew J P

    2016-01-28

    In a continued effort to improve the suitability of ionic liquids in applications operating at raised temperatures, novel spirocyclic 'azoniaspiro' salts (with cations derived from five-, six-, seven- and eight-membered rings) are prepared and characterised. The structural and thermal properties of these salts are compared against those of established analogues. The stable geometries and ion pairing behaviour of these species are investigated via a combined experimental/computational approach, employing X-ray crystallography and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods. Subsequently, the thermal stabilities of these organic salts are characterised and compared using a broad range of techniques. Hyphenated Thermogravimetry-Mass Spectrometry investigations enable complex mechanisms underlying thermal decomposition to be elucidated. Lastly, transition state structures are optimised, corresponding to plausible decomposition mechanisms of the azoniaspiro salt, 6-azoniaspiro[6.5]dodecanium chloride, and one prototypical monocyclic species 1-butyl-1-methylpiperidinium chloride, using DFT. The observed improved thermal stabilities of the azoniaspiro salts, and their potential higher-temperature stable-liquid ranges, render them promising candidates for future ionic liquid applications.

  12. Salt supply to and significance of asymmetric salt diapirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koyi, H.; Burliga, S.; Chemia, Zurab

    2012-01-01

    Salt diapirs can be asymmetric both internally and externally reflecting their evolution history. As such, this asymmetry bear a significant amount of information about the differential loading (± lateral forces) and in turn the salt supply that have shaped the diapir. In two dimensions...... southeastern overhang due to salt extrusion during Middle Cretaceous followed by its burial in Tertiary. This external asymmetry is also reflected in the internal configuration of the diapir which shows different rates of salt flow on the two halves of the structure. The asymmetric external and internal...... sediments, the diapir extruded an overhang. Using the asymmetric Klodawa Salt Structure (KSS) in central Poland as a prototype, a series of analogue models were carried out to investigate the evolution history and salt supply driven by asymmetric differential loading. During extension of the model, a daipir...

  13. Where Does Road Salt Go - a Static Salt Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C. W.; Liu, F.; Moriarty, V. W.

    2017-12-01

    Each winter, more than 15 million tons of road salt is applied in the United States for the de-icing purpose. Considerable amount of chloride in road salt flows into streams/drainage systems with the snow melt runoff and spring storms, and eventually goes into ecologically sensitive low-lying areas in the watershed, such as ponds and lakes. In many watersheds in the northern part of US, the chloride level in the water body has increased significantly in the past decades, and continues an upward trend. The environmental and ecological impact of the elevated chloride level can no longer be ignored. However although there are many studies on the biological impact of elevated chloride levels, there are few investigations on how the spatially distributed road salt application affects various parts of the watershed. In this presentation, we propose a static road salt model as a first-order metric to address spacial distribution of salt loading. Derived from the Topological Wetness Index (TWI) in many hydrological models, this static salt model provides a spatial impact as- sessment of road salt applications. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the static model, National Elevation Dataset (NED) of ten-meter resolution of Lake George watershed in New York State is used to generate the TWI, which is used to compute a spatially dis- tributed "salt-loading coefficient" of the whole watershed. Spatially varying salt applica- tion rate is then aggregated, using the salt-loading coefficients as weights, to provide salt loading assessments of streams in the watershed. Time-aggregated data from five CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) sensors in selected streams are used for calibration. The model outputs and the sensor data demonstrate a strong linear correlation, with the R value of 0.97. The investigation shows that the static modeling approach may provide an effective method for the understanding the input and transport of road salt to within watersheds.

  14. Reactive halogen species above salt lakes and salt pans

    OpenAIRE

    Holla, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Salt lakes can be found on all continents and saline soils cover 2.5% of the land surface of the earth (FAO, 2012). This thesis investigates the presence of reactive halogen species (RHS) above salt lakes and saline soils to evaluate their relevance for tropospheric chemistry of the planetary boundary layer. Ground-based MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS measurements were conducted at salt lakes and two other sites with high halogen content. Prior to this work, RHS were found at three salt ...

  15. Rheology of rock salt for salt tectonics modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerical modeling of salt tectonics is a rapidly evolving field; however, the constitutive equations to model long-term rock salt rheology in nature still remain controversial. Firstly, we built a database about the strain rate versus the differential stress through collecting the data from salt creep experiments at a range of temperatures (20–200 °C in laboratories. The aim is to collect data about salt deformation in nature, and the flow properties can be extracted from the data in laboratory experiments. Moreover, as an important preparation for salt tectonics modeling, a numerical model based on creep experiments of rock salt was developed in order to verify the specific model using the Abaqus package. Finally, under the condition of low differential stresses, the deformation mechanism would be extrapolated and discussed according to microstructure research. Since the studies of salt deformation in nature are the reliable extrapolation of laboratory data, we simplified the rock salt rheology to dislocation creep corresponding to power law creep (n = 5 with the appropriate material parameters in the salt tectonic modeling.

  16. Halophytes: Potential Resources for Salt Stress Tolerance Genes and Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Avinash; Tanna, Bhakti

    2017-01-01

    Halophytes have demonstrated their capability to thrive under extremely saline conditions and thus considered as one of the best germplasm for saline agriculture. Salinity is a worldwide problem, and the salt-affected areas are increasing day-by-day because of scanty rainfall, poor irrigation system, salt ingression, water contamination, and other environmental factors. The salinity stress tolerance mechanism is a very complex phenomenon, and some pathways are coordinately linked for imparting salinity tolerance. Though a number of salt responsive genes have been reported from the halophytes, there is always a quest for promising stress-responsive genes that can modulate plant physiology according to the salt stress. Halophytes such as Aeluropus, Mesembryanthemum, Suaeda, Atriplex, Thellungiella, Cakile , and Salicornia serve as a potential candidate for the salt-responsive genes and promoters. Several known genes like antiporters ( NHX, SOS, HKT, VTPase ), ion channels (Cl - , Ca 2+ , aquaporins), antioxidant encoding genes ( APX, CAT, GST, BADH, SOD ) and some novel genes such as USP, SDR1, SRP etc. were isolated from halophytes and explored for developing stress tolerance in the crop plants (glycophytes). It is evidenced that stress triggers salt sensors that lead to the activation of stress tolerance mechanisms which involve multiple signaling proteins, up- or down-regulation of several genes, and finally the distinctive or collective effects of stress-responsive genes. In this review, halophytes are discussed as an excellent platform for salt responsive genes which can be utilized for developing salinity tolerance in crop plants through genetic engineering.

  17. Halophytes: Potential Resources for Salt Stress Tolerance Genes and Promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Mishra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Halophytes have demonstrated their capability to thrive under extremely saline conditions and thus considered as one of the best germplasm for saline agriculture. Salinity is a worldwide problem, and the salt-affected areas are increasing day-by-day because of scanty rainfall, poor irrigation system, salt ingression, water contamination, and other environmental factors. The salinity stress tolerance mechanism is a very complex phenomenon, and some pathways are coordinately linked for imparting salinity tolerance. Though a number of salt responsive genes have been reported from the halophytes, there is always a quest for promising stress-responsive genes that can modulate plant physiology according to the salt stress. Halophytes such as Aeluropus, Mesembryanthemum, Suaeda, Atriplex, Thellungiella, Cakile, and Salicornia serve as a potential candidate for the salt-responsive genes and promoters. Several known genes like antiporters (NHX, SOS, HKT, VTPase, ion channels (Cl−, Ca2+, aquaporins, antioxidant encoding genes (APX, CAT, GST, BADH, SOD and some novel genes such as USP, SDR1, SRP etc. were isolated from halophytes and explored for developing stress tolerance in the crop plants (glycophytes. It is evidenced that stress triggers salt sensors that lead to the activation of stress tolerance mechanisms which involve multiple signaling proteins, up- or down-regulation of several genes, and finally the distinctive or collective effects of stress-responsive genes. In this review, halophytes are discussed as an excellent platform for salt responsive genes which can be utilized for developing salinity tolerance in crop plants through genetic engineering.

  18. Challenges of constructing salt cavern gas storage in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Yuan, Guangjie; Ban, Fansheng; Zhuang, Xiaoqian; Li, Jingcui

    2017-11-01

    After more than ten years of research and engineering practice in salt cavern gas storage, the engineering technology of geology, drilling, leaching, completion, operation and monitoring system has been established. With the rapid growth of domestic consumption of natural gas, the requirement of underground gas storage is increasing. Because high-quality rock salt resources about 1000m depth are relatively scarce, the salt cavern gas storages will be built in deep rock salt. According to the current domestic conventional construction technical scheme, construction in deep salt formations will face many problems such as circulating pressure increasing, tubing blockage, deformation failure, higher completion risk and so on, caused by depth and the complex geological conditions. Considering these difficulties, the differences between current technical scheme and the construction scheme of twin well and big hole are analyzed, and the results show that the technical scheme of twin well and big hole have obvious advantages in reducing the circulating pressure loss, tubing blockage and failure risk, and they can be the alternative schemes to solve the technical difficulties of constructing salt cavern gas storages in the deep rock salt.

  19. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  20. Salt fluoridation and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthaler, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the caries-protective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%). In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67%) and Switzerland (85%). In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  1. Salt, caprock, and sheath study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karably, L.S. Jr.; Jernigan, B.L.; Petre, I.C.; Sullivan, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Salt domes of the Gulf Coast region of the United States consist of four component parts: 1) a salt stock, 2) caprock material, 3) sheath material, and 4) the surrounding upturned sediments. Salt stock consists of remarkably pure halite (NaCl), which represents 90 to 99% of the total mass, with the major impurity being anhydrite. Salt stocks are markedly homogeneous and continuous with respect to composition, texture and structure. Caprock consists primarily of anhydrite, gypsum and calcite which commonly occur in monomineralic zones oriented roughly parallel to the top of the salt stock. Caprock composition varies markedly over any single salt stock as well as from one salt stock to another. Fracturing, porosity and permeability of caprock material are correspondingly variable, but are usually developed tto a higher degree in the upper portions of caprock; porosity and permeability may also be relatively high at the caprock-salt interface. Caprock is generally believed to form by residual accumulation of anhydrite from the dissolution of salt, with subsequent alteration of the anhydrite to calcite and gypsum. Sheath material, probably a mixture of sedimentary rocks (clastic and evaporite), formed as a result of mechanical interaction between the salt stock and surrounding sediments during diapirism. Sheath material is thought to be distributed throughout an external zone, consisting mainly of disturbed sediment, and an internal zone, consisting mainly of disturbed salt. Sheath material forms along a roughly cylindrical shear zone which encloses thesalt stock. Sheath material may be overpressured and is generally thought to be impermeable. Upturned sediments around the salt diapirs are the result of dome genesis; hovever, these sedimentary beds and other structures are beyond the scope of this report

  2. Zechstein salt Denmark. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyngsie Jacobsen, F.; Soenderholm, M.; Springer, N.; Gutzon Larsen, J.; Lagoni, P.; Fabricius, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Salt Research Project EFP-81 has mainly been aiming upon an elucidation of the stratigraphy of the Danish Zechstein evaporites. Also an attempt to clarify the connection between the fabric and the strength of the strongly deformed domal rock salt is performed. The unravelling of the stratigraphy is carried out by means of renewed interpretations of new and old data from all the wells drilling in the Danish Permian basin in connection with a revaluation of the core descriptions. By means of trace elements analysis it is possible to some extent to distinguish between Zestein 1 and 2 ''grey salt''. A description of the transition zone between Zechstein 1 and 2 is carried out. New methods of fabric analyses are introduced and the strength measurements of the rock salt are treated statistically in connection with new defined rock salt parameters. An investigation of fluid inclusions in halite and quartz crystals from dome salt has resulted in the determination of salinity and chemical composition of the brines present in the salt. Temperatures and corresponding pressures during the evolution of the salt pillow and salt dome have been established. The dehydration conditions of natural carnallite in situ are clarified. (author)

  3. Salt formations offer disposal alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funderburk, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how three U.S. firms are spending millions to permit and build underground disposal sites in salt formations. These companies claim salt is the ideal geological medium for holding hazardous wastes. Two Texas locations and one in Michigan have been targeted as future sites for hazardous waste disposal. The Michigan site, outside Detroit, is a former salt mine 2,000 feet beneath the Ford Motor Co. (Detroit) assembly works in Dearborn. Both Texas sites are atop salt domes---one east and one west of Houston

  4. Pathophysiology of salt sensitivity hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2012-06-01

    Dietary salt intake is the most important factor contributing to hypertension, but the salt susceptibility of blood pressure (BP) is different in individual subjects. Although the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension is heterogeneous, it is mainly attributable to an impaired renal capacity to excrete sodium (Na(+) ). We recently identified two novel mechanisms that impair renal Na(+) -excreting function and result in an increase in BP. First, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation in the kidney, which facilitates distal Na(+) reabsorption through epithelial Na(+) channel activation, causes salt-sensitive hypertension. This mechanism exists not only in models of high-aldosterone hypertension as seen in conditions of obesity or metabolic syndrome, but also in normal- or low-aldosterone type of salt-sensitive hypertension. In the latter, Rac1 activation by salt excess causes MR stimulation. Second, renospecific sympathoactivation may cause an increase in BP under conditions of salt excess. Renal beta2 adrenoceptor stimulation in the kidney leads to decreased transcription of the gene encoding WNK4, a negative regulator of Na(+) reabsorption through Na(+) -Cl (-) cotransporter in the distal convoluted tubules, resulting in salt-dependent hypertension. Abnormalities identified in these two pathways of Na(+) reabsorption in the distal nephron may present therapeutic targets for the treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  5. Fused salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    Working conditions for zirconium preparation by fused salt electrolysis were studied. For such purpose, a cell was built for operation under argon atmosphere. A graphite crucible served as anode, with steel cathodes. Proper design allowed cathode rechange under the inert atmosphere. Cathodic deposits of zirconium powder occluded salts from the bath. After washing with both water and hydrochloric acid, the metallic powder was consolidated by fusion. Optimum operating conditions were found to arise from an electrolyte of 12% potassium hexafluorzirconate -88% sodium chloride, at 820 deg C and 5 A/cm 2 cathodic current density. Deposits contained 35% of metal and current efficiency reached 66%. The powder contained up to 600 ppm of chlorine and 1.700 ppm of fluorine; after fusion, those amounts decreased to 2 ppm and 3 ppm respectively, with low proportion of metallic impurities. Though oxygen proportion was 4.500 ppm, it should be lowered by improving working conditions, as well as working on an ampler scale. (Author)

  6. Sealing of boreholes using natural, compatible materials: Granular salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, R.E.; Zeuch, D.H.; Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1994-01-01

    Granular salt can be used to construct high performance permanent seals in boreholes which penetrate rock salt formations. These seals are described as seal systems comprised of the host rock, the seal material, and the seal rock interface. The performance of these seal systems is defined by the complex interactions between these seal system components through time. The interactions are largely driven by the creep of the host formation applying boundary stress on the seal forcing host rock permeability with time. The immediate permeability of these seals is dependent on the emplaced density. Laboratory test results suggest that careful emplacement techniques could results in immediate seal system permeability on the order of 10 -16 m 2 to 10 -18 m 2 (10 -4 darcy to 10 -6 ). The visco-plastic behavior of the host rock coupled with the granular salts ability to ''heal'' or consolidate make granular salt an ideal sealing material for boreholes whose permanent sealing is required

  7. Experiments in connection with Salt Domes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escher, B.G.; Kuenen, Ph.H.

    1928-01-01

    The different theories concerning the origin of Salt Domes in Roumania, Germany, Texas, Louisiana, Colorado and Utah are discussed. In Roumania the salt occurs in cores of “Diapir” anticlines. The existance of hills of salt indicates, that the salt is still pushing upwards. In Germany the salt

  8. Theory Of Salt Effects On Protein Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Yuba; Schmit, Jeremy

    Salt is one of the major factors that effects protein solubility. Often, at low salt concentration regime, protein solubility increases with the salt concentration(salting in) whereas at high salt concentration regime, solubility decreases with the increase in salt concentration(salting out). There are no quantitative theories to explain salting in and salting out. We have developed a model to describe the salting in and salting out. Our model accounts for the electrostatic Coulomb energy, salt entropy and non-electrostatic interaction between proteins. We analytically solve the linearized Poisson Boltzmann equation modelling the protein charge by a first order multipole expansion. In our model, protein charges are modulated by the anion binding. Consideration of only the zeroth order term in protein charge doesn't help to describe salting in phenomenon because of the repulsive interaction. To capture the salting in behaviour, it requires an attractive electrostatic interaction in low salt regime. Our work shows that at low salt concentration, dipole interaction is the cause for salting in and at high salt concentration a salt-dependent depletion interaction dominates and gives the salting out. Our theoretical result is consistent with the experimental result for Chymosin protein NIH Grant No R01GM107487.

  9. Irreversible and reversible components in the genesis of hypertension by sodium chloride (salt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekol, Yalcin

    2008-01-01

    Despite the abundant studies and overwhelming evidences demonstrating the essential role of salt (sodium chloride) for developing "essential" hypertension (EH), the controversies about salt-hypertension (HT) relations are still continuing. One of important mistakes in this topic is assuming that the HT-producing effect of salt is reversible. The present paper explains the complex nature of salt-HT relations. The deduction was made basing on the studies which investigate the relations between salt and HT. Animal experiments show that HT-producing effect of salt contains irreversible and reversible components. The existence of irreversible component manifests itself in this way: the blood pressure (BP) does not recede to the natural values despite removing of salt exposure. The proportion of BP decreasing after salt exposure termination belongs to the reversible component. Available evidences indicate that the irreversible component is developed in utero, during suckling and, generally, in prepubertal period secondary to salt exposure, however, if the salt exposure extends over more than one period, the HT may be intensified. The consequences of salt exposure during early life of human beings have not been investigated as detailed as in experimental animals, however, there are some clinical trials and epidemiological observations indicating that, similar to experimental animals, irreversible and reversible components are also developed in man during the genesis of HT. By the introduction of irreversible and reversible components notion, some obscured items on salt-HT relations can be clarified. For example, some intervention studies could not find dramatic relations between salt and HT, because these interventions modify only the reversible component, but irreversible component remains unchanged. As a result, salt exposure is detrimental for each period of life. For eradication of HT, it is prerequisite to prevent all individuals (especially pregnant or lactating

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans response to salt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.O. Umuerri (Oluwatoroti Omowayewa)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes my work, where I used genetic methods to identify new genes involved in salt taste in C. elegans. In addition, I used calcium imaging to characterize the cellular response of C. elegans to salt. The thesis is divided into five sections and each section is summarized

  11. The Salt II Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, D.

    1991-01-01

    The first strategic arms limitation talks resulted in two agreements: the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and the Interim Agreement to Limit Strategic Offensive Arms. Senator Henry M. (Scoop) Jackson (D-Wa.) was concerned about the numerical advantage granted to the USSR by the Latter agreement and proposed an amendment that would prohibit future negotiators from granting the Soviet Union similar terms. This paper discusses the second round of SALT negotiations which opened in November 1972 and continued under presidents Richard M. Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Jimmy Carter. As the negotiators met, U.S. and Soviet scientists and engineers continued their work to develop new nuclear weapons and launchers. Particularly problematic were modern, large ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and the Soviet Backfire bomber

  12. Salt resistant crop plants

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Stuart J.

    2014-04-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to agriculture. To improve salinity tolerance of crops, various traits can be incorporated, including ion exclusion, osmotic tolerance and tissue tolerance. We review the roles of a range of genes involved in salt tolerance traits. Different tissues and cells are adapted for specific and often diverse function, so it is important to express the genes in specific cell-types and to pyramid a range of traits. Modern biotechnology (marker- assisted selection or genetic engineering) needs to be increasingly used to introduce the correct combination of genes into elite crop cultivars. Importantly, the effects of introduced genes need to be evaluated in the field to determine their effect on salinity tolerance and yield improvement.

  13. A multi-proxy approach to understanding complex responses of salt-lake catchments to climate variability and human pressure: A Late Quaternary case study from south-eastern, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Samantha Elsie; Burjachs, Francesc; Ferrer-García, Carlos; Giralt, Santiago; Schulte, Lothar; Fernández-López de Pablo, Javier

    2018-03-01

    This article focuses on a former salt lake in the upper Vinalopó Valley in south-eastern Spain. The study spans the Late Pleistocene through to the Late Holocene, although with particular focus on the period between 11 ka cal BP and 3000 ka cal BP (which spans the Mesolithic and part of the Bronze Age). High resolution multi-proxy analysis (including pollen, non pollen palynomorphs, grain size, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction) was undertaken on the lake sediments. The results show strong sensitivity to both long term and small changes in the evaporation/precipitation ratio, affecting the surrounding vegetation composition, lake-biota and sediment geochemistry. To summarise the key findings the main general trends identified include: 1) Hyper-saline conditions and low lake levels at the end of the Late Glacial 2) Increasing wetness and temperatures which witnessed an expansion of mesophilic woodland taxa, lake infilling and the establishment of a more perennial lake system at the onset of the Holocene 3) An increase in solar insolation after 9 ka cal BP which saw the re-establishment of pine forests 4) A continued trend towards increasing dryness (climatic optimum) at 7 ka cal BP but with continued freshwater input 5) An increase in sclerophyllous open woody vegetation (anthropogenic?), and increasing wetness (climatic?) is represented in the lake record between 5.9 and 3 ka cal BP 6) The Holocene was also punctuated by several aridity pulses, the most prominent corresponding to the 8.2 ka cal BP event. These events, despite a paucity of well dated archaeological sites in the surrounding area, likely altered the carrying capacity of this area both regionally and locally, particularly during the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition, in terms of fresh water supply for human/animal consumption, wild plant food reserves and suitable land for crop growth.

  14. The community project COSA: comparison of geo-mechanical computer codes for salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, M.J.S.; Knowles, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    Two benchmark problems related to waste disposal in salt were tackled by ten European organisations using twelve rock-mechanics finite element computer codes. The two problems represented increasing complexity with first a hypothetical verification and then the simulation of a laboratory experiment. The project allowed to ascertain a shapshot of the current combined expertise of European organisations in the modelling of salt behaviour

  15. Ecology and Distribution of Copepods from the Salt Pan Ecosystems of Mumbai, West Coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Stephen, R.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; NaveenKumar, K.R.; Nair, V.R.

    on the modification of a diverse community of copepods of the creek salt works into a simplified ecosystem of low complexity based on the influence of environmental factors on the copepods density. The prevailing environmental conditions of the salt pan systems...

  16. Iodized Salt Sales in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Maalouf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iodized salt has been an important source of dietary iodine, a trace element important for regulating human growth, development, and metabolic functions. This analysis identified iodized table salt sales as a percentage of retail salt sales using Nielsen ScanTrack. We identified 1117 salt products, including 701 salt blends and 416 other salt products, 57 of which were iodized. When weighted by sales volume in ounces or per item, 53% contained iodized salt. These findings may provide a baseline for future monitoring of sales of iodized salt.

  17. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Experimental Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Alan L; Liu, Bo; Rogers, Troy D; Sartor, R Balfour; Miao, Edward A

    2017-08-01

    The Western diet is characterized by high protein, sugar, fat, and low fiber intake, and is widely believed to contribute to the incidence and pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, high sodium chloride salt content, a defining feature of processed foods, has not been considered as a possible environmental factor that might drive IBD. We set out to bridge this gap. We examined murine models of colitis on either a high salt diet (HSD) or a low salt diet. We demonstrate that an HSD exacerbates inflammatory pathology in the IL-10-deficient murine model of colitis relative to mice fed a low salt diet. This was correlated with enhanced expression of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. Surprisingly, sodium accumulated in the colons of mice on an HSD, suggesting a direct effect of salt within the colon. Similar to the IL-10-deficient model, an HSD also enhanced cytokine expression during infection by Salmonella typhimurium This occurred in the first 3 d of infection, suggesting that an HSD potentiates an innate immune response. Indeed, in cultured dendritic cells we found that high salt media potentiates cytokine expression downstream of TLR4 activation via p38 MAPK and SGK1. A third common colitis model, administration of dextran sodium sulfate, was hopelessly confounded by the high sodium content of the dextran sodium sulfate. Our results raise the possibility that high dietary salt is an environmental factor that drives increased inflammation in IBD. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Comparing salt tolerance of beet cultivars and their halophytic ancestor: consequences of domestication and breeding programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, Jelte; Cornelisse, Danny; Zhang, Yuancheng; Li, Hongxiu; Bruning, Bas; Katschnig, Diana; Broekman, Rob; Ji, Bin; van Bodegom, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Salt tolerance of higher plants is determined by a complex set of traits, the timing and rate of evolution of which are largely unknown. We compared the salt tolerance of cultivars of sugar beet and their ancestor, sea beet, in hydroponic studies and evaluated whether traditional domestication and more recent breeding have changed salt tolerance of the cultivars relative to their ancestor. Our comparison of salt tolerance of crop cultivars is based on values of the relative growth rate (RGR) of the entire plant at various salinity levels. We found considerable salt tolerance of the sea beet and slightly, but significantly, reduced salt tolerance of the sugar beet cultivars. This indicates that traditional domestication by selection for morphological traits such as leaf size, beet shape and size, enhanced productivity, sugar content and palatability slightly affected salt tolerance of sugar beet cultivars. Salt tolerance among four sugar beet cultivars, three of which have been claimed to be salt tolerant, did not differ. We analysed the components of RGR to understand the mechanism of salt tolerance at the whole-plant level. The growth rate reduction at higher salinity was linked with reduced leaf area at the whole-plant level (leaf area ratio) and at the individual leaf level (specific leaf area). The leaf weight fraction was not affected by increased salinity. On the other hand, succulence and leaf thickness and the net assimilation per unit of leaf area (unit leaf rate) increased in response to salt treatment, thus partially counteracting reduced capture of light by lower leaf area. This compensatory mechanism may form part of the salt tolerance mechanism of sea beet and the four studied sugar beet cultivars. Together, our results indicate that domestication of the halophytic ancestor sea beet slightly reduced salt tolerance and that breeding for improved salt tolerance of sugar beet cultivars has not been effective. PMID:25492122

  19. Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate by a diacylhydrazine ligand by the formation of a colour alkali metal complex. Purnandhu Bose Ranjan Dutta I ... Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S C Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032, India ...

  20. Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 6. Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate by a diacylhydrazine ligand by the formation of a colour alkali metal complex. Purnandhu Bose Ranjan Dutta I Ravikumar Pradyut Ghosh. Volume 123 Issue 6 November 2011 pp 869- ...

  1. Optical Detection of Sodium Salts of Fluoride, Acetate and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Optical Detection of Sodium Salts of Fluoride, Acetate and Phosphate by a Diacylhydrazine. Ligand via the Formation of a Colour Alkali Metal Complex. Purnandhu Bose, Ranjan Dutta, I. Ravikumar and Pradyut Ghosh. ∗. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A & 2B Raja ...

  2. Salting our landscape: An integrated catchment model using readily accessible data to assess emerging road salt contamination to streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Li; Whitehead, Paul; Siegel, Donald I.; Findlay, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    A new integrated catchment model for salinity has been developed to assess the transport of road salt from upland areas in watersheds to streams using readily accessible landscape, hydrologic, and meteorological data together with reported salt applications. We used Fishkill Creek (NY) as a representative watershed to test the model. Results showed good agreement between modeled and measured stream water chloride concentrations. These results suggest that a dominant mode of catchment simulation that does not entail complex deterministic modeling is an appropriate method to model salinization and to assess effects of future applications of road salt to streams. We heuristically increased and decreased salt applications by 100% and results showed that stream chloride concentrations increased by 13% and decreased by 7%, respectively. The model suggests that future management of salt application can reduce environmental concentrations, albeit over some time. - Highlights: → A new Integrated Catchment Model (INCA-Cl) is developed to simulate salinity. → Road salt application is important in controlling stream chloride concentration. → INCA-Cl can be used to manage and forecast the input and transport of chloride to the rivers. - A newly developed integrated catchment model for salinity can be used to manage and forecast the inputs and transport of chloride to streams.

  3. Young Stars with SALT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Adric R.; Alam, Munazza K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Henry, Todd J.

    2017-05-01

    We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All of these dwarfs are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph on the South African Large Telescope, we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, lithium 6708 Å, and potassium 7699 Å equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all of our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 pc of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, 9 members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find 14 young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star systems do not appear to be young. This appears to be evidence of a new population of nearby young stars not related to the known nearby young moving groups. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  4. Influence of Salts on Electrospinning of Aqueous and Nonaqueous Polymer Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Yalcinkaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A roller electrospinning system was used to produce nanofibres by using different solution systems. Although the process of electrospinning has been known for over half a century, knowledge about spinning behaviour is still lacking. In this work, we investigated the effects of salt for two solution systems on spinning performance, fibre diameter, and web structure. Polyurethane (PU and polyethylene oxide (PEO were used as polymer, and tetraethylammonium bromide and lithium chloride were used as salt. Both polymer and salt concentrations had a noteworthy influence on the spinning performance, morphology, and diameter of the nanofibres. Results indicated that adding salt increased the spinnability of PU. Salt created complex bonding with dimethylformamide solvent and PU polymer. Salt added to PEO solution decreased the spinning performance of fibres while creating thin nanofibres, as explained by the leaky dielectric model.

  5. Sodium (Salt or Sodium Chloride)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pick up the salt shaker. Get tips on cutting back and how to build a healthier relationship ... from the start. Healthy Eating • Healthy Eating Home • Nutrition AHA Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Making Healthy Choices ...

  6. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and salt that cooks add to foods at restaurants and other food service establishments. Q. What are ... State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home Latest ...

  7. Microbiology of solar salt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, B.

    1985-01-01

    Solar salt ponds are shallow ponds of brines that range in salinity from that of normal seawater (3.4 percent) through NaCl saturation. Some salterns evaporate brines to the potash stage of concentration (bitterns). All the brines (except the bitterns, which are devoid of life) harbor high concentrations of microorganisms. The high concentrations of microorganisms and their adaptation to life in the salt pond are discussed.

  8. Hydrogen-bonding catalysis of sulfonium salts

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Shiho; Kumatabara, Yusuke; Shimizu, Shoichi; Maruoka, Keiji; Shirakawa, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Although quaternary ammonium and phosphonium salts are known as important catalysts in phase-transfer catalysis, the catalytic ability of tertiary sulfonium salts has not yet been well demonstrated. Herein, we demonstrate the catalytic ability of trialkylsulfonium salts as hydrogen-bonding catalysts on the basis of the characteristic properties of the acidic α hydrogen atoms on alkylsulfonium salts.

  9. Tetraphenylborate Solubility in High Ionic Strength Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, S.M.; Ginn, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1998-04-01

    Solubility of sodium and potassium salts of the tetraphenylborate ion (TPB) in simulated Savannah River Site High Level Waste was investigated. Data generated from this study allow more accurate predictions of TPB solubility at the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility. Because previous research showed large deviations in the observed solubility of TPB salts when compared with model predictions, additional data were generated to better understand the solubility of TPB in more complex systems of high ionic strength and those containing both potassium and sodium. These data allow evaluation of the ability of current models to accurately predict equilibrium TPB concentrations over the range of experimental conditions investigated in this study

  10. Salt-bridge networks within globular and disordered proteins: characterizing trends for designable interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sankar; Mukharjee, Debasish

    2017-07-01

    There has been considerable debate about the contribution of salt bridges to the stabilization of protein folds, in spite of their participation in crucial protein functions. Salt bridges appear to contribute to the activity-stability trade-off within proteins by bringing high-entropy charged amino acids into close contacts during the course of their functions. The current study analyzes the modes of association of salt bridges (in terms of networks) within globular proteins and at protein-protein interfaces. While the most common and trivial type of salt bridge is the isolated salt bridge, bifurcated salt bridge appears to be a distinct salt-bridge motif having a special topology and geometry. Bifurcated salt bridges are found ubiquitously in proteins and interprotein complexes. Interesting and attractive examples presenting different modes of interaction are highlighted. Bifurcated salt bridges appear to function as molecular clips that are used to stitch together large surface contours at interacting protein interfaces. The present work also emphasizes the key role of salt-bridge-mediated interactions in the partial folding of proteins containing long stretches of disordered regions. Salt-bridge-mediated interactions seem to be pivotal to the promotion of "disorder-to-order" transitions in small disordered protein fragments and their stabilization upon binding. The results obtained in this work should help to guide efforts to elucidate the modus operandi of these partially disordered proteins, and to conceptualize how these proteins manage to maintain the required amount of disorder even in their bound forms. This work could also potentially facilitate explorations of geometrically specific designable salt bridges through the characterization of composite salt-bridge networks. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  11. Opinion on Salt intake of Dutch children

    OpenAIRE

    Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority

    2009-01-01

    The amount of salt in many, especially commercially prepared, food is too high. Reducing salt intake can contribute positively to public health. A reduction in salt intake at a young age reduces the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in later life. The salt intake of 2-6 year old Dutch children was estimated using the Dutch Food Consumption Survey, which was aimed at children in 2005/2006. The foods that contributed most to the total salt intake were determined.

  12. Numerical analysis of the bearing capacity of complex rock mechanical underground systems with filigree structures in the presence of imponderables. A contribution to the systematization of the investigative process with application/demonstration using the example of the salt cavern ASSE II/south flank; Numerische Analyse des Tragverhaltens komplexer gebirgsmechanischer untertaegiger Systeme mit filigranen Strukturen bei Anwesenheit von Imponderabilien. Ein Beitrag zur Systematisierung des Untersuchungsprozesses mit Anwendung/Demonstration am Beispiel des Salzbergwerks Schacht ASSE II/Suedflanke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyogtyev, Oleksandr

    2017-03-02

    The thesis dealing with the numerical analysis of the bearing capacity of complex rock mechanical underground systems with filigree structures in the presence of imponderables covers the following issues: status of science and technology, concept for the performance of numerical studies on the bearing capacity of large-volume underground systems, application example salt cavern ASSE II - application of the developed concept/development of numerical tools for the overall system/application of the global model to the given questions/realization of the modification potential.

  13. Thermodynamic characterization of salt components for the Molten Salt Reactor Fuel - 15573

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capelli, E.; Konings, R.J.M.; Benes, A.

    2015-01-01

    Molten fluoride salts are considered as primary candidates for nuclear fuel in the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), one of the 6 generation IV nuclear reactor designs. In order to determine the safety limits and to access the properties of the potential fuel mixtures, thermodynamic studies are very important. This study is a combination of experimental work and thermodynamic modelling and focusses on the fluoride systems with alkaline and alkaline earth fluorides as matrix and ThF 4 , UF 4 and PuF 3 as fertile and fissile materials. The purification of the single components was considered as essential first step for the study of more complex systems and ternary phase diagrams were described using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and drop calorimetry, which are used to measure phase transitions, enthalpy of mixing and heat capacity. In addition to the calorimetric techniques, Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) were used to collect data on vapour pressure and crystal structure of fluorides. The results are then coupled with thermodynamic modelling using the Calphad method for the assessment of the phase diagrams. A thermodynamic database describing the most important systems for MSR application has been developed and it has been used to optimize the fuel composition in view of the relevant properties such as melting temperature. A reliable database of thermodynamic properties of fluoride salts has been generated. It includes the key systems for the MSR fuel and it is very useful to predict the properties of the fuel

  14. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in

  15. Numerical investigation of road salt impact on an urban wellfield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, M L; Frind, E O; Molson, J W; Rudolph, D L

    2006-01-01

    The impact of road salt on a wellfield in a complex glacial moraine aquifer system is studied by numerical simulation. The moraine underlies an extensive urban and industrial landscape, which draws its water supply from >20 wellfields, several of which are approaching or have exceeded the drinking water limit for chloride. The study investigates the mechanisms of road salt infiltration, storage, and transport in the subsurface and assesses the effectiveness of mitigation measures designed to reduce the impact. The three-dimensional transport model accounts for increases in salt loading, as well as growth of the urbanized area and road network over the past 50 years. The simulations, which focus on one impacted wellfield, show chloride plumes originating mainly at arterial roads and migrating through aquitard windows into the water supply aquifers. The results suggest that the aquifer system contains a large and heterogeneously distributed mass of chloride and that concentrations in the aquifer can be substantially higher than the concentrations in the well water. Future impact scenarios indicate that although the system responds rapidly to reductions in salt loading, the residual chloride mass may take decades to flush out, even if road salting were discontinued. The implications with respect to urban wellfields in typical snow-belt areas are discussed.

  16. Hydrogeological research at the site of the Asse salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batsche, H.; Rauert, W.; Klarr, K.

    1980-01-01

    In connection with the storage of radioactive wastes in the abandoned Asse salt mine near Brunswick (Federal Republic of Germany), the hydrogeology of the ridge of hills of Asse has been investigated. In order to obtain as detailed information as possible on the hydrogeological conditions, a long-term investigation programme has been set up and many methods of investigation have been used. Hydrogeological boring operations resulted in important scientific findings regarding, for example, the course of the salt table and the main anhydrite which towers up above the salt table into the overlying collapsed rocks. Hydrochemical data showed the hydraulic effect of transverse faults. Isotopic hydrological measurements permitted distinction between the flow behaviour of the groundwater in different aquifers. The origin of the salt springs at the northwest end of the structure can be explained. Some additional pumping and labelling tests are expected to yield quantitative results concerning hydraulic interrelationships recognized to date. The very complex hydrogeological structure of the ridge of hills of Asse is the result of the multiple succession of permeable and impermeable layers on the flanks of the structure, and, furthermore, is possibly due to the fact that in some individual faults groundwater may seep through normally impermeable layers as well as via waterways at the salt table. (author)

  17. Starch-lipid inclusion complexes for aerogel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently we reported that aqueous slurries of starch can be excess steam jet-cooked and blended with aqueous solutions of fatty acid salts to produce inclusion complexes between amylose and the fatty acid salt. These complexes can be simply prepared on large scale using commercially available steam ...

  18. Disposal of Radioactive Wastes in Natural Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, F.L.; Boegly, W.J.; Bradshaw, R.L.; Empson, F.M.; Hemphill, L.; Struxness, E.G.; Tamura, T.

    1960-01-01

    The proposed use of cavities in salt formations as a disposal site for radioactive wastes is based upon : 1. Existence of salt for geologic time periods, 2. The impermeability of salt to the passage of water; 3. The widespread geographical distribution of salt; 4. The extremely large quantities of salt available; 5. The structural strength of salt; 6. The relatively high thermal conductivity of salt in comparison with other general geologic formations; 7. The possible recovery of valuable fission products in the wastes injected into the salt; 8. The relative ease of forming cavities in salt by mining, and the even greater ease and low cost of developing solution cavities in salt; and 9. The low seismicity in the areas of major salt deposits. Radioactive liquid wastes can be stored in cavities in natural salt formations if the structural properties of the salt are not adversely affected by chemical interaction, pressure, temperature, and radiation. Analytical studies show that it is possible to-store 2-year-old 10,000 MWD/T, 800 gal/ton waste in a sphere of 10 ft diameter without exceeding a temperature of 200° F. Laboratory tests show that the structural properties and thermal conductivity of rock salt are not greatly altered by high radiation doses, although high temperatures increase the creep rate for both irradiated and unirradiated samples. Chemical interaction of liquid wastes with salt produces chlorine and other chlorine compound gases, but the volumes are not excessive. The migration of nuclides through the salt and deformation of the cavity and chamber can only be studied in undisturbed salt in situ. One-fifth-scale models have been run in a bedded salt deposit in Hutchinson, Kansas, and full-scale field tests are in progress. (author) [fr

  19. Simulation of salt production process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraveva, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper an approach to the use of simulation software iThink to simulate the salt production system has been proposed. The dynamic processes of the original system are substituted by processes simulated in the abstract model, but in compliance with the basic rules of the original system, which allows one to accelerate and reduce the cost of the research. As a result, a stable workable simulation model was obtained that can display the rate of the salt exhaustion and many other parameters which are important for business planning.

  20. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  1. Thermodynamic characterization of salt components for Molten Salt Reactor fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelli, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a promising future nuclear fission reactor technology with excellent performance in terms of safety and reliability, sustainability, proliferation resistance and economics. For the design and safety assessment of this concept, it is extremely important to have a

  2. Relationship Between Salt Intake, Salt-Taste Threshold and Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Sodium intake measured as 24-hour urinary sodium is increased in subjects with hypertension attesting to sodium intake as a risk factor for the development of high blood pressure. Subjects with high salt taste threshold also have increased urinary sodium excretion which may predispose them to deveploment ...

  3. [Determination of Chloride Salt Solution by NIR Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Jian-hong; Jiao, Ming-xing

    2015-07-01

    Determination of chloride salt solution by near infrared spectrum plays a very important role in Biomedicine. The near infrared spectrum analysis of Sodium chloride, potassium chloride, calcium chloride aqueous solution shows that the concentration change of chloride salt can affect hydrogen bond, resulting in the variation of near infrared spectrum of water. The temperature influence on NIR spectrum has been decreased by choosing reasonable wavelength range and the wavelength where the temperature effects are zero (isosbestic point). Chlorine salt prediction model was established based on partial least squares method and used for predicting the concentration of the chlorine ion. The impact on near infrared spectrum of the cation ionic radius, the number of ionic charge, the complex effect of ionic in water has also discussed in this article and the reason of every factor are analysed. Experimental results show that the temperature and concentration will affect the near-infrared spectrum of the solution, It is found that the effect of temperature plays the dominant role at low concentrations of chlorine salt; rather, the ionic dominates at high concentration. Chloride complexes are formed in aqueous solution, It has an effect on hydrogen bond of water combining with the cations in chlorine salt solution, Comparing different chloride solutions at the same concentration, the destruction effects of chloride complexes and catnions on the hydrogen bond of water increases in the sequences: CaCl2 >NaCl>KC. The modeling result shows that the determination coefficients (R2) = 99.97%, the root mean square error of cross validation (RM- SECV) = 4.51, and the residual prediction deviation (RPD) = 62.7, it meets the daily requirements of biochemical detection accuracy.

  4. Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: salt selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Huang, V.S.

    1976-08-01

    A research program aimed at the development of a molten salt thermal energy storage system commenced in June 1976. This topical report describes Work performed under Task I: Salt Selection is described. A total of 31 inorganic salts and salt mixtures, including 9 alkali and alkaline earth carbonate mixtures, were evaluated for their suitability as heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage materials at temperatures of 850 to 1000/sup 0/F. Thermophysical properties, safety hazards, corrosion, and cost of these salts were compared on a common basis. We concluded that because alkali carbonate mixtures show high thermal conductivity, low volumetric expansion on melting, low corrosivity and good stability, they are attractive as heat-of-fusion storage materials in this temperature range. A 35 wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (50 mole percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-50 mole percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) mixture was selected as a model system for further experimental work. This is a eutectoid mixture having a heat of fusion of 148 Btu/lb (82 cal/g) that forms an equimolar compound, LiKCO/sub 3/. The Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture is intended to serve as a model system to define heat transfer characteristics, potential problems, and to provide ''first-cut'' engineering data required for the prototype system. The cost of a thermal energy storage system containing this mixture cannot be predicted until system characteristics are better defined. However, our comparison of different salts indicated that alkali and alkaline earth chlorides may be more attractive from a salt cost point of view. The long-term corrosion characteristics and the effects of volume change on melting for the chlorides should be investigated to determine their overall suitability as a heat-of-fusion storage medium.

  5. Sources of household salt in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Pieter L

    2005-01-01

    Marketing of non-iodized salt through unconventional distribution channels is one of the factors weakening the national salt iodization program in South Africa. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the various sources of household salt, and to relate this information to socio-economic status. Questionnaire information was collected by personal interview during home visits from a multistage, cluster, probability sample of 2164 adults representative of the adult population. Nationally 77.7% of households obtained their table salt from the typical food shops distributing iodized salt. However, in the nine different provinces between 8 and 37.3% of households used unconventional sources, distributing mainly non-iodized salt, to obtain their household salt. These alternative sources include distributors of agricultural salt, small general dealer shops called spaza shops, in peri-urban and rural townships, street vendors and salt saches placed in the packaging of maize meal bags. Country-wide around 30% of low socio-economic households obtained their salt from unconventional sources compared to less than 5% in high socio-economic households, emphasizing the vulnerability of low socio-economic groups to the use of non-iodized salt. Intervention strategies should mobilize all role players involved in unconventional marketing channels of household salt to provide only iodized salt to consumers, as required by law.

  6. thermic oil and molten salt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boukelia T.E, Mecibah M.S and Laouafi A

    1 mai 2016 ... [27] Zavoico, AB. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document. Tech. rep, Sandia National. Laboratories, SAND2001-2100, 2001. How to cite this article: Boukelia T.E, Mecibah M.S and Laouafi A. Performance simulation of parabolic trough solar collector using two fluids (thermic oil and molten salt).

  7. Salt effects in electromembrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seip, Knut Fredrik; Jensen, Henrik; Kieu, Thanh Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Electromembrane extraction (EME) was performed on samples containing substantial amounts of NaCl to investigate how the presence of salts affected the recovery, repeatability, and membrane current in the extraction system. A group of 17 non-polar basic drugs with various physical chemical...

  8. Monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility and salt repository integration: Engineering study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This MRS Facility and Salt Repository Integration Study evaluates the impacts of an integrated MRS/Salt Repository Waste Management System on the Salt Repository Surface facilities' design, operations, cost, and schedule. Eight separate cases were studied ranging from a two phase repository design with no MRS facility to a design in which the repository only received package waste from the MRS facility for emplacement. The addition of the MRS facility to the Waste Management System significantly reduced the capital cost of the salt repository. All but one of the cases studied were capable of meeting the waste acceptance data. The reduction in the size and complexity of the Salt Repository waste handling building with the integration of the MRS facility reduces the design and operating staff requirements. 7 refs., 35 figs., 43 tabs

  9. Dietary salt reduction for control of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In developed as well as developing countries, the four main factors affecting blood pressure are high salt intake, low potassium intake, overweight, and low physical activity level. This is also true for the increase in blood pressure with advancing age, occurring in all societies. It is now accepted that excess dietary salt raises blood pressure levels, whereas dietary salt reduction reduces blood pressure and prevents vascular complications.(1 The effect of salt on blood pressure is presumably due to the inability of the kidneys to excrete large amounts of salt, as humans are evolutionary adapted to ingest and excrete less than 1 gram of salt per day.(2 In this connection it should be noted that the more important element in common salt (sodium chloride is the sodium ion, and any restrictions applying to common salt also apply to all food items that contain sodium ions, such as sodium glutamate and baking soda.

  10. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gadbury, Casey [USDOE Carlsbad Field Office, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  11. Tetraalkylammonium Salts as Hydrogen-Bonding Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Shirakawa, Seiji; Liu, Shiyao; Kaneko, Shiho; Kumatabara, Yusuke; Fukuda, Airi; Omagari, Yumi; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Although the hydrogen-bonding ability of the α hydrogen atoms on tetraalkylammonium salts is often discussed with respect to phase-transfer catalysts, catalysis that utilizes the hydrogen-bond-donor properties of tetraalkylammonium salts remains unknown. Herein, we demonstrate hydrogen-bonding catalysis with newly designed tetraalkylammonium salt catalysts in Mannich-type reactions. The structure and the hydrogen-bonding ability of the new ammonium salts were investigated by X-ray diffraction...

  12. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Francis D.; Gadbury, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  13. An Investigation of the Integrity of Cemented Casing Seals with Application to Salt Cavern Sealing and Abandonment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifle, T.W.; Mellegard, K.D.; Skaug, N.T.; Bruno, M.S.

    2001-04-19

    This research project was pursued in three key areas. (1) Salt permeability testing under complex stress states; (2) Hydraulic and mechanical integrity investigations of the well casing shoe through benchscale testing; and (3) Geomechanical modeling of the fluid/salt hydraulic and mechanical interaction of a sealed cavern.

  14. Evolutionary diversity of bile salts in reptiles and mammals, including analysis of ancient human and extinct giant ground sloth coprolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Alan F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion and in influencing the intestinal microflora. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt diversity in both reptiles and mammals, including analysis of 8,000 year old human coprolites and coprolites from the extinct Shasta ground sloth (Nothrotherium shastense. Results While there is significant variation of bile salts across species, bile salt profiles are generally stable within families and often within orders of reptiles and mammals, and do not directly correlate with differences in diet. The variation of bile salts generally accords with current molecular phylogenies of reptiles and mammals, including more recent groupings of squamate reptiles. For mammals, the most unusual finding was that the Paenungulates (elephants, manatees, and the rock hyrax have a very different bile salt profile from the Rufous sengi and South American aardvark, two other mammals classified with Paenungulates in the cohort Afrotheria in molecular phylogenies. Analyses of the approximately 8,000 year old human coprolites yielded a bile salt profile very similar to that found in modern human feces. Analysis of the Shasta ground sloth coprolites (approximately 12,000 years old showed the predominant presence of glycine-conjugated bile acids, similar to analyses of bile and feces of living sloths, in addition to a complex mixture of plant sterols and stanols expected from an herbivorous diet. Conclusions The bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution, with some bile salt modifications only found within single groups such as marsupials. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt structures in different species provides a potentially rich model system for the evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates. Our results also demonstrate the stability of bile salts in coprolites

  15. Evolutionary diversity of bile salts in reptiles and mammals, including analysis of ancient human and extinct giant ground sloth coprolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion and in influencing the intestinal microflora. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt diversity in both reptiles and mammals, including analysis of 8,000 year old human coprolites and coprolites from the extinct Shasta ground sloth (Nothrotherium shastense). Results While there is significant variation of bile salts across species, bile salt profiles are generally stable within families and often within orders of reptiles and mammals, and do not directly correlate with differences in diet. The variation of bile salts generally accords with current molecular phylogenies of reptiles and mammals, including more recent groupings of squamate reptiles. For mammals, the most unusual finding was that the Paenungulates (elephants, manatees, and the rock hyrax) have a very different bile salt profile from the Rufous sengi and South American aardvark, two other mammals classified with Paenungulates in the cohort Afrotheria in molecular phylogenies. Analyses of the approximately 8,000 year old human coprolites yielded a bile salt profile very similar to that found in modern human feces. Analysis of the Shasta ground sloth coprolites (approximately 12,000 years old) showed the predominant presence of glycine-conjugated bile acids, similar to analyses of bile and feces of living sloths, in addition to a complex mixture of plant sterols and stanols expected from an herbivorous diet. Conclusions The bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution, with some bile salt modifications only found within single groups such as marsupials. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt structures in different species provides a potentially rich model system for the evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates. Our results also demonstrate the stability of bile salts in coprolites preserved in arid climates

  16. Salt loading affects cortisol metabolism in normotensive subjects : Relationships with salt sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, MN; van der Kleij, FGH; Boonstra, AH; Sluiter, WJ; Koerts, J; Navis, G; Dullaart, RPF

    We studied cortisol metabolism together with insulin sensitivity [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)] and renal hemodynamics in 19 salt-resistant (sr) and nine salt-sensitive ( ss) normotensive subjects after a low-and high-salt diet. Results are described as high- vs. low-salt diet. Sum of urinary

  17. Salt-assisted and salt-suppressed sol-gel transitions of methylcellulose in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Wang, C; Tam, K C; Li, L

    2004-02-03

    The effects of various salts on the sol-gel transition of aqueous methylcellulose (MC) solutions have been studied systematically by means of a micro differential scanning calorimeter. It was found that the heating process was endothermic while the cooling process was exothermic for both MC solutions with and without salts. The addition of salts did not change the patterns of gelation and degelation of MC. However, the salts could shift the sol-gel transition and the gel-sol transition to lower or higher temperatures from a pure MC solution, depending on the salt type. These opposite effects were termed the salt-assisted and salt-suppressed sol-gel transitions. Either the salt-assisted transition or the salt-suppressed sol-gel transition was a function of salt concentration. In addition, each salt was found to have its own concentration limit for producing a stable aqueous solution of MC at a given concentration of MC, which was related to the anionic charge density of the salt. Cations were proved to have weaker effects than anions. The "salt-out strength", defined as the salt effect per mole of anion, was obtained for each anion studied. The thermodynamic mechanisms involved in the salt-assisted and salt-suppressed sol-gel transitions are discussed.

  18. Cardiovascular and other effects of salt consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Cappuccio, Francesco P

    2013-01-01

    Salt is one of the most important determinants of high blood pressure and increased cardiovascular risk worldwide. However, a high salt intake has other adverse effects beyond those involving the cardiovascular system, so that there is renewed interest in the relationships between high salt intake and other diseases.

  19. Effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after 1 week of high salt (200 mmol per day sodium) and 1 week of low salt (10 mmol per day sodium) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure>15 mm Hg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% women; 16% blacks; body mass index, 28.5±4.2 kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mm Hg) as compared with high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mm Hg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dL; 10.8±7.3 mIU/L; 2.6±1.9) as compared with high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dL; 9.4±5.8 mIU/L; 2.1±1.4; Psalt-sensitive (n=193) versus salt-resistant (n=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in homeostasis model assessment on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt-sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt-resistant subjects (P=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in homeostasis model assessment after including age, body mass index, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone, and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. [The relationship between salt consumption and blood pressure among residents in Shandong province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaolei; Ma, Jixiang; Yan, Liuxia; Bi, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Xiaofei; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Jiyu; Cai, Xiaoning; Lu, Zilomg; Xu, Aiqiang

    2014-02-01

    To study the relationship between salt consumption and blood pressure among residents in Shandong province, and to provide basic information for guiding people to prevent hypertension by reducing salt intake. Using multi-stage stratified cluster random sampling method, 2 184 residents aged 18 to 69 were selected as the research subjects, which were extracted randomly from 20 counties in Shandong province in June, 2011. The blood pressure of the subjects were measured and weighted. Based on 72 h dietary recalls and weighing measurement, and according to the distribution of salt intake, the grouping cut-off points were 10, 14 and 18 g. The difference of subjects with different characteristics and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and prevalence of hypertension by grouping salt intake and other characteristics were analyzed, and the relationship between salt intake and prevalence of hypertension were analyzed. The total of 2 133 residents were involved finally, the completion rate was 97.7%. After the complex weighted, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure's means (95%CI value) of the subjects were 121.0 (119.5-122.5) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) and 78.5(77.4-79.6) mmHg respectively, which were all elevated with increasing of salt consumption. The blood pressure of the subjects with salt intake salt intake ≥ 18 g was the highest, which were 122.3(120.1-124.5) mmHg and 79.6(78.2-80.9) mmHg respectively. The analysis results showed that, among residents with normal waistline, the prevalence of hypertension of people with salt intake ≥ 18 g was 1.70(95%CI:1.04-2.76) times compared to that of people who consumed less than 10 g salt per day. The hypertension prevalence of Shandong province is quite high, and there is a relationship between salt consumption and blood pressure.

  1. Preparation and study of conductivity in lithium salt complexes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. G Saibaba1 D Srikanth2 A Ramachandra Reddy2. Department of Physics, Railway College, Kazipet 506 003, India; Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Warangal 506 004, India ...

  2. Speciation of cadmium mixed ligand complexes in salt water lakes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experimentally determined shifts in half-wave potentials are used to compute several formation constants. At the natural [CO32-] of 0.5 M in the lake, the main contributor to the speciation of cadmium is [Cd(CO3Cl2)]2-. At high [Cd2+], the DPASV detects the presence of free Cd2+ ions, hence, potential polluting effect, ...

  3. Synthesis of Backfunctionalized Imidazolinium Salts and NHC Carbene Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-02

    Unlimited. PA# 17132 Backfluorinated NHC Carbenes Is There a Better Synthetic Method? • Maybe! • What about a cyclization with a formamidine and a...phenyl- Colorless solid 50% adamantyl- Colorless solid cyclohexyl- Colorless solid 2-ethyl-1-hexyl- Yellow viscous oil Toluene soluble! US Patent App ...viscous oil Toluene soluble US Patent App 20160102061 16 Distribution A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA# 17132

  4. SPECIATION OF CADMIUM MIXED LIGAND COMPLEXES IN SALT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    ABSTRACT. Amalgam voltammetry has been used to study heavy metal interaction in model lake water in KNO3 at 23 oC at concentration levels of genuine lake water. The hanging drop amalgam electrode was prepared in situ before exchanging the medium for the sample solution. Half-wave potentials at two metal ion ...

  5. Effect of basement structure and salt tectonics on deformation styles along strike: An example from the Kuqa fold-thrust belt, West China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neng, Yuan; Xie, Huiwen; Yin, Hongwei; Li, Yong; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    The Kuqa fold-thrust belt (KFTB) has a complex thrust-system geometry and comprises basement-involved thrusts, décollement thrusts, triangle zones, strike-slip faults, transpressional faults, and pop-up structures. These structures, combined with the effects of Paleogene salt tectonics and Paleozoic basement uplift form a complex structural zone trending E-W. Interpretation and comprehensive analysis of recent high-quality seismic data, field observations, boreholes, and gravity data covering the KFTB has been performed to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of the deformation styles along strike. Regional sections, fold-thrust system maps of the surface and the sub-salt layer, salt and basement structure distribution maps have been created, and a comprehensive analysis of thrust systems performed. The results indicate that the thrust-fold system in Paleogene salt range can be divided into five segments from east to west: the Kela-3, Keshen, Dabei, Bozi, and Awate segments. In the easternmost and westernmost parts of the Paleogene salt range, strike-slip faulting and basement-involved thrusting are the dominant deformation styles, as basement uplift and the limits of the Cenozoic evaporite deposit are the main controls on deformation. Salt-core detachment fold-thrust systems coincide with areas of salt tectonics, and pop-up, imbricate, and duplex structures are associated with the main thrust faults in the sub-salt layer. Distribution maps of thrust systems, basement structures, and salt tectonics show that Paleozoic basement uplift controlled the Paleozoic foreland basin morphology and the distribution of Cenozoic salt in the KFTB, and thus had a strong influence on the segmented structural deformation and evolution of the fold-thrust belt. Three types of transfer zone are identified, based on the characteristics of the salt layer and basement uplift, and the effects of these zones on the fault systems are evaluated. Basement uplift and the boundary of

  6. Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two

  7. Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-06-15

    The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two

  8. Salt-occluded zeolite waste forms: Crystal structures and transformability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of salt-occluded zeolite and zeolite/glass composite samples, simulating nuclear waste forms loaded with fission products, have revealed complex structures, with cations assuming the dual roles of charge compensation and occlusion (cluster formation). These clusters roughly fill the 6--8 angstrom diameter pores of the zeolites. Samples are prepared by equilibrating zeolite-A with complex molten Li, K, Cs, Sr, Ba, Y chloride salts, with compositions representative of anticipated waste systems. Samples prepared using zeolite 4A (which contains exclusively sodium cations) as starting material are observed to transform to sodalite, a denser aluminosilicate framework structure, while those prepared using zeolite 5A (sodium and calcium ions) more readily retain the zeolite-A structure. Because the sodalite framework pores are much smaller than those of zeolite-A, clusters are smaller and more rigorously confined, with a correspondingly lower capacity for waste containment. Details of the sodalite structures resulting from transformation of zeolite-A depend upon the precise composition of the original mixture. The enhanced resistance of salt-occluded zeolites prepared from zeolite 5A to sodalite transformation is thought to be related to differences in the complex chloride clusters present in these zeolite mixtures. Data relating processing conditions to resulting zeolite composition and structure can be used in the selection of processing parameters which lead to optimal waste forms

  9. A daily salt balance model for stream salinity generation processes following partial clearing from forest to pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a coupled salt and water balance model to represent the stream salinity generation process following land use changes. The conceptual model consists of three main components with five stores: (i Dry, Wet and Subsurface Stores, (ii a saturated Groundwater Store and (iii a transient Stream zone Store. The Dry and Wet Stores represent the salt and water movement in the unsaturated zone and also the near-stream dynamic saturated areas, responsible for the generation of salt flux associated with surface runoff and interflow. The unsaturated Subsurface Store represents the salt bulge and the salt fluxes. The Groundwater Store comes into play when the groundwater level is at or above the stream invert and quantifies the salt fluxes to the Stream zone Store. In the stream zone module, we consider a 'free mixing' between the salt brought about by surface runoff, interflow and groundwater flow. Salt accumulation on the surface due to evaporation and its flushing by initial winter flow is also incorporated in the Stream zone Store. The salt balance model was calibrated sequentially following successful application of the water balance model. Initial salt stores were estimated from measured salt profile data. We incorporated two lumped parameters to represent the complex chemical processes like diffusion-dilution-dispersion and salt fluxes due to preferential flow. The model has performed very well in simulating stream salinity generation processes observed at Ernies and Lemon experimental catchments in south west of Western Australia. The simulated and observed stream salinity and salt loads compare very well throughout the study period with NSE of 0.7 and 0.4 for Ernies and Lemon catchment respectively. The model slightly over predicted annual stream salt load by 6.2% and 6.8%.

  10. Inorganic salts in atmospheric particulate matter: Raman spectroscopy as an analytical tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Jentzsch, Paul; Kampe, Bernd; Ciobotă, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter is composed of inorganic and organic components of natural and anthropogenic origin. Wind-transport is probably the most important process responsible for the emission of solid particulate matter into the troposphere, but there are also important contributions from chemical reactions due to the interaction of different atmospheric components in presence of water and solar radiation. Sulfate, nitrate and carbonate salts can be both reactants and products in this complex dynamic system, and there is no doubt about their important impact on the climate. Both simple and mixed salts can be produced in atmosphere by dissolution-crystallization processes. The Raman spectra of 45 representative salts of the atmospheric environment were recorded and the bands assigned. The chemometric analysis of the spectroscopic data of these 45 salts demonstrates the suitability of Raman spectroscopy to classify and identify sulfate, nitrate and carbonate salts of atmospheric importance. Salts were classified into three groups: "sulfates", "nitrates or carbonates" and "sulfate-nitrates or sulfate-carbonate". This kind of information is relevant in atmospheric studies because specific characteristics of the salts can provide valuable information about the origin of the salts, the atmospheric chemistry and climate forcing, thus contributing to the evaluation of environmental impacts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Feasibility of Direct Disposal of Salt Waste from Electochemical Processing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Rechard, Rob P; Hadgu, Teklu; Wang, Yifeng; Sanchez, Larry C.; McDaniel, Patrick; Skinner, Corey; Fathi, Nima; Frank, Steven; Patterson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The US Department of Energy decided in 2000 to treat its sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel, produced for experiments on breeder reactors, with an electrochemical process. The metallic waste produced is to be cast into ingots and the salt waste further processed to form a ceramic waste form for disposal in a mined repository. However, alternative disposal pathways for metallic and salt waste streams are being investigated that may reduce the processing complexity. As summarized here, performanc...

  12. Salt tolerance is evolutionarily labile in a diverse set of angiosperm families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, Camile; Hua, Xia; Bromham, Lindell

    2015-05-19

    Salt tolerance in plants is rare, yet it is found across a diverse set of taxonomic groups. This suggests that, although salt tolerance often involves a set of complex traits, it has evolved many times independently in different angiosperm lineages. However, the pattern of evolution of salt tolerance can vary dramatically between families. A recent phylogenetic study of the Chenopodiaceae (goosefoot family) concluded that salt tolerance has a conserved evolutionary pattern, being gained early in the evolution of the lineage then retained by most species in the family. Conversely, a phylogenetic study of the Poaceae (grass family) suggested over 70 independent gains of salt tolerance, most giving rise to only one or a few salt tolerant species. Here, we use a phylogenetic approach to explore the macroevolutionary patterns of salt tolerance in a sample of angiosperm families, in order to ask whether either of these two patterns - deep and conserved or shallow and labile - represents a common mode of salt tolerance evolution. We analyze the distribution of halophyte species across the angiosperms and identify families with more or less halophytes than expected under a random model. Then, we explore the phylogenetic distribution of halophytes in 22 families using phylogenetic comparative methods. We find that salt tolerance species have been reported from over one-third of angiosperm families, but that salt tolerant species are not distributed evenly across angiosperm families. We find that salt tolerance has been gained hundreds of times over the history of the angiosperms. In a few families, we find deep and conserved gains of salt tolerance, but in the majority of families analyzed, we find that the pattern of salt tolerant species is best explained by multiple independent gains that occur near the tips of the phylogeny and often give rise to only one or a few halophytes. Our results suggest that the pattern of many independent gains of salt tolerance near the tips

  13. Thermophysical properties of reconsolidating crushed salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Urquhart, Alexander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Reconsolidated crushed salt is being considered as a backfilling material placed upon nuclear waste within a salt repository environment. In-depth knowledge of thermal and mechanical properties of the crushed salt as it reconsolidates is critical to thermal/mechanical modeling of the reconsolidation process. An experimental study was completed to quantitatively evaluate the thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt as a function of porosity and temperature. The crushed salt for this study came from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In this work the thermal conductivity of crushed salt with porosity ranging from 1% to 40% was determined from room temperature up to 300°C, using two different experimental methods. Thermal properties (including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat) of single-crystal salt were determined for the same temperature range. The salt was observed to dewater during heating; weight loss from the dewatering was quantified. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt decreases with increasing porosity; conversely, thermal conductivity increases as the salt consolidates. The thermal conductivity of reconsolidated crushed salt for a given porosity decreases with increasing temperature. A simple mixture theory model is presented to predict and compare to the data developed in this study.

  14. Salt Intake: ¿Risk or Need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Nicolás Diez y Martínez de la Cotera

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A literary review on salt intake and its uses throughout the different stages in the history of mankind was conducted. It addresses issues related to salt concentrations in the human body, its physiological functions that are essential for homeostatic control, as well as the complications when salt levels are below or over the physiological limits. Different studies were analyzed including the contradictions they all present on the damage that salt intake can cause to human health. Population groups are defined as salt sensitive (SS and salt resistant (SR according to study that was conducted as well as to the possible causes for their variations. Conclusions are drawn on the risks and benefits of salt intake. Intervention is recommended for balanced consumption, both for individuals and for populations.

  15. Mixing of zeolite powders and molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.; Zyryanov, V.N.; Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Transuranics and fission products in a molten salt can be incorporated into zeolite A by an ion exchange process and by a batch mixing or blending process. The zeolite is then mixed with glass and consolidated into a monolithic waste form for geologic disposal. Both processes require mixing of zeolite powders with molten salt at elevated temperatures (>700 K). Complete occlusion of salt and a uniform distribution of chloride and fission products are desired for incorporation of the powders into the final waste form. The relative effectiveness of the blending process was studied over a series of temperature, time, and composition profiles. The major criteria for determining the effectiveness of the mixing operations were the level and uniformity of residual free salt in the mixtures. High operating temperatures (>775 K) improved salt occlusion. Reducing the chloride levels in the mixture to below 80% of the full salt capacity of the zeolite significantly reduced the free salt level in the final product

  16. Artisanal salt production in Aveiro/Portugal - an ecofriendly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carolina M; Bio, Ana; Amat, Francisco; Vieira, Natividade

    2011-11-04

    Solar salinas are man-made systems exploited for the extraction of salt, by solar and wind evaporation of seawater. Salt production achieved by traditional methods is associated with landscapes and environmental and patrimonial values generated throughout history. Since the mid-twentieth century, this activity has been facing a marked decline in Portugal, with most salinas either abandoned or subjected to destruction, making it necessary to find a strategy to reverse this trend.It is, however, possible to generate revenue from salinas at several levels, not merely in terms of good quality salt production, but also by obtaining other products that can be commercialized, or by exploring their potential for tourism, and as research facilities, among others. Furthermore, with an adequate management, biodiversity can be restored to abandoned salinas, which constitute important feeding and breeding grounds for resident and migratory aquatic birds, many of which are protected by European Community Directives.The aims of this manuscript are to present a brief overview on the current state of sea salt exploitation in Portugal and to stress the importance of recovering these salinas for the conservation of this particular environment, for the regional economy, the scientific community and the general public. The Aveiro salina complex is presented in detail, to exemplify salina structure and functioning, as well as current problems and potential solutions for artisanal salinas.

  17. Early Holocene Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviatt, Charles G.; Madsen, David B.; Miller, David; Thompson, Robert S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Shorelines and surficial deposits (including buried forest-floor mats and organic-rich wetland sediments) show that Great Salt Lake did not rise higher than modern lake levels during the earliest Holocene (11.5–10.2 cal ka BP; 10–9 14C ka BP). During that period, finely laminated, organic-rich muds (sapropel) containing brine-shrimp cysts and pellets and interbedded sodium-sulfate salts were deposited on the lake floor. Sapropel deposition was probably caused by stratification of the water column — a freshwater cap possibly was formed by groundwater, which had been stored in upland aquifers during the immediately preceding late-Pleistocene deep-lake cycle (Lake Bonneville), and was actively discharging on the basin floor. A climate characterized by low precipitation and runoff, combined with local areas of groundwater discharge in piedmont settings, could explain the apparent conflict between evidence for a shallow lake (a dry climate) and previously published interpretations for a moist climate in the Great Salt Lake basin of the eastern Great Basin.

  18. Geologic technical assessment of the Chacahoula Salt Dome, Louisiana, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

    2006-03-01

    The Chacahoula salt dome, located in southern Louisiana, approximately 66 miles southwest of New Orleans, appears to be a suitable site for a 160-million-barrel-capacity expansion facility for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, comprising sixteen 10-million barrel underground storage caverns. The overall salt dome appears to cover an area of some 1800 acres, or approximately 2.8 square miles, at a subsea elevation of 2000 ft, which is near the top of the salt stock. The shallowest known salt is present at 1116 ft, subsea. The crest of the salt dome is relatively flatlying, outward to an elevation of -4000 ft. Below this elevation, the flanks of the dome plunge steeply in all directions. The dome appears to comprise two separate spine complexes of quasi-independently moving salt. Two mapped areas of salt overhang, located on the eastern and southeastern flanks of the salt stock, are present below -8000 ft. These regions of overhang should present no particular design issues, as the conceptual design SPR caverns are located in the western portion of the dome. The proposed cavern field may be affected by a boundary shear zone, located between the two salt spines. However, the large size of the Chacahoula salt dome suggests that there is significant design flexibility to deal with such local geologic issues.

  19. Fluorido complexes of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari

    2013-07-04

    Fluorine chemistry has received considerable interest during recent years due to its significant role in the life sciences, especially for drug development. Despite the great nuclear medicinal importance of the radioactive metal technetium in radiopharmaceuticals, its coordination chemistry with the fluorido ligand is by far less explored than that of other ligands. Up to now, only a few technetium fluorides are known. This thesis contains the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of novel technetium fluorides in the oxidation states ''+1'', ''+2'', ''+4'' and ''+6''. In the oxidation state ''+6'', the fluoridotechnetates were synthesized either from nitridotechnetic(VI) acid or from pertechnetate by using reducing agent and have been isolated as cesium or tetraethylammonium salts. The compounds were characterized spectroscopically and structurally. In the intermediate oxidation state ''+4'', hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) was known for long time and studied spectroscopically. This thesis reports novel and improved syntheses and solved the critical issues of early publications such as the color, some spectroscopic properties and the structure of this key compound. Single crystal analyses of alkali metal, ammonium and tetramethylammonium salts of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) are presented. In aqueous alkaline solutions, the ammonium salt of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) undergoes hydrolysis and forms an oxido-bridged dimeric complex. It is the first step hydrolysis product of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) and was characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic methods. Low-valent technetium fluorides with the metal in the oxidation states of ''+2'' or ''+1'' are almost unknown. A detailed description of the synthesis and characterization of pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) is presented. The

  20. Renal arteriolar injury by salt intake contributes to salt memory for the development of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Hideyo; Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Shinoda, Kazunobu; Morita, Shinya; Kono, Hidaka; Nakagawa, Ken; Ishiguro, Kimiko; Hayashi, Kaori; Nakamura, Mari; Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Oya, Mototsugu; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    The role of salt intake in the development of hypertension is prominent, but its mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Our aim was to examine the effect of transient salt intake during the prehypertensive period in hypertensive model animals. Dahl salt-sensitive rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats were fed from 6 to 14 weeks with low-salt (0.12% NaCl), normal-salt (0.8% NaCl), high-salt (7% NaCl), or high-sodium/normal-chloride diet and returned to normal-salt diet for 3 months. Rats in the high-salt group saw elevations in blood pressure (BP) not only during the treatment period but also for the 3 months after returning to normal-salt diet. We named this phenomenon salt memory. Renal arteriolar injury was found in the high-salt group at the end of experiment. Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed from 6 to 14 weeks with high-salt diet with angiotensin receptor blocker, vasodilator, calcium channel blocker, and calcium channel blocker+angiotensin receptor blocker and returned to normal-salt diet. Although BP was suppressed to control levels by vasodilator or calcium channel blocker, elevated renal angiotensin II and renal arteriolar injury were observed, and salt memory did not disappear because of sustained renal arteriolar injury. Calcium channel blocker+angiotensin receptor blocker suppressed renal arteriolar injury, resulting in the disappearance of salt memory. Cross-transplantation of kidneys from Dahl salt-sensitive rats on high salt to control rats caused increase of BP, whereas control kidneys caused reduction in BP of hypertensive rats, inducing the central role of the kidney. These results suggest that renal arteriolar injury through BP and renal angiotensin II elevation plays important roles in the development of salt memory for hypertension. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Ultrasonic characterization of pork meat salting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Pérez, J V; De Prados, M; Pérez-Muelas, N; Cárcel, J A; Benedito, J

    2012-01-01

    Salting process plays a key role in the preservation and quality of dry-cured meat products. Therefore, an adequate monitoring of salt content during salting is necessary to reach high quality products. Thus, the main objective of this work was to test the ability of low intensity ultrasound to monitor the salting process of pork meat. Cylindrical samples (diameter 36 mm, height 60±10 mm) of Biceps femoris were salted (brine 20% NaCl, w/w) at 2 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 7 days. During salting and at each experimental time, three cylinders were taken in order to measure the ultrasonic velocity at 2 °C. Afterwards, the cylinders were split in three sections (height 20 mm), measuring again the ultrasonic velocity and determining the salt and the moisture content by AOAC standards. In the whole cylinders, moisture content was reduced from 763 (g/kg sample) in fresh samples to 723 (g/kg sample) in samples salted for 7 days, while the maximum salt gain was 37.3 (g/kg sample). Although, moisture and salt contents up to 673 and 118 (g/kg sample) were reached in the sections of meat cylinders, respectively. During salting, the ultrasonic velocity increased due to salt gain and water loss. Thus, significant (p 2 = 0.975) and moisture (R 2 = 0.863) contents. In addition, the change of the ultrasonic velocity with the increase of the salt content showed a good agreement with the Kinsler equation. Therefore, low intensity ultrasound emerges as a potential technique to monitor, in a non destructive way, the meat salting processes carried out in the food industry.

  2. Acceptability of Salt Fluoridation in a Rural Latino Community in the United States: An Ethnographic Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith C Barker

    acceptable, the feasibility of producing and distributing fluoridated salt in the United States is, however, complex and challenging.

  3. Bone seeking technetium 99M complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, N.; Camin, L.L.

    1982-01-01

    A method of making a metabolizable radioactive bone-seeking composition for intravenous administration to mammals comprises mixing a pyrophosphate with a stannous salt to form a stannous-phosphate complex, adjusting the pH of the complex to between 3 and 8, sterilizing the complex, and adding a sterile, non-pyrogenic solution of sup(99m)Tc to form a technetium-stannous-phosphate complex

  4. Preformulation investigation of some clopidogrel addition salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupančič, Vinko; Smrkolj, Matej; Benkič, Promož; Simonič, Igor; Plevnik, Miha; Ritlop, Gregor; Kristl, Albin; Vrečer, Franc

    2010-06-01

    Physico-chemical properties of active substances such as solubility, dissolution rate, chemical stability, pharmaceutical processibility, etc. can be improved by salt formation of active substances. Characterization of physical properties of such salts is important for selection of an optimal salt having required biopharmaceutical properties, stability and manufacturability. The present study deals with the preformulation study of selected clopidogrel acid addition salts, i.e. hydrogen sulfate, hydrochloride (HCl), hydrobromide (HBr), besylate and (-)-camphor-10-sulfonate salt (CSA) and two commercially available polymorphic forms of hydrogen sulphate salt, i.e. form 1 (HS F1) and form 2 (HS F2). Clopidogrel salts were characterized by means of thermal analysis (TG, DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), true density, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and solubility. Distinct differences in tested parameters were found among acid addition salts and crystalline forms of clopidogrel. Higher melting point of both hydrogen sulphate salt was attributed to presence of hydrogen bonds among HS anions, connecting them into a chain. All salts included in the present study were anhydrous, except HBr which was in the form of monohydrate. The two tested polymorphic forms of clopidogrel HS salt are enantiotropically related to each other and showed the highest hygroscopicity among the tested salts. This is important for development of solid dosage form containing both polymorphic forms and for selection of primary packaging. Solubility studies in different aqueous media showed comparable solubility for clopidogrel hydrogen sulfate (polymorphic forms 1 and 2), hydrochloride (form 1) and hydrobromide hydrate (form 1) whereas clopidogrel camphorsulfonate (CSA) and besylate salt showed slightly lower solubility.

  5. Geomechanics considerations for through-and near-salt well design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, S.M.; Fredrich, Joanne T.

    2005-01-01

    Over the next decade a significant amount of exploration and new field developments will take place in salt provinces around the world - in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico, and offshore Angola, Brazil, and North and West Africa. Salt formations provide both opportunities and challenges to the design and construction of the often complex wells to be drilled in these locations. An overview of the many geomechanical considerations necessary to ensure successful well construction when drilling in through-, sub- and near-salt environments is presented. The structural styles of deformed sediments adjacent to salt, combined with stress perturbations caused by the presence of salt, are used to assess the risk of encountering zones that might cause wellbore instability or lost-circulation problems. Well design examples are provided that show how near- and through-salt uncertainties may be included within a geomechanical well design for required mud weights while drilling. Salt is found in many hydrocarbon basins around the world. Significant deposits exist in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), offshore West Africa and Brazil, in the Southern North Sea, Egypt, and the Middle East (Figure 1(1)). In deep water offshore North America, the GoM and offshore Nova Scotia (NE Canada) are notable areas of current oil and gas exploration and production. Significant exploration activity is also targeting areas offshore Angola and Brazil. The extent of deepwater exploration in the GoM is illustrated in Figure 2 that shows the steady march into deeper water, together with a focusing of efforts in the Sigsbee Escarpment areas of Green Canyon, Walker Ridge and Atwater Valley. The deepest wells in the GoM are reaching true vertical depths of up to 32,000 feet, with maximum-recorded downhole pressures in excess of 26,000 psi and bottomhole temperatures in excess of 400 F. Such wells may penetrate considerable thicknesses of salt - up to 20,000 feet of salt is not unheard of. With substantial discoveries

  6. Roadmap for disposal of Electrorefiner Salt as Transuranic Waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, Robert P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Trone, Janis R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Lawrence C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The experimental breeder reactor (EBR-II) used fuel with a layer of sodium surrounding the uranium-zirconium fuel to improve heat transfer. Disposing of EBR-II fuel in a geologic repository without treatment is not prudent because of the potentially energetic reaction of the sodium with water. In 2000, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to treat the sodium-bonded fuel with an electrorefiner (ER), which produces metallic uranium product, a metallic waste, mostly from the cladding, and the salt waste in the ER, which contains most of the actinides and fission products. Two waste forms were proposed for disposal in a mined repository; the metallic waste, which was to be cast into ingots, and the ER salt waste, which was to be further treated to produce a ceramic waste form. However, alternative disposal pathways for metallic and salt waste streams may reduce the complexity. For example, performance assessments show that geologic repositories can easily accommodate the ER salt waste without treating it to form a ceramic waste form. Because EBR-II was used for atomic energy defense activities, the treated waste likely meets the definition of transuranic waste. Hence, disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southern New Mexico, may be feasible. This report reviews the direct disposal pathway for ER salt waste and describes eleven tasks necessary for implementing disposal at WIPP, provided space is available, DOE decides to use this alternative disposal pathway in an updated environmental impact statement, and the State of New Mexico grants permission.

  7. 168 Hours Salt Fog Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin

    2011-01-01

    This report explained the test conducted in salt fog chamber to evaluate the effectiveness of mild steel, coated with rust converter, for 168 hours in artificial seawater exposure. The samples were compared with mild steel coated with commercial primer. The tests were conducted followed ASTM B117. Individual pictures were taken of each sample before the tests began, at 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 hours to see the progression of the corrosion. Results showed that the samples coated with rust converter provide a good significant protection against corrosion phenomenon than the samples coated with commercial primer that available in the market. (author)

  8. Aggregation of Crystalline Copper Sulphate Salt in a Gelatin Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Subarnarekha; Roy, Biswajit; Tarafdar, Sujata

    A drying droplet changes its morphological pattern depending upon complex pattern forming system. To control the distribution of solute particles in a droplet during drying is an important aspect in many scientific and industrial purposes. In this work, with the help of optical microscopy, we study characteristic patterns generated in dried drops of colloidal copper sulphate (CuSO4ṡ5H2O) solution on surface of glass. At lower concentration of salt solution the growth pattern follows a monofractal structure whereas at higher concentration, the self-assembled pattern gradually gets disappeared. Calculating the fractal dimension (FD) of the generated patterns by box counting method with help of imageJ, it is observed that the patterns resemble DLA structure through a specific range of concentration of the salt solution.

  9. Brine Migration in Heated Salt: Lessons Learned from Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Matteo, E. N.; Mills, M.

    2017-12-01

    We summarize several interesting brine migration related phenomena hinted at in field experiments from field testing related to salt radioactive waste repositories in Germany and the US. Past heater tests in salt have shown 1) thermal-hydrological-mechanical coupling is quite strong during both heating and cooling; 2) chemical composition of brine evolves during heating, and comprises a mix of several water sources; and 3) acid gas (HCl) generation has been observed during past heater tests and may have multiple mechanisms for formation. We present a heated brine migration test design, formulated with these complexities in mind. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  10. Deep Biosphere Secrets of the Mediterranean Salt Giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisi, Giovanni; Lugli, Stefano; McGenity, Terry; Kuroda, Junichiro; Takai, Ken; Treude, Tina; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2015-04-01

    reproduction, and opening new avenues for research for life on other planets. Fluid inclusions and the microbes they contain also inform us on the chemical and physical conditions of the sedimentary environment at the moment of deposition. This information will be key in deciphering the complex succession of paleoclimatic and hydrological events that led to the formation of the MSC Salt Giant. Drilling the MSC Salt Giant is an unprecedented opportunity to sample and investigate this highly reactive association of microbial communities, pore fluids and minerals which is the modern analogue for ancient deep biosphere communities developed in the salt giants of the geological past.

  11. Dynamic interactions between coastal storms and salt marshes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Carnacina, Iacopo; Donatelli, Carmine; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Plater, Andrew James; Schuerch, Mark; Temmerman, Stijn

    2018-01-01

    This manuscript reviews the progresses made in the understanding of the dynamic interactions between coastal storms and salt marshes, including the dissipation of extreme water levels and wind waves across marsh surfaces, the geomorphic impact of storms on salt marshes, the preservation of hurricanes signals and deposits into the sedimentary records, and the importance of storms for the long term survival of salt marshes to sea level rise. A review of weaknesses, and strengths of coastal defences incorporating the use of salt marshes including natural, and hybrid infrastructures in comparison to standard built solutions is then presented. Salt marshes are effective in dissipating wave energy, and storm surges, especially when the marsh is highly elevated, and continuous. This buffering action reduces for storms lasting more than one day. Storm surge attenuation rates range from 1.7 to 25 cm/km depending on marsh and storms characteristics. In terms of vegetation properties, the more flexible stems tend to flatten during powerful storms, and to dissipate less energy but they are also more resilient to structural damage, and their flattening helps to protect the marsh surface from erosion, while stiff plants tend to break, and could increase the turbulence level and the scour. From a morphological point of view, salt marshes are generally able to withstand violent storms without collapsing, and violent storms are responsible for only a small portion of the long term marsh erosion. Our considerations highlight the necessity to focus on the indirect long term impact that large storms exerts on the whole marsh complex rather than on sole after-storm periods. The morphological consequences of storms, even if not dramatic, might in fact influence the response of the system to normal weather conditions during following inter-storm periods. For instance, storms can cause tidal flats deepening which in turn promotes wave energy propagation, and exerts a long term detrimental

  12. Dynamic interactions between coastal storms and salt marshes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Carnacina, Iacopo; Donatelli, Carmine; Ganju, Neil K.; Plater, Andrew James; Schuerch, Mark; Temmerman, Stijn

    2018-01-01

    This manuscript reviews the progresses made in the understanding of the dynamic interactions between coastal storms and salt marshes, including the dissipation of extreme water levels and wind waves across marsh surfaces, the geomorphic impact of storms on salt marshes, the preservation of hurricanes signals and deposits into the sedimentary records, and the importance of storms for the long term survival of salt marshes to sea level rise. A review of weaknesses, and strengths of coastal defences incorporating the use of salt marshes including natural, and hybrid infrastructures in comparison to standard built solutions is then presented.Salt marshes are effective in dissipating wave energy, and storm surges, especially when the marsh is highly elevated, and continuous. This buffering action reduces for storms lasting more than one day. Storm surge attenuation rates range from 1.7 to 25 cm/km depending on marsh and storms characteristics. In terms of vegetation properties, the more flexible stems tend to flatten during powerful storms, and to dissipate less energy but they are also more resilient to structural damage, and their flattening helps to protect the marsh surface from erosion, while stiff plants tend to break, and could increase the turbulence level and the scour. From a morphological point of view, salt marshes are generally able to withstand violent storms without collapsing, and violent storms are responsible for only a small portion of the long term marsh erosion.Our considerations highlight the necessity to focus on the indirect long term impact that large storms exerts on the whole marsh complex rather than on sole after-storm periods. The morphological consequences of storms, even if not dramatic, might in fact influence the response of the system to normal weather conditions during following inter-storm periods. For instance, storms can cause tidal flats deepening which in turn promotes wave energy propagation, and exerts a long term

  13. Platinum recovery from industrial process streams by halophilic bacteria: Influence of salt species and platinum speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Synthia; Claus, Mathias; Verbeken, Kim; Wallaert, Elien; De Smet, Rebecca; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2016-11-15

    The increased use and criticality of platinum asks for the development of effective low-cost strategies for metal recovery from process and waste streams. Although biotechnological processes can be applied for the valorization of diluted aqueous industrial streams, investigations considering real stream conditions (e.g., high salt levels, acidic pH, metal speciation) are lacking. This study investigated the recovery of platinum by a halophilic microbial community in the presence of increased salt concentrations (10-80 g L -1 ), different salt matrices (phosphate salts, sea salts and NH 4 Cl) and a refinery process stream. The halophiles were able to recover 79-99% of the Pt at 10-80 g L -1 salts and at pH 2.3. Transmission electron microscopy suggested a positive correlation between intracellular Pt cluster size and elevated salt concentrations. Furthermore, the halophiles recovered 46-95% of the Pt-amine complex Pt[NH 3 ] 4 2+ from a process stream after the addition of an alternative Pt source (K 2 PtCl 4 , 0.1-1.0 g L -1 Pt). Repeated Pt-tetraamine recovery (from an industrial process stream) was obtained after concomitant addition of fresh biomass and harvesting of Pt saturated biomass. This study demonstrates how aqueous Pt streams can be transformed into Pt rich biomass, which would be an interesting feed of a precious metals refinery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characteristics of a protein error in determination of serum protein in the presence of inorganic salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    There is a possibility that the color development of the dye-binding method based on a protein error of a pH indicator is affected by the coexisting inorganic salt. Thus, the author theoretically and experimentally investigated the effect of the inorganic salt on the protein error. In a theoretical analysis, the anion of an inorganic salt, like the dissociated dye and buffer anions, was assumed to react with the protein, forming a colorless anion-protein complex. The calculated results were compared with those obtained by experiments using three pH indicators and various kinds of inorganic salts. The calculated results obtained are as follows: (1) The color development decreases with increasing the concentration of the inorganic salt and the equilibrium constant of the reaction between the inorganic salt and protein; (2) The rate of the absorbance decrease is larger for a lower concentration of the inorganic salt than for a higher one; (3) The larger is the equilibrium constant, the larger is the absorbance decrease. The absorbance decrease was caused by the anion, and was increased by increasing the anion concentration. The magnitude of the effect of the anion was iodide > bromide > chloride, which was associated with their ionic radius. The difference in the effect of the anion was thought to indicate that the equilibrium constant, in other words, the bonding strength of the anion to protein is iodide > bromide > chloride.

  15. Physical Properties Data for Rock Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    foreign substances, such as oil . Other characteristics of Rock salt is a coarsely crystalline, sedimentary rock rock salt, specifically porosity and...225Permian """ 280 - , Pennsyl vani an-. ’, ~320---.. Mississippian 345 Paleozoic Devonian 395- . Silurian 430... Silurian salt-bearing Salina Formation of Michi- well into the Gulf of Mexico to the Sigsbee knolls, which gan, northern Ohio, Ontario, New York

  16. Impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachshon, Uri

    2017-04-01

    Field measurements indicated on high variability in salt accumulation along natural and cultivated slopes, even for relatively homogeneous soil conditions. It was hypothesised that slope inclination has an impact on the location of salt accumulation along the slope. A set of laboratory experiments and numerical models were used to explore the impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation. It was shown, experimentally, that for conditions of saline water source at the lower boundary of the slope - salt accumulates in low concentrations and homogeneously along the entire slope, for moderate slopes. However, as inclination increases high salt concentrations were observed at the upper parts of the slope, leaving the lower parts of the slope relatively free of salt. The traditional flow and transport models did not predict the experimental observations as they indicated also for the moderate slopes on salt accumulation in the elevated parts of the slope, away of the saline water source. Consequently - a conceptual model was raised to explain the laboratory observations. It was suggested that the interactions between slope angle, evaporation rates, hydraulic conductivity of the medium and distribution of wetness along the slope affect the saline water flow path through the medium. This lead to preferential flow path close to the soil-atmosphere interface for the steep slopes, which leads to constant wash of the salts from the evaporation front upward towards the slope upper parts, whereas for the moderate slopes, flow path is below the soil-atmosphere interface, therefore salt that accumulates at the evaporation front is not being transported upward. Understanding of salt dynamics along slopes is important for agricultural and natural environments, as well as for civil engineering purposes. Better understanding of the salt transport processes along slopes will improve our ability to minimize and to cope with soil salinization processes. The laboratory experiments and

  17. Evaluation of salt content in school meals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Alexandra Colaço Lourenço Viegas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: High blood pressure is a major rick factor for cardiovascular disease, and it is closely associated with salt intake. Schools are considered ideal environments to promote health and proper eating habits. Therefore the objective of this study was to evaluate the amount of salt in meals served in school canteens and consumers' perceptions about salt. METHODS: Meals, including all the components (bread, soup, and main dish were retrieved from school canteens. Salt was quantified by a portable salt meter. For food perception we constructed a questionnaire that was administered to high school students. RESULTS: A total of 798 food samples were analysed. Bread had the highest salt content with a mean of 1.35 g/100 g (SD=0.12. Salt in soups ranged from 0.72 g/100 g to 0.80 g/100 g (p=0.05 and, in main courses, from 0.71 g/100 to 0.97 g/100g (p=0.05. The salt content of school meals is high with a mean value of 2.83 to 3.82 g of salt per meal. Moreover, a high percentage of students consider meals neither salty nor bland, which shows they are used to the intensity/amount of salt consumed. CONCLUSION: The salt content of school meals is high, ranging from 2 to 5 times more than the Recommended Dietary Allowances for children, clearly exceeding the needs for this population, which may pose a health risk. Healthy choices are only possible in environments where such choices are possible. Therefore, salt reduction strategies aimed at the food industry and catering services should be implemented, with children and young people targeted as a major priority.

  18. Salt Bridges: Geometrically Specific, Designable Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Donald, Jason E.; Kulp, Daniel W.; DeGrado, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Salt bridges occur frequently in proteins, providing conformational specificity and contributing to molecular recognition and catalysis. We present a comprehensive analysis of these interactions in protein structures by surveying a large database of protein structures. Salt bridges between Asp or Glu and His, Arg, or Lys display extremely well-defined geometric preferences. Several previously observed preferences are confirmed and others that were previously unrecognized are discovered. Salt ...

  19. Molten salt safety study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The considerations concerning safety in using molten salt (40% potassium nitrate, 60% sodium nitrate) in a solar central receiver plant are addressed. The considerations are of a general nature and do not cover any details of equipment or plant operation. The study includes salt chemical reaction, experiments with molten salt, dry storage and handling constraints, and includes data from the National Fire Protection Association. The contents of this report were evaluated by two utility companies and they concluded that no major safety problems exist in using a molten salt solar system.

  20. Granular Salt Summary: Reconsolidation Principles and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Frank; Popp, Till; Wieczorek, Klaus; Stuehrenberg, Dieter

    2014-07-01

    The purposes of this paper are to review the vast amount of knowledge concerning crushed salt reconsolidation and its attendant hydraulic properties (i.e., its capability for fluid or gas transport) and to provide a sufficient basis to understand reconsolidation and healing rates under repository conditions. Topics covered include: deformation mechanisms and hydro-mechanical interactions during reconsolidation; the experimental data base pertaining to crushed salt reconsolidation; transport properties of consolidating granulated salt and provides quantitative substantiation of its evolution to characteristics emulating undisturbed rock salt; and extension of microscopic and laboratory observations and data to the applicable field scale.

  1. Applications of molten salts in plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Plutonium is efficiently recovered from scrap at Los Alamos by a series of chemical reactions and separations conducted at temperatures ranging from 700 to 900 0 C. These processes usually employ a molten salt or salt eutectic as a heat sink and/or reaction medium. Salts for these operations were selected early in the development cycle. The selection criteria are being reevaluated. In this article we describe the processes now in use at Los Alamos and our studies of alternate salts and eutectics

  2. Brine Transport Experiments in Granular Salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-06

    To gain confidence in the predictive capability of numerical models, experimental validation must be performed to ensure that parameters and processes are correctly simulated. The laboratory investigations presented herein aim to address knowledge gaps for heat-generating nuclear waste (HGNW) disposal in bedded salt that remain after examination of prior field and laboratory test data. Primarily, we are interested in better constraining the thermal, hydrological, and physicochemical behavior of brine, water vapor, and salt when moist salt is heated. The target of this work is to use run-of-mine (RoM) salt; however during FY2015 progress was made using high-purity, granular sodium chloride.

  3. Characterization of the salt stress vulnerability of three invasive freshwater plant species using a metabolic profiling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Lise; Deleu, Carole; Berardocco, Solenne; Haury, Jacques; Thiébaut, Gabrielle

    2015-03-01

    The effects of salt stress on freshwater plants has been little studied up to now, despite the fact that they are expected to present different levels of salt sensitivity or salt resistance depending on the species. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of NaCl at two concentrations on three invasive freshwater species, Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum aquaticum and Ludwigia grandiflora, by examining morphological and physiological parameters and using metabolic profiling. The growth rate (biomass and stem length) was reduced for all species, whatever the salt treatment, but the response to salt differed between the three species, depending on the NaCl concentration. For E. canadensis, the physiological traits and metabolic profiles were only slightly modified in response to salt, whereas M. aquaticum and L. grandiflora showed great changes. In both of these species, root number, photosynthetic pigment content, amino acids and carbohydrate metabolism were affected by the salt treatments. Moreover, we are the first to report the salt-induced accumulation of compatible solutes in both species. Indeed, in response to NaCl, L. grandiflora mainly accumulated sucrose. The response of M. aquaticum was more complex, because it accumulated not only sucrose and myo-inositol whatever the level of salt stress, but also amino acids such as proline and GABA, but only at high NaCl concentrations. These responses are the metabolic responses typically found in terrestrial plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis and chemosensitivity of a new iminium salt toward a cyanide anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Boddu Ananda; Lee, Jae-Young; Son, Young-A.

    2014-06-01

    A short, high-yielding route to pyranylidene Iminium (Imi) salts using a new pyrylium salt reaction between N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) and acetic anhydride is reported. The Imi salt-sensing behavior toward various anions has been investigated using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The Imi salt demonstrates high selectively for CN- when various other anions, such as CN-, Cl-, Br-, I-, SCN-, ClO4-, NO3-, HSO4-, PF6- and N3-, are present because it is highly reactive towards nucleophiles. The selective detection of CN- with the Imi unit gave rise to a significant hypochromic shift in the CH3CN solution at λmax = 444 nm and 423 nm and creation of new peak at 252 nm. These studies indicated that CN- had high affinity toward Imi, forming a 1:1 complex; this observation agrees with the current understanding of these materials.

  5. Anaglyph, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This anaglyph image provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed

  6. ERG review of salt constitutive law, salt stress determinations, and salt corrosion and modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balon, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) was established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The August 1983 meeting of the ERG reviewed a RE/SPEC technical report containing a review of eight constitutive laws that have been proposed to model the creep of salt over the ranges of stress and temperature anticipated in a nuclear repository. This report documents the ERG's comments and recommendations on this subject and the ONWI responses to the specific points raised by the ERG

  7. Fault and fracture patterns around a strike-slip influenced salt wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, G. I.; Weinberger, R.; Marco, S.; Levi, T.

    2018-01-01

    The trends of faults and fractures in overburden next to a salt diapir are generally considered to be either parallel to the salt margin to form concentric patterns, or at right angles to the salt contact to create an overall radial distribution around the diapir. However, these simple diapir-related patterns may become more complex if regional tectonics influences the siting and growth of a diapir. Using the Sedom salt wall in the Dead Sea Fault system as our case study, we examine the influence of regional strike-slip faulting on fracture patterns around a salt diapir. This type of influence is important in general as the distribution and orientation of fractures on all scales may influence permeability and hence control fluid and hydrocarbon flow. Fractures adjacent to the N-S trending salt wall contain fibrous gypsum veins and injected clastic dykes, attesting to high fluid pressures adjacent to the diapir. Next to the western flank of the salt wall, broad (∼1000 m) zones of upturn or 'drape folds' are associated with NW-SE striking conjugate extensional fractures within the overburden. Within 300 m of the salt contact, fracture patterns in map view display a progressive ∼30°-35° clockwise rotation with more NNW-SSE strikes immediately adjacent to the salt wall. While some extensional faults display growth geometries, indicating that they were syn-depositional and initiated prior to tilting of beds associated with drape folding, other fractures display increasing dips towards the salt, suggesting that they have formed during upturn of bedding near the diapir. These observations collectively suggest that many fractures developed to accommodate rotation of beds during drape folding. Extensional fractures in the overburden define a mean strike that is ∼45° anticlockwise (counter-clockwise) of the N-S trending salt wall, and are therefore consistent with sinistral transtension along the N-S trending Sedom Fault that underlies the salt wall. Our outcrop

  8. Balancing sub- and supra-salt strain in salt-influenced rifts: Implications for extension estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Alexander J.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Duffy, Oliver B.

    2017-09-01

    The structural style of salt-influenced rifts may differ from those formed in predominantly brittle crust. Salt can decouple sub- and supra-salt strain, causing sub-salt faults to be geometrically decoupled from, but kinematically coupled to and responsible for, supra-salt forced folding. Salt-influenced rifts thus contain more folds than their brittle counterparts, an observation often ignored in extension estimates. Fundamental to determining whether sub- and supra-salt structures are kinematically coherent, and the relative contributions of thin- (i.e. gravity-driven) and thick-skinned (i.e. whole-plate stretching) deformation to accommodating rift-related strain, is our ability to measure extension at both structural levels. We here use published physical models of salt-influenced extension to show that line-length estimates yield more accurate values of sub- and supra-salt extension compared to fault-heave, before applying these methods to seismic data from the Halten Terrace, offshore Norway. We show that, given the abundance of ductile deformation in salt-influenced rifts, significant amounts of extension may be ignored, leading to the erroneous interpretations of thin-skinned, gravity-gliding. If a system is kinematically coherent, supra-salt structures can help predict the occurrence and kinematics of sub-salt faults that may be poorly imaged and otherwise poorly constrained.

  9. Salt Reductions in Some Foods in The Netherlands: Monitoring of Food Composition and Salt Intake.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temme, Elisabeth H M; Hendriksen, Marieke A H; Milder, Ivon E J; Toxopeus, Ido B; Westenbrink, Susanne; Brants, Henny A M; van der A, Daphne L

    2017-01-01

    High salt intake increases blood pressure and thereby the risk of chronic diseases. Food reformulation (or food product improvement) may lower the dietary intake of salt. This study describes the changes in salt contents of foods in the Dutch market over a five-year period (2011-2016) and

  10. Comparative effects of neutral salt and alkaline salt stress on seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative effects of neutral salt and alkaline salt stress on seed germination, early seedling growth and physiological response of a halophyte species Chenopodium glaucum. ... Relative water content (RWC) of C. glaucum remained high even under the highest salt or alkali stress. No obvious increase of osmolytes ...

  11. Oral iron therapy in human subjects, comparative absorption between ferrous salts and iron polymaltose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, P.; Johnson, G.; Wood, L.

    1984-01-01

    Iron absorption was directly compared between equivalent doses of ferrous salts and a polymaltose complex using a twin-isotope technique in which each individual acts as his own control. In the first study, bioavailability of iron from ferrous sulfate and the complex was defined at physiologic doses of 5 mg (Group 1: n = 14) and therapeutic doses of 50 mg (Group 2: n = 13). In Group 1, mean absorption from salt was 47.77% (SD 14.58%) and from polymaltose, 46.56% SD 17.07%). In Group 2, mean absorption from salt was 32.92% (SD 13.42%) and from polymaltose, 27.07% (SD 6.50%). In a second study, 100 mg of iron in a chewable formulation was used to compare absorption between equal doses of ferrous fumarate and the polymaltose complex. Mean absorption from salt was 10.25% (SD 6.89%) and from polymaltose 10.68% (SD 4.68%). At all three dosage levels, iron is equally available from salt or polymaltose for hemoglobin synthesis (p greater than 0.20), and absorption negatively correlated with plasma ferritin (p less than 0.01). These two materials may be used interchangeably in the treatment of patients with absolute iron deficiency

  12. Long Term Analysis of Deformations in Salt Mines: Kłodawa Salt Mine Case Study, Central Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cała, Marek; Tajduś, Antoni; Andrusikiewicz, Wacław; Kowalski, Michał; Kolano, Malwina; Stopkowicz, Agnieszka; Cyran, Katarzyna; Jakóbczyk, Joanna

    2017-09-01

    Located in central Poland, the Kłodawa salt dome is 26 km long and about 2 km wide. Exploitation of the dome started in 1956, currently rock salt extraction is carried out in 7 mining fields and the 12 mining levels at the depth from 322 to 625 meters below sea level (m.b.s.l.). It is planned to maintain the mining activity till 2052 and extend rock salt extraction to deeper levels. The dome is characterised by complex geological structure resulted from halokinetic and tectonic processes. Projection of the 3D numerical analysis took into account the following factors: mine working distribution within the Kłodawa mine (about 1000 rooms, 350 km of galleries), complex geological structure of the salt dome, complicated structure and geometry of mine workings and distinction in rocks mechanical properties e.g. rock salt and anhydrite. Analysis of past mine workings deformation and prediction of future rock mass behaviour was divided into four stages: building of the 3D model (state of mine workings in year 2014), model extension of the future mine workings planned for extraction in years 2015-2052, the 3D model calibration and stability analysis of all mine workings. The 3D numerical model of Kłodawa salt mine included extracted and planned mine workings in 7 mining fields and 14 mining levels (about 2000 mine workings). The dimensions of the model were 4200 m × 4700 m × 1200 m what was simulated by 33 million elements. The 3D model was calibrated on the grounds of convergence measurements and laboratory tests. Stability assessment of mine workings was based on analysis of the strength/stress ratio and vertical stress. The strength/stress ratio analysis enabled to indicate endangered area in mine workings and can be defined as the factor of safety. Mine workings in state close to collapse are indicated by the strength/stress ratio equals 1. Analysis of the vertical stress in mine workings produced the estimation of current state of stress in comparison to initial

  13. Mined salt storage feasibility: Engineering study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This study addresses a method of eliminating the surface storage of mined salt at the Deaf Smith repository site. It provides rough estimates of the logistics and costs of transporting 3.7 million tons of salt from the repository to the salt disposal site near Carlsbad, New Mexico and returning it to the repository for decommissioning backfill. The study assumes that a railcar/truck system will be installed and that the excavated salt will be transported from the repository to an existing potash mine located near Carlsbad, New Mexico approximately 300 miles from the repository. The 3.7 million tons of salt required for repository decommissioning backfill can be stored in the potash mines along with the excess salt, with no additional capital costs required for either a railcar or a truck transportation system. The capital cost for facilities to reclaim the 3.7 million tons of salt from the potash mine is estimated to be $4,400,000 with either a rail or truck transportation system. Segregating the 3.7 million tons of backfill salt in a surface storage area at the potash mine requires a capital cost of $13,900,000 with a rail system or $11,400,000 with a truck system. Transportation costs are estimated at $0.08/ton-mile for rail and $0.13/ton-mile for truck. 2 figs., 5 tabs

  14. vinyltriphenylphosphonium salt-mediated preparation of thiophene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    phosphonium salts are usually made from phosphine and an alkyl halide [10-16], and they are also obtained by the ... novel reaction of dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylates (DAAD), triphenylphosphine (TPP) and acids ... concomitant protonation of the intermediate by an acid leads to vinyltriphenylphosphonium salts [18-28].

  15. Specific investigations related to salt rock behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vons, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper results are given of work in various countries in rather unrelated areas of research. Nevertheless, since the studies have been undertaken to better understand salt behaviour, both from mechanical and chemical points of view, some connection between the studies can be found. In the French contribution the geological conditions have been investigated that might promote or prevent the formation of salt domes from layers in view of possible use of the latter type of formation. This was done theoretically by the finite element method, and a start was made with centrifuge tests. The density of a number of samples from salt and overburden from the Bresse basin was measured and it was shown that a favourable condition exists in this region for waste disposal. In the German contribution various subjects are touched upon, one being the effect of water on the mobility in the early stages of salt dome formation. Evidence was found for an anisotropy in salt. One Dutch contribution describes results of studies on the effect of small amounts of water on the rheology of salt. The results imply that flow laws obtained for salt at rapid strain rates and/or low confining pressure cannot be reliably extrapolated to predict the long term behaviour of wet or even very dry material under natural conditions. Preliminary results on the effect of water upon ion-mobility indicate a certain pseudo-absorptive capacity of salt e.g. for Sr

  16. Asymmetric Hydrogenation of 3-Substituted Pyridinium Salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renom-Carrasco, Marc; Gajewski, Piotr; Pignataro, Luca; de Vries, Johannes G.; Piarulli, Umberto; Gennari, Cesare; Lefort, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The use of an equivalent amount of an organic base leads to high enantiomeric excess in the asymmetric hydrogenation of N-benzylated 3-substituted pyridinium salts into the corresponding piperidines. Indeed, in the presence of Et3N, a Rh-JosiPhos catalyst reduced a range of pyridinium salts with ee

  17. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  18. Public health impact of salt reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, M.A.H.

    2015-01-01

    The health and economic burden related to cardiovascular diseases is substantial and prevention of these diseases remains a challenge. There is convincing evidence that high salt intake affects blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. As salt intake is far above the recommended

  19. Nonlinear Analysis of Cavities in Rock Salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, N. S.; Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The paper covers some material and computational aspects of the rock mechanics of leached cavities in salt. A material model is presented in which the instantaneous stiffness of the salt is obtained by interpolation between the unloaded state and a relevant failure state. The model enables predic...

  20. Secondary Aluminum Processing Waste: Salt Cake ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-nine salt cake samples were collected from 10 SAP facilities across the U.S. The facilities were identified by the Aluminum Association to cover a wide range of processes. Results suggest that while the percent metal leached from the salt cake was relatively low, the leachable metal content may still pose a contamination concern and potential human and ecological exposure if uncontrollably released to the environment. As a result, salt cake should always be managed at facilities that utilize synthetic liner systems with leachate collection (the salt content of the leachate will increase the hydraulic conductivity of clay liners within a few years of installation). The mineral phase analysis showed that various species of aluminum are present in the salt cake samples with a large degree of variability. The relative abundance of various aluminum species was evaluated but it is noted that the method used is a semi-quantitative method and as a result there is a limitation for the data use. The analysis only showed a few aluminum species present in salt cake which does not exclude the presence of other crystalline species especially in light of the variability observed in the samples. Results presented in this document are of particular importance when trying to understand concerns associated with the disposal of salt cake in MSW landfills. From the end-of-life management perspective, data presented here suggest that salt cake should not be size reduce

  1. The effect of the salt viscosity on future evolution of the Gorleben salt diapir, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Schmeling, H.; Koyi, H.

    2009-01-01

    for various salt rheologies. It is shown that the rheology of the salt plays a significant role in how and at which rate the anhydrite blocks sink within the diapir. The mobility of anhydrite blocks depends on the effective viscosity of salt which has to be lower than threshold value of around 1018–1019 Pa s....... Decreasing salt viscosity allows the previously “stationary” anhydrite blocks to sink. If the effective viscosity of salt in post-depositional stage of the Gorleben diapir falls below this threshold value, induced internal flow due to the present anhydrite layer might disturb any repository within the diapir....

  2. Actinide removal from molten salts by chemical oxidation and salt distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeese, J.A.; Garcia, E.; Dole, V.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Actinide removal from molten salts can be accomplished by a two step process where the actinide is first oxidized to the oxide using a chemical oxidant such as calcium carbonate or sodium carbonate. After the actinide is precipitated as an oxide the molten salt is distilled away from the actinide oxides leaving a oxide powder heel and an actinide free distilled salt that can be recycled back into the processing stream. This paper discusses the chemistry of the oxidation process and the physical conditions required to accomplish a salt distillation. Possible application of an analogous process sequence for a proposed accelerator driven transmutation molten salt process is also discussed.

  3. Dam construction in salt rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockmann, N.; Beinlich, A.; Flach, D.; Jockwer, N.; Klarr, K.; Krogmann, P.; Miehe, R.; Schmidt, M.W.; Schwaegermann, H.F.; Walter, F.; Yaramanci, U.

    1991-11-01

    Barriers are a major component of the satefy concept for the Gorleben repository. The construction and performance of dams are currently tested within the framework of a project carried out in the Asse salt mine. A measuring programme has been established to give evidence of the sealing capacities of a barrier consisting of an abatement, long-term sealing material, and a hydraulic sealing system. Tests are to be made to verify the barrier's performance for shorter of long time periods (up to about 500 years). The tests are assisted by computed models established for the project. The long-term safety aspects to be studied include such conditions as permeability changes due to mechanical impacts, circulation conditions at the roadside, and the serviceable life and efficiency of the sealing components. (DG) [de

  4. Whitecaps, sea-salt aerosols, and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguelova, Magdalena Dimitrova

    Oceanic whitecaps are the major source of sea-salt aerosols. Because these aerosols are dominant in remote marine air, they control the radiative properties of the clean background atmosphere by scattering sunlight, changing cloud properties and lifetime, and providing media for chemical reactions. Including sea-salt effects in climate models improves predictions, but simulating their generation is first necessary. To make the sea-salt generation function currently used in climate models more relevant for aerosol investigations, this study proposes two modifications. First, the conventional relation between whitecap coverage, W, and the 10-meter wind speed, U10, used in typical generation functions is expanded to include additional factors that affect whitecaps and sea-salt aerosol formation. Second, the sea-salt generation function is extended to smaller sizes; sea-salt aerosol with initial radii from 0.4 to 20 mum can now be modeled. To achieve these goals, this thesis develops a new method for estimating whitecap coverage on a global scale using satellite measurements of the brightness temperature of the ocean surface. Whitecap coverage evaluated with this method incorporates the effects of atmospheric stability, sea-surface temperature, salinity, wind fetch, wind duration, and the amount of surface-active material. Assimilating satellite-derived values for whitecap coverage in the sea-salt generation function incorporates the effects of all environmental factors on sea-salt production and predicts realistic sea-salt aerosol loadings into the atmosphere. An extensive database of whitecap coverage and sea-salt aerosol fluxes has been compiled with the new method and is used to investigate their spatial and temporal characteristics. The composite effect of all environmental factors suggests a more uniform latitudinal distribution of whitecaps and sea-salt aerosols than that predicted from wind speed alone. The effect of sea-surface temperature, TS, is

  5. SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1959-01-20

    It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

  6. complexes bearing pyridine-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bromopyridine with 1- substituted imidazoles. These imidazolium salts (1a–d) were successfully employed as ligand precursors for the syntheses of new ruthenium(II) complexes bearing neutral bidentate ligands of N-heterocyclic carbene and pyridine ...

  7. Ruthenium(II) complexes bearing pyridine-functionalized N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bromopyridine with 1- substituted imidazoles. These imidazolium salts (1a–d) were successfully employed as ligand precursors for the syntheses of new ruthenium(II) complexes bearing neutral bidentate ligands of N-heterocyclic carbene and.

  8. Ruthenium (II) complexes bearing pyridine-functionalized N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bromopyridine with 1- substituted imidazoles. These imidazolium salts (1a–d) were successfully employed as ligand precursors for the syntheses of new ruthenium(II) complexes bearing neutral bidentate ligands of N-heterocyclic carbene and pyridine ...

  9. Alternative methods of salt disposal at the seven salt sites for a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This study discusses the various alternative salt management techniques for the disposal of excess mined salt at seven potentially acceptable nuclear waste repository sites: Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties, Texas; Richton and Cypress Creek Domes, Mississippi; Vacherie Dome, Louisiana; and Davis and Lavender Canyons, Utah. Because the repository development involves the underground excavation of corridors and waste emplacement rooms, in either bedded or domed salt formations, excess salt will be mined and must be disposed of offsite. The salt disposal alternatives examined for all the sites include commercial use, ocean disposal, deep well injection, landfill disposal, and underground mine disposal. These alternatives (and other site-specific disposal methods) are reviewed, using estimated amounts of excavated, backfilled, and excess salt. Methods of transporting the excess salt are discussed, along with possible impacts of each disposal method and potential regulatory requirements. A preferred method of disposal is recommended for each potentially acceptable repository site. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  10. The Strategy of Welfare Improvement for Salt Farmers in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudaryana Bambang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now, production of salt in Indonesia is done by salt farmers and PT. Garam Indonesia as the only state company that produces salt. As the perpetrators of production which contribute greatly to the national salt production, salt farmer is considered not prosperous. In general, they depend on marine and coastal resources, use requires large investment and rely heavily on season. Climate and weather conditions that are often hostile, the price mechanism and the salt market tend to be contrast to the condition of farmers, this is what makes salt business is risky. The goals of this research are: 1. Improving the Welfare of salt farmers through a focused and effective empowerment. 2. Improving government’spolicies on salt. To conclude, Empowerment of salt farmers in Indonesia should be focused and effective, salt governance and policy revisions significantly affect the welfare of salt farmers.

  11. Systematic Evaluation of Salt Cavern Well Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B. L.; Lord, D. L.; Lord, A. S.; Bettin, G.; Sobolik, S. R.; Park, B. Y.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) holds a reserve of crude oil ( 700 million barrels) to help ease any interruptions in oil import to the United States. The oil is stored in a set of 63 underground caverns distributed across four sites along the U.S. Gulf Coast. The caverns were solution mined into salt domes at each of the four sites. The plastic nature of the salt is beneficial for the storage of crude oil as it heals any fractures that may occur in the salt. The SPR is responsible for operating and maintaining the nearly 120 wells used to access the storage caverns over operational lifetimes spanning decades. Salt creep can induce deformation of the well casing which must be remediated to insure cavern and well integrity. This is particularly true at the interface between the plastic salt and the rigid caprock. The Department of Energy, the SPR Management and Operations contractor, and Sandia National Laboratories has developed a multidimensional well-grading system for the salt cavern access wells. This system is designed to assign numeric grades to each well indicating its risk of losing integrity and remediation priority. The system consists of several main components which themselves may consist of sub-components. The main components consider such things as salt cavern pressure history, results from geomechanical simulations modeling salt deformation, and measurements of well casing deformation due to salt creep. In addition, the geology of the salt domes and their overlying caprock is also included in the grading. These multiple factors are combined into summary values giving the monitoring and remediation priority for each well. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  12. Method for estimating road salt contamination of Norwegian lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitterød, Nils-Otto; Wike Kronvall, Kjersti; Turtumøygaard, Stein; Haaland, Ståle

    2013-04-01

    Consumption of road salt in Norway, used to improve winter road conditions, has been tripled during the last two decades, and there is a need to quantify limits for optimal use of road salt to avoid further environmental harm. The purpose of this study was to implement methodology to estimate chloride concentration in any given water body in Norway. This goal is feasible to achieve if the complexity of solute transport in the landscape is simplified. The idea was to keep computations as simple as possible to be able to increase spatial resolution of input functions. The first simplification we made was to treat all roads exposed to regular salt application as steady state sources of sodium chloride. This is valid if new road salt is applied before previous contamination is removed through precipitation. The main reasons for this assumption are the significant retention capacity of vegetation; organic matter; and soil. The second simplification we made was that the groundwater table is close to the surface. This assumption is valid for major part of Norway, which means that topography is sufficient to delineate catchment area at any location in the landscape. Given these two assumptions, we applied spatial functions of mass load (mass NaCl pr. time unit) and conditional estimates of normal water balance (volume of water pr. time unit) to calculate steady state chloride concentration along the lake perimeter. Spatial resolution of mass load and estimated concentration along the lake perimeter was 25 m x 25 m while water balance had 1 km x 1 km resolution. The method was validated for a limited number of Norwegian lakes and estimation results have been compared to observations. Initial results indicate significant overlap between measurements and estimations, but only for lakes where the road salt is the major contribution for chloride contamination. For lakes in catchments with high subsurface transmissivity, the groundwater table is not necessarily following the

  13. Molten salt oxidation of organic hazardous waste with high salt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chengqian; Chi, Yong; Jin, Yuqi; Jiang, Xuguang; Buekens, Alfons; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Jian

    2018-02-01

    Organic hazardous waste often contains some salt, owing to the widespread use of alkali salts during industrial manufacturing processes. These salts cause complications during the treatment of this type of waste. Molten salt oxidation is a flameless, robust thermal process, with inherent capability of destroying the organic constituents of wastes, while retaining the inorganic ingredients in the molten salt. In the present study, molten salt oxidation is employed for treating a typical organic hazardous waste with a high content of alkali salts. The hazardous waste derives from the production of thiotriazinone. Molten salt oxidation experiments have been conducted using a lab-scale molten salt oxidation reactor, and the emissions of CO, NO, SO 2 , HCl and dioxins are studied. Impacts are investigated from the composition of the molten salts, the types of feeding tube, the temperature of molten carbonates and the air factor. Results show that the waste can be oxidised effectively in a molten salt bath. Temperature of molten carbonates plays the most important role. With the temperature rising from 600 °C to 750 °C, the oxidation efficiency increases from 91.1% to 98.3%. Compared with the temperature, air factor has but a minor effect, as well as the composition of the molten salts and the type of feeding tube. The molten carbonates retain chlorine with an efficiency higher than 99.9% and the emissions of dioxins are below 8 pg TEQ g -1 sample. The present study shows that molten salt oxidation is a promising alternative for the disposal of organic hazardous wastes containing a high salt content.

  14. Analog modeling and kinematic restoration of inverted hangingwall synclinal basins developed above syn-kinematic salt: Application to the Lusitanian and Parentis basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Maria; Vidal-Royo, Oskar; McClay, Ken; Ferrer, Oriol; Muñoz, Josep Anton

    2017-04-01

    The formation of hagingwall syncline basins is basically constrained by the geometry of the basement-involved fault, but also by salt distribution . The formation of such basins is common around the Iberian Peninsula (e.g. Lusitanian, Parentis, Basque-Cantabian, Cameros and Organyà basins) where Upper Triassic (Keuper) salt governed their polyphasic Mesozoic extension and their subsequent Alpine inversion. In this scenario, a precise interpretation of the sub-salt faults geometry and a reconstruction of the initial salt thickness are key to understand the kinematic evolution of such basins. Using an experimental approach (sandbox models) and these Mesozoic basins as natural analogues, the aim of this work is to: 1) investigate the main parameters that controlled the formation and evolution of hagingwall syncline basins analyzing the role of syn-kinematic salt during extension and subsequent inversion; and 2) quantify the deformation and salt mobilization based on restoration of analog model cross sections. The experimental results demonstrate that premature welds are developed by salt deflation with consequent upward propagation of the basal fault in salt-bearing rift systems with a large amount of extension,. In contrast, thicker salt inhibits the upward fault propagation, which results into a further salt migration and development of a hagingwall syncline basins flanked by salt walls. The inherited extensional architecture as well as salt continuity dramatically controlled subsequent inversion. Shortening initially produced the folding and the uplift of the synclinal basins. Minor reverse faults form as a consequence of overtightening of welded diapir stems. However, no trace of reverse faulting is found around diapirs stems, as ductile unit is still available for extrusion, squeezing and accommodation of shortening. Restoration of the sandbox models has demonstrated that this is a powerful tool to unravel the complex structures in the models and this may

  15. Permanent Disposal of Nuclear Waste in Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, F. D.

    2016-12-01

    Salt formations hold promise for eternal removal of nuclear waste from our biosphere. Germany and the United States have ample salt formations for this purpose, ranging from flat-bedded formations to geologically mature dome structures. Both nations are revisiting nuclear waste disposal options, accompanied by extensive collaboration on applied salt repository research, design, and operation. Salt formations provide isolation while geotechnical barriers reestablish impermeability after waste is placed in the geology. Between excavation and closure, physical, mechanical, thermal, chemical, and hydrological processes ensue. Salt response over a range of stress and temperature has been characterized for decades. Research practices employ refined test techniques and controls, which improve parameter assessment for features of the constitutive models. Extraordinary computational capabilities require exacting understanding of laboratory measurements and objective interpretation of modeling results. A repository for heat-generative nuclear waste provides an engineering challenge beyond common experience. Long-term evolution of the underground setting is precluded from direct observation or measurement. Therefore, analogues and modeling predictions are necessary to establish enduring safety functions. A strong case for granular salt reconsolidation and a focused research agenda support salt repository concepts that include safety-by-design. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Author: F. D. Hansen, Sandia National Laboratories

  16. Site characterization plan: Gulf Coast salt domes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for developing technology and providing facilities for safe, environmentally acceptable, permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation has been intensively investigating Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin salt domes and bedded salt in Texas and Utah since 1978. In the Gulf Coast, the application of screening criteria in the region phase led to selection of eight domes for further study in the location phase. Further screening in the area phase identified four domes for more intensive study in the location phase: Oakwood Dome, Texas; Vacherie Dome, Louisiana; and Richton Dome and Cypress Creek Dome, Mississippi. For each dome, this Site Characterization Plan identifies specific hydrologic, geologic, tectonic, geochemical, and environmental key issues that are related to the DOE/NWTS screening criteria or affect the feasibility of constructing an exploratory shaft. The Site Characterization Plan outlines studies need to: (1) resolve issues sufficiently to allow one or more salt domes to be selected and compared to bedded salt sites in order to determine a prime salt site for an exploratory shaft; (2) conduct issue-related studies to provide a higher level of confidence that the preferred salt dome site is viable for construction of an exploratory shaft; and (3) provide a vehicle for state input to issues. Extensive references, 7 figures, 20 tables

  17. Salted fish and nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R W; Eng, A C

    1983-01-01

    The evidence for a hypothesis that eating salted fish is associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is reviewed. The hypothesis was tested among Malaysian Chinese using a matched case-control design. The kinds of salted fish and patterns of use were also investigated in a control group comprising 100 Chinese, 50 Malay and 50 Indian households. During 1980, in Selangor, Malaysia, interviews with 100 Chinese cases of NPC and 100 non-disease controls indicated that salted fish consumption during childhood was a significant risk (relative risk = 3.0, P = 0.04), with an elevated risk for daily as opposed to less frequent consumption. Salted fish consumption during adolescence was a less significant risk, and current consumption not at all. There were 19 kinds of fishes reported as being eaten as salted fish by the 200 control households. There were marked differences between ethnic groups in preference for different kinds: Chinese preferred red snapper (74% of households), Malay jewfish (54%) and Indian red snapper (28%). Salted fish was hardly ever eaten daily by any household; weekly was a moderate frequency in all ethnic groups; less than weekly most common. There were no statistically significant differences between Chinese NPC case and non-disease control participants in kind of salted fish eaten. Results were the same when the data were analyzed by sex, subethnic group and income.

  18. Spectroscopic Characterization of Omeprazole and Its Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Vrbanec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During drug development, it is important to have a suitable crystalline form of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API. Mostly, the basic options originate in the form of free base, acid, or salt. Substances that are stable only within a certain pH range are a challenge for the formulation. For the prazoles, which are known to be sensitive to degradation in an acid environment, the formulation is stabilized with alkaline additives or with the application of API formulated as basic salts. Therefore, preparation and characterization of basic salts are needed to monitor any possible salinization of free molecules. We synthesized salts of omeprazole from the group of alkali metals (Li, Na, and K and alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca. The purpose of the presented work is to demonstrate the applicability of vibrational spectroscopy to discriminate between the OMP and OMP-salt molecules. For this reason, the physicochemical properties of 5 salts were probed using infrared and Raman spectroscopy, NMR, TG, DSC, and theoretical calculation of vibrational frequencies. We found out that vibrational spectroscopy serves as an applicable spectroscopic tool which enables an accurate, quick, and nondestructive way to determine the characteristic of OMP and its salts.

  19. Use of structured decision making to identify monitoring variables and management priorities for salt marsh ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckles, Hilary A.; Lyons, James E.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Shriver, W. Gregory; Adamowicz, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Most salt marshes in the USA have been degraded by human activities, and coastal managers are faced with complex choices among possible actions to restore or enhance ecosystem integrity. We applied structured decision making (SDM) to guide selection of monitoring variables and management priorities for salt marshes within the National Wildlife Refuge System in the northeastern USA. In general, SDM is a systematic process for decomposing a decision into its essential elements. We first engaged stakeholders in clarifying regional salt marsh decision problems, defining objectives and attributes to evaluate whether objectives are achieved, and developing a pool of alternative management actions for achieving objectives. Through this process, we identified salt marsh attributes that were applicable to monitoring National Wildlife Refuges on a regional scale and that targeted management needs. We then analyzed management decisions within three salt marsh units at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, coastal Delaware, as a case example of prioritizing management alternatives. Values for salt marsh attributes were estimated from 2 years of baseline monitoring data and expert opinion. We used linear value modeling to aggregate multiple attributes into a single performance score for each alternative, constrained optimization to identify alternatives that maximized total management benefits subject to refuge-wide cost constraints, and used graphical analysis to identify the optimal set of alternatives for the refuge. SDM offers an efficient, transparent approach for integrating monitoring into management practice and improving the quality of management decisions.

  20. Selective solid-liquid extraction of lithium halide salts using a ditopic macrobicyclic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Joseph M; Beatty, Alicia M; Smith, Bradley D

    2004-11-29

    A ditopic salt receptor that is known to bind and extract solid NaCl, KCl, NaBr, and KBr into organic solution as their contact ion pairs is now shown by NMR and X-ray crystallography to bind and extract solid LiCl and LiBr as water-separated ion pairs. The receptor can transport these salts from an aqueous phase through a liquid organic membrane with a cation selectivity of K+ > Na+ > Li+. However, the selectivity order is strongly reversed when the receptor extracts solid alkali metal chlorides and bromides into organic solution. For a three-component mixture of solid LiCl, NaCl, and KCl, the ratio of salts extracted and complexed to the receptor in CDCl3 was 94:4:2, respectively. The same strong lithium selectivity was also observed in the case of a three-component mixture of solid LiBr, NaBr, and KBr where the ratio of extracted salts was 92:5:3. This observation is attributed to the unusually high solubility of lithium salts in organic solvents. The study suggests that ditopic receptors with an ability to extract solid salts as associated ion pairs may have application in separation processes.

  1. Influence of Hydrophobicity on Polyelectrolyte Complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadman, Kazi [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Wang, Qifeng [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Chen, Yaoyao [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Keshavarz, Bavand [Department; Jiang, Zhang [X-ray; Shull, Kenneth R. [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States

    2017-11-16

    Polyelectrolyte complexes are a fascinating class of soft materials that can span the full spectrum of mechanical properties from low viscosity fluids to glassy solids. This spectrum can be accessed by modulating the extent of electrostatic association in these complexes. However, to realize the full potential of polyelectrolyte complexes as functional materials their molecular level details need to be clearly correlated with their mechanical response. The present work demonstrates that by making simple amendments to the chain architecture it is possible to affect the salt responsiveness of polyelectrolyte complexes in a systematic manner. This is achieved by quaternizing poly(4-vinylpyridine) (QVP) with methyl, ethyl and propyl substituents– thereby increasing the hydrophobicity with increasing side chain length– and complexing them with a common anionic polyelectrolyte, poly(styrene sulfonate). The mechanical 1 ACS Paragon Plus Environment behavior of these complexes is compared to the more hydrophilic system of poly(styrene sulfonate) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium) by quantifying the swelling behavior in response to salt stimuli. More hydrophobic complexes are found to be more resistant to doping by salt, yet the mechanical properties of the complex remain contingent on the overall swelling ratio of the complex itself, following near universal swelling-modulus master curves that are quantified in this work. The rheological behavior of QVP complex coacervates are found to be approximately the same, only requiring higher salt concentrations to overcome strong hydrophobic interactions, demonstrating that hydrophobicity can be used as an important parameter for tuning the stability of polyelectrolyte complexes in general, while still preserving the ability to be processed “saloplastically”.

  2. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alkhaldi, A.A.M.; Martínek, Jan; Panicucci, Brian; Dardonville, C.; Zíková, Alena; de Koning, H.P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-34 ISSN 2211-3207 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1205 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * mitochondrion * FoF1 ATPase * succinate dehydrogenase * phosphonium salt * SDH complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.809, year: 2016

  3. Estimation of effect of inorganic salts on state of melts and carbamide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymnikov, N.S.; Yakunin, N.A.; Baranov, A.V.; Moryganov, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    The character of coordination in the systems carbamide-LiCl and carbamide-CaCl 2 has been shown on the basis of IR spectroscopy data. Interrelation between complexing in the melt carbamide-inorganic salt and thermal resistance of amide compound has been ascertained. 3 refs.; 3 figs

  4. A dynamic nitrogen budget model of a Pacific Northwest salt marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of salt marshes as either nitrogen sinks or sources in relation to their adjacent estuaries has been a focus of ecosystem service research for many decades. The complex hydrology of these systems is driven by tides, upland surface runoff, precipitation, evapotranspirati...

  5. Modeling of Salt Solubilities in Mixed Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiavone-Filho, O.; Rasmussen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    A method to correlate and predict salt solubilities in mixed solvents using a UNIQUAC+Debye-Huckel model is developed. The UNIQUAC equation is applied in a form with temperature-dependent parameters. The Debye-Huckel model is extended to mixed solvents by properly evaluating the dielectric...... constants and the liquid densities of the solvent media. To normalize the activity coefficients, the symmetric convention is adopted. Thermochemical properties of the salt are used to estimate the solubility product. It is shown that the proposed procedure can describe with good accuracy a series of salt...... solubility measurements in aqueous organic solvent mixtures....

  6. Evaluation of constitutive models for crushed salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Hurtado, L.D.; Hansen, F.D.

    1996-05-01

    Three constitutive models are recommended as candidates for describing the deformation of crushed salt. These models are generalized to three-dimensional states of stress to include the effects of mean and deviatoric stress and modified to include effects of temperature, grain size, and moisture content. A database including hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and southeastern New Mexico salt is used to determine material parameters for the models. To evaluate the capability of the models, parameter values obtained from fitting the complete database are used to predict the individual tests. Finite element calculations of a WIPP shaft with emplaced crushed salt demonstrate the model predictions.

  7. Interaction of Bile Salts with β-Cyclodextrins Reveals Nonclassical Hydrophobic Effect and Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2016-04-28

    Herein, we present an endeavor toward exploring the lacuna underlying the host:guest chemistry of inclusion complex formation between bile salt(s) and β-cyclodextrin(s) (βCDs). An extensive thermodynamic investigation based on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrates a dominant contribution from exothermic enthalpy change (ΔH enthalpy-entropy compensation behavior showing indication for almost complete compensation. To this end, we have quantified the interaction of two bile salt molecules (namely, sodium deoxycholate and sodium glycocholate) with a series of varying chemical substituents on the host counterpart, namely, βCD, (2-hydroxypropyl)-βCD, and methyl βCD.

  8. How do salt withdrawal minibasins form? Insights from forward modelling, and implications for hydrocarbon migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Frank J.

    2014-09-01

    Existing models for the initiation of salt withdrawal minibasins focus on the role of triggers that exist within the minibasin, either stratigraphic (e.g. differential deposition) or tectonic (extension, translation or contraction). Existing studies tend to focus on complex settings, such as continental margins, which contain many different potential triggering mechanisms. It can be difficult in these settings to identify which process is responsible for minibasin initiation, or the influence of individual factors on their subsequent development. Salt withdrawal minibasins also exist in simpler settings, without any obvious intrinsic trigger; the region of the North German Basin used by Trusheim (1960) in the classic definition of salt withdrawal geometries was of this nature. There is no overall basal or surface slope, no major lateral movement, and there is no depositional heterogeneity. Previously recognized trigger processes for minibasin initiation do not apply in this benign setting, suggesting that other, potentially more fundamental, influences may be at work. A simple forward-modelling approach shows how, in the absence of any other mechanism, a new minibasin can develop as the consequence of salt movement driven by its neighbour, and families of withdrawal minibasins can propagate across a region from a single seed point. This new mechanism may explain how some minibasins appear to initiate before the sediment density has exceeded that of the underlying salt. The forward modelling also indicates that some minibasins begin to invert to form turtle anticlines before the underlying salt has been evacuated, so that the timing of turtle formation may not be diagnostic of weld formation. This mechanism may also give rise to salt-cored turtles that have a lens of salt trapped beneath their cores. These new findings have implications for hydrocarbon migration and trapping.

  9. High Spatial resolution remote sensing for salt marsh change detection on Fire Island National Seashore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Salt marshes are under increasing pressure due to anthropogenic stressors including sea level rise, nutrient enrichment, herbivory and disturbances. Salt marsh losses risk the important ecosystem services they provide including biodiversity, water filtration, wave attenuation, and carbon sequestration. This study determines salt marsh change on Fire Island National Seashore, a barrier island along the south shore of Long Island, New York. Object-based image analysis was used to classifying Worldview-2, high resolution satellite, and topobathymetric LiDAR. The site was impacted by Hurricane Sandy in October of 2012 causing a breach in the Barrier Island and extensive overwash. In situ training data from vegetation plots were used to train the Random Forest classifier. The object-based Worldview-2 classification achieved an overall classification accuracy of 92.75. Salt marsh change for the study site was determined by comparing the 2015 classification with a 1997 classification. The study found a shift from high marsh to low marsh and a reduction in Phragmites on Fire Island. Vegetation losses were observed along the edge of the marsh and in the marsh interior. The analysis agreed with many of the trends found throughout the region including the reduction of high marsh and decline of salt marsh. The reduction in Phragmites could be due to the species shrinking niche between rising seas and dune vegetation on barrier islands. The complex management issues facing salt marsh across the United States including sea level rise and eutrophication necessitate very high resolution classification and change detection of salt marsh to inform management decisions such as restoration, salt marsh migration, and nutrient inputs.

  10. Use of Li.sub.2[B.sub.12H.sub.12] salt to absorb water into polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Eric A.; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-08-30

    Methods of adjusting the properties of a composition are provided. The compositions comprise a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a hygroscopic salt. Preferred such salts comprise a cage compound selected from the group consisting of borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer.

  11. Palladium-Catalyzed Heck Coupling Reaction of Aryl Bromides in Aqueous Media Using Tetrahydropyrimidinium Salts as Carbene Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Özdemir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and stereoselective catalytic system for the Heck cross coupling reaction using novel 1,3-dialkyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidinium salts (1, LHX and Pd(OAc2 loading has been reported. The palladium complexes derived from the salts 1a-f prepared in situ exhibit good catalytic activity in the Heck coupling reaction of aryl bromides under mild conditions.

  12. Investigating the possible effects of salt in the fault zones on rates of seismicity - insights from analogue and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urai, Janos; Kettermann, Michael; Abe, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    generated seismic events. Based on the results of our models we conclude that if the rocks underlying the salt layer did form dilatant faults in the past, the overlying rock salt could have flown into the open fractures, resulting in the presence of salt lenses inside the fault zones at present. The distribution of salt in the fault zone is controlled by the failure mode of the underlying rocks, the fault geometry, the rate of faulting and the rheology of the overlying salt. The results from the DEM models show that the presence of salt can make the fault behavior dependent on the shear loading rate, resulting in a complex interplay between stick-slip dynamics of fault and visco-elastic behavior of salt.

  13. Dilithium salt of the tetrasilyl substituted cyclobutadiene dianon: synthesis and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, A.; Tanaka, M.; Vatanabe, Kh.; Nakamoto, M.; Matsuo, Ts.

    2004-01-01

    Dilithium salts of cyclobutadiene dianon (CBD 2- ) stabilized by four trimethylsilyl groups were synthesized by means of remetallation of the relevant cobalt complexes with CBD by metallic lithium in tetrahydrofurane. The compounds prepared were characterized by data of X-ray diffraction analysis and NMR spectroscopy, which suggest aromaticity of the four-member cycle. It is pointed out that complexing with lithium cations is of great importance for CBD 2- dianion stabilization [ru

  14. Syn-depositional deformation of the late Zechstein evaporites on the Friesland Platform capturing the early life of a salt giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Alexander; Urai, Janos L.

    2017-04-01

    It is often thought that the deposition of the Zechstein of NE Netherlands took place in a tectonically quiet environment and experienced complex deformation later. While early deformation structures were mostly overprinted by later salt flow, we focused on the Friesland platform, which was only weakly affected by later salt tectonics. In this study, we analyzed the present structures and deformation history with the help of 3D seismic and well data. Results show that the ZIII AC stringer contains (i) a regional network of thicker zones (TZ), and (ii) a network of zones where the stringers are absent, interpreted as ruptures formed by salt flow. These ruptures in many cases mark a clear vertical shift of the sub-horizontal stringer. Mapping of the base salt and top salt reflectors shows that the ruptures often coincide with faults at base Zechstein level, and that the thickness of the post-stringer rock salt layers is thicker where the stringers are lower, while the total salt thickness is relatively constant. We interpret these structures as evidence for movement on the faults at base salt, during Zechstein times, suggesting that late Zechstein deposition was syn-tectonic. Spatial correlation of TZ and these syn-depositional depressions also indicate syn-depositional or very early development of thickening in the ZIII-AC stringer. They are interpreted to reflect the interaction of anhydrite dewatering pathways and dissolution of salt below fracture systems in the stringer localized by the active shear zones in the salt.

  15. Coordination chemistry in fused-salt solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Spectrophotometric work on structural determinations with fused-salt solutions is reviewed. Constraints placed on the method, as well as interpretation of the spectra, are discussed with parallels drawn to aqueous spectrophotometric curves of the same materials.

  16. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes from the fuel cycle of an integral fast reactor (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal fuel. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500 degrees C. This cell has a cadmium anode and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a low-melting mixture of alkaline and alkaline earth chlorides. This paper discusses one method being considered for immobilizing this treated salt, to disperse it in a portland cement-base motar, which would then be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canisters where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material

  17. Assessment of Jordanian salt using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saleh, K.A.; Arafah, D.E.; Jabr, I.J.; Saleh, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    Elemental study and concentration determinations have been conducted on Jordanian crude salt using Rutherford Back-Scattering (RBS) and X-ray Fluorescence (SRF) spectrometry techniques. Analysis have also been carried out on different purified salt samples available in the local market. The concentration of some elements, in particular bromide, content and its significance on human health and nutrition is discussed. Results reveal relatively high traces of elemental concentrations in crude salt. For example, bromide concentration ranges from 178 to 384 ppm in comparison to a tolerance limit of 30 ppm set by the Unites States Food and Drug Administration (USDA) and other International Agencies like FAO/WHO. It is suggested that refining crude salt may result in a reduction of bromide concentration and other traces considerably, thus making it feasible for human consumption

  18. Sodium: How to Tame Your Salt Habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the transition. After a few weeks of cutting back on salt, you probably won't miss ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/sodium/art-20045479 . ...

  19. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  20. Nitrate salt immobilization process development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, R.D.; Johnson, A.J.; Peter, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The waste nitrate salts generated at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) were determined to be unacceptable in their present form for shipment to and storage at the Nevada Test Site, according to the recently implemented Waste Acceptance Criteria. A reduction in the dispersibility and oxidizing potential of the salt was necessary. Various methods of immobilization were investigated to determine the waste form with the highest possible waste loading and the most cost effective processing. Portland cement was selected as the most effective binder (in terms of cost and performance), with a 55 wt % waste loading and a 1.5 water-to-cement ratio. A nitrate salt immobilization process has been installed in the liquid waste processing building. The process uses dry nitrate salts from the existing spray dryer, spray dryer feed solution, and Portland cement. The resulting waste grout is packaged in a plastic lined, corrugated fiberboard tri-wall box, and shipped to the Nevada Test Site for burial

  1. Oregon Salt Marshes: How Blue are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

  2. Plutonium and americium separation from salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, P.G.; Miner, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution

  3. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  4. Potential for creation of a salt dome following disposal of radioactive waste in a salt layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charo, L.; Habib, P.

    1987-01-01

    The study aims at quantifying the possibility of creation of a salt dome from a salt layer in which heat-emitting radioactive waste would be buried. Volume 1 describes the results of numerical computer simulations, and of laboratory-scale models in centrifuges. Volume 2 envisages, in a geological perspective, the origin of salt domes, the mechanisms of their formation, and the associated parameters [fr

  5. SALT4: a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity code for thermomechanical analysis in bedded salt deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    SALT4 is a two-dimensional analytical/displacement-discontinuity code designed to evaluate temperatures, deformation, and stresses associated with underground disposal of radioactive waste in bedded salt. This code was developed by the University of Minnesota. This documentation describes the mathematical equations of the physical system being modeled, the numerical techniques utilized, and the organization of the computer code, SALT4. The SALT4 code takes into account: (1) viscoelastic behavior in the pillars adjacent to excavations; (2) transversely isotropic elastic moduli such as those exhibited by bedded or stratified rock; and (2) excavation sequence. Major advantages of the SALT4 code are: (1) computational efficiency; (2) the small amount of input data required; and (3) a creep law consistent with laboratory experimental data for salt. The main disadvantage is that some of the assumptions in the formulation of SALT4, i.e., temperature-independent material properties, render it unsuitable for canister-scale analysis or analysis of lateral deformation of the pillars. The SALT4 code can be used for parameter sensitivity analyses of two-dimensional, repository-scale, thermal and thermomechanical response in bedded salt during the excavation, operational, and post-closure phases. It is especially useful in evaluating alternative patterns and sequences of excavation or waste canister placement. SALT4 can also be used to verify fully numerical codes. This is similar to the use of analytic solutions for code verification. Although SALT4 was designed for analysis of bedded salt, it is also applicable to crystalline rock if the creep calculation is suppressed. In Section 1.5 of this document the code custodianship and control is described along with the status of verification, validation and peer review of this report

  6. Potential for creation of a salt dome following disposal of radioactive waste in a salt layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, G.

    1987-01-01

    The study aims at quantifying the possibility of creation of a salt dome from a salt layer in which heat-emitting radioactive waste would be buried. Volume 1 describes the results of numerical computer simulations, and of laboratory-scale models in centrifuges. Volume 2 envisages, in a geological perspective, the origin of salt domes, the mechanisms of thei formation, and the associated parameters [fr

  7. Cum grano salis - NAA of selected salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauser, G.; Sterba, J.H.; Poljanc, K.; Bichler, M.; Buchtela, K.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the trace element concentrations of salt samples from different regions, in particular Austria, Germany, Pakistan, Poland, Switzerland, and Ukraine. Investigated types of salt were Rock-, Sea-, Lake-, and Evaporated Salt. The main objective was to find out whether the consumption of salt can contribute significantly to the daily human requirements of trace elements. Therefore, trace element concentrations in the untreated samples were compared to those of specially treated samples, simulating digestive uptake using a simple model. Salt is a non-trivial matrix for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) because of very high background activities from 38 Cl and 24 Na, as well as the bremsstrahlung of 32 P (originating from 35 Cl(n,α) 32 P). Because of this fact, detection limits in salt are higher compared to other matrices. Nevertheless, several elements could be detected, namely Al, Ba, Br, (Ca), Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, and Zn, some of them only in single samples. In most samples the concentrations of trace elements in salt were too low to show biological effects. Salt can therefore only significantly contribute the essential elements sodium, chlorine, and, if added on purpose, fluorine and iodine to human nutrition. The contribution of all other traces in salt to the average daily human requirements can be neglected. Thus, from an analytical point of view, there is no health reason to use unpurified salt. There are, however, a few drawbacks to the use of unpurified salt, as hygroscopic compounds like MgCl 2 , and even toxic heavy metals like chromium or thorium. Especially rare earth element (REE) concentrations can often be used to obtain a chemical fingerprint, which can be used to identify the origin of an unknown sample. In the case of this study, the sample number from each region was too small to collect significant data. Therefore more analytical information is needed

  8. Comments on a letter by George D. DeBuchananne (US Geological Survey) regarding the use of salt domes for high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) concluded in a letter to the US Department of Energy, dated March 7, 1981, that subsurface geologic conditions in bedded salt are more predictable and less complex than those in domal salt. This predictability is equated with the relative suitability of bedded and domal salt as repository host media. This report comments on the USGS letter. The key points made are as follows: Complexities which may exist in the geologic setting of a salt dome (or other potential host medium) should not a priori preclude the dome from being an acceptable host medium for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. Predictability, as used by the USGS, focused on the spatial extrapolation of information on geologic conditions and should not be confused with predicting the performance of a repository. Notwithstanding the general characteristics of bedded and domal salt, there are salt domes whose individual characteristics should make them as acceptable as potential bedded salt areas for HLW repository sites. Complexities which may occur in the geologic setting of a salt dome can be explored and characterized with sufficient accuracy by available techniques

  9. Monitoring change in Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.; Angeroth, Cory E.; Freeman, Michael L.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Carling, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake, only limited water quality monitoring has occurred historically. To change this, new monitoring stations and networks—gauges of lake level height and rate of inflow, moored buoys, and multiple lake-bottom sensors—will provide important information that can be used to make informed decisions regarding future management of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem.

  10. Molten salts processes and generic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    Development of dry separation process (pyrochemical process) using molten salts for the application of spent-nuclear fuel reprocessing requires a rather complete fundamental database as well as process simulation technique with wide applicability. The present report concerns recent progress and problems in this field taking behaviors of co-electrodeposition of UO 2 and PuO 2 in molten salts as an example, and using analytical simulation of local equilibrium combined with generic diffusion. (S. Ohno)

  11. Molten salts processes and generic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    Development of dry separation process (pyrochemical process) using molten salts for the application of spent-nuclear fuel reprocessing requires a rather complete fundamental database as well as process simulation technique with wide applicability. The present report concerns recent progress and problems in this field taking behaviors of co-electrodeposition of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} in molten salts as an example, and using analytical simulation of local equilibrium combined with generic diffusion. (S. Ohno)

  12. DNA nanosensor surface grafting and salt dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, B. G.; Fagundes, J.; Martin, A. A.; Raniero, L.; Favero, P. P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we investigated the Paracoccidoides brasiliensis fungus nanosensor by simulations of simple strand DNA grafting on gold nanoparticle. In order to improve the knowledge of nanoparticle environment, the addiction of salt solution was studied at the models proposed by us. Nanoparticle and DNA are represented by economic models validated by us in this paper. In addition, the DNA grafting and salt influences are evaluated by adsorption and bond energies calculations. This theoretical evaluation gives support to experimental diagnostics techniques of diseases.

  13. Electrochemical ion separation in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Ihlefeld, Jon; Waldrip, Karen; Wheeler, Jill S.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.

    2017-12-19

    A purification method that uses ion-selective ceramics to electrochemically filter waste products from a molten salt. The electrochemical method uses ion-conducting ceramics that are selective for the molten salt cations desired in the final purified melt, and selective against any contaminant ions. The method can be integrated into a slightly modified version of the electrochemical framework currently used in pyroprocessing of nuclear wastes.

  14. Managing mainland salt marshes for breeding birds

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Wadden Sea region is one of the most important breeding areas in Western Europe for coastal breeding bird species. It is expected that management of salt marshes is important for successful conservation of breeding bird populations but the impact of management on the habitat quality for breeding birds is still not fully understood. In this study the effects of management on the three crucial habitat characteristics for breeding birds were studied on mainland salt marshes: effects of manag...

  15. Salt toxicosis in waterfowl in North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windingstad, Ronald M.; Kartch, Fred X.; Stroud, Richard K.; Smith, Milton R.

    1987-01-01

    About 150 waterfowl died and another 250 became weak and lethargic from suspected salt poisoning after using White Lake, a highly saline lake in Mountrail County, North Dakota. Frigid temperatures made fresh water unavailable, forcing the birds to ingest the saline waters with resultant toxic effects. Sick birds recovered when removed from the salt water and released into fresh water marshes. Brain sodium levels were higher in dead geese submitted for necropsy than in controls.

  16. Salt on roads and the environment (VB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessberg, Philipp von; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2000-01-01

    This report descripes the extent of use of salt on roads in Denmark and the environmental consequences of this. Alternative strategies for reducing the risk of greasy roads and different ways of alleviating the vegetation are also discussed.The different consequences for the environment that this...... that this report discusses are:- The ground water.- Lakes and streams.- Plants and trees along roads.The consequences for the economy through usage of salt on roads has not been carried out....

  17. [Formation of purple membranes during salt bacteria cultivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekulaeva, L N; Korolev, Iu N; Telegin, N L; Rikhireva, G T

    1975-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on cultivation of halophile with probe selection in the interval of 1--2 hours to record the spectra of repeated disturbed completed inner reflection. Periodicity in the changes of spectral characteristics of the culture with the interval of 20--24 hours is revealed. A clearly expressed dichroism of the amid II band of the membrane complex is found, the absence of this dichroism in the protein isolated from the membrane complex is stated. It is suggested that dichroism revealed is a specific feature of the presence of purpuric membranes in the cells. Spontaneous plane orientation of protein macromolecules in purpuric membranes is established. The level of dichroism of amid II band is shown to depend on fermentation conditions of salt bacteria.

  18. Water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and simulation of water and salt movement through the causeway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Steven R.; Thomas, Blakemore E.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    1997-01-01

    The water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake primarily depends on the amount of inflow from tributary streams and the conveyance properties of a causeway constructed during 1957-59 that divides the lake into the south and north parts. The conveyance properties of the causeway originally included two culverts, each 15 feet wide, and the permeable rock-fill material.During 1980-86, the salt balance changed as a result of record high inflow that averaged 4,627,000 acre-feet annually and modifications made to the conveyance properties of the causeway that included opening a 300-foot-wide breach. In this study, a model developed in 1973 by Waddell and Bolke to simulate the water and salt balance of the lake was revised to accommodate the high water-surface altitude and modifications made to the causeway. This study, done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of State Lands and Forestry, updates the model with monitoring data collected during 1980-86. This report describes the calibration of the model and presents the results of simulations for three hypothetical 10-year periods.During January 1, 1980, to July 31, 1984, a net load of 0.5 billion tons of dissolved salt flowed from the south to the north part of the lake primarily as a result of record inflows. From August 1, 1984, when the breach was opened, to December 31,1986, a net load of 0.3 billion tons of dissolved salt flowed from the north to the south part of the lake primarily as a result of the breach.For simulated inflow rates during a hypothetical 10-year period resulting in the water-surface altitude decreasing from about 4,200 to 4,192 feet, there was a net movement of about 1.0 billion tons of dissolved salt from the south to the north part, and about 1.7 billion tons of salt precipitated in the north part. For simulated inflow rates during a hypothetical 10-year period resulting in a rise in water-surface altitude from about 4,200 to 4

  19. Assessment of crushed salt consolidation and fracture healing processes in a nuclear waste repository in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    For a nuclear waste repository in salt, two aspects of salt behavior are expected to contribute to favorable conditions for waste isolation. First, consolidation of crushed salt backfill due to creep closure of the underground openings may result in a backfill barrier with low permeability. Second, fractures created in the salt by excavation may heal under the influence of stress and temperature following sealing. This report reviews the status of knowledge regarding crushed salt consolidation and fracture healing, provides analyses which predict the rates at which the processes will occur under repository conditions, and develops requirements for future study. Analyses of the rate at which crushed salt will consolidate are found to be uncertain because of unexplained wide variation in the creep properties of crushed salt obtained from laboratory testing, and because of uncertainties in predictions of long term closure rates of openings in salt. This uncertainty could be resolved to a large degree by additional laboratory testing of crushed salt. Similarly, additional testing of fracture healing processes is required to confirm that healing will be effective under repository conditions. Extensive references, 27 figures, 5 tables

  20. 238Pu recovery and salt disposition from the molten salt oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remerowski, M.L.; Stimmel, Jay J.; Wong, Amy S.; Ramsey, Kevin B.

    2000-01-01

    We have begun designing and optimizing our recovery and recycling processes by experimenting with samples of 'spent salt' produced by MSO treatment of surrogate waste in the reaction vessel at the Naval Surface Warfare Center-Indian Head. One salt was produced by treating surrogate waste containing pyrolysis ash spiked with cerium. The other salt contains residues from MSO treatment of materials similar to those used in 238 Pu processing, e.g., Tygon tubing, PVC bagout bags, HDPE bottles. Using these two salt samples, we will present results from our investigations

  1. 238Pu recovery and salt disposition from the molten salt oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remerowski, M. L.; Stimmel, Jay J.; Wong, Amy S.; Ramsey, Kevin B.

    2000-07-01

    We have begun designing and optimizing our recovery and recycling processes by experimenting with samples of "spent salt" produced by MSO treatment of surrogate waste in the reaction vessel at the Naval Surface Warfare Center-Indian Head. One salt was produced by treating surrogate waste containing pyrolysis ash spiked with cerium. The other salt contains residues from MSO treatment of materials similar to those used in 238Pu processing, e.g., Tygon tubing, PVC bagout bags, HDPE bottles. Using these two salt samples, we will present results from our investigations.

  2. Autophagy Is Rapidly Induced by Salt Stress and Is Required for Salt Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Luo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salinity stress challenges agriculture and food security globally. Upon salt stress, plant growth slows down, nutrients are recycled, osmolytes are produced, and reallocation of Na+ takes place. Since autophagy is a high-throughput degradation pathway that contributes to nutrient remobilization in plants, we explored the involvement of autophagic flux in salt stress response of Arabidopsis with various approaches. Confocal microscopy of GFP-ATG8a in transgenic Arabidopsis showed that autophagosome formation is induced shortly after salt treatment. Immunoblotting of ATG8s and the autophagy receptor NBR1 confirmed that the level of autophagy peaks within 30 min of salt stress, and then settles to a new homeostasis in Arabidopsis. Such an induction is absent in mutants defective in autophagy. Within 3 h of salt treatment, accumulation of oxidized proteins is alleviated in the wild-type; however, such a reduction is not seen in atg2 or atg7. Consistently, the Arabidopsis atg mutants are hypersensitive to both salt and osmotic stresses, and plants overexpressing ATG8 perform better than the wild-type in germination assays. Quantification of compatible osmolytes further confirmed that the autophagic flux contributes to salt stress adaptation. Imaging of intracellular Na+ revealed that autophagy is required for Na+ sequestration in the central vacuole of root cortex cells following salt treatment. These data suggest that rapid protein turnover through autophagy is a prerequisite for salt stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  3. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  4. Fault controlled dissolution of bedded rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Neil L.; Knapp, Ralph W. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States); Brown, R. James [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of well log and seismic data suggest that about 40 m of Famennian-age bedded rock salt was uniformly deposited within the Wabamun Group in the Stettler area, southeastern Alberta, Canada. Subsequent to deposition, this original rock salt was leached to the extent that is preserved, now only as isolated-to-contiguous bodies of irregular shape and variable thickness. In the immediate study area, dissolution appears to have been initiated by regional faulting and/or fracturing during the mid-Late Cretaceous, and accentuated thereafter by various large-scale mechanisms including glaciation. In this paper, seismic data across a prominent NNE trending salt-dissolution feature in the Stettler area are presented. In short cross-section, this subsidence feature is manifested as an up-ward-expanding zone of measurable subsidence, characterized by increased structural relief at greater depths, and small-amplitude near-vertical offsets. This subsidence feature is consistent with: the onset of salt dissolution as a result of regional faulting and/or fracturing during mid-Late Cretaceous time; the plastic deformation of rock salt creep; the gradual (as opposed to catastrophic) subsidence of the post-salt strata; and accelerated rates of leaching during the Pleistocene and Holocene in response to glacial loading and unloading. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs

  5. Mass transfer and transport in salt repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-02-01

    Salt is a unique rock isolation of nuclear waste because it is ''dry'' and nearly impermeable. In this paper we summarize some mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. First we analyses brine migration. Heating by high-level waste can cause brine in grain boundaries to move due to pressure-gradients. We analyze brine migration treating salt as a thermoelastic solid and found that brine migration is transient and localized. We use previously developed techniques to estimate release rates from waste packages by diffusion. Interbeds exist in salt and may be conduits for radionuclide migration. We analyze steady-state migration due to brine flow in the interbed, as a function of the Peclet number. Then we analyze transient mass transfer, both into the interbed and directly to salt, due only to diffusion. Finally we compare mass transfer rates of a waste cylinder in granite facing a fracture and in salt facing an interbed. In all cases, numerical illustrations of the analytic solution are given. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed.

  7. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered

  8. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks

  9. Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2011-09-01

    The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

  10. Salt intake in first degree relations of hypertensive and normotensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the salt taste threshold (STT) and salt threshold (STT) and salt intake(SI) in first degree relations of hypertensive and normotensive Nigerians. Hence to determine the relevance of STT in the genesis of hypertension in the Nigerian Africans. The relevance of salt to the development of systemic ...

  11. Detection of salt bridges to lysines in solution in barnase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Williamson, Michael P.; Hounslow, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that salt bridges involving lysines can be detected by deuterium isotope effects on NMR chemical shifts of the sidechain amine. Lys27 in the ribonuclease barnase is salt bridged, and mutation of Arg69 to Lys retains a partially buried salt bridge. The salt bridges are functionally important....

  12. Molecular markers associated with salt tolerance in Egyptian wheats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinity affects plant growth by the osmotic stress of the salt around the roots, as well as by toxicity caused by excessive accumulation of salt in leaves. In the present study, seven common (Triticum aestivum) and two durum (T. turgidum ssp. Durum) wheat genotypes were subjected to salt stress for 2 weeks. Salt stress ...

  13. The effects of naturally occurring impurities in rock salt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we investigate the effect that naturally occurring impurities in salt mines have both on effective permittivity of ... The effect of trapped water in different forms is also evaluated. Keywords. Effective permittivity; salt ... Thus, salt in salt mines (with a theoretical low dielectric permittivity and high purity) can serve as the ...

  14. Supporting a population wide reduction of salt consumption in Costa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    quality of the processed and fast food supply, and trends in dietary salt intake and salt content labeling;. • measure the salt content in key processed food products and fast foods;. • identify school children's knowledge, perceptions, and behaviours on salt and its relation to food labeling and their health, to complement ...

  15. Application of salting-out effect equation to modelling of liquid-liquid distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitsch, H.K.

    1986-03-01

    Physicochemical interpretation of salting-out is reviewed and effects of the medium on liquid-liquid distribution equilibria are described by two non-specific parameters of salting-out agents: total concentration of species in the aqueous phase and water activity. Thus extraction of a given constituent in various media can be forecasted with few data. Different uranyl and technetium (VII) extraction systems are analyzed to show the potentiality of the method. Coextraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate by tributyl phosphate is used to show the possibility of modelling complex distribution systems in industrial conditions [fr

  16. Low molecular weight salts combined with fluorinated solvents for electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Konstantin; Yip, Ka Ki; Lin, Tzu-Yuan; Lei, Norman; Guerrero-Zavala, Guillermo; Kwong, Kristie W.

    2015-11-10

    Provided are electrochemical cells and electrolytes used to build such cells. An electrolyte includes at least one salt having a molecular weight less than about 250. Such salts allow forming electrolytes with higher salt concentrations and ensure high conductivity and ion transport in these electrolytes. The low molecular weight salt may have a concentration of at least about 0.5M and may be combined with one or more other salts, such as linear and cyclic imide salts and/or methide salts. The concentration of these additional salts may be less than that of the low molecular weight salt, in some embodiments, twice less. The additional salts may have a molecular weight greater than about 250. The electrolyte may also include one or more fluorinated solvents and may be capable of maintaining single phase solutions at between about -30.degree. C. to about 80.degree. C.

  17. Mobilization of arsenic, lead, and mercury under conditions of sea water intrusion and road deicing salt application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongbing; Alexander, John; Gove, Brita; Koch, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Water geochemistry data from complexly designed salt-solution injection experiments in the laboratory, coastal aquifers of Bangladesh and Italy, taken from the literature, and two salted watersheds of New Jersey, US were collected and analyzed to study the geochemical mechanisms that mobilize As, Pb, and Hg under varied salting conditions. Overall, increased NaCl-concentrations in aquifers and soil are found to increase the release of Pb and Hg into the water. Reducing environments and possible soil dispersion by hydrated Na+ are found to lead to an increase of As-concentration in water. However, the application of a pure NaCl salt solution in the column injection experiment was found to release less As, Pb, and Hg initially from the soil and delay their concentration increase, when compared to the application of CaCl2 and NaCl mixed salts (at 6:4 weight ratio). The concentration correlation dendrogram statistical analyses of the experimental and field data suggest that the release of As, Hg, and Pb into groundwater and the soil solution depends not only on the salt level and content, but also on the redox condition, dissolved organic matter contents, competitiveness of other ions for exchange sites, and source minerals. With the ongoing over-exploration of coastal aquifers from increased pumping, continued sea-level rise, and increased winter deicing salt applications in salted watersheds of many inland regions, the results of this study will help understand the complex relation between the concentrations of As, Pb, and Hg and increased salt level in a coastal aquifer and in soils of a salted watershed.

  18. Salt-body Inversion with Minimum Gradient Support and Sobolev Space Norm Regularizations

    KAUST Repository

    Kazei, Vladimir

    2017-05-26

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique which solves the ill-posed seismic inversion problem of fitting our model data to the measured ones from the field. FWI is capable of providing high-resolution estimates of the model, and of handling wave propagation of arbitrary complexity (visco-elastic, anisotropic); yet, it often fails to retrieve high-contrast geological structures, such as salt. One of the reasons for the FWI failure is that the updates at earlier iterations are too smooth to capture the sharp edges of the salt boundary. We compare several regularization approaches, which promote sharpness of the edges. Minimum gradient support (MGS) regularization focuses the inversion on blocky models, even more than the total variation (TV) does. However, both approaches try to invert undesirable high wavenumbers in the model too early for a model of complex structure. Therefore, we apply the Sobolev space norm as a regularizing term in order to maintain a balance between sharp and smooth updates in FWI. We demonstrate the application of these regularizations on a Marmousi model, enriched by a chunk of salt. The model turns out to be too complex in some parts to retrieve its full velocity distribution, yet the salt shape and contrast are retrieved.

  19. Salt consumption and the effect of salt on mineral metabolism in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryver, H F; Parker, M T; Daniluk, P D; Pagan, K I; Williams, J; Soderholm, L V; Hintz, H F

    1987-04-01

    The voluntary salt consumption of mature unexercised horses was measured weekly for up to 45 weeks. Voluntary intake among horses was quite variable ranging from 19 to 143 g of salt per day and was inversely related to total salt intake (salt in feeds plus voluntary intake). Mean daily voluntary salt consumption was 53 g. Season of the year did not influence voluntary intake. In preference tests which evaluated every two choice combination of 0.2% and 4% NaCl in test diets fed daily for four days, ponies generally preferred diets containing the lower amount of salt. In similar preference studies which used NaHCO3 as a sodium source, ponies always preferred the diet containing the lower level of NaHCO3. Metabolism studies employing diets containing 1, 3 or 5% NaCl showed that urinary excretion was the major excretory pathway for sodium and chloride. Fecal excretion, intestinal absorption and retention of sodium were not affected by level of salt intake. Urinary calcium excretion was unaffected by salt intake but calcium and phosphorus absorption and retention were enhanced when ponies were fed diets containing 3 or 5% sodium chloride. Magnesium and copper metabolism were unaffected by salt intake. Horses voluntarily consume relatively large amounts of sodium chloride but it is likely that not all voluntary consumption is related to the salt requirement of the horse. Habit and taste preference could also be involved. Salt consumption at the levels used in these studies does not appear to be detrimental to the metabolism of other minerals in the horse.

  20. Chemical and physical parameters of dried salted pork meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronela Cviková

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was analysed and evaluated chemical and physical parameters of dried salted pork neck and ham. Dried salted meat is one of the main meat products typically produced with a variety of flavors and textures. Neck (14 samples and ham (14 samples was salted by nitrite salt mixture during 1week. The nitrite salt mixture for salting process (dry salting was used. This salt mixture contains: salt, dextrose, maltodextrin, flavourings, stabilizer E316, taste enhancer E621, nitrite mixture. The meat samples were dried at 4 °C and relative humudity 85% after 1 week salting. The weight of each sample was approximately 1 kg. After salting were vacuum-packed and analysed after 1 week. The traditional dry-cured meat such as dry-cured ham and neck obtained after 12 - 24 months of ripening under controlled conditions. The average protein content was significantly (p <0.001 lower in dried pork neck in comparison with dried salted pork ham. The average intramuscular fat was significantly (p <0.001 lower in dried pork ham in comparison with dried salted pork neck. The average moisture was significantly lower (p ≤0.05 in dried salted ham in comparison with dried pork neck. The average pH value was 5.50 in dried salted pork ham and 5.75 in dried salted pork neck. The content of arginine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine and threonine in dried salted ham was significantly lower (p <0.001 in comparison with dried salted pork neck. The proportion of analysed amino acids from total proteins was 56.31% in pork salted dried ham and 56.50% in pork salted dried neck.  Normal 0 21 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE

  1. The salt glands of Tamarix usneoides E. Mey. ex Bunge (South African Salt Cedar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hayden; Mycock, David; Weiersbye, Isabel M

    2017-06-03

    Tamarix usneoides is a halophyte tree endemic to south-western Africa. This species is known to excrete a range of ions from specialized glandular structures on its leaves. To understand the mechanisms involved in the transport, sequestration and excretion of ions by the glands, a study was performed on salt gland distribution and ultrastructure. The glands are vesiculated trichomes, comprised of eight cells viz. two basal collecting cells and six excretory cells, partially bounded by a secondary cell wall that could serve as an impermeable barrier, forcing excess ions to move from the apoplast of the surrounding tissue into the cytoplasm of the basal excretory cells. It was hypothesized that the ions are moved across the excretory cells in endocytotic vesicles that fuse with the plasmalemma or form junctional complexes, allowing ion movement from one excretory cell to the next. In the apical cell, the vesicles fuse with the plasmalemma, releasing the ions into the network of cell wall ingrowths which channel the ions to the outside surface of the cell. This study shows that there are distinct structural adaptations for the processing of ions for excretion, although the mechanism by which ions enter the cells still needs to be determined.

  2. Effects of smell loss (hyposmia) on salt usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Robert I

    2014-06-01

    Smell loss (hyposmia) inhibits flavor perception and influences food intake. To compensate for flavor loss, some patients with hyposmia appear to increase salt usage. The purpose of this study was to compare self-reported salt usage in patients with hyposmia with that in normal volunteers. Salt usage was compared in 56 patients with hyposmia but with normal taste function with that in 27 normal volunteers. Salt usage was formulated with respect to 1) a standard quantitative salt intake scale, 2) salt addition related to food intake, 3) intake of foods and beverages with high salt content, and 4) salt intake related to presence or absence of hypertension. Eighteen (32%) of the 56 patients self-reported increased salt usage; they were labeled "increased users." The other 38 hyposmic patients (68%) did not report increased salt usage; they were labeled "non-changers." Increased users estimated their salt usage rose an average 2.8 times that experienced before their hyposmia onset. They also reported adding salt to their food before tasting it and ate more highly salted foods than did the non-changers. Salt usage was not increased further among increased users with hypertension but was increased further among non-changers with hypertension. Salt usage is increased among some patients with hyposmia presumably to enhance flavor perception to compensate for diminished flavor perception related to loss of smell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New Imidazolium and Piperazinium Salts of Pyropheophorbide-a for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Key Shim

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We have designed imidazolium and piperazinium salts of pyropheophorbide-a in order to develop effective photosensitizers which have good solubility in polar and non polar media and to reveal the possible influences of the piperazine and imidazole moieties on the biological activities of pyropheophorbide-a. The phototoxicity of those pyropheophorbide-a salts against A549 cells was studied in vitro and compared with that of pyropheophorbide-a. The result showed that complexing piperazine and imidazole into pyropheophorbide-a decreases its dark toxicity without greatly decreasing phototoxicity and, enhances its phototoxicity without greatly increasing dark toxicity, respectively. This work not only describes novel amphiphilic salt complexes of pyropheophobide-a which retain the biological activities of the parent compound pyropheophorbide-a and could be effective candidate for PDT, but also reveals the possibility of developing effective photosensitizers by complexing imidazole and piperazine into other hydrophobic photosensitizers.

  4. “Use salt and foods high in salt sparingly”: A food-based dietary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Legislating the levels of salt in processed food is only one part of this national strategy. All health professionals and educators should also provide appropriate nutritional recommendations that will educate, motivate and enable consumers to change their nutritional behaviour to reduce salt intake to less than 5 g per day, ...

  5. Uninephrectomy in young age or chronic salt loading causes salt-sensitive hypertension in adult rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlström, Mattias; Sällström, Johan; Skøtt, Ole

    2007-01-01

    animals raised with normal-salt diet (UNX) or high-salt diet (UNX+HS). In the adult animals, renal and cardiovascular functions were evaluated and blood pressure recorded telemetrically under different sodium conditions (normal, high, and low). Hypertension was present in UNX+HS (122+/-9 mm Hg), UNX (101......+/-3 mm Hg), and HS (96+/-1 mm Hg) groups on normal-salt diets compared with the controls (84+/-2 mm Hg), and the blood pressure was salt sensitive (high- versus normal-salt diet; 23+/-3, 9+/-2, 7+/-2, and 1+/-1 mm Hg, respectively). The hypertensive groups (UNX+HS, UNX, and HS) had increased diuresis......The importance of nephron endowment and salt intake for the development of hypertension is under debate. The present study was designed to investigate whether reduced nephron number, after completion of nephrogenesis, or chronic salt loading causes renal injury and salt-sensitive hypertension...

  6. Comparative effects of neutral salt and alkaline salt stress on seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl user 4

    2012-04-27

    Apr 27, 2012 ... Effects of neutral salt (NaCl) and alkaline salt (NaHCO3) stress on seed germination, early seedling growth and ...... J. Northeast. Forest. Univ., 37: 29-32. (in Chinese). Yang CW, Chong JN, Li CY, Kim CM, Shi DC, Wang DL (2007). Osmotic adjustment and ion balance traits of an alkali resistant halophyte.

  7. High salt meals in staff canteens of salt policy makers: observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brewster, L. M.; Berentzen, C. A.; van Montfrans, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the salt content of hot meals served at the institutions of salt policy makers in the Netherlands. Observational study. 18 canteens at the Department of Health, the Health Council, the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, university hospitals, and affiliated non-university

  8. Comparative miRomics of Salt-Tolerant and Salt-Sensitive Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami Kavita

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Increase in soil salt causes osmotic and ionic stress to plants, which inhibits their growth and productivity. Rice production is also hampered by salinity and the effect of salt is most severe at the seedling and reproductive stages. Salainity tolerance is a quantitative property controlled by multiple genes coding for signaling molecules, ion transporters, metabolic enzymes and transcription regulators. MicroRNAs are key modulators of gene-expression that act at the post-transcriptional level by translation repression or transcript cleavage. They also play an important role in regulating plant’s response to salt-stress. In this work we adopted the approach of comparative and integrated data-mining to understand the miRNA-mediated regulation of salt-stress in rice. We profiled and compared the miRNA regulations using natural varieties and transgenic lines with contrasting behaviors in response to salt-stress. The information obtained from sRNAseq, RNAseq and degradome datasets was integrated to identify the salt-deregulated miRNAs, their targets and the associated metabolic pathways. The analysis revealed the modulation of many biological pathways, which are involved in salt-tolerance and play an important role in plant phenotype and physiology. The end modifications of the miRNAs were also studied in our analysis and isomiRs having a dynamic role in salt-tolerance mechanism were identified.

  9. Transient behaviour of deep underground salt caverns; Comportement transitoire des cavites salines profondes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi-Jafari, M

    2007-11-15

    This work deals with the transient behaviour of deep underground salt caverns. It has been shown that a cavern is a complex system, in which there are mechanical, thermal, chemical and hydraulic evolutions. The importance of the transient evolutions, particularly the role of the 'reverse' creep in the interpretation of the tightness test in a salt cavern is revealed. Creep is characterized by a formulation of the behaviour law which presents the advantage, in a practical point of view, to only have a reduced number of parameters while accounting of the essential of what it is observed. The initiation of the rupture in the effective traction in a salt cavern rapidly pressurized is discussed. A model fitted to a very long term behaviour (after abandonment) is developed too. In this case too, a lot of phenomena, more or less coupled, occur, when the existing literature took only into account some phenomena. (O.M.)

  10. Reactions of salts of polycyclic derivatives of hydrogenated indole with potassium iodobismuthate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhareva, E.V.; Savel'eva, G.I.; Yakovleva, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iodobismuthates of five derivatives of hydrogenated indole, namely, strychnine, brucine, physostigmine, pyrazidole, and carbidine, were prepared by treating salts of the latter with potassium iodobismuthate preparations containing different amounts of the addend, and they were isolated and characterized. The iodobismuthates of the monoacid bases (I)-(IV) correspond to a structure of constant composition Ht.HBiI4. The salt of the diacid base carbidine forms different products in reaction with the reagent; their composition depends on the concentration of the addend in the aniono complex. Potassium iodobismuthate is shown to be promising as a reagent for the development of a bismuthometric method for the determination of salts of organic bases in medicinal preparations

  11. Lithium isotope effect in the extraction systems of polyethers: effect of salt concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Shengqiang; Fu Lian

    1991-01-01

    Separation factors of lithium isotopes at 20 deg C were determined in the extraction systems of B15C5-CHCl 3 /LiBr-H 2 O. The initial concentration of LiBr was controlled in the extent of more than 2 mol/l. It may be established that the increase of LiBr concentration causes a remarkable increase of the separation factor. The essence of this effect due to the change in salt concentration was discussed in connection with examination of relevant phenomena in literature. It can be concluded that the relationship between α and Cm, the concentration of lithium salt, is dependent on K Q and K P express respectively, lithium isotope exchange equilibrium constants between Li-crownether complex and hydrated lithium ion for lithium concentration less than 1-2 mol/l, and between lithium salt ion pair and hydrated lithium ion for lithium concentration more than 2 mol/l in aqueous phase

  12. Ionic conductivity in poly(vinyl butyral) based polymeric electrolytes. Effect of solvents and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Shaleen; Agnihotry, S.A. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India); Gupta, V.D. [Lucknow University, Lucknow (India)

    1996-10-29

    Li{sup +} conductive solid polymeric electrolytes (SPEs) have been prepared by complexing Li salts LiX (X=I, SCN, CLO4, CF3SO3) with poly (vinyl butyral) (PVB) an amorphous polymer with a low T{sub g} value and well known for its outstanding laminating properties. These self-supporting SPEs have been prepared by the solution cast technique using cyclohexanone, tetrahydrofuran, and n-butyl alcohol as solvents. The XRD and DSC investigations correlated to measured ionic conductivities have revealed that in addition to the amorphous nature of the resulting complex, its T{sub g} value, the concentration and the values of the lattice energies of the complexing salts, the solvent used in making the SPEs also govern the value of ionic conductivity. Highest ionic conductivity values attained in SPEs made with n-butyl alcohol are explained in terms of the interception of the hydrogen bonding due to solvation

  13. Drug salt formation via mechanochemistry: the case study of vincamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasa, Dritan; Perissutti, Beatrice; Cepek, Cinzia; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Carlino, Elvio; Grassi, Mario; Invernizzi, Sergio; Voinovich, Dario

    2013-01-07

    In the present research a salt of vincamine, a poorly bioavailable indole alkaloid derived from the leaves of Vinca minor L., was synthesized in the solid state by means of a mechanochemical process employing citric acid as a reagent. The mechanochemical process was adopted as a solvent-free alternative to classical citrate synthetic route that involves the use of solvents. Since the mechanochemical salification is little studied to date and presents the disadvantage of offering a low yield, in this work, the influence of three process and formulation variables on the percentage of vincamine citrate was studied. In particular, the time of mechanical treatment (in planetary mill Fritsch P5) and the amount of citric acid were varied in order to evaluate their effect on the yield of the process, and the introduction of a solid solvent, a common pharmaceutical excipient (sodium carboxymethylcellulose, NaCMC), was considered. Due to the complexity of the resulting samples' matrix, an appropriate experimental design was employed to project the experimental trials and the influence of the three variables on the experimental response was estimated with the help of a statistical analysis. The experimental response, that is, the yield of the process corresponding to the percentage of vincamine in the protonated form, was unconventionally calculated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS). Out of 16 samples, the one with the highest yield was the coground sample containing vincamine and citric acid in a 1:2 molar ratio, treated for 60 min in the presence of NaCMC. Under the above conditions the salification reaction was completed highlighting the importance of a proper selection of process and formulation variables of the mechanochemical salification, and emphasizing the crucial role of the solid solvent in facilitating the salification. The second step of the research encompassed the characterization of the citrate salt obtained by solid excipient

  14. 3D modelling in salt tectonic context: the Crocodile minibasin in Sivas (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, Pauline; Pichat, Alexandre; Kergaravat, Charlie; Botella, Arnaud; Caumon, Guillaume; Favreau, Océane; Fuss, Gaétan; Godefroy, Gabriel; Lerat, Marine; Mazuyer, Antoine; Parquer, Marion; Charreau, Julien; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2015-04-01

    Impermeable, with a low density and acting as a viscous fluid at the geological time scale, salt plays a unique tectonic role favouring hydrocarbon trap formations. Halokinetic structures are various and difficult to image with classic seismic techniques. Thus, outcrop analogues are precious and sought after. Since the re-interpretation in September 2011 of its evaporite deposits, the Oligo-Miocene basin of Sivas (Turkey) is a new choice analogue for the study of salt tectonic with outstanding outcrops reflecting the variety of salt related structures: minibasins, diapirs, welds... While studying these structures requires an important field work, building 3D models becomes an interesting way to better help understanding the three-dimensional organisation and to further perform numerical simulations (e.g., restoration, potential field measurement campaign simulation). The complex geometries observed in salt tectonic context make these 3D geological models particularly challenging to build, especially when only outcrops data are available. We focus on the Crocodile minibasin (Sivas) and present a modelling strategy using a subtle combination of recently developed techniques. Available data are: a Digital Elevation Model, satellite images and associated interpreted bedding traces on topography, orientation measurements of the strata and a conceptual interpretation. Located on an ancient salt extrusion, this minibasin is filled with lacustrine and sabkha sediments. It is interpreted with a closed synclinal structure on North. On its southern part, a central diapir has risen up, separating two tightened synclinals. The salt surface is modelled first as a triangulated surface using a classical explicit surface patch construction method and a manual post-process mesh improvement. Then, the minibasin sediments are modelled with an implicit approach that considers interfaces as equipotentials of a 3D scalar field. This requires to build a volumetric mesh conformable to the

  15. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  16. Pore-scale dynamics of salt transport and distribution in drying porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, water quality, and mineral-fluid interactions. We applied synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography to investigate the pore-scale dynamics of dissolved salt distribution in a three dimensional drying saline porous media using a cylindrical plastic column (15 mm in height and 8 mm in diameter) packed with sand particles saturated with CaI2 solution (5% concentration by mass) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 μm and 30 min, respectively. Every time the drying sand column was set to be imaged, two different images were recorded using distinct synchrotron x-rays energies immediately above and below the K-edge value of Iodine. Taking the difference between pixel gray values enabled us to delineate the spatial and temporal distribution of CaI2 concentration at pore scale. Results indicate that during early stages of evaporation, air preferentially invades large pores at the surface while finer pores remain saturated and connected to the wet zone at bottom via capillary-induced liquid flow acting as evaporating spots. Consequently, the salt concentration increases preferentially in finer pores where evaporation occurs. Higher salt concentration was observed close to the evaporating surface indicating a convection-driven process. The obtained salt profiles were used to evaluate the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation (CDE). Results show that the macro-scale CDE could capture the overall trend of the measured salt profiles but fail to produce the exact slope of the profiles. Our results shed new insight on the physics of salt transport and its complex dynamics in drying porous media and establish synchrotron x-ray tomography as an effective tool to investigate the dynamics of salt transport in porous media at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  17. Quaternary geology of Vacherie salt dome, north Louisiana salt dome basin. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, C.R.; Holmes, J.C.; Alford, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    This volume comprises 14 appendices: lineations on Vacherie and Rayburn's domes (1977); possible geomorphic influence of Vacherie salt dome on the Quaternary fluvial geomorphology of Bashaway Creek (1980); remote sensing and analysis of radar imagery (1978); uphole seismic survey at Vacherie salt dome (1977); electrical resistivity survey at Vacherie salt dome (1978); pedologic investigations (1977); ionium-thorium dating of ironstones from terrace deposits, Vacherie salt dome, North Louisiana (1978); grain-shape and grain-surface studies (1981); the terrace concept - Gulf Coastal Plain (1981); interpretation of Quaternary sediments along lines of seismic shot hole (1976); topographic lows above domes (1977); structural significance of topographic lows above North Louisiana salt domes (1981); diagnostic microfossils - Vacherie dome (1978); and development of stratigraphy above Vacherie dome from Cretaceous to Sparta times (1982)

  18. Stabilization Using Phosphate Bonded Ceramics. Salt Containing Mixed Waste Treatment. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference No. 117

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex there are large inventories of homogeneous mixed waste solids, such as wastewater treatment residues, fly ashes, and sludges that contain relatively high concentrations (greater than 15% by weight) of salts. The inherent solubility of salts (e.g., nitrates, chlorides, and sulfates) makes traditional treatment of these waste streams difficult, expensive, and challenging. One alternative is low-temperature stabilization by chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). The process involves reacting magnesium oxide with monopotassium phosphate with the salt waste to produce a dense monolith. The ceramic makes a strong environmental barrier, and the metals are converted to insoluble, low-leaching phosphate salts. The process has been tested on a variety of surrogates and actual mixed waste streams, including soils, wastewater, flyashes, and crushed debris. It has also been demonstrated at scales ranging from 5 to 55 gallons. In some applications, the CBPC technology provides higher waste loadings and a more durable salt waste form than the baseline method of cementitious grouting. Waste form test specimens were subjected to a variety of performance tests. Results of waste form performance testing concluded that CBPC forms made with salt wastes meet or exceed both RCRA and recommended Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) low-level waste (LLW) disposal criteria. Application of a polymer coating to the CBPC may decrease the leaching of salt anions, but continued waste form evaluations are needed to fully assess the deteriorating effects of this leaching, if any, over time.

  19. Stabilization Using Phosphate Bonded Ceramics. Salt Containing Mixed Waste Treatment. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference No. 117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex there are large inventories of homogeneous mixed waste solids, such as wastewater treatment residues, fly ashes, and sludges that contain relatively high concentrations (greater than 15% by weight) of salts. The inherent solubility of salts (e.g., nitrates, chlorides, and sulfates) makes traditional treatment of these waste streams difficult, expensive, and challenging. One alternative is low-temperature stabilization by chemically bonded phosphate ceramics (CBPCs). The process involves reacting magnesium oxide with monopotassium phosphate with the salt waste to produce a dense monolith. The ceramic makes a strong environmental barrier, and the metals are converted to insoluble, low-leaching phosphate salts. The process has been tested on a variety of surrogates and actual mixed waste streams, including soils, wastewater, flyashes, and crushed debris. It has also been demonstrated at scales ranging from 5 to 55 gallons. In some applications, the CBPC technology provides higher waste loadings and a more durable salt waste form than the baseline method of cementitious grouting. Waste form test specimens were subjected to a variety of performance tests. Results of waste form performance testing concluded that CBPC forms made with salt wastes meet or exceed both RCRA and recommended Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) low-level waste (LLW) disposal criteria. Application of a polymer coating to the CBPC may decrease the leaching of salt anions, but continued waste form evaluations are needed to fully assess the deteriorating effects of this leaching, if any, over time.

  20. Alternatives for definse waste-salt disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, R.W.; McDonell, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Alternatives for disposal of decontaminated high-level waste salt at Savannah River were reviewed to estimate costs and potential environmental impact for several processes. In this review, the reference process utilizing intermediate-depth burial of salt-concrete (saltcrete) monoliths was compared with alternatives including land application of the decontaminated salt as fertilizer for SRP pine stands, ocean disposal with and without containment, and terminal storage as saltcake in existing SRP waste tanks. Discounted total costs for the reference process and its modifications were in the same range as those for most of the alternative processes; uncontained ocean disposal with truck transport to Savannah River barges and storage as saltcake in SRP tanks had lower costs, but presented other difficulties. Environmental impacts could generally be maintained within acceptable limits for all processes except retention of saltcake in waste tanks, which could result in chemical contamination of surrounding areas on tank collapse. Land application would require additional salt decontamination to meet radioactive waste disposal standards, and ocean disposal without containment is not permitted in existing US practice. The reference process was judged to be the only salt disposal option studied which would meet all current requirements at an acceptable cost

  1. Volatility of atmospherically relevant alkylaminium carboxylate salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Avi; Segre, Enrico; Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; Zhang, Renyi; Rudich, Yinon

    2015-05-14

    Heterogeneous neutralization reactions of ammonia and alkylamines with sulfuric acid play an important role in aerosol formation and particle growth. However, little is known about the physical and chemical properties of alkylaminium salts of organic acids. In this work we studied the thermal stability and volatility of alkylaminium carboxylate salts of short aliphatic alkylamines with monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids. The enthalpy of vaporization and saturation vapor pressure at 298 K were derived using the kinetic model of evaporation and the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The vapor pressure of alkylaminium dicarboxylate salts is ∼10(-6) Pa, and the vaporization enthalpy ranges from 73 to 134 kJ mol(-1). Alkylaminium monocarboxylate salts show high thermal stability, and their thermograms do not follow our evaporation model. Hence, we inferred their vapor pressure from their thermograms as comparable to that of ammonium sulfate (∼10(-9) Pa). Further characterization showed that alkylaminium monocarboxylates are room temperature protic ionic liquids (RTPILs) that are more hygroscopic than ammonium sulfate (AS). We suggest that the irregular thermograms result from an incomplete neutralization reaction leading to a mixture of ionic and nonionic compounds. We conclude that these salts are expected to contribute to new particle formation and particle growth under ambient conditions and can significantly enhance the CCN activity of mixed particles in areas where SO2 emissions are regulated.

  2. Salt sensitivity, endogenous ouabain and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlyn, John M.; Blaustein, Mordecai P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Endogenous cardiotonic steroids (CTS) exert long-term effects on salt and blood pressure homeostasis. Here we discuss recent observations on mechanisms of salt sensitivity that involve endogenous ouabain and novel pathways in the brain and discuss their possible relationship to arterial and renal function in hypertension. Recent findings Chronic elevation of brain sodium promotes sustained hypertension mediated by central endogenous ouabain and the Na+ pump α-2 catalytic subunit. The intermediary pressor mechanism in the brain involves aldosterone biosynthesis, activation of mineralocorticoid receptors and increased epithelial sodium channel activity. In the periphery, elevated plasma CTS raise contractility and blood pressure by augmentation of sympathetic nerve responses, increasing arterial Ca2+ signaling and blunting nitric oxide production in the renal medulla and collecting ducts. Summary Endogenous ouabain in the brain appears to play a critical role in salt sensitivity and hypertension. In the periphery, the J-shaped relationship of plasma endogenous ouabain in response to short-term changes in salt balance in humans raises the possibility that endogenous ouabain contributes to the increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events associated with both low and high salt intakes. PMID:23207724

  3. Organic waste processing using molten salt oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, M. G., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal means of oxidizing (destroying) the organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. The U. S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is currently funding research that will identify alternatives to incineration for the treatment of organic-based mixed wastes. (Mixed wastes are defined as waste streams which have both hazardous and radioactive properties.) One such project is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Expedited Technology Demonstration of Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). The goal of this project is to conduct an integrated demonstration of MSO, including off-gas and spent salt treatment, and the preparation of robust solid final forms. Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are presently being performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO process vessel with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. In this paper we describe the integrated system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is to identify the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  4. Salt-specific effects in lysozyme solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Janc

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of additions of low-molecular-mass salts on the properties of aqueous lysozyme solutions are examined by using the cloud-point temperature, T_{cloud}, measurements. Mixtures of protein, buffer, and simple salt in water are studied at pH=6.8 (phosphate buffer and pH=4.6 (acetate buffer. We show that an addition of buffer in the amount above I_{buffer} = 0.6 mol dm^{-3} does not affect the T_{cloud} values. However, by replacing a certain amount of the buffer electrolyte by another salt, keeping the total ionic strength constant, we can significantly change the cloud-point temperature. All the salts de-stabilize the solution and the magnitude of the effect depends on the nature of the salt. Experimental results are analyzed within the framework of the one-component model, which treats the protein-protein interaction as highly directional and of short-range. We use this approach to predict the second virial coefficients, and liquid-liquid phase diagrams under conditions, where T_{cloud} is determined experimentally.

  5. The effects of tree establishment on water and salt dynamics in naturally salt-affected grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosetto, Marcelo D; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Tóth, Tibor; Di Bella, Carlos M

    2007-07-01

    Plants, by influencing water fluxes across the ecosystem-vadose zone-aquifer continuum, can leave an imprint on salt accumulation and distribution patterns. We explored how the conversion of native grasslands to oak plantations affected the abundance and distribution of salts on soils and groundwater through changes in the water balance in naturally salt-affected landscapes of Hortobagy (Hungary), a region where artificial drainage performed approximately 150 years ago lowered the water table (from -2 to -5 m) decoupling it from the surface ecosystem. Paired soil sampling and detailed soil conductivity transects revealed consistently different salt distribution patterns between grasslands and plantations, with shallow salinity losses and deep salinity gains accompanying tree establishment. Salts accumulated in the upper soil layers during pre-drainage times have remained in drained grasslands but have been flushed away under tree plantations (65 and 83% loss of chloride and sodium, respectively, in the 0 to -0.5 m depth range) as a result of a five- to 25-fold increase in infiltration rates detected under plantations. At greater depth, closer to the current water table level, the salt balance was reversed, with tree plantations gaining 2.5 kg sodium chloride m(-2) down to 6 m depth, resulting from groundwater uptake and salt exclusion by tree roots in the capillary fringe. Diurnal water table fluctuations, detected in a plantation stand but not in the neighbouring grasslands, together with salt mass balances suggest that trees consumed approximately 380 mm groundwater per year, re-establishing the discharge regime and leading to higher salt accumulation rates than those interrupted by regional drainage practices more than a century ago. The strong influences of vegetation changes on water dynamics can have cascading consequences on salt accumulation and distribution, and a broad ecohydrological perspective that explicitly considers vegetation-groundwater links is

  6. Physico-chemical characteristics of salt affected soils in Sindh Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, R.R.; Khattak, M.I.

    2005-01-01

    Physico-chemical characteristics of 13 typical soil profiles obtained from the salt affected areas of the Sindh provinces were determined to characterize the salinity of these soils. The soils are available in texture and highly calcareous in nature. From salinity point of view, the problem was found to be two fold. The soils contained not only high amounts of water soluble salts, but at certain places specially in Khairpur District: the Na/sup +/ ions had also entered the clay complexes and pH values at some places were above 8.5. According to the US salinity laboratory classification, the soils come under saline and saline sodic groups. The nature of soluble salts and reclamation measures have been desorbed and disused. The soils are mostly well drained and easily reclaimable. A salient feature of these soils is that good amount of reclamation. The saline soils can be reclaimed simply by leaching and cropping while salient alkali soils poor to leaching should be treated with required amount of gypsum or sulphur. Nearly 30 to 35 % of the salt affected soils need gypsum treatment. It is also suggested that Bajri Barseem or Rice Barseem rotation may be followed during the reclamation of highly saline and saline alkali soils. Further these would be the requirement of an effective drainage system, which is essential to lower the salt content and water table depth, especially at places, where salinity and water logging both occur together. (author)

  7. Simulating Salt Movement using a Coupled Salinity Transport Model in a Variably Saturated Agricultural Groundwater System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli Kivi, S.; Bailey, R. T.; Gates, T. K.

    2017-12-01

    Salinization is one of the major concerns in irrigated agricultural fields. Increasing salinity concentrations are due principally to a high water table that results from excessive irrigation, canal seepage, and a lack of efficient drainage systems, and lead to decreasing crop yield. High groundwater salinity loading to nearby river systems also impacts downstream areas, with saline river water diverted for application on irrigated fields. To assess the different strategies for salt remediation, we present a reactive transport model (UZF-RT3D) coupled with a salinity equilibrium chemistry module for simulating the fate and transport of salt ions in a variably-saturated agricultural groundwater system. The developed model accounts not for advection, dispersion, nitrogen and sulfur cycling, oxidation-reduction, sorption, complexation, ion exchange, and precipitation/dissolution of salt minerals. The model is applied to a 500 km2 region within the Lower Arkansas River Valley (LARV) in southeastern Colorado, an area acutely affected by salinization in the past few decades. The model is tested against salt ion concentrations in the saturated zone, total dissolved solid concentrations in the unsaturated zone, and salt groundwater loading to the Arkansas River. The model now can be used to investigate salinity remediation strategies.

  8. Commonly used metal and crystalline salts in South African traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, R A; Cele, M P

    2013-06-21

    Traditional medicines in the form of plants, animals and/or minerals are used by millions of South Africans. There is currently no data regarding the commonly used mineral elements thus the potential benefits or hazards of such products remain unclear. Metal and crystalline salts were purchased from a rural market (Nongoma, Zululand, South Africa). Information regarding the colloquial name, price and weight was recorded. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was used to quantatively determine the unknown salts. Six widely available salts were analyzed. Ndonya, as it is colloquially known, refers to two products which look identical to the untrained eye-one is dyed table salt and the other is hexavalent chromium. A further product used medicinally, although not widely available, was identified as iron chromite ore. The array of substances documented, ranging from benign to carcinogenic, stresses the importance of documenting components used in traditional medicine and confirms the necessity to regulate South Africa traditional medicine. Healthcare workers should be aware of the complexities of using such metal salt. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Global plant-responding mechanisms to salt stress: physiological and molecular levels and implications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Mu, Xingmin; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Hongyan; Brestic, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The increasing seriousness of salinization aggravates the food, population and environmental issues. Ameliorating the salt-resistance of plants especially the crops is the most effective measure to solve the worldwide problem. The salinity can cause damage to plants mainly from two aspects: hyperosmotic and hyperionic stresses leading to the restrain of growth and photosynthesis. To the adverse effects, the plants derive corresponding strategies including: ion regulation and compartmentalization, biosynthesis of compatible solutes, induction of antioxidant enzymes and plant hormones. With the development of molecular biology, our understanding of the molecular and physiology knowledge is becoming clearness. The complex signal transduction underlying the salt resistance is being illuminated brighter and clearer. The SOS pathway is the central of the cell signaling in salt stress. The accumulation of the compatible solutes and the activation of the antioxidant system are the effective measures for plants to enhance the salt resistance. How to make full use of our understanding to improve the output of crops is a huge challenge for us, yet the application of the genetic engineering makes this possible. In this review, we will discuss the influence of the salt stress and the response of the plants in detail expecting to provide a particular account for the plant resistance in molecular, physiological and transgenic fields.

  10. Prediction of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Fluxes from Coastal Salt Marshes using Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, K. S.; Abdul-Aziz, O. I.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal salt marshes are among the most productive ecosystems on earth. Given the complex interactions between ambient environment and ecosystem biological exchanges, it is difficult to predict the salt marsh greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes (CO2 and CH4) from their environmental drivers. In this study, we developed an artificial neural network (ANN) model to robustly predict the salt marsh GHG fluxes using a limited number of input variables (photosynthetically active radiation, soil temperature and porewater salinity). The ANN parameterization involved an optimized 3-layer feed forward Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm. Four tidal salt marshes of Waquoit Bay, MA — incorporating a gradient in land-use, salinity and hydrology — were considered as the case study sites. The wetlands were dominated by native Spartina Alterniflora, and characterized by high salinity and frequent flooding. The developed ANN model showed a good performance (training R2 = 0.87 - 0.96; testing R2 = 0.84 - 0.88) in predicting the fluxes across the case study sites. The model can be used to estimate wetland GHG fluxes and potential carbon balance under different IPCC climate change and sea level rise scenarios. The model can also aid the development of GHG offset protocols to set monitoring guidelines for restoration of coastal salt marshes.

  11. Enduring perceptions: Place naming and the perception of Louisiana’s salt dome islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Hayward

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Salt domes are geological features that occur when areas of salt deposits are pressured into layers above them, causing dome shaped distortions in horizontal strata. In some instances, the distortions protrude above flat areas of land or else appear underwater as seamounts. In the case of the five Louisiana salt dome hills considered in this article, their distinct elevation above the swampy bayous and flatlands surrounding them has led to their characterisation as islands by indigenous Atakapa-Ishak peoples and by subsequent Francophone and Anglophone settlers. The article considers the ways in which the five salt domes’ islandness has been perceived, enhanced and/or undermined by various local inhabitants and/or the commercial operations that have operated on them. Discussion of these aspects involves consideration of the manner in which the salt dome islands’ islandness is mutable and complex, particularly with regard to human impacts. This mutability is discussed with regard to both individual island placenames and the islands’ overall designations.

  12. The Effect of Salts in Promoting Specific and Competitive Interactions between Zinc Finger Proteins and Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongyu; Yuan, Siming; Zheng, Shihui; Chen, Yuting; Zheng, Zhen; Liu, Yangzhong; Huang, Guangming

    2017-12-01

    Specific protein-metal interactions (PMIs) fulfill essential functions in cells and organic bodies, and activation of these functions in vivo are mostly modulated by the complex environmental factors, including pH value, small biomolecules, and salts. Specifically, the role of salts in promoting specific PMIs and their competition among various metals has remained untapped mainly due to the difficulty to distinguish nonspecific PMIs from specific PMIs by classic spectroscopic techniques. Herein, we report Hofmeister salts differentially promote the specific PMIs by combining nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry and spectroscopic techniques (fluorescence measurement and circular dichroism). Furthermore, to explore the influence of salts in competitive binding between metalloproteins and various metals, we designed a series of competitive experiments and applied to a well-defined model system, the competitive binding of zinc (II) and arsenic (III) to holo-promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML). These experiments not only provided new insights at the molecular scale as complementary to previous NMR and spectroscopic results, but also deduced the relative binding ability between zinc finger proteins and metals at the molecular scale, which avoids the mass spectrometric titration-based determination of binding constants that is frequently affected and often degraded by variable solution conditions including salt contents. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. New primary energy source by thorium molten-salt reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Kato, Yoshio; Furuhashi, Akira; Numata, Hiroo; Mitachi, Koushi; Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Sato, Yuzuru; Arakawa, Kazuto

    2005-01-01

    Among the next 30 years, we have to implement a practical measure in the global energy/environmental problems, solving the followings: (1) replacing the fossil fuels without CO 2 emission, (2) no severe accidents, (3) no concern on military, (4) minimizing wastes, (5) economical, (6) few R and D investment and (7) rapid/huge global application supplying about half of the total primary energy till 50 years later. For this purpose the following system was proposed: THORIMS-NES [Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetic System], which is composed of (A) simple fission Molten-Salt power stations (FUJI), and (B) fissile-producing Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder (AMSB). It has been internationally prepared a practical Developmental Program for its huge-size industrialization of Th breeding fuel cycle to produce a new rational primary energy. Here it is explained the social meaning, the conceptual system design and technological bases, especially, including the molten fluoride salt technology, which was developed as the triple-functional medium for nuclear-engineering, heat-transfer and chemical engineering. The complex function of this system is fully achieved by the simplified facility using a single phase molten-salt only. (author)

  14. Comparison of a salt check sheet with 24-h urinary salt excretion measurement in local residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Kenichiro; Miyoshi, Emiko; Kajiyama, Tomomi; Umeki, Yoko; Misumi, Yukiko; Horita, Noriko; Murata, Yusuke; Ohe, Kenji; Enjoji, Munechika; Tsuchihashi, Takuya

    2016-12-01

    The salt check sheet developed by Tsuchihashi et al. is widely used in general practice to assess salt intake and the associated diets. However, its appropriateness for the general population has not been assessed alongside 24-h urinary salt excretion monitoring. Therefore, in local residents, we analyzed the correlation between check-sheet scores and 24-h urinary salt excretion levels to determine the appropriateness of the check sheet. We asked 176 local residents to complete the salt check sheet and provide urinary samples; the latter were obtained using a proportional sampling method over a 24-h period. One hundred and forty subjects completed the study (men/women: 23/117, mean±s.d. age: 52.7±19.6 years, blood pressure: 122.3±18.0/74.3±11.1 mm Hg), of whom 51 (36.4%) had hypertension. The total salt check-sheet scores were widely distributed (mean±s.d.: 11.1±4.2 points, range: 0-22 points), and the subjects were divided into the following groups on the basis of salt levels: 29.3% were 'low' (0-8 points), 42.8% were 'medium' (9-13 points), 23.6% were 'high' (14-19 points) and 4.3% were 'very high' (>20 points). The mean 24-h urinary salt excretion level was 8.5±3.3 g. The subjects with higher salt-intake levels tended to have increased 24-h urinary salt excretion levels, with significant differences between the three groups ('low' vs. 'medium' vs. 'high to very high' salt levels: 7.6±2.9 g vs. 8.4±2.8 g vs. 9.6±4.2 g, respectively; P=0.03). The total salt check-sheet scores significantly correlated with the 24-h urinary salt excretion levels (r=0.27; Psalt check sheet is applicable for the general population.

  15. Modeling Episodic Ephemeral Brine Lake Evaporation and Salt Crystallization on the Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Harman, C. J.; Kipnis, E. L.; Bowen, B. B.

    2017-12-01

    Public concern about apparent reductions in the areal extent of the Bonneville Salt Flat (BSF) and perceived changes in inundation frequency has motivated renewed interest in the hydrologic and geochemical behavior of this salt playa. In this study, we develop a numerical modeling framework to simulate the relationship between hydrometeorologic variability, brine evaporation and salt crystallization processes on BSF. The BSF, locates in Utah, is the remnant of paleo-lake Bonneville, and is capped by up to 1 meter of salt deposition over a 100 km2 area. The BSF has two distinct hydrologic periods each year: a winter wet periods with standing surface brine and the summer dry periods when the brine is evaporated, exposing the surface salt crust. We develop a lumped non-linear dynamical models coupling conservation expressions from water, dissolved salt and thermal energy to investigate the seasonal and diurnal behavior of brine during the transition from standing brine to exposed salt at BSF. The lumped dynamic models capture important nonlinear and kinetic effects introduced by the high ionic concentration of the brine, including the pronounced effect of the depressed water activity coefficient on evaporation. The salt crystallization and dissolution rate is modeled as a kinetic process linearly proportional to the degree of supersaturation of brine. The model generates predictions of the brine temperature and the solute and solvent masses controlled by diurnal net radiation input and aerodynamic forcing. Two distinct mechanisms emerge as potential controls on salt production and dissolution: (1) evapo-concentration and (2) changes in solubility related to changes in brine temperature. Although the evaporation of water is responsible for ultimate disappearance of the brine each season ,variation in solubility is found to be the dominant control on diurnal cycles of salt precipitation and dissolution in the BSF case. Most salt is crystallized during nighttime, but the

  16. Precipitates/Salts Model Sensitivity Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariner, P.

    2001-01-01

    The objective and scope of this calculation is to assist Performance Assessment Operations and the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Department in modeling the geochemical effects of evaporation on potential seepage waters within a potential repository drift. This work is developed and documented using procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', in support of ''Technical Work Plan For Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY 02 Work Activities'' (BSC 2001a). The specific objective of this calculation is to examine the sensitivity and uncertainties of the Precipitates/Salts model. The Precipitates/Salts model is documented in an Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Analysis'' (BSC 2001b). The calculation in the current document examines the effects of starting water composition, mineral suppressions, and the fugacity of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) on the chemical evolution of water in the drift

  17. Synthesis, structure, and properties of azatriangulenium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B.W.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2001-01-01

    A general synthetic route to novel nitrogen-bridged heterocyclic carbenium ions of the acridinium and triangulenium type has been developed and investigated. The synthetic method is based on nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) on the tris(2,6-dimethoxyphenyl)carbenium ion (1) with primary...... amines and, by virtue of its stepwise and irreversible nature, provides a powerful tool for the preparation of a wide variety of new heterocyclic carbenium salts. Several derivatives of the three new oxygen- and/or nitrogen-bridged triangulenium salts, azadioxa- (6), diazaoxa- (7......), and triazatriangulenium (4), have been synthesized and their physicochemical properties have been investigated. Crystal structures for compounds 2 b-PF6: 2d-PF6, 4b-BF4, 4c-BF4, 6e-BF4, and 8 are reported. The different packing modes found for the triazatriagulenium salts are discussed in relation to the electrostatic...

  18. Energy storage in irradiating rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaschenz, H.; Noack, W.; Runge, K.; Koerner, W.

    1980-01-01

    In order to determine both the amount of energy stored by the effect of ionizing radiation on rock salt and the conditions of its release, light absorption spectroscopy and differential thermo-analysis have been used for investigating rock salt samples irradiated with 60 Co. Within the investigated energy dose range from 1 . 10 6 Gy to 5 . 10 7 Gy the amount of stored energy was between 0.12 and 1.5 kJ/kg. The main portion of stored energy is released by heating to temperatures ranging from 200 to 350 0 C. It is considered that the energy stored in rock salt does not cause any danger in the ultimate storage of radioactive wastes. (author)

  19. Pseudostrain representation of multipass excavations in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Torres, T.M.; Jones, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Historically, creep closure of excavations in salt have been framed in terms of displacements. However, it appears possible because of the relatively homogeneous nature of salt to introduce a pseudostrain representation, which calls attention to the fact that the displacements are related directly to the strains in the material around the opening. Application of this representation to extensive early-time closure data illustrates the nature of salt response. This paper presents a description of the experimental rooms and explains how early-time mining sequence data were obtained during the multipass excavation. Representative mining sequence displacement data for various size openings are compared and analyzed in terms of pseudostrains. In addition, numerical calculations with a simple back-fitted model of creep are presented. Implications of the results are discussed in the conclusions. 8 refs., 8 figs

  20. Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Lecocq, A.; Kato, Yoshio; Mitachi, Kohshi.

    1990-01-01

    In the next century, the 'fission breeder' concept will not be practical to solve the global energy problems, including environmental and North-South problems. As a new measure, a simple rational Th molten salt breeding fuel cycle system, named 'Thorium Molten-Salt Nuclear Energy Synergetics (THORIMS-NES)', which composed of simple power stations and fissile producers, is proposed. This is effective to establish the essential improvement in issues of resources, safety, power-size flexibility, anti-nuclear proliferation and terrorism, radiowaste, economy, etc. securing the simple operation, maintenance, chemical processing, and rational breeding fuel cycle. As examples, 155 MWe fuel self-sustaining power station 'FUJI-II', 7 MWe pilot-plant 'miniFUJI-II', 1 GeV-300 mA proton Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder 'AMSB', and their combined fuel cycle system are explained. (author)

  1. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  2. Salt intake and eating habits of school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yuko; Iwayama, Keiko; Suzuki, Hirotoshi; Sakata, Satoko; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Iwashima, Yoshio; Takata, Akira; Kawano, Yuhei

    2016-11-01

    Salt restriction is important for the prevention and treatment of hypertension; however, salt consumption is still high in Japan. Improvements in dietary habits, including salt reduction in childhood, may contribute to the prevention of hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate the salt intake of school-aged children and the relationship between their diet diary and actual salt intake. The subjects comprised 580 schoolchildren (471 elementary school pupils and 109 junior high school pupils) who wanted to evaluate their salt intake in Kuji, a northeast coastal area in Japan. We estimated salt intake using spot urine samples and a formula. Lifestyle was assessed using a questionnaire. We also evaluated the salt intake and the lifestyles of 440 parents. The estimated salt intakes of elementary school pupils, junior high school pupils and their parents were 7.1±1.5, 7.6±1.5 and 8.0±1.7 g per day, respectively. The proportion of lower-grade children who achieved the recommended salt intake was low. In the multivariate analysis, the estimated salt intake of school-aged children correlated with their age, estimated salt intake of their parents and the menu priorities of the household. The estimated salt intake of the parents was associated with female gender, obesity, age and the habitual consumption of bread and noodles. In conclusion, the estimated salt intake of school-aged children positively correlated with the estimated salt intake of their parents, and the proportion of lower-grade children who achieved the recommended salt intake was low. Guidance on salt restriction for children and their parents may reduce the salt intake of school-aged children.

  3. 4D modeling of salt-sediment interactions during diapir evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callot, J.P.; Rondon, D.; Letouzey, J. [IFP, Rueil Malmaison (France); Krajewski, P. [Gaz de France-PEG, Lingen (Germany); Rigollet, C. [Gaz de France, St. Denis la Plaine (France)

    2007-09-13

    salt in Oman produce oil, but constitute a major exploration risk due to large technical difficulties of structural and seismic imagery, complexity in deciphering their evolutionary steps, and possible unexpected overpressures and of hydrocarbons. 4D analogue modelling of cylindrical and salt-like diapirs is performed to reproduce the evolution of internal sand layer during diapir growth. The growth and geometry of the salt structure is entirely controlled and only driven by the overburden deposition. The 3D internal geometry is reconstructed for different steps to show the progressive rise, tearing apart, and fall of the stringers pieces. Complex geometries are observed and compare well to natural examples picked on seismic imagery. It appears that stringers observed in the German salt basin may originate from cap rock pieces detaching from the diapir roof and drowning in the salt. (orig.)

  4. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  5. Vertical Redistribution of Ocean Salt Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X.; Liu, C.; Ponte, R. M.; Piecuch, C. G.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean salinity is an important proxy for change and variability in the global water cycle. Multi-decadal trends have been observed in both surface and subsurface salinity in the past decades, and are usually attributed to the change in air-sea freshwater flux. Although air-sea freshwater flux, a major component of the global water cycle, certainly contributes to the change in surface and upper ocean salinity, the salt redistribution inside the ocean can affect the surface and upper ocean salinity as well. Also, the mechanisms controlling the surface and upper ocean salinity changes likely depend on timescales. Here we examined the ocean salinity changes as well as the contribution of the vertical redistribution of salt with a 20-year dynamically consistent and data-constrained ocean state estimate (ECCO: Estimating Circulation and Climate of the Ocean). A decrease in the spatial mean upper ocean salinity and an upward salt flux inside the ocean were observed. These findings indicate that over 1992-2011, surface freshwater fluxes contribute to the decrease in spatial mean upper ocean salinity and are partly compensated by the vertical redistribution of salt inside the ocean. Between advection and diffusion, the two major processes determining the vertical exchange of salt, the advective term at different depths shows a downward transport, while the diffusive term is the dominant upward transport contributor. These results suggest that the salt transport in the ocean interior should be considered in interpreting the observed surface and upper ocean salinity changes, as well as inferring information about the changes in the global water cycle.

  6. Life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis due to 'bath salts' injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Russell; Marks, Noah; Morris, Katy; King, Heather; Gelvin, Angelle; Rooney, Ronald

    2012-01-16

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an orthopedic emergency. The ability to quickly and accurately diagnose this rapidly spreading disease can save a patient's life and limb. However, the diagnosis is complex because necrotizing fasciitis usually manifests as a less severe cellulitis or abscess while the majority of the damages rage beneath the surface of the skin. Although the diagnosis is not new, the potential causes and vectors continually change. This article reports a new source of necrotizing fasciitis in an intramuscular injection of "bath salts," a rapidly emerging street drug that is legal in some states and evades authorities with its innocuous name. The patient presented 2 days after injection of bath salts with extensive cellulitis extending to the mid portion of her upper arm. The cellulitis initially responded to broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, but rapidly deteriorated 48 hours later, leading to a forequarter amputation with radical mastectomy and chest wall debridement to obtain healthy tissue margins and control the disease. The patient made a full recovery after further minor debridements, negative pressure dressings, directed antibiotic therapy, and skin grafting. The recent emerging popularity of this highly obtainable, injectable substance may lead to an increase in cases of necrotizing fasciitis. Orthopedic surgeons should be vigilant in diagnosing this process early and should perform an extensive debridement. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Membrane crystallization for recovery of salts from produced water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist-Jensen, Cejna Anna; Jensen, Henriette Casper; Ali, Aamer

    Membrane Crystallization (MCr) is a novel technology able to recover freshwater and high-purity salts from complex solutions and therefore, is suggested for a better exploitation of wastewater streams. Unlike other membrane processes, MCr is not limited by high concentrations and, therefore, the ......, the membrane maintained its hydrophobic nature despite that produced water contained oil residues. Conductivity and HPLC was utilized to analyze the quality of the permeate stream......., the solutions can be treated to achieve saturation level. Hereby different salts can be precipitated and directly recovered from various streams. In this study, it is shown that MCr is able to treat produced water by producing clean water and simultaneously NaCl crystals. The recovered crystals exhibited high...... purity. Moreover, the MCr process showed excellent stability in terms of trans-membrane flux during 20 hours of operation. At moderate feed temperature of 47.2 ± 1.7 °C, transmembrane flux of 0.49 ± 0.08 L/(h·m2) was obtained by using commercial hollow fiber membrane module. Throughout the experiments...

  8. Reducing the Salt Added to Takeaway Food: Within-Subjects Comparison of Salt Delivered by Five and 17 Holed Salt Shakers in Controlled Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Goffe

    Full Text Available To determine if the amount of salt delivered by standard salt shakers commonly used in English independent takeaways varies between those with five and 17 holes; and to determine if any differences are robust to variations in: the amount of salt in the shaker, the length of time spent shaking, and the person serving.Four laboratory experiments comparing the amount of salt delivered by shakers. Independent variables considered were: type of shaker used (five or 17 holes, amount of salt in the shaker before shaking commences (shaker full, half full or nearly empty, time spent shaking (3s, 5s or 10s, and individual serving.Controlled, laboratory, conditions.A quota-based convenience sample of 10 participants (five women aged 18-59 years.Amount of salt delivered by salt shakers.Across all trials, the 17 holed shaker delivered a mean (SD of 7.86g (4.54 per trial, whilst the five holed shaker delivered 2.65g (1.22. The five holed shaker delivered a mean of 33.7% of the salt of the 17 holed shaker. There was a significant difference in salt delivered between the five and 17 holed salt shakers when time spent shaking, amount of salt in the shaker and participant were all kept constant (p<0.001. This difference was robust to variations in the starting weight of shakers, time spent shaking and participant shaking (pssalt shakers have the potential to reduce the salt content of takeaway food, and particularly food from Fish & Chip shops, where these shakers are particularly used. Further research will be required to determine the effects of this intervention on customers' salt intake with takeaway food and on total dietary salt intake.

  9. Complex Narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.; Buckland, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the opening chapter, "Complex Narratives," Jan Simons brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. He presents an overview of the different concepts - forking path narratives, mind-game films,

  10. phenanthroline complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHRANIL DE

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... complex in a unique binding motif and provide additional stability to the compound in the solid state. This iron(II) complex is able to catalyze the cleavage of aromatic C-C linkage of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Gentisic acid,. GA) in oxygen environment. The iron(II) complex in the presence of two equivalent ...

  11. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  12. Salt crystallization tests: Focus on their objective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charola, A. Elena; Rörig-Dalgaard, Inge; Chwast, Jacek

    Many factors influence the durability of a building material, such as its mechanical resistance, exposure conditions and the presence of soluble salts in it. Since the latter interact with each other, it is difficult to relate any of them to the specific damage observed. Lubelli et al. [1] have r...... compatibility of restoration mortars, and another where the efflorescence of gypsum for brick masonry is evaluated. These methods have proven their reliability and lead to the conclusion that salt tests should be designed for specific objectives....

  13. Migration of brine inclusions in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Theories of the migration of brine inclusions in salt are interpreted as simple physical processes, and theories by Russian and U.S. workers are shown to yield the same results. The migration theory is used to predict threshold temperature gradients below which migration of brine inclusions should not occur. The predicted threshold gradients are compared with the temperature gradients expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The theory of a threshold gradient helps explain the existence of brine inclusions in natural salt deposits

  14. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila V. Dyakova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cobalt solution for the production of pure cobalt salts has been developed and introduced at Severonikel combine.

  15. Metal Oxide Solubility and Molten Salt Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-29

    soluble oxides that relations like eq. (3) are significant. The oxides of several metal oxides have been found to be amphoteric , i.e., their solution...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT CORROSION.(U) MAR 82 K H STERN UNCLASSI E DL R L-4772NL EL .2. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BURALU...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT Interim report on a continuing CORROSION NRL problem. S. PERFORMING a4. REPORT NUMlER 7. AuTtwORr) S. CONTRACT OR

  16. Hot water, fresh beer, and salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    In the ''hot chocolate effect'' the best musical scales (those with the finest tone quality, largest range, and best tempo) are obtained by adding salt to a glass of hot water supersaturated with air. Good scales can also be obtained by adding salt to a glass of freshly opened beer (supersaturated with CO 2 ) provided you first (a) get rid of much of the excess CO 2 so as to produce smaller, hence slower, rising bubbles, and (b) get rid of the head of foam, which damps the standing wave and ruins the tone quality. Finally the old question, ''Do ionizing particles produce bubbles in fresh beer?'' is answered experimentally

  17. Salt reduction strategy at population level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi Bhargava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available World is facing a huge burden of noncommunicable diseases such as hypertension, ischemic health diseases, and stroke. Moreover, the developing countries have had a relatively speedy rise of the problem, with noncommunicable diseases occurring at much lower age as compared to the developed world. The World Health Organization, therefore, recommends reduction in salt intake at population level to <5 g/day. Not all researchers and public health physicians agree to it, leading to conflicting information for a primary care physician. This evidence based summary documents this polarization of the recommendations regarding salt reduction and acknowledges the ongoing challenge primary care physicians face when following such evidence based guidelines.

  18. Salt-specific effects in lysozyme solutions

    OpenAIRE

    T. Janc; M. Kastelic; M. Bončina; V. Vlachy

    2016-01-01

    The effects of additions of low-molecular-mass salts on the properties of aqueous lysozyme solutions are examined by using the cloud-point temperature, $T_{cloud}$, measurements. Mixtures of protein, buffer, and simple salt in water are studied at pH=6.8 (phosphate buffer) and pH=4.6 (acetate buffer). We show that an addition of buffer in the amount above $I_{buffer} = 0.6$ mol dm$^{-3}$ does not affect the $T_{cloud}$ values. However, by replacing a certain amount of the buffer electrolyte b...

  19. Archaeological and chemical evidence for early salt production in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flad, Rowan; Zhu, Jiping; Wang, Changsui; Chen, Pochan; von Falkenhausen, Lothar; Sun, Zhibin; Li, Shuicheng

    2005-01-01

    Salt production and trade is thought to be critical to the development of all states and emergent empires. Until now, however, scientific evidence of early salt production has rarely been presented, and no studies of early Chinese salt production have provided unequivocal proof. Here, we report x-ray fluorescence, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses that demonstrate that salt was the primary product during the first millennium before Christ (B.C.) at Zhongba in Central China. This work provides an early example of salt production discovered in China and presents a methodology for evaluating salt production sites in other regions. PMID:16116100

  20. Numerical simulation of salt cementation in the porous rocks adjacent to salt diapirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allstadt, Raphael; Li, Shiyuan; Marquart, Gabriele; Reuning, Lars; Niederau, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Porosity and permeability are among the most important petrophysical properties of reservoirs rocks in oil systems. Observations during exploration indicate that in the vicinity of salt domes the porosity of reservoir rocks is often reduced by halite cementation. In this study we present results of simulating the process of salt precipitation near salt diapirs by using a schematic model of a Zechstein diapir in the North Sea basin. The numerical simulation is based on solving the transport equations for heat, porous flow and dispersive and reactive chemical species. Chemical reaction and equilibrium is based on the PHREEQC computer code. In our model over-pressured brine is entering from below and is deflected towards the diapir due to an intermediate layer of low permeability. The high thermal conductivity of salt yields a lateral temperature gradient starting from the diapir. Due to this effect the simulated temperature profile shows lower temperatures close to the salt dome than in comparable depths further away. Caused by the temperature-controlled solubility of NaCl in the brine and supplied ions by the diapir, halite first precipitates near the salt diapir by cementing the pore spaces and thus reducing the porosity. Salt-precipitation in the simulation starts after 840 000 years and reduces the porosity from 10 % to 5.5 % after 19 Mill. years. The permanent influx of brine causes growth of the cementation area and the related reduction of porosity in the reservoir.

  1. Salt Stability - The Effect of pHmax on Salt to Free Base Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ling; Merritt, Jeremy M; Yu, Weili; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how the disproportionation process can be impacted by the properties of the salt, specifically pHmax. Five miconazole salts and four sertraline salts were selected for this study. The extent of conversion was quantified using Raman spectroscopy. A mathematical model was utilized to estimate the theoretical amount of conversion. A trend was observed that for a given series of salts of a particular basic compound (both sertraline and miconazole are bases), the extent of disproportionation increases as pHmax decreases. Miconazole phosphate monohydrate and sertraline mesylate, although exhibiting significantly different pHmax values (more than 2 units apart), underwent a similar extent of disproportionation, which may be attributed to the lower buffering capacity of sertraline salts. This work shows that the disproportionation tendency can be influenced by pHmax and buffering capacity and thus highlights the importance of selecting the appropriate salt form during the screening process in order to avoid salt-to-free form conversion.

  2. Fundamental study on the salt distillation from the mixtures of rare earth precipitates and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H. C.; Eun, H. C.; Cho, Y. Z.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, I. T.

    2008-01-01

    An electrorefining process of spent nuclear fuel generates waste salt containing some radioactive metal chlorides. The most effective method to reduce salt waste volume is to separate radioactive metals from non-radioactive salts. A promising approach is to change radioactive metal chlorides into salt-insoluble oxides by an oxygen sparging. Following this, salt distillation process is available to effectively separate the precipitated particulate metal oxides from salt. This study investigated the distillation rates of LiCl-KCl eutectic salt under different vacuums at elevated temperatures. The first part study investigated distillation rates of eutectic salt under different vacuums at high temperatures by using thermo-gravimetric furnace system. In the second part, we tested the removal of eutectic salt from the RE precipitates by using the laboratory vacuum distillation furnace system. Investigated variables were the temperature of mixture, the degree of vacuum and the time

  3. Differing metabolic responses to salt stress in wheat-barley addition lines containing different 7H chromosomal fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darko, Eva; Gierczik, Krisztián; Hudák, Orsolya; Forgó, Péter; Pál, Magda; Türkösi, Edina; Kovács, Viktória; Dulai, Sándor; Majláth, Imre; Molnár, István; Janda, Tibor; Molnár-Láng, Márta

    2017-01-01

    Salinity-induced osmotic, ionic and oxidative stress responses were investigated on Asakaze/Manas wheat/barley addition lines 7H, 7HL and 7HS, together with their barley (salt-tolerant) and wheat (relatively salt-sensitive) parents. Growth, photosynthetic activity, chlorophyll degradation, proline, glycine betaine accumulation, sugar metabolism, Na+ and K+ uptake and transport processes and the role of polyamines and antioxidants were studied in young plants grown in hydroponic culture with or without salt treatment. Changes in plant growth and photosynthetic activity of plants demonstrated that the salt tolerance of the addition lines 7H and 7HL was similar to that of barley parent cv. Manas, while the sensitivity of the addition line 7HS was similar to that of the wheat parent cv. Asakaze. The Na accumulation in the roots and shoots did not differ between the addition lines and wheat parent. The activation of various genes related to Na uptake and transport was not correlated with the salt tolerance of the genotypes. These results indicated that the direct regulation of Na transport processes is not the main reason for the salt tolerance of these genotypes. Salt treatment induced a complex metabolic rearrangement in both the roots and shoots of all the genotypes. Elevated proline accumulation in the roots and enhanced sugar metabolism in the shoots were found to be important for salt tolerance in the 7H and 7HL addition lines and in barley cv. Manas. In wheat cv. Asakaze and the 7HS addition line the polyamine metabolism was activated. It seems that osmotic adjustment is a more important process in the improvement of salt tolerance in 7H addition lines than the direct regulation of Na transport processes or antioxidant defence.

  4. The influence of bile salts on the distribution of simvastatin in the octanol/buffer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đanić, Maja; Pavlović, Nebojša; Stanimirov, Bojan; Vukmirović, Saša; Nikolić, Katarina; Agbaba, Danica; Mikov, Momir

    2016-01-01

    Distribution coefficient (D) is useful parameter for evaluating drugs permeability properties across biological membranes, which are of importance for drugs bioavailability. Given that bile acids are intensively studied as drug permeation-modifying and -solubilizing agents, the aim of this study was to estimate the influence of sodium salts of cholic (CA), deoxycholic (DCA) and 12-monoketocholic acids (MKC) on distribution coefficient of simvastatin (SV) (lactone [SVL] and acid form [SVA]) which is a highly lipophilic compound with extremely low water solubility and bioavailability. LogD values of SVA and SVL with or without bile salts were measured by liquid-liquid extraction in n-octanol/buffer systems at pH 5 and 7.4. SV concentrations in aqueous phase were determined by HPLC-DAD. Chem3D Ultra program was applied for computation of physico-chemical properties of analyzed compounds and their complexes. Statistically significant decrease in both SVA and SVL logD was observed for all three studied bile salts at both selected pH. MKC exerted the most pronounced effect in the case of SVA while there were no statistically significant differences between observed bile salts for SVL. The calculated physico-chemical properties of analyzed compounds and their complexes supported experimental results. Our data indicate that the addition of bile salts into the n-octanol/buffer system decreases the values of SV distribution coefficient at both studied pH values. This may be the result of the formation of hydrophilic complexes increasing the solubility of SV that could consequently impact the pharmacokinetic parameters of SV and the final drug response in patients.

  5. Effect of metal salts on antibacterial activity of zingiber officinale roscoe extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohail, T.; Yaqeen, Z.; Imran, H.; Rehman, Z.; Fatima, N.

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of ethanol extract of Zingiber Officinale Roscoe (ginger) and its combination with different salts like CuSO/sub 4/, ZnSO/sub 4/ and MnCl/sub 2/ was investigated. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested by agar diffusion method. The results showed that ethanol extract of Zingiber Officinale gave the maximum zone of inhibition at 50 mg/ml concentrations against Escherichia coli among Gram negative bacteria and against Staphylococcus aureus in Gram positive bacteria. However antibacterial activity of the ginger and metal salts combination was greater than activity of ethanol extract. These investigations indicate that though ethanol extract has antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, ginger and metal salts complex has more inhibitory effect on microorganisms. Antibacterial activity was also compared with standard drug ampicillin. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ginger extract and metal salts complexes against all test organisms ranged from 0.3125 to 2.5 mg/ml. (author)

  6. Drop amalgam voltammetric study of lead complexation by natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of inorganic complexation of lead using drop amalgam voltammetry is described. The study has been carried out in simulated salt lake water and at ionic strength of 7.35 M, the predetermined ionic strength of Lake Katwe. The complexation of lead with the simple ligands (Cl-, CO32-) created anodic waves and the ...

  7. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  8. Plasma 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentration of Dahl salt-sensitive rats decreases during high salt intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Tewolde, Teclemicael K.; Forte, Camille; Wang, Min; Bayorh, Mohamed A.; Emmett, Nerimiah L.; White, Jolanda; Griffin, Keri

    2002-01-01

    Dahl salt-sensitive rats, but not salt-resistant rats, develop hypertension in response to high salt intake. We have previously shown an inverse relationship between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration and blood pressure of Dahl salt-sensitive rats during high salt intake. In this study, we report on the relationship between high salt intake and plasma 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25-(OH)(2)D) concentration of Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant rats. Rats were fed a high salt diet (8%) and sacrificed at day 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentrations of salt-sensitive rats were reduced to 50% of that at baseline at day 2-when blood pressure and plasma 25-OHD concentration were unchanged, but 25-OHD content in the kidney was 81% of that at baseline. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration was reduced further to 10% of that at baseline from day 7 to 14 of high salt intake, a reduction that was prevented in rats switched to a low salt (0.3%) diet at day 7. Exogenous 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (24,25-(OH)(2)D(3)), administered at a level that increased plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration to five times normal, did not attenuate the salt-induced hypertension of salt-sensitive rats. Plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration of salt-resistant rats was gradually reduced to 50% of that at baseline at day 14 and returned to baseline value at day 28 of high salt intake. We conclude that the decrease in plasma 24,25-(OH)(2)D concentration in salt-sensitive rats during high salt intake is caused by decreased 25-OHD content in the kidney and also by another unidentified mechanism.

  9. Steady State Analysis of Small Molten Salt Reactor : Effect of Fuel Salt Flow on Reactor Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMOTO, Takahisa; MITACHI, Koshi; SUZUKI, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a thermal neutron reactor with graphite moderation and operates on the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. The feature of the MSR is that fuel salt flows inside the reactor during the nuclear fission reaction. In the previous study, the authors developed numerical model with which to simulate the effects of fuel salt flow on the reactor characteristics. In this study, we apply the model to the steady-state analysis of a small MSR system and estimate the effects of fue...

  10. Consumption of Salt Rich Products in the UK: Impact of The Reduced Salt Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Abhijit; di Falco, Salvatore; Fraser, Iain

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes use of a leading UK supermarket’s loyalty card based data which records information on purchase decisions by consumers who shop at its stores in order to assess the effectiveness and impact of the UK reduced salt campaign. We present an empirical analysis of consumption data to assess the effectiveness of the UK Food Standard Agency’s (FSA) ‘reduced salt campaign’ on the basis of information on health related announcements undertaken by the FSA under its ‘low salt campaign’. ...

  11. Current Levels of Salt Knowledge: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Sarmugam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High salt intake increases the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Given the role of knowledge as a determinant of food intake, this paper aims to review the current levels of salt knowledge and the association between salt knowledge and dietary salt intake and salt-related dietary practices in the general population. Twenty two studies were included in the review. In general, the studies showed consumers were able to identify the health risks associated with high salt intake. However, knowledge of recommended daily intakes, understanding of the relationships between salt and sodium and foods that contribute most salt to the diet were poor. Four of the five studies which examined the relationships between salt knowledge and salt-related dietary practices reported significant associations. Two important gaps in the current literature were identified. First, there is a need for a robustly validated tool to examine salt knowledge and its impact on salt intake. Second, a comprehensive salt knowledge assessment should include assessment of procedural, as well as declarative, knowledge.

  12. The structure of salt marsh soil mesofauna food webs - The prevalence of disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynert, Kristin; Kiggen, Mirijam; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Mesofauna taxa fill key trophic positions in soil food webs, even in terrestrial-marine boundary habitats characterized by frequent natural disturbances. Salt marshes represent such boundary habitats, characterized by frequent inundations increasing from the terrestrial upper to the marine pioneer zone. Despite the high abundance of soil mesofauna in salt marshes and their important function by facilitating energy and carbon flows, the structure, trophic ecology and habitat-related diet shifts of mesofauna species in natural salt marsh habitats is virtually unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of natural disturbance (inundation frequency) on community structure, food web complexity and resource use of soil mesofauna using stable isotope analysis (15N, 13C) in three salt marsh zones. In this intertidal habitat, the pioneer zone is exposed to inundations twice a day, but lower and upper salt marshes are less frequently inundated based on shore height. The mesofauna comprised 86 species / taxa dominated by Collembola, Oribatida and Mesostigmata. Shifts in environmental disturbances influenced the structure of food webs, diversity and density declined strongly from the land to the sea pointing to the importance of increasing levels of inundation frequency. Accordingly, the reduced diversity and density was associated by a simplification of the food web in the pioneer zone as compared to the less inundated lower and upper salt marsh with a higher number of trophic levels. Strong variations in δ15N signatures demonstrated that mesofauna species are feeding at multiple trophic levels. Primary decomposers were low and most mesofauna species functioned as secondary decomposers or predators including second order predators or scavengers. The results document that major decomposer taxa, such as Collembola and Oribatida, are more diverse than previously assumed and predominantly dwell on autochthonous resources of the respective salt marsh zone. The results further

  13. How three countries in the Americas are fortifying dietary salt reduction: a north and south perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legowski, Barbara; Legetic, Branka

    2011-09-01

    A chronic disease/risk factor prevention framework with three policy environments--communications, physical and economic--was used to organize population level interventions that address the "over consumption of dietary salt", a key risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The framework was then used to map the population based strategies to reduce dietary salt consumption being applied in three countries in the Americas--Argentina, Canada and Chile--each with a history of multi-sector approaches to deal with the risk factors for chronic disease, offering a north versus south perspective. Results show that in all three countries policy instruments are concentrated in the communications environment, e.g., media and education campaigns and/or regulations for standardized information on the salt or sodium content of packaged food products. Notable gaps are the requirement for nutrient information on meals and food items prepared by food establishments and restrictions on advertising and marketing of foods to children. In the physical environment, referring to the sodium levels in commercially prepared foods and meals available on the market, voluntary reformulation of food products is underway at this time in the three countries. Argentina and Chile began with bread and have gradually added other food categories; Canada at the outset is addressing all food categories where products have added salt. Argentina alone is at this point actively approaching regulations to limit the salt content of food, preferring this over ongoing monitoring of voluntary targets. No government in the three counties has yet considered action in the economic environment, a complex area where the research on and initiatives to limit or disadvantage energy-dense food products to address obesity may also capture foods that are highly salted. In the meantime, with recent research estimating substantially higher gains in population health from government legislation to limit salt in foods

  14. The structure of salt marsh soil mesofauna food webs – The prevalence of disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiggen, Mirijam; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Mesofauna taxa fill key trophic positions in soil food webs, even in terrestrial–marine boundary habitats characterized by frequent natural disturbances. Salt marshes represent such boundary habitats, characterized by frequent inundations increasing from the terrestrial upper to the marine pioneer zone. Despite the high abundance of soil mesofauna in salt marshes and their important function by facilitating energy and carbon flows, the structure, trophic ecology and habitat-related diet shifts of mesofauna species in natural salt marsh habitats is virtually unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of natural disturbance (inundation frequency) on community structure, food web complexity and resource use of soil mesofauna using stable isotope analysis (15N, 13C) in three salt marsh zones. In this intertidal habitat, the pioneer zone is exposed to inundations twice a day, but lower and upper salt marshes are less frequently inundated based on shore height. The mesofauna comprised 86 species / taxa dominated by Collembola, Oribatida and Mesostigmata. Shifts in environmental disturbances influenced the structure of food webs, diversity and density declined strongly from the land to the sea pointing to the importance of increasing levels of inundation frequency. Accordingly, the reduced diversity and density was associated by a simplification of the food web in the pioneer zone as compared to the less inundated lower and upper salt marsh with a higher number of trophic levels. Strong variations in δ15N signatures demonstrated that mesofauna species are feeding at multiple trophic levels. Primary decomposers were low and most mesofauna species functioned as secondary decomposers or predators including second order predators or scavengers. The results document that major decomposer taxa, such as Collembola and Oribatida, are more diverse than previously assumed and predominantly dwell on autochthonous resources of the respective salt marsh zone. The results

  15. The structure of salt marsh soil mesofauna food webs - The prevalence of disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Haynert

    Full Text Available Mesofauna taxa fill key trophic positions in soil food webs, even in terrestrial-marine boundary habitats characterized by frequent natural disturbances. Salt marshes represent such boundary habitats, characterized by frequent inundations increasing from the terrestrial upper to the marine pioneer zone. Despite the high abundance of soil mesofauna in salt marshes and their important function by facilitating energy and carbon flows, the structure, trophic ecology and habitat-related diet shifts of mesofauna species in natural salt marsh habitats is virtually unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of natural disturbance (inundation frequency on community structure, food web complexity and resource use of soil mesofauna using stable isotope analysis (15N, 13C in three salt marsh zones. In this intertidal habitat, the pioneer zone is exposed to inundations twice a day, but lower and upper salt marshes are less frequently inundated based on shore height. The mesofauna comprised 86 species / taxa dominated by Collembola, Oribatida and Mesostigmata. Shifts in environmental disturbances influenced the structure of food webs, diversity and density declined strongly from the land to the sea pointing to the importance of increasing levels of inundation frequency. Accordingly, the reduced diversity and density was associated by a simplification of the food web in the pioneer zone as compared to the less inundated lower and upper salt marsh with a higher number of trophic levels. Strong variations in δ15N signatures demonstrated that mesofauna species are feeding at multiple trophic levels. Primary decomposers were low and most mesofauna species functioned as secondary decomposers or predators including second order predators or scavengers. The results document that major decomposer taxa, such as Collembola and Oribatida, are more diverse than previously assumed and predominantly dwell on autochthonous resources of the respective salt marsh zone

  16. Complexation thermodynamics of modified cyclodextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönbeck, Jens Christian Sidney; Westh, Peter; Holm, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion complexes between two bile salts and a range of differently methylated β-cyclodextrins were studied in an attempt to rationalize the complexation thermodynamics of modified cyclodextrins. Calorimetric titrations at a range of temperatures provided precise values of the enthalpies (ΔH......°), entropies (ΔS°), and heat capacities (ΔCp) of complexation, while molecular dynamics simulations assisted the interpretation of the obtained thermodynamic parameters. As previously observed for several types of modified cyclodextrins, the substituents at the rims of the cyclodextrin induced large changes......° and then a strong decrease when the degree of substitution exceeded some threshold. Exactly the same trend was observed for ΔCp. The dehydration of nonpolar surface, as quantified by the simulations, can to a large extent explain the variation in the thermodynamic parameters. The methyl substituents form additional...

  17. Silicon alleviates salt stress, decreases malondialdehyde content ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... A greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of silicon (Si) application on cut rose (Rosa xhybrida L.) 'Hot Lady' under two levels of salt stress. Four Si concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 ppm) as Si were combined with a 25 mM NaCl (EC ≈ 3.8) level in the.

  18. Crushed-salt constitutive model update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C.; Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Modifications to the constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt are presented in this report. Two mechanisms--dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solutioning--defined previously but used separately are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. New creep consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and southeastern New Mexico salt to determine material parameters for the constitutive model. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to data from the shear consolidation tests and a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests produced two sets of material parameter values for the model. The change in material parameter values from test group to test group indicates the empirical nature of the model but demonstrates improvement over earlier work with the previous models. Key improvements are the ability to capture lateral strain reversal and better resolve parameter values. To demonstrate the predictive capability of the model, each parameter value set was used to predict each of the tests in the database. Based on the fitting statistics and the ability of the model to predict the test data, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt quite well.

  19. Constitutive behavior of reconsolidating crushed salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, G.D.; Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The constitutive model used to describe deformation of crushed salt is presented in this paper. Two mechanisms--dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solutioning--are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Recently completed creep consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and southeastern New Mexico salt to determine material parameters for the constitutive model. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to data from shear consolidation tests and a combination of shear and hydrostatic tests produces two sets of material parameter values for the model. Changes in material parameter values from test group to test group indicate the empirical nature of the model but show significant improvement over earlier work. To demonstrate the predictive capability of the model, each parameter value set was used to predict each of the tests in the database. Based on fitting statistics and ability of the model to predict test data, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt quite well.

  20. Bile salts in control of lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Groen, Albert K.

    Purpose of review The view on bile salts has evolved over the years from being regarded as simple detergents that aid intestinal absorption of fat-soluble nutrients to being important hormone-like integrators of metabolism. This review provides an update on the rapidly developing field of

  1. Bile salts in control of lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Groen, Albert K.

    2016-01-01

    The view on bile salts has evolved over the years from being regarded as simple detergents that aid intestinal absorption of fat-soluble nutrients to being important hormone-like integrators of metabolism. This review provides an update on the rapidly developing field of interactions between bile

  2. Salt repository project closeout status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE's) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Geothermal studies of seven interior salt domes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report defines and compares the geothermal environments of eight selected Gulf Coast salt domes. The thermal regimes in and around Gulf Coast salt domes are not well documented. The data base used for this study is an accumulation of bottom-hole temperature readings from oil and gas exploration wells and temperature logs run for the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. The bottom-hole tempreatures were corrected in order to estimate the actual geothermal environments. Prior thermal studies and models indicate temperatures in and around salt domes are elevated above the norm by 1 0 F to 25 0 F. Using existing geothermal data and accepted theory, geothermal gradients for the selected domes and surrounding sediments were estimated. This study concludes that salt domes within a given basin have similar geothermal gradients, but that the basins differ in average geothermal gradients. This relationship is probably controlled by deep basement structural trends. No evidence of residual heat of emplacement was found associated with any of the selected domes

  4. Fluid inclusions in salt: an annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isherwood, D.J.

    1979-01-26

    An annotated bibliography is presented which was compiled while searching the literature for information on fluid inclusions in salt for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's study on the deep-geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The migration of fluid inclusions in a thermal gradient is a potential hazard to the safe disposal of nuclear waste in a salt repository. At the present time, a prediction as to whether this hazard precludes the use of salt for waste disposal can not be made. Limited data from the Salt-Vault in situ heater experiments in the early 1960's (Bradshaw and McClain, 1971) leave little doubt that fluid inclusions can migrate towards a heat source. In addition to the bibliography, there is a brief summary of the physical and chemical characteristics that together with the temperature of the waste will determine the chemical composition of the brine in contact with the waste canister, the rate of fluid migration, and the brine-canister-waste interactions.

  5. Dimensional crossover and deconfinement in Bechgaard salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giamarchi, T.; Biermann, S.; Georges, A.; Lichtenstein, A.I.

    2004-01-01

    The Bechgaard salts are made of weakly coupled one dimensional chains. This particular structure gives the possibility to observe in these systems a dimensional crossover between a high temperature (or high energy) one dimensional phase and a two or three dimensional system. Since the filling of the

  6. Crushed-salt constitutive model update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C.; Mellegard, K.D.; Hansen, F.D.

    1998-01-01

    Modifications to the constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt are presented in this report. Two mechanisms--dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solutioning--defined previously but used separately are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. New creep consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and southeastern New Mexico salt to determine material parameters for the constitutive model. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to data from the shear consolidation tests and a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests produced two sets of material parameter values for the model. The change in material parameter values from test group to test group indicates the empirical nature of the model but demonstrates improvement over earlier work with the previous models. Key improvements are the ability to capture lateral strain reversal and better resolve parameter values. To demonstrate the predictive capability of the model, each parameter value set was used to predict each of the tests in the database. Based on the fitting statistics and the ability of the model to predict the test data, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt quite well

  7. Salt for the earthen oven revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2011-06-07

    237) argued as early as in 1981 that, in the ancient world, salt was a catalytic agent used in the typical earthen oven by peasants to facilitate the burning of dung, the common fuel. He repeated that information in a commentary ...

  8. Salt repository project closeout status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-06-01

    This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Restoration of salt marshes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.; Esselink, P.; Dijkema, K.S.; Duin, van W.E.; Jong, de D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The conquest of land from the sea has been a long tradition in the Netherlands. When salt marshes were high enough, they were embanked when it was economically feasible, and transformed into intensively exploited agricultural land. This resulted in the transformation of halophytic communities to

  10. Restoration of salt marshes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, JP; Esselink, Peter; Dijkema, KS; van Duin, WE; de Jong, D.J.

    The conquest of land from the sea has been a long tradition in the Netherlands. When salt marshes were high enough, they were embanked when it was economically feasible, and transformed into intensively exploited agricultural land. This resulted in the transformation of halophytic communities to

  11. The Path to Nitrate Salt Disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-16

    The topic is presented in a series of slides arranged according to the following outline: LANL nitrate salt incident as thermal runaway (thermally sensitive surrogates, full-scale tests), temperature control for processing, treatment options and down selection, assessment of engineering options, anticipated control set for treatment, and summary of the overall steps for RNS.

  12. Responses of Cymbopogon schoenanthus to salt stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-27

    Mar 27, 2012 ... Responses of Cymbopogon schoenanthus to salt stress. Ayda Khadhri1*, Ridha El Mokni2, Khaled Mguis3, Mohamed Neffati4 and Samira Smiti1. 1Research Unit of ... medium (Garg et al., 2002; Moinuddin et al., 2005), and measures their ..... The ability of a plant to survive under restrictive environmental.

  13. Fluid inclusions in salt: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    An annotated bibliography is presented which was compiled while searching the literature for information on fluid inclusions in salt for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's study on the deep-geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The migration of fluid inclusions in a thermal gradient is a potential hazard to the safe disposal of nuclear waste in a salt repository. At the present time, a prediction as to whether this hazard precludes the use of salt for waste disposal can not be made. Limited data from the Salt-Vault in situ heater experiments in the early 1960's (Bradshaw and McClain, 1971) leave little doubt that fluid inclusions can migrate towards a heat source. In addition to the bibliography, there is a brief summary of the physical and chemical characteristics that together with the temperature of the waste will determine the chemical composition of the brine in contact with the waste canister, the rate of fluid migration, and the brine-canister-waste interactions

  14. Solid waste disposal into salt mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repke, W.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: general introduction to disposal of radioactive waste; handling of solid nuclear waste; technology of final disposal, with specific reference to salt domes; conditioning of radioactive waste; safety barriers for radioactive waste; practice of final disposal in other countries. (U.K.)

  15. Constitutive behavior of reconsolidating crushed salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, G.D.; Mellegard, K.D.; Hansen, F.D.

    1998-02-01

    The constitutive model used to describe deformation of crushed salt is presented in this paper. Two mechanisms--dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solutioning--are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Recently completed creep consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and southeastern New Mexico salt to determine material parameters for the constitutive model. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to data from shear consolidation tests and a combination of shear and hydrostatic tests produces two sets of material parameter values for the model. Changes in material parameter values from test group to test group indicate the empirical nature of the model but show significant improvement over earlier work. To demonstrate the predictive capability of the model, each parameter value set was used to predict each of the tests in the database. Based on fitting statistics and ability of the model to predict test data, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt quite well

  16. Salt-avoidance tropism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Ws

    2008-05-01

    The orientation of plant root growth is modulated by developmental as well as environmental cues. Among the environmental factors, gravity has been extensively studied because of its overpowering effects in modulating root growth direction. However, our knowledge of the effects of other abiotic signals that influence root growth direction is largely unknown. Recently, we have shown that high salinity can modify root growth direction by inducing rapid amyloplast degradation in root columella cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. By exploiting salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants and PIN2 expression analyses, we have shown that the altered root growth direction in response to salt is mediated by ion disequilibrium and is correlated with PIN2 mRNA abundance and expression and localization of the protein. Our study demonstrates that the SOS pathway may mediate this process. Here we discuss our data from broader perspectives. We propose that salt-induced modification of root growth direction is a salt-avoidance behavior, which is an active adaptive mechanism for plants grown under saline conditions. Furthermore, high salinity also stimulates alteration of gravitropic growth of shoots. These findings illustrate that plants have a fine and sophisticated sensory and communication system that enable plants to dynamically and efficiently cope with rapidly changing environment.

  17. Triethylammonium salt of dimethyl diphenyldithiophosphates: Single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Triethylammonium salt of dimethyl diphenyldithiophosphates: Single crystal X-ray and DFT analysis. SANDEEP KUMAR RUCHI KHAJURIA MANDEEP KOUR RAKESH KUMAR LOVE KARAN RANA GEETA HUNDAL VIVEK K GUPTA RAJNI KANT SUSHIL K PANDEY. Regular Article Volume 128 Issue 6 June 2016 pp ...

  18. Organometallic Salts Generate Optical Second Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Seth R.; Perry, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    Series of organometallic salts exhibit large second-order dielectric susceptibilities, as evidenced by generation of second harmonics when illuminated at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Investigations of these and related compounds continue with view toward development of materials for use as optical second-harmonic generators, electro-optical modulators, optical switches, piezoelectric sensors, and parametric crystals.

  19. Impact evaluation of iron & iodine fortified salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K M; Brahmam, G N; Ranganathan, S; Vijayaraghavan, K; Sivakumar, B; Krishnaswamy, K

    1998-11-01

    As a novel approach to tackle the problems of iron deficiency anaemia and iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs), which often coexist, the National Institute of Nutrition has developed iron and iodine fortified common salt (double fortified salt-DFS) as a public health measure. This salt has undergone a battery of laboratory and field tests to evaluate its feasibility for use in a national programme. The DFS is designed to provide 1 mg of iron and 15 micrograms of iodine per gram of common salt. This was made possible by the inclusion of a polyphosphate stabilizer, sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) at 1 per cent level. The stability of iron and iodine was found to be good up to 6 months. However, the stability of iodine depended upon the quality of the salt used for fortification. The biological effects of long-term consumption of DFS were evaluated in experimental rats and in field trials. Both iron and iodine from the salt were found to be biologically available in regenerating haemoglobin and in increasing excretion of iodine in urine. When this salt was tested in tribal villages endemic for goitre and iron deficiency anaemia, the bioresponse was good with regard to the iodine status but was not uniform in all segments with regard to iron, probably due to confounding variables. In a study carried out in residential school children where such variables did not exist, DFS was found to have significant impact on haemoglobin status in anaemic children and improved their urinary iodine excretion. The consumption of DFS for 2 yr did not have any adverse effects in school children as well as in the tribal population. Parameters related to calcium homeostasis were not altered in children receiving DFS. Histopathological examination of tissues and radiological examination of bone did not reveal any abnormality in DFS fed rats. Similarly serum and urinary parameters related to calcium and phosphorus were not altered in DFS fed rats. Therefore, DFS is presented as a feasible and

  20. Heat transfer behavior of molten nitrate salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Apurba K.; Clark, Michael M.; Teigen, Bard C.; Fiveland, Woodrow A.; Anderson, Mark H.

    2016-05-01

    The usage of molten nitrate salt as heat transfer fluid and thermal storage medium decouples the generation of electricity from the variable nature of the solar resource, allowing CSP plants to avoid curtailment and match production with demand. This however brings some unique challenges for the design of the molten salt central receiver (MSCR). An aspect critical to the use of molten nitrate (60wt%/40wt% - NaNO3/KNO3) salt as heat transfer fluid in the MSCR is to understand its heat transfer behavior. Alstom collaborated with the University of Wisconsin to conduct a series of experiments and experimentally determined the heat transfer coefficients of molten nitrate salt up to high Reynolds number (Re > 2.0E5) and heat flux (q″ > 1000 kW/m2), conditions heretofore not reported in the literature. A cartridge heater instrumented with thermocouples was installed inside a stainless steel pipe to form an annular test section. The test section was installed in the molten salt flow loop at the University of Wisconsin facility, and operated over a range of test conditions to determine heat transfer data that covered the expected operating regime of a practical molten salt receiver. Heat transfer data were compared to widely accepted correlations found in heat transfer literature, including that of Gnielinski. At lower Reynolds number conditions, the results from this work concurred with the molten salt heat transfer data reported in literature and followed the aforementioned correlations. However, in the region of interest for practical receiver design, the correlations did not accurately model the experimentally determined heat transfer data. Two major effects were observed: (i) all other factors remaining constant, the Nusselt numbers gradually plateaued at higher Reynolds number; and (ii) at higher Reynolds number a positive interaction of heat flux on Nusselt number was noted. These effects are definitely not modeled by the existing correlations. In this paper a new

  1. Lewis Dahl and the genetics of salt-induced hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Bashyam, Hema

    2007-01-01

    In the 1960s, Lewis Dahl bred two strains of rats that differed in their susceptibility to developing salt-induced hypertension. These animal models proved that hypertension induced by a high-salt diet is influenced by genetic background.

  2. Potential effect of salt reduction in processed foods on health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, M.A.H.; Hoogenveen, R.T.; Hoekstra, J.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Raaij, van J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Excessive salt intake has been associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Reducing salt intake is considered an important public health strategy in the Netherlands. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the health benefits of

  3. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-14

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  4. The natural regeneration of salt marsh on formerly reclaimed land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbutt, Angus; Wolters, Mineke

    Question: Does the vegetation of restored salt marshes increasingly resemble natural reference communities over time? Location: The Essex estuaries, southeast England. Methods: Abandoned reclamations, where coastal defences had been breached in storm events, and Current salt marsh recreation schemes

  5. 21 CFR 172.660 - Salts of furcelleran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.660 Salts of furcelleran. The food additive salts...

  6. 21 CFR 172.626 - Salts of carrageenan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.626 Salts of carrageenan. The food additive salts...

  7. Compound list: imatinib, methanesulfonate salt [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available imatinib, methanesulfonate salt IMA 00186 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-t...ggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/imatinib%2C_methanesulfonate_salt.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  8. Identifying salt stress-responsive transcripts from Roselle ( Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hibiscus sabdariffa L.). Identifying the potentially novel transcripts responsible for salt stress tolerance in roselle will increase knowledge of the molecular mechanism underlying salt stress responses. In this study, differential display reverse ...

  9. Salt Acclimation of Cyanobacteria and Their Application in Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadin Pade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The long evolutionary history and photo-autotrophic lifestyle of cyanobacteria has allowed them to colonize almost all photic habitats on Earth, including environments with high or fluctuating salinity. Their basal salt acclimation strategy includes two principal reactions, the active export of ions and the accumulation of compatible solutes. Cyanobacterial salt acclimation has been characterized in much detail using selected model cyanobacteria, but their salt sensing and regulatory mechanisms are less well understood. Here, we briefly review recent advances in the identification of salt acclimation processes and the essential genes/proteins involved in acclimation to high salt. This knowledge is of increasing importance because the necessary mass cultivation of cyanobacteria for future use in biotechnology will be performed in sea water. In addition, cyanobacterial salt resistance genes also can be applied to improve the salt tolerance of salt sensitive organisms, such as crop plants.

  10. Oxidative stress-induced glomerular mineralocorticoid receptor activation limits the benefit of salt reduction in Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kento Kitada

    Full Text Available Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR antagonists attenuate renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertensive rats with low plasma aldosterone levels. We hypothesized that oxidative stress causes MR activation in high-salt-fed Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Furthermore, we determined if MR activation persisted and induced renal injury, even after switching from a high- to a normal-salt diet.High-salt feeding for 4 weeks increased dihydroethidium fluorescence (DHE, an oxidant production marker, p22phox (a NADPH oxidase subunit and serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1 (SGK1, an MR transcript in glomeruli, compared with normal-salt feeding, and these changes persisted 4 weeks after salt withdrawal. Tempol treatment (0.5 mmol/L during high-salt feeding abolished the changes in DHE fluorescence, p22phox and SGK1. Dietary salt reduction after a 4-week high-salt diet decreased both blood pressure and proteinuria, but was associated with significantly higher proteinuria than in normal control rats at 4 weeks after salt reduction. Administration of tempol during high-salt feeding, or eplerenone, an MR antagonist (100 mg/kg/day, started after salt reduction, recovered proteinuria to normal levels at 4 weeks after salt reduction. Paraquat, a reactive oxygen species generator, enhanced MR transcriptional activity in cultured rat mesangial cells and mouse podocytes.These results suggest that oxidative stress plays an important role in glomerular MR activation in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Persistent MR activation even after reducing salt intake could limit the beneficial effects of salt restriction.

  11. saltPAD: A New Analytical Tool for Monitoring Salt Iodization in Low Resource Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M. Myers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We created a paper test card that measures a common iodizing agent, iodate, in salt. To test the analytical metrics, usability, and robustness of the paper test card when it is used in low resource settings, the South African Medical Research Council and GroundWork performed independ‐ ent validation studies of the device. The accuracy and precision metrics from both studies were comparable. In the SAMRC study, more than 90% of the test results (n=1704 were correctly classified as corresponding to adequately or inadequately iodized salt. The cards are suitable for market and household surveys to determine whether salt is adequately iodized. Further development of the cards will improve their utility for monitoring salt iodization during production.

  12. POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF DEVELOPMENT OF SALT SENSITIVE ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantaria, N; Pantsulaia, I; Andronikashvili, I; Simonia, G

    2016-09-01

    It has been known that salt-sensitivity of blood pressure is defined genetically as well as can be developed secondary to either decreased renal function or by influence of other environmental factors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible mechanism for the development of salt-sensitive essential hypertension in the population of Georgia. The Case-Control study included 185 subjects, 94 cases with Essential Hypertension stage I (JNC7) without prior antihypertensive treatment, and 91 controls. Salt-sensitivity test was used to divide both case and control groups into salt-sensitive (n=112) and salt-resistant (n=73) subgroups. Endogenous cardiotonic steroids, sodium and PRA were measured in blood and urine samples at the different sodium conditions. Determinations of circulating levels of endogenous sodium pump inhibitors and PRA were carried out using the ELISA and RIA methods. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Differences in variables between sodium conditions were assessed using paired t-tests. Salt-sensitivity was found in 60.5% of total population investigated, with higher frequency in females. Salt-sensitivity positively correlated with age in females (r=0.262, psalt-sensitivity r=0.334, psalt-sensitivity and PRA. Since no significant correlations were found between BMI and salt-sensitivity, we assume that BMI and salt-sensitivity should be discussed as different independent risk factors for the development of Essential Hypertension. Significant correlation was found between changes in GFR in salt-sensitive cases and controls phypertensive nephropathy in salt-sensitive individuals. At the high sodium condition Endogenous MBG and OU were high in salt-sensitive subjects compared to salt-resistant. These compounds decreased after low salt diet in salt-sensitive cases as well as controls but remained within the same level in salt-resistant individuals. MBG and OU levels positively correlated with SBP in salt-sensitive individuals but

  13. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Investigations on PVdF- HFP - PEMA polymer blend electrolytes doped with different lithium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojkumar Ubarhande, Radha; Bhattacharya, Shreya; Usha Rani, M.; Shanker Babu, Ravi; Krishnaveni, S.

    2017-11-01

    Plasticized polymer blend electrolytes were prepared by incorporating poly (vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)(PVdF-HFP) and poly(ethylmethacrylate) (PEMA) complexed with plasticizer (PC) and different lithium salts such as LiClO4, LiBF4, LiCF3SO3 and LiN (CF3SO2)2) using solution-casting technique. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infra-red techniques confirms the structural characters and complex formation of the polymer electrolytes respectively. AC impedance analysis was carried out for all the samples in the range303-373K. The results suggest that among the various lithium salts, LiN (CF3SO2)2) based electrolytes exhibited the highest ionic conductivity (3.17 × 10-3 Scm-1).

  15. The effects of restricted circulation on the salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, K.M.; Bolke, E.L.

    1973-01-01

    During the 1970-1972 water years a net load of dissolved solids of 0.26 billion tons moved from the south to north part of Great Salt Lake, Utah, through the causeway of the Southern Pacific Transportation Co. The load loss from the south part during the 1972 water year was only 0.01 billion tons, thus indicating that the salt balance between the two parts of the lake was near equilibrium for inflow conditions such as those of 1972.

  16. Thermal Properties of Consolidated Granular Salt as a Backfill Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneru, Laxmi P.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Stormont, John C.

    2018-03-01

    Granular salt has been proposed as backfill material in drifts and shafts of a nuclear waste disposal facility where it will serve to conduct heat away from the waste to the host rock. Creep closure of excavations in rock salt will consolidate (reduce the porosity of) the granular salt. This study involved measuring the thermal conductivity and specific heat of granular salt as a function of porosity and temperature to aid in understanding how thermal properties will change during granular salt consolidation accomplished at pressures and temperatures consistent with a nuclear waste disposal facility. Thermal properties of samples from laboratory-consolidated granular salt and in situ consolidated granular salt were measured using a transient plane source method at temperatures ranging from 50 to 250 °C. Additional measurements were taken on a single crystal of halite and dilated polycrystalline rock salt. Thermal conductivity of granular salt decreased with increases in temperature and porosity. Specific heat of granular salt at lower temperatures decreased with increasing porosity. At higher temperatures, porosity dependence was not apparent. The thermal conductivity and specific heat data were fit to empirical models and compared with results presented in the literature. At comparable densities, the thermal conductivities of granular salt samples consolidated hydrostatically in this study were greater than those measured previously on samples formed by quasi-static pressing. Petrographic studies of the consolidated salt indicate that the consolidation method influenced the nature of the porosity; these observations are used to explain the variation of measured thermal conductivities between the two consolidation methods. Thermal conductivity of dilated polycrystalline salt was lower than consolidated salt at comparable porosities. The pervasive crack network along grain boundaries in dilated salt impedes heat flow and results in a lower thermal conductivity

  17. 21 CFR 172.863 - Salts of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Salts of fatty acids. 172.863 Section 172.863 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.863 Salts of fatty acids. The food additive salts of fatty acids may be safely..., magnesium, potassium, and sodium salts of the fatty acids conforming with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid...

  18. Quantifying Trophic Interactions and Carbon Flow in Louisiana Salt Marshes Using Multiple Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, M. J.; Lopez-Duarte, P. C.; Olin, J.; Johnson, J. J.; Able, K.; Martin, C. W.; Fodrie, J.; Hooper-Bui, L. M.; Taylor, S.; Stouffer, P.; Roberts, B. J.; Rabalais, N. N.; Jensen, O.

    2017-12-01

    Salt marshes are critical habitats for many species in the northern Gulf of Mexico. However, given their complex nature, quantifying trophic linkages and the flow of carbon through salt marsh food webs is challenging. This gap in our understanding of food web structure and function limits our ability to evaluate the impacts of natural and anthropogenic stressors on salt marsh ecosystems. For example, 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill had the potential to alter trophic and energy pathways. Even so, our ability to evaluate its effects on Louisiana salt marsh food webs was limited by a poor basis for comparison of the pre-spill baseline food web. To be better equipped to measure significant alterations in salt marsh ecosystems in the future, we quantified trophic interactions at two marsh sites in Barataria Bay, LA in May and October of 2015. Trophic structure and carbon flow across 52 species of saltmarsh primary producers and consumers were examined through a combination of three approaches: bulk tissue stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S), dietary fatty acid analysis (FAA), and compound-specific stable isotope analysis of essential amino acids (δ13C EAA). Bulk stable isotope analysis indicated similar trophic diversity between sites and seasons with the use of aquatic resources increasing concomitantly with trophic level. FAA and δ13C EAA biomarkers revealed that marsh organisms were largely divided into two groups: those that primarily derive carbon from terrestrial C4 grasses, and those that predominately derive carbon from a combination of phytoplankton and benthic microalgal sources. Differences in trophic structure and carbon flow were minimal between seasons and sites that were variably impacted by the DWH spill. These data on salt marsh ecosystem structure will be useful to inform future injury assessments and restoration initiatives.

  19. Biotic interactions mediate the expansion of black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) into salt marshes under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyu; Zhang, Yihui; Lan, Zhenjiang; Pennings, Steven C

    2013-09-01

    Many species are expanding their distributions to higher latitudes due to global warming. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these distribution shifts is critical for better understanding the impacts of climate changes. The climate envelope approach is widely used to model and predict species distribution shifts with changing climates. Biotic interactions between species, however, may also influence species distributions, and a better understanding of biotic interactions could improve predictions based solely on climate envelope models. Along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, USA, subtropical black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) at the northern limit of its distribution grows sympatrically with temperate salt marsh plants in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. In recent decades, freeze-free winters have led to an expansion of black mangrove into salt marshes. We examined how biotic interactions between black mangrove and salt marsh vegetation along the Texas coast varied across (i) a latitudinal gradient (associated with a winter-temperature gradient); (ii) the elevational gradient within each marsh (which creates different marsh habitats); and (iii) different life history stages of black mangroves (seedlings vs. juvenile trees). Each of these variables affected the strength or nature of biotic interactions between black mangrove and salt marsh vegetation: (i) Salt marsh vegetation facilitated black mangrove seedlings at their high-latitude distribution limit, but inhibited black mangrove seedlings at lower latitudes; (ii) mangroves performed well at intermediate elevations, but grew and survived poorly in high- and low-marsh habitats; and (iii) the effect of salt marsh vegetation on black mangroves switched from negative to neutral as black mangroves grew from seedlings into juvenile trees. These results indicate that the expansion of black mangroves is mediated by complex biotic interactions. A better understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecological

  20. Induced seismicity in a salt mine environment evaluated by a coupled continuum-discrete modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercerat, E.; Souley, M.; Driad, L.; Bernard, P.

    2005-12-01

    Within the framework of a research project launched to assess the feasibility of seismic monitoring of underground growing cavities, this specific work focus on two main complementary axis: the validation of seismic monitoring techniques in salt mine environments, and the numerical modelling of deformation and failure mechanisms with their associated acoustic emissions, the induced microseismicity. The underground cavity under monitoring is located at Cerville (Lorraine, France) within a salt layer 180 m deep and it presents a rather regular cylindrical shape of 100 m diameter. Typically, the overburden is characterized by the presence of two competent layers with elasto-brittle behaviour and located 50 m above the salt layer. When the salt exploitation restarts, the cavity will progressively grow causing irreversible damage of the upper layers until its final collapse at a time scale of the order of one year. Numerical modelling of such a complex process requires a large scale model which takes into account both the growing cavity within the salt layer and the mechanical behaviour of the overburden where high deformation and fracturing is expected. To keep the elasto-brittle behaviour of the competent layers where most seismic damage is expected, we use the PFC code (Itasca Cons). To approach the other layers (mainly composed of marls and salt) which present more ductile and/or viscoplastic behaviour, a continuum approach based on the FLAC code (Itasca Cons) is employed. Numerous calibration process were needed to estimate the microproperties used in PFC to reproduce the macroscopic behaviour from laboratory tests performed on samples extracted from the competent layers. As long as the size of the PFC inclusion representing the brittle material is much higher than the core sample sizes, the scale effect of microproperties is examined. The next stage is to perform calculations on the basis of previous macroscopic and microproperties calibration results, and compare

  1. Mechanical and hydraulic behaviour of compacting crushed salt backfill at low porosities. Project REPOPERM. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroehn, Klaus-Peter; Czaikowski, Oliver; Wieczorek, Klaus; Zhang, Chun-Liang; Moog, Helge; Friedenberg, Larissa [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany); Stuehrenberg, Dieter; Heemann, Ulrich [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Jobmann, Michael; Mueller, Christian; Schirmer, Sonja [DBE Technology GmbH (DBE TEC), Peine (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The compaction behavior of crushed salt has been extensively investigated by means of experimental as well as theoretical work. The readiness of numerical tools for the application to modeling the complex coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the crushed salt backfilled in a repository in salt rock has also been demonstrated. Compaction tests were performed under repository-relevant conditions. These tests were supplemented by laboratory work aiming at specific aspects of compaction. The following list covers the topics of these investigations as well as the main results. - Revisiting the determination of the porosity in relevant, past experiments (BGR). - Influence of the grain size distribution on compaction (BGR). - Triaxial compaction test with dry material at low porosities (BGR). - Investigation of the influence of humidity on compaction covers several subtopics. - Permeability associated with low porosity includes two subtopics. - Constitutive equations for two -phase flow (GRS). - Microstructural Investigations (DBE TEC). Parallel to the experimental work attention focussed on several aspects of the basics for modelling the compaction of crushed salt. This work covers checking the validity of the established numerical tools as well as exploring new methods. Topics and main results are listed here: - Development/definition and comparison of constitutive models (BGR). - Benchmark calculations (BGR and GRS). - Capability of scaling-rules for capillary pressure from the oil industry (GRS). - Application of discrete element codes to compacting crushed salt (DBE TEC). Finally, repository-relevant scenarios are discussed as a basis for a realistic but generic numerical model of brine inflow in to a converging back filled drift under a thermal gradient (GRS). This exercise demonstrates the feasibility of modelling crushed salt compaction as a fully coupled thermohydraulic-mechanical process including two-phase flow effects.

  2. Salt briquette: the form of salt monopoly in madura, 1883-1911

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnu; Alrianingrum, S.; Artono; Liana, C.

    2018-01-01

    This study describes the history of the salt monopoly in Indonesia because it is associated with the issue of salt crisis lately, widely reported in various media. This study tried to find answers to the relationship between monopoly and crisis events through the study of history. Monopoly policy by the government of the colonial period is actually an industrial modernization effort, but it turned out another impact. Although the colonial government wanted to issue a policy that ends strengthens the position of the government in the industry, but ultimately backfire and disasters in the salt industry at the time. This article discusses only the focus of the salt monopoly in Madura as a selection of events, arguing the island as a center of salt in Indonesia. The method used in this study using a review of history. Therefore, their explanations using historical sources. Methodologically through the process of collecting historical sources, criticize these sources, synthesize and interpret the analysis in an array of historical writing. In conclusion, although the salt monopoly policy gives a great advantage to the colonial government, but the overall population of Madura remains in a poor state. It is evident that the Madurese to migrate Madurese to various areas outside the island of Madura, to fix the economy.

  3. Recent Trends in Bird Abundance on Rhode Island Salt Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt marsh habitat is under pressure from development on the landward side, and sea level rise from the seaward side. The resulting loss of habitat is potentially disastrous for salt marsh dependent species. To assess the population status of three species of salt marsh dependent...

  4. Chemical analysis of the Assale (Ethiopia) rock salt deposit | Binega ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    contaminants) elements found in the Assale (Ethiopia) rock salt. The results showed that the rock salt is found to be the best natural common salt. This was proved by comparison with the chemical requirement and trace elements in common ...

  5. SALT, HISTORY AND CULTURE IN THE WESTERN GRASSLANDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dean SPGS NAU

    household in salt business clearly shows that salt was important. It also shows that it was an essential and scarce commodity which needed regulation to benefit the highly placed in society as well as those who belonged to the lower rung of the social ladder.Other commodities were used in exchange for salt because of its ...

  6. Stability of pharmaceutical salts in solid oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Haichen; Byrn, Stephen R; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2017-08-01

    Using pharmaceutical salts in solid dosage forms can raise stability concerns, especially salt dissociation which can adversely affect the product performance. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the salt instability encountered in solid-state formulations is imperative to ensure the product quality. The present article uses the fundamental theory of acid base, ionic equilibrium, relationship of pH and solubility as a starting point to illustrate and interpret the salt formation and salt disproportionation in pharmaceutical systems. The criteria of selecting the optimal salt form and the underlying theory of salt formation and disproportionation are reviewed in detail. Factors influencing salt stability in solid dosage forms are scrutinized and discussed with the case studies. In addition, both commonly used and innovative strategies for preventing salt dissociations in formulation, on storage and during manufacturing will be suggested herein. This article will provide formulation scientists and manufacturing engineers an insight into the mechanisms of salt disproportionation and salt formation, which can help them to avoid and solve the instability issues of pharmaceutical salts in the product design.

  7. Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2014-09-09

    This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

  8. Salt iodisation in Port Harcourt metropolis: a survey of households ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Salt iodisation at the point of production has proved effective in increasing the consumption of iodised salts in Port Harcourt despite the widespread ignorance of the programme and its importance in controlling IDD. That most of the salts had >30 ppm of iodine portends the danger of toxicity with long-term use.

  9. Enhanced antioxidative responses of a salt-resistant wheat cultivar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhanced antioxidative responses of a salt-resistant wheat cultivar facilitate its adaptation to salt stress. L Chen, H Yin, J Xu, X Liu. Abstract. Wheat cultivars capable of accumulating minerals under salt stress are of considerable interest for their potential to improve crop productivity and crop quality. This study addressed the ...

  10. Response of Tomato Genotypes to Induced Salt Stress | Agong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirteen tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) genotypes were subjected to salt treatment under hydroponics and their responses monitored in a set of two experiments with the objective of advancing them as potential salt tolerant tomato scion and/or rootstocks. Salt applications ranged from 0 to 2% NaCl, with the resultant ...

  11. Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane injury and sugar contents in salt-sensitive rice ( Oryza sativa L. spp. indica ) roots under isoosmotic conditions. ... The accumulation of sugars in PT1 roots may be a primary salt-defense mechanism and may function as an osmotic control. Key words: ...

  12. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal salts...

  13. Cesium Salts of Phosphotungstic Acid: Comparison of Surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    acidity and lowest solubility in reaction media in comparison with the other cesium content salts. KEYWORDS. Polyoxometalates, cesium ... insoluble salt of HPA is cesium salt of tungstophosphoric acid,. CsxH3-xPW12O40 (CsxPW), a ... of Cs2CO3, very fine particles (precipitates) were formed to make the solution milky.

  14. Effect of hurricanes and violent storms on salt marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, N.; Ganju, N. K.; Fagherazzi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marsh losses have been documented worldwide because of land use change, wave erosion, and sea-level rise. It is still unclear how resistant salt marshes are to extreme storms and whether they can survive multiple events without collapsing. Based on a large dataset of salt marsh lateral erosion rates collected around the world, here, we determine the general response of salt marsh boundaries to wave action under normal and extreme weather conditions. As wave energy increases, salt marsh response to wind waves remains linear, and there is not a critical threshold in wave energy above which salt marsh erosion drastically accelerates. We apply our general formulation for salt marsh erosion to historical wave climates at eight salt marsh locations affected by hurricanes in the United States. Based on the analysis of two decades of data, we find that violent storms and hurricanes contribute less than 1% to long-term salt marsh erosion rates. In contrast, moderate storms with a return period of 2.5 mo are those causing the most salt marsh deterioration. Therefore, salt marshes seem more susceptible to variations in mean wave energy rather than changes in the extremes. The intrinsic resistance of salt marshes to violent storms and their predictable erosion rates during moderate events should be taken into account by coastal managers in restoration projects and risk management plans.

  15. Use of sodium salt electrolysis in the process of continuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents test results concerning the selection of sodium salt for the technology of continuous modification of the EN AC-AlSi12 alloy, which is based on electrolysis of sodium salts, occurring directly in a crucible with liquid alloy. Sodium ions formed as a result of the sodium salt dissociation and the electrolysis are ...

  16. [Food processing industry--the salt shock to the consumers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doko Jelinić, Jagoda; Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Andabaka, Damir

    2010-05-01

    Industrial food production and processing is necessarily connected with the use of salt. Salt or sodium chloride is used as a preservative, spice, agent for color maintenance, texture, and to regulate fermentation by stopping the growth of bacteria, yeast and mold. Besides kitchen salt, other types of salt that also contain sodium are used in various technological processes in food preparing industry. Most of the "hidden" salt, 70%-75%, can be brought to the body by using industrial food, which, unfortunately, has been increasingly used due to the modern way of life. Bread and bakery products, meat products, various sauces, dried fish, various types of cheese, fast food, conserved vegetables, ready-made soups and food additives are the most common industrial foods rich in sodium. Many actions have been taken all over the world to restrict salt consumption. The World Health Organization recommends the upper limit of salt input of 5 g per day. These actions appeal to food industry to reduce the proportion of salt in their products. Besides lower salt addition during manufacture, food industry can use salt substitutes, in particular potassium chloride (KCl), in combination with additives that can mask the absence of salt, and flavor intensifiers that also enhance the product salinity. However, food industry is still quite resistant to reducing salt in their products for fear from losing profits.

  17. Effects of basal media, salt concentrations, antioxidant supplements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antioxidants than MS, LS and D basal media. Five different levels of N6 medium salts (10, 30, 50, 70 and 100%) were tested, and the highest transformation efficiency was 15.9% under a 50% salt concentration, followed by 6.4% transformation efficiency with 70 and 3.2% under 100% salt conditions. More than 95% of ...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3629 - Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids... Substances § 721.3629 Triethanolamine salts of fatty acids. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as triethanolamine salts of fatty...

  19. 21 CFR 573.914 - Salts of volatile fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salts of volatile fatty acids. 573.914 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.914 Salts of volatile fatty acids. (a) Identity. The food additive is a... contains ammonium or calcium salts of volatile fatty acids and shall conform to the following...

  20. Health Gain by Salt Reduction in Europe: A Modelling Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, M.A.H.; Raaij, van J.M.A.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Breda, J.; Boshuizen, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive salt intake is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Salt intake exceeds the World Health Organization population nutrition goal of 5 grams per day in the European region. We assessed the health impact of salt reduction in nine European countries (Finland, France,