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Sample records for memory glass effect

  1. Significantly enhanced memory effect in metallic glass by multistep training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. X.; Luo, P.; Sun, Y. T.; Wen, P.; Bai, H. Y.; Liu, Y. H.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-11-01

    The state of metastable equilibrium glass can carry an imprint of the past and exhibit memory effect. As a hallmark of glassy dynamics, memory effect can affect glassy behavior as it evolves further upon time. Even though the physical picture of the memory effect has been well studied, it is unclear whether a glass can recall as many pieces of information as possible, and if so, how the glass will accordingly behave. We report that by fractionizing temperature interval, inserting multistep aging protocols, and optimizing the time of each temperature step, i.e., by imposing a multistep "training" on a prototypical P d40N i10C u30P20 metallic glass, the memory of the trained glass can be significantly strengthened, marked by a pronounced augment in potential energy. These findings provide a new guide for regulating the energy state of glass by enhancing the nonequilibrium behaviors of the memory effect and offer an opportunity to develop a clearer physical picture of glassy dynamics.

  2. Memory Effects in the Two-Level Model for Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Allahverdyan, Armen; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2008-07-01

    We study an ensemble of two-level systems interacting with a thermal bath. This is a well-known model for glasses. The origin of memory effects in this model is a quasistationary but nonequilibrium state of a single two-level system, which is realized due to a finite-rate cooling and slow thermally activated relaxation. We show that single-particle memory effects, such as negativity of the specific heat under reheating, vanish for a sufficiently disordered ensemble. In contrast, a disordered ensemble displays a collective memory effect [similar to the Kovacs effect], where nonequilibrium features of the ensemble are monitored via a macroscopic observable. An experimental realization of the effect can be used to further assess the consistency of the model.

  3. Memory effect and super-spin-glass ordering in an aggregated nanoparticle sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cador, O.; Grasset, F.; Haneda, H.; Etourneau, J.

    2004-01-01

    A system consisting of aggregated nonstoichiometric zinc ferrite nanoparticles has been studied using AC and DC magnetization measurements. A superparamagnetic-super-spin-glass phase transition at T g has been identified. The relaxation time diverges at T g and the nonlinear susceptibility shows an abrupt increase. The critical behavior vanishes when the nanoparticles are not in close contact. The observation of the memory effect identical to that which has been already discovered in canonical spin-glass supports the existence of a true thermodynamic transition in agglomerated magnetic nanoparticles

  4. Atomic theory of viscoelastic response and memory effects in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bingyu; Yang, Jie; Qiao, Jichao; Jiang, Minqiang; Dai, Lanhong; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    An atomic-scale theory of the viscoelastic response of metallic glasses is derived from first principles, using a Zwanzig-Caldeira-Leggett system-bath Hamiltonian as a starting point within the framework of nonaffine linear response to mechanical deformation. This approach provides a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) as the average equation of motion for an atom or ion in the material, from which non-Markovian nonaffine viscoelastic moduli are extracted. These can be evaluated using the vibrational density of states (DOS) as input, where the boson peak plays a prominent role in the mechanics. To compare with experimental data for binary ZrCu alloys, a numerical DOS was obtained from simulations of this system, which also take electronic degrees of freedom into account via the embedded-atom method for the interatomic potential. It is shown that the viscoelastic α -relaxation, including the α -wing asymmetry in the loss modulus, can be very well described by the theory if the memory kernel (the non-Markovian friction) in the GLE is taken to be a stretched-exponential decaying function of time. This finding directly implies strong memory effects in the atomic-scale dynamics and suggests that the α -relaxation time is related to the characteristic time scale over which atoms retain memory of their previous collision history. This memory time grows dramatically below the glass transition.

  5. Electrical switching phenomenon and memory effect in the semiconductor chalcogenide glass Ge0.10 As0.20 Te0.70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haro, M.; Marquez, E.; Villares, P.; Jimenez-Garay, R.

    1987-01-01

    Electrical switching phenomenon, as well as the memory effect in the semiconductor chalcogenide glass Ge 0.10 As 0.20 Te 0.70 has been studied. A device with a plano-punctual interelectrode configuration has been designed and built, so that the electrical stimuli may be applied correctly. This device permits adequate positioning of the upper electrode, as well as contact pressure regulation. The I-V characteristics in the OFF-state have been obtained, showing a marked non-linear character. Equally, a relation has been found between the threshold voltage and electrical resistance parameters, indicating that the electrical power giving rise to the phenomenon is constant. Finally, memory effects showing a sudden reduction in electrical resistance, as well as interelectrode filaments, have been observed. (author)

  6. Memory phenomenon in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ye; Huang, Wei Min; Zhao, Yong; Ding, Zhen; Li, Yan; Tor, Shu Beng; Liu, Erjia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate two memory phenomena in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass (BMG). While the temperature memory effect (TME) is not found by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) test, shape recovery is observed in samples indented at both low and high temperatures. In terms of shape memory related characteristics, this BMG shares some features of shape memory alloys (SMAs) due to its metal nature, and some other features of shape memory polymers (SMPs) owing to its glassy–rubbery transition. The formation of protrusion in the polished sample after heating to super-cooled liquid region (SCLR) indicates that surface tension is not a necessarily positive contributor for shape recovery. Release of internal elastic stress is concluded as the major player. Although the amorphous nature of BMGs enables for storing appreciable amount of internal elastic stress upon deformation, without the presence of cross-linker as in typical SMPs, the shape recovery in BMGs is rather limited. - Highlights: • Experimental investigation of shape recovery in BMG. • Surface tension is not the major reason for shape recovery in BMG. • Release of internal stress is the major contributor for shape recovery. • Comparison of shape memory features of BMG with other shape memory materials.

  7. Memory phenomenon in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Wei Min, E-mail: mwmhuang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Zhao, Yong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ding, Zhen [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Li, Yan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Tor, Shu Beng; Liu, Erjia [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-07-05

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate two memory phenomena in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass (BMG). While the temperature memory effect (TME) is not found by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) test, shape recovery is observed in samples indented at both low and high temperatures. In terms of shape memory related characteristics, this BMG shares some features of shape memory alloys (SMAs) due to its metal nature, and some other features of shape memory polymers (SMPs) owing to its glassy–rubbery transition. The formation of protrusion in the polished sample after heating to super-cooled liquid region (SCLR) indicates that surface tension is not a necessarily positive contributor for shape recovery. Release of internal elastic stress is concluded as the major player. Although the amorphous nature of BMGs enables for storing appreciable amount of internal elastic stress upon deformation, without the presence of cross-linker as in typical SMPs, the shape recovery in BMGs is rather limited. - Highlights: • Experimental investigation of shape recovery in BMG. • Surface tension is not the major reason for shape recovery in BMG. • Release of internal stress is the major contributor for shape recovery. • Comparison of shape memory features of BMG with other shape memory materials.

  8. Aging, rejuvenation, and memory effects in short-range Ising spin glass: Cu_0.5Co_0.5Cl_2-FeCl3 GBIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M.; Suzuki, I. S.

    2004-03-01

    Cu_0.5Co_0.5Cl_2-FeCl3 GBIC undergoes a spin glass (SG) transition at Tg (= 3.92 ± 0.11 K). The system shows a dynamic behavior that has some similarities and some significant differences compared to a 3D Ising SG.^1 Here we report on non-equilibrium aging dynamics which has been studied using zero-field cooled (ZFC) magnetization and low frequency AC magnetic susceptibility.^2 The time dependence of the relaxation rate S(t) = (1/H)dM_ZFC/dln t for the ZFC magnetization after the ZFC aging protocol, shows a peak at a characteristic time t_cr near a wait time t_w, corresponding to a crossover from quasi equilibrium dynamics to non-equilibrium. The time t_cr strongly depends on t_w, temperature, magnetic field, and the temperature shift. The rejuvenation effect is observed in both i^' and i^'' under the T-shift and H-shift procedures. The memory of the specific spin configurations imprinted during the ZFC aging protocol can be recalled when the system is re-heated at a constant heating rate. The aging, rejuvenation, and memory effects are discussed in terms of the scaling concepts derived from numerical studies on 3D Edwards-Anderson spin glass model. 1. I.S. Suzuki and M. Suzuki, Phys. Rev. B 68, 094424 (2003) 2. M. Suzuki and I.S. Suzuki, cond-mat/0308285

  9. Effects of temperature changes and stress loading on the mechanical and shape memory properties of thermoplastic materials with different glass transition behaviours and crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Kohda, Naohisa; Kawaguchi, Kyotaro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Ohta, Mitsuru; Naganishi, Atsuko; Murakami, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effects of temperature changes and stress loading on the mechanical and shape memory properties of thermoplastic materials with different glass transition behaviours and crystal structures. Five thermoplastic materials, polyethylene terephthalate glycol (Duran®, Scheu Dental), polypropylene (Hardcast®, Scheu Dental), and polyurethane (SMP MM®, SMP Technologies) with three different glass transition temperatures (T g) were selected. The T g and crystal structure were assessed using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The deterioration of mechanical properties by thermal cycling and the orthodontic forces during stepwise temperature changes were investigated using nanoindentation testing and custom-made force-measuring system. The mechanical properties were also evaluated by three-point bending tests; shape recovery with heating was then investigated. The mechanical properties for each material were decreased significantly by 2500 cycles and great decrease was observed for Hardcast (crystal plastic) with higher T g (155.5°C) and PU 1 (crystalline or semi-crystalline plastic) with lower T g (29.6°C). The Duran, PU 2, and PU 3 with intermediate T g (75.3°C for Duran, 56.5°C for PU 2, and 80.7°C for PU 3) showed relatively stable mechanical properties with thermal cycling. The polyurethane polymers showed perfect shape memory effect within the range of intraoral temperature changes. The orthodontic force produced by thermoplastic appliances decreased with the stepwise temperature change for all materials. Orthodontic forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances may influence by the T g of the materials, but not the crystal structure. Polyurethane is attractive thermoplastic materials due to their unique shape memory phenomenon, but stress relaxation with temperature changes is expected. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For

  10. Professor I I Glass A Tribute and Memorial

    CERN Document Server

    Igra, Ozer

    2013-01-01

    The book provides personal memories along with description of scientific works written by ex-graduate students and research associates of the late Professor Glass. The described research work covers a wide range of shock wave phenomena, resulting from seeds planted by Professor Glass. Professor Glass was born in Poland in 1918. He immigrated together with his parents to Canada at the age of 12 and received all his professional education at the University of Toronto, Canada. He became a world recognized expert in shock wave phenomena, and during his 45 years of active research he supervised more than 125 master and doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows and visiting research associates. In this book seven of his past students/research-associates describe their personal memories of Professor Glass and present some of their investigations in shock wave phenomena which sprung from their past work with Professor Glass. Specifically, these investigations include underwater shock waves, shock/bubble interaction, m...

  11. Aging, rejuvenation and memory phenomena in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spin glass; relaxation; aging; rejuvenation; memory. PACS Nos 75.10. .... the application of finite excitations, the long time needed to cool the sample down ..... wait at T − ∆T during t2 = 9000 s and finally re-heated to T for another short time t3 ...

  12. Radiation effects in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Howitt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of radiation effects in complex silicate glasses has received renewed attention because of their use in special applications such as high level nuclear waste immobilization and fiber optics. Radiation changes the properties of these glasses by altering their electronic and atomic configurations. These alterations or defects may cause dilatations or microscopic phase changes along with absorption centers that limit the optical application of the glasses. Atomic displacements induced in the already disordered structure of the glasses may affect their use where heavy irradiating particles such as alpha particles, alpha recoils, fission fragments, or accelerated ions are present. Large changes (up to 1%) in density may result. In some cases the radiation damage may be severe enough to affect the durability of the glass in aqueous solutions. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning radiation effects on density, durability, stored energy, microstructure and optical properties of silicate glasses. Both simple glasses and complex glasses used for immobilization of nuclear waste are considered

  13. Chitosan/bioactive glass nanoparticles scaffolds with shape memory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Cristina O; Leite, Álvaro J; Mano, João F

    2015-06-05

    We propose a combination of chitosan (CHT) with bioactive glass nanoparticles (BG-NPs) in order to produce CHT/BG-NPs scaffolds that combine the shape memory properties of chitosan and the biomineralization ability of BG-NPs for applications in bone regeneration. The addition of BG-NPs prepared by a sol-gel route to the CHT polymeric matrix improved the bioactivity of the nanocomposite scaffold, as seen by the precipitation of bone-like apatite layer upon immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). Shape memory tests were carried out while the samples were immersed in varying compositions of water/ethanol mixtures. Dehydration with ethanol enables to fix a temporary shape of a deformed scaffold that recovers the initial geometry upon water uptake. The scaffolds present good shape memory properties characterized by a recovery ratio of 87.5% for CHT and 89.9% for CHT/BG-NPs and a fixity ratio of 97.2% for CHT and 98.2% for CHT/BG-NPs (for 30% compressive deformation). The applicability of such structures was demonstrated by a good geometrical accommodation of a previously compressed scaffold in a bone defect. The results indicate that the developed CHT/BG-NPs nanocomposite scaffolds have potential for being applied in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of composition on waste glass properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Chick, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical conductivity, viscosity, chemical durability, devitrification, and crystallinity of a defense waste glass were measured. Each oxide component in the glass was varied to determine its effect on these properties. A generic study is being developed which will determine the effects of 26 oxides on the above and additional properties of a wide field of possible waste glasses. 5 figures, 2 tables

  15. Mixed mobile ion effect in fluorozincate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S; Ghosh, A

    2005-01-01

    The mixed mobile ion effect has been investigated for the first time in zinc fluoride glasses where in addition to alkali cations fluorine anions also participate in the diffusion process, unlike mixed alkali oxide glasses. The minimum in the conductivity, conductivity relaxation frequency, crossover frequency and decoupling index indicates the existence of the mixed mobile ion effect in these fluoride glasses. It has been observed that the non-exponential parameter and the frequency exponent are independent of temperature. It has been established that alkali ions and fluorine anions exhibit lower dimensionality of the conduction pathways in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses than that in the single alkali lithium based zinc fluoride glasses while they are migrating. From the scaling of the conductivity spectra, it has been established that the relaxation dynamics in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses is independent of temperature and composition

  16. Shape memory effect alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshimizu, S.

    1992-01-01

    Although the pseudo- or super-elasticity phenomena and the shape memory effect were known since the 1940's, the enormous curiosity and the great interest to their practical applications emerged with the development of the NITINOL alloy (Nickel-Titanium Naval Ordance Laboratory) by the NASA during the 1960's. This fact marked the appearance of a new class of materials, popularly known as shape memory effect alloys (SMEA). The objective of this work is to present a state-of-the-art of the development and applications for the SMEA. (E.O.)

  17. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1993-01-01

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties

  18. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  19. Effects of solar radiation on glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Kinser, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation of selected glasses are reported. Optical property degradation is studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Strength changes are measured using a concentric ring bend test. Direct fracture toughness measurements using an indentation test are planned.

  20. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Some Properties of Bismuth Silicate Glasses and Their Glass Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo Hussein, E.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Glasses containing bismuth oxide have attracted considerable attention, although it is non-conventional glass forming oxide, but it has wide applications. In this work, it is aimed to prove that bismuth silicate glass can act as a good shielding material for γ- rays. For this purpose glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO_2 was prepared using melting-annealing technique. Also effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass such as PbO, BaO or SrO were also studied. The formed glasses were also heat treated at 450 degree C for 4 hours to give the corresponding heat treated glasses. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that the prepared glasses and heat treated glasses have very good stability when exposed to γ- irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using these glasses as gamma ray shielding materials. Many properties have been investigated, such as density to understand the structural properties, also mechanical properties were verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing their durability in both acidic and basic solutions. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass and heat treated glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 553 K, which proved that these glasses have very low conductivity even at high temperature. The formed phases of heat treated glass or glass ceramic samples were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also studying the structure of glasses and heat treated glasses before and after irradiation was investigated by the Infrared transmitting spectra. Calculations of optical band gap energies were demonstrated for some selected glasses and heat treated glasses from the data of UV optical absorption spectra to support the probability of using these bismuth silicate glasses for gamma radiation shielding processing.

  1. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures

  2. Memory effect versus exchange bias for maghemite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, K.; Krenn, H.; Szabó, D.V.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the temperature dependence of memory and exchange bias effects and their dependence on each other in maghemite (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles by using magnetization studies. Memory effect in zero field cooled process in nanoparticles is a fingerprint of spin-glass behavior which can be due to i) surface disordered spins (surface spin-glass) and/or ii) randomly frozen and interacting nanoparticles core spins (super spin-glass). Temperature region (25–70 K) for measurements has been chosen just below the average blocking temperature (T B =75 K) of the nanoparticles. Memory effect (ME) shows a non-monotonous behavior with temperature. It shows a decreasing trend with decreasing temperature and nearly vanishes below 30 K. However it also decreased again near the blocking temperature of the nanoparticles e.g., 70 K. Exchange bias (EB) in these nanoparticles arises due to core/shell interface interactions. The EB increases sharply below 30 K due to increase in core/shell interactions, while ME starts vanishing below 30 K. We conclude that the core/shell interface interactions or EB have not enhanced the ME but may reduce it in these nanoparticles. - Highlights: • We studied the T-dependent memory and exchange bias (EB) effects in maghemite nanoparticles. • EB causes spin-canting at the core/shell interface which may reduces the memory effect (ME). • Interface interactions does not increase the ME in these nanoparticles

  3. Memory effect versus exchange bias for maghemite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeem, K., E-mail: kashif.nadeem@iiu.edu.pk [Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, International Islamic University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Krenn, H. [Institute of Physics, Karl-Franzens University Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Szabó, D.V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temperature dependence of memory and exchange bias effects and their dependence on each other in maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles by using magnetization studies. Memory effect in zero field cooled process in nanoparticles is a fingerprint of spin-glass behavior which can be due to i) surface disordered spins (surface spin-glass) and/or ii) randomly frozen and interacting nanoparticles core spins (super spin-glass). Temperature region (25–70 K) for measurements has been chosen just below the average blocking temperature (T{sub B}=75 K) of the nanoparticles. Memory effect (ME) shows a non-monotonous behavior with temperature. It shows a decreasing trend with decreasing temperature and nearly vanishes below 30 K. However it also decreased again near the blocking temperature of the nanoparticles e.g., 70 K. Exchange bias (EB) in these nanoparticles arises due to core/shell interface interactions. The EB increases sharply below 30 K due to increase in core/shell interactions, while ME starts vanishing below 30 K. We conclude that the core/shell interface interactions or EB have not enhanced the ME but may reduce it in these nanoparticles. - Highlights: • We studied the T-dependent memory and exchange bias (EB) effects in maghemite nanoparticles. • EB causes spin-canting at the core/shell interface which may reduces the memory effect (ME). • Interface interactions does not increase the ME in these nanoparticles.

  4. Corrosion effects on soda lime glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, F.A.; Rodichev, Y.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although soda lime glass is the most common used transparent material in architecture, little is known about the corrosion effects on long term strength and the interaction between corrosion and defects. Extensive testing on soda lime bars under different environmental conditions and different

  5. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted {beta}-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of {beta}/{gamma} radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  6. Effects of beta/gamma radiation on nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    A key challenge in the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) in glass waste forms is the development of models of long-term performance based on sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Beta decay of fission products is one source of radiation that can impact the performance of HLW glasses through the interactions of the emitted β-particles and g-rays with the atoms in the glass by ionization processes. Fused silica, alkali silicate glasses, alkali borosilicate glasses, and nuclear waste glasses are all susceptible to radiation effects from ionization. In simple glasses, defects (e.g., non-bridging oxygen and interstitial molecular oxygen) are observed experimentally. In more complex glasses, including nuclear waste glasses, similar defects are expected, and changes in microstructure, such as the formation of bubbles, have been reported. The current state of knowledge regarding the effects of β/γ radiation on the properties and microstructure of nuclear waste glasses are reviewed. (author)

  7. Polarization memory of white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in glass host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A S; Tikhomirov, V K; Moshchalkov, V V

    2012-09-10

    A mechanism for white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in oxyfluoride glass host has been revealed by studying a temperature dependence of its polarization memory. The spectral dependence of the polarization memory indicates the presence of a variety of Ag nanoclusters, particularly emitting in the blue, green and red. Temperature activated intercluster energy transfer has been found responsible for white luminescence. The means for increasing luminescence quantum yield have been suggested. This efficient white luminescence may be used in highly demanded devices, such as luminescent lamps, displays, color phosphors for LEDs, photovoltaic devices based on down shifting of solar spectrum.

  8. Magnetic memory effects in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockenbauer, A.

    1989-01-01

    Microwave absorption of high temperature oxide superconductors MBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (M = Y, Er, Dy, Ho, Lu, Tm, Gd) at 77 K have been studied by ESR. In granular samples diamagnetic zero-field resonance and strong ESR baseline hysteresis have been observed: for increasing field sweep - a high, for decreasing one - a low, while in constant field the baseline approaches the middle position with kinetics typical of spin-glasses. The hysteresis amplitude, i.e. the deviation of high and low baselines, possesses maximum at zero field if the sample is cooled down in zero field. In case of field cooling both the diamagnetic resonance and hysteresis maximum are shifted as a function of relative direction of the fields where the samples are cooled and measured, respectively. The shift is caused by the remanent diamagnetism of trapped fluxons. The hysteresis critically depends on the modulation amplitude of magnetic field, and no hysteresis can be observed if the microwave absorption is detected without field modulation. By applying saw-tooth sweep the spin-glass can be driven between two extreme hysteresis states, and the ESR response is rectangular for large saw-tooth amplitude and linear - for small one, while for intermediate amplitudes the recording shows characteristic memory effects. The hysteresis memory is explained in terms of loop distribution of fluxons. In the single crystal the fluxon absorptions are also detected and the separation of fluxon lines can be related to the hysteresis in granular samples. (author)

  9. Fusibility of medical glass in hospital waste incineration: Effect of glass components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, X.G.; An, C.G.; Li, C.Y.; Fei, Z.W.; Jin, Y.Q.; Yan, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Medical glass, which is the principal incombustible component in hospital wastes, has a bad influence on combustion. In a rotary kiln incinerator, medical glass melts and turns into slag, possibly adhering to the inner wall. Prediction of the melting characteristics of medical glass hence is important for preventing slagging. The effect of various glass components on fusibility has been investigated experimentally; that of Na 2 O is the most marked. The softening temperature and flow temperature decrease 19.8 o C and 34.0 o C, respectively, with a rise of Na 2 O content in the Basic Content (standard composition of medical glass) of 1%. Correlations between fusion temperatures and glass components have been investigated; predictive functions of four characteristic melting temperatures have been obtained by simplifying the multi-variant series and were verified by testing glass samples. Relative errors of fusion temperatures (computed vs. measured) are mostly less than 5%.

  10. Effect of alumina on the dissolution rate of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palavit, G.; Montagne, L.

    1997-01-01

    Small alumina addition to silicate glasses improves their chemical durability, but a large amount of alumina can also be beneficial to obtain a high dissolution rate. This paper describes the effect of Al 3+ on the early stage of glass alteration, in relation with its coordination in the glass and also with the reactions involved (hydrolysis and ionic exchange). We describe briefly nuclear magnetic resonance tools available to characterize the aluminum environments in the glasses. The rote of alumina on the dissolution rate of phosphate glasses is also discussed in order to show that the effect of Al 3+ is dependant upon the nature of the glass matrix. (author)

  11. Giant Kovacs-Like Memory Effect for Active Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürsten, Rüdiger; Sushkov, Vladimir; Ihle, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Dynamical properties of self-propelled particles obeying a bounded confidence rule are investigated by means of kinetic theory and agent-based simulations. While memory effects are observed in disordered systems, we show that they also occur in active matter systems. In particular, we find that the system exhibits a giant Kovacs-like memory effect that is much larger than predicted by a generic linear theory. Based on a separation of time scales we develop a nonlinear theory to explain this effect. We apply this theory to driven granular gases and propose further applications to spin glasses.

  12. Diffusion processes and memory effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V; Yulmetyev, Renat M; Haenggi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of the numerical estimation of statistical memory effects in diffusion for two various systems: Lennard-Jones fluids and the model of the Brownian particle in a one-dimensional harmonic lattice. We have found the relation between the diffusion coefficient and the non-Markovity parameter, which is linear for the Lennard-Jones systems in liquid state. The relation between the memory measure and the excess entropy is also discussed here

  13. Effect of stirring on striae in glass melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Chemical striae have often negative effect on the glass properties, and hence, elimination of striae has been a key issue in glass science and technology. To produce highly homogeneous glasses, it is necessary to stir melts during the melting process. To explore the physical origin of the stria...

  14. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high temperature.

  15. Antibacterial effects and dissolution behavior of six bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Leppäranta, Outi; Munukka, Eveliina; Ylänen, Heimo; Viljanen, Matti K; Eerola, Erkki; Hupa, Mikko; Hupa, Leena

    2010-05-01

    Dissolution behavior of six bioactive glasses was correlated with the antibacterial effects of the same glasses against sixteen clinically important bacterial species. Powdered glasses (<45 microm) were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 48 h. The pH in the solution inside the glass powder was measured in situ with a microelectrode. After 2, 4, 27, and 48 h, the pH and concentration of ions after removing the particles and mixing the SBF were measured with a normal glass pH electrode and ICP-OES. The bacteria were cultured in broth with the glass powder for up to 4 days, after which the viability of the bacteria was determined. The antibacterial effect of the glasses increased with increasing pH and concentration of alkali ions and thus with increased dissolution tendency of the glasses, but it also depended on the bacterium type. The changes in the concentrations of Si, Ca, Mg, P, and B ions in SBF did not show statistically significant influence on the antibacterial property. Bioactive glasses showed strong antibacterial effects for a wide selection of aerobic bacteria at a high sample concentration (100 mg/mL). The antibacterial effects increased with glass concentration and a concentration of 50 mg/mL (SA/V 185 cm(-1)) was required to generate the bactericidal effects. Understanding the dissolution mechanisms of bioactive glasses is essential when assessing their antibacterial effects. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Hysteretic memory effects in disordered magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Zimanyi, Gergely T.

    2005-01-01

    We study the return point as well as the complementary point memory effects numerically with paradigmatic models for random magnets and show that already simple systems with Ising spin symmetry can reproduce the experimental results of Pierce et al. where both memory effects become more pronounced for increasing disorder and return point memory is always better than complementary point memory.

  17. Kovacs effect in solvable model glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Leuzzi, Luca; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M

    2006-01-01

    The Kovacs protocol, based on the temperature shift experiment originally conceived by A.J. Kovacs and applied on glassy polymers, is implemented in an exactly solvable model with facilitated dynamics. This model is based on interacting fast and slow modes represented respectively by spherical spins and harmonic oscillator variables. Due to this fundamental property and to slow dynamics, the model reproduces the characteristic nonmonotonic evolution known as the 'Kovacs effect', observed in polymers, spin glasses, in granular materials and models of molecular liquids, when similar experimental protocols are implemented

  18. Kovacs effect in solvable model glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Leuzzi, Luca; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2006-05-01

    The Kovacs protocol, based on the temperature shift experiment originally conceived by A.J. Kovacs and applied on glassy polymers [1], is implemented in an exactly solvable model with facilitated dynamics. This model is based on interacting fast and slow modes represented respectively by spherical spins and harmonic oscillator variables. Due to this fundamental property and to slow dynamics, the model reproduces the characteristic nonmonotonic evolution known as the ''Kovacs effect'', observed in polymers, spin glasses, in granular materials and models of molecular liquids, when similar experimental protocols are implemented.

  19. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  20. Memory effects in turbulent diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorodny, A.G.; Weiland, J.; Wilhelmsson, H.

    1993-01-01

    A non-Markovian approach is proposed for the derivation of the diffusion coefficient of saturated turbulence. A memory term accounting for nonlocal coherence effects is introduced in a new attempt to describe the transition between weak and strong turbulence. The result compares favourably with recent experiments as well as mode coupling simulations of fusion plasmas. (14 refs.)

  1. Memory effect versus exchange bias for maghemite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, K.; Krenn, H.; Szabó, D. V.

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temperature dependence of memory and exchange bias effects and their dependence on each other in maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles by using magnetization studies. Memory effect in zero field cooled process in nanoparticles is a fingerprint of spin-glass behavior which can be due to i) surface disordered spins (surface spin-glass) and/or ii) randomly frozen and interacting nanoparticles core spins (super spin-glass). Temperature region (25-70 K) for measurements has been chosen just below the average blocking temperature (TB=75 K) of the nanoparticles. Memory effect (ME) shows a non-monotonous behavior with temperature. It shows a decreasing trend with decreasing temperature and nearly vanishes below 30 K. However it also decreased again near the blocking temperature of the nanoparticles e.g., 70 K. Exchange bias (EB) in these nanoparticles arises due to core/shell interface interactions. The EB increases sharply below 30 K due to increase in core/shell interactions, while ME starts vanishing below 30 K. We conclude that the core/shell interface interactions or EB have not enhanced the ME but may reduce it in these nanoparticles.

  2. Effect of Radiation on Silicon and Borosilicate Glass

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allred, Clark

    2003-01-01

    .... These two glasses are commonly used as substrates for silicon microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices, and radiation-induced compaction in a substrate can have deleterious effects on device performance...

  3. 'Vanishing' structural effects of temperature in polymer glasses close to the glass-transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shantarovich, V.P.; Suzuki, T.; Ito, Y.; Yu, R.S.; Kondo, K.; Yampolskii, Yu. P.; Alentiev, A.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were used for observation of structural effects of temperature in polystyrene (PS), super-cross-linked polystyrene networks (CPS), and in polyimides (PI) below and in the vicinity of glass-transition temperature T g . 'Vanishing' of these structural effects in the repeating cycles of the temperature controlled PAL experiments due to the slow relaxation processes in different conditions and details of chemical structure is demonstrated. Obtained results illustrate complex, dependent on thermal history, inhomogeneous character of the glass structure. In fact, structure of some polymer glasses is changing continuously. Calculations of the number density of free volume holes in these conditions are discussed

  4. Alpha self irradiation effects in nuclear borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peuget, S.; Roudil, D.; Deschanels, X.; Jegou, C.; Broudic, V.; Bart, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The properties of actinide glasses are studied in the context of high-level waste management programs. Reprocessing high burnup fuels in particular will increase the minor actinide content in the glass package, resulting in higher cumulative alpha decay doses in the glass, and raising the question of the glass matrix behavior and especially its containment properties. The effect of alpha self-irradiation on the glass behavior is evaluated by doping the glass with a short-lived actinide ( 244 Cm) to reach in several years the alpha dose received by the future glass packages over several thousand years. 'R7T7' borosilicate glasses were doped with 3 different curium contents (0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 wt% 244 CmO 2 ). The density and mechanical properties of the curium-doped glasses were characterized up to 2. 10 18 α/g, revealing only a slight evolution of the macroscopic behavior of R7T7 glass in this range. The leaching behavior of curium-doped glass was also studied by Soxhlet tests. The results do not show any significant evolution of the initial alteration rate with the alpha dose. (authors)

  5. Effect of alteration phase formation on the glass dissolution rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    The dissolution rates of many glasses have been observed to increase upon the formation of certain alteration phases. While simulations have predicted the accelerating effect of formation of certain phases, the phases predicted to form in computer simulations are usually different than those observed to form in experiments. This is because kinetically favored phases form first in experiments, while simulations predict the thermodynamically favored phases. Static dissolution tests with crushed glass have been used to measure the glass dissolution rate after alteration phases form. Because glass dissolution rates are calculated on a per area basis, an important effect in tests conducted with crushed glass is the decrease in the surface area of glass that is available for reaction as the glass dissolves. This loss of surface area must be taken into account when calculating the dissolution rate. The phases that form and their effect on the dissolution rate are probably related to the glass composition. The impact of phase formation on the glass dissolution rate also varies according to the solubility products of the alteration phases and how the orthocilicic acid activity is affected. Insight into the relationship between the glass dissolution rate, solution chemistry and alteration phase formation is provided by the results of accelerated dissolution tests

  6. Effect of alteration phase formation on the glass dissolution rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W L [Argonne National Laboratory, Chemical Technology Div. (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The dissolution rates of many glasses have been observed to increase upon the formation of certain alteration phases. While simulations have predicted the accelerating effect of formation of certain phases, the phases predicted to form in computer simulations are usually different than those observed to form in experiments. This is because kinetically favored phases form first in experiments, while simulations predict the thermodynamically favored phases. Static dissolution tests with crushed glass have been used to measure the glass dissolution rate after alteration phases form. Because glass dissolution rates are calculated on a per area basis, an important effect in tests conducted with crushed glass is the decrease in the surface area of glass that is available for reaction as the glass dissolves. This loss of surface area must be taken into account when calculating the dissolution rate. The phases that form and their effect on the dissolution rate are probably related to the glass composition. The impact of phase formation on the glass dissolution rate also varies according to the solubility products of the alteration phases and how the orthocilicic acid activity is affected. Insight into the relationship between the glass dissolution rate, solution chemistry and alteration phase formation is provided by the results of accelerated dissolution tests.

  7. Mixed alkaline earth effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    2013-01-01

    While the mixed alkali effect has received significant attention in the glass literature, the mixed alkaline earth effect has not been thoroughly studied. Here, we investigate the latter effect by partial substitution of magnesium for calcium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and NMR...

  8. Effective temperature in relaxation of Coulomb glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, A M; Ortuño, M; Caravaca, M; Pollak, M

    2008-08-01

    We study relaxation in two-dimensional Coulomb glasses up to macroscopic times. We use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm especially designed to escape efficiently from deep valleys around metastable states. We find that, during the relaxation process, the site occupancy follows a Fermi-Dirac distribution with an effective temperature much higher than the real temperature T. Long electron-hole excitations are characterized by T(eff), while short ones are thermalized at T. We argue that the density of states at the Fermi level is proportional to T(eff) and is a good thermometer to measure it. T(eff) decreases extremely slowly, roughly as the inverse of the logarithm of time, and it should affect hopping conductance in many experimental circumstances.

  9. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural...

  10. 57Fe Moessbauer effect in borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was carried out to elucidate the valence state of iron and its co-ordination in borosilicate glasses, which are being investigated as possible solidification matrices for the immobilization of a simulated nuclear waste. 57 Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy was used as the experimental technique. The chemical compositions of glass samples and the experimental conditions for the preparation of these samples are given. Iron in the form of haematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) was used as doping material. Details of the experimental procedure have previously been described. Isomer shifts are calculated relative to α-iron. The results indicate a strong dependence of the valency of the iron and its coordination on the chemical composition of the glass and the Fe 2 O 3 content. The method of preparing the glasses also influences the state of the iron in oxide glasses. (Author)

  11. Indentation size effect and the plastic compressibility of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M., E-mail: mos@bio.aau.dk [Section of Chemistry, Aalborg University, 9000 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2014-06-23

    Oxide glasses exhibit significant densification under an applied isostatic pressure at the glass transition temperature. The glass compressibility is correlated with the chemical composition and atomic packing density, e.g., borate glasses with planar triangular BO{sub 3} units are more disposed for densification than silicate glasses with tetrahedral units. We here show that there is a direct relation between the plastic compressibility following hot isostatic compression and the extent of the indentation size effect (ISE), which is the decrease of hardness with indentation load exhibited by most materials. This could suggest that the ISE is correlated with indentation-induced shear bands, which should form in greater density when the glass network is more adaptable to volume changes through structural and topological rearrangements under an applied pressure.

  12. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory syst...

  13. Temperature effects on waste glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazer, J.J.

    1991-02-01

    The temperature dependence of glass durability, particularly that of nuclear waste glasses, is assessed by reviewing past studies. The reaction mechanism for glass dissolution in water is complex and involves multiple simultaneous reaction proceeded, including molecular water diffusion, ion exchange, surface reaction, and precipitation. These processes can change in relative importance or dominance with time or changes in temperature. The temperature dependence of each reaction process has been shown to follow an Arrhenius relationship in studies where the reaction process has been isolated, but the overall temperature dependence for nuclear waste glass reaction mechanisms is less well understood, Nuclear waste glass studies have often neglected to identify and characterize the reaction mechanism because of difficulties in performing microanalyses; thus, it is unclear if such results can be extrapolated to other temperatures or reaction times. Recent developments in analytical capabilities suggest that investigations of nuclear waste glass reactions with water can lead to better understandings of their reaction mechanisms and their temperature dependences. Until a better understanding of glass reaction mechanisms is available, caution should be exercised in using temperature as an accelerating parameter. 76 refs., 1 tab

  14. Perceptions of the Glass Ceiling Effect in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Cheryl E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the existence of a glass ceiling effect within community colleges by examining faculty, staff and administrator's perceptions of a glass ceiling as it relates to the advancement of women at their institutions. This was done by using a cross-sectional survey administered electronically to faculty, staff…

  15. Effects of Mixed Alkaline Earth Oxides in Potash Silicate Glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of mixed alkaline earth oxide in potash silicate glasses with regards to their physical properties. More recently; there has been an increase in the demand for light weight glasses which retains their physical and chemical properties for both domestic and industrial applications.

  16. Atomic size effect on critical cooling rate and glass formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Payman; Li Mo

    2005-01-01

    Atomic size effect on critical cooling rate and glass formability in a model binary system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. To isolate atomic size effect from the rest of the factors that critically influence the glass formation, a hard sphere model is employed in conjunction with a newly developed densification method. The glass formability is defined as a set of optimal conditions that result in the slowest cooling rate of the glass-forming liquid. Critical cooling rates are identified from extensive molecular dynamics simulations. A kinetic glass-forming diagram is mapped out that marks the boundary between the glass-forming regions and competing crystalline phases in terms of the parameters of the atomic size ratio and alloy concentration. It is found that the potency of the atomic size difference on glass formation is influenced greatly by the competing metastable and equilibrium crystalline phases in the system, and the kinetic processes leading to the formation of these phases. The mechanisms of the atomic size effect on topological instability of crystal packing and glass formation are discussed

  17. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour. PMID:27034845

  18. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Ness

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour.

  19. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour.

  20. Inhibitory Effect of Waste Glass Powder on ASR Expansion Induced by Waste Glass Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed research is carried out to ascertain the inhibitory effect of waste glass powder (WGP on alkali-silica reaction (ASR expansion induced by waste glass aggregate in this paper. The alkali reactivity of waste glass aggregate is examined by two methods in accordance with the China Test Code SL352-2006. The potential of WGP to control the ASR expansion is determined in terms of mean diameter, specific surface area, content of WGP and curing temperature. Two mathematical models are developed to estimate the inhibitory efficiency of WGP. These studies show that there is ASR risk with an ASR expansion rate over 0.2% when the sand contains more than 30% glass aggregate. However, WGP can effectively control the ASR expansion and inhibit the expansion rate induced by the glass aggregate to be under 0.1%. The two mathematical models have good simulation results, which can be used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of WGP on ASR risk.

  1. The gravitational-wave memory effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favata, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The nonlinear memory effect is a slowly growing, non-oscillatory contribution to the gravitational-wave amplitude. It originates from gravitational waves that are sourced by the previously emitted waves. In an ideal gravitational-wave interferometer a gravitational wave with memory causes a permanent displacement of the test masses that persists after the wave has passed. Surprisingly, the nonlinear memory affects the signal amplitude starting at leading (Newtonian-quadrupole) order. Despite this fact, the nonlinear memory is not easily extracted from current numerical relativity simulations. After reviewing the linear and nonlinear memory I summarize some recent work, including (1) computations of the memory contribution to the inspiral waveform amplitude (thus completing the waveform to third post-Newtonian order); (2) the first calculations of the nonlinear memory that include all phases of binary black hole coalescence (inspiral, merger, ringdown); and (3) realistic estimates of the detectability of the memory with LISA.

  2. Memory and Its Effect on Adult Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouh Navvabi-Nejad

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Memory capabilities, including its mechanisms and memory approaches weaken as age increases. However, the studies reveal that the content of memory, i.e. the knowledge stored in it, usually increases. Memory system includes sensory memory within which environmental information are recorded. Short-term memory is related to storing data at awareness level, whereas long-term memory is associated with  storing knowledge and past experiences. Psychological and physiological factors such as mental and physical health, nutrition, using narcotic substances and alcohol, and also stimulation during life may affect all functions of the elderly such as their memory. Unfortunately, many researchers overlooked the effects of these variables on subjects.

  3. Stress Effects on Working Memory, Explicit Memory, and Implicit Memory for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli in Healthy Men

    OpenAIRE

    Luethi, Mathias; Meier, Beat; Sandi, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Stress is a strong modulator of memory function. However, memory is not a unitary process and stress seems to exert different effects depending on the memory type under study. Here, we explored the impact of social stress on different aspects of human memory, including tests for explicit memory and working memory (for neutral materials), as well as implicit memory (perceptual priming, contextual priming and classical conditioning for emotional stimuli). A total of 35 young adult...

  4. Radiation effects on lead silicate glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.W.; Zhang, L.P.; Borgen, N.; Pannell, K.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of lead silicate glass were investigated in situ under Mg K α irradiation in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Lead-oxygen bond breaking resulting in the formation of pure lead was observed. The segregation, growth kinetics and the structural relaxation of the lead, with corresponding changes in the oxygen and silicon on the glass surfaces were studied by measuring the time-dependent changes in concentration, binding energy shifts, and the full width at half maximum. A bimodal distribution of the oxygen XPS signal, caused by bridging and non-bridging oxygens, was found during the relaxation process. All experimental data indicate a reduction of the oxygen concentration, a phase separation of the lead from the glass matrix, and the metallization of the lead occurred during and after the X-ray irradiation. (author)

  5. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  6. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado-Depierre, S.; Angeli, F.; Frizon, F.; Gin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage

  7. Memory effects on stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Alexander; Sung, Wokyung

    1996-02-01

    We study the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system with internal colored noise. In this situation the system possesses time-dependent memory friction connected with noise via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, so that in the absence of periodic driving the system approaches the thermodynamic equilibrium state. For this non-Markovian case we find that memory usually suppresses stochastic resonance. However, for a large memory time SR can be enhanced by the memory.

  8. Configurational entropy of polar glass formers and the effect of electric field on glass transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V., E-mail: dmitrym@asu.edu [Department of Physics and School of Molecular Sciences, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    A model of low-temperature polar liquids is constructed that accounts for the configurational heat capacity, entropy, and the effect of a strong electric field on the glass transition. The model is based on the Padé-truncated perturbation expansions of the liquid state theory. Depending on parameters, it accommodates an ideal glass transition of vanishing configurational entropy and its avoidance, with a square-root divergent enumeration function at the point of its termination. A composite density-temperature parameter ρ{sup γ}/T, often used to represent combined pressure and temperature data, follows from the model. The theory is in good agreement with the experimental data for excess (over the crystal state) thermodynamics of molecular glass formers. We suggest that the Kauzmann entropy crisis might be a signature of vanishing configurational entropy of a subset of degrees of freedom, multipolar rotations in our model. This scenario has observable consequences: (i) a dynamical crossover of the relaxation time and (ii) the fragility index defined by the ratio of the excess heat capacity and excess entropy at the glass transition. The Kauzmann temperature of vanishing configurational entropy and the corresponding glass transition temperature shift upward when the electric field is applied. The temperature shift scales quadratically with the field strength.

  9. Configurational entropy of polar glass formers and the effect of electric field on glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-21

    A model of low-temperature polar liquids is constructed that accounts for the configurational heat capacity, entropy, and the effect of a strong electric field on the glass transition. The model is based on the Padé-truncated perturbation expansions of the liquid state theory. Depending on parameters, it accommodates an ideal glass transition of vanishing configurational entropy and its avoidance, with a square-root divergent enumeration function at the point of its termination. A composite density-temperature parameter ρ(γ)/T, often used to represent combined pressure and temperature data, follows from the model. The theory is in good agreement with the experimental data for excess (over the crystal state) thermodynamics of molecular glass formers. We suggest that the Kauzmann entropy crisis might be a signature of vanishing configurational entropy of a subset of degrees of freedom, multipolar rotations in our model. This scenario has observable consequences: (i) a dynamical crossover of the relaxation time and (ii) the fragility index defined by the ratio of the excess heat capacity and excess entropy at the glass transition. The Kauzmann temperature of vanishing configurational entropy and the corresponding glass transition temperature shift upward when the electric field is applied. The temperature shift scales quadratically with the field strength.

  10. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)∙H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of

  11. Absence of isotope effect of diffusion in a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesemann, A.; Raetzke, K.; Faupel, F.; Hoffmann, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1995-01-01

    The isotope effect E = d ln(D)/d ln (1/√m) of Co diffusion in structurally relaxed Co 86 Zr 14 and Co 81 Zr 19 glasses has been measured by means of a radiotracer technique. Within experimental accuracy no isotope effect was detected (E < 0.04). This suggests a highly cooperative diffusion mechanism. The connection between diffusion and collective low-frequency relaxations in glasses is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Memory effects in nuclear fragmentation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1994-01-01

    A general procedure to identify instability regions which lead to multifragmentation events is presented. The dominant mode at the instability point is determined from the knowledge of the mean properties (density and temperature) of the system at that point. For spinodal instabilities the dependence of fragment structures on the dynamical conditions is studied changing the beam energy and the considered equation of state. An important competition between two dynamical effects, expansion of the system and growth of fluctuations, is revealed. It is shown that in heavy-ion central collisions at medium energies memory effects of the configuration formed at the instability time could be observed in the final fragmentation pattern. Some hints towards a fully dynamical picture of fragmentation processes are finally suggested. ((orig.))

  13. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs

  14. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs.

  15. Memory effect in the high-temperature superconducting bulks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xing-Yi; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Effects of temperature cycles on levitation force relaxation are investigated. •Memory effect of the YBCO bulks is observed in experiments. •With an increase of temperature, memory of the superconductor is gradually lost. -- Abstract: We present an experimental investigation of the relaxation of vertical force components in a high-temperature superconducting levitation system with different temperature cycle processes. For a selected ambient temperature (T 1 ) of the system, the experimental results show that the relaxations of the levitation forces are strongly dependent on the initial temperature. When the sample was submitted to temperature jumps around T 1 , the sample temperature was regulated at T 2 , and there were two cases of the experiments, ΔT = T 2 − T 1 0 (positive temperature cycle). It was found that in the case of negative temperature cycle, the superconducting samples have memory effect. And for the positive temperature cycle, with the experimental temperature increase, the memory effect of samples is gradually losing. Additionally, with the increase of temperature, the influences of the negative and positive temperature cycle on the levitation force relaxation are unsymmetrical. All the results are interpreted by using the characteristics of the free energy ‘ground’ plot of the Spin-glasses qualitatively

  16. Kovacs-Like Memory Effect in Driven Granular Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, A.; Trizac, E.

    2014-05-01

    While memory effects have been reported for dense enough disordered systems such as glasses, we show here by a combination of analytical and simulation techniques that they are also intrinsic to the dynamics of dilute granular gases. By means of a certain driving protocol, we prepare the gas in a state where the granular temperature T coincides with its long time limit. However, T does not subsequently remain constant but exhibits a nonmonotonic evolution before reaching its nonequilibrium steady value. The corresponding so-called Kovacs hump displays a normal behavior for weak dissipation (as observed in molecular systems) but is reversed under strong dissipation, where it, thus, becomes anomalous.

  17. Radionuclide decay effects on waste glass corrosion and weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The release of glass components into solution, including radionuclides, may be influenced by the presence of radiolytically produced nitric acid, carboxylic acid, and transient water dissociation products such as ·OH and O 2 - . Under batch test conditions, glass corrosion has been shown to increase up to a maximum of three-to five-fold in irradiated tests relative to nonirradiated tests, while in other studies the presence of radiolytic products has actually decreased glass corrosion rates. Bicarbonate groundwaters will buffer against pH decreases and changes in corrosion rates. Under high surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) conditions, the bicarbonate buffering reservoir may be quickly overwhelmed by radiolytic acids that are concentrated in the thin films of water contacting the samples. Glass reaction rates have been shown to increase up to 10-to-15-fold due to radiation exposure under high S/V conditions. Radiation damage to solid glass materials results in bond damage and atomic displacements. This type of damage has been shown to increase the release rates of glass components up to four-fold during subsequent corrosion tests, although under actual disposal conditions, glass annealing processes may negate the solid radiation damage effects

  18. Parametric effects on glass reaction in the unsaturated test method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodland, A.B.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1991-12-01

    The Unsaturated Test Method has been applied to study glass reaction under conditions that may be present at the potential Yucca Mountain site, currently under evaluation for storage of reprocessed high-level nuclear waste. The results from five separate sets of parametric experiments are presented wherein test parameters ranging from water contact volume to sensitization of metal in contact with the glass were examined. The most significant effect was observed when the volume of water, as controlled by the water inject volume and interval period, was such to allow exfoliation of reacted glass to occur. The extent of reaction was also influenced to a lesser extent by the degree of sensitization of the 304L stainless steel. For each experiment, the release of cations from the glass and alteration of the glass were examined. The major alteration product is a smectite clay that forms both from precipitation from solution and from in-situ alteration of the glass itself. It is this clay that undergoes exfoliation as water drips from the glass. A comparison is made between the results of the parametric experiments with those of static leach tests. In the static tests the rates of release become progressively reduced through 39 weeks while, in contrast, they remain relatively constant in the parametric experiments for at least 300 weeks. This differing behavior may be attributable to the dripping water environment where fresh water is periodically added and where evaporation can occur

  19. High-capacity optical long data memory based on enhanced Young's modulus in nanoplasmonic hybrid glass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiming; Xia, Zhilin; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Gu, Min

    2018-03-22

    Emerging as an inevitable outcome of the big data era, long data are the massive amount of data that captures changes in the real world over a long period of time. In this context, recording and reading the data of a few terabytes in a single storage device repeatedly with a century-long unchanged baseline is in high demand. Here, we demonstrate the concept of optical long data memory with nanoplasmonic hybrid glass composites. Through the sintering-free incorporation of nanorods into the earth abundant hybrid glass composite, Young's modulus is enhanced by one to two orders of magnitude. This discovery, enabling reshaping control of plasmonic nanoparticles of multiple-length allows for continuous multi-level recording and reading with a capacity over 10 terabytes with no appreciable change of the baseline over 600 years, which opens new opportunities for long data memory that affects the past and future.

  20. Item Effects in Recognition Memory for Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Emily; Heathcote, Andrew; Chalmers, Kerry; Hockley, William

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effects of word characteristics on episodic recognition memory using analyses that avoid Clark's (1973) "language-as-a-fixed-effect" fallacy. Our results demonstrate the importance of modeling word variability and show that episodic memory for words is strongly affected by item noise (Criss & Shiffrin, 2004), as measured by the…

  1. The Attentional Boost Effect and Context Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Smith, S. Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors--the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is…

  2. The attentional boost effect and context memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W; Smith, S Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors-the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is unclear if context memory is likewise affected. Some accounts suggest enhanced perceptual encoding or associative binding, predicting an ABE on context memory, whereas other evidence suggests a more abstract, amodal basis of the effect. In Experiment 1, context memory was assessed in terms of an intramodal perceptual detail, the font and color of the study word. Experiment 2 examined context memory cross-modally, assessing memory for the modality (visual or auditory) of the study word. Experiments 3 and 4 assessed context memory with list discrimination, in which 2 study lists are presented and participants must later remember which list (if either) a test word came from. In all experiments, item (recognition) memory was also assessed and consistently displayed a robust ABE. In contrast, the attentional-boost manipulation did not enhance context memory, whether defined in terms of visual details, study modality, or list membership. There was some evidence that the mode of responding on the detection task (motoric response as opposed to covert counting of targets) may impact context memory but there was no evidence of an effect of target detection, per se. In sum, the ABE did not occur in context memory with verbal materials. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Do animacy effects persist in memory for context?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, Margaux; Bonin, Patrick; Méot, Alain; Bugaiska, Aurélia

    2018-04-01

    The adaptive view of human memory assumes that animates (e.g, rabbit) are remembered better than inanimates (e.g. glass) because animates are ultimately more important for fitness than inanimates. Previous studies provided evidence for this view by showing that animates were recalled or recognized better than inanimates, but they did not assess memory for contextual details (e.g., where animates vs inanimates occurred). In this study, we tested recollection of spatial information (Study 1) and temporal information (Study 2) associated with animate versus inanimate words. The findings showed that the two types of contextual information were remembered better when they were related to animates than to inanimates. These findings provide further evidence for an ultimate explanation of animacy effects.

  4. Effect of particle size on the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ryan J; Zukoski, Charles F

    2011-05-01

    The glass transition temperature of a broad class of molecules is shown to depend on molecular size. This dependency results from the size dependence of the pair potential. A generalized equation of state is used to estimate how the volume fraction at the glass transition depends on the size of the molecule, for rigid molecule glass-formers. The model shows that at a given pressure and temperature there is a size-induced glass transition: For molecules larger than a critical size, the volume fraction required to support the effective pressure due to particle attractions is above that which characterizes the glassy state. This observation establishes the boundary between nanoparticles, which exist in liquid form only as dispersions in low molecular weight solvents and large molecules which form liquids that have viscosities below those characterized by the glassy state.

  5. Preparation of SnO_2-Glass Composite Containing Cu Particles Reduced from Copper Ions in Glass Matrix : Effect of Glass Particle Size on Microstructure and Electrical Property

    OpenAIRE

    Haruhisa, SHIOMI; Kaori, UMEHARA; Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology; Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology

    2000-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve the electrical properties of SnO_2-glass composites by dispersing Cu particles with low resistivity and positive temperature coefficient of resistance(TCR)in the glass matrix. Cu metal particles were precipitated by reducing Cu_2O previously dissolved into the matrix glass by adding LaB_6 as a reducing agent. The effect of the glass particle size, which influences the homogeneity of LaB_6 dispersion in the powder mixture before firing, on the Cu precipitation in...

  6. Effects of memory load on hemispheric asymmetries of colour memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Wes; Kirk, Ian J; Hausmann, Markus

    2007-03-01

    Hemispheric asymmetries in colour perception have been a matter of debate for some time. Recent evidence suggests that lateralisation of colour processing may be largely task specific. Here we investigated hemispheric asymmetries during different types and phases of a delayed colour-matching (recognition) memory task. A total of 11 male and 12 female right-handed participants performed colour-memory tasks. The task involved presentation of a set of colour stimuli (encoding), and subsequent indication (forced choice) of which colours in a larger set had previously appeared at the retrieval or recognition phase. The effect of memory load (set size), and the effect of lateralisation at the encoding or retrieval phases were investigated. Overall, the results indicate a right hemisphere advantage in colour processing, which was particularly pronounced in high memory load conditions, and was seen in males rather than female participants. The results suggest that verbal (mnemonic) strategies can significantly affect the magnitude of hemispheric asymmetries in a non-verbal task.

  7. Recycling of post-consumer glass: energy savings, CO2 emission reduction, effects on glass quality and glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kers, G.; Santen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    This presentation shows the advantages of re-melting post-consumer glass, but also the potential risks of using contaminated cullet in the raw material batch of glass furnaces (e.g. container glass furnaces). As an example of potential advantages: increasing the cullet % in the batch of an efficient

  8. Memory effect and fast spinodal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, T.; Krein, G.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2007-01-01

    We consider the modification of the Cahn-Hilliard equation when a time delay process through a memory function is taken into account. We then study the process of spinodal decomposition in fast phase transitions associated with a conserved order parameter. The introduced memory effect plays an important role to obtain a finite group velocity. Then, we discuss the constraint for the parameters to satisfy causality. The memory effect is seen to affect the dynamics of phase transition at short times and have the effect of delaying, in a significant way, the process of rapid growth of the order parameter that follows a quench into the spinodal region. (author)

  9. Modeling surface area to volume effects on borosilicate glass dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Feng, X.

    1992-11-01

    We simulated the reaction of SRL-131 glass with equilibrated J-13 water in order to investigate the effects of surface area to volume ratio (SA/V) on glass dissolution. We show that glass-fluid ion exchange causes solution pH to rise to progressively higher values as SA/V increases. Because the ion exchange is rapid relative to the duration of the glass dissolution experiment, the pH effect does not scale with (SA/V)*time. Experiments compared at the same (SA/V)*time value therefore have different pHs, with higher pHs at higher SA/V ratios. Both experimental data and our simulation results show similar trends of increasing reaction rate as a function of SA/V ratio when scaled to (SA/V)*time. Glasses which react in systems of differing SA/V ratio therefore follow different reaction paths and high SA/V ratios cannot be used to generate data which accurately scales to long time periods unless the ion exchange effect is taken into account. We suggest some simple test designs which enable more reliable high. SA/V accelerated tests

  10. Effect of small glass composition changes on flue gas emissions of glass furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kersbergen, M.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Relatively small changes in glass composition might have drastic consequences on the evaporation rates of volatile glass components in glass melting furnaces. Transpiration evaporation tests have been applied to measure the impact of minor glass composition changes on the evaporation rates of

  11. Glass formation, magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect of ternary Ho–Al–Co bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Li, Ran; Ji, Yunfei; Liu, Fanmao; Luo, Qiang; Zhang, Tao

    2012-01-01

    A ternary Ho–Al–Co system with high glass-forming ability (GFA) was developed and fully glassy rods with diameters up to 1 cm can be produced for the best glass former of Ho 55 Al 27.5 Co 17.5 alloy. The thermal stability and low-temperature magnetic properties of the Ho 55 Al 27.5 Co 17.5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) were studied. The magnetic transition temperature of this alloy is ∼14 K as determined by the thermomagnetic measurement. Two indicators, i.e. isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔS M ) and the relative cooling power (RCP), were adopted to evaluate the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of the alloy under a low magnetic field up to 2 T, which can be generated by permanent magnets. The values of |ΔS M | and RCP are 7.98 J kg −1 K −1 and 191.5 J kg −1 , respectively. The Ho 55 Al 27.5 Co 17.5 BMG with good MCE and high GFA provides an attractive candidate for magnetic refrigeration applications, like hydrogen liquefaction and storage. - Highlights: ► A ternary Ho–Al–Co BMG system with high glass-forming ability was developed. ► Fully glassy rods of Ho 55 Al 27.5 Co 17.5 alloy were produced up to 1 cm in diameter. ► The thermal stability and magnetic properties of the BMG were evaluated. ► The BMG exhibits good magnetocaloric effect under a low magnetic field up to 2 T.

  12. Component effects on crystallization of RE-containing aluminoborosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani, E-mail: syazwanimf@ukm.edu.my [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang (Korea, Republic of); School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, The National University of Malaysia, 43650 Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hrma, Pavel [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 790784 Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Lanthanide-aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass is one option for immobilizing rare earth (RE) oxide fission products generated during reprocessing of pyroprocessed fuel. This glass system can accommodate a high loading of RE oxides and has excellent chemical durability. The present study describes efforts to model equilibrium crystallinity as a function of glass composition and temperature as well as liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) as a function of glass composition. The experimental method for determining T{sub L} was ASTM C1720-11. Typically, three crystalline phases were formed in each glass: Ce-borosilicate (Ce{sub 3}BSi{sub 2}O{sub 10}), mullite (Al{sub 10}Si{sub 2}O{sub 19}), and corundum (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Cerianite (CeO{sub 2}) was a common minor crystalline phase and Nd-silicate (Nd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}) occurred in some of the glasses. In the composition region studied, T{sub L} decreased as SiO{sub 2} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} fractions increased and strongly increased with increasing fractions of RE oxides; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} had a moderate effect on the T{sub L} but, as expected, it strongly affected the precipitation of Al-containing crystals. - Highlights: • We investigated equilibrium crystal fraction in glasses versus temperature. • We fitted empirical models to measured data obtaining component coefficients. • Liquidus temperature increased as SiO{sub 2} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} fractions decreased. • Liquidus temperature increased as CeO{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fractions increased.

  13. Bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Nicholas R. T.; Song, Jeremy; Nieh, James C.

    2009-10-01

    Associative learning is key to how bees recognize and return to rewarding floral resources. It thus plays a major role in pollinator floral constancy and plant gene flow. Honeybees are the primary model for pollinator associative learning, but bumblebees play an important ecological role in a wider range of habitats, and their associative learning abilities are less well understood. We assayed learning with the proboscis extension reflex (PER), using a novel method for restraining bees (capsules) designed to improve bumblebee learning. We present the first results demonstrating that bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect. They improve their associative learning of odor and nectar reward by exhibiting increased memory acquisition, a component of long-term memory formation, when the time interval between rewarding trials is increased. Bombus impatiens forager memory acquisition (average discrimination index values) improved by 129% and 65% at inter-trial intervals (ITI) of 5 and 3 min, respectively, as compared to an ITI of 1 min. Memory acquisition rate also increased with increasing ITI. Encapsulation significantly increases olfactory memory acquisition. Ten times more foragers exhibited at least one PER response during training in capsules as compared to traditional PER harnesses. Thus, a novel conditioning assay, encapsulation, enabled us to improve bumblebee-learning acquisition and demonstrate that spaced learning results in better memory consolidation. Such spaced learning likely plays a role in forming long-term memories of rewarding floral resources.

  14. Ion irradiation effect on metallic condensate adhesion to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.V.; Upit, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    The ion irradiation effect on metallic condensate adhesion to glass is investigated. It has been found that in case of indium ion deposition the condensate adhesion to glass cleavages being in contact with atmosphere grows up to the level corresponding to a juvenile surface while in case of argon ion irradiation - exceeds it. It is shown that the observed adhesion growth is determined mainly by the surfwce modification comparising charge accumulation on surface, destruction of a subsurface layer and an interlayer formation in the condensate-substrate interface. The role of these factors in the course of various metals deposition is considered

  15. Is Working Memory Training Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipstead, Zach; Redick, Thomas S.; Engle, Randall W.

    2012-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is a cognitive system that strongly relates to a person's ability to reason with novel information and direct attention to goal-relevant information. Due to the central role that WM plays in general cognition, it has become the focus of a rapidly growing training literature that seeks to affect broad cognitive change through…

  16. On the instability effects in radiation-sensitive chalcogenide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balitska, V.; Kovalskiy, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Vakiv, M.

    2007-01-01

    The features of application of radiation-sensitive media based on chalcogenide glasses of As-Ge-S system for registration of high-energy γ-radiation are analysed. It is shown that compositional features of the observed time-instability effect should be taken into account in order to ensure a higher accuracy of the developed dosimeters

  17. On the instability effects in radiation-sensitive chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, V. [Lviv State University for Vital Activity Safety, 35 Kleparivska str., Lviv, UA-79007 (Ukraine); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua; Vakiv, M. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)

    2007-04-15

    The features of application of radiation-sensitive media based on chalcogenide glasses of As-Ge-S system for registration of high-energy {gamma}-radiation are analysed. It is shown that compositional features of the observed time-instability effect should be taken into account in order to ensure a higher accuracy of the developed dosimeters.

  18. Investigations on the Broadband Shielding Effectiveness of Metallized Glass Fiber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coburn, William

    1998-01-01

    ...) is an E-glass fiber metallized with Al and processed into a nonwoven mat. When formed into a mat, the MGFs lead to an effective sample conductivity, sigma eff, which is the parameter of interest for electromagnetic shielding in the RF region...

  19. Acute Alcohol Effects on Repetition Priming and Word Recognition Memory with Equivalent Memory Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Suchismita; Bates, Marsha E.

    2006-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication effects on memory were examined using a recollection-based word recognition memory task and a repetition priming task of memory for the same information without explicit reference to the study context. Memory cues were equivalent across tasks; encoding was manipulated by varying the frequency of occurrence (FOC) of words…

  20. Age effects on explicit and implicit memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eWard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that explicit memory (e.g., recognition declines with age. In contrast, many argue that implicit memory (e.g., priming is preserved in healthy aging. For example, priming on tasks such as perceptual identification is often not statistically different in groups of young and older adults. Such observations are commonly taken as evidence for distinct explicit and implicit learning/memory systems. In this article we discuss several lines of evidence that challenge this view. We describe how patterns of differential age-related decline may arise from differences in the ways in which the two forms of memory are commonly measured, and review recent research suggesting that under improved measurement methods, implicit memory is not age-invariant. Formal computational models are of considerable utility in revealing the nature of underlying systems. We report the results of applying single and multiple-systems models to data on age effects in implicit and explicit memory. Model comparison clearly favours the single-system view. Implications for the memory systems debate are discussed.

  1. Age effects on explicit and implicit memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Emma V; Berry, Christopher J; Shanks, David R

    2013-01-01

    It is well-documented that explicit memory (e.g., recognition) declines with age. In contrast, many argue that implicit memory (e.g., priming) is preserved in healthy aging. For example, priming on tasks such as perceptual identification is often not statistically different in groups of young and older adults. Such observations are commonly taken as evidence for distinct explicit and implicit learning/memory systems. In this article we discuss several lines of evidence that challenge this view. We describe how patterns of differential age-related decline may arise from differences in the ways in which the two forms of memory are commonly measured, and review recent research suggesting that under improved measurement methods, implicit memory is not age-invariant. Formal computational models are of considerable utility in revealing the nature of underlying systems. We report the results of applying single and multiple-systems models to data on age effects in implicit and explicit memory. Model comparison clearly favors the single-system view. Implications for the memory systems debate are discussed.

  2. Pitch memory and exposure effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Eitan, Zohar; Chajut, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the ability to represent absolute pitch values in long-term memory (LTM), long believed to be the possession of a small minority of trained musicians endowed with "absolute pitch" (AP), is in fact shared to some extent by a considerable proportion of the population. The current study examined whether this newly-discovered ability affects aspects of music and auditory cognition, particularly pitch learning and evaluation. Our starting points are two well establishe...

  3. Pitch memory and exposure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Eitan, Zohar; Chajut, Eran

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that the ability to represent absolute pitch values in long-term memory, long believed to be the possession of a small minority of trained musicians endowed with "absolute pitch," is in fact shared to some extent by a considerable proportion of the population. The current study examined whether this newly discovered ability affects aspects of music and auditory cognition, particularly pitch learning and evaluation. Our starting points are two well-established premises: (1) frequency of occurrence has an influence on the way we process stimuli; (2) in Western music, some pitches and musical keys are much more frequent than others. Based on these premises, we hypothesize that if absolute pitch values are indeed represented in long-term memory, pitch frequency of occurrence in music would significantly affect cognitive processes, in particular pitch learning and evaluation. Two experiments were designed to test this hypothesis in participants with no absolute pitch, most with little or no musical training. Experiment 1 demonstrated a faster response and a learning advantage for frequent pitches over infrequent pitches in an identification task. In Experiment 2, participants evaluated infrequent pitches as more pleasing than frequent pitches when presented in isolation. These results suggest that absolute pitch representation in memory may play a substantial, hitherto unacknowledged role in auditory (and specifically musical) cognition. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. The effect of empathy on eyewitness memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Numerous factors have been identified that can influence eyewitness memory. These factors lead to an increased susceptibility to the misinformation effect, potentially resulting in critical errors in testimony. One other potential influencing factor may be empathy. Empathy is considered as the reactions of an individual to something another person is experiencing. Research has indicated empathy to be a multidimensional construct, combining cognitive and emotional concepts. Empathy has yet to be investigated as an influencing factor, therefore, the current research sought to examine the effect of empathy on eyewitness memory. Method: Participants (n = 60 completed an online survey consisting of a short video, followed by reading a short narrative containing correct and misinformation. One group of participants (N=31 also received an empathy induction. They then completed empathy measures, a cued recall memory test and a recognition memory test. The memory test contained questions relating to the correct and misinformation. Results: Overall there was no difference between groups on general empathy. The empathy induction group had more event related empathy, however, there was no effect of empathy on memory accuracy. For cued recall, participants were more accurate on questions relating to correct (89% information compared to misleading (37% information. For the recognition questions, participants were about as accurate for the correct (63% and misleading (60% information. Conclusions: These findings indicate that feelings of empathy toward the victim of a crime may not improve the accuracy of witness memory. Cued recall results in superior memory performance for correct information, but very poor performance for misleading information. Recognition recall is moderately accurate for both correct and misleading information.

  5. Effects of stereotypes and suggestion on memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechory, Mally; Nachson, Israel; Glicksohn, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the interactive effect of stereotype and suggestion on accuracy of memory was examined by presenting 645 participants (native Israelis and immigrants from the former Soviet Union and Ethiopia) with three versions of a story about a worker who is waiting in a manager's office for a meeting. All versions were identical except for the worker's name, which implied a Russian or an Ethiopian immigrant or a person of no ethnic origin. Each participant was presented with one version of the story. After an hour delay, the participants' memories were tested via two questionnaires that differed in terms of level of suggestion. Data analyses show that (a) when a suggestion matched the participant's stereotypical perception, the suggestion was incorporated into memory but (b) when the suggestion contradicted the stereotype, it did not influence memory. The conclusion was that recall is influenced by stereotypes but can be enhanced by compatible suggestions.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of disordered materials from network glasses to phase-change memory alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Massobrio, Carlo; Bernasconi, Marco; Salmon, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    This book is a unique reference work in the area of atomic-scale simulation of glasses. For the first time, a highly selected panel of about 20 researchers provides, in a single book, their views, methodologies and applications on the use of molecular dynamics as a tool to describe glassy materials. The book covers a wide range of systems covering ""traditional"" network glasses, such as chalcogenides and oxides, as well as glasses for applications in the area of phase change materials. The novelty of this work is the interplay between molecular dynamics methods (both at the classical and firs

  7. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Faure, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The immune system (IS) and the central nervous system (CNS) are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self) of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit) memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e., danger-fear) memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e., the taste of the Proust's madeleine cake) by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model's approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  8. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eSánchez-Ramón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The immune system (IS and the central nervous system (CNS are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e. danger-fear memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e. the taste of the Proust’s madeleine cake by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model’s approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  9. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Faure, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The immune system (IS) and the central nervous system (CNS) are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self) of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit) memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e., danger-fear) memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e., the taste of the Proust’s madeleine cake) by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model’s approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective. PMID:26869886

  10. Testing Memories of Personally Experienced Events: The Testing Effect Seems Not to Persist in Autobiographical Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerdinger, Kathrin J.; Kuhbandner, Christof

    2018-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that retrieving contents from memory in a test improves long-term retention for those contents, even when compared to restudying (i.e., the “testing effect”). The beneficial effect of retrieval practice has been demonstrated for many different types of memory representations; however, one particularly important memory system has not been addressed in previous testing effect research: autobiographical memory. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of retrieving memories for personally experienced events on long-term memory for those events. In an initial elicitation session, participants described memories for personally experienced events in response to a variety of cue words. In a retrieval practice/restudy session the following day, they repeatedly practiced retrieval for half of their memories by recalling and writing down the previously described events; the other half of memories was restudied by rereading and copying the event descriptions. Long-term retention of all previously collected memories was assessed at two different retention intervals (2 weeks and 13 weeks). In the retrieval practice session, a hypermnesic effect emerged, with memory performance increasing across the practice cycles. Long-term memory performance significantly dropped from the 2-weeks to the 13-weeks retention interval, but no significant difference in memory performance was observed between previously repeatedly retrieved and previously repeatedly restudied memories. Thus, in autobiographical memory, retrieval practice seems to be no more beneficial for long-term retention than repeated re-exposure. PMID:29881365

  11. Effects of glucocorticoids on memory retrieval and reconsolidation of recent and remote memories in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoreh Najjar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous studies demonstrated that the systemic injection of corticosterone impairs both retrieval and reconsolidation of fear memory in experimental animals. Here, we investigated whether these disrupting effects of corticosterone depend on the age (recent or remote of the memory in mice. Materials and Methods: Mice were trained and tested in an inhibitory avoidance task (50 Hz, 1mA for 3 S. Corticosterone (1, 3 and 10mg/kg injected 30 min before of retrieval test of either a two-day recent or 36-day remote memory. Memory retrieval tested during 10 min. For memory reconsolidation experiments immediately after memory reactivation of two-day recent or 36-day remote memories, mice received corticosterone (1, 3 and 10mg/kg or vehicle. Two, five, seven and nine days after memory reactivation, mice were returned to the context for 10 min, and step-through latency was recorded.Results: For memory retrieval, corticosterone impaired subsequent expression of both recent and remote memories. Similar effect was found on the reconsolidation of both memories. Additionally, a higher dose of corticosterone was needed to impair retrieval and reconsolidation of remote memory. No significant differences were found on the amount of memory deficit induced by corticosterone among memories with different age. Conclusion: Our data indicate that the efficacy of corticosterone in impairing retrieval and reconsolidation of fear memory is not limited to the age of memory

  12. Radiation effects in vitreous and devitrified simulated waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.J.; Turcotte, R.P.; Bunnell, L.R.; Roberts, F.P.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The long-term radiation stability of vitreous and partially devitrified forms of high-level waste glass was investigated in accelerated experiments by 266 Cm doping. The effects of radiation on microstructure, phase behavior, density, impact strength, stored energy, and leachability are reported to a cumulative radiation dose of 5 x 10 18 α decays/cm 3 . This dose produces saturation of radiation effects in most properties. 4 figures

  13. Rent sharing as a driver of the glass ceiling effect

    OpenAIRE

    Matano, Alessia; Naticchioni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we show that rent sharing plays a role in accounting for the glass ceiling effect. We make use of a unique employer-employee panel database for Italy from 1996 to 2003, which allows controlling for observed individual and firm heterogeneity and for collective bargaining. Moreover, by means of IV quantile fixed effects estimates we can cope with unobserved heterogeneity and endogeneity. We then go on to discuss the possible related explanations.

  14. The effect of sample preparation methods on glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, M.S.; Oversby, V.M.

    1990-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted using SRL 165 synthetic waste glass to investigate the effects of surface preparation and leaching solution composition on the alteration of the glass. Samples of glass with as-cast surfaces produced smooth reaction layers and some evidence for precipitation of secondary phases from solution. Secondary phases were more abundant in samples reacted in deionized water than for those reacted in a silicate solution. Samples with saw-cut surfaces showed a large reduction in surface roughness after 7 days of reaction in either solution. Reaction in silicate solution for up to 91 days produced no further change in surface morphology, while reaction in DIW produced a spongy surface that formed the substrate for further surface layer development. The differences in the surface morphology of the samples may create microclimates that control the details of development of alteration layers on the glass; however, the concentrations of elements in leaching solutions show differences of 50% or less between samples prepared with different surface conditions for tests of a few months duration. 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  15. Working memory capacity and the spacing effect in cued recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Peter F; Godbole, Namrata R; Holden, Latasha R; Chang, Yoojin

    2018-07-01

    Spacing repetitions typically improves memory (the spacing effect). In three cued recall experiments, we explored the relationship between working memory capacity and the spacing effect. People with higher working memory capacity are more accurate on memory tasks that require retrieval relative to people with lower working memory capacity. The experiments used different retention intervals and lags between repetitions, but were otherwise similar. Working memory capacity and spacing of repetitions both improved memory in most of conditions, but they did not interact, suggesting additive effects. The results are consistent with the ACT-R model's predictions, and with a study-phase recognition process underpinning the spacing effect in cued recall.

  16. The memory effect for plane gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.-M.; Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2017-09-01

    We give an account of the gravitational memory effect in the presence of the exact plane wave solution of Einstein's vacuum equations. This allows an elementary but exact description of the soft gravitons and how their presence may be detected by observing the motion of freely falling particles. The theorem of Bondi and Pirani on caustics (for which we present a new proof) implies that the asymptotic relative velocity is constant but not zero, in contradiction with the permanent displacement claimed by Zel'dovich and Polnarev. A non-vanishing asymptotic relative velocity might be used to detect gravitational waves through the "velocity memory effect", considered by Braginsky, Thorne, Grishchuk, and Polnarev.

  17. Effect of Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles on Water Glass Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrowski A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to determine the effect of an addition of colloidal suspensions of the nanoparticles of magnesium oxide on the structure of water glass, which is a binder for moulding and core sands. Nanoparticles of magnesium oxide MgO in propanol and ethanol were introduced in the same mass content (5wt.% and structural changes were determined by measurement of the FT-IR absorption spectra.

  18. Glass ceiling effects: the case of taiwanese top executives

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-i Wang; Jennjou Chen

    2010-01-01

    Gender discrimination in labor markets has been an important issue in labor economics. The main purpose of this paper is to empirically study glass ceiling effects, and investigate whether female workers are indeed being discriminated against, particularly during the promotion process, in top management positions in Taiwan. This paper uses data from 4,485 large firms in Taiwan to study whether there are gender preferences when the chairperson of a company chooses a chief executive officer (CE...

  19. Kovacs effect in a model for a fragile glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Leuzzi, Luca; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2006-03-01

    The Kovacs protocol, based on the temperature shift experiment originally conceived by A. J. Kovacs for glassy polymers, is implemented in an exactly solvable dynamical model. This model is characterized by interacting fast and slow modes represented, respectively, by spherical spins and harmonic oscillator variables. Due to this fundamental property, the model reproduces the characteristic nonmonotonic evolution known as the “Kovacs effect,” observed in polymers, spin glasses, granular materials, and molecular liquid models, when similar experimental protocols are implemented.

  20. Radiation effects on phase separation and viscosity of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biron, I.; Barbu, A.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of electron irradiations on the stability of B 2 O 3P bO glasses is studied by transmission electron microscopy. Rapid coagulation of pure lead particles is observed. By using the Smoluchosky's coagulation theory, it is shown that the viscosity of B 2 O 3 is drastically reduced by several orders of magnitude under irradiation. The electron excitations are shown to play the dominant role in this phenomena

  1. Leaching behavior of microtektite glass compositions in sea water and the effect of precipitation on glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In the present study it was attempted to account for the slow corrosion rates of microtektite glass in nature by comparing the leach rates of synthetic microtektite glass samples in deionized water and in sea-water, respectively. In order to obtain systematic data about leachant composition effects, leach tests were also carried out with synthetic leachant compositions enriched with respect to silica or depleted with respect to certain major components of sea-water (Mg, Ca). 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  2. Effect of Ba in the glass characteristics of cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Asuvathraman, R.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive 137 Cs extracted from high level nuclear waste, when immobilized in a suitable matrix can be used as a γsource in medical industry. Iron phosphate glass (IPG) is one of a suitable matrix for the immobilization of 137 Cs prior to the immobilization of 137 Cs in IPG, it is essential to optimize the immobilization conditions using natural (inactive) cesium. Glass characteristics of inactive Cs loaded iron phosphate glasses were already explored in our earlier studies. However, the change in glass characteristics of 137 Cs loaded iron phosphate glass to 137 Ba loaded iron phosphate glass need to be studied before the immobilization of 137 Cs in iron phosphate glass as 137 Cs transforms to 137 Ba due to nuclear transmutation ( 137 Cs(β,γ) 137 Ba). This paper reports the studies on such a behaviour by incorporating inactive Ba in cesium loaded iron phosphate glasses. Cs and Ba loaded iron phosphate glasses were prepared by melt quench technique in air using appropriate amounts of Fe 2 O 3 , NH 4 H 2 PO 4 , Ba(OH) 2.8 H 2 O and Cs 2 CO 3 . The chemicals were added such that the glass formed possesses the batch composition of (a) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -45 wt. % Cs 2 O-5 wt % BaO-P 2 O 5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs45Ba5); (b) 21.4 wt. % Fe 2 O 3 -25 wt. % Cs 2 O-25 wt % BaO-P 2 O5 (henceforth referred as IP50Cs25Ba25). The thermal expansion measurements were also carried out using a home-built quartz push-rod dilatometer. The data related to change in thermal expansion behaviour, glass forming ability, glass stability and structural changes in phosphate network due to the partial replacement of Cs with Ba will also be discussed. (author)

  3. Isotope effect in glass-transition temperature and ionic conductivity of lithium-borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Takanori; Morishima, Ryuta; Matsui, Tsuneo

    2002-01-01

    The glass-transition temperature and the electrical conductivity of lithium borate (0.33Li 2 O-0.67B 2 O 3 ) glasses with various isotopic compositions were determined by differential thermal analysis and by impedance spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained glass-transition temperature as well as the vibrational frequency of B-O network structure was independent of lithium isotopic composition. This result indicates that lithium ions, which exist as network modifier, only weakly interact with B-O network structure. In addition, the glass-transition temperature increased with 10 B content although the reason has not been understood. The electrical conductivity, on the other hand, increased with 6 Li content. The ratio of the conductivity of 6 Li glass to that of 7 Li glass was found to be 2, being larger than the value (7/6) 1/2 calculated with the simple classical diffusion theory. This strong mass dependence could be explained by the dynamic structure model, which assumes local structural relaxation even far below the glass-transition temperature. Besides, the conductivity appeared to increase with the glass-transition temperature. Possible correlations between the glass-transition temperature and the electrical conductivity were discussed. (author)

  4. Embedded nonvolatile memory devices with various silicon nitride energy band gaps on glass used for flat panel display applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Dang Ngoc; Van Duy, Nguyen; Jung, Sungwook; Yi, Junsin

    2010-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices with a nitride–nitride–oxynitride stack structure on a rough poly-silicon (poly-Si) surface were fabricated using a low-temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistor technology on glass substrates for application of flat panel display (FPD). The plasma-assisted oxidation/nitridation method is used to form a uniform oxynitride with an ultrathin tunneling layer on a rough LTPS surface. The NVMs, using a Si-rich silicon nitride film as a charge-trapping layer, were proposed as one of the solutions for the improvement of device performance such as the program/erase speed, the memory window and the charge retention characteristics. To further improve the vertical scaling and charge retention characteristics of NVM devices, the high-κ high-density N-rich SiN x films are used as a blocking layer. The fabricated NVM devices have outstanding electrical properties, such as a low threshold voltage, a high ON/OFF current ratio, a low subthreshold swing, a low operating voltage of less than ±9 V and a large memory window of 3.7 V, which remained about 1.9 V over a period of 10 years. These characteristics are suitable for electrical switching and data storage with in FPD application

  5. Regularity effect in prospective memory during aging

    OpenAIRE

    Blondelle, Geoffrey; Hainselin, Mathieu; Gounden, Yannick; Heurley, Laurent; Voisin, Hélène; Megalakaki, Olga; Bressous, Estelle; Quaglino, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regularity effect can affect performance in prospective memory (PM), but little is known on the cognitive processes linked to this effect. Moreover, its impacts with regard to aging remain unknown. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine regularity effect in PM in a lifespan perspective, with a sample of young, intermediate, and older adults.Objective and design: Our study examined the regularity effect in PM in three groups of participants: 28 young adults (18–30), 1...

  6. Are our memory predictions absolute or relative? : The effect of comparison on memory judgments

    OpenAIRE

    Karademir, Derya

    2016-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. Thesis (M.S.): Bilkent University, Department of Psychology, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2016. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 57-64). The effect of divided attention on memory is well documented. However, its effects on memory predictions are not known. One of the aims of the present study was to investigate whether divided attention affects memory performance and prospective memory predictions. The other aim of the current ...

  7. Regularity effect in prospective memory during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Blondelle

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regularity effect can affect performance in prospective memory (PM, but little is known on the cognitive processes linked to this effect. Moreover, its impacts with regard to aging remain unknown. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine regularity effect in PM in a lifespan perspective, with a sample of young, intermediate, and older adults. Objective and design: Our study examined the regularity effect in PM in three groups of participants: 28 young adults (18–30, 16 intermediate adults (40–55, and 25 older adults (65–80. The task, adapted from the Virtual Week, was designed to manipulate the regularity of the various activities of daily life that were to be recalled (regular repeated activities vs. irregular non-repeated activities. We examine the role of several cognitive functions including certain dimensions of executive functions (planning, inhibition, shifting, and binding, short-term memory, and retrospective episodic memory to identify those involved in PM, according to regularity and age. Results: A mixed-design ANOVA showed a main effect of task regularity and an interaction between age and regularity: an age-related difference in PM performances was found for irregular activities (older < young, but not for regular activities. All participants recalled more regular activities than irregular ones with no age effect. It appeared that recalling of regular activities only involved planning for both intermediate and older adults, while recalling of irregular ones were linked to planning, inhibition, short-term memory, binding, and retrospective episodic memory. Conclusion: Taken together, our data suggest that planning capacities seem to play a major role in remembering to perform intended actions with advancing age. Furthermore, the age-PM-paradox may be attenuated when the experimental design is adapted by implementing a familiar context through the use of activities of daily living. The clinical

  8. A critical review of radiation effects on borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, F.; Manara, A.; Rutten, F. van

    1981-01-01

    Most of the experimental values have been obtained by loading the glass with alpha emitters like Cm 244 and Pu 238. The data existing in literature on stored energy, and density variation are presented and discussed. Attention is given to the variation of the leaching rate due to the radiation effect. Samples loaded with alpha emitters have given data up to 0.17 dpa and such bombarded with heavy ions show large effects due to dose rate effects. A study on defect formation has shown that under electrons irradiation, formation of bubbles is possible. (DG)

  9. Caffeine effects on mood and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, R S

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of the present research was to assess whether a psychoactive dose of caffeine would have differential affects on the mood dimensions of arousal versus feelings of pleasantness and whether these mood alterations would influence memory either by (1) the experience of arousal at learning and/or (2) altered and congruent mood states at learning and recall. To address these questions, the administration of 5 mg/kg caffeine or placebo at learning and retrieval sessions was manipulated and subjects' mood was evaluated by several different self-report measures. Sixteen words were incidentally studied during the learning session and memory was evaluated by the number of words correctly recalled at the retrieval session two days later. Results revealed that caffeine reliably increased arousal, but did not affect any emotion dimensions related to feelings of pleasure. Subjects who received caffeine at learning and retrieval were also in equivalent mood states at both sessions. Moreover, caffeine did not produce any effects on memory; thus, neither hypothesis concerning the influence of arousal on memory was supported. These data show that caffeine is a useful method for manipulating arousal in the laboratory without influencing feelings of pleasantness or learning and memory performance.

  10. Time course of effects of emotion on item memory and source memory for Chinese words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Fu, Xiaolan

    2011-05-01

    Although many studies have investigated the effect of emotion on memory, it is unclear whether the effect of emotion extends to all aspects of an event. In addition, it is poorly understood how effects of emotion on item memory and source memory change over time. This study examined the time course of effects of emotion on item memory and source memory. Participants learned intentionally a list of neutral, positive, and negative Chinese words, which were presented twice, and then took test of free recall, followed by recognition and source memory tests, at one of eight delayed points of time. The main findings are (within the time frame of 2 weeks): (1) Negative emotion enhances free recall, whereas there is only a trend that positive emotion enhances free recall. In addition, negative and positive emotions have different points of time at which their effects on free recall reach the greatest magnitude. (2) Negative emotion reduces recognition, whereas positive emotion has no effect on recognition. (3) Neither positive nor negative emotion has any effect on source memory. The above findings indicate that effect of emotion does not necessarily extend to all aspects of an event and that valence is a critical modulating factor in effect of emotion on item memory. Furthermore, emotion does not affect the time course of item memory and source memory, at least with a time frame of 2 weeks. This study has implications for establishing the theoretical model regarding the effect of emotion on memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancing the production effect in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Chelsea K; Taylor, Tracy L

    2013-01-01

    The production effect is the finding that subsequent memory is better for words that are produced than for words that are not produced. Whereas the current literature demonstrates that reading aloud is the most effective form of production, the distinctiveness account used to explain the production effect predicts that there is nothing special about reading aloud per se: Other forms of vocal production that include an additional distinct element should produce even greater subsequent memory benefits than reading aloud. To test this, we presented participants with study words that they were instructed to read aloud loudly, read aloud, or read silently (Experiment 1); sing, read aloud, or read silently (Experiment 2); and sing, read aloud loudly, read aloud, or read silently (Experiment 3). We observed that both reading items aloud loudly (Experiments 1 and 3) and singing items (Experiments 2 and 3) at study resulted in greater subsequent recognition than reading items aloud in a normal voice; singing had a larger memory benefit than reading aloud loudly (Experiment 3). Our findings support the distinctiveness hypothesis by demonstrating that there are other forms of production, such as singing and reading aloud loudly that have a more pronounced effect on memory than reading aloud.

  12. Memory effects in syntactic ERP tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabourin, L.L.; Stowe, L.A.

    The study presented here investigated the role of memory in normal sentence processing by looking at ERP effects to normal sentences and sentences containing grammatical violations. Sentences where the critical word was in the middle of the sentence were compared to sentences where the critical word

  13. Phase boundary effects in metal matrix embedded glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, E.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study reactions at the phase boundaries of glass-lead composites at temperatures up to the softening point of the glass. Some metal was oxidized at the boundary and penetrated into the glass. Solid-state diffusion was rate controlling. In the case of a phosphate glass, fission products were depleted in the boundary area. Molybdenum migrated into the lead, and cesium migrated into the glass core. 2 figures, 3 tables

  14. Multi-layered metal nanocrystals in a sol-gel spin-on-glass matrix for flash memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Meiyu Stella [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); Globalfoundries Singapore Pte Ltd, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Suresh, Vignesh [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*Star, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore); Chan, Mei Yin [School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Ma, Yu Wei [Globalfoundries Singapore Pte Ltd, 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, 738406 (Singapore); Lee, Pooi See [School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar [Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*Star, Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), #08-03, 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, 138634 (Singapore); Science et Analyse des Materiaux Unit (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, 41, rue du Brill, Belvaux, 4422 (Luxembourg); Srinivasan, M.P., E-mail: srinivasan.madapusi@rmit.edu.au [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E5, 4 Engineering Drive 4, 117576 (Singapore); School of Engineering, RMIT University, Building 10, Level 11, Room 14, 376-392 Swanston Street, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001 (Australia)

    2017-01-15

    A simple and low-cost process of embedding metal nanocrystals as charge storage centers within a dielectric is demonstrated to address leakage issues associated with the scaling of the tunnelling oxide in flash memories. Metal nanocrystals with high work functions (nickel, platinum and palladium) were prepared as embedded species in methyl siloxane spin-on-glass (SOG) films on silicon substrates. Sub-10 nm-sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed, multi-layered nanocrystals with high particle densities (10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}) were formed in the films by thermal curing of the spin-coated SOG films containing the metal precursors. Capacitance-Voltage measurements performed on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors with the SOG films show that the presence of metal nanocrystals enhanced the memory window of the films to 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. These SOG films demonstrated the ability to store both holes and electrons. Capacitance-time measurements show good charge retention of more than 75% after 10{sup 4} s of discharging. This work demonstrates the applicability of the low-cost in-situ sol-gel preparation in contrast to conventional methods that involve multiple and expensive processing steps. - Highlights: • Sub-10 nm sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed nanoparticle based charge trap memories. • Preparation of multi-layer high work function metal nanocrystals at low cost. • Large memory window of 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. • Good charge retention of more than 90% and 75% after 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} s of discharging respectively. • Use of a 3 nm thick tunnelling oxide in compliance with ITRS specifications.

  15. Multi-layered metal nanocrystals in a sol-gel spin-on-glass matrix for flash memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Meiyu Stella; Suresh, Vignesh; Chan, Mei Yin; Ma, Yu Wei; Lee, Pooi See; Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2017-01-01

    A simple and low-cost process of embedding metal nanocrystals as charge storage centers within a dielectric is demonstrated to address leakage issues associated with the scaling of the tunnelling oxide in flash memories. Metal nanocrystals with high work functions (nickel, platinum and palladium) were prepared as embedded species in methyl siloxane spin-on-glass (SOG) films on silicon substrates. Sub-10 nm-sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed, multi-layered nanocrystals with high particle densities (10"1"1–10"1"2 cm"−"2) were formed in the films by thermal curing of the spin-coated SOG films containing the metal precursors. Capacitance-Voltage measurements performed on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors with the SOG films show that the presence of metal nanocrystals enhanced the memory window of the films to 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. These SOG films demonstrated the ability to store both holes and electrons. Capacitance-time measurements show good charge retention of more than 75% after 10"4 s of discharging. This work demonstrates the applicability of the low-cost in-situ sol-gel preparation in contrast to conventional methods that involve multiple and expensive processing steps. - Highlights: • Sub-10 nm sized, well-isolated, uniformly distributed nanoparticle based charge trap memories. • Preparation of multi-layer high work function metal nanocrystals at low cost. • Large memory window of 2.32 V at low operating voltages of ±5 V. • Good charge retention of more than 90% and 75% after 10"3 and 10"4 s of discharging respectively. • Use of a 3 nm thick tunnelling oxide in compliance with ITRS specifications.

  16. Thermoinduced plastic flow and shape memory effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Heng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an enhanced form of thermocoupled J2-flow models of finite deformation elastoplasticity with temperature-dependent yielding and hardening behaviour. The thermomechanical constitutive structure of these models is rendered free and explicit in the rigorous sense of thermodynamic consistency. Namely, with a free energy function explicitly introduced in terms of almost any given form of the thermomechanical constitutive functions, the requirements from the second law are identically fulfilled with positive internal dissipation. We study the case when a dependence of yielding and hardening on temperature is given and demonstrate that thermosensitive yielding with anisotropic hardening may give rise to appreciable plastic flow either in a process of heating or in a cyclic process of heating/cooling, thus leading to the findings of one- and two-way thermoinduced plastic flow. We then show that such theoretical findings turn out to be the effects found in shape memory materials, such as one- and two-way memory effects. Thus, shape memory effects may be explained to be thermoinduced plastic flow resulting from thermosensitive yielding and hardening behaviour. These and other relevant facts may suggest that, from a phenomenological standpoint, thermocoupled elastoplastic J2-flow models with thermosensitive yielding and hardening may furnish natural, straightforward descriptions of thermomechanical behaviour of shape memory materials.

  17. Size effect model for the edge strength of glass with cut and ground edge finishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandebroek, M.; Louter, C.; Caspeele, R.; Ensslen, F.; Belis, J.L.I.F.

    2014-01-01

    The edge strength of glass is influenced by the size of the surface (near the edge) which is subjected to tensile stresses. To quantify this size effect, 8 series of single layer annealed glass beam specimens (as-received glass) were subjected to in-plane four-point bending with linearly increased

  18. Dissociation between Features and Feature Relations in Infant Memory: Effects of Memory Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramesh S.; Rovee-Collier, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    Four experiments examined effects of the number of features and feature relations on learning and long-term memory in 3-month olds. Findings suggested that memory load size selectively constrained infants' long-term memory for relational information, suggesting that in infants, features and relations are psychologically distinct and that memory…

  19. Age differences in perceptions of memory strategy effectiveness for recent and remote memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, Tara T; Horhota, Michelle; Crumley, Jessica; Geanon, Catherine T; Juett, Jacqueline J

    2018-03-01

    We examined whether young and older adults hold different beliefs about the effectiveness of memory strategies for specific types of memory tasks and whether memory strategies are perceived to be differentially effective for young, middle-aged, and older targets. Participants rated the effectiveness of five memory strategies for 10 memory tasks at three target ages (20, 50, and 80 years old). Older adults did not strongly differentiate strategy effectiveness, viewing most strategies as similarly effective across memory tasks. Young adults held strategy-specific beliefs, endorsing external aids and physical health as more effective than a positive attitude or internal strategies, without substantial differentiation based on task. We also found differences in anticipated strategy effectiveness for targets of different ages. Older adults described cognitive and physical health strategies as more effective for older than middle-aged targets, whereas young adults expected these strategies to be equally effective for middle-aged and older target adults.

  20. Bactericidal effects of bioactive glasses on clinically important aerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munukka, Eveliina; Leppäranta, Outi; Korkeamäki, Mika; Vaahtio, Minna; Peltola, Timo; Zhang, Di; Hupa, Leena; Ylänen, Heimo; Salonen, Jukka I; Viljanen, Matti K; Eerola, Erkki

    2008-01-01

    Bioactive glasses (BAGs) have been studied for decades for clinical use, and they have found many dental and orthopedic applications. BAGs have also been shown to have an antibacterial effect e.g., on some oral microorganisms. In this extensive work we show that six powdered BAGs and two sol-gel derived materials have a clear antibacterial effect on 29 clinically important bacterial species. We also incorporated a rapid and accurate flow cytometric (FCM) method to calculate and standardize the numbers of viable bacteria inoculated in the suspensions used in the tests for antibacterial activity. In all materials tested growth inhibition could be demonstrated, although the concentration and time needed for the effect varied depending on the BAG. The most effective glass was S53P4, which had a clear growth-inhibitory effect on all pathogens tested. The sol-gel derived materials CaPSiO and CaPSiO II also showed a strong antibacterial effect. In summary, BAGs were found to clearly inhibit the growth of a wide selection of bacterial species causing e.g., infections on the surfaces of prostheses in the body after implantation.

  1. Effect of lead species on the durability of simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchinski, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    It has been shown that the incorporation of lead metal into the corrosion environment reduces the leaching rate of nuclear waste glasses. The present study evaluated the effects of lead metal, oxides, alloys, glasses and soluble species on the corrosion rate of a waste glass. The inherent durability of nuclear waste glasses comes from the about due to the insoluble surface film developed during corrosion. This surface film, enriched with iron, aluminum and calcium acts as a diffusion barrier to further corrosion. Except for PbO 2 , all lead species inhibited glass corrosion due to the formation of a surface film enriched in lead. No corroded glass layer was observed below the lead surface layer. Also, no glass corrosion products were found on the lead surface, except for small amounts of silicon. The transport and deposition of lead on the glass surface appears to be the key factors in preventing glass corrosion. At high glass surface area to volume ratios, the glass corroded considerably at short times since the dissolved lead source could not coat the entire glass surface rapidly enough to prevent continued corrosion. Also, experimental solution values did not agree with thermodynamics model predictions. This suggests that kinetic factors, namely diffusion barriers, are controlling the glass corrosion rate

  2. Effects of chewing in working memory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Obata, Takayuki; Kashikura, Kenichi; Nonaka, Hiroi; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Ikehira, Hiroo; Onozuka, Minoru

    2008-05-09

    It has been generally suggested that chewing produces an enhancing effect on cognitive performance-related aspects of memory by the test battery. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that chewing is associated with activation of various brain regions, including the prefrontal cortex. However, little is known about the relation between cognitive performances affected by chewing and the neuronal activity in specified regions in the brain. We therefore examined the effects of chewing on neuronal activities in the brain during a working memory task using fMRI. The subjects chewed gum, without odor and taste components, between continuously performed two- or three-back (n-back) working memory tasks. Chewing increased the BOLD signals in the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 9 and 46) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during the n-back tasks. Furthermore, there were more prominent activations in the right premotor cortex, precuneus, thalamus, hippocampus and inferior parietal lobe during the n-back tasks after the chewing trial. These results suggest that chewing may accelerate or recover the process of working memory besides inducing improvement in the arousal level by the chewing motion.

  3. The role of shape memory alloy on impact response of glass/epoxy laminates under low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K. W.; Kim, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    The paper aims to evaluate the impact response of glass/epoxy laminates with embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) subject to low velocity impact at various temperatures. For the goal, the impact tests were performed by using an instrumented impact-testing machine at three temperatures: 293K, 263K and 233K for the baseline (laminates without SMA wires) and SMA laminates (laminates with embedded SMA wires). And the resultant damages were inspected through the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). Also, based on the impact force history and the damage configuration, the impact resistance parameters were employed to evaluate damage resistance of laminates with embedded SMA wires. As a result, it was observed that the damage resistance of glass/epoxy laminates is influenced by embedded SMA wires and embedding SMA wires into laminates does not compromise the structure any differently to laminates without wires. In fact, it has been shown that under lower temperature, the SMA laminates have a little superior damage resistance compared with the baseline laminates

  4. Structure-Property Relationships and the Mixed Network Former Effect in Boroaluminosilicate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Potuzak, Marcel; Mauro, John C.

    compositions by substituting Al2O3 for SiO2. We also investigate the various roles of sodium in the glasses including charge compensation of tetrahedral aluminum and boron atoms and formation of non-bridging oxygen. We find that mechanical properties (density, elastic moduli, and hardness), glass transition......Boroaluminosilicate glasses are important materials for various applications, e.g., liquid crystal display substrates, glass fibers for reinforcement, and thermal shock-resistant glass containers. The complicated structural speciation in these glasses leads to a mixed network former effect yielding...... nonlinear variation in many macroscopic properties. It is therefore crucial to investigate and understand structure-property correlations in boroaluminosilicate glasses. Here we study the structure-property relationships of a range of sodium boroaluminosilicate glasses from peralkaline to peraluminous...

  5. An Easy Way to Show Memory Color Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes and evaluates a simple stimulus display that allows one to measure memory color effects (the effect of object knowledge and memory on color perception). The proposed approach is fast and easy and does not require running an extensive experiment. It shows that memory color effects are robust to minor variations due to a lack of color calibration.

  6. An Easy Way to Show Memory Color Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Witzel, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes and evaluates a simple stimulus display that allows one to measure memory color effects (the effect of object knowledge and memory on color perception). The proposed approach is fast and easy and does not require running an extensive experiment. It shows that memory color effects are robust to minor variations due to a lack of color calibration.

  7. Effects of glass fibers on the properties of micro molded plastic parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gasparin, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Glass fibers are used to reinforce plastics and to improve their mechanical properties. But plastic filled with glass fibers is a concern for molding of micro scale plastic parts. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of glass fiber on the replication quality and mechanical properties...... of polymeric thin ribs. It investigates the effect of feature size and gate location on distribution of glass fibers inside the molded parts. The results from this work indicate that glass filled plastic materials have poor replication quality and nonhomogeneous mechanical properties due to the nonuniform...

  8. Testing the exclusivity effect in location memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel P A; Dunn, Andrew K; Baguley, Thom

    2013-01-01

    There is growing literature exploring the possibility of parallel retrieval of location memories, although this literature focuses primarily on the speed of retrieval with little attention to the accuracy of location memory recall. Baguley, Lansdale, Lines, and Parkin (2006) found that when a person has two or more memories for an object's location, their recall accuracy suggests that only one representation can be retrieved at a time (exclusivity). This finding is counterintuitive given evidence of non-exclusive recall in the wider memory literature. The current experiment explored the exclusivity effect further and aimed to promote an alternative outcome (i.e., independence or superadditivity) by encouraging the participants to combine multiple representations of space at encoding or retrieval. This was encouraged by using anchor (points of reference) labels that could be combined to form a single strongly associated combination. It was hypothesised that the ability to combine the anchor labels would allow the two representations to be retrieved concurrently, generating higher levels of recall accuracy. The results demonstrate further support for the exclusivity hypothesis, showing no significant improvement in recall accuracy when there are multiple representations of a target object's location as compared to a single representation.

  9. Effects of neutron irradiation on a superconducting metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, E.A.; Johnson, W.L.; Cline, C.

    1979-06-01

    The effects of fast neutron irradiation on a superconducting metallic glass (Mo 6 Ru 4 ) 82 B 18 have been studied. Following irradiation to a total fluence of 10 19 n/cm 2 , T/sub c/ increases from 6.05 K to 6.19 K, and the width of the transition decreases sharply. The density of the material decreases by 1.5%, and the x-ray scattering intensity maxima are broadened. An improvement in the ductility of the samples is observed which together with the other observations suggests the production of defects having atomic scale dimensions and characterized by excess volume

  10. The effect of bacterial cellulose on the shape memory behavior of polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposite hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirahmadi, Pegah; Kokabi, Mehrdad

    2018-01-01

    Most research on shape memory polymers has been confined to neat polymers in their dry state, while, some hydrogel networks are known for their shape memory properties. Hydrogels have low glass transition temperatures which are below 100°C depend on the content of water. But they are usually weak and brittle, and not suitable for structural applications due to their low mechanical strengths because of these materials have large amount of water (>50%), so they could not remember original shape perfectly. Bacterial cellulose nanofibers with perfect properties such as high water holding capacity, high crystallinity, high tensile strength and good biocompatibility can dismiss all the drawbacks. In the present study, polyvinyl alcohol/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite hydrogel prepared by repetitive freezing-thawing method. The bacterial cellulose was used as reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties and stimuli response. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to obtain the glass transition temperature. Nanocomposite morphology was characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and mechanical properties were investigated by standard tensile test. Finally, the effect of bacterial cellulose nanofiber on shape memory behavior of polyvinyl alcohol/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite hydrogel was investigated. It is found that switching temperature of this system is the glass transition temperature of the nano domains formed within the system. The results also show increase of shape recovery, and shape recovery speed due to presence of bacterial cellulose.

  11. Polymer ferroelectric field-effect memory device with SnO channel layer exhibits record hole mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus Alfonso

    2014-06-10

    Here we report for the first time a hybrid p-channel polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory device with record mobility. The memory device, fabricated at 200C on both plastic polyimide and glass substrates, uses ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE) as the gate dielectric and transparent p-type oxide (SnO) as the active channel layer. A record mobility of 3.3 cm 2V-1s-1, large memory window (~16 V), low read voltages (~-1 V), and excellent retention characteristics up to 5000 sec have been achieved. The mobility achieved in our devices is over 10 times higher than previously reported polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory with p-type channel. This demonstration opens the door for the development of non-volatile memory devices based on dual channel for emerging transparent and flexible electronic devices.

  12. Polymer ferroelectric field-effect memory device with SnO channel layer exhibits record hole mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus Alfonso; Khan, M. A.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report for the first time a hybrid p-channel polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory device with record mobility. The memory device, fabricated at 200C on both plastic polyimide and glass substrates, uses ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE) as the gate dielectric and transparent p-type oxide (SnO) as the active channel layer. A record mobility of 3.3 cm 2V-1s-1, large memory window (~16 V), low read voltages (~-1 V), and excellent retention characteristics up to 5000 sec have been achieved. The mobility achieved in our devices is over 10 times higher than previously reported polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory with p-type channel. This demonstration opens the door for the development of non-volatile memory devices based on dual channel for emerging transparent and flexible electronic devices.

  13. Squeal vibrations, glass sounds, and the stick-slip effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patitsas, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the squeal acoustic emissions when a chalk is rubbed on a blackboard or better on a ceramic plate, and those when a wet finger is rubbed on a smooth surface, such as a glass surface, is sought in the stick-slip effect between the rubbing surfaces. In the case of the squealing chalk, the stick-slip effect is anchored by shear modes of vibration in about a 0.3 mm thick chalk powder band at the rubbing interface, while in the case of the wet finger on glass, by such modes in a band comprising the finger skin. Furthermore, there are the interfacial bands at the contact areas that result in the decrease of the friction coefficient with relative velocity of slide, i.e., the condition for the stick-slip effect to occur. Such bands are basically composed of the asperities on the surface of the chalk band and of the epidermis ridges and the water layer, respectively. (author)

  14. Memory effect in uniformly heated granular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trizac, E.; Prados, A.

    2014-07-01

    We evidence a Kovacs-like memory effect in a uniformly driven granular gas. A system of inelastic hard particles, in the low density limit, can reach a nonequilibrium steady state when properly forced. By following a certain protocol for the drive time dependence, we prepare the gas in a state where the granular temperature coincides with its long time value. The temperature subsequently does not remain constant but exhibits a nonmonotonic evolution with either a maximum or a minimum, depending on the dissipation and on the protocol. We present a theoretical analysis of this memory effect at Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation level and show that when dissipation exceeds a threshold, the response can be called anomalous. We find excellent agreement between the analytical predictions and direct Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. A statistical approach to determine the effects of nuclear glass components on the short and long term glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, Th.; Tovena, I.; Vernaz, E.; Larche, F.; Phan Tan Luu, R.

    1997-01-01

    The experimentation plan methodology may be a powerful tool to design statistical models able to calculate quantitative leach rates as a function of glass compositions. The investigation discussed here implemented an experimentation plan methodology covering a wide range of glass composition variations with two major objectives: - identify the effects of the main component oxides of R7T7 glass (SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , Na 2 O+Li 2 O, additive oxides, Fission Products oxides, actinide oxides) on the dissolution rates far and close to equilibrium; - and develop a statistical model relating the measured initial dissolution rate with the selected oxide compositions. A second-degree silica-based model was developed to express the initial dissolution rates at 100 deg C according to the oxide weight percentage of 6 major oxides or oxide groups. The model is qualified by comparison with independent experimental results. For the short term, far from saturation conditions (confined media), plotting the effects of the oxides clearly showed that SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and the additive oxides enhanced glass durability at 100 deg C, while B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O+Li 2 O diminished the initial corrosion resistance. For the long term, plotting the effects of the oxides showed that additive oxides, Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 enhanced glass durability at 90 deg C, in that order, while Na 2 O+Li 2 O still diminished the corrosion resistance. The fission products and actinide oxides and ZrO 2 have apparently a slight beneficial effect on the glass durability, under saturation conditions (long term). (author)

  16. A statistical approach to determine the effects of nuclear glass components on the short and long term glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advocat, Th; Tovena, I; Vernaz, E [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, DEN, 30 - Marcoule (France); Larche, F [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France); Phan Tan Luu, R [Faculte de St Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1997-07-01

    The experimentation plan methodology may be a powerful tool to design statistical models able to calculate quantitative leach rates as a function of glass compositions. The investigation discussed here implemented an experimentation plan methodology covering a wide range of glass composition variations with two major objectives: - identify the effects of the main component oxides of R7T7 glass (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O+Li{sub 2}O, additive oxides, Fission Products oxides, actinide oxides) on the dissolution rates far and close to equilibrium; - and develop a statistical model relating the measured initial dissolution rate with the selected oxide compositions. A second-degree silica-based model was developed to express the initial dissolution rates at 100 deg C according to the oxide weight percentage of 6 major oxides or oxide groups. The model is qualified by comparison with independent experimental results. For the short term, far from saturation conditions (confined media), plotting the effects of the oxides clearly showed that SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the additive oxides enhanced glass durability at 100 deg C, while B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O+Li{sub 2}O diminished the initial corrosion resistance. For the long term, plotting the effects of the oxides showed that additive oxides, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} enhanced glass durability at 90 deg C, in that order, while Na{sub 2}O+Li{sub 2}O still diminished the corrosion resistance. The fission products and actinide oxides and ZrO{sub 2} have apparently a slight beneficial effect on the glass durability, under saturation conditions (long term). (author)

  17. Memory effect for particle scattering in odd spacetime dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satishchandran, Gautam; Wald, Robert M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the gravitational memory effect for linearized perturbations off of Minkowski space in odd spacetime dimensions d by examining the effects of gravitational radiation from classical point particle scattering. We also investigate analogous memory effects for electromagnetic and scalar radiation. We find that there is no gravitational memory effect in all odd dimensions. For scalar and electromagnetic fields, there is no memory effect for d ≥7 ; for d =3 there is an infinite momentum memory effect, whereas for d =5 there is no momentum memory effect but the displacement of a test particle will grow unboundedly with time. Our results are further elucidated by analyzing the memory effect for any slowly moving source of compact spatial support in odd dimensions.

  18. Velocity Memory Effect for polarized gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.-M.; Duval, C.; Gibbons, G. W.; Horvathy, P. A.

    2018-05-01

    Circularly polarized gravitational sandwich waves exhibit, as do their linearly polarized counterparts, the Velocity Memory Effect: freely falling test particles in the flat after-zone fly apart along straight lines with constant velocity. In the inside zone their trajectories combine oscillatory and rotational motions in a complicated way. For circularly polarized periodic gravitational waves some trajectories remain bounded, while others spiral outward. These waves admit an additional "screw" isometry beyond the usual five. The consequences of this extra symmetry are explored.

  19. Experimental Effects of Acute Exercise on Prospective Memory and False Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2018-01-01

    Research demonstrates that acute exercise can enhance retrospective episodic memory performance. However, limited research has examined the effects of acute exercise on prospective memory, and no studies have examined the effects of exercise on false memory performance. This study examined the potential effects of acute exercise on prospective memory and false memory performance. A between-group randomized controlled trial was employed, with participants (college students; M age  = 20 years) randomized into an exercise group (15-minute acute bout of treadmill walking; N = 25) or a control group (15 minutes of sitting; N = 26). Prospective memory was assessed from two laboratory and two naturalistic assessments outside the lab. False memory was assessed using a word-list trial. There were no statistically significant differences in prospective memory based on group allocation (F Group×Time  = 1.17; P = 0.32; η 2  = 0.06). However, the control group recalled more false words and had a higher rate of false memory recognition (F Group×Time  = 3.15; P = 0.01; η 2  = 0.26). These findings indicate that acute moderate-intensity aerobic exercise is not associated with prospective memory performance but provides some suggestive evidence that acute exercise may reduce the rate of false memories.

  20. High-energy γ-irradiation effect on physical ageing in Ge-Se glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchak, R.; Kozdras, A.; Kozyukhin, S.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of Co 60 γ-irradiation on physical ageing in binary Ge x Se 100-x glasses (5 ≤ x ≤ 27) is studied using conventional differential scanning calorimetry method. It is shown, that high-energy irradiation leads to additional increase in the glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area near the glass transition region over the one induced by isochronal storage of these glasses at normal conditions. This γ-induced physical ageing is shown to be well-pronounced in Se-rich glasses (x < 20), while only negligible changes are recorded for glasses of 20 ≤ x ≤ 27 compositions. The effect under consideration is supposed to be associated with γ-activated structural relaxation of the glass network towards thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid.

  1. High-energy {gamma}-irradiation effect on physical ageing in Ge-Se glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska Str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Department of Economy of Academy of Management and Administration in Opole, 18 Niedzialkowski Str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Kozyukhin, S. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of RAS, Leninsky Pr. 31, Moscow 199991 (Russian Federation); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL-42201 (Poland)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2009-09-01

    Effect of Co{sup 60} {gamma}-irradiation on physical ageing in binary Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} glasses (5 {<=} x {<=} 27) is studied using conventional differential scanning calorimetry method. It is shown, that high-energy irradiation leads to additional increase in the glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area near the glass transition region over the one induced by isochronal storage of these glasses at normal conditions. This {gamma}-induced physical ageing is shown to be well-pronounced in Se-rich glasses (x < 20), while only negligible changes are recorded for glasses of 20 {<=} x {<=} 27 compositions. The effect under consideration is supposed to be associated with {gamma}-activated structural relaxation of the glass network towards thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid.

  2. Temperature Effects on Aluminoborosilicate Glass and Melt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative determination of the atomic-scale structure of multi-component oxide melts, and the effects of temperature on them, is a complex problem. Ca- and Na- aluminoborosilicates are especially interesting, not only because of their major role in widespread technical applications (flat-panel computer displays, fiber composites, etc.), but because the coordination environments of two of their main network cations (Al3+ and B3+) change markedly with composition and temperature is ways that may in part be analogous to processes in silicate melts at high pressures in the Earth. Here we examine a series of such glasses with different cooling rates, chosen to evaluate the role modifier cation field strength (Ca2+ vs. Na+) and of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) content. To explore the effects of fictive temperature, fast quenched and annealed samples were compared. We have used B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to measure the different B and Al coordinations and calculated the contents of non-bridging oxygens (NBO). Lower cooling rates increase the fraction of [4]B species in all compositions. The conversion of [3]B to [4]B is also expected to convert NBO to bridging oxygens, which should affect thermodynamic properties such as configurational entropy and configurational heat capacity. For four compositions with widely varying compositions and initial NBO contents, analysis of the speciation changes with the same, simple reaction [3]B = [4]B + NBO yields similar enthalpy values of 25±7 kJ/mol. B-11 triple quantum MAS NMR allows as well the proportions of [3]B boroxol ring and non-ring sites to be determined, and reveals more [3]B boroxol ring structures present in annealed (lower temperature) glasses. In situ, high-temperature MAS NMR spectra have been collected on one of the Na-aluminoborosilicate and on a sodium borate glass at 14.1 T. The exchange of boron between the 3- and 4-coordinated sites is clearly observed well above the glass transition temperatures, confirming the

  3. Time-dependent effects of cardiovascular exercise on memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Thomas, Richard; Mang, Cameron S

    2016-01-01

    We present new evidence supporting the hypothesis that the effects of cardiovascular exercise on memory can be regulated in a time-dependent manner. When the exercise stimulus is temporally coupled with specific phases of the memory formation process, a single bout of cardiovascular exercise may...... be sufficient to improve memory. SUMMARY: The timing of exercise in relation to the information to be remembered is critical to maximize the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on memory....

  4. Study of memory effects in polymer dispersed liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jinwoo

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the memory effects in polymer dispersed liquid crystal films. We found that optical responses, such as the memory effects, of the films depended strongly on the morphology. For example, memory effects were observed for films with polymer ball morphologies; however, only weak hysteresis effects were observed for films with droplet morphologies. In particular, a stronger memory effect was observed for films with more complicated polymer ball structures. Coincidentally, T TE , the temperature at which the memory state is thermally erased, was generally higher for the films exhibiting a stronger memory effect. In addition, studies of the temporal evolution of the films show that the memory effects become stronger after films have been kept on the shelf for a period of time. This change is likely to be associated with a modification of surface anchoring properties at the LC-polymer interface.

  5. Glass consistency and glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  6. Gender differences in episodic memory and visual working memory including the effects of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Franz; Petermann, Franz; Lepach, Anja Christina

    2013-01-01

    Analysing the relationship between gender and memory, and examining the effects of age on the overall memory-related functioning, are the ongoing goals of psychological research. The present study examined gender and age group differences in episodic memory with respect to the type of task. In addition, these subgroup differences were also analysed in visual working memory. A sample of 366 women and 330 men, aged between 16 and 69 years of age, participated in the current study. Results indicate that women outperformed men on auditory memory tasks, whereas male adolescents and older male adults showed higher level performances on visual episodic and visual working memory measures. However, the size of gender-linked effects varied somewhat across age groups. Furthermore, results partly support a declining performance on episodic memory and visual working memory measures with increasing age. Although age-related losses in episodic memory could not be explained by a decreasing verbal and visuospatial ability with age, women's advantage in auditory episodic memory could be explained by their advantage in verbal ability. Men's higher level visual episodic memory performance was found to result from their advantage in visuospatial ability. Finally, possible methodological, biological, and cognitive explanations for the current findings are discussed.

  7. Effects of thought suppression on episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, E; Merckelbach, H; Muris, P

    1997-11-01

    Subjects were shown a short film fragment. Following this, one group of subjects (n = 26) was instructed to suppress their thoughts about the film, while the other group (n = 24) received no instructions. After 5 hrs subjects returned to the laboratory and completed a questionnaire testing their memory about the film. Results showed that suppression subjects reported a higher frequency of thoughts about the film than control subjects. No evidence was obtained for Wegner, Quillian, and Houston's (1996; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71, 680-691) claim that suppression has an undermining effect on memory for chronology. Possible causes for the differences between the results as obtained by Wegner et al., and those found in the present study are discussed. These causes may pertain to the experimental design, but also to differences in emotional impact of the stimulus material that was used in both studies.

  8. Joint effects of emotion and color on memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhbandner, Christof; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2013-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown that memory is enhanced for emotionally negative and positive information relative to neutral information. We examined whether emotion-induced memory enhancement is influenced by low-level perceptual attributes such as color. Because in everyday life red is often used as a warning signal, whereas green signals security, we hypothesized that red might enhance memory for negative information and green memory for positive information. To capture the signaling function of colors, we measured memory for words standing out from the context by color, and manipulated the color and emotional significance of the outstanding words. Making words outstanding by color strongly enhanced memory, replicating the well-known von Restorff effect. Furthermore, memory for colored words was further increased by emotional significance, replicating the memory-enhancing effect of emotion. Most intriguingly, the effects of emotion on memory additionally depended on color type. Red strongly increased memory for negative words, whereas green strongly increased memory for positive words. These findings provide the first evidence that emotion-induced memory enhancement is influenced by color and demonstrate that different colors can have different functions in human memory.

  9. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO2 fuel reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of 129 I, 85 Kr and 14 C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  10. A Study of the Effect of Recycled Mix Glass on the Mechanical Properties of Green Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseel B. Al-Zubaidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we utilized mixing of different types of recycled glass such as (neon glass, brown glass, and green glass that has high percentage of silicon dioxide (SiO2 with different concentrations. Utilization these landfall materials can be considered as keeping on resources. Different waste glasses used as a partial replacement of cement with different concentrations 11%, 13%, and 15% of cement weight for each type, and study the effect of it on the mechanical properties of concrete. After mixing, casting, and curing in water at (20±2°C for (7, 14, and 28 days, the mechanical properties showed that the compressive strength and flexural showed highest results at 13% from cement weight of neon glass, whereas splitting tensile strength showed the highest value at the same percentage, but from green glass.

  11. On the alleged memory-undermining effects of daydreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Cleere, Colleen; Merckelbach, Harald; Peters, Maarten; Jelicic, Marko; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2016-01-01

    In three experiments, we examined the memory-undermining effects of daydreaming for (un)related stimuli. In Experiments 1 and 2, we tested whether daydreaming fosters forgetting of semantically interrelated material and hence, catalyzes false memory production. In Experiment 3, we examined the memory effects of different daydreaming instructions. In Experiment 1, daydreaming did not undermine correct recall of semantically interrelated words, nor did it affect false memories. In Experiment 2, we again failed to find that daydreaming exerted memory-undermining effects a. In Experiment 3, no memory effects were obtained using different daydreaming instructions. Together, our studies fail to show appreciable memory-undermining effects of daydreaming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ageing and memory effects in a mechanically alloyed nanoparticle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osth, Michael; Herisson, Didier; Nordblad, Per; De Toro, Jose A.; Riveiro, Jose M.

    2007-01-01

    Ageing and memory experiments have been performed to explore the non-equilibrium dynamics of the mechanically alloyed nanoparticle system Fe 30 Ag 40 W 30 , which comprises a heterogeneous ensemble of magnetic particles with average moment ∼ 10 2 μ B dispersed in a metallic non-magnetic matrix. This system has earlier, from critical slowing down analysis, been reported to enter a spin glass like state at low temperatures [J. A. de Toro et al., Phys. Rev. B 69, (2004) 224407]. The wait time dependence of the magnetic relaxation observed after the application of a weak magnetic field and the memory of the thermal history in the low temperature phase recorded on continuous heating in a weak applied field show similar features as observed in corresponding experiments on canonical spin glasses

  13. Differential Age Effects on Spatial and Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterman, Joukje M.; Morel, Sascha; Meijer, Lisette; Buvens, Cleo; Kessels, Roy P. C.; Postma, Albert

    2011-01-01

    The present study was intended to compare age effects on visual and spatial working memory by using two versions of the same task that differed only in presentation mode. The working memory task contained both a simultaneous and a sequential presentation mode condition, reflecting, respectively, visual and spatial working memory processes. Young…

  14. Effects of Acute Exercise on Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labban, Jeffrey D.; Etnier, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of acute exercise on long-term memory, specifically the timing of exercise relative to the memory challenge. We assessed memory via paragraph recall, in which participants listened to two paragraphs (exposure) and recounted them following a 35-min delay. Participants (n = 48) were randomly assigned to one of…

  15. Two component memory of Rotstein effect in nuclear emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushchin, E.M.; Lebedev, A.N.; Somov, S.V.; Timofeev, M.K.; Tipografshchik, G.I.

    1991-01-01

    Two sharply differing memory components - fast and slow -are simultaneously detected during investigation into the controlled mode of fast charged particle detection in simple nuclear emulsions, with the emulsion trace sensitivity, corresponding to these components, being about 5 time different. The value of memory time is T m ≅40 μs for fast memory and T m ≅3.5 ms for the slow one. The detection of two Rotstein effect memory components confirms the correctness of the trap model

  16. Effect of platinoids on French LWR reference glass properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacaud, F.; Fillet, C.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1991-01-01

    Nine samples of the 'R7T7' glass composition selected to vitrify fission product solutions in France were prepared with added platinoid elements (ruthenium, rhodium and palladium) in soluble form and as insoluble metal particles in solution, and their major properties were measured. Regardless of the initial form when added to the glass the platinoids always formed the same heterogeneous inclusions in the final glass: RuO 2 precipitates which were often found as aggregates, and polymetallic (Pd, Rh and Te) inclusions. The particles tended to settle in the molten glass. The viscosity increased by about 20% at 1100 deg C. The mechanical properties and short-term leach rates were not significantly affected. Crystallization increased by a factor of 2 or 3 in heat-treated glass specimens but did not exceed a few volume percent. However, as the short-term leach rate did not significantly increase, the glass properties were very satisfactory

  17. Volatility mechanisms of borosilicate glasses and molten glasses of nuclear interest structural effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, L.

    1998-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the mechanisms which control the volatility of the reference glass used for the confinement of radioactive waste. It was conducted on simplified compositions, in the SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -αNa 2 O-(1-alpha)Li 2 O-CaO system.The structural approach carried out by NMR, from room temperature up to 1500 deg.C, shows a strong increase in the mobility of alkalis above Tg. A rapid exchange between B III and B IV sites near 700 deg.C, and the change of coordination number B IV- B III near 1100 deg.C, also seem to take place. The analysis of the vapor phase, carried out by High Temperature Mass Spectrometry coupled to Knudsen cells, reveals the presence between 780 deg.C and 830 deg.C of NaBO 2 (g), LiBO 2 (g) and Na 2 (BO 2 )2(g). The calculation of the partial pressure of each species shows that the total pressure of simplified glasses is dominated by the contribution of sodium. To study the volatility of glasses at higher temperature, equipment using the Transpiration method was used. The analysis of the deposits indicate the presence at 1060 deg.C of the species quoted previously. The vaporization rate and the vapor density were determined for each composition studied in a saturated state. Thus, we show that the volatility of the reference glass can be simulated by that of a simplified glass. For α=1, the kinetic of vaporization between 1060 deg.C and 1200 deg.C reveals an evaporation from the surface associated with a mechanism of diffusion in the molten glass. This is similar to the volatility of the reference glass at 1060 deg.C. To finally explain these mechanisms on a microscopic basis, we develop a model of molecular interactions. Between 780 deg.C and 830 deg.C, these mechanisms are controlled by a strong attraction between Na 2 O and Li 2 O, which maintains the total vapor pressure on a quasi-constant lever up to α=0.27. (author)

  18. Mixed alkali effect in glasses containing MnO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, M. Sudhakara; Rajiv, Asha; Veeranna Gowda, V. C.; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2013-01-01

    Glass systems of the composition xLi 2 O−(25−x)K 2 O−70(0.4ZnO+0.6P 2 O 5 )+5MnO 2 (x = 4,8,12,16 and 20 mol %) have been prepared by melt quenching technique. The thermal and mechanical properties of the glasses have been evaluated as a function of mixed alkali content. Glass transition temperature and Vickers’s hardness of the glasses show a pronounced deviation from linearity at 12 mol%Li 2 O. Theoretically estimated elastic moduli of the glasses show small positive deviations from linearity. MAE in these properties has been attributed to the localized changes in the glass network. The absorption spectra of Mn 2+ ions in these glasses showed strong broad absorption band at 514 nm corresponding to the transition 6 A 1g (S)→ 4 T 1g (G), characteristic of manganese ions in octahedral symmetry. The fundamental absorption edge in UV region is used to study the optical transitions and electronic band structure. From UV absorption edge, optical band gap energies have been evaluated. Band gap energies of the glasses have exhibited MAE and shows minimum value for 12 mol%Li 2 O glass.

  19. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  20. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  1. Self-Radiation Effects in Plutonium-Bearing Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Hess, Nancy J.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.

    2003-01-01

    Three compositionally identical Pu-bearing reference glasses were prepared in July 1982, each containing 1 wt.% PuO2; however, the 238Pu/239Pu isotopic ratio was different in each glass. As a result, the alpha-activities in the as-prepared glasses varied by nearly a factor of 200. The actual activities measured are within 15% of the intended values. In the 20 some years since their preparation, several studies have been performed on these glasses. The final results of the most recent studies are summarized in this paper.

  2. Studies on the memory effect in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M.A.; Burillo, G.; Charlesby, A.

    1994-01-01

    Polyethylene films of LDPE, a commercial product of PEMEX Mexico, with three different thicknesses were stretched from 1 cm to various lengths, and irradiated in air and in vacuum, at doses from 0 to 730 kGy. The effect of stretching on the ''memory effect'', % of gel formed, crystallinity, radio-chemical yield of crosslinking G c and scission G d was determined. Maximum shrinking effect is obtained at temperatures above the crystalline melting point, and is almost the same at any irradiation dose, from 0 to 525 kGy; in the case of doses from 713 kGy up, the recovery decreases slightly due to higher density of crosslinking. The increase of draw ratio from 5 to 6.5 has no significant effect on recovery. Preirradiation of 40 kGy in air before stretching has no significant effect on recovery but minimizes possible creep during the stretching and irradiation process. (author)

  3. Security authentication using the reflective glass pattern imaging effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji Cheng; Shen, Su; Wu, Jian Hong

    2015-11-01

    The reflective glass pattern imaging effect is investigated experimentally for the utility in forming a synthetic 3D image as a security authentication device in this Letter. An array of homogeneously randomly distributed reflective elements and a corresponding micropattern array are integrated onto a thin layer of polyester film aiming to create a vivid image floating over a substrate surface, which can be clearly visible to the naked eye. By using the reflective-type configuration, the micro-optic system can be realized on a thinner substrate and is immune to external stain due to its flat working plane. A novel gravure-like doctor blading technique can realize a resolution up to 12,000 dpi and a stringent 2D alignment requirement should be imposed. Such devices can find applications in document security and banknotes or other valuable items to protect them against forgery.

  4. Electromagnetic duality and the electric memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yuta; Seo, Min-Seok; Shiu, Gary

    2018-02-01

    We study large gauge transformations for soft photons in quantum electrodynamics which, together with the helicity operator, form an ISO(2) algebra. We show that the two non-compact generators of the ISO(2) algebra correspond respectively to the residual gauge symmetry and its electromagnetic dual gauge symmetry that emerge at null infinity. The former is helicity universal (electric in nature) while the latter is helicity distinguishing (magnetic in nature). Thus, the conventional large gauge transformation is electric in nature, and is naturally associated with a scalar potential. We suggest that the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect is a direct measure for the electromagnetic memory arising from large gauge transformations.

  5. Effects of alpha and gamma radiation on glass reaction in an unsaturated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Young, J.E.; Bates, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation may effect the long-term performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water. The present study examines (1) the effects of alpha or gamma irradiation in a water vapor environment, and (2) the influence of radiolytic products on glass reaction. Results indicate that nitric and organic acids form in an irradiated water vapor environment and are dissolved in thin films of condensed water. Glass samples exposed to these conditions react faster and have a different assemblage of secondary phases than glasses exposed to nonirradiated water vapor environments. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Recent results on the effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of DWPF glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Tosten, M.H.; Beam, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on the durability and microstructure of a simulated nuclear waste glass from the Savannah River Site has been carefully investigated. Three large pieces of glass were irradiated with a Co-60 source to three doses up to a maximum dose of 3.1 x 10 10 rad. Internal samples of the large pieces of irradiated and unirradiated glass were leached in deionized water to investigate durability changes and were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate microstructure changes. Leach tests were performed in triplicate at 90 degree C with crushed glass samples in deionized water. A statistical analysis of the results indicated to the 95% confidence level that the radiation did not affect the glass durability. Careful examination by TEM indicated no effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure of the glass although severe damage could be induced by the electron beam from the microscope. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Effect of Nb on glass forming ability and plasticity of (Ti-Cu)-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo, Z.Y.; Qiu, K.Q.; Li, Q.F.; Ren, Y.L.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2010-01-01

    A Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 bulk metallic glass has been developed by Nb partial substitution for Zr in Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 11 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 alloy. The glass forming ability Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 alloy has been investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry. Partial Nb substitutes for Zr promote the glass forming ability. Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG with diameter of 3 mm can be fabricated by Cu-mold injection casting method. The glass forming ability of Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 alloy is enhanced by stabilizing the undercooled liquid against crystallization. The plastic strain up to 2.5% was obtained for Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG compared to 0.15% for Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 11 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 BMG, which demonstrates that small amount of Nb addition can have a dramatic effect on plasticity enhancement in Ti-Cu-based BMG. The intersection and branching of the shear bands are observed. The plastic strain of the Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG can be improved by the generation of nanocrystalline particles, which lead to multiple shear bands.

  8. Memory processing and the glucose facilitation effect: the effects of stimulus difficulty and memory load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, Andrew; Riby, Leigh M; Stollery, Brian

    2005-08-01

    Previous research has consistently found enhancement of memory after the ingestion of a glucose containing drink. The aims of the present study were to specify more precisely the nature of this facilitation by examining the cognitive demand hypothesis. This hypothesis predicts greater glucose induced facilitation on tasks that require significant mental effort. In two experiments, both employing an unrelated sample design, participants consumed either 25 g of glucose or a control solution. In experiment 1, participants first studied low and high imagery word-pairs and memory was assessed 1-, 7- and 14-days later by cued recall. Overall, glucose enhanced both encoding and consolidation processes only for the more difficult low imagery pairs. In experiment 2, the degree of mental effort in a verbal memory task was manipulated in two ways: (1) by varying the phonological similarity of the words; and (2) by varying the length of word lists. Glucose was found to enhance memory only for longer word lists. These data are consistent with the idea that glucose is especially effective in demanding memory tasks, but place some limits on the forms of difficulty that are susceptible to enhancement.

  9. Solubility effects in waste-glass/demineralized-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    Aqueous systems involving demineralized water and four glass compositions (including standins for actinides and fission products) at temperatures of up to 150 0 C were studied. Two methods were used to measure the solubility of glass components in demineralized water. One method involved approaching equilibrium from subsaturation, while the second method involved approaching equilibrium from supersaturation. The aqueous solutions were analyzed by induction-coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Uranium was determined using a Scintrex U-A3 uranium analyzer and zinc and cesium were determined by atomic absorption. The system that results when a waste glass is contacted with demineralized water is a complex one. The two methods used to determine the solubility limits gave very different results, with the supersaturation method yielding much higher solution concentrations than the subsaturation method for most of the elements present in the waste glasses. The results show that it is impossible to assign solubility limits to the various glass components without thoroughly describing the glass-water systems. This includes not only defining the glass type and solution temperature, but also the glass surface area-to-water volume ratio (S/V) of the system and the complete thermal history of the system. 21 figures, 22 tables

  10. Terahertz-induced Kerr effect in amorphous chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the terahertz-induced third-order (Kerr) nonlinear optical properties of the amorphous chalcogenide glasses As2S3 and As2Se3. Chalcogenide glasses are known for their high optical Kerr nonlinearities which can be several hundred times greater than those of fused silica. We use...

  11. Effects of glass fibres on the filling of polymeric thin ribs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollgaard, Claus; Sundberg, Oliver; Vesth, Kirstine

    the effects of the glass fibers on the replication of polymeric ribs. - Investigate fibers orientations based on the injection parameters - Geometrical size effect on the amount of glass fibers in the post moulded plastic parts. Several tests were carried and analyzed in order to investigate the three project...

  12. Effects of treadmill exercise intensity on spatial working memory and long-term memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Gong-Wu

    2016-03-15

    Moderate exercise promotes learning and memory. Most studies mainly focused on memory exercise effects of in the ageing and patients. There is lack of quantitative research about effect of regular exercise intensity on different memory types in normal subjects. Present study investigated the effects of different intensities of treadmill exercise on working memory and long-term memory. Fifty female Wistar rats were trained by T-maze delayed spatial alternation (DSA) task with 3 delays (10s, 60s and 300s). Then they got a 30min treadmill exercise for 30days in 4 intensities (control, 0m/min; lower, 15m/min; middle, 20m/min, and higher, 30m/min). Then animals were tested in DSA, passive avoidance and Morris water maze tasks. 1. Exercise increased the neuronal density of hippocampal subregions (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus) vs. naïve/control. 2. In DSA task, all groups have similar baseline, lower intensity improved 10s delay accuracy vs. baseline/control; middle and higher intensities improved 300s delay accuracy vs. baseline/control. 3. In water maze learning, all groups successfully found the platform, but middle intensity improved platform field crossing times vs. control in test phase. Present results suggested that treadmill exercise can improve long-term spatial memory and working memory; lower intensity benefits to short-term delayed working memory, and middle or higher intensity benefits to long-term delayed working memory. There was an inverted U dose-effect relationship between exercise intensity and memory performance, but exercise -working memory effect was impacted by delay duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of mild acute stress during memory consolidation on emotional recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Brittany; Weinberg, Lisa; Duarte, Audrey

    2017-11-01

    Stress during consolidation improves recognition memory performance. Generally, this memory benefit is greater for emotionally arousing stimuli than neutral stimuli. The strength of the stressor also plays a role in memory performance, with memory performance improving up to a moderate level of stress and thereafter worsening. As our daily stressors are generally minimal in strength, we chose to induce mild acute stress to determine its effect on memory performance. In the current study, we investigated if mild acute stress during consolidation improves memory performance for emotionally arousing images. To investigate this, we had participants encode highly arousing negative, minimally arousing negative, and neutral images. We induced stress using the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST) in half of the participants and a control task to the other half of the participants directly after encoding (i.e. during consolidation) and tested recognition 48h later. We found no difference in memory performance between the stress and control group. We found a graded pattern among confidence, with responders in the stress group having the least amount of confidence in their hits and controls having the most. Across groups, we found highly arousing negative images were better remembered than minimally arousing negative or neutral images. Although stress did not affect memory accuracy, responders, as defined by cortisol reactivity, were less confident in their decisions. Our results suggest that the daily stressors humans experience, regardless of their emotional affect, do not have adverse effects on memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of mild acute stress during memory consolidation on emotional recognition memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Brittany; Weinberg, Lisa; Duarte, Audrey

    2018-01-01

    Stress during consolidation improves recognition memory performance. Generally, this memory benefit is greater for emotionally arousing stimuli than neutral stimuli. The strength of the stressor also plays a role in memory performance, with memory performance improving up to a moderate level of stress and thereafter worsening. As our daily stressors are generally minimal in strength, we chose to induce mild acute stress to determine its effect on memory performance. In the current study, we investigated if mild acute stress during consolidation improves memory performance for emotionally arousing images. To investigate this, we had participants encode highly arousing negative, minimally arousing negative, and neutral images. We induced stress using the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST) in half of the participants and a control task to the other half of the participants directly after encoding (i.e. during consolidation) and tested recognition 48 h later. We found no difference in memory performance between the stress and control group. We found a graded pattern among confidence, with responders in the stress group having the least amount of confidence in their hits and controls having the most. Across groups, we found highly arousing negative images were better remembered than minimally arousing negative or neutral images. Although stress did not affect memory accuracy, responders, as defined by cortisol reactivity, were less confident in their decisions. Our results suggest that the daily stressors humans experience, regardless of their emotional affect, do not have adverse effects on memory. PMID:28838881

  15. Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  16. A literature review of surface alteration layer effects on waste glass behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    When in contact with an aqueous solution, nuclear waste glass is subject to a chemical attack that results in progressive alteration. During tills alteration, constituent elements of the glass pass into the solution; elements initially in solution diffuse into, or are adsorbed onto, the solid; and new phases appear. This results in the formation of surface layers on the reacted glass. The glass corrosion and radionuclide release can be better understood by investigating these surface layer effects. In the past decade, there have been numerous studies regarding the effects of surface layers on glass reactions. This paper presents a systematic analysis and summary of the past knowledge regarding the effects of surface layers on glass-water interaction. This paper describes the major formation mechanisms of surface layers; reviews the role of surface layers in controlling mass transport and glass reaction affinity (through crystalline phases, an amorphous silica, a gel layer, or all the components in the glass); and discusses how the surface layers contribute to the retention of radionuclides during glass dissolution

  17. Effect of MoO3 addition on phase separation in borosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hajimu; Yamanaka, Hiroshi; Terai, Ryohei; Fukumoto, Shinji.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of MoO 3 addition on the phase separation of sodium borosilicate glasses has been studied by electron microscopic observation and electrical conductivity measurement. With increasing MoO 3 addition, the immiscibility temperatures rose, the growth rate of phase separation increased, and the immiscibility region in the Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 system extended. When MoO 3 more than 5 mol% was added to the glasses, two stages of phase separation appeared ; one is metastable immiscibility, which takes place below the liquidus temperature, and the other is stable immiscibility, occurring above the liquidus temperature. The present experiment confirmed that the conductivity measurement of molten glasses is usefull to detect phase separation in the glasses, giving some suggestions for preventing the separation of molybdates in nuclear waste glasses and also for controlling the micro-pore sizes of porous glasses. (author)

  18. Effect of replacing calcium oxide with calcium fluoride on some physical properties of borosilicate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assem, E E

    2005-01-01

    Two glass samples were prepared according to the molar formula (20%X-40%B 2 O 3 -40%SiO 2 ), where X = CaO or CaF 2 . The glass was melted at 1300 deg. C for 3 h until homogenous glass was obtained. The glass samples were heat-treated at 700 deg. C for 2 h and at 850 deg. C for different times. The green glass obtained has low dielectric constant and positive magnetic susceptibility. The molar volume, scanning electron microscope and differential thermal analysis studies showed that the crystallization rate increases with an increase in the sintering time. The replacement of CaO by CaF 2 improves the physical properties of the glass. The existence of fluorine ions increases the electrical conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, molar volume, dielectric constant and effective overall reaction rate (κ). All measured properties have a random behaviour with sintering time due to phase separation and asymmetry of crystallization

  19. Effect of composition on peraluminous glass properties: An application to HLW containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, V.; Bardez-Giboire, I.; Perret, D.; Montouillout, V.; Pellerin, N.

    2017-01-01

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of thermal stability, chemical durability, and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses of the SiO2 - Al2O3 - B2O3 - Na2O - Li2O - CaO - La2O3 system, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al3+ in comparison with modifier elements such as Na+, Li+ or Ca2+. To understand the effect of composition on physical properties of glasses (viscosity, density, Tg), a Design Of Experiments (DOE) approach was applied to investigate the peraluminous glass domain. The influence of each oxide was quantified to build predictive models for each property. Lanthanum and lithium oxides appear to be the most influential factors on peraluminous glass properties.

  20. The time course of working memory effects on visual attention differs depending on memory type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dombrowe, I.; Olivers, C.N.L.; Donk, M.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has generated inconsistent results with regard to what extent working memory (WM) content guides visual attention. Some studies found effects of easy to verbalize stimuli, whereas others only found an influence of visual memory content. To resolve this, we compared the time courses of

  1. The effect of rehearsal rate and memory load on verbal working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegen, David; Buchsbaum, Bradley R; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-15

    While many neuroimaging studies have investigated verbal working memory (WM) by manipulating memory load, the subvocal rehearsal rate at these various memory loads has generally been left uncontrolled. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate how mnemonic load and the rate of subvocal rehearsal modulate patterns of activity in the core neural circuits underlying verbal working memory. Using fMRI in healthy subjects, we orthogonally manipulated subvocal rehearsal rate and memory load in a verbal WM task with long 45-s delay periods. We found that middle frontal gyrus (MFG) and superior parietal lobule (SPL) exhibited memory load effects primarily early in the delay period and did not exhibit rehearsal rate effects. In contrast, we found that inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), premotor cortex (PM) and Sylvian-parietal-temporal region (area Spt) exhibited approximately linear memory load and rehearsal rate effects, with rehearsal rate effects lasting through the entire delay period. These results indicate that IFG, PM and area Spt comprise the core articulatory rehearsal areas involved in verbal WM, while MFG and SPL are recruited in a general supervisory role once a memory load threshold in the core rehearsal network has been exceeded. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of clay on the dissolution of nuclear waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K.

    2001-09-01

    In a nuclear waste repository, the waste glass can interact with metals, backfill materials (if present) and natural host rock. Of the various host rocks considered, clays are often reported to delay the onset of the apparent glass saturation, where the glass dissolution rate becomes very small. This effect is ascribed to the sorption of silica or other glass components on the clay. This can have two consequences: (1) the decrease of the silica concentration in solution increases the driving force for further dissolution of glass silica, and (2) the transfer of relatively insoluble glass components (mainly silica) from the glass surface to the clay makes the alteration layer less protective. In recent literature, the latter explanation has gained credibility. The impact of the environmental materials on the glass surface layers is however not well understood. Although the glass dissolution can initially be enhanced by clay, there are arguments to assume that it will decrease to very low values after a long time. Whether this will indeed be the case, depends on the fate of the released glass components in the clay. If they are sorbed on specific sites, it is likely that saturation of the clay will occur. If however the released glass components are removed by precipitation (growth of pre-existing or new secondary phases), saturation of the clay is less likely, and the process can continue until exhaustion of one of the system components. There are indications that the latter mechanism can occur for varying glass compositions in Boom Clay and FoCa clay. If sorption or precipitation prevents the formation of protective surface layers, the glass dissolution can in principle proceed at a high rate. High silica concentrations are assumed to decrease the dissolution rate (by a solution saturation effect or by the impact on the properties of the glass alteration layer). In glass corrosion tests at high clay concentrations, silica concentrations are, however, often higher

  3. The effect of clay on the dissolution of nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmens, K.

    2001-01-01

    In a nuclear waste repository, the waste glass can interact with metals, backfill materials (if present) and natural host rock. Of the various host rocks considered, clays are often reported to delay the onset of the apparent glass saturation, where the glass dissolution rate becomes very small. This effect is ascribed to the sorption of silica or other glass components on the clay. This can have two consequences: (1) the decrease of the silica concentration in solution increases the driving force for further dissolution of glass silica, and (2) the transfer of relatively insoluble glass components (mainly silica) from the glass surface to the clay makes the alteration layer less protective. In recent literature, the latter explanation has gained credibility. The impact of the environmental materials on the glass surface layers is however not well understood. Although the glass dissolution can initially be enhanced by clay, there are arguments to assume that it will decrease to very low values after a long time. Whether this will indeed be the case, depends on the fate of the released glass components in the clay. If they are sorbed on specific sites, it is likely that saturation of the clay will occur. If however the released glass components are removed by precipitation (growth of pre-existing or new secondary phases), saturation of the clay is less likely, and the process can continue until exhaustion of one of the system components. There are indications that the latter mechanism can occur for varying glass compositions in Boom Clay and FoCa clay. If sorption or precipitation prevents the formation of protective surface layers, the glass dissolution can in principle proceed at a high rate. High silica concentrations are assumed to decrease the dissolution rate (by a solution saturation effect or by the impact on the properties of the glass alteration layer). In glass corrosion tests at high clay concentrations, silica concentrations are, however, often higher

  4. The effect of chromium oxide on the properties of simulated nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtech, O.; Sussmilch, J.; Urbanec, Z.

    1996-02-01

    A study of the effect of chromium on the properties of selected glasses was performed in the frame of a Contract between Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Nuclear Research Institute, ReZ. In the period from July 1994 to June 1995 two borosilicate glasses of special composition were prepared according to the PNL procedure and their physical and structural characteristics of glasses were studied. This Final Report contains a vast documentation on the properties of all glasses studied. For the preparation of the respective technology more detailed study of physico-chemical properties and crystallinity of investigated systems would be desirable

  5. Task demands moderate stereotype threat effects on memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Thomas M; Emery, Lisa; Queen, Tara L

    2009-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults' memory performance is adversely affected by the explicit activation of negative stereotypes about aging. In this study, we examined the impact of stereotype threat on recognition memory, with specific interest in (a) the generalizability of previously observed effects, (b) the subjective experience of memory, and (c) the moderating effects of task demands. Older participants subjected to threat performed worse than did those in a nonthreat condition but only when performance constraints were high (i.e., memory decisions had to be made within a limited time frame). This effect was reflected in the subjective experience of memory, with participants in this condition having a lower ratio of "remember" to "know" responses. The absence of threat effects when constraints were minimal provides important boundary information regarding stereotype influences on memory performance.

  6. Stress effects on memory: an update and integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, L.; Joëls, M.; Roozendaal, B.; Wolf, O.T.; Oitzl, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that stressful experiences may affect learning and memory processes. Less clear is the exact nature of these stress effects on memory: both enhancing and impairing effects have been reported. These opposite effects may be explained if the different time courses of stress hormone, in

  7. Stress effects on memory : An update and integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, Lars; Joëls, Marian; Roozendaal, Benno; Wolf, Oliver T.; Oitzl, Melly S.

    It is well known that stressful experiences may affect learning and memory processes. Less clear is the exact nature of these stress effects on memory: both enhancing and impairing effects have been reported. These opposite effects may be explained if the different time courses of stress hormone, in

  8. Pressure effect of glass transition temperature in Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Roseker, W.; Sikorski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressure effects on glass transition temperature and supercooled liquid region of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. The glass transition was det...... range of 0-2.2 GPa. This method opens a possibility to study the pressure effect of glass transition process in glassy systems under high pressures (>1 GPa). (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics.......Pressure effects on glass transition temperature and supercooled liquid region of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. The glass transition...... was detected from the change of the slope of peak position as a function of temperature. It is found that the glass transition temperature increases with pressure by 4.4 K/GPa for the Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass, and the supercooled liquid range decreases with pressure by 2.9 K/GPa in a pressure...

  9. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues.

  10. A Positive Generation Effect on Memory for Auditory Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Amy A; Richard, Alison G; Stephens, Joseph D W

    2017-06-01

    Self-generation of information during memory encoding has large positive effects on subsequent memory for items, but mixed effects on memory for contextual information associated with items. A processing account of generation effects on context memory (Mulligan in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 30(4), 838-855, 2004; Mulligan, Lozito, & Rosner in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 32(4), 836-846, 2006) proposes that these effects depend on whether the generation task causes any shift in processing of the type of context features for which memory is being tested. Mulligan and colleagues have used this account to predict various negative effects of generation on context memory, but the account also predicts positive generation effects under certain circumstances. The present experiment provided a critical test of the processing account by examining how generation affected memory for auditory rather than visual context. Based on the processing account, we predicted that generation of rhyme words should enhance processing of auditory information associated with the words (i.e., voice gender), whereas generation of antonym words should have no effect. These predictions were confirmed, providing support to the processing account.

  11. The effects of emotion on memory for music and vocalisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubé, William; Peretz, Isabelle; Armony, Jorge L

    2013-01-01

    Music is a powerful tool for communicating emotions which can elicit memories through associative mechanisms. However, it is currently unknown whether emotion can modulate memory for music without reference to a context or personal event. We conducted three experiments to investigate the effect of basic emotions (fear, happiness, and sadness) on recognition memory for music, using short, novel stimuli explicitly created for research purposes, and compared them with nonlinguistic vocalisations. Results showed better memory accuracy for musical clips expressing fear and, to some extent, happiness. In the case of nonlinguistic vocalisations we confirmed a memory advantage for all emotions tested. A correlation between memory accuracy for music and vocalisations was also found, particularly in the case of fearful expressions. These results confirm that emotional expressions, particularly fearful ones, conveyed by music can influence memory as has been previously shown for other forms of expressions, such as faces and vocalisations.

  12. Vantage perspective during encoding: The effects on phenomenological memory characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooren, Nora; Krans, Julie; Näring, Gérard W B; Moulds, Michelle L; van Minnen, Agnes

    2016-05-01

    The vantage perspective from which a memory is retrieved influences the memory's emotional impact, intrusiveness, and phenomenological characteristics. This study tested whether similar effects are observed when participants were instructed to imagine the events from a specific perspective. Fifty student participants listened to a verbal report of car-accidents and visualized the scenery from either a field or observer perspective. There were no between-condition differences in emotionality of memories and the number of intrusions, but imagery experienced from a relative observer perspective was rated as less self-relevant. In contrast to earlier studies on memory retrieval, vantage perspective influenced phenomenological memory characteristics of the memory representation such as sensory details, and ratings of vividness and distancing of the memory. However, vantage perspective is most likely not a stable phenomenological characteristic itself. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing the aging effect on auditory-verbal memory by Persian version of dichotic auditory verbal memory test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahidipour

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, significant reduction in auditory memory was seen in aged group and the Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test, like many other auditory verbal memory tests, showed the aging effects on auditory verbal memory performance.

  14. Effect of heat treatment duration on phase separation of sodium borosilicate glass, containing copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shejnina, T.G.; Gutner, S.Kh.; Anan'in, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment duration on phase separation of sodium borosilicate (SBS) glass, containing copper is studied. It is stated that phase separation close to equilibrium one is attained under 12 hours of heat treatment of SBS glass containing copper

  15. Effect of glass composition on the relaxation of the 4Isub(13/2) level of erbium ions in borate and silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Jezowska-Trzebiatowska, B.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of glass nerwork formers and glass modifiers on radiative transition probabilities and quantum efficiencies of the 4 Isub(13/2) level of Er +3 ions in ternary borate and silicate glasses was studied by both absorption and emission spectroscopy. It was found that the transition probabilities may be widely varied by changes glass network former and alkali ion substitution. The role of multiphonon emission and O-H vibration in the relaxation of the 4 Isub(13/2) level is discussed. (author)

  16. Environmental context effects in conceptual explicit and implicit memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew; Dagnall, Neil; Coyle, Anne-Marie

    2007-05-01

    Previous research has found environmental context effects for both conceptual explicit and conceptual implicit memory (Parker, Gellatly, & Waterman, 1999). The research presented here challenges these findings on methodological grounds. Experiment 1 assessed the effects of context change on category-exemplar generation (conceptual implicit memory test) and category-cued recall (conceptual explicit memory test). Experiment 2 assessed the effects of context change on word association (conceptual implicit memory test) and word associate cued recall (conceptual explicit memory test). In both experiments, study-test changes in environmental context were found to influence performance only on tests of explicit memory. It is concluded that when retrieval cues across explicit and implicit tests are matched, and the probability of explicit contamination is reduced, then only conceptual explicit test performance is reduced by study-test changes in environmental context.

  17. Effects of Aging on General and Specific Memory for Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan J. Limbert

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the number of documented declines in memory with age, memory for socioemotional information can be preserved into older adulthood. These studies assessed whether memory for character information could be preserved with age, and how the general versus specific nature of the information tested affected outcomes. We hypothesized that memory for general impressions would be preserved with age, but that memory for specific details would be impaired. In two experiments, younger and older adults learned character information about individuals characterized as positive, neutral, or negative. Participants then retrieved general impressions and specific information for each individual. The testing conditions in Experiment 2 discouraged deliberate recall. In Experiment 1, we found that younger performed better than older adults on both general and specific memory measures. Although age differences in memory for specific information persisted in Experiment 2, we found that younger and older adults remembered general impressions to a similar extent when testing conditions encouraged the use of “gut impressions” rather than deliberate retrieval from memory. We conclude that aging affects memory for specific character information, but memory for general impressions can be age-equivalent. Furthermore, there is no evidence for a positivity bias or differences in the effects of valence on memory across the age groups.

  18. Effect of SiO2 addition and gamma irradiation on the lithium borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, A. P.; Deshpande, V. K.

    2018-01-01

    The physical properties like density, glass transition temperature (Tg), and ionic conductivity of lithium borate (LB) glasses with SiO2 addition were measured before and after gamma irradiation. Remarkable changes in properties have been obtained in the physical properties of LB glasses with SiO2 addition and after gamma irradiation. The increase in density and glass transition temperature of LB glasses with SiO2 addition has been explained with the help of increase in density of cross linking due to SiO4 tetrahedra formation. The increase in ionic conductivity with SiO2 addition was explained with the help of ‘mixed glass former effect’. The increase in density and Tg of LB glasses with SiO2 addition after gamma irradiation has been attributed to fragmentation of bigger ring structure into smaller rings, which increases the density of cross linking and hence compaction. The exposure of gamma irradiation has lead to decrease in ionic conductivity of LB glasses with SiO2 addition. The atomic displacement caused by gamma irradiation resulted in filling of interstices and decrease in trapping sites. This explains the obtained decrease in ionic conductivity after gamma irradiation of glasses. The obtained results of effect of SiO2 addition and gamma irradiation on the density, Tg and ionic conductivity has been supported by FTIR results.

  19. Effect of composition on peraluminous glass properties: An application to HLW containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piovesan, V. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France); Bardez-Giboire, I., E-mail: isabelle.giboire@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Perret, D. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, LDMC – Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Montouillout, V.; Pellerin, N. [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France)

    2017-01-15

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of thermal stability, chemical durability, and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses of the SiO{sub 2} – Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} – B{sub 2}O{sub 3} – Na{sub 2}O – Li{sub 2}O – CaO – La{sub 2}O{sub 3} system, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al{sup 3+} in comparison with modifier elements such as Na{sup +}, Li{sup +} or Ca{sup 2+}. To understand the effect of composition on physical properties of glasses (viscosity, density, T{sub g}), a Design Of Experiments (DOE) approach was applied to investigate the peraluminous glass domain. The influence of each oxide was quantified to build predictive models for each property. Lanthanum and lithium oxides appear to be the most influential factors on peraluminous glass properties. - Highlights: • A Design of Experiment approach to link composition and glass properties. • Adding alkali decreases glass transition temperature. • Adding La{sub 2}O{sub 3} strongly decreases glass melt viscosity. • Adding La{sub 2}O{sub 3} increases density.

  20. Alteration of a borosilicate glass in cemented water: antagonist effects of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizon, F.; Depierre, S.; Angeli, F.; Gin, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the storage of radioactive wastes in deep geological layers, vitrified waste may be in contact with an environment saturated with solutions stemming from various stages of cement degradation. A series of experiments has been performed to assess how a basic aqueous calcium-rich solution can impact the mechanisms and kinetics of glass alteration. This study shows that 2 main parameters have an impact on the kinetics of the dissolution of glass: the S/V ratio (the glass surface divided by the volume of solution) and the calcium concentration. The calcium concentration is a key parameter whatever the kinetics of glass degradation. In a diluted medium with a pH over 11, the kinetics of glass alteration slows down along with an increase in calcium concentration. What happens is that the silicon flux being too weak to allow the nucleation of C-S-H phases, calcium can penetrate the alteration layer which leads to a better retention of glass components through specific silicon-calcium reactivity and a slowing down of the glass alteration kinetics. On the contrary in a confined environment, a high concentration in calcium leads to the precipitation of C-S-H and to less C-S-H available to cover glass grains diminishing its passivating effect and consequently the dissolving of glass can keep on at more or less the same pace. (A.C.)

  1. Effect of CASP glass doping on sintering and dielectric properties of SBN ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guohua; Qi Bing

    2009-01-01

    16CaO-29Al 2 O 3 -34SiO 2 -13PbO-4B 2 O 3 -2ZnO-2P 2 O 5 (CASP) glass doped-Sr 0.5 Ba 0.5 Nb 2 O 6 (SBN50) ceramics have been synthesized by solid-state ceramic route. The effects of CASP glass on the firing, microstructure and dielectric characterization of SBN50 ceramics are investigated. The densities of the ceramic samples firstly increase and then slightly decrease with increasing CASP glass content. The appropriate amount of doping glass is 2%. The SBN50 ceramics doped with CASP glass can be sintered at a relatively low temperature, 1200 deg. C. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the single phase (tetragonal tungsten bronze type structure) is preserved for all the samples. The diffuse character of the ceramic system increases and the dielectric constant at phase transition temperature (T c ) markedly decreases as CASP glass content increases. Interestingly, the CASP glass addition drastically alters the microstructure of the sintered ceramics. The isotropic grains in the pure SBN50 ceramics transform to rod like grains after the addition of CASP glass. The grain size of SBN phase is found to obviously increase with increase in CASP glass doping level

  2. Memory Effects of Benzodiazepines: Memory Stages and Types Versus Binding-Site Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav M. Savic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines are well established as inhibitory modulators of memory processing. This effect is especially prominent when applied before the acquisition phase of a memory task. This minireview concentrates on the putative subtype selectivity of the acquisition-impairing action of benzodiazepines. Namely, recent genetic studies and standard behavioral tests employing subtype-selective ligands pointed to the predominant involvement of two subtypes of benzodiazepine binding sites in memory modulation. Explicit memory learning seems to be affected through the GABAA receptors containing the α1 and α5 subunits, whereas the effects on procedural memory can be mainly mediated by the α1 subunit. The pervading involvement of the α1 subunit in memory modulation is not at all unexpected because this subunit is the major subtype, present in 60% of all GABAA receptors. On the other hand, the role of α5 subunits, mainly expressed in the hippocampus, in modulating distinct forms of memory gives promise of selective pharmacological coping with certain memory deficit states.

  3. GLASS-FIBRE REINFORCED COMPOSITES: THE EFFECT OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    mechanical and corrosion wear behaviour of any reinforced composites. In other ..... physical properties of glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin and the following .... waste in concrete and cement composites," Journal of Cleaner Production, vol.

  4. The effect of casting conditions on the biaxial flexural strength of glass-ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A; Shareef, M Y; Walsh, J M; Hatton, P V; van Noort, R; Hill, R G

    1998-11-01

    To assess the effect of mould and glass casting temperatures on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of two different types of castable glass-ceramic, using existing laboratory equipment and techniques. Two castable glass-ceramic materials were evaluated. One glass (LG3) is based on SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5-CaO-CaF2, and is similar in composition to glasses used in the manufacture of glass-ionomer cements. The other glass (SG3) is based on SiO2-K2O-Na2O-CaO-CaF2, and is a canasite-based material. Both materials were used to produce discs of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness using the same lost-wax casting process as used for metal castings. Mould temperatures of between 500 degrees C and 1000 degrees C and glass casting temperatures of between 1100 degrees C and 1450 degrees C were evaluated. The cast discs were cerammed and the biaxial flexural strength determined with a Lloyd 2000 R tester. A significant difference was found for the BFS in the range of mould temperatures evaluated, with the optimum investment mould temperature being 590 degrees C for LG3 and 610 degrees C for SG3 (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.019, respectively). No significant differences were seen between any of the glass casting temperatures evaluated. The mould temperature for castable glass-ceramic materials produced using the lost-wax casting process can have a significant effect on BFS. The optimum mould temperature may differ slightly depending on the type of material being used. The glass casting temperature of these materials does not appear to have a significant effect on BFS.

  5. The Radiation Effect to Waste Glass that Resulting of Vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlan Martono; Aisyah

    2002-01-01

    The high level liquid waste (HLLW) is generated from the first step extraction of the nuclear fuel reprocessing. This waste was contain of few of actinide and many of fission product. The alpha radiation of actinide that contain on the HLLW cause the change the waste glass characteristic. The experiment was conducted by the doping, irradiation and heating of waste glass resulting from vitrification. The alpha radiation cause the change of composition that could be detected from change of waste glass density and mechanical strength. The increasing of alpha radiation dose cause the increasing change of density and mechanical strength, although the change of mechanical strength is not significant. Degree of change of waste glass density also depend on type of waste-glass and reach for saturated point at over of 5x10 24 alpha decay/m 3 . The gamma radiation of fission product that contain on the HLLW can increasing of waste glass temperature that cause the structure change, so devitrification was occur. The devitrification can the increasing of leaching rate. The cumulative of gamma dose rate was not cause the devitrification. (author)

  6. Time and interference: Effects on working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botto, Marta; Palladino, Paola

    2016-05-01

    This study tested predictions from the time-based resource-sharing (TBRS) model with a classical verbal working memory (WM) task, where target and non-target information interfere strongly with each other. Different predictions can be formulated according to the dominant perspectives (TBRS and interference hypothesis) on the role of inhibitory control in WM task performance. Here, we aimed to trace the activation of irrelevant information, examining priming effects in a lexical decision task immediately following WM recall. Results indicate the roles of both time and interference constraints in determining task performance. In particular, the role of time available seemed crucial at the highest WM loads (i.e., 3 and 4 memoranda). These were also associated with a higher activation of no-longer-relevant information but, in this case, independently from time available for processing. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pulak K. [Department of Chemistry, Presidency University, Kolkata 700073 (India); Li, Yunyun, E-mail: yunyunli@tongji.edu.cn [Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Marchegiani, Giampiero [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Marchesoni, Fabio [Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2015-12-07

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer’s diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer’s propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer’s axis. The corresponding swimmer’s diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  8. The Effect of Shape Memory on Red Blood Cell Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiting; Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-11-01

    An elastic spring model is applied to study the effect of the shape memory on the motion of red blood cell in flows. In shear flow, shape memory also plays an important role to obtain all three motions: tumbling, swinging, and tank-treading. In Poiseuille flow, cell has an equilibrium shape as a slipper or parachute depending on capillary number. To ensure the tank-treading motion while in slippery shape, a modified model is proposed by introducing a shape memory coefficient which describes the degree of shape memory in cells. The effect of the coefficient on the cell motion of red blood cell will be presented.

  9. The effects of free recall testing on subsequent source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gene A; Marsh, Richard L; Meeks, Joseph T; Clark-Foos, Arlo; Hicks, Jason L

    2010-05-01

    The testing effect is the finding that prior retrieval of information from memory will result in better subsequent memory for that material. One explanation for these effects is that initial free recall testing increases the recollective details for tested information, which then becomes more available during a subsequent test phase. In three experiments we explored this hypothesis using a source-monitoring test phase after the initial free recall tests. We discovered that memory is differentially enhanced for certain recollective details depending on the nature of the free recall task. Thus further research needs to be conducted to specify how different kinds of memorial details are enhanced by free recall testing.

  10. Laboratory testing of waste glass aqueous corrosion; effects of experimental parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey has been performed to assess the effects of the temperature, glass surface area/leachate volume ratio, leachant composition, leachant flow rate, and glass composition (actual radioactive vs. simulated glass) used in laboratory tests on the measured glass reaction rate. The effects of these parameters must be accounted for in mechanistic models used to project glass durability over long times. Test parameters can also be utilized to highlight particular processes in laboratory tests. Waste glass corrosion results as water diffusion, ion-exchange, and hydrolysis reactions occur simultaneously to devitrify the glass and release soluble glass components into solution. The rates of these processes are interrelated by the affects of the solution chemistry and glass alteration phases on each process, and the dominant (fastest) process may change as the reaction progresses. Transport of components from the release sites into solution may also affect the observed corrosion rate. The reaction temperature will affect the rate of each process, while other parameters will affect the solution chemistry and which processes are observed during the test. The early stages of corrosion will be observed under test conditions which maintain dilute leachates and the later stages will be observed under conditions that generate more concentrated leachate solutions. Typically, water diffusion and ion-exchange reactions dominate the observed glass corrosion in dilute solutions while hydrolysis reactions dominant in more concentrated solutions. Which process(es) controls the long-term glass corrosion is not fully understood, and the long-term corrosion rate may be either transport- or reaction-limited

  11. Word Length Effects in Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehan, Gerald; Tolan, Georgina Anne

    2007-01-01

    The word length effect has been a central feature of theorising about immediate memory. The notion that short-term memory traces rapidly decay unless refreshed by rehearsal is based primarily upon the finding that serial recall for short words is better than that for long words. The decay account of the word length effect has come under pressure…

  12. The memory effect for particle scattering in even spacetime dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, David; Hollands, Stefan; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2017-07-01

    We explicitly calculate the gravitational wave memory effect for classical point particle sources in linearized gravity off an even dimensional Minkowski background. We show that there is no memory effect in d  >  4 dimensions, in agreement with the general analysis of Hollands et al (2016 arXiv:1612.03290).

  13. The Effects of Motoric Action and Organization on Children's Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, Patricia; Kose, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Two experiments examined preschool, first, and third grade students for the effects of motoric activities on memory performance. Findings for the first experiment revealed that, although organizational differences affected memory performance, the drawing of configurations enhanced the effect of unitary organization. In the second experiment,…

  14. Analyzing the glass ceiling effect among radiologic technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinsky, Susan B; Blagg, James D

    2011-01-01

    The literature has suggested that advancement within politics, academia and the health professions is influenced by gender. Purpose The authors conducted a survey to determine whether advancement was equal by gender in the radiologic science disciplines of nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy and radiography. The survey was mailed to 900 subjects, 300 from each discipline. The discipline groups were further stratified by initial year of American Registry of Radiologic Technology certification; the authors selected 100 subjects from each discipline who initially were certified in 1978, 100 in 1988 and 100 in 1998. Approximately 33% of those selected responded. The findings of the study provided no evidence that men are promoted differentially than women. Women perceived that men were paid more for the same work. It appears that gender bias is pervasive outside of promotion decisions and, indeed, that some illegal actions (eg, sexual harassment, inappropriate gender-related interview questions) take place in radiologic science clinical settings. It is hoped that this study will set a baseline for future research on whether there is a glass ceiling effect in radiologic clinical practice and stimulate discussion of the importance of equal opportunity regardless of gender.

  15. Memory bias for negative emotional words in recognition memory is driven by effects of category membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corey N; Kapucu, Aycan; Bruno, Davide; Rotello, Caren M; Ratcliff, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Recognition memory studies often find that emotional items are more likely than neutral items to be labelled as studied. Previous work suggests this bias is driven by increased memory strength/familiarity for emotional items. We explored strength and bias interpretations of this effect with the conjecture that emotional stimuli might seem more familiar because they share features with studied items from the same category. Categorical effects were manipulated in a recognition task by presenting lists with a small, medium or large proportion of emotional words. The liberal memory bias for emotional words was only observed when a medium or large proportion of categorised words were presented in the lists. Similar, though weaker, effects were observed with categorised words that were not emotional (animal names). These results suggest that liberal memory bias for emotional items may be largely driven by effects of category membership.

  16. Assessing the aging effect on auditory-verbal memory by Persian version of dichotic auditory verbal memory test

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Shahidipour; Ahmad Geshani; Zahra Jafari; Shohreh Jalaie; Elham Khosravifard

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Memory is one of the aspects of cognitive function which is widely affected among aged people. Since aging has different effects on different memorial systems and little studies have investigated auditory-verbal memory function in older adults using dichotic listening techniques, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the auditory-verbal memory function among old people using Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test. Methods: The Persian version of dic...

  17. Shape memory effect and super elasticity. Its dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotian, R

    2001-01-01

    The shape memory alloys are quite fascinating materials characterized by a shape memory effect and super elasticity which ordinary metals do not have. This unique behaviour was first found in a Au-47.5 at % Cd alloy in 1951, and was published in 1963 by the discovery of Ti-Ni alloy. Shape memory alloys now being practically used as new functional alloys for various dental and medical applications.

  18. Effects of crystal size on the mechanical properties of a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Guo, J.W.; Wang, X.S; Zhang, S.F. [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, 145 West Changle Road, Xi’an 710032 (China); He, L., E-mail: helin@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Crystal size of lithium disilicate (LD) phase in a LD glass-ceramic was changed by thermally controlled crystallization of a precursory LD glass at different temperatures. Effects of the crystal size on the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic were investigated. It was found that the flexural strength presented a hump-like variation trend with increasing the crystal size, the hardness monotonously decreased at the same time. It was further confirmed that micro residual compressive stresses existed inside the LD crystals due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the glass matrix and the crystalline phase. The levels of the residual stresses increased with increasing the crystal size. The crystal size performed dual effects on the flexural strength of the glass-ceramic: an “interlocking effect” caused by larger-sized LD crystals and a “micro residual stress effect” related to the balancing tensile stresses in the glass matrix. Higher residual tensile stresses in the glass matrix induced by larger-sized LD crystals would counteract the “interlocking effect” of the crystals, causing the strength degradation. The hardness of the glass-ceramic was mainly controlled by the “micro residual stress effect”.

  19. Parallel effects of memory set activation and searchon timing and working memory capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eSchweickert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurately estimating a time interval is required in everyday activities such as driving or cooking. Estimating time is relatively easy, provided a person attends to it. But a brief shift of attention to another task usually interferes with timing. Most processes carried out concurrently with timing interfere with it. Curiously, some do not. Literature on a few processes suggests a general proposition, the Timing and Complex-Span Hypothesis: A process interferes with concurrent timing if and only if process performance is related to complex span. Complex-span is the number of items correctly recalled in order, when each item presented for study is followed by a brief activity. Literature on task switching, visual search, memory search, word generation and mental time travel supports the hypothesis. Previous work found that another process, activation of a memory set in long term memory, is not related to complex-span. If the Timing and Complex-Span Hypothesis is true, activation should not interfere with concurrent timing in dual-task conditions. We tested such activation in single-task memory search task conditions and in dual-task conditions where memory search was executed with concurrent timing. In Experiment 1, activating a memory set increased reaction time, with no significant effect on time production. In Experiment 2, set size and memory set activation were manipulated. Activation and set size had a puzzling interaction for time productions, perhaps due to difficult conditions, leading us to use a related but easier task in Experiment 3. In Experiment 3 increasing set size lengthened time production, but memory activation had no significant effect. Results here and in previous literature on the whole support the Timing and Complex-Span Hypotheses. Results also support a sequential organization of activation and search of memory. This organization predicts activation and set size have additive effects on reaction time and multiplicative

  20. Parallel effects of memory set activation and search on timing and working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweickert, Richard; Fortin, Claudette; Xi, Zhuangzhuang; Viau-Quesnel, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating a time interval is required in everyday activities such as driving or cooking. Estimating time is relatively easy, provided a person attends to it. But a brief shift of attention to another task usually interferes with timing. Most processes carried out concurrently with timing interfere with it. Curiously, some do not. Literature on a few processes suggests a general proposition, the Timing and Complex-Span Hypothesis: A process interferes with concurrent timing if and only if process performance is related to complex span. Complex-span is the number of items correctly recalled in order, when each item presented for study is followed by a brief activity. Literature on task switching, visual search, memory search, word generation and mental time travel supports the hypothesis. Previous work found that another process, activation of a memory set in long term memory, is not related to complex-span. If the Timing and Complex-Span Hypothesis is true, activation should not interfere with concurrent timing in dual-task conditions. We tested such activation in single-task memory search task conditions and in dual-task conditions where memory search was executed with concurrent timing. In Experiment 1, activating a memory set increased reaction time, with no significant effect on time production. In Experiment 2, set size and memory set activation were manipulated. Activation and set size had a puzzling interaction for time productions, perhaps due to difficult conditions, leading us to use a related but easier task in Experiment 3. In Experiment 3 increasing set size lengthened time production, but memory activation had no significant effect. Results here and in previous literature on the whole support the Timing and Complex-Span Hypotheses. Results also support a sequential organization of activation and search of memory. This organization predicts activation and set size have additive effects on reaction time and multiplicative effects on percent

  1. Effects of mild cognitive impairment on emotional scene memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, J D; Dimsdale-Zucker, H R; Flannery, S; Budson, A E; Kensinger, E A

    2017-02-01

    Young and older adults experience benefits in attention and memory for emotional compared to neutral information, but this memory benefit is greatly diminished in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Little is known about whether this impairment arises early or late in the time course between healthy aging and AD. This study compared memory for positive, negative, and neutral items with neutral backgrounds between patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy older adults. We also used a divided attention condition in older adults as a possible model for the deficits observed in MCI patients. Results showed a similar pattern of selective memory for emotional items while forgetting their backgrounds in older adults and MCI patients, but MCI patients had poorer memory overall. Dividing attention during encoding disproportionately reduced memory for backgrounds (versus items) relative to a full attention condition. Participants performing in the lower half on the divided attention task qualitatively and quantitatively mirrored the results in MCI patients. Exploratory analyses comparing lower- and higher-performing MCI patients showed that only higher-performing MCI patients had the characteristic scene memory pattern observed in healthy older adults. Together, these results suggest that the effects of emotion on memory are relatively well preserved for patients with MCI, although emotional memory patterns may start to be altered once memory deficits become more pronounced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-volatile memory based on the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; You, Lu; Zhou, Yang; Shiuh Lim, Zhi; Zou, Xi; Chen, Lang; Ramesh, R.; Wang, Junling

    2013-01-01

    The quest for a solid state universal memory with high-storage density, high read/write speed, random access and non-volatility has triggered intense research into new materials and novel device architectures. Though the non-volatile memory market is dominated by flash memory now, it has very low operation speed with ~10 μs programming and ~10 ms erasing time. Furthermore, it can only withstand ~105 rewriting cycles, which prevents it from becoming the universal memory. Here we demonstrate that the significant photovoltaic effect of a ferroelectric material, such as BiFeO3 with a band gap in the visible range, can be used to sense the polarization direction non-destructively in a ferroelectric memory. A prototype 16-cell memory based on the cross-bar architecture has been prepared and tested, demonstrating the feasibility of this technique. PMID:23756366

  3. Shape memory polymer hybrids of SBS/dl-PLA and their shape memory effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Heng; Chen, Zhi; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Xiaomin; Wang, Haitao

    2013-01-01

    The hybrids of styrene-butadiene-styrene tri-block copolymer (SBS) and amorphous poly(dl-lactic acid) (dl-PLA) are found to exhibit shape memory effects, which gives an example of a dual-domain shape memory system consisting of an elastic domain and a thermo-switch domain. The dual-domain manner in this hybrid is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Subsequently, the tensile test clarifies the interactions of the two domains on shape memory effects. As an elastic domain, SBS offers good shape recovery when its content exceeds 50 wt%. As a thermo-switch domain, dl-PLA triggers the shape memory effect at ca. 55 °C and offers good shape fixing when the content exceeds 30 wt%. An easy-to-do and easy-to-know feature of the hybrid is that the optimization of shape memory effect can be achieved by generating bicontinous phases of SBS and dl-PLA, in which the dl-PLA content ranges from 30 to 70 wt%. -- Highlights: ► The composite materials of SBS and amorphous dl-PLA were prepared by blending. ► A continuous domain was observed with the increasing content of dl-PLA. ► The composites exhibited shape memory effects.

  4. Structural relaxation dynamics and annealing effects of sodium silicate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Mohamed; Piazza, Francesco; Guimbretière, Guillaume; Canizarès, Aurélien; Vaills, Yann

    2013-05-09

    Here we report high-precision measurements of structural relaxation dynamics in the glass transition range at the intermediate and short length scale for a strong sodium silicate glass during long annealing times. We evidence for the first time the heterogeneous dynamics at the intermediate range order by probing the acoustic longitudinal frequency in the GHz region by Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. Or, from in-situ Raman measurements, we show that relaxation is indeed homogeneous at the interatomic length scale. Our results show that the dynamics at the intermediate range order contains two distinct relaxation time scales, a fast and a slow component, differing by about a 10-fold factor below Tg and approaching to one another past the glass transition. The slow relaxation time agrees with the shear relaxation time, proving that Si-O bond breaking constitutes the primary control of structural relaxation at the intermediate range order.

  5. Effects of finite size on spin glass dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tetsuya; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    In spite of comprehensive studies to clarify a variety of interesting phenomena of spin glasses, their understanding has been insufficiently established. To overcome such a problem, fabrication of a mesoscopic spin glass system, whose dynamics can be observed over the entire range to the equilibrium, is useful. In this review the challenges of research that has been performed up to now in this direction and our recent related studies are introduced. We have established to study the spin glass behaviour in terms of droplet picture using nanofabricated mesoscopic samples to some extent, but some problems that should be clarified have been left. Finally, the direction of some new studies is proposed to solve the problems.

  6. The effect of corrosion on stained glass windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laissner, Johanna

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Stained glass windows belong to the most important cultural heritage of Europe. Within the last decades a disastrous deterioration took place. The wonderful stained glass windows and their glass paintings as pieces of art are acutely menaced by environmental corrosive influences. This corrosion process is a very complex reaction which is not only influenced by temperature and humidity changes but also by gaseous pollutants like sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides or ozone, by dust and air, microorganisms as well as synergetic interactions. Strongly affected by these environmental attacks are medieval stained glasses due to their chemical composition. They have a low content in silica and high contents of modifier ions (e.g. potassium and calcium. The corrosion phenomena can range from predominantly pitting on the surface to the formation of thick corrosion crusts which are turning the panel opaque and thus reducing strongly the transparency of the windows. In order to set up a conservation and restoration concept, it is necessary to know about the environmental conditions to which the stained glass windows are exposed. For this purpose very corrosion sensitive model glasses (so called glass sensors were developed which have a similar chemical composition as historic stained glasses. They exhibit the same corrosion reactions but react much faster, and are now widely used to estimate corrosive stresses on stained glass windows to give basic information about the corrosive impacts which work on the historic glasses. In this paper principle corrosion mechanisms of stained glass windows and their enhancing factors are discussed. For the evaluation of the environmental impact, the application of glass sensors is demonstrated.

    Las vidrieras coloreadas pertenecen al legado cultural más importante de Europa. En las últimas décadas se ha producido en ellas un desastroso deterioro. Las maravillosas vidrieras coloreadas y sus policromías est

  7. Effect of Glass Thickness on Performance of Flat Plate Solar Collectors for Fruits Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadhani Bakari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the effect of thickness of glazing material on the performance of flat plate solar collectors. Performance of solar collector is affected by glaze transmittance, absorptance, and reflectance which results into major heat losses in the system. Four solar collector models with different glass thicknesses were designed, constructed, and experimentally tested for their performances. Collectors were both oriented to northsouth direction and tilted to an angle of 10° with the ground toward north direction. The area of each collector model was 0.72 m2 with a depth of 0.15 m. Low iron (extra clear glass of thicknesses 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm was used as glazing materials. As a control, all collector performances were analysed and compared using a glass of 5 mm thickness and then with glass of different thickness. The results showed that change in glass thickness results into variation in collector efficiency. Collector with 4 mm glass thick gave the best efficiency of 35.4% compared to 27.8% for 6 mm glass thick. However, the use of glass of 4 mm thick needs precautions in handling and during placement to the collector to avoid extra costs due to breakage.

  8. Effect of low dose electron beam irradiation on the alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@gmail.com [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Panczer, G. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Charpentier, T. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    This investigation concerns borosilicate glass leaching mechanisms and the evolution of alteration layer under electron beam irradiation. A simple glass doped with rare earth elements was selected in order to access mechanistic and structural information and better evaluate the effects of irradiation. It was fully leached in initially pure water at 90 °C and at high glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V = 20 000 m{sup −1}) in static conditions. Under these conditions, the system quickly reaches the residual alteration rate regime. A small particle size fraction (2–5 μm) was sampled in order to obtain a fairly homogeneous altered material enabling the use of bulk characterization methods. External irradiations with 10 MeV electrons up to a dose of 10 MGy were performed either before or after leaching, to investigate respectively the effect of initial glass irradiation on its alteration behavior and the irradiation stability of the alteration layer. Glass dissolution rate was analyzed by regular leachate samplings and the alteration layer structure was characterized by Raman, luminescence (continuous or time-resolved), and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR and EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that the small initial glass evolutions under irradiation did not induce any modification of the leaching kinetic nor of the structure of the alteration layer. The alteration process seemed to “smooth over” the created defects. Otherwise, the alteration layer and initial glass appeared to have different behaviors under irradiation. No Eu{sup 3+} reduction was detected in the alteration layer after irradiation and the defect creation efficiency was much lower than for initial glass. This can possibly be explained by the protective role of pore water contained in the altered material (∼20%). Moreover, a slight depolymerization of the silicon network of the altered glass under irradiation with electrons was evidenced, whereas in the initial glass it typically

  9. Moessbauer effect and infrared study of some borate glass containing Mn and Fe oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabr, M.

    2005-01-01

    Lithium borate glasses containing transition metals appeared now of very high technological and scientific interest. Therefore some lithium borate glasses containing mixed transition metal ions (manganese and iron) were investigated. The glass batches were melted at 1250 degree C for three hours and annealed at 350 degree C -over night- to obtain strain free glasses. Moessbauer Effect spectroscopy and Infrared analysis were employed to investigate the structural changes due to the change of their batches composition. Differential thermal analysis, magnetic susceptibility, density and molar volume measurements were also performed to study the effect of changing both manganese and iron oxides at the expense of boron oxide on these properties. Infrared analysis indicated the presence of different structural groups such as BO 3 , BO 4 , FeO 4 and MnO 6 as well as different vibrations indicated the presence of various bonds in the glass network. The values of the characteristic temperatures (T g , T c and T m ) showed gradual increase except those of the last sample where they showed a decrease. The mid sample showed the lowest stability value. It was found that the molar volume showed its highest value at R=0.33 [where R is the ratio of glass network modifier to the glass network former]. After that it showed gradual linear decrease. The magnetic susceptibility measurements showed approximately stable value between R=0.29 and 0.33, then it increased up to R=0.38, and after that, it decreased up to R= 0.43. The obtained magnetic susceptibility values indicated that all these glasses are paramagnetic. The obtained Moessbauer spectra and the calculated parameters confirmed that iron ions participated in the glass network as network former cations. It confirmed also that all glasses reflect paramagnetic character. The observed structural change were explained and correlated with the change of the measured physical properties

  10. Anchoring effects on early autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Daniel L; Bishara, Anthony J; Mugayar-Baldocchi, Marino A

    2017-10-01

    Studies of childhood memory typically show that our earliest memories come from between three and four years of age. This finding is not universal, however. The age estimate varies across cultures and is affected by social influences. Research from the judgments and decision-making literature suggests that these estimates might also involve a judgment under uncertainty. Therefore, they might be susceptible to less social influences such as heuristics and biases. To investigate this possibility, we conducted two experiments that used anchoring paradigms to influence participants' estimates of their age during early autobiographical memories. In Experiment 1, participants answered either a high-anchor or a low-anchor question, and were warned that the anchor was uninformative; they went on to estimate their age during their earliest autobiographical memory. In Experiment 2, we replicated Experiment 1 and extended the design to examine additional early autobiographical memories. In both experiments, participants in the low-anchor condition gave earlier age estimates than those in the high-anchor condition. These results provide new insights into the methods used to investigate autobiographical memory. Moreover, they show that reports of early autobiographical memories can be influenced by a relatively light touch - a change to a single digit in a single question.

  11. Sentence Complexity and Working Memory Effects in Ambiguity Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyon; Christianson, Kiel

    2013-01-01

    Two self-paced reading experiments using a paraphrase decision task paradigm were performed to investigate how sentence complexity contributed to the relative clause (RC) attachment preferences of speakers of different working memory capacities (WMCs). Experiment 1 (English) showed working memory effects on relative clause processing in both…

  12. Effects of Aging and Education on False Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the…

  13. Revisiting the Novelty Effect: When Familiarity, Not Novelty, Enhances Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppenk, J.; Kohler, S.; Moscovitch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reports of superior memory for novel relative to familiar material have figured prominently in recent theories of memory. However, such "novelty effects" are incongruous with long-standing observations that familiar items are remembered better. In 2 experiments, we explored whether this discrepancy was explained by differences in the…

  14. Effects of Music Notation Reinforcement on Aural Memory for Melodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonviri, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of music notation reinforcement on aural memory for melodies. Participants were 41 undergraduate and graduate music majors in a within-subjects design. Experimental trials tested melodic memory through a sequence of target melodies, distraction melodies, and matched and unmatched answer choices.…

  15. Effect of various lead species on the leaching behavior of borosilicate waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehman, R.L.; Kuchinski, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    A borosilicate nuclear waste glass was static leached in pure water, silicate water, and brine solution. Three different forms of lead were included in specified corrosion cells to assess the extent to which various lead species alter the leaching behavior of the glass. Weight loss data indicated that Pb/sub m/ amd PbO greatly reduce the weight loss of glass when leached in pure water, and similar effects were noted in silicate and brine. Si concentrations, which were substantial in the glass-alone leachate, were reduced to below detection limits in all pure water cells containing a lead form. Lead concentration levels in the leachate were controlled by lead form solubility and appeared to be a significant factor in influencing apparent leaching behavior. Surface analysis revealed surface crystals, which probably formed when soluble lead in the leachate reacted with dissolved or activated silica at the glass surface. The net effect was to reduce the lease of some glass constituents to the leachate, although it was not clear whether the actual corrosion of the glass surface was reduced. Significantly different corrosion inhibiting effects were noted among lead metal and two forms of lead oxide. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Cumulative and competitive effects of chemical elements on nuclear glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arena, Helene

    2016-01-01

    This work takes place in the context of the long-term behavior of nuclear glasses under repository conditions. The main objective is to identify, understand and compare the effects of some chemical elements present in the glass composition and/or in the repository media (Zn, Mg, Ni, Co, Fe, Ca, Gd, Ce, K, Cs, Cr and Ag) on the processes involved in glass alteration by water. The cumulative or competitive nature of the effects of these chemical elements was determined. To reach this goal, a 6 oxides simple glass (ISG) has been altered for more than 500 days in a solution containing one or more of the chemical elements of interest. The results indicate that Zn, Mg, Ni, Co and Fe elements increase glass alteration forming secondary phases with the same structure and stoichiometry (tri-octahedral smectites). To form, these silicates consume chemical elements (Si, Al) from the environment and induce a pH decrease until a limiting value of pH. Beyond this pH the precipitation of secondary phases is inhibited and these chemical elements can be integrated into the gel, replacing Ca whose solubility increases at lower pH. As long as they form secondary phases, the effects of these elements are cumulative. Rare earths Gd and Ce also increase glass alteration forming secondary phases but their effects are lower as they contain less silicon. These elements are not integrated in the gel. Chromium increases glass alteration by precipitating with Ca and leading to a less protective gel, depleted in Ca. Silver precipitates as AgCl and has no effect on the alteration of the glass. The chemical elements K, Cs and Ca limit glass alteration by integrating into the gel and slowing down the transport phenomena therein. This integration is competitive: the order of integration (quantity and effectiveness glass alteration limitation) is the following Ca≥≥Cs≥K. Thus, the increase of glass alteration may be proportional to the quantity of elements promoting the precipitation of

  17. Memory effects in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, C.; Wagner, K.; Reinhard, P.

    1994-01-01

    We consider equilibration in relativistic nuclear dynamics starting from a nonequilibrium Green's-functions approach. The widely used Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation is obtained only as the Markovian limit (i.e., negligible memory time). The actual memory time in energetic nuclear collisions turns out to be ∼2--3 fm/c, which interferes substantially with the time scale of the relaxation process. The memory kernels of the collision process will be presented. Because of their more involved structure, depending sensitively on the kinematical regime, both less and more stopping power is observed in the reaction compared to the Markovian description

  18. The Effects of Valence and Arousal on Associative Working Memory and Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Heiko C.; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernández, Guillén; Kessels, Roy P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Emotion can either facilitate or impair memory, depending on what, when and how memory is tested and whether the paradigm at hand is administered as a working memory (WM) or a long-term memory (LTM) task. Whereas emotionally arousing single stimuli are more likely to be remembered, memory for the relationship between two or more component parts (i.e., relational memory) appears to be worse in the presence of emotional stimuli, at least in some relational memory tasks. The current study investigated the effects of both valence (neutral vs. positive vs. negative) and arousal (low vs. high) in an inter-item WM binding and LTM task. Methodology/Principal Findings A five-pair delayed-match-to-sample (WM) task was administered. In each trial, study pairs consisted of one neutral picture and a second picture of which the emotional qualities (valence and arousal levels) were manipulated. These pairs had to be remembered across a delay interval of 10 seconds. This was followed by a probe phase in which five pairs were tested. After completion of this task, an unexpected single item LTM task as well as an LTM task for the pairs was assessed. As expected, emotional arousal impaired WM processing. This was reflected in lower accuracy for pairs consisting of high-arousal pictures compared to pairs with low-arousal pictures. A similar effect was found for the associative LTM task. However, the arousal effect was modulated by affective valence for the WM but not the LTM task; pairs with low-arousal negative pictures were not processed as well in the WM task. No significant differences were found for the single-item LTM task. Conclusions/Significance The present study provides additional evidence that processes during initial perception/encoding and post-encoding processes, the time interval between study and test and the interaction between valence and arousal might modulate the effects of “emotion” on associative memory. PMID:23300724

  19. Addition of bioactive glass to glass ionomer cements: Effect on the physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caluwé, T; Vercruysse, C W J; Ladik, I; Convents, R; Declercq, H; Martens, L C; Verbeeck, R M H

    2017-04-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are a subject of research because of their inferior mechanical properties, despite their advantages such as fluoride release and direct bonding to bone and teeth. Recent research aims to improve the bioactivity of the GICs and thereby improve mechanical properties on the long term. In this study, two types of bioactive glasses (BAG) (45S5F and CF9) are combined with GICs to evaluate the physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility of the BAG-GIC combinations. The effect of the addition of Al 3+ to the BAG composition and the use of smaller BAG particles on the BAG-GIC properties was also investigated. Conventional aluminosilicate glass (ASG) and (modified) BAG were synthesized by the melt method. BAG-GIC were investigated on setting time, compressive strength and bioactivity. Surface changes were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDS and PO 4 3- -and Ca 2+ uptake in SBF. Biocompatibility of selected BAG-GICs was determined by a direct toxicity assay. The addition of BAG improves the bioactivity of the GIC, which can be observed by the formation of an apatite (Ap) layer, especially in CF9-containing GICs. More BAG leads to more bioactivity but decreases strength. The addition of Al 3+ to the BAG composition improves strength, but decreases bioactivity. BAGs with smaller particle sizes have no effect on bioactivity and decrease strength. The formation of an Ap layer seems beneficial to the biocompatibility of the BAG-GICs. Bioactive GICs may have several advantages over conventional GICs, such as remineralization of demineralized tissue, adhesion and proliferation of bone- and dental cells, allowing integration in surrounding tissue. CF9 BAG-GIC combinations containing maximum 10mol% Al 3+ are most promising, when added in ≤20wt% to a GIC. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of moisture on glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzamora Guzman, Vladimir Joel; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    performance of wind turbine blades over their lifetime. Here, environmental moisture conditions were simulated by immersing glass fiber-reinforced polymer specimens in salt water for a period of up to 8 years. The mechanical properties of specimens were analyzed before and after immersion to evaluate...

  1. Effect of glass hybridization and staking sequence on mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coir fibre; glass fibre; polyester resin; hybrid laminate; mechanical properties. 1. Introduction. Natural fibres exhibit many advantageous properties as rein- forcement in fibre-reinforced composites. They are low- density materials, yielding relatively light weight composites with specific properties. In an effort to develop a ...

  2. Shielding effect of lead glasses on radiologists' eye lens exposure in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-01-01

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm"2-sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm"2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm"2 per glass) lens are recommended (authors)

  3. Effect of Chemical Reactions on the Hydrologic Properties of Fractured and Rubbelized Glass Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saripalli, Prasad; Meyer, P D.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of geological media, such as porosity, permeability and dispersivity, is critical to many natural and engineered sub-surface systems. Influence of glass corrosion (precipitation and dissolution) reactions on fractured and rubbelized (crushed) forms HAN28 and LAWBP1, two candidate waste glass forms for a proposed immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) disposal facility at the Hanford, WA site, was investigated. Flow and tracer transport experiments were conducted using fractured and rubbelized forms, before and after subjecting them to corrosion using Vapor Hydration Testing (VHT) at 200 C temperature and 200 psig pressure, causing the precipitation of alteration products. Data were analyzed using analytical expressions and CXTFIT, a transport parameter optimization code, for the estimation of the hydrologic characteristics before and after VHT. It was found that glass reactions significantly influence the hydrologic properties of ILAW glass media. Hydrologic properties of rubbelized glass decreased due to precipitation reactions, whereas those of fractured glass media increased due to reaction which led to unconfined expansion of fracture aperture. The results are unique and useful to better understand the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of fractured and rubbelized stony media in general and glass media in particular

  4. Shielding Effect of Lead Glasses on Radiologists' Eye Lens Exposure in Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-04-20

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm2-sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm2 per glass) lens are recommended. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Antibacterial effect of bioactive glasses on clinically important anaerobic bacteria in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppäranta, Outi; Vaahtio, Minna; Peltola, Timo; Zhang, Di; Hupa, Leena; Hupa, Mikko; Ylänen, Heimo; Salonen, Jukka I; Viljanen, Matti K; Eerola, Erkki

    2008-02-01

    Bioactive glasses (BAGs) of different compositions have been studied for decades for clinical use and they have found many dental and orthopaedic applications. Particulate BAGs have also been shown to have antibacterial properties. This large-scale study shows that two bioactive glass powders (S53P4 and 13-93) and a sol-gel derived material (CaPSiO II) have an antibacterial effect on 17 clinically important anaerobic bacterial species. All the materials tested demonstrated growth inhibition, although the concentration and time needed for the effect varied depending on the BAG. Glass S53P4 had a strong growth-inhibitory effect on all pathogens tested. Glass 13-93 and sol-gel derived material CaPSiO II showed moderate antibacterial properties.

  6. Memory color effect induced by familiarity of brand logos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Wada, Yuji; Masuda, Tomohiro; Goto, Sho-Ichi; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Hibino, Haruo; Cai, Dongsheng; Dan, Ippeita

    2013-01-01

    When people are asked to adjust the color of familiar objects such as fruits until they appear achromatic, the subjective gray points of the objects are shifted away from the physical gray points in a direction opposite to the memory color (memory color effect). It is still unclear whether the discrepancy between memorized and actual colors of objects is dependent on the familiarity of the objects. Here, we conducted two experiments in order to examine the relationship between the degree of a subject's familiarity with objects and the degree of the memory color effect by using logographs of food and beverage companies. In Experiment 1, we measured the memory color effects of logos which varied in terms of their familiarity (high, middle, or low). Results demonstrate that the memory color effect occurs only in the high-familiarity condition, but not in the middle- and low-familiarity conditions. Furthermore, there is a positive correlation between the memory color effect and the actual number of domestic stores of the brand. In Experiment 2, we assessed the semantic association between logos and food/beverage names by using a semantic priming task to elucidate whether the memory color effect of logos relates to consumer brand cognition, and found that the semantic associations between logos and food/beverage names in the high-familiarity brands were stronger than those in the low-familiarity brands only when the logos were colored correctly, but not when they were appropriately or inappropriately colored, or achromatic. The current results provide behavioral evidence of the relationship between the familiarity of objects and the memory color effect and suggest that the memory color effect increases with the familiarity of objects, albeit not constantly.

  7. Memory Color Effect Induced by Familiarity of Brand Logos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Wada, Yuji; Masuda, Tomohiro; Goto, Sho-ichi; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Hibino, Haruo; Cai, Dongsheng; Dan, Ippeita

    2013-01-01

    Background When people are asked to adjust the color of familiar objects such as fruits until they appear achromatic, the subjective gray points of the objects are shifted away from the physical gray points in a direction opposite to the memory color (memory color effect). It is still unclear whether the discrepancy between memorized and actual colors of objects is dependent on the familiarity of the objects. Here, we conducted two experiments in order to examine the relationship between the degree of a subject’s familiarity with objects and the degree of the memory color effect by using logographs of food and beverage companies. Methods and Findings In Experiment 1, we measured the memory color effects of logos which varied in terms of their familiarity (high, middle, or low). Results demonstrate that the memory color effect occurs only in the high-familiarity condition, but not in the middle- and low-familiarity conditions. Furthermore, there is a positive correlation between the memory color effect and the actual number of domestic stores of the brand. In Experiment 2, we assessed the semantic association between logos and food/beverage names by using a semantic priming task to elucidate whether the memory color effect of logos relates to consumer brand cognition, and found that the semantic associations between logos and food/beverage names in the high-familiarity brands were stronger than those in the low-familiarity brands only when the logos were colored correctly, but not when they were appropriately or inappropriately colored, or achromatic. Conclusion The current results provide behavioral evidence of the relationship between the familiarity of objects and the memory color effect and suggest that the memory color effect increases with the familiarity of objects, albeit not constantly. PMID:23874638

  8. Memory color effect induced by familiarity of brand logos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kimura

    Full Text Available When people are asked to adjust the color of familiar objects such as fruits until they appear achromatic, the subjective gray points of the objects are shifted away from the physical gray points in a direction opposite to the memory color (memory color effect. It is still unclear whether the discrepancy between memorized and actual colors of objects is dependent on the familiarity of the objects. Here, we conducted two experiments in order to examine the relationship between the degree of a subject's familiarity with objects and the degree of the memory color effect by using logographs of food and beverage companies.In Experiment 1, we measured the memory color effects of logos which varied in terms of their familiarity (high, middle, or low. Results demonstrate that the memory color effect occurs only in the high-familiarity condition, but not in the middle- and low-familiarity conditions. Furthermore, there is a positive correlation between the memory color effect and the actual number of domestic stores of the brand. In Experiment 2, we assessed the semantic association between logos and food/beverage names by using a semantic priming task to elucidate whether the memory color effect of logos relates to consumer brand cognition, and found that the semantic associations between logos and food/beverage names in the high-familiarity brands were stronger than those in the low-familiarity brands only when the logos were colored correctly, but not when they were appropriately or inappropriately colored, or achromatic.The current results provide behavioral evidence of the relationship between the familiarity of objects and the memory color effect and suggest that the memory color effect increases with the familiarity of objects, albeit not constantly.

  9. Memory effect o force measurements at nanoscales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisy, V.; Tothova, J.

    2011-01-01

    we have obtained an exact solution for the drift velocity of a Brownian particle in an incompressible fluid under the action of a constant force, taking into account the hydrodynamic memory in the particle motion. This velocity is proportional to the applied force but depends in a complicated manner on the time of observation t. At short times it is proportional to t and at long times it contains algebraic tails, the longest-lived of which being ∼ t -1/ 2. Due to this the velocity very slowly approaches the limiting value F/γ. As a consequence, the force F can significantly differ from the value that would be extracted from the drift measurements neglecting the inertial effects, which is a standard assumption in the interpretation of such experiments. The presented method can be equally applicable in the case of force linearly depending on the particle position. For nonlinear forces, first the open question about the choice of convention to be used in stochastic calculus should be resolved. (authors)

  10. Radiation effects on transport and bubble formation in silicate glasses. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    'To study the fundamental chemistry of radiation damage in silicate/borosilicate glasses and simulated high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms. Special emphasis is on delineating molecular processes crucial for understanding the aggregation of defects and formation of oxygen bubbles. The knowledge obtained will provide the needed scientific basis for extrapolating long-term behavior of stored radiative waste glass forms. This report summarizes the first 6 months of a 3-year project. The following issues have been addressed: (i) the production of radiolytic oxygen, (ii) the chemistry of hydrogenous species, and (iii) the effect of glass composition and microstructure on the formation and accumulation of metastable point defects.'

  11. Effect of γ-ray irradiation on optical properties of erbium doped bismuth-tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavamurthy, K.; Eraiah, B.

    2018-05-01

    Heavy metal oxide contained glasses are very promising candidates in shielding and photonic materials. In this paper, we studied the effect of γ-ray irradiation on optical properties of Er2O3-Bi2O3-TeO2 glasses through UV-Visible spectrophotometer. After γ-ray exposure, the optical band gap decreases and Urbach energy increases, which is due to creation of defects within the glass network as a result increases the number of non-bridging oxygens.

  12. Effect of reducing conditions of synthesis on the character of the crystallization of phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseeva, I.P.; Karapetyan, G.O.; Milyukov, E.M.; Rusan, V.V.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigate the effect of synthesis conditions on the properties of phosphate glasses with a high concentration of rare-earth elements (REE) which are promising materials for quantum electronics. Particular attention was paid to the character of the crystallization of the glasses. A model glass of the composition La/sub 2/O/sub 3/ X 3P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ was studied which is transparent in the visible and near-IR regions of the spectrum and produced commercially.

  13. Effect of glass microfibre addition on the mechanical performances of fly ash-based geopolymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamer Alomayri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, various amounts of glass microfibres were introduced into a geopolymer for reinforcement purposes. The influence of these microfibres on the performance of the geopolymer composites was investigated. Results show that the appropriate addition of glass microfibres can improve the mechanical properties of geopolymer composites. In particular, the flexural strength, flexural modulus and impact strength increase at an optimum fibre content of 2 wt%. Further, adding glass microfibres to a plain geopolymer matrix has a significant effect on the pre-cracking behaviour. It substantially enhances the post-cracking response.

  14. A Bayesian Model of the Memory Colour Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Christoph; Olkkonen, Maria; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2018-01-01

    According to the memory colour effect, the colour of a colour-diagnostic object is not perceived independently of the object itself. Instead, it has been shown through an achromatic adjustment method that colour-diagnostic objects still appear slightly in their typical colour, even when they are colourimetrically grey. Bayesian models provide a promising approach to capture the effect of prior knowledge on colour perception and to link these effects to more general effects of cue integration. Here, we model memory colour effects using prior knowledge about typical colours as priors for the grey adjustments in a Bayesian model. This simple model does not involve any fitting of free parameters. The Bayesian model roughly captured the magnitude of the measured memory colour effect for photographs of objects. To some extent, the model predicted observed differences in memory colour effects across objects. The model could not account for the differences in memory colour effects across different levels of realism in the object images. The Bayesian model provides a particularly simple account of memory colour effects, capturing some of the multiple sources of variation of these effects.

  15. Glass transition, crystallization kinetics and pressure effect on crystallization of ZrNbCuNiBe bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, P.F.; Zhuang, Yanxin; Wang, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The glass transition behavior and crystallization kinetics of Zr48Nb8Cu14Ni12Be18 bulk metallic glass have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The activation energies of both glass transition and crystallization events have been obtained using...... the Kissinger method. Results indicate that this glass crystallizes by a three-stage reaction: (1) phase separation and primary crystallization of glass, (2) formation of intermetallic compounds, and (3) decomposition of intermetallic compounds and crystallization of residual amorphous phase. The pressure...

  16. Effect of Si addition on glass-forming ability and mechanical properties of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekan, M.; Shabestari, S.G.; Zhang, W.; Seyedein, S.H.; Gholamipour, R.; Makino, A.; Inoue, A.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: The Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 alloy has a surprising GFA, and the glassy rods with diameter of 10 mm have been produced in this research. It has not been reported that the Cu-based glassy rods (Cu ≥ 50 at.%) to be produced with the critical diameter greater than 10 mm. The novelty of this research is that the glass formation has been improved and the critical diameter increased to 12 mm for the alloy having x = 1 with the addition of Si. Different criteria are used to evaluate the influence of Si content on the GFA, and the possible mechanisms involved in the achievement of this GFA are also discussed. - Abstract: The effect of Si addition on the glass-forming ability (GFA) and mechanical properties of (Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 ) 100-x Si x (x = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 at.%) alloys were investigated. The GFA of Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 alloy is improved by addition of a small amount of Si, and the critical diameter for glass formation increases from 10 mm for the alloy with x = 0-12 mm for the alloy with x = 1 when prepared using copper mold casting. Different criteria are used to evaluate the influence of Si content on the GFA, and the possible mechanisms involved in the achievement of this GFA are also discussed. In the uniaxial compression, the bulk glassy alloys exhibit a limited plastic strain of less than 1%, but the compressive fracture strength and Young's modulus were obtained in high values of 1969-2129 MPa and 101-144 GPa, respectively. Fracture surface and shear bands of samples were studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  17. Glass interface effect on high-strain-rate tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The glass interface effect on dynamic tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material has been investigated by subjecting a glass-polymer system of this polymer material matrix embedded a single 3 mm-diameter glass particle to impact loading in a split Hopkinson tension bar

  18. Motivated reconstruction: The effect of brand commitment on false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Nicole Votolato; Rajagopal, Priyali

    2018-06-01

    Across 5 studies, we examine the effect of prior brand commitment on the creation of false memories about product experience after reading online product reviews. We find that brand commitment and the valence of reviews to which consumers are exposed, interact to affect the incidence of false memories. Thus, highly committed consumers are more susceptible to the creation of false experience memories on exposure to positive versus negative reviews, whereas low commitment consumers exhibit similar levels of false memories in response to both positive and negative reviews. Further, these differences across brand commitment are attenuated when respondents are primed with an accuracy motivation, suggesting that the biasing effects of commitment are likely because of the motivation to defend the committed brand. Finally, we find that differences in false memories subsequently lead to differences in intentions to spread word-of-mouth (e.g., recommend the product to friends), suggesting that the consequences of false product experience memories can be significant for marketers and consumers. Our findings contribute to the literatures in false memory and marketing by documenting a motivated bias in false memories because of brand commitment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Microstructure development in RuO2-glass thick-film resistors and its effect on the electrical resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Iizuka, K.

    1990-01-01

    Microstructure development in RuO 2 -glass thick-film resistors has been studied by optical microscopy with special emphasis on the effect of glass particle size and mixing and firing conditions. The microstructure development has been characterized by the coalescence of glass grains, infiltration of glass into RuO 2 particle aggregates, and agglomeration of RuO 2 particles. The resistivity-firing temperature relationship has been correlated with the microstructure development

  20. The Cost of Learning: Interference Effects in Memory Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Kevin P.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.

    2015-01-01

    Learning often affects future learning and memory for previously learned information by exerting either facilitation or interference effects. Several theoretical accounts of interference effects have been proposed, each making different developmental predictions. This research examines interference effects across development, with the goal of better understanding mechanisms of interference and of memory development. Preschool-aged children and adults participated in a three-phased associative learning paradigm containing stimuli that were either unique or repeated across phases. Both age groups demonstrated interference effects, but only for repeated items. Whereas proactive interference effects were comparable across age groups, retroactive interference reached catastrophic-like levels in children. Additionally, retroactive interference increased in adults when contextual differences between phases were minimized (Experiment 2), and decreased in adults who were more successful at encoding repeated pairs of stimuli during a training phase (Experiment 3). These results are discussed with respect to theories of memory and memory development. PMID:25688907

  1. With sadness comes accuracy; with happiness, false memory: mood and the false memory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storbeck, Justin; Clore, Gerald L

    2005-10-01

    The Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm lures people to produce false memories. Two experiments examined whether induced positive or negative moods would influence this false memory effect. The affect-as-information hypothesis predicts that, on the one hand, positive affective cues experienced as task-relevant feedback encourage relational processing during encoding, which should enhance false memory effects. On the other hand, negative affective cues are hypothesized to encourage item-specific processing at encoding, which should discourage such effects. The results of Experiment 1 are consistent with these predictions: Individuals in negative moods were significantly less likely to show false memory effects than those in positive moods or those whose mood was not manipulated. Experiment 2 introduced inclusion instructions to investigate whether moods had their effects at encoding or retrieval. The results replicated the false memory finding of Experiment 1 and provide evidence that moods influence the accessibility of lures at encoding, rather than influencing monitoring at retrieval of whether lures were actually presented.

  2. Effect of nitrogen and fluorine on mechanical properties and bioactivity in two series of bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Ahmed; Mercier, Cyrille; Tricoteaux, Arnaud; Hampshire, Stuart; Leriche, Anne; Follet, Claudine

    2013-07-01

    Bioactive glasses are able to bond to bone through formation of carbonated hydroxyapatite in body fluids, and fluoride-releasing bioactive glasses are of interest for both orthopaedic and, in particular, dental applications for caries inhibition. However, because of their poor strength their use is restricted to non-load-bearing applications. In order to increase their mechanical properties, doping with nitrogen has been performed on two series of bioactive glasses: series (I) was a "bioglass" composition (without P2O5) within the quaternary system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-Si3N4 and series (II) was a simple substitution of CaF2 for CaO in series (I) glasses keeping the Na:Ca ratio constant. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of the variation in nitrogen and fluorine content on the properties of these glasses. The density, glass transition temperature, hardness and elastic modulus all increased linearly with nitrogen content which indicates that the incorporation of nitrogen stiffens the glass network because N is mainly in 3-fold coordination with Si atoms. Fluorine addition significantly decreases the thermal property values but the mechanical properties of these glasses remain unchanged with fluorine. The combination of both nitrogen and fluorine in oxyfluoronitride glasses gives better mechanical properties at much lower melting temperatures since fluorine reduces the melting point, allows higher solubility of nitrogen and does not affect the higher mechanical properties arising from incorporation of nitrogen. The characterization of these N and F substituted bioactive glasses using (29)Si MAS NMR has shown that the increase in rigidity of the glass network can be explained by the formation of SiO3N, SiO2N2 tetrahedra and Q(4) units with extra bridging anions at the expense of Q(3) units. Bioactivity of the glasses was investigated in vitro by examining apatite formation on the surface of glasses treated in acellular simulated body fluid (SBF) with ion

  3. Contribution to the study of the effects of α-irradiation in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.

    2001-01-01

    The main topic of this work is to characterise the effects of α-disintegration in nuclear waste glasses. Experimental and numerical approaches have been considered. The structure of the French nuclear waste glass (R7T7) has been simulated using four- and six-oxides simplified glasses which contain the main elements of the R7T7 glass: SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , Na 2 O, ZrO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaO. Four- and six-oxides glasses have been irradiated with 1 MeV-He + (ionisation) and 2.1 MeV-Kr 3+ (ionisation and atomic collisions) ions in order to reproduce the effects of the α-particle and of the recoil nucleus emitted during α-disintegration of actinides, and also to differentiate electronic and ballistic effects. Irradiated glasses have been characterised using several techniques, which have been adapted to the peculiarities of our samples (isolated material, small irradiated depth). The results point out the salient role of sodium in the observed modifications: depth concentration profiles obtained with RBS show an accumulation of sodium at the irradiated surface. We found a apparent acceleration of sodium release in leaching experiments which confirm that point. Modifications observed in Raman spectra of irradiated glasses show an increase of the polymerisation (increase of Q 3 /Q 2 ratio) due to sodium migration. In simplified glasses we have found that the modifications of mechanical properties by external irradiations reproduce the modifications observed in actinide doped nuclear glass (decrease of hardness and increase of fracture toughness). At the same time, we performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of a six-oxides glass. We have shown that the surface modifies the glass structure down to a depth of 10 Angstrom: modification of depth concentration profiles, decrease of the atomic coordination number (A1, B and Si). During cascades, we found that atomic displacements are easier near the surface. This behaviour is also observed when the glass is submitted to an

  4. Effect of providing free glasses on children's educational outcomes in China: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaochen; Zhou, Zhongqiang; Yi, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaopeng; Shi, Yaojiang; Chen, Qianyun; Meltzer, Mirjam E; le Cessie, Saskia; He, Mingguang; Rozelle, Scott; Liu, Yizhi; Congdon, Nathan

    2014-09-23

    To assess the effect of provision of free glasses on academic performance in rural Chinese children with myopia. Cluster randomized, investigator masked, controlled trial. 252 primary schools in two prefectures in western China, 2012-13. 3177 of 19,934 children in fourth and fifth grades (mean age 10.5 years) with visual acuity 6/12 with glasses. 3052 (96.0%) completed the study. Children were randomized by school (84 schools per arm) to one of three interventions at the beginning of the school year: prescription for glasses only (control group), vouchers for free glasses at a local facility, or free glasses provided in class. Spectacle wear at endline examination and end of year score on a specially designed mathematics test, adjusted for baseline score and expressed in standard deviations. Among 3177 eligible children, 1036 (32.6%) were randomized to control, 988 (31.1%) to vouchers, and 1153 (36.3%) to free glasses in class. All eligible children would benefit from glasses, but only 15% wore them at baseline. At closeout glasses wear was 41% (observed) and 68% (self reported) in the free glasses group, and 26% (observed) and 37% (self reported) in the controls. Effect on test score was 0.11 SD (95% confidence interval 0.01 to 0.21) when the free glasses group was compared with the control group. The adjusted effect of providing free glasses (0.10, 0.002 to 0.19) was greater than parental education (0.03, -0.04 to 0.09) or family wealth (0.01, -0.06 to 0.08). This difference between groups was significant, but was smaller than the prespecified 0.20 SD difference that the study was powered to detect. The provision of free glasses to Chinese children with myopia improves children's performance on mathematics testing to a statistically significant degree, despite imperfect compliance, although the observed difference between groups was smaller than the study was originally designed to detect. Myopia is common and rarely corrected in this setting.Trial Registration

  5. Shattered illusions: the effect of explicit memory mediation on an indirect memory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, P A; Mayes, A R; Meudell, P R

    1999-05-01

    Four experiments were conducted to explore the possible involvement of explicit memory in an indirect memory test in which white noise accompanying old sentences was judged to be quieter than white noise accompanying new sentences (Jacoby, Allan, Collins & Larwill, 1988). Experiment 1 established that this effect lasted up to 1 week. Experiment 2 found that a group of amnesic patients showed a noise effect that was marginally above chance and not significantly less that that of their matched controls after a delay of one day. Effect of time pressure at test (Experiment 3) and divided attention at study (Experiment 4) suggested that the memory processes mediating the noise effect were not automatic, although the possibility that the processes involve enhanced fluency is also discussed.

  6. The effects of uranium oxide high-level waste on the structure of iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badyal, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Because of their unusually good chemical durability, iron phosphate glasses are a natural candidate for a nuclear waste disposal glass. We have studied the effects of UO 2 high-level waste on the structure of iron phosphate glasses with both neutron and high-energy x-ray diffraction using the GLAD instrument of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source and the 1-BM bending magnet beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, respectively. The results of neutron scattering, which is mostly sensitive to correlations involving light atoms i.e. O-O, Fe-O and P-O, suggest the main structural features of the base glass are largely unaffected by the addition of UO 2 . The nearest-neighbor P-O, Fe-O and O-O peaks remain at the same position in real space and their intensities scale approximately with concentration. These findings are consistent with the earlier results of Raman scattering and EXAFS on the Fe-K edge wherein both cases the spectra remain similar to the base glass. High-energy x-ray scattering which is sensitive to correlations involving the heavier atoms and thus complements the neutron measurements, is also consistent with uranium occupying interstitial sites in the relatively undisturbed base glass structure. However, important questions remain as to the precise local structure and oxidation state of uranium in these glasses

  7. The effects of uranium on the structure of iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badyal, Y.; Karabulut, M.; Marasinghe, K.; Saboungi, M.L.; Haeffner, D.; Shastri, S.; Day, D.E.; Ray, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Because of their high chemical durability and waste loading capacity, iron phosphate glasses are a natural candidate for a nuclear waste disposal medium. The authors have studied the effects of uranium on the structure of iron phosphate glasses with both neutron and high-energy x-ray diffraction. The results of neutron scattering, which is mostly sensitive to pair correlations involving light atoms, i.e., O-O, Fe-O and P-O, indicate the main structural features of the base glass are largely unaffected by the addition of UO 2 . The nearest-neighbor P-O, Fe-O and O-O peaks remain at the same position in real space and their intensities scale approximately with concentration. These findings are consistent with earlier results using Raman scattering and EXAFS on the Fe-K edge, where in both cases the spectra remain similar to the base glass. The results of high-energy x-ray scattering, which is sensitive to correlations involving the heavier atoms and thus complements the neutron measurements, are also consistent with the overall picture of uranium occupying interstitial sites in the relatively undisturbed base glass structure. Combining the neutron and x-ray data for a 10 mol% UO 2 glass suggests the intriguing possibility of a U 6+ uranyl ion configuration although further work is needed to establish the precise local structure and valence state of uranium in these glasses

  8. Effect of sintering on crystallization and structural properties of soda lime silica glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid Mohd Hafiz Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sintering temperatures on crystallization and structural of the soda lime silica (SLS glass was reported. Elemental weight composition of the SLS glass powder was identified through Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF analysis while the thermal behavior of the glass was determined using Differential thermal analysis (DTA technique. Archimedes’ method and direct geometric measurement were respectively used to determine bulk density and linear shrinkage of the glass samples. Crystallisation behavior of the samples was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis and chemical bonds present in the samples were measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Results showed an increase in the density and linear shrinkage of the samples as a function of the sintering temperature. The XRD analysis revealed the formation of α-quartz (SiO2 and a minor amount of devitrite phases in the samples and these were further verified through the detection of chemical bonds by FTIR after sintering at 800ºC. The properties of the glass-ceramics can be explained on the basis of crystal chemistry which indicated that the alkali ions formed as carriers in the random network structure and can be recommended for the manufacture of glass fiber or toughened glass-ceramic insulators.

  9. Prismatic displacement effect of progressive multifocal glasses on reaction time and accuracy in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Ashton C; Campbell, A John; Robertson, M Clare; Sanderson, Gordon F

    2014-01-01

    Multifocal glasses (bifocals, trifocals, and progressives) increase the risk of falling in elderly people, but how they do so is unclear. To explain why glasses with progressive addition lenses increase the risk of falls and whether this can be attributed to false projection, this study aimed to 1) map the prismatic displacement of a progressive lens, and 2) test whether this displacement impaired reaction time and accuracy. The reaction times of healthy ≥75-year-olds (31 participants) were measured when grasping for a bar and touching a black line. Participants performed each test twice, wearing their progressives and new, matched single vision (distance) glasses in random order. The line and bar targets were positioned according to the maximum and minimum prismatic displacement effect through the progressive lens, mapped using a focimeter. Progressive spectacle lenses have large areas of prismatic displacement in the central visual axis and edges. Reaction time was faster for progressives compared with single vision glasses with a centrally-placed horizontal grab bar (mean difference 101 ms, P=0.011 [repeated measures analysis]) and a horizontal black line placed 300 mm below center (mean difference 80 ms, P=0.007). There was no difference in accuracy between the two types of glasses. Older people appear to adapt to the false projection of progressives in the central visual axis. This adaptation means that swapping to new glasses or a large change in prescription may lead to a fall. Frequently updating glasses may be more beneficial.

  10. Effect of irradiation on the evolution of alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougnaud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) remaining after spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is immobilized within a glass matrix, eventually destined for geological disposal. Water intrusion into the repository is expected after several thousand years. The alteration of a non-radioactive surrogate for nuclear glass has been extensively studied and it has been determined that successive leaching mechanisms lead to the formation of a 'passivating' alteration layer and to the establishment of a residual rate regime in the long term. However, glass packages are submitted to the radioactivity of confined radioelements. This work focuses on the influence of irradiation on the alteration layer formed during the residual rate regime, in a structural and mechanistic point of view. Three focal areas have been selected. Non-radioactive simple glasses have been leached and externally irradiated in order to determine modifications induced by electronic effects (irradiations with electrons and alpha particles). The same type of glass samples have been previously irradiated with heavy ions and their leaching behavior have been studied in order to assess the impact of ballistic dose cumulated by the glass before water intrusion. Leaching behavior of a complex radioactive glass, doped with an alpha-emitter, has been studied to consider a more realistic situation. (author) [fr

  11. RADIATION EFFECTS IN PHYSICAL AGING OF BINARY As-S AND As-Se GLASSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchak, Roman; Shpotyuk, O.; Kozdras, A.; Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S.K.; McCloy, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation-induced physical aging effects are studied in binary As x S 100-x and As x Se 100-x (30 (le) x (le) 42) glasses by conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) method. It is shown that γ-irradiation (Co 60 source, ∼ 3 MGy dose) of glassy As x S 100-x caused a measurable increase in glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area in the vicinity of glass transition region, which was associated with acceleration of structural relaxation processes in these materials. In contrast to sulfide glasses, the samples of As-Se family did not exhibit any significant changes in DSC curves after γ-irradiation. The observed difference in radiation-induced physical aging between sulfides and selenides was explained by more effective destruction-polymerization transformations and possible metastable defects formation in S-based glassy network.

  12. On the origin of the mixed alkali effect on indentation in silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    The compositional scaling of Vickers hardness (Hv) in mixed alkali oxide glasses manifests itself as a positive deviation from linearity as a function of the network modifier/modifier ratio, with a maximum deviation at the ratio of 1:1. In this work, we investigate the link between the indentation...... deformation processes (elastic deformation, plastic deformation, and densification) and Hv in two mixed sodium–potassium silicate glass series. We show that the mixed alkali effect in Hv originates from the nonlinear scaling of the resistance to plastic deformation. We thus confirm a direct relation between...... the resistance to plastic flow and Hv in mixed modifier glasses. Furthermore, we find that the mixed alkali effect also manifests itself as a positive deviation from linearity in the compositional scaling of density for glasses with high alumina content. This trend could be linked to a compaction of the network...

  13. Differential effects of arousal in positive and negative autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jaclyn Hennessey; Addis, Donna Rose; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2012-01-01

    Autobiographical memories are characterised by a range of emotions and emotional reactions. Recent research has demonstrated that differences in emotional valence (positive vs. negative emotion) and arousal (the degree of emotional intensity) differentially influence the retrieved memory narrative. Although the mnemonic effects of valence and arousal have both been heavily studied, it is currently unclear whether the effects of emotional arousal are equivalent for positive and negative autobiographical events. In the current study, multilevel models were used to examine differential effects of emotional valence and arousal on the richness of autobiographical memory retrieval both between and within subjects. Thirty-four young adults were asked to retrieve personal autobiographical memories associated with popular musical cues and to rate the valence, arousal and richness of these events. The multilevel analyses identified independent influences of valence and intensity upon retrieval characteristics at the within- and between-subject levels. In addition, the within-subject interactions between valence and arousal highlighted differential effects of arousal for positive and negative memories. These findings have important implications for future studies of emotion and memory, highlighting the importance of considering both valence and arousal when examining the role emotion plays in the richness of memory representation.

  14. Effect of vacuum annealing on evaporated pentacene thin films for memory device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayathri, A.G.; Joseph, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Switching of ITO/pentacene/Al thin films for different annealing temperatures. - Highlights: • Memory device performance in pentacene improved considerably with annealing. • ON/OFF ratio of the pentacene device increases due to annealing. • Threshold voltage reduces from 2.55 V to 1.35 V due to annealing. • Structure of pentacene thin films is also dependent on annealing temperature. - Abstract: Thin films of pentacene were deposited thermally onto glass substrates and annealed at 323 K, 373 K, 423 K, 473 K and 523 K in high vacuum. Effect of annealing on the morphological and structural properties of these films was studied. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the crystalline nature of the films. Electrical studies for the use as write once read many (WORM) memory devices were done for the vacuum deposited pentacene thin films on indium tin oxide coated glass. Due to annealing, a sharp increase in the ON/OFF ratio of current and a decrease in threshold voltage were observed at around 373 K. This device showed a stable switching with an ON/OFF current ratio as high as 10 9 and a switching threshold voltage of 1.35 V. The performance of the device degraded above 423 K due to the changes in the crystallinity of the film.

  15. Effect of vacuum annealing on evaporated pentacene thin films for memory device applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayathri, A.G., E-mail: gaythri305@yahoo.com; Joseph, C.M., E-mail: cmjoseph@rediffmail.com

    2016-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Switching of ITO/pentacene/Al thin films for different annealing temperatures. - Highlights: • Memory device performance in pentacene improved considerably with annealing. • ON/OFF ratio of the pentacene device increases due to annealing. • Threshold voltage reduces from 2.55 V to 1.35 V due to annealing. • Structure of pentacene thin films is also dependent on annealing temperature. - Abstract: Thin films of pentacene were deposited thermally onto glass substrates and annealed at 323 K, 373 K, 423 K, 473 K and 523 K in high vacuum. Effect of annealing on the morphological and structural properties of these films was studied. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the crystalline nature of the films. Electrical studies for the use as write once read many (WORM) memory devices were done for the vacuum deposited pentacene thin films on indium tin oxide coated glass. Due to annealing, a sharp increase in the ON/OFF ratio of current and a decrease in threshold voltage were observed at around 373 K. This device showed a stable switching with an ON/OFF current ratio as high as 10{sup 9} and a switching threshold voltage of 1.35 V. The performance of the device degraded above 423 K due to the changes in the crystallinity of the film.

  16. Glass fiber effect on mechanical properties of Eco-SCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad M. L., V.; Loksesh, G.; Ramanjaneyulu, B.; Venkatesh, S.; Mousumi, K.

    2017-07-01

    Sustainable Construction encouraging the use of recycled materials and implies adoption of fewer natural resources in buildings and other infrastructure. In this paper Quarry Dust (QD) is used as partial replacement for River Sand (RS) to make Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) of grade M40. Glass fiber is used as strengthening material to the developed concrete. The present study mainly focused to develop Eco-SCC using QD. In this study it was found that, for developing Eco-SCC, what is the optimum dosage of replacement of QD in RS. Fresh properties of SCC are satisfying the EFNARC specifications and also target strength is achieved. Further it is concluded that, with the glass fiber addition there is an improvement in the split and flexural strength values.

  17. Size and field effect on mesoscopic spin glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, K. [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Infomatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: komatsu@az.appi.keio.ac.jp; Maki, H. [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Infomatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Taniyama, T. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Sato, T. [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Infomatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    Spin glass particles were prepared as the mesoscopic system in order to examine the space scale of spin glass domain (droplet). The peak temperature T {sub peak} in the temperature-dependent magnetization is systematically reduced with decreasing average particle size. This is due to the imitation of droplet growth to the particle diameter. The magnetic field H also decreases T {sub peak}, which is caused by the reduction of the barrier height by Zeeman energy. However, there appears different tendency in the relation between H and T {sub peak} below 100 Oe. This indicates the existence of crossover between the two regimes in which the free energy and Zeeman energy govern the droplet excitation.

  18. Radiation effects in glass waste forms for high-level waste and plutonium disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    A key challenge in the permanent disposal of high-level waste (HLW), plutonium residues/scraps, and excess weapons plutonium in glass waste forms is the development of predictive models of long-term performance that are based on a sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Radiation effects from β-decay and α-decay can impact the performance of glasses for HLW and Pu disposition through the interactions of the α-particles, β-particles, recoil nuclei, and γ-rays with the atoms in the glass. Recently, a scientific panel convened under the auspices of the DOE Council on Materials Science to assess the current state of understanding, identify important scientific issues, and recommend directions for research in the area of radiation effects in glasses for HLW and Pu disposition. The overall finding of the panel was that there is a critical lack of systematic understanding on radiation effects in glasses at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels. The current state of understanding on radiation effects in glass waste forms and critical scientific issues are presented

  19. Prospective memory: effects of divided attention on spontaneous retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler L; Mullet, Hillary G; Whiffen, Katie N; Ousterhout, Hunter; Einstein, Gilles O

    2014-02-01

    We examined the effects of divided attention on the spontaneous retrieval of a prospective memory intention. Participants performed an ongoing lexical decision task with an embedded prospective memory demand, and also performed a divided-attention task during some segments of lexical decision trials. In all experiments, monitoring was highly discouraged, and we observed no evidence that participants engaged monitoring processes. In Experiment 1, performing a moderately demanding divided-attention task (a digit detection task) did not affect prospective memory performance. In Experiment 2, performing a more challenging divided-attention task (random number generation) impaired prospective memory. Experiment 3 showed that this impairment was eliminated when the prospective memory cue was perceptually salient. Taken together, the results indicate that spontaneous retrieval is not automatic and that challenging divided-attention tasks interfere with spontaneous retrieval and not with the execution of a retrieved intention.

  20. Effects of timbre and tempo change on memory for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Andrea R; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of different encoding tasks and of manipulations of two supposedly surface parameters of music on implicit and explicit memory for tunes. In two experiments, participants were first asked to either categorize instrument or judge familiarity of 40 unfamiliar short tunes. Subsequently, participants were asked to give explicit and implicit memory ratings for a list of 80 tunes, which included 40 previously heard. Half of the 40 previously heard tunes differed in timbre (Experiment 1) or tempo (Experiment 2) in comparison with the first exposure. A third experiment compared similarity ratings of the tunes that varied in timbre or tempo. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results suggest first that the encoding task made no difference for either memory mode. Secondly, timbre and tempo change both impaired explicit memory, whereas tempo change additionally made implicit tune recognition worse. Results are discussed in the context of implicit memory for nonsemantic materials and the possible differences in timbre and tempo in musical representations.

  1. Optical bleaching of bismuth implanted silica glass: A threshold effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.Y.; Magruder, R.H. III; Weeks, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The near surface regions of high purity silica glass discs, Spectrosil A, were modified by implantation with bismuth ions at 160 key and room temperature. The glasses implanted with a nominal dose of 6x10 16 Bi/cm 2 at ∼5 μA/cm 2 were subsequently bleached with a 5.0 eV KrF pulsed excimer laser. The laser had an average pulse duration of ∼20 ns and repetition rate of 10 Hz. It was found that the bleaching was dependent upon the power density of the laser for a constant total integrated energy. Ion backscattering and optical absorption measurements were made before and after laser irradiation. Large changes in optical density and depth distribution of the implanted ions were observed at power densities of ≥45 mJ/cm 2 -pulse. Onset of threshold for bleaching of silica glass implanted with 6x10 16 Bi/cm 2 at 160 key and at room temperature is between 30 and 45 mJ/cm 2 -pulse

  2. Effect Of Laser CO2 Parameters In Marking Of Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanafi-Benghalem, Nafissa; Boudoukha, Hassina; Benghalem, Kamel

    2008-01-01

    Currently many techniques of marking are exploited in a great number of sectors, on various materials (cardboard, textile, wood, leather, plastic, metal, ceramics and glass). The printing is done on supports of great or small dimension for all geometrical forms (plane, round, conical and ovalised). We can print colour as much than we wish. The marking technology for the identification of the glass parts knows a remarkable development carried by the new needs for the industrialists using transparent materials such as the optical, chemical, pharmaceutical sectors, the luxury and drink industries or publicity and decoration (neon signs, advertising mirrors). The objective of our work consists particularly in engraving on glass the measurement scales forming a whole of ordered graduation which the goal is to carry out reading systems of measuring apparatus about 1/10 μm of precision. We used as tool for marking the laser CO 2 . Our choice is justified by the flexibility of the laser, the permanent lifespan of the graduations carried out and the guarantee of the facility of reading incidentally the precision and the accuracy of the measuring apparatus. The study parameters of the laser beam are the velocity (400, 600, 800, 1000 m/s.), the power (25, 75 and 80% of 25W) and the numbers pass (one, two and three pass). The optical observations results obtained suggest that the highest and the average power used remain the favourable parameters for the quality of the graduations carried out.

  3. Effect of certain alkaline metals on Pr doped glasses to investigate spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkennavar Susheela, K.; Madhu, A.; Eraiah, B.; Kokila, M. K.

    2018-02-01

    Incorporation of different Alkaline earth metal like Barium, Calcium and strontium in sodium lead borate glass doped with Pr3+ is studied. Physical parameters such as density, molar volume, molar refractivity etc have been evaluated. Effect of different atomic size of alkaline metal using optical and physical parameters is analysed. XRD and FTIR were carried out to know the structural behaviour of the glasses. Absorption and Emission spectra are recorded at room temperature and the results were discussed.

  4. Pressure effect on crystallization temperature in Zr70Pd30 metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Jeppesen, S; Saida, J.

    2004-01-01

    The pressure effect on amorphous-to-quasicrystalline-to-intermetallic phase transformations in a Zr70Pd30 metallic glass has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. It is found that the glass crystallizes in two steps: (1) amorphous...... temperature for the formation of quasicrystals has been further discussed with the nucleation theory. ©2004 American Institute of Physics....

  5. Effects of composition on properties in an 11-component nuclear waste glass system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Piepel, G.F.; Mellinger, G.B.; May, R.P.; Gray, W.J.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1981-09-01

    Ninety simplified nuclear waste glass compositions within an 11-component oxide composition matrix were tested for crystallinity, viscosity, volatility, and chemical durability. Empirical models of property response as a function of glass composition were developed using statistical experimental design and modeling techniques. A new statistical technique was developed to calculate the effects of oxide components on each property. Independent melts were used to check the prediction accuracy of the models

  6. The effect of temperature on guiding of slow highly charged ions through a mesoscopic glass capillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereczky, R J; Tökési, K; Kowarik, G; Ladinig, F; Schrempf, D; Aumayr, F

    2012-01-01

    We present first temperature dependent transmission measurements of slow highly charged ions through a single, straight Duran glass capillary with a high aspect ratio. By changing the temperature of the glass capillary the electrical conductivity of the Duran can be varied by several orders of magnitude. This held the promise to investigate the effect of conductivity on particle transport (build-up and removal of charge patches) through capillaries in more details.

  7. Electron irradiation effect on bubble formation and growth in a sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the authors studied simultaneous and intermittent electron irradiation effects on bubble growth in a simple sodium borosilicate glass during Xe ion implantation at 200 C. Simultaneous electron irradiation increases the average bubble size in the glass. This enhanced diffusion is also shown by the migration of Xe from bubbles into the matrix when the sample is irradiated by an electron beam after the Xe implantation

  8. Mixed mobile ion effect on a.c. conductivity of boroarsenate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article we report the study of mixed mobile ion effect (MMIE) in boroarsenate glasses. DSC and a.c. electrical conductivity studies have been carried out for MgO–(25−)Li2O–50B2O3–25As2O3 glasses. It is observed that strength of MMIE in a.c. conductivity is less pronounced with increase in temperature and ...

  9. Whorfian effects on colour memory are not reliable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Oliver; Davies, Ian R L; Franklin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The Whorfian hypothesis suggests that differences between languages cause differences in cognitive processes. Support for this idea comes from studies that find that patterns of colour memory errors made by speakers of different languages align with differences in colour lexicons. The current study provides a large-scale investigation of the relationship between colour language and colour memory, adopting a cross-linguistic and developmental approach. Colour memory on a delayed matching-to-sample (XAB) task was investigated in 2 language groups with differing colour lexicons, for 3 developmental stages and 2 regions of colour space. Analyses used a Bayesian technique to provide simultaneous assessment of two competing hypotheses (H1-Whorfian effect present, H0-Whorfian effect absent). Results of the analyses consistently favoured H0. The findings suggest that Whorfian effects on colour memory are not reliable and that the importance of such effects should not be overestimated.

  10. Effects of methylphenidate on memory functions of adults with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuermaier, Anselm B M; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; Weisbrod, Matthias; Lange, Klaus W; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Tucha, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Neuropsychological research on adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) revealed considerable impairments in memory functions related to executive control. However, only limited evidence exists supporting the effects of pharmacological treatment using methylphenidate (MPH) on

  11. Optical transitions of Tm3+ in oxyfluoride glasses and compositional and thermal effect on upconversion luminescence of Tm3+/Yb3+-codoped oxyfluoride glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Wu, Yinsu; Liu, Zhuo; Guo, Tao

    2014-01-24

    Optical properties of Tm(3+)-doped SiO2-BaF2-ZnF2 glasses have been investigated on the basis of the Judd-Ofelt theory. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, radiative transition probabilities, fluorescence branching ratios and radiative lifetimes have been calculated for different glass compositions. Upconversion emissions were observed in Tm(3+)/Yb(3+)-codoped SiO2-BaF2-ZnF2 glasses under 980 nm excitation. The effects of composition, concentration of the doping ions, temperature, and excitation pump power on the upconversion emissions were also systematically studied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Divided Attention at Retrieval on Conceptual Implicit Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prull, Matthew W; Lawless, Courtney; Marshall, Helen M; Sherman, Annabella T K

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether conceptual implicit memory is sensitive to process-specific interference at the time of retrieval. Participants performed the implicit memory test of category exemplar generation (CEG; Experiments 1 and 3), or the matched explicit memory test of category-cued recall (Experiment 2), both of which are conceptually driven memory tasks, under one of two divided attention (DA) conditions in which participants simultaneously performed a distracting task. The distracting task was either syllable judgments (dissimilar processes), or semantic judgments (similar processes) on unrelated words. Compared to full attention (FA) in which no distracting task was performed, DA had no effect on CEG priming overall, but reduced category-cued recall similarly regardless of distractor task. Analyses of distractor task performance also revealed differences between implicit and explicit memory retrieval. The evidence suggests that, whereas explicit memory retrieval requires attentional resources and is disrupted by semantic and phonological distracting tasks, conceptual implicit memory is automatic and unaffected even when distractor and memory tasks involve similar processes.

  13. Effects of Divided Attention at Retrieval on Conceptual Implicit Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Prull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether conceptual implicit memory is sensitive to process-specific interference at the time of retrieval. Participants performed the implicit memory test of category exemplar generation (Experiments 1 and 3, or the matched explicit memory test of category-cued recall (Experiment 2, both of which are conceptually-driven memory tasks, under one of two divided attention (DA conditions in which participants simultaneously performed a distracting task. The distracting task was either syllable judgments (dissimilar processes, or semantic judgments (similar processes on unrelated words. Compared to full attention (FA in which no distracting task was performed, DA had no effect on category exemplar generation priming overall, but reduced category-cued recall similarly regardless of distractor task. Analyses of distractor task performance also revealed differences between implicit and explicit memory retrieval. The evidence suggests that, whereas explicit memory retrieval requires attentional resources and is disrupted by semantic and phonological distracting tasks, conceptual implicit memory is automatic and unaffected even when distractor and memory tasks involve similar processes.

  14. Memory Effects on Movement Behavior in Animal Foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracis, Chloe; Gurarie, Eliezer; Van Moorter, Bram; Goodwin, R Andrew

    2015-01-01

    An individual's choices are shaped by its experience, a fundamental property of behavior important to understanding complex processes. Learning and memory are observed across many taxa and can drive behaviors, including foraging behavior. To explore the conditions under which memory provides an advantage, we present a continuous-space, continuous-time model of animal movement that incorporates learning and memory. Using simulation models, we evaluate the benefit memory provides across several types of landscapes with variable-quality resources and compare the memory model within a nested hierarchy of simpler models (behavioral switching and random walk). We find that memory almost always leads to improved foraging success, but that this effect is most marked in landscapes containing sparse, contiguous patches of high-value resources that regenerate relatively fast and are located in an otherwise devoid landscape. In these cases, there is a large payoff for finding a resource patch, due to size, value, or locational difficulty. While memory-informed search is difficult to differentiate from other factors using solely movement data, our results suggest that disproportionate spatial use of higher value areas, higher consumption rates, and consumption variability all point to memory influencing the movement direction of animals in certain ecosystems.

  15. Memory Effects on Movement Behavior in Animal Foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracis, Chloe; Gurarie, Eliezer; Van Moorter, Bram; Goodwin, R. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    An individual’s choices are shaped by its experience, a fundamental property of behavior important to understanding complex processes. Learning and memory are observed across many taxa and can drive behaviors, including foraging behavior. To explore the conditions under which memory provides an advantage, we present a continuous-space, continuous-time model of animal movement that incorporates learning and memory. Using simulation models, we evaluate the benefit memory provides across several types of landscapes with variable-quality resources and compare the memory model within a nested hierarchy of simpler models (behavioral switching and random walk). We find that memory almost always leads to improved foraging success, but that this effect is most marked in landscapes containing sparse, contiguous patches of high-value resources that regenerate relatively fast and are located in an otherwise devoid landscape. In these cases, there is a large payoff for finding a resource patch, due to size, value, or locational difficulty. While memory-informed search is difficult to differentiate from other factors using solely movement data, our results suggest that disproportionate spatial use of higher value areas, higher consumption rates, and consumption variability all point to memory influencing the movement direction of animals in certain ecosystems. PMID:26288228

  16. Working memory overload: fronto-limbic interactions and effects on subsequent working memory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Richard J; Krystal, John H; Mathalon, Daniel H

    2010-03-01

    The human working memory system provides an experimentally useful model for examination of neural overload effects on subsequent functioning of the overloaded system. This study employed functional magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with a parametric working memory task to characterize the behavioral and neural effects of cognitive overload on subsequent cognitive performance, with particular attention to cognitive-limbic interactions. Overloading the working memory system was associated with varying degrees of subsequent decline in performance accuracy and reduced activation of brain regions central to both task performance and suppression of negative affect. The degree of performance decline was independently predicted by three separate factors operating during the overload condition: the degree of task failure, the degree of amygdala activation, and the degree of inverse coupling between the amygdala and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that vulnerability to overload effects in cognitive functioning may be mediated by reduced amygdala suppression and subsequent amygdala-prefrontal interaction.

  17. Production and remediation of low sludge simulated Purex waste glasses, 2: Effects of sludge oxide additions on glass durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Glass produced during the Purex 4 campaigns of the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) and the 774 Research Melter contained a lower fraction of sludge components than targeted by the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Purex 4 glass was more durable than the benchmark (EA) glass, but was less durable than most other simulated SRS high-level waste glasses. Further, the measured durability of Purex 4 glass was not as well correlated with the durability predicted from the DWPF process control algorithm, probably because the algorithm was developed to predict the durability of SRS high-level waste glasses with higher sludge content than Purex 4. A melter run, designated Purex 4 Remediation, was performed using the 774 Research Melter to determine if the initial PCCS target composition determined for Purex 4 would produce acceptable glass whose durability could be accurately modeled by the DWPF glass durability algorithm. Reagent grade oxides and carbonates were added to Purex 4 melter feed stock to simulate a higher sludge loading. Each canister of glass produced was sampled and the glass durability was determined by the Product Consistency Test method. This document details the durability data and subsequent analysis

  18. The effects of drumming on working memory in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degé, Franziska; Kerkovius, Katharina

    2018-05-04

    Our study investigated the effect of a music training program on working memory (verbal memory, visual memory, and as a part of central executive processing working memory) in older adults. The experimental group was musically trained (drumming and singing), whereas one control group received a literature training program and a second control group was untrained. We randomly assigned 24 participants (all females; M = 77 years and 3 months) to the music group, the literature group, and the untrained group. The training groups were trained for 15 weeks. The three groups did not differ significantly in age, socioeconomic status, music education, musical aptitude, cognitive abilities, or depressive symptoms. We did not find differences in the music group in central executive function. However, we found a potential effect of music training on verbal memory and an impact of music training on visual memory. Musically trained participants remembered more words from a word list than both control groups, and they were able to remember more symbol sequences correctly than the control groups. Our findings show a possible effect of music training on verbal and visual memory in older people. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Coaching positively influences the effects of working memory training on visual working memory as well as mathematical ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelwan, M.; Vissers, C.T.W.M.; Kroesbergen, E.H.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to test whether the amount of coaching influenced the results of working memory training on both visual and verbal working memory. Additionally, the effects of the working memory training on the amount of progress after specific training in mathematics were

  20. An additional memory effect in mass spectrometry for BF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Kiichi; Satooka, Sakae

    1978-01-01

    It is considered that the memory effect appears in a metallic gas inlet of a mass spectrometer for measurement with samples of BF 3 is classified into two kinds, one is essential memory effect which is caused by an action between the surface of metal and BF 3 , and the other is additional memory effect which is caused by viscous liquid produced by reaction among water, BF 3 and metals. The additional memory effect is caused by stain on the inner surface of the gas inlet. Air is introduced into the sample bottle joint at each time for change of sample bottle. Moisture in the air is adsorbed on inner surfaces of the joint and piping made of metal, and combined with BF 3 which is introduced, and then viscous compound is produced by dissolution of the metal into the compound made from H 2 O and BF 3 . The vapour pressure of the viscous compound is not sufficient low, and so the compound propagates from the sample bottle joint to the whole of the gas inlet at each time of opening and closing of valves of the gas inlet. The coated film of the viscous compound with adsorption and release of Bf 3 is a cause of the additional memory effect. If the stain of the inner surface of the gas inlet grows up, the additional memory effect becomes more intense compared with the essential memory effect, and the measured values are not converged. To remove the additional memory effect, it is desirable to introduce the sample BF 3 after the moisture intruded into the piping by the exchange of sample bottles is removed sufficiently by introduction of F 2 or ClF 3 . (auth.)

  1. Effect of background music on auditory-verbal memory performance

    OpenAIRE

    Sona Matloubi; Ali Mohammadzadeh; Zahra Jafari; Alireza Akbarzade Baghban

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Music exists in all cultures; many scientists are seeking to understand how music effects cognitive development such as comprehension, memory, and reading skills. More recently, a considerable number of neuroscience studies on music have been developed. This study aimed to investigate the effects of null and positive background music in comparison with silence on auditory-verbal memory performance.Methods: Forty young adults (male and female) with normal hearing, aged betw...

  2. Weathering effects on materials from historical stained glass windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Heras, M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of materials (stained glasses, lead cames, support elements and putty from historical stained glass windows of different periods (13th-19th centuries have been studied. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray diffraction were used as characterization techniques. Degradation of historical stained glass windows is due to the particular chemical composition oftlie materials used for their production: stained glasses, lead network, metallic support elements and refilling putty. However, the presence of a given chemical composition is not the only factor involved in the degradation process. It is necessary the occurrence of other external factors that contribute to the development and progress of alteration problems in the materials mentioned above. The presence of gaseous pollution in the air produces a negative interaction with the surface of the stained glass windows materials. Firstly, the stained glasses and the grisailles begin a dealkalinisation process and a silica gel layer is formed during the early contact between the glasses and the wet environment. After that, insoluble salt deposits and corrosion crusts are formed as a consequence of a deeper chemical attack which results in a depolymerisation of the glass network. The lead cames and the metallic support elements are also altered by weathering. Such materials are oxidized and both pits and crusts appear on their surfaces. The transport of ions and other substances from the corrosion crusts of the metallic elements gives rise new deposits upon the stained glasses, which could intensify their own degradation processes. The putty experiments a noticeable shrinkage and cracking. Likewise, adverse environmental conditions favour the transport of putty substances towards the other materials of the stained glass window, thereby increasing the crusts thickness and adding elements that contribute to the total alteration of the

  3. Working memory capacity predicts the beneficial effect of selective memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Andreas; Aslan, Alp; Holterman, Christoph; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2015-01-01

    Selective retrieval of some studied items can both impair and improve recall of the other items. This study examined the role of working memory capacity (WMC) for the two effects of memory retrieval. Participants studied an item list consisting of predefined target and nontarget items. After study of the list, half of the participants performed an imagination task supposed to induce a change in mental context, whereas the other half performed a counting task which does not induce such context change. Following presentation of a second list, memory for the original list's target items was tested, either with or without preceding retrieval of the list's nontarget items. Consistent with previous work, preceding nontarget retrieval impaired target recall in the absence of the context change, but improved target recall in its presence. In particular, there was a positive relationship between WMC and the beneficial, but not the detrimental effect of memory retrieval. On the basis of the view that the beneficial effect of memory retrieval reflects context-reactivation processes, the results indicate that individuals with higher WMC are better able to capitalise on retrieval-induced context reactivation than individuals with lower WMC.

  4. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  5. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  6. Effects of Cu substitution for Fe on the glass-forming ability and soft magnetic properties for Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, Lintao; Liu, Haishun; Hou, Long; Xue, Lin; Yang, Weiming; Zhao, Yucheng; Chang, Chuntao

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Cu substitution for Fe on the glass-forming ability (GFA) and soft magnetic properties for Fe 72−x Cu x B 20 Si 4 Nb 4 (x=0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are investigated. It is found that the investigated BMGs exhibit large GFA as well as excellent soft magnetic properties, and proper substitution of Fe by Cu improves the saturation magnetization, coercive force, and effective permeability without obvious deterioration of the GFA. - Highlights: • Fully glassy rods of Fe 72−x Cu x B 20 Si 4 Nb 4 BMGs were produced above 1 mm in diameter. • Investigated BMGs exhibit large glass-forming ability and excellent soft magnetic properties. • Proper Cu substitution improves magnetic properties without obvious deterioration of glass-forming ability

  7. Effects of deposited nuclear and electronic energy on the hardness of R7T7-type containment glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuget, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Batiment 166, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)]. E-mail: sylvain.peuget@cea.fr; Noel, P.-Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Batiment 166, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Loubet, J.-L. [Laboratoire de Tribologie et Dynamique des Systemes, UMR CNRS 5513, Ecole Centrale de Lyon 36, avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Pavan, S. [Laboratoire de Tribologie et Dynamique des Systemes, UMR CNRS 5513, Ecole Centrale de Lyon 36, avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Nivet, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Batiment 166, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Chenet, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Batiment 166, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2006-05-15

    The effects of elastic and inelastic interactions induced by cumulative alpha decay on the hardness of R7T7-type nuclear containment glass were investigated on actinide-doped glass specimens and by external irradiation of inactive glass by light and heavy ions. Vickers microindentation and nanoindentation hardness measurements showed that in the deposited energy range investigated (below 3 x 10{sup 22} keV/cm{sup 3}) inelastic effects have no influence on the plastic response of the glass. Conversely, identical hardness variations versus the nuclear energy deposited in the material were observed on curium-doped glass and on glass irradiated by ion bombardment. The observed hardness variation stabilized after the deposited energy reached about 3 x 10{sup 2} keV{sub nucl}/cm{sup 3}. These findings indicate that the change in the plastic response of the glass is a consequence of ballistic effects.

  8. Stress and Memory: Behavioral Effects and Neurobiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Pinelo-Nava

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a potent modulator of learning and memory processes. Although there have been a few attempts in the literature to explain the diversity of effects (including facilitating, impairing, and lack of effects described for the impact of stress on memory function according to single classification criterion, they have proved insufficient to explain the whole complexity of effects. Here, we review the literature in the field of stress and memory interactions according to five selected classifying factors (source of stress, stressor duration, stressor intensity, stressor timing with regard to memory phase, and learning type in an attempt to develop an integrative model to understand how stress affects memory function. Summarizing on those conditions in which there was enough information, we conclude that high stress levels, whether intrinsic (triggered by the cognitive challenge or extrinsic (induced by conditions completely unrelated to the cognitive task, tend to facilitate Pavlovian conditioning (in a linear-asymptotic manner, while being deleterious for spatial/explicit information processing (which with regard to intrinsic stress levels follows an inverted U-shape effect. Moreover, after reviewing the literature, we conclude that all selected factors are essential to develop an integrative model that defines the outcome of stress effects in memory processes. In parallel, we provide a brief review of the main neurobiological mechanisms proposed to account for the different effects of stress in memory function. Glucocorticoids were found as a common mediating mechanism for both the facilitating and impairing actions of stress in different memory processes and phases. Among the brain regions implicated, the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex were highlighted as critical for the mediation of stress effects.

  9. The effect of cannabis use on memory function: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoeler T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tabea Schoeler, Sagnik BhattacharyyaDepartment of Psychosis Studies, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UKAbstract: Investigating the effects of cannabis use on memory function appears challenging. While early observational investigations aimed to elucidate the longer-term effects of cannabis use on memory function in humans, findings remained equivocal and pointed to a pattern of interacting factors impacting on the relationship between cannabis use and memory function, rather than a simple direct effect of cannabis. Only recently, a clearer picture of the chronic and acute effects of cannabis use on memory function has emerged once studies have controlled for potential confounding factors and started to investigate the acute effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC and cannabidiol (CBD, the main ingredients in the extract of the cannabis plant in pharmacological challenge experiments. Relatively consistent findings have been reported regarding the acute impairments induced by a single dose of Δ9-THC on verbal and working memory. It is unclear whether they may persist beyond the intoxication state. In the long-term, these impairments seem particularly likely to manifest and may also persist following abstinence if regular and heavy use of cannabis strains high in Δ9-THC is started at an early age. Although still at an early stage, studies that employed advanced neuroimaging techniques have started to model the neural underpinnings of the effects of cannabis use and implicate a network of functional and morphological alterations that may moderate the effects of cannabis on memory function. Future experimental and epidemiological studies that take into consideration individual differences, particularly previous cannabis history and demographic characteristics, but also the precise mixture of the ingredients of the consumed cannabis are necessary to clarify the magnitude and the mechanisms by which cannabis

  10. Effect of Na{sub 2}O on aqueous dissolution of nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farooqi, Rahmat Ullah, E-mail: rufarooqi@live.com [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, 77 Cheongam-Ro, Nam-Gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Sodium oxide is present in the majority of commercial and waste glasses as a viscosity-reducing component. In some nuclear waste glasses, its source is the waste itself. As such, it can limit the waste loading because of its deleterious effect on the resistance of the glass to attack by aqueous media. The maximum tolerable content of Na{sub 2}O in glass depends on the presence and concentration of components that interact with it. To assess the acceptability limits of Na{sub 2}O in the composition region of nuclear waste glasses, we formulated 11 baseline compositions by varying the content of oxides of Si, B, Al, Ca, Zr, and Li. In each of these compositions, we varied the Na{sub 2}O fraction from 8–16 mass% to 23–30 mass%. To each of 146 glasses thus formulated, we applied the seven-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) to determine normalized B and Na releases (r{sub i}, where i ≡ B or Na). Fitting approximation functions ln(r{sub i}/gm{sup −2}) = Σb{sub ij}g{sub j} to r{sub i} data (g{sub j} is the j-th component mass fraction and b{sub ij} the corresponding component coefficient), we showed that the r{sub B} (and, consequently, the initial glass alteration rate) was proportional to the glass component mass fractions in the order Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}glass structure would fall apart or beyond which a continuous nondurable phase would be separated. Specific examples are given to demonstrate restrictions imposed on the boundary of the composition region of acceptable glasses by the maximum allowable r{sub B} and by the melt viscosity required for glass melter operation. Finally, the role that PCT data may play in understanding the evolution of the glass alteration process is discussed.

  11. Effects of entorhinal cortex lesions on memory in different tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Gutierrez-Figueroa

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of the entorhinal cortex produce retrograde memory impairment in both animals and humans. Here we report the effects of bilateral entorhinal cortex lesions caused by the stereotaxic infusion of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA in rats at two different moments, before or after the training session, on memory of different tasks: two-way shuttle avoidance, inhibitory avoidance and habituation to an open field. Pre- or post-training entorhinal cortex lesions caused an impairment of performance in the shuttle avoidance task, which agrees with the previously described role of this area in the processing of memories acquired in successive sessions. In the inhibitory avoidance task, only the post-training lesions had an effect (amnesia. No effect was observed on the open field task. The findings suggest that the role of the entorhinal cortex in memory processing is task-dependent, perhaps related to the complexity of each task

  12. Memory effects in attenuation and amplification quantum processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    With increasing communication rates via quantum channels, memory effects become unavoidable whenever the use rate of the channel is comparable to the typical relaxation time of the channel environment. We introduce a model of a bosonic memory channel, describing correlated noise effects in quantum-optical processes via attenuating or amplifying media. To study such a channel model, we make use of a proper set of collective field variables, which allows us to unravel the memory effects, mapping the n-fold concatenation of the memory channel to a unitarily equivalent, direct product of n single-mode bosonic channels. We hence estimate the channel capacities by relying on known results for the memoryless setting. Our findings show that the model is characterized by two different regimes, in which the cross correlations induced by the noise among different channel uses are either exponentially enhanced or exponentially reduced.

  13. Effect of Technetium-99 sources on its retention in low activity waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksic, Steven A.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Schweiger, Michael J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Lukens, Wayne; Kruger, Albert A.

    2018-05-01

    Small-scale crucible melting tests on simulated waste glass were performed with technetium-99 (Tc-99) introduced as different species in a representative low activity waste simulant. The glass saw an increase in Tc-99 retention when TcO2•2H2O and various Tc-minerals containing reduced tetravalent Tc were used compared to tests in which pertechnetate with heptavalent Tc was used. We postulate that the increase of Tc retention is likely caused by different reaction paths for Tc incorporation into glass during early stages of melting, rather than the low volatility of reduced tetravalent Tc compounds, which has been a generally accepted idea. Additional studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanisms relevant to the effect of reduced Tc compounds on Tc incorporation into or volatilization from the glass melt.

  14. Effect of the melting conditions on the properties of radiation color centers in lanthanum phosphate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetyan, G.O.; Rusan, V.V.; Yashchurzhinskaya, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate the spatial effects of ionizing radiation on the radiation processes in phosphate glasses to make a comparative estimate of the radiation yield from the radiation color centers (RCC) of different types. A study is made of their behavior under thermal decoloration. The results of a comparison of the integrated intensities of the ESR signal from trapping centers are given. The ESR spectrum of the glasses are presented--one differs slightly from the others. On the basis of the result of processing the ESR and optical spectra of gamma-irradiated lanthanum phosphate glasses synthesized under various conditions, the radiation yield of the RCC and the behavior of the intensity of their absorption under thermodecoloration are significantly affected by the conditions of synthesis of the glass.

  15. Effect of Technetium-99 Sources on Its Retention in Low Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksic, Steven A.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Schweiger, Michael J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2018-05-01

    Small-scale crucible melting tests on simulated waste glass were performed with technetium-99 (Tc-99) introduced as different species in a representative low activity waste simulant. The glass saw an increase in Tc-99 retention when TcO2∙2H2O and various Tc-minerals containing reduced tetravalent Tc were used compared to tests in which pertechnetate with hexavalent Tc was used. We postulate that the increase of Tc retention is likely caused by different reaction paths for Tc incorporation into glass during early stages of melting, rather than the low volatility of reduced tetravalent Tc compounds, which has been a generally accepted idea. Additional studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanisms relevant to the effect of reduced Tc compounds on Tc incorporation into or volatilization from glass melt.

  16. Effect of copper valence on the glass structure and crystallization behavior of Bi-Pb-Cu-O glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yi; Lin, U.-L.; Liu, N.-H.

    1997-01-01

    Bi 0.43 Pb 0.35 Cu 0.22 O y glasses with different Cu + contents were prepared by melting at different temperatures. The glass structure consists of [BiO 3 [ and [BiO 6 [ units and the ratio of [BiO 3 [/[BiO 6 [ increases with increasing Cu + content. The glass transition temperature, the first crystallization temperature peak, and the thermal stability of the glasses decreases with increasing Cu + content. The value of the activation energy, E a , varies as a function of the Cu + content. The crystallization mechanism in the glasses is closely related to the glass structure, which is mainly affected by the Cu + content. (orig.)

  17. Pharmacological effects of cannabinoids on learning and memory in Lymnaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunada, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Dai; Lee, Sangmin; Forest, Jeremy; Sakakibara, Manabu; Ito, Etsuro; Lukowiak, Ken

    2017-09-01

    Cannabinoids are hypothesized to play an important role in modulating learning and memory formation. Here, we identified mRNAs expressed in Lymnaea stagnalis central nervous system that encode two G-protein-coupled receptors ( Lymnaea CBr-like 1 and 2) that structurally resemble mammalian cannabinoid receptors (CBrs). We found that injection of a mammalian CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN 55) into the snail before operant conditioning obstructed learning and memory formation. This effect of WIN 55 injection persisted for at least 4 days following its injection. A similar obstruction of learning and memory occurred when a severe traumatic stimulus was delivered to L. stagnalis In contrast, injection of a mammalian CBr antagonist AM 251 enhanced long-term memory formation in snails and reduced the duration of the effects of the severe traumatic stressor on learning and memory. Neither WIN 55 nor AM 251 altered normal homeostatic aerial respiratory behaviour elicited in hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that putative cannabinoid receptors mediate stressful stimuli that alter learning and memory formation in Lymnaea This is also the first demonstration that putative CBrs are present in Lymnaea and play a key role in learning and memory formation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Effect of irradiation on differential thermal properties and crystallization behavior of some lithium borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Alaily, N.A.; Mohamed, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    Differential thermal properties and the crystallization behavior of binary system Li 2 O-B 2 O 3 glasses were investigated. The effects of the presence of oxides of aluminum, lead or one of the transition metals TiO 2 or V 2 O 5 or Fe 2 O 3 in the parent glass were also studied. The effects of three different heat treatments on the crystalline structure of all the studied glasses were also investigated. The results showed that all glass samples were amorphous before the heat treatment, with the most common formed phase being tetraborate Li 2 B 8 O 13 (Li 2 O-4B 2 O 3 ). The exposure of the glass samples to either gamma rays or fast neutrons resulted in considerable changes in their thermal behavior. The results also showed that T g increases for all studied glasses when subjected to irradiation either by fast neutron or gamma rays, while T c decreased only at higher doses

  19. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-01

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then β irradiated at different doses up to 10 9 Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe 3+ reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe 3+ amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h 0 /e-) consuming equilibrium. He + and Kr 3+ ions and γ irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  20. Effects of Micromachining Processes on Electro-Osmotic Flow Mobility of Glass Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Miki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Silica glass is frequently used as a device material for micro/nano fluidic devices due to its excellent properties, such as transparency and chemical resistance. Wet etching by hydrofluoric acid and dry etching by neutral loop discharge (NLD plasma etching are currently used to micromachine glass to form micro/nano fluidic channels. Electro-osmotic flow (EOF is one of the most effective methods to drive liquids into the channels. EOF mobility is affected by a property of the micromachined glass surfaces, which includes surface roughness that is determined by the manufacturing processes. In this paper, we investigate the effect of micromaching processes on the glass surface topography and the EOF mobility. We prepared glass surfaces by either wet etching or by NLD plasma etching, investigated the surface topography using atomic force microscopy, and attempted to correlate it with EOF generated in the micro-channels of the machined glass. Experiments revealed that the EOF mobility strongly depends on the surface roughness, and therefore upon the fabrication process used. A particularly strong dependency was observed when the surface roughness was on the order of the electric double layer thickness or below. We believe that the correlation described in this paper can be of great help in the design of micro/nano fluidic devices.

  1. Effect of ZnO on phase emergence, microstructure and surface modifications of calcium phosphosilicate glass/glass-ceramics having iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, K.; Dixit, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Jagannath [Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Deo, M.N. [High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kothiyal, G.P., E-mail: gpkoth@barc.gov.in [Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2010-03-01

    The effect of ZnO on phase emergence and microstructure properties of glass and glass-ceramics with composition 25SiO{sub 2}-50CaO-15P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(10 - x)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-xZnO (where x = 0, 2, 5, 7 mol%) has been studied. They have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface modifications of these glass-ceramics in simulated body fluid have been studied using Fourier transform infrared reflection spectroscopy (FTIR), XPS and SEM. Results have shown a decrease in the fraction of non-bridging oxygen with increase in zinc oxide content. Emergence of crystalline phases in glass-ceramics at different heat treatment temperatures was studied using XRD. When glass is heat treated at 800 deg. C calcium phosphate, hematite and magnetite are developed as major phases in the glass-ceramics samples with ZnO up to 5 mol%. In addition to these, calcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}) phase is also observed when glass is heat treated at 1000 deg. C. The microstructure of the glass-ceramics heat treated at 800 deg. C exhibits the formation of nano-size (40-50 nm) grains. On heat treatment at 1000 deg. C crystallites grow to above 50 nm size and more than one phase are observed in the microstructure. The formation of thin flake-like structure with coarse particles is observed at high zinc oxide concentration (x = 7 mol%). In vitro studies have shown the surface modifications and formation of Ca-P-rich layer on the glass-ceramics when immersed in simulated body fluids (SBF) for different durations. The bioactive response was found to depend on ZnO content.

  2. Effect of ZnO on phase emergence, microstructure and surface modifications of calcium phosphosilicate glass/glass-ceramics having iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, K.; Dixit, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Jagannath; Deo, M.N.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of ZnO on phase emergence and microstructure properties of glass and glass-ceramics with composition 25SiO 2 -50CaO-15P 2 O 5 -(10 - x)Fe 2 O 3 -xZnO (where x = 0, 2, 5, 7 mol%) has been studied. They have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface modifications of these glass-ceramics in simulated body fluid have been studied using Fourier transform infrared reflection spectroscopy (FTIR), XPS and SEM. Results have shown a decrease in the fraction of non-bridging oxygen with increase in zinc oxide content. Emergence of crystalline phases in glass-ceramics at different heat treatment temperatures was studied using XRD. When glass is heat treated at 800 deg. C calcium phosphate, hematite and magnetite are developed as major phases in the glass-ceramics samples with ZnO up to 5 mol%. In addition to these, calcium silicate (Ca 3 Si 2 O 7 ) phase is also observed when glass is heat treated at 1000 deg. C. The microstructure of the glass-ceramics heat treated at 800 deg. C exhibits the formation of nano-size (40-50 nm) grains. On heat treatment at 1000 deg. C crystallites grow to above 50 nm size and more than one phase are observed in the microstructure. The formation of thin flake-like structure with coarse particles is observed at high zinc oxide concentration (x = 7 mol%). In vitro studies have shown the surface modifications and formation of Ca-P-rich layer on the glass-ceramics when immersed in simulated body fluids (SBF) for different durations. The bioactive response was found to depend on ZnO content.

  3. Glucose enhancement of human memory: a comprehensive research review of the glucose memory facilitation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Riby, Leigh M; Eekelen, J Anke M van; Foster, Jonathan K

    2011-01-01

    The brain relies upon glucose as its primary fuel. In recent years, a rich literature has developed from both human and animal studies indicating that increases in circulating blood glucose can facilitate cognitive functioning. This phenomenon has been termed the 'glucose memory facilitation effect'. The purpose of this review is to discuss a number of salient studies which have investigated the influence of glucose ingestion on neurocognitive performance in individuals with (a) compromised neurocognitive capacity, as well as (b) normally functioning individuals (with a focus on research conducted with human participants). The proposed neurocognitive mechanisms purported to underlie the modulatory effect of glucose on neurocognitive performance will also be considered. Many theories have focussed upon the hippocampus, given that this brain region is heavily implicated in learning and memory. Further, it will be suggested that glucose is a possible mechanism underlying the phenomenon that enhanced memory performance is typically observed for emotionally laden stimuli. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of nanocrystallization on the electrical conductivity enhancement and Moessbauer hyperfine parameters of iron based glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Desoky, M.M., E-mail: mmdesoky@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, Al-Arish 45511, North Sinaa (Egypt); Ibrahim, F.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Suez Canal University, Al-Arish 45511, North Sinaa (Egypt); Mostafa, A.G.; Hassaan, M.Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Nasr City 11884, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    Selected glasses of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PbO{sub 2}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} system have been transformed into nanomaterials by annealing at temperature close to crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) for 1 h. The effects of the annealing of the present samples on its structural and electrical properties were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron micrograph (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and dc conductivity ({sigma}). Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in order to determine the states of iron and its hyperfine structure. The effect of nanocrystalization on the Moessbauer hyperfine parameters did not exhibit significant modifications in present glasses. However, in case of glass ceramic nanocrystals show a distinct decrease in the quadrupole splitting ({Delta}) is observed, reflecting an evident decrease in the distortion of structural units like FeO{sub 4} units. In general, the Moessbauer parameters of the nano-crystalline phase exhibit tendency to increase with PbO{sub 2} content. TEM of as-quenched glasses confirm the homogeneous and essentially featureless morphology. TEM of the corresponding glass ceramic nanocrystals indicates nanocrystals embedded in the glassy matrix with average particle size of about 32 nm. The crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) was observed to decrease with PbO{sub 2} content. The glass ceramic nanocrystals obtained by annealing at T{sub c} exhibit improvement of electrical conductivity up to four orders of magnitude than the starting glasses. This considerable improvement of electrical conductivity after nanocrystallization is attributed to formation of defective, well-conducting phases 'easy conduction paths' along the glass-crystallites interfaces.

  5. [Effects of false memories on the Concealed Information Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsu, Wataru

    2012-10-01

    The effects of false memories on polygraph examinations with the Concealed Information Test (CIT) were investigated by using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, which allows participants to evoke false memories. Physiological responses to questions consisting of learned, lure, and unlearned items were measured and recorded. The results indicated that responses to lure questions showed critical responses to questions about learned items. These responses included repression of respiration, an increase in electrodermal activity, and a drop in heart rate. These results suggest that critical response patterns are generated in the peripheral nervous system by true and false memories.

  6. Negative effects of item repetition on source memory

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyungmi; Yi, Do-Joon; Raye, Carol L.; Johnson, Marcia K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we explored how item repetition affects source memory for new item–feature associations (picture–location or picture–color). We presented line drawings varying numbers of times in Phase 1. In Phase 2, each drawing was presented once with a critical new feature. In Phase 3, we tested memory for the new source feature of each item from Phase 2. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated and replicated the negative effects of item repetition on incidental source memory. Prior item re...

  7. Interference and memory capacity effects in memristive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermiz, John; Chang, Ting; Du, Chao; Lu, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Short-term memory implies the existence of a capacity limit beyond which memory cannot be securely formed and retained. The underlying mechanisms are believed to be two primary factors: decay and interference. Here, we demonstrate through both simulation and experiment that the memory capacity effect can be implemented in a parallel memristor circuit, where decay and interference are achieved by the inherent ion diffusion in the device and the competition for current supply in the circuit, respectively. This study suggests it is possible to emulate high-level biological behaviors with memristor circuits and will stimulate continued studies on memristor-based neuromorphic circuits.

  8. Effect of glass-batch makeup on the melting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Humrickhouse, Carissa J.; Moody, J. Adam; Tate, Rachel M.; Rainsdon, Timothy T.; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Marcial, Jose; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Tincher, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 (micro)m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures 800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B 2 O 3 , CaO, Li 2 O, MgO, and Na 2 O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

  9. Effect Of Glass-Batch Makeup On The Melting Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.

    2010-01-01

    The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 (micro)m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures 800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B 2 O 3 , CaO, Li 2 O, MgO, and Na 2 O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

  10. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-14

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Q n distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3 B and 4 B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  11. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  12. Task-selective memory effects for successfully implemented encoding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshikar, Eric D; Duarte, Audrey; Hertzog, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Previous behavioral evidence suggests that instructed strategy use benefits associative memory formation in paired associate tasks. Two such effective encoding strategies--visual imagery and sentence generation--facilitate memory through the production of different types of mediators (e.g., mental images and sentences). Neuroimaging evidence suggests that regions of the brain support memory reflecting the mental operations engaged at the time of study. That work, however, has not taken into account self-reported encoding task success (i.e., whether participants successfully generated a mediator). It is unknown, therefore, whether task-selective memory effects specific to each strategy might be found when encoding strategies are successfully implemented. In this experiment, participants studied pairs of abstract nouns under either visual imagery or sentence generation encoding instructions. At the time of study, participants reported their success at generating a mediator. Outside of the scanner, participants further reported the quality of the generated mediator (e.g., images, sentences) for each word pair. We observed task-selective memory effects for visual imagery in the left middle occipital gyrus, the left precuneus, and the lingual gyrus. No such task-selective effects were observed for sentence generation. Intriguingly, activity at the time of study in the left precuneus was modulated by the self-reported quality (vividness) of the generated mental images with greater activity for trials given higher ratings of quality. These data suggest that regions of the brain support memory in accord with the encoding operations engaged at the time of study.

  13. Long-term memory, sleep, and the spacing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Matthew C; Kawadri, Nader; Simone, Patricia M; Wiseheart, Melody

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have shown that memory is enhanced when study sessions are spaced apart rather than massed. This spacing effect has been shown to have a lasting benefit to long-term memory when the study phase session follows the encoding session by 24 hours. Using a spacing paradigm we examined the impact of sleep and spacing gaps on long-term declarative memory for Swahili-English word pairs by including four spacing delay gaps (massed, 12 hours same-day, 12 hours overnight, and 24 hours). Results showed that a 12-hour spacing gap that includes sleep promotes long-term memory retention similar to the 24-hour gap. The findings support the importance of sleep to the long-term benefit of the spacing effect.

  14. False memory ≠ false memory: DRM errors are unrelated to the misinformation effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ost

    Full Text Available The DRM method has proved to be a popular and powerful, if controversial, way to study 'false memories'. One reason for the controversy is that the extent to which the DRM effect generalises to other kinds of memory error has been neither satisfactorily established nor subject to much empirical attention. In the present paper we contribute data to this ongoing debate. One hundred and twenty participants took part in a standard misinformation effect experiment, in which they watched some CCTV footage, were exposed to misleading post-event information about events depicted in the footage, and then completed free recall and recognition tests. Participants also completed a DRM test as an ostensibly unrelated filler task. Despite obtaining robust misinformation and DRM effects, there were no correlations between a broad range of misinformation and DRM effect measures (mean r  = -.01. This was not due to reliability issues with our measures or a lack of power. Thus DRM 'false memories' and misinformation effect 'false memories' do not appear to be equivalent.

  15. Effects of hepatic arterial yttrium 90 glass microspheres in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollner, I; Knutsen, C; Smith, P; Prieskorn, D; Chrisp, C; Andrews, J; Juni, J; Warber, S; Klevering, J; Crudup, J

    1988-04-01

    A 22-micron glass microsphere called TheraSphere (Theragenics Corp., Atlanta, GA) has been developed in which yttrium 89 oxide is incorporated into the glass matrix and is activated by neutron bombardment to form the beta-emitting isotope yttrium 90 (Y 90) before using the spheres as radiotherapeutic vehicles. The injection of up to 12 times (on a liver weight basis) the anticipated human dose of nonradioactive TheraSphere into the hepatic arteries of dogs was well tolerated and produced clinically silent alterations within centrolobular areas. The hepatic arterial (HA) injection of radioactive TheraSphere also produced portal changes similar to those observed in humans after external beam therapy. While the extent of damage increased with the delivered dose, radiation exposures in excess of 30,000 cGy did not cause total hepatic necrosis and were compatible with survival. No microspheres distributed to the bone marrow and absolutely no myelosuppression was encountered in any animal. Proposed hepatic exposures to humans of 5000 to 10,000 cGy by means of these microspheres, therefore, would appear to be feasible and tolerable. Radiotherapeutic microsphere administration preceded by regional infusion of a radiosensitizing agent and/or immediately following the redistribution of blood flow toward intrahepatic tumor by vasoactive agents can potentially yield a synergistic, highly selective attack on tumors confined to the liver.

  16. Memory Color Effect Induced by Familiarity of Brand Logos

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Atsushi; Wada, Yuji; Masuda, Tomohiro; Goto, Sho-ichi; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Hibino, Haruo; Cai, Dongsheng; Dan, Ippeita

    2013-01-01

    Background When people are asked to adjust the color of familiar objects such as fruits until they appear achromatic, the subjective gray points of the objects are shifted away from the physical gray points in a direction opposite to the memory color (memory color effect). It is still unclear whether the discrepancy between memorized and actual colors of objects is dependent on the familiarity of the objects. Here, we conducted two experiments in order to examine the relationship between the ...

  17. Size and pressure effects on glass transition temperature of poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, X.Y.; Zhang, G.H.; Lian, J.S.; Jiang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    A simple and unified model, without any adjustable parameter, is developed for size and pressure effects on glass transition temperatures of nanopolymers. The model is based on a model for size dependent glass transition temperature of nanopolymer glasses under ambient pressure, and a pressure-dependent function of the root of mean-square displacement of atom vibration. It is found that the size- and pressure-dependent glass transition temperatures of free-standing films or supported films having weak interaction with substrates decreases with decreasing of pressure and size. However, the glass transition temperature of supported films having strong interaction with substrates increases with the increase of pressure and the decrease of size. The predicted results correspond with available experimental evidences for atactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under hydrostatic pressure or under the pressure induced by supercritical fluid CO 2 . In addition, the predicted glass transition temperature of isotactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under ambient pressure is consistent with available experimental evidences

  18. The composition effect on the long-term corrosion of high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Waste glass can be optimized for long-term corrosion behavior if the key parameters that control the rate of corrosion are identified, measured, and modeled as functions of glass composition. Second-order polynomial models have been used to optimize glass with respect to a set of requirements on glass properties, such as viscosity and outcomes of standard corrosion tests. Extensive databases exist for the 7-day Product Consistency Test and the 28-day Materials Characterization Center tests, which have been used for nuclear waste glasses in the United States. Models based on these tests are reviewed and discussed to demonstrate the compositional effects on the extent of corrosion under specified conditions. However, modeling the rate of corrosion is potentially more useful for predicting long-term behavior than modeling the extent of corrosion measured by standard tests. Based on an experimental study of two glasses, it is shown that the rate of corrosion can be characterized by simple functions with physically meaningful coefficients. (author)

  19. Effect of incorporation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on mechanical properties of conventional glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahandeh, Narges; Torabzadeh, Hassan; Aghaee, Mohammadamin; Hasani, Elham; Safa, Saeed

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the physical properties of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs) compared to GICs supplemented with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanofiller particles at 5% (w/w). In this in vitro study, ZnO nanoparticles of different morphologies (nanospherical, nanorod, and nanoflower) were incorporated to glass ionomer powder. The samples were subjected to the flexural strength ( n = 20) and surface hardness test ( n = 12) using a universal testing machine and a Vickers hardness machine, respectively. Surface analysis and crystal structure of samples were performed with scanning electron microscope and X-radiation diffraction, respectively. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Shapiro-Wilk, and Tukey's tests ( P glass ionomer containing nanoparticles was not significantly different from the control group ( P > 0.05). The surface hardness of the glass ionomer containing nanospherical or nanoflower ZnO was significantly lower than the control group ( P glass ionomer containing nanorod ZnO was not significantly different from the control group ( P = 0.868). Incorporation of nanospherical and nanoflower ZnO to glass ionomer decreased their surface hardness, without any changes on their flexural strength. Incorporation of nanorod ZnO particles caused no effect on the mechanical properties.

  20. Effect of Crushed Glass Cullet Sizes on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Red Clay Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ponce Peña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the effect of clear waste glass from bottles added on 20 to 30 wt.% and variable particle size (<500, <300, and <212 μm, into clay mixtures for the handmade brick manufacturing process. The bricks were manufactured with mixtures of clay, crushed glass, and water in different proportions, homogenized, casted in wooden molds, air-dried at room temperature for 72 h, and sintered at 1000°C for 12 h. Total shrinkage, water absorption, compressive strength, microstructure, and phase composition are discussed with respect to glass content and its particle size. The results indicate that increasing the content of glass and decreasing its particle size enhanced significantly the brick properties of water absorption and compressive strength by up to 18.5% and 6.8 MPa, for bricks with 30 wt% and particle size lower than 212 μm. It is proposed that decreasing the glass particle size its surface area increases allowing easier melting of glass by lower energy consumption, reducing porosity and enhancing brick properties.

  1. Low-level lead exposure effects on spatial reference memory and working memory in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhua Yang; Ping Zhou; Yonghui Li

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that lead exposure can result in cognitive dysfunction and behavior disorders. However, lead exposure impairments vary under different experimental conditions.OBJECTIVE: To detect changes in spatial learning and memory following low-level lead exposure in rats, in Morris water maze test under the same experimental condition used to analyze lead exposure effects on various memory types and learning processes.DESIGN AND SETTING: The experiment was conducted at the Animal Laboratory, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Science between February 2005 and March 2006. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and behavioral observations were performed.MATERIALS: Sixteen male, healthy, adult, Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into normal control and lead exposure groups (n = 8).METHODS: Rats in the normal control group were fed distilled water, and those in the lead exposure group were fed 250 mL of 0.05% lead acetate once per day. At day 28, all rats performed the Morris water maze test, consisting of four phases: space navigation, probe test, working memory test, and visual cue test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Place navigation in the Morris water maze was used to evaluate spatial learning and memory, probe trials for spatial reference memory, working memory test for spatial working memory, and visual cue test for non-spatial cognitive function. Perkin-Elmer Model 300 Atomic Absorption Spectrometer was utilized to determine blood lead levels in rats.RESULTS: (1) In the working memory test, the time to reach the platform remained unchanged between the control and lead exposure groups (F(1,1) = 0.007, P = 0.935). A visible decrease in escape latencies was observed in each group (P = 0.028). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups (F(1,1) = 1.869, P = 0.193). The working memory probe test demonstrated no change between the two groups in the time spent in the target quadrant during the working memory probe test

  2. The sky pattern of the linearized gravitational memory effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mädler, Thomas; Winicour, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational memory effect leads to a net displacement in the relative positions of test particles. This memory is related to the change in the strain of the gravitational radiation field between infinite past and infinite future retarded times. There are three known sources of the memory effect: (i) the loss of energy to future null infinity by massless fields or particles, (ii) the ejection of massive particles to infinity from a bound system and (iii) homogeneous, source-free gravitational waves. In the context of linearized theory, we show that asymptotic conditions controlling these known sources of the gravitational memory effect rule out any other possible sources with physically reasonable stress–energy tensors. Except for the source-free gravitational waves, the two other known sources produce gravitational memory with E -mode radiation strain, characterized by a certain curl-free sky pattern of their polarization. Thus our results show that the only known source of B -mode gravitational memory is of primordial origin, corresponding in the linearized theory to a homogeneous wave entering from past null infinity. (paper)

  3. The emotional carryover effect in memory for words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stephen R; Schmidt, Constance R

    2016-08-01

    Emotional material rarely occurs in isolation; rather it is experienced in the spatial and temporal proximity of less emotional items. Some previous researchers have found that emotional stimuli impair memory for surrounding information, whereas others have reported evidence for memory facilitation. Researchers have not determined which types of emotional items or memory tests produce effects that carry over to surrounding items. Six experiments are reported that measured carryover from emotional words varying in arousal to temporally adjacent neutral words. Taboo, non-taboo emotional, and neutral words were compared using different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), recognition and recall tests, and intentional and incidental memory instructions. Strong emotional memory effects were obtained in all six experiments. However, emotional items influenced memory for temporally adjacent words under limited conditions. Words following taboo words were more poorly remembered than words following neutral words when relatively short SOAs were employed. Words preceding taboo words were affected only when recall tests and relatively short retention intervals were used. These results suggest that increased attention to the emotional items sometimes produces emotional carryover effects; however, retrieval processes also contribute to retrograde amnesia and may extend the conditions under which anterograde amnesia is observed.

  4. Effect of in vitro degradation of poly(D,L-lactide)/beta-tricalcium composite on its shape-memory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Shaobing; Yu, Xiongjun; Li, Xiaohong; Feng, Bo; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie

    2008-07-01

    The in vitro degradation characteristic and shape-memory properties of poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) composites were investigated because of their wide application in biomedical fields. In this article, PDLLA and crystalline beta-TCP were compounded and interesting shape-memory behaviors of the composite were first investigated. Then, in vitro degradation of the PDLLA/beta-TCP composites with weight ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1 was performed in phosphate buffer saline solution (PBS) (154 mM, pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C. The effect of in vitro degradation time for PDLLA/beta-TCP composites on shape-memory properties was studied by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The changes of structural morphology, glass transition temperature (T(g)), molecular weight, and weight loss of composites matrix and pH change of degradation medium indicated that shape-memory effects at different degradation time were nonlinearly influenced because of the breaking down of polymer chain and the formation of degradation products. Furthermore, the results from XRD and FTIR implied that the degradation products, for example, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO(4)), and calcium pyrophosphate (Ca(2)P(2)O(7)) phases also had some effects on shape-memory properties during the degradation. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Is the Glass Half Full or Half Empty? How to Reverse the Effect of Glass Elongation on the Volume Poured

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caljouw, Simone R.; van Wijck, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the volume of drinks and the risk of overconsumption, health professionals recommend the use of tall skinny instead of short wide glasses. Yet the results of the present study contradict this health advice. Participants who generously filled up a glass with lemonade served 9% more in tall

  6. Effects of Nanodiamond Abrasive Friability in Experimental MR Fluids with Phosphate Laser Glass LHG-8 and Other Optical Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Spencer, K.E.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2005-09-22

    Research is currently being conducted to better understand the role that nanodiamond abrasives play in the removal process of Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF). The following presents removal rate data for a set of six optical glasses that were spotted (not polished out) with four different MR fluids, as well as texturing/smoothing data for phosphate laser glass LHG-8.

  7. Experimental Investigations on the effect of Additive on the Tensile Properties of Fiber Glass Fabric Lamina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava Sai Divya, A.; Raghu Kumar, B., Dr; Lakshmi Narayana, G., Dr

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the effect of additives on tensile behaviour of fiber glass fabric at lamina level to explore an alternative skin material for the outer body of aerospace applications and machines. This experimental work investigates the effect of silica concentration in epoxy resin lapox L-12 on the tensile properties of glass fabric lamina of 4H-satin weave having 3.6 mm thickness. The lamina was prepared by using hand lay-up method and tests were conducted on it. Various tensile properties values obtained from experimentation were compared for four glass fiber lamina composites fabricated by adding the silica powder to resin bath. The effect of variations in silica concentration (0% SiO2, 5% SiO2, 10% SiO2 and 15% SiO2) on the tensile properties of prepared material revealed that maximum stiffness was obtained at 15% and yield strength at 10% SiO2 concentration in glass fiber lamina. Increasing the silica concentration beyond 10% had led to deterioration in the material properties. The experimentation that was carried out on test specimen was reasonably successful as the effect of silica powder as an additive in glass fiber lamina enhanced the mechanical properties up to certain limit. The underpinning microscopic behaviour at the source of these observations will be investigated in a follow up work.

  8. Coaching positively influences the effects of working memory training on visual working memory as well as mathematical ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelwan, Michel; Vissers, Constance; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H

    2018-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to test whether the amount of coaching influenced the results of working memory training on both visual and verbal working memory. Additionally, the effects of the working memory training on the amount of progress after specific training in mathematics were evaluated. In this study, 23 children between 9 and 12 years of age with both attentional and mathematical difficulties participated in a working memory training program with a high amount of coaching, while another 25 children received no working memory training. Results of these groups were compared to 21 children who completed the training with a lower amount of coaching. The quality of working memory, as well as mathematic skills, were measured three times using untrained transfer tasks. Bayesian statistics were used to test informative hypotheses. After receiving working memory training, the highly coached group performed better than the group that received less coaching on visual working memory and mathematics, but not on verbal working memory. The highly coached group retained their advantage in mathematics, even though the effect on visual working memory decreased. However, no added effect of working memory training was found on the learning curve during mathematical training. Moreover, the less-coached group was outperformed by the group that did not receive working memory training, both in visual working memory and mathematics. These results suggest that motivation and proper coaching might be crucial for ensuring compliance and effects of working memory training, and that far transfer might be possible. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of tunnel oxide process on SONOS flash memory characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dong Hua; Park, Il Han; Yun, Jang-Gn; Park, Byung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, various process conditions of tunnel oxides are applied in SONOS flash memory to investigate their effects on charge transport during the program/erase operations. We focus the key point of analysis on Fermi-level (E F ) variation at the interface of silicon substrate and tunnel oxide. The Si-O chemical bonding information which describes the interface oxidation states at the Si/SiO 2 is obtained by the core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Moreover, relative E F position is determined by measuring the Si 2p energy shift from XPS spectrums. Experimental results from memory characteristic measurement show that MTO tunnel oxide structure exhibits faster erase speed, and larger memory window during P/E cycle compared to FTO and RTO tunnel oxide structures. Finally, we examine long-term charge retention characteristic and find that the memory windows of all the capacitors remain wider than 2 V after 10 5 s.

  10. Marijuana effects on long-term memory assessment and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darley, C F; Tinklenberg, J R; Roth, W T; Vernon, S; Kopell, B S

    1977-05-09

    The ability of 16 college-educated male subjects to recall from long-term memory a series of common facts was tested during intoxication with marijuana extract calibrated to 0.3 mg/kg delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and during placebo conditions. The subjects' ability to assess their memory capabilities was then determined by measuring how certain they were about the accuracy of their recall performance and by having them predict their performance on a subsequent recognition test involving the same recall items. Marijuana had no effect on recall or recognition performance. These results do not support the view that marijuana provides access to facts in long-term storage which are inaccessible during non-intoxication. During both marijuana and placebo conditions, subjects could accurately predict their recognition memory performance. Hence, marijuana did not alter the subjects' ability to accurately assess what information resides in long-term memory even though they did not have complete access to that information.

  11. A facilitative effect of negative affective valence on working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Fumiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Olofsson, Ulrich

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that negatively valenced information impaired working memory performance due to an attention-capturing effect. The present study examined whether negative valence could also facilitate working memory. Affective words (negative, neutral, positive) were used as retro-cues in a working memory task that required participants to remember colors at different spatial locations on a computer screen. Following the cue, a target detection task was used to either shift attention to a different location or keep attention at the same location as the retro-cue. Finally, participants were required to discriminate the cued color from a set of distractors. It was found that negative cues yielded shorter response times (RTs) in the attention-shift condition and longer RTs in the attention-stay condition, compared with neutral and positive cues. The results suggest that negative affective valence may enhance working memory performance (RTs), provided that attention can be disengaged.

  12. Control of crack pattern using memory effect of paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Akio; Shinohara, Yuu; Matsuo, Yousuke

    2011-01-01

    A densely packed colloidal suspension, called as a paste, remembers the direction of external mechanical fields, such as flow and vibration. When the pastes are dried, memories in pastes are visualized as macroscopically anisotropic crack patterns, such as lamellar, radial, ring and spiral. Here, we experimentally investigate how pastes remember such experiences by using paste with different size distribution of colloidal particles. We find that a paste with smaller particles have a better memory, in the sense it remembers external mechanical fields at smaller solid volume fraction, which implies that interparticle forces between colloidal particles play an important role in memory effects, causing a quantitative change in the phase diagram for the same material. This result supports the hypothesis that memories in pastes are maintained as microscopically anisotropic network structure of colloidal particles, connected via interparticle forces between colloidal particles, such as van der Waals interaction.

  13. Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Wager, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    This chapter will explore a response to traumatic victimisation which has divided the opinions of psychologists at an exponential rate. We will be examining amnesia for memories of childhood sexual abuse and the potential to recover these memories in adulthood. Whilst this phenomenon is generally accepted in clinical circles, it is seen as highly contentious amongst research psychologists, particularly experimental cognitive psychologists. The chapter will begin with a real case study of a wo...

  14. Effects of modality and repetition in a continuous recognition memory task: Repetition has no effect on auditory recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir Kassim, Azlina; Rehman, Rehan; Price, Jessica M

    2018-04-01

    Previous research has shown that auditory recognition memory is poorer compared to visual and cross-modal (visual and auditory) recognition memory. The effect of repetition on memory has been robust in showing improved performance. It is not clear, however, how auditory recognition memory compares to visual and cross-modal recognition memory following repetition. Participants performed a recognition memory task, making old/new discriminations to new stimuli, stimuli repeated for the first time after 4-7 intervening items (R1), or repeated for the second time after 36-39 intervening items (R2). Depending on the condition, participants were either exposed to visual stimuli (2D line drawings), auditory stimuli (spoken words), or cross-modal stimuli (pairs of images and associated spoken words). Results showed that unlike participants in the visual and cross-modal conditions, participants in the auditory recognition did not show improvements in performance on R2 trials compared to R1 trials. These findings have implications for pedagogical techniques in education, as well as for interventions and exercises aimed at boosting memory performance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Modality-Match Effect in Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Osborn, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    The modality-match effect in recognition refers to superior memory for words presented in the same modality at study and test. Prior research on this effect is ambiguous and inconsistent. The present study demonstrates that the modality-match effect is found when modality is rendered salient at either encoding or retrieval. Specifically, in…

  16. Effects of radionuclide decay on waste glass behavior: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    This paper is an extension of a chapter in an earlier report [1] that provides an updated review on the status of radiation damage problems in nuclear waste glasses. This report will focus on radiation effects on vitrified borosilicate nuclear waste glasses under conditions expected in the proposed Yucca mountain repository. Radiation effects on high-level waste glasses and their surrounding repository environment are important considerations for radionuclide immobilization because of the potential to alter the glass stability and thereby influence the radionuclide retentive properties of this waste form. The influence of radionuclide decay on vitrified nuclear waste may be manifested by several changes, including volume, stored energy, structure, microstructure, mechanical properties, and phase separation. Radiation may also affect the composition of aqueous fluids and atmospheric gases in relatively close proximity to the waste form. What is important to the radionuclide retentive properties of the repository is how these radiation effects collectively or individually influence the durability and radionuclide release from the glass in the event of liquid water contact

  17. Analyses of glass transition phenomena by solving differential equation with delay effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, A.; Inoue, A.

    2007-01-01

    A linear differential equation for the analyses of glass transition phenomena has been proposed by taking into account the delay effect due to the change in transportation of atoms near the glass transition temperature (T g ). Under the condition maintaining the order of the differential equation as the second, the non-linear differential equation proposed by Van Den Beukel and Sietsma is modified to obtain the analytic solution for a linear equation by introducing the following points: the delay effect which is described with a term of Mackey-Glass model, a concept of effective free volume (x fe eff ) and its concentration expression (C fe eff ) which correspond to the equilibrium, and an additional term associated with C fe eff . In analyzing the linear equation, Doyle's p-function was used for the integral of reaction rate with respect to temperature (T). It is found that the linear equation proposed in the present study can describe the changes in free volume (x) with increasing temperature in the dx/dT-T chart, the sharp increase in free volume at T g , and over shooting phenomena of free volume slightly above the T g , as experimentally in thermal analyses for metallic glasses. The linear solution obtained in the present study is of great importance for the analyses of the glass transition because the change in free volume with increasing temperature on heating is described with fundamental functions

  18. Effects of partitioned enthalpy of mixing on glass-forming ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wen-Xiong; Zhao, Shi-Jin, E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Science, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2015-04-14

    We explore the inherent reason at atomic level for the glass-forming ability of alloys by molecular simulation, in which the effect of partitioned enthalpy of mixing is studied. Based on Morse potential, we divide the enthalpy of mixing into three parts: the chemical part (Δ E{sub nn}), strain part (Δ E{sub strain}), and non-bond part (Δ E{sub nnn}). We find that a large negative Δ E{sub nn} value represents strong AB chemical bonding in AB alloy and is the driving force to form a local ordered structure, meanwhile the transformed local ordered structure needs to satisfy the condition (Δ E{sub nn}/2 + Δ E{sub strain}) < 0 to be stabilized. Understanding the chemical and strain parts of enthalpy of mixing is helpful to design a new metallic glass with a good glass forming ability. Moreover, two types of metallic glasses (i.e., “strain dominant” and “chemical dominant”) are classified according to the relative importance between chemical effect and strain effect, which enriches our knowledge of the forming mechanism of metallic glass. Finally, a soft sphere model is established, different from the common hard sphere model.

  19. Effect of Water Glass Modification on Its Viscosity and Wettability of Quartz Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kmita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a modifier for water glass. The method of thermal generation of metal oxide nanoparticleswas adapted and used in the research. Nanoparticles of ZnO from the thermal decomposition of basic zinc carbonate were used. A methodfor the modifier introduction was developed, and the effect of modifier content and organic solvent type on the physico-chemicalproperties of binder (viscosity and quartz wettability was determined. Binder viscosity was examined from the flow curves plotted with the help of a RHEOTEST 2 rotational rheometer equipped with proper software. Quartz wettability was determined examining timerelated changes in the value of the contact angle in a quartz-binder system, until full stabilisation of the angle value has been achieved.Binder modification was carried out on sodium water glass designated as R"145". The water glass modifiers were suspensions of ZnOnanoparticles in propanol and methanol at a fixed concentration of c = 0.3 M and with the size of nanoparticles comprised in a range of. Water glass modification with the suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in methanol and propanol showed the effect ofmodifier on the water glass viscosity and quartz wettability. This effect depends on the type of alcohol used. The ZnO suspension inpropanol (alcohol with a longer hydrocarbon chain affects more strongly the viscosity of binder and quartz wettability than the methanol suspension.

  20. Effect of Water Glass Modification on Its Viscosity and Wettability of Quartz Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kmita A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a modifier for water glass. The method of thermal generation of metal oxide nanoparticles was adapted and used in the research. Nanoparticles of ZnO from the thermal decomposition of basic zinc carbonate were used. A method for the modifier introduction was developed, and the effect of modifier content and organic solvent type on the physico-chemical properties of binder (viscosity and quartz wettability was determined. Binder viscosity was examined from the flow curves plotted with the help of a RHEOTEST 2 rotational rheometer equipped with proper software. Quartz wettability was determined examining timerelated changes in the value of the contact angle in a quartz-binder system, until full stabilisation of the angle value has been achieved. Binder modification was carried out on sodium water glass designated as R"145". The water glass modifiers were suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in propanol and methanol at a fixed concentration of c = 0.3 M and with the size of nanoparticles comprised in a range of . Water glass modification with the suspensions of ZnO nanoparticles in methanol and propanol showed the effect of modifier on the water glass viscosity and quartz wettability. This effect depends on the type of alcohol used. The ZnO suspension in propanol (alcohol with a longer hydrocarbon chain affects more strongly the viscosity of binder and quartz wettability than the methanol suspension

  1. Effect of discrete glass fibers on the behavior of R.C. Beams exposed to fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Riad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding discrete glass fibers on the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC beams under different fire and cooling conditions. Eighteen beams with different concrete compressive strengths were tested to study the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC beams containing discrete glass fibers when exposed to different fire and cooling conditions. Nine beams were prepared from normal strength concrete (NSC with compressive strength equal to 35 MPa while the other beams were prepared from high strength concrete (HSC with compressive strength equal to 60 MPa. The beams contained different contents of discrete glass fibers. The modes of failure of tested specimens show that the crack patterns change according to fire condition and fiber content. Analysis of test results show that adding discrete glass fibers to NSC increased the residual stiffness of the tested specimens after firing and decreased the rate of the deflection gain during firing. Also adding fibers to concrete has a limited positive effect on the ultimate strength of the specimens compared to the control specimens. Its effect on deflection due to fire is more pronounced. Finally, the recommended optimum ratio of discrete glass fibers is not more than 0.5% of the total concrete weight.

  2. Effect of water table dynamics on land surface hydrologic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S.

    2010-11-01

    The representation of groundwater dynamics in land surface models has received considerable attention in recent years. Most studies have found that soil moisture increases after adding a groundwater component because of the additional supply of water to the root zone. However, the effect of groundwater on land surface hydrologic memory (persistence) has not been explored thoroughly. In this study we investigate the effect of water table dynamics on National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model hydrologic simulations in terms of land surface hydrologic memory. Unlike soil water or evapotranspiration, results show that land surface hydrologic memory does not always increase after adding a groundwater component. In regions where the water table level is intermediate, land surface hydrologic memory can even decrease, which occurs when soil moisture and capillary rise from groundwater are not in phase with each other. Further, we explore the hypothesis that in addition to atmospheric forcing, groundwater variations may also play an important role in affecting land surface hydrologic memory. Analyses show that feedbacks of groundwater on land surface hydrologic memory can be positive, negative, or neutral, depending on water table dynamics. In regions where the water table is shallow, the damping process of soil moisture variations by groundwater is not significant, and soil moisture variations are mostly controlled by random noise from atmospheric forcing. In contrast, in regions where the water table is very deep, capillary fluxes from groundwater are small, having limited potential to affect soil moisture variations. Therefore, a positive feedback of groundwater to land surface hydrologic memory is observed in a transition zone between deep and shallow water tables, where capillary fluxes act as a buffer by reducing high-frequency soil moisture variations resulting in longer land surface hydrologic memory.

  3. Study of radiation effects on some glasses and their applications in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, A.El.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis comprises a study of the X-ray diffraction, thermal, electrical, ESR and optical properties of lead lithium tetra borate glass. The objective of this thesis is to prepare glass dosimeter and study the effect of several gamma-irradiation doses on Lead lithium tetra borate glasses doped with Cu O. The two glasses were prepared from chemical reagents; Li 2 B 4 O 7 from ready package, lead and copper oxide were added in fixed Proportions. The glass melting was made in porcelain crucibles, using electrically heated furnace at temperature of 1000 -1100 degree C. The melts rapidly quenched in air by pressing between two stainless-steel plates mould kept at room temperature. The resultant glasses were colorless for LPTB and transparent greenish sheet of LPTB Cu glass about 0.8 mm thick and where polished to meet the requirements for optical and electrical measurements. The obtained results can be summarized as follows:- Density It is observed that, for unirradiated samples, the addition of copper to LPTB leads to the increase of the number of ions in the sample which decreases the inter-ionic distance. As a result, the molar volume of LPTB Cu decreased and consequently its density increased in the range of 10 ± 1 %. Irradiation with gamma rays is assumed to create displacements, electronic defects and /or breaks in the network bonds. Irradiation can cause the compaction of B 2 O 3 by breaking of the bonds between trigonal elements, allowing the formation of different configuration. Irradiating the LPTB glass with growing gamma doses up to 25 kGy decreased its molar volume with in 4.07 % and consequently increased the density with the same percentage. For the glass LPTB Cu, the effect of gamma rays appeared as a decrease in the molar volume and increase in density with the same percentage (12.9%). The addition traces of copper (0.01 weight %) to LPTB enhanced the effect of gamma radiation on it. Crystallization Behavior: - X-ray diffraction The results show

  4. The effect of rotational viscosity on the memory effect in ferroelectric liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, S.; Thakur, A.K.; Chauhan, R.; Bawa, S.S.; Biradar, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Memory effect in deformed helix ferroelectric liquid crystal (DHFLC) is not a new phenomenon. Although it was reported 12 years ago yet its exact physical behavior is not explained. It has been thought by various researchers all over the world that it might be a transient memory effect. In the present study, it has been observed and predicted that memory effect is of long duration and shows remarkable dependencies on the voltage and frequency of the driving electrical pulse, which is entirely different from the memory effect in surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal (SSFLC). The memory effect in SSFLC is primarily due to surface effect but in DHFLC, its ultra-short pitch plays a dominant role. So, it has been observed that the memory effect in DHFLC is due to its high viscosity and inter/intra layer dipolar interactions

  5. Effect of the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey fraction on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debure, M.; Frugier, P.; GIN, S.; De Windt, L.; Michau, N.

    2012-01-01

    easily exchangeable Mg and to check whether remaining Mg, especially structural Mg could still feed the solution. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the exchangeable cation population after treatment were measured by the cobaltihexamine test, indicating an enrichment of Na (from 14% to 79% in equivalents) of the exchangeable population at the expense of Ca (from 50% to 4%), Mg (from 15% to 6%) and K (from 18% to 7%) compared to the pristine clay-stone. Synthetic borosilicate Mg-free glasses were used as simplified references of the French nuclear glass R7T7. Batch experiments were performed in closed system at 90 deg. C during 150 days. The clay/glass (C/G) weight ratio ranged from 0.01 to 100 for a liquid/solid (L/S) weight ratio of 20. The specific surface was estimated to be around 0.06 m 2 /g and 100 m 2 /g for the glass powder and the clayey fraction, respectively. Chemical analysis of the batch solutions were carried out with time, as well as XRD, SEM and TOF-SIMS analysis of the solids after completion of the batch experiments. Modeling was performed with the GRAAL kinetic model of glass dissolution that considers elements and water diffusion in the alteration layer (Frugier et al., 2008), implemented within the reactive transport code HYTEC (van der Lee et al., 2003). The experiments showed that the higher the clay/glass ratio, the lower the pH 90deg.C and the higher the glass alteration. As shown in Fig. 1, the pH 90deg.C varied from 8.9 for the lowest clay/glass proportion (C/G 1) to 5.4 for the highest one (C/G = 100). The corresponding mean glass dissolution rates are 15 nm/d and 300 nm/d, respectively. A batch test performed with the sole clayey fraction in pure water yielded a pH 90deg.C of 5.2, whereas the test made with the glass alone led to a pH 90deg.C around 9. The main effect of the clayey fraction in the batch tests seems to drop the pH down to more acidic values that concentrations of B (a tracer of the glass alteration) on the one hand, and of

  6. Bioactive glass particulate filler composite: Effect of coupling of fillers and filler loading on some physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Onur; Lassila, Lippo V; Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silanization of biostable and bioactive glass fillers in a polymer matrix on some of the physical properties of the composite. The water absorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness of different particulate filler composite resins were studied in vitro. Five different specimen groups were analyzed: A glass-free control, a non-silanized bioactive glass, a silanized bioactive glass, a non-silanized biostable glass and a silanized biostable glass groups. All of these five groups were further divided into sub-groups of dry and water-stored materials, both of them containing groups with 3wt%, 6wt%, 9wt% or 12wt% of glass particles (n=8 per group). The silanization of the glass particles was carried out with 2% of gamma-3-methacryloxyproyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). For the water absorption and solubility tests, the test specimens were stored in water for 60 days, and the percentages of weight change were statistically analyzed. Flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness values were tested with a three-point bending test and statistically analyzed. Higher solubility values were observed in non-silanized glass in proportion to the percentage of glass particles. Silanization, on the other hand, decreased the solubility values of both types of glass particles and polymer. While 12wt% non-silanized bioactive glass specimens showed -0.98wt% solubility, 12wt% silanized biostable glass specimens were observed to have only -0.34wt% solubility. The three-point bending results of the dry specimens showed that flexural strength, toughness and flexural modulus decreased in proportion to the increase of glass fillers. The control group presented the highest results (106.6MPa for flexural strength, 335.7kPA for toughness, 3.23GPa for flexural modulus), whereas for flexural strength and toughness, 12wt% of non-silanized biostable glass filler groups presented the lowest (70.3MPa for flexural strength

  7. The effects of carbon nanotubes on electroactive shape-memory behaviors of hydro-epoxy/carbon black composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Kun; Zhu, Guangming; Tang, Yusheng; Liu, Tingting; Li, Ximin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize the effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the thermomechanical, electrical and shape-memory properties of hydro-epoxy/carbon black (CB) composite. The shape-memory hydro-epoxy composite is fabricated by adding MWCNTs and CB into shape-memory hydro-epoxy resin. The total amount of the fillers fixed at 1.9 wt%, five different composites are produced by varying the amount of MWCNTs between 0 and 0.8 wt% and the amount of CB between 1.1 and 1.9 wt%. The thermomechanical properties and shape-memory performance of the composites are studied. These results indicate that the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the storage modulus of the composites increases at first and then decreases as MWCNTs content increases. The shape recovery time decreases at first and then increases slightly as MWCNTs content increases. The composite presents good shape-memory behavior, and the shape recovery ratio is around 100%. Due to the synergic effect of CB and MWCNTs, the volume electrical resistivity of the composite could decrease by adding a small amount of MWCNTs. (paper)

  8. Fracture toughness in nuclear waste glasses and ceramics: environmental and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.J.; Matzke, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of atmospheric moisture and radiation damage on fracture properties of nuclear waste glasses and ceramics was investigated by indentation techniques. In nuclear waste glasses, atmospheric moisture has no measurable effect on hardness but decreases the fracture toughness; radiation damage, on the other hand, decreased the hardness and increased the fracture toughness. In nuclear ceramics, self-radiation damage from alpha decay decreased the hardness and elastic modules; the fracture toughness increased with dose to a broad maximum and then decreased slightly with further increases in dose

  9. Effect of Abrasion-Induced Contact Damage on the Optical Properties and Strength of Float Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-07

    in glass. J Am Ceram Soc. 1969;52(6):338–339. 2. Mecholsky JJ Jr, Freiman SW, Rice RW. Effect of grinding on flaw geometry and fracture of glass. J...Am Ceram Soc. 1977;60(3–4):114–117. 3. Rice RW, Mecholsky JJ Jr. The nature of strength controlling machining flaws in ceramics. In: Hockey BJ, Rice...National Bureau of Standards; 1979. p. 351–378. 4. Rice RW, Mecholsky JJ Jr, Becher PF. The effect of grinding direction on flaw character and

  10. Kondo effect and non-Fermi liquid behavior in metallic glasses containing Yb, Ce, and Sm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.; Yang, Y. F.; Wang, W. H.

    2013-04-01

    The low temperature properties of metallic glasses containing different concentrations of ytterbium, cerium, and samarium are studied. It is found that the Kondo effect caused by exchange interactions between the conduction and 4f electrons and non-Fermi liquid behavior appear in the strongly disordered alloys. We study the origins for these unique features and demonstrate that the found Kondo effect is inherited from the crystalline counterparts. The results might have significance on investigating the strong electron-electron interaction systems with structural disorder and be helpful for designing new metallic glasses with functional properties.

  11. Spectroscopic study of local thermal effect in transparent glass ceramics containing nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Local thermal effect influencing the fluorescence of triply ionized rare earth ions doped in nanocrystals is studied with laser spectroscopy and theory of thermal transportation for transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing nanocrystals. The result shows that the local temperature of the nanocrystals embedded in glass matrices is much higher than the environmental temperature of the sample. It is suggested that the temperature-dependent thermal energy induced by the light absorption must be considered when the theory of thermal transportation is applied to the study of local thermal effect.

  12. The effective atomic number for gamma ray interactions with heavy metal oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2010-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), and the effective electron density, N-el,N-eff, have been calculated at photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV for CaO-SrO-B2O3, ZnO-PbO-B2O3, and CdO-PbO-B2O3 glasses with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials. Appreciable variations are noted...... glasses have gamma ray shielding properties comparable with standard shielding materials, such as concrete....

  13. Memory effects in single-molecule spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Daniel T.; Schulz, Michael; Reineker, Peter

    2007-01-01

    From the time series of LH2 optical single-molecule fluorescence excitation spectra of Rhodospirillum molischianum the memory function of the Mori-Zwanzig equation for the optical intensity is derived numerically. We show that the time dependence of the excited states is determined by at least three different non-Markovian stochastic processes with decay constants for the Mori-Zwanzig kernel on the order of 1-5min -1 . We suggest that this decay stems from the conformational motion of the protein scaffold of LH2

  14. Memory for tonal pitches: a music-length effect hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiva-Kabiri, Lilach; Vecchi, Tomaso; Granot, Roni; Basso, Demis; Schön, Daniele

    2009-07-01

    One of the most studied effects of verbal working memory (WM) is the influence of the length of the words that compose the list to be remembered. This work aims to investigate the nature of musical WM by replicating the word length effect in the musical domain. Length and rate of presentation were manipulated in a recognition task of tone sequences. Results showed significant effects for both factors (length and presentation rate) as well as their interaction, suggesting the existence of different strategies (e.g., chunking and rehearsal) for the immediate memory of musical information, depending upon the length of the sequences.

  15. Magnetocaloric effect in Heusler shape-memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planes, A.; Manosa, Ll.; Moya, X.; Krenke, T.; Acet, M.; Wassermann, E.F.

    2007-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the magnetocaloric properties of Ni-Mn-X Heusler shape-memory alloys with X=Ga, Sn and In. In these materials, the magnetocaloric effect is a consequence of the magnetostructural coupling that enables the magnetic shape-memory properties. We show that inverse magnetocaloric effects can occur in these materials. The origin of this anomalous behavior is different in stoichiometric Ni 2 MnGa and in Ni-Mn-Sn/In. In the former case it is related to the strong uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of the martensitic phase, while in the later it is an intrinsic effect associated with an incipient antiferromagnetism

  16. Effect of binder burnout on the sealing performance of glass ceramics for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Tugrul Y.; Celik, Selahattin; Mat, Mahmut D.

    2013-11-01

    The glass ceramics composite sealants are among few materials suitable for the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) due to their high operating temperatures (600 °C-850 °C). The glass ceramics chemically bond to both the metallic interconnector and the ceramic electrolyte and provide a gas tight connection. A careful and several stages manufacturing procedure is required to obtain a gas tight sealing. In this study, effects of binder burnout process on the sealing performance are investigated employing commercially available glass ceramic powders. The glass ceramic laminates are produced by mixing glass ceramic powders with the organic binders and employing a tape casting method. The laminates are sandwiched between the metallic interconnectors of an SOFC cell. The burnout and subsequent sealing quality are analyzed by measuring leakage rate and final macrostructure of sealing region. The effects of heating rate, dead weight load, solid loading, carrier gas and their flow rates are investigated. It is found that sealing quality is affected from all investigated parameters. While a slower heating rate is required for a better burnout, the mass flow rate of sweep gas must be adequate for removal of the burned gas. The leakage rate is reduced to 0.1 ml min-1 with 2 °C min-1 + 1 °C min-1 heating rate, 86.25% solid loading, 200 N dead weight load and 500 ml min-1 sweep gas flow rate.

  17. Gamma-ray shielding effect of Gd3+ doped lead barium borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummathi, Harshitha; Naveen Kumar, P.; Vedavathi T., C.; Abhiram, J.; Rajaramakrishna, R.

    2018-05-01

    The glasses of the batch xPbO: 10BaO: (90-x)B2O3: 0.2Gd2O3 (x = 40,45,50 mol %) were prepared by melt-quench technique. The work emphasizes on gamma ray shielding effect on doped lead glasses. The role of Boron is significant as it acts as better neutron attenuator as compared with any other materials, as the thermal neutron cross-sections are high for Gadolinium, 0.2 mol% is chosen as the optimum concentration for this matrix, as higher the concentration may lead to further increase as it produces secondary γ rays due to inelastic neutron scattering. Shielding effects were studied using Sodium Iodide (NaI) - Scintillation Gamma ray spectrometer. It was found that at higher concentration of lead oxide (PbO) in the matrix, higher the attenuation which can be co-related with density. Infra-red (I.R.) spectra reveals that the conversion of Lose triangles to tight tetrahedral structure results in enhancement of shielding properties. The Differential Scanning Calorimeter (D.S.C.) study also reveals that the increase in glass forming range increases the stability which in-turn results in inter-conversion of BO3 to BO4 units such that the density of glass increases with increase in PbO content, resulting in much stable and efficient gamma ray shielding glasses.

  18. Evidence against memorial facilitation and context-dependent memory effects through the chewing of gum

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, A.J.; Miles, C.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment examined the prediction that chewing gum at learning and/or recall facilitated subsequent word recall. Chewing gum at learning significantly impaired recall, indicating that the chewing of gum has a detrimental impact upon initial word encoding. In addition, a context-dependent memory effect was reported for those participants who both learned and recalled in the absence of gum, however a context dependent effect was not found with chewing gum. The findings contradict previous ...

  19. Evidence against memorial facilitation and context-dependent memory effects through the chewing of gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew J; Miles, Christopher

    2007-05-01

    The experiment examined the prediction that chewing gum at learning and/or recall facilitated subsequent word recall. Chewing gum at learning significantly impaired recall, indicating that the chewing of gum has a detrimental impact upon initial word encoding. In addition, a context-dependent memory effect was reported for those participants who both learned and recalled in the absence of gum; however, a context-dependent effect was not found with chewing gum. The findings contradict previous research.

  20. CuO and Ag2O effect on electrical properties of barium vanadate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolova, L.D.; Glasova, M.N.; Kalygina, V.M.; Spasibkina, S.N.; Khorikov, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of CuO on barium vanadate glass (BVG) conductivity on direct and alternating currents in the frequency range (10 2 -10 4 )Hz has been studied. Effect of Ag 2 O has been also studied for comparison, as Ag and Cu have idendical structure of external electron shells (d 10 , S 1 ). CuO introduction to binary barium vanadate glasses as a modificator results in the conductivity improvement on direct and alternating currents conditioned with reducing activation energy of small radius polaron jump, apparently, owing to exchange (ferromagnetic) interaction between V(IV) and Cu(II). Jump activation energy in barium vanadate glasses with Ag 2 O increases and conductivity drops due to the distance increase between vanadium atoms

  1. Effect of the glass transition temperature on alpha-amylase activity in a starch matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Vinita; Panyoyai, Naksit; Small, Darryl M; Shanks, Robert A; Kasapis, Stefan

    2017-02-10

    This study optimises a protocol for the estimation of α-amylase activity in a condensed starch matrix in the vicinity of the glass transition region. Enzymatic activity on the vitrified starch system was compared with that of a reference substrate, maltodextrin. The activity was assayed as the rate of release of reducing sugar using a dinitrosalicylic acid procedure. The condensed carbohydrate matrices served the dual purpose of acting as a substrate as well as producing a pronounced effect on the ability to enzymatic hydrolysis. Activation energies were estimated throughout the glass transition region of condensed carbohydrate preparations based on the concept of the spectroscopic shift factor. Results were used to demonstrate a considerable moderation by the mechanical glass transition temperature, beyond the expected linear effect of the temperature dependence, on the reaction rate of starch hydrolysis by α-amylase in comparison with the low-molecular weight chain of maltodextrin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Phase decomposition in niobate glasses and the electrooptical effect in materials based on them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseeva, I.P.; Karapetyan, G.O.; Korolov, Y.G.; Maksimov, L.V.

    1986-10-01

    This paper studies the effect of the composition and heat treatment on the dielectric, electrooptical, and structural-physical proprties of niobium-containing glasses. The appearance and intensification of fluctuations of the niobium concentration accompanying an increase in the niobium content in the samples is characteristic for glasses in the system Na/sub 2/O-K/sub 2/O-Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/-SiO/sub 2/. The presence of insignificant quantities of NaNbO/sub 3/ microcrystals in niobate glasses gives rise to a significant growth of the dielectric constant (by a factor of 508) and the appearance of a quadratic electrooptical effect.

  3. Sleep and environmental context: interactive effects for memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, Scott A; Durrant, Simon J; Musgrove, Hazel; Lewis, Penelope A

    2011-09-01

    Sleep after learning is often beneficial for memory. Reinstating an environmental context that was present at learning during subsequent retrieval also leads to superior declarative memory performance. This study examined how post-learning sleep, relative to wakefulness, impacts upon context-dependent memory effects. Thirty-two participants encoded word lists in each of two rooms (contexts), which were different in terms of size, odour and background music. Immediately after learning and following a night of sleep or a day of wakefulness, memory for all previously studied words was tested using a category-cued recall task in room one or two alone. Accordingly, a comparison could be made between words retrieved in an environmental context which was the same as, or different to, that of the learning phase. Memory performance was assessed by the difference between the number of words remembered at immediate and delayed retrieval. A 2 × 2 × 2 mixed ANOVA revealed an interaction between retrieval context (same/different to learning) and retention interval (sleep/wakefulness), which was driven by superior memory after sleep than after wake when learning and retrieval took place in different environmental contexts. Our findings suggest a sleep-related reduction in the extent to which context impacts upon retrieval. As such, these data provide initial support for the possibility that sleep dependent processes may promote a decontextualisation of recently formed declarative representations.

  4. Prismatic displacement effect of progressive multifocal glasses on reaction time and accuracy in elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellison AC

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ashton C Ellison, A John Campbell, M Clare Robertson, Gordon F SandersonDunedin School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Dunedin, New ZealandBackground: Multifocal glasses (bifocals, trifocals, and progressives increase the risk of falling in elderly people, but how they do so is unclear. To explain why glasses with progressive addition lenses increase the risk of falls and whether this can be attributed to false projection, this study aimed to 1 map the prismatic displacement of a progressive lens, and 2 test whether this displacement impaired reaction time and accuracy.Methods: The reaction times of healthy ≥75-year-olds (31 participants were measured when grasping for a bar and touching a black line. Participants performed each test twice, wearing their progressives and new, matched single vision (distance glasses in random order. The line and bar targets were positioned according to the maximum and minimum prismatic displacement effect through the progressive lens, mapped using a focimeter.Results: Progressive spectacle lenses have large areas of prismatic displacement in the central visual axis and edges. Reaction time was faster for progressives compared with single vision glasses with a centrally-placed horizontal grab bar (mean difference 101 ms, P=0.011 [repeated measures analysis] and a horizontal black line placed 300 mm below center (mean difference 80 ms, P=0.007. There was no difference in accuracy between the two types of glasses.Conclusion: Older people appear to adapt to the false projection of progressives in the central visual axis. This adaptation means that swapping to new glasses or a large change in prescription may lead to a fall. Frequently updating glasses may be more beneficial.Keywords: fall prevention, false projection, stored visual spatial information

  5. Hearing something emotional influences memory for what was just seen: How arousal amplifies effects of competition in memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzio, Allison; Mather, Mara

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced memory for emotional items often comes at the cost of memory for the background scenes. Because emotional foreground items both induce arousal and attract attention, it is not clear whether the emotion effects are simply the result of shifts in visual attention during encoding or whether arousal has effects beyond simple attention capture. In the current study, participants viewed a series of scenes that each either had a foreground object or did not have one, and then, after each image, heard either an emotionally arousing negative sound or a neutral sound. After a 24-hr delay, they returned for a memory test for the objects and scenes. Postencoding arousal decreased recognition memory of scenes shown behind superimposed objects but not memory of scenes shown alone. These findings support the hypothesis that arousal amplifies the effects of competition between mental representations, influencing memory consolidation of currently active representations.

  6. The effects of acute hypoglycaemia on memory acquisition and recall and prospective memory in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, R E; Zammitt, N N; Deary, I J; Frier, B M

    2007-01-01

    Global memory performance is impaired during acute hypoglycaemia. This study assessed whether moderate hypoglycaemia disrupts learning and recall in isolation, and utilised a novel test of prospective memory which may better reflect the role of memory in daily life than conventional tests. Thirty-six subjects with type 1 diabetes participated, 20 with normal hypoglycaemia awareness (NHA) and 16 with impaired hypoglycaemia awareness (IHA). Each underwent a hypoglycaemic clamp with target blood glucose 2.5 mmol/l. Prior to hypoglycaemia, subjects attempted to memorise instructions for a prospective memory task, and recall was assessed during hypoglycaemia. Subjects then completed the learning and immediate recall stages of three conventional memory tasks (word recall, story recall, visual recall) during hypoglycaemia. Euglycaemia was restored and delayed memory for the conventional tasks was tested. The same procedures were completed in euglycaemic control studies (blood glucose 4.5 mmol/l). Hypoglycaemia impaired performance significantly on the prospective memory task (p = 0.004). Hypoglycaemia also significantly impaired both immediate and delayed recall for the word and story recall tasks (p visual memory task. The effect of hypoglycaemia did not differ significantly between subjects with NHA and IHA. Impaired performance on the prospective memory task during hypoglycaemia demonstrates that recall is disrupted by hypoglycaemia. Impaired performance on the conventional memory tasks demonstrates that learning is also disrupted by hypoglycaemia. Results of the prospective memory task support the relevance of these findings to the everyday lives of people with diabetes.

  7. The effects of refreshing and elaboration on working memory performance, and their contributions to long-term memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Lea M; Singmann, Henrik; Oberauer, Klaus

    2018-03-19

    Refreshing and elaboration are cognitive processes assumed to underlie verbal working-memory maintenance and assumed to support long-term memory formation. Whereas refreshing refers to the attentional focussing on representations, elaboration refers to linking representations in working memory into existing semantic networks. We measured the impact of instructed refreshing and elaboration on working and long-term memory separately, and investigated to what extent both processes are distinct in their contributions to working as well as long-term memory. Compared with a no-processing baseline, immediate memory was improved by repeating the items, but not by refreshing them. There was no credible effect of elaboration on working memory, except when items were repeated at the same time. Long-term memory benefited from elaboration, but not from refreshing the words. The results replicate the long-term memory benefit for elaboration, but do not support its beneficial role for working memory. Further, refreshing preserves immediate memory, but does not improve it beyond the level achieved without any processing.

  8. Effects of magnesium minerals representative of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay-stone on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debure, M.

    2012-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses dissolution has been studied in presence of magnesium minerals. Those minerals (dolomite, illite, smectite...) belong to the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone layer, studied in France as a potential site for nuclear waste disposal. Such minerals contain magnesium, an element able to sustain glass alteration when it is available in solution. In the confined media of the wastes disposal, the solids reactivity controls the solution composition and can be the driving force of nuclear glass alteration. Experiments show that magnesium carbonates (hydro-magnesite and dolomite) increase in the glass alteration: the precipitation of magnesium silicates consumes silicon which slows down the formation of the glass passivating layer. The lower the magnesium mineral solubility, the lower the glass alteration. The purified clay phases (illite, smectite...) from the COx layer increase the glass alteration. Half the magnesium was replaced by sodium during the purification process. In such conditions, the effect of clay phases on glass alteration is in part due to the acidic pH-buffering effect of the clay fraction. The GRAAL model implemented in the geochemical transport code HYTEC has confirmed and quantified the mechanisms put in evidence in the experiments. Cells diffusion experiments where the two solids were separated by an inert diffusion barrier allow to valid reactive transport modelling. Such experiments are more representative of the glass package which will be separated from the COx by corrosion products. They show that glass alteration rate is reduced when solids are not close. (author) [fr

  9. Stereodynamic insight into the thermal history effects on poly(vinyl chloride) calorimetric sub-glass and glass transitions as a fragile glass model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Jean-Mathieu; Behazin, Ehsan; Misra, Manjusri; Mohanty, Amar

    2018-05-02

    The dynamic thermal history impact of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) has been explored for a wide range of pre-cooling rates, from 1 to 30 °C min-1. A first macroscopic insight into the dynamic thermal history influence has been highlighted through a decrease in the apparent activation energy (Eapp) in the first stage of the glass transition. The overall glass transition Eapp surface was successfully modeled in a polynomial fashion regarding the pre-cooling range. Raman scattering was used to associate the Eapp variations along the glass transition conversion with the stereochemistry evolution during the polymeric relaxation. Herein, the selection of atactic PVC as the polymer model permits us to monitor the glassy polymer segment stereodynamics during the heating ramp through the C-Cl stretching. The intermolecular H-Cl dipole interactions, as well as intramolecular conformational reorganizations among syndiotactic, isotactic and heterotactic polymer sequences, have been associated with non-cooperative and cooperative motions, i.e. the β- and α-process, respectively. The fruitful comparison of the two extreme values of the pre-cooling rates permits us to propose a thermokinetic scenario that explains the occurrence, intensity, and inter-dependence of β- and α-processes in the glassy state and during the glass transition. This scenario could potentially be generalized to all the other polymeric glass-formers.

  10. Effect of heat treatment on the structural and optical properties of tellurite glasses doped erbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jlassi, I., E-mail: ifa.jlassi@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Mineraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, B.P. 95 Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Elhouichet, H. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Mineraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, B.P. 95 Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus ElManar 2092 (Tunisia); Hraiech, S.; Ferid, M. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Mineraux et leurs Applications, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, B.P. 95 Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2012-03-15

    The 75TeO{sub 2}-20ZnO-4Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-1Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} (in molar ratio) glass system was prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method. As such, the samples prepared were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffractrometry (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and infrared luminescence. DSC analyses were carried out on our glass at different heating rates between 5 and 20 Degree-Sign C/min. The result of the annealing temperature on the spectroscopic properties of Er{sup 3+} in tellurite glasses was discussed. The activation energy, for surface crystallization, was determined graphically from a Kissinger-type plot and had a value about 897.2 kJ/mol. Crystalline phases for both {alpha}-TeO{sub 2}, {gamma}-TeO{sub 2} and Zn{sub 2}Te{sub 3}O{sub 8} system were determined by the XRD method and were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy characterizations after heat treatment. The effect of heat treatment on absorption spectra and luminescence properties in the tellurite glass was also investigated. With heat treatment, the ultraviolet absorption edge presented a redshift. As a result, the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters ({Omega}{sub 2}, {Omega}{sub 4}, {Omega}{sub 6}) were determined. The spontaneous emission probabilities of some relevant transitions, the branching ratio and the radiative lifetimes of several excited states of Er{sup 3+} were predicted using intensity J-O parameters. The near infrared emission that corresponds to Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}{yields}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} can be significantly enhanced after heat treatment. Notably, it is found that the luminescence lifetime in the present system is much longer than that in most other glasses and glass ceramics. A comparative study on luminescence performance suggests that the obtained glass ceramic is a promising material for Er{sup 3+} doped fiber amplifiers. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tellurite glasses were prepared by conventional melt-quenching method. Black

  11. The effect of aqueous media on the mechanical properties of fluorapatite-mullite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollazadeh, S; Ajalli, Siamak; Kashi, Tahereh S Jafarzadeh; Yekta, Bijan Eftekhai; Javadpour, Jafar; Jafari, S; Youssefi, Abbas; Fazel, Akbar

    2015-11-01

    To verify the effects of alternating thermal changes in aqueous media and chemical composition on mechanical properties of apatite-mullite glass-ceramics and to investigate concentration of ions eluted from glass-ceramics in aqueous media. The glass compositions were from SiO2Al2O3P2O5CaOTiO2BaOZrO2CaF2 system. Glass-ceramics were prepared by heat-treating at 1100°C for 3h samples alternately immersed in water at 5 and 60°C. The 3-point bending strength (n=10) were determined using 3×4×25mm/bar and a universal testing machine, at a cross-head speed of 0.1mm/min. Vickers micro hardness were evaluated by applying a total of 15-20 indentations under a 100g load for 30s. Concentrations of ions eluted from glass-ceramics immersed in 60±5°C double distilled water were determined by ion chromatography. The toxicity of glass-ceramics was assessed by seeding the osteosarcoma cells (MG63) on powder for different days and their cell proliferation assessment was investigated by MTT assay. The data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance and the means were compared by Tukey's test (5% significance level). The highest flexural strength and hardness values after thermal changes belonged to TiO2 and ZrO2 containing glass-ceramics which contained lower amount of released ions. BaO containing glass-ceramic and sample with extra amount of silica showed the highest amount of reduction in their mechanical strength values. These additives enhanced the concentration of eluted ions in aqueous media. MTT results showed that glass-ceramics were almost equivalent concerning their in-vitro biological behavior. Thermal changes and chemical compositions had significant effects on flexural strength and Vickers micro-hardness values. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of glass composition on the residual rate of alteration and modelling parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleury, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the long-term behavior of the French nuclear glasses R7T7. An experiment plan (based on 27 glass compositions) is developed for studying the effect of glass composition on the residual rate of alteration. The impact of Mg-phase precipitation on glass alteration is also studied and several modelling exercises are performed. There is one order of magnitude between the different measurements (rate or pH...) associated with the different glass compositions. The statistical treatment of these measurements results in predictive equations and several observable trends are valid for all materials with a composition complying with the experiment plan conditions. The effect of Si, Na, B and Al on alteration (.i.e, gel and secondary phase's formation, pH) is confirmed, the influence of Zn, Zr and Ni-Co is evidenced. The role of Cr has to be clarified. Experiments show that glass alteration rate in underground water, which contains high level of Ca and Mg, is one order of magnitude higher than in the case of pure water. The glass composition plays the same role for the alteration in the two types of solution. During alteration, the late addition of Mg introduces a time lag in the resumption response because silicon is first provided from partial dissolution of the previously-formed alteration gel. The nucleation process does not limit Mg-silicate precipitation whereas a pH above 8-8.5 is necessary for Mg-silicate precipitation. The glass alteration rate can be a limiting factor if the quantity of Mg supplied to the reaction is enough. The Mg silicate phase seems to have systematically a molar ratio Mg/Si between 0.2 and 0.4. It is also shown that the air tightness of the reactor influences the rate of dissolution of CO 2 in the solution leading to a decrease of pH. Finally, modelling exercises with GRAAL show promising results. Such modelling is required in order to extend the prediction of the long-term alteration behavior to different glass

  13. Kinetics of the deformation induced memory effect in polyamide-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drongelen, van M.; Stroeks, A.A.M.; Peters, G.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Nascent polyamide-6 shows a peculiar and irreversible effect; the quiescent crystallization kinetics on cooling are accelerated upon deformation in the melt, even after full relaxation of the melt. This phenomenon, known as the orientation (or better, deformation) induced memory effect of polyamide

  14. The Self-Reference Effect on Memory in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Sheila J.; Brebner, Joanne L.; Quinn, Francis; Turk, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The self-reference effect in memory is the advantage for information encoded about self, relative to other people. The early development of this effect was explored here using a concrete encoding paradigm. Trials comprised presentation of a self- or other-image paired with a concrete object. In Study 1, 4- to 6-year-old children (N = 53) were…

  15. The Effects of Caffeine on Memory for Word Lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, George; And Others

    Research has suggested that behavioral differences may account for the effects of caffeine on information processing. To investigate the effects of caffeine on memory for supraspan word lists, 107 college students (47 males, 60 females), divided into 12 groups by high and low impulsivity scores on the Eysenck Personality Inventory, participated in…

  16. [Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite to glass ionomer cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ya-Bing; Zang, Guang-Xiang; Sun, Hong-Chen; Wang, Cheng-Kun

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the mechanical character, microleakage and mineralizing potential of nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAP)-added glass ionomer cement(GIC). 8% nano-HAP were incorporated into GIC as composite, and pure GIC as control. Both types of material were used to make 20 cylinders respectively in order to detect three-point flexural strength and compressive strength. Class V cavities were prepared in 120 molars extracted for orthodontic treatment, then were filled by two kinds of material. The microleakage at the composite-dentine interface was observed with confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) after stained with 1% rhodamin-B-isothiocyanate for 24 hours. Class V cavities were prepared in the molars of 4 healthy dogs, filled with composite, and the same molars in the other side were filled with GIC as control. The teeth were extracted to observe the mineralizing property with polarimetric microscope in 8 weeks after filling. Three-point flexural strength and compressive of nano-HAP-added GIC were increased compared with pure GIC (P nano-HAP-added GIC, while there was no hydroxyapatite crystals formed at the interface of tooth and pure GIC. 8% nano-HAP-added GIC can tightly fill tooth and have mineralizing potential, and can be used as liner or filling material for prevention.

  17. Concentration effect on the spectroscopic behavior of Tb3+ ions in zinc phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavulu, C.R.; Almeida Silva, Anielle Christine; Dousti, M.R.; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Camargo, A.S.S. de; Catunda, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Zinc phosphate glasses (PZABPTb) in the compositional system: P 2 O 5 –ZnO–Al 2 O 3 –BaO–PbO doped with variable Tb 3+ concentrations (1–5 wt% Tb 2 O 3 ) were prepared and characterized through absorption, excitation, emission and intensity decay rate measurements. The Judd–Ofelt model has been adopted to evaluate the radiative properties of the 5 D 4 → 7 F 6–3 emission transitions. The effect of Tb 3+ ion concentration on the emissions from the 5 D 3,4 excited levels is discussed in detail. Analysis of the intensity decay curves corresponding to blue and green emissions from levels 5 D 3 and 5 D 4 , respectively, allowed determination of effective lifetimes, which confirmed the Tb 3+ ion concentration quenching of the blue emission in these glasses. The decay curves for the 5 D 3 level are found to be non-exponential in nature for all the studied concentrations due to ion–ion energy transfer through cross-relaxation. In an attempt to identify the origin of the energy transfer mechanism, the decay curves were well fitted to the Inokuti–Hirayama model for S=6, which indicates that the energy transfer process is of dipole–dipole type. The optical band gap energy (E opt ) has been evaluated taking into account the ultraviolet edge of absorption spectra. - Highlights: • Tb 3+ -doped zinc phosphate glasses have been prepared by melt quenching technique. • Spectroscopic parameters were evaluated using the Judd–Ofelt theory. • Effects of Tb 3+ concentration on luminescence of the glasses were studied. • Strong intense laser transition for Tb 3+ ion in PZABPTb glasses is 5 D 4 → 7 F 5 (0.54 μm). • PZABPTb glasses could be used in the development of green color display devices and solid state visible lasers

  18. Effect of F- ions on physical and spectroscopic properties of Yb3+-doped TeO2-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guonian; Dai Shixun; Zhang Junjie; Xu Shiqing; Hu Lili; Jiang Zhonghong

    2005-01-01

    The effects of F - ions on physical and spectroscopic properties of the Yb 3+ in tellurite glass system are investigated. The results show that the glass system takes on good thermal stability with the content of ZnF 2 lower than 15 mol%, both the emission cross-section and the fluorescence lifetime of Yb 3+ ions increase evidently which indicate that such oxyfluoride tellurite glass system is a promising laser host matrix for high power generation. FT-IR spectra were used to analyze the effect of F- ions on the structure of tellurite glasses and OH - groups in this glass system. Analysis demonstrates that addition of fluoride decreases the symmetry of the structure of tellurite glasses which increases the emission cross-section and removes the OH - groups, and which improves the measured fluorescence lifetime of Yb 3+ ions

  19. Effects of carbonate and sulphate ions in synthetic groundwater on high-level waste glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, H.

    1990-01-01

    This laboratory experiment aims to examine the effects of rare earth carbonate and sulphate ions, that are naturally present in underground water, have on glass used to store high-level radioactive waste for disposal underground. Borosilicate glass (or HLW glass) is stored under observation on the land surface for several decades before being buried deep below ground in geological disposal sites. Two types of precipitation occur during leaching from the glass, immediate formation of a hydrated surface layer and slow precipitation from concentration in the leachates. This slow process of some elements precipitating onto the glass surface or into the leachates is examined in this experiment using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Carbonates from rare-earth elements are found in the synthetic groundwater used. It is shown that carbonate and sulphate ions will affect leaching and will occur in geological disposal sites. Other particles were also observed to precipitate using SEM-EDX. (author)

  20. Effect of B2O3 on luminescence of erbium doped tellurite glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiang; Nie, Qiuhua; Xu, Tiefeng; Dai, Shixun; Wang, Xunsi

    2007-02-01

    The B2O3 was introduced into the Er3+ doped TeO2-ZnO-Na2O glass to increase the phonon energy of the host. The effect of B2O3 on the non-radiative rate of the 4I11/2-->4I13/2 transition of Er3+, the lifetime of the 4I11/2 and 4I13/2 levels, the green and red upconversion emissions intensity, and the 4I13/2-->4I15/2 emission intensity was discussed. The results show that the phonon energy of boro-tellurite glass is close to that of germanate glass and is quite smaller than that of borate glass. The lifetime of 4I11/2 level and the upconversion emissions decrease with increasing B2O3 concentration. The higher OH group concentration presented in the boro-tellurite glass may shorten the lifetime of 4I13/2 level and also reduce the quantum efficiency of 4I13/2-->4I15/2 emission. The future dehydrating procedures are suggested to enhance the efficiency of amplification at 1.5 microm band.

  1. Durability of simulated waste glass: effects of pressure and formation of surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Mosley, W.C.; Whitkop, P.G.; Saturday, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    The leaching behavior of simulated Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste glass was studied at elevated pressures and anticipated storage temperatures. An integrated approach, which combined leachate solution analyses with both bulk and surface studies, was used to study the corrosion process. Compositions of leachates were evaluated by colorimetry and atomic absorption. Used in the bulk and surface analyses were optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy spectroscopy, wide-angle x-ray, diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, infrared reflectance spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results from this study show that there is no significant adverse effect of pressure, up to 1500 psi and 90 0 C, on the chemical durability of simulated SPR waste glass leached for one month in deionized water. In addition, the leached glass surface layer was characterized by an adsorbed film rich in minor constituents from the glass. This film remained on the glass surface even after leaching in relatively alkaline solutions at elevated pressures at 90 0 C for one month. The sample surface area to volume of leachant ratios (SA/V) was 10:1 cm -1 and 1:10 cm -1 . The corrosion mechanisms and surface and subsurface layers produced will be discussed along with the potential importance of these results to repository storage

  2. Temporal correlations and structural memory effects in break junction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyarkuti, A.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Balogh, Zoltan Imre

    2017-01-01

    that correlations between the opening and subsequent closing traces may indicate structural memory effects in atomic-sized metallic and molecular junctions. Applying these methods on measured and simulated gold metallic contacts as a test system, we show that the surface diffusion induced flattening of the broken......-molecule junctions, we demonstrate pronounced contact memory effects and recovery of the molecule for junctions breaking before atomic chains are formed. However, if chains are pulled the random relaxation of the chain and molecule after rupture prevents opening-closing correlations....

  3. The effect of quantum memory on quantum games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzan, M; Nawaz, Ahmad; Toor, A H; Khan, M K

    2008-01-01

    We study quantum games with correlated noise through a generalized quantization scheme. We investigate the effects of memory on quantum games, such as Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes and Chicken, through three prototype quantum-correlated channels. It is shown that the quantum player enjoys an advantage over the classical player for all nine cases considered in this paper for the maximally entangled case. However, the quantum player can also outperform the classical player for subsequent cases that can be noted in the case of the Battle of the Sexes game. It can be seen that the Nash equilibria do not change for all the three games under the effect of memory

  4. A new memory effect (MSD) in fully depleted SOI MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawedin, M.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Yun, J. G.; Flandre, D.

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate that the transconductance and drain current of fully depleted MOSFETs can display an interesting time-dependent hysteresis. This new memory effect, called meta-stable dip (MSD), is mainly due to the long carrier generation lifetime in the silicon film. Our parametric analysis shows that the memory window can be adjusted in view of practical applications. Various measurement conditions and devices with different doping, front oxide and silicon film thicknesses are systematically explored. The MSD effect can be generalized to several fully depleted CMOS technologies. The MSD mechanism is discussed and validated by two-dimensional simulations results.

  5. Effects of saccadic bilateral eye movements on episodic and semantic autobiographical memory fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew; Parkin, Adam; Dagnall, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Performing a sequence of fast saccadic horizontal eye movements has been shown to facilitate performance on a range of cognitive tasks, including the retrieval of episodic memories. One explanation for these effects is based on the hypothesis that saccadic eye movements increase hemispheric interaction, and that such interactions are important for particular types of memory. The aim of the current research was to assess the effect of horizontal saccadic eye movements on the retrieval of both episodic autobiographical memory (event/incident based memory) and semantic autobiographical memory (fact based memory) over recent and more distant time periods. It was found that saccadic eye movements facilitated the retrieval of episodic autobiographical memories (over all time periods) but not semantic autobiographical memories. In addition, eye movements did not enhance the retrieval of non-autobiographical semantic memory. This finding illustrates a dissociation between the episodic and semantic characteristics of personal memory and is considered within the context of hemispheric contributions to episodic memory performance.

  6. Shape memory effect for titanium nickelide semiproducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, D.B.; Fatkullina, L.P.; Smirnova, Z.I.; Timonin, G.D.; Olejnikova, S.V.

    1978-01-01

    The thermomechanical properties of titanium nickelide semi-finished products obtained by garnissage melting followed by arc remelting have been studied for the purpose of investigating the NiTi ''form memory'' mechanism. The ingots were subjected to stepped pressing to produce rods. Calcined rods were tension tested. Investigation of the elastic and thermomechanical free return after deformation has shown that the share of elastic return increases as the preliminary deformation degree is increased. The return to the original form began at about 150 deg C; at 200 deg C the process rate decreases and at 300 deg C it stops. The degree of form recovery decreases with the increase of preliminary deformation. The return stress versus preliminary deformation degree relationship has a maximum at 11% strain degree. Maximum thermomechanical return stresses are observed at about 300 deg C. It is noted that yield strength decreases with the increasing degree of deformation to which the semi-finished products are subjected

  7. Memory function after stress : the effects of acute stress and cortisol on memory and the inhibition of emotional distraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, Nicole Yü Lan

    2010-01-01

    The present thesis contains five experimental studies into the effects of stress on memory I healthy males. Hydrocortisone (and propranolol) administration or the induction of social stress are used to heighten cortisol levels, and consequently to study its effects on working memory performance and

  8. Effect of fiber content on the properties of glass fiber-phenolic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, M.Y.; Shahid, M.R.; Subhani, T.; Sharif, M.N.

    2003-01-01

    Glass fiber-Phenolic matrix composite is used for the manufacturing of parts /components related to electronic and aerospace industry due to its high strength, dimensional stability and excellent electrical insulation properties. The evaluation of this composite material is necessary prior to make parts/components of new designs. In the present research, thermosetting phenolic plastic was reinforced with E-glass fiber in different fiber-to-resin ratios to produce composites of different compositions. Mechanical and electrical properties of these composite materials were evaluated with reference to the effect of fiber content variation in phenolic resin. (author)

  9. The extent of the glass transition from molecular simulation revealing an overcrank effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godey, François; Fleury, Alexandre; Ghoufi, Aziz; Soldera, Armand

    2018-02-15

    A deep understanding of the transition between rubber and amorphous state characterized by a glass transition temperature, T g , is still a source of discussions. In this work, we highlight the role of molecular simulation in revealing explicitly this temperature dependent behavior. By reporting the specific volume, the thermal expansion coefficient and the heat capacity versus the temperature, we actually show that the glass transition domain extends to a greater range of temperature, compared with experiments. This significant enlargement width is due to the fast cooling rate, and actually explains the difficulty to locate T g . This result is the manifestation of an overcranking effect used by high-speed cameras to reveal slow-motion. Accordingly, atomistic simulation offers the significant opportunity to show that the transition from the rubber state to the glass phase should be detailed in terms of the degrees of freedom freeze. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The effects of gamma radiation on groundwater chemistry and glass reaction in a saturated tuff environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project has completed a series of experiments that provide insight into groundwater chemistry and glass waste form performance in the presence of a gamma radiation field at 90 0 C. Results from experiments done at 1 x 10 3 and O R/hr are presented and compared to similar experiments done at 2 x 10 5 and 1 x 10 4 R/hr. The major effect of radiation is to lower the groundwater pH to a value near 6.4. The addition of glass to the system results in slightly more basic final pH, both in the presence and absence of radiation. However, there is essentially no difference in the extent of glass reaction, as measured by elemental release, as a function of dose rate or total dose, for reaction periods up to 278 days

  11. Anisotropic surroundings effects on photo absorption of partially embedded Au nanospheroids in silica glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xuan; Shibayama, Tamaki, E-mail: shiba@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060–8628 (Japan); Yu, Ruixuan; Ishioka, Junya [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060–8628 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    The influence of a directly adjacent or an anisotropic surrounding medium alters the plasmonic properties of a nanoparticle because it provides a mechanism for symmetry breaking of the scattering. Given the success of ion irradiation induced embedment of rigid metallic nanospheroids into amorphous substrate, it is possible to examine the effect of the silica glass substrate on the plasmonic properties of these embedded nanospheroids. In this work presented here, discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations for the Au nanospheroids’ optical properties were performed based on 3–dimensional (3D) configuration extracted from planar SEM micrographs and cross–sectional TEM micrographs of the Au nanospheroids partially embedded in the silica glass, and the well–matched simulations with respect to the experimental measurements could demonstrate the dielectric constant at the near surface of silica glass decreased after Ar–ion irradiation.

  12. The effect of devitrification on leaching rate of glass containing simulated high level liquid waste (HLLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro; Sumarbagiono; Martono, H.

    1996-01-01

    Effect of devitrification on leaching rate of glass named G1 and G2 each contains 20 wt% and 30wt% of waste has been studied. devitrification of waste - glass has been carried out by heating those specimens at 850 o C for 10, 18, 26, 34, 42 and 50 hours respectively. The weight percentage of crystal in waste glass was determined by X-ray diffractometer and leaching rate was determined by soxhlet apparatus at 100 o C for 24 hours. The longer heating time, the more weight percentage of crystal is formed. The results show that leaching rate of G2 specimens are higher than those of G1. For G1 the leaching rate at 850 o C in 20 times than without heating, and for G2 leaching rate is 15.7 times than without heating. (author)

  13. Effect of the addition of Na2O on the thermal stability of alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassalle-Herraud, Olivier; Matecki, Marc; Glorieux, Benoit; Sadiki, Najim; Montoullout, Valerie; Dussossoy, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    Alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths have been prepared by concentrated solar way. Their recrystallization, the structural and microstructural properties as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of these glasses have been studied. The results show the effect of sodium addition on the thermal stability of the materials, the vitreous transition temperature and the recrystallization temperature. A heat treatment has allowed to reveal the formation of sodium apatite micro-crystallites and of lanthanum silicate in the glasses. (O.M.)

  14. Nonvolatile memory effect of tungsten nanocrystals under oxygen plasma treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Wei-Ren; Lo, Yuan-Chun; Wu, Kai-Ting; Sze, S.M.; Chen, Jason; Liao, I.H.; Yeh, Fon-Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, an oxygen plasma treatment was used to improve the memory effect of nonvolatile W nanocrystal memory, including memory window, retention and endurance. To investigate the role of the oxygen plasma treatment in charge storage characteristics, the X-ray photon-emission spectra (XPS) were performed to analyze the variation of chemical composition for W nanocrystal embedded oxide both with and without the oxygen plasma treatment. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were also used to identify the microstructure in the thin film and the size and density of W nanocrystals. The device with the oxygen plasma treatment shows a significant improvement of charge storage effect, because the oxygen plasma treatment enhanced the quality of silicon oxide surrounding the W nanocrystals. Therefore, the data retention and endurance characteristics were also improved by the passivation.

  15. The effect of silver on the optical, spectral-luminescent, and crystallization properties of bromide photo-thermo-refractive glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkina, K. V.; Dubrovin, V. D.; Ignat'ev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silver on the optical, spectral-luminescent, and crystallization properties of bromide photo-thermo-refractive glasses is studied. Multicomponent photosensitive glasses of the Na2O-ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system with photosensitizing agents (cerium, antimony, silver) and halogenides (fluorine and bromine) are synthesized. Ultraviolet irradiation and thermal treatment below the glass-transition temperature of the glasses cause the formation of silver molecular clusters, which exhibit luminescence in the visible and infrared regions. UV irradiation and thermal treatment of glasses above the glass-transition temperature lead to the growth of silver nanoparticles with plasmon resonance peak in the region of 420 nm. Further thermal treatment of glasses above the glass-transition temperature shifts the plasmon-resonance maximum by 70 nm to longer wavelengths, which is related to the growth of a crystalline shell consisting of mixed silver and sodium bromides on nanoparticles. This formation of a crystalline phase on colloidal centers results in a local increase in the refractive index of the irradiated region by +Δ n 900 ppm compared to the nonirradiated region. Photo-thermo-refractive glasses with increased silver concentration are promising photosensitive materials for creating holographic optical elements and devices for line narrowing and stabilizing filters, spectral beam combiners, and filters for increasing the spectral brightness of laser diodes. A positive change in the refractive index of Photo-thermo-refractive glasses provides the possibility of recording in them 3D waveguide and integrated-optical structures.

  16. What Do We Know about Glass Ceiling Effects? A Taxonomy and Critical Review to Inform Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jerlando F. L.; O'Callaghan, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of "glass ceiling effects" has emerged in social science research in general and higher education in particular over the past 20 years. These studies have described the impediments that women and people of color encounter in their quest for senior-level positions (e.g., CEOs) in society as glass ceiling effects. Literature, both…

  17. Working memory in multilingual children: is there a bilingual effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale M J

    2011-07-01

    This research investigates whether early childhood bilingualism affects working memory performance in 6- to 8-year-olds, followed over a longitudinal period of 3 years. The study tests the hypothesis that bilinguals might exhibit more efficient working memory abilities than monolinguals, potentially via the opportunity a bilingual environment provides to train cognitive control by combating interference and intrusions from the non-target language. A total of 44 bilingual and monolingual children, matched on age, sex, and socioeconomic status, completed assessments of working memory (simple span and complex span tasks), fluid intelligence, and language (vocabulary and syntax). The data showed that the monolinguals performed significantly better on the language measures across the years, whereas no language group effect emerged on the working memory and fluid intelligence tasks after verbal abilities were considered. The study suggests that the need to manage several language systems in the bilingual mind has an impact on children's language skills while having little effects on the development of working memory.

  18. Prestimulus subsequent memory effects for auditory and visual events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Leun J; Quayle, Angela H; Puvaneswaran, Bhamini

    2010-06-01

    It has been assumed that the effective encoding of information into memory primarily depends on neural activity elicited when an event is initially encountered. Recently, it has been shown that memory formation also relies on neural activity just before an event. The precise role of such activity in memory is currently unknown. Here, we address whether prestimulus activity affects the encoding of auditory and visual events, is set up on a trial-by-trial basis, and varies as a function of the type of recognition judgment an item later receives. Electrical brain activity was recorded from the scalps of 24 healthy young adults while they made semantic judgments on randomly intermixed series of visual and auditory words. Each word was preceded by a cue signaling the modality of the upcoming word. Auditory words were preceded by auditory cues and visual words by visual cues. A recognition memory test with remember/know judgments followed after a delay of about 45 min. As observed previously, a negative-going, frontally distributed modulation just before visual word onset predicted later recollection of the word. Crucially, the same effect was found for auditory words and observed on stay as well as switch trials. These findings emphasize the flexibility and general role of prestimulus activity in memory formation, and support a functional interpretation of the activity in terms of semantic preparation. At least with an unpredictable trial sequence, the activity is set up anew on each trial.

  19. Negative effects of item repetition on source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungmi; Yi, Do-Joon; Raye, Carol L; Johnson, Marcia K

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, we explored how item repetition affects source memory for new item-feature associations (picture-location or picture-color). We presented line drawings varying numbers of times in Phase 1. In Phase 2, each drawing was presented once with a critical new feature. In Phase 3, we tested memory for the new source feature of each item from Phase 2. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated and replicated the negative effects of item repetition on incidental source memory. Prior item repetition also had a negative effect on source memory when different source dimensions were used in Phases 1 and 2 (Experiment 3) and when participants were explicitly instructed to learn source information in Phase 2 (Experiments 4 and 5). Importantly, when the order between Phases 1 and 2 was reversed, such that item repetition occurred after the encoding of critical item-source combinations, item repetition no longer affected source memory (Experiment 6). Overall, our findings did not support predictions based on item predifferentiation, within-dimension source interference, or general interference from multiple traces of an item. Rather, the findings were consistent with the idea that prior item repetition reduces attention to subsequent presentations of the item, decreasing the likelihood that critical item-source associations will be encoded.

  20. Comparison of radiation and quenching rate effects on the structure of a sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peuget, Sylvain; Maugeri, Emilio-Andrea; Mendoza, Clement; Fares, Toby; Bouty, Olivier; Jegou, Christophe; Charpentier, Thibault; Moskura, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of quenching rate and irradiation on the structure of a sodium borosilicate glass were compared using 29 Si, 11 B, and 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy. Quenching rate ranging from 0.1 to 3 * 10 4 K min -1 was studied. Various irradiation conditions were performed, i.e. gold-ion irradiation in a multi-energy mode (from 1 to 6.75 MeV), and Kr and Xe ion irradiations with energy of 74 and 92 MeV, respectively. In pile irradiation with thermal neutron flux was performed as well, to study the effect of alpha radiation from the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li. Both irradiation and high quenching rate induce similar local order modification of the glass structure, mainly a decrease of the mean boron coordination and an increase of Q 3 units. Nevertheless, the variations observed under irradiation are more pronounced than the ones induced by the quenching rate. Moreover, some important modifications of the glass medium range order, i.e. the emergence of the D2 band associated to three members silica rings and a modification of the Si-O-Si angle distribution were only noticed after irradiation. These results suggest that the irradiated structure is certainly not exactly the one obtained by a rapidly quenched equilibrated melt, but rather a more disordered structure that was weakly relaxed during the very rapid quenching phase following the energy deposition step. Raman spectroscopy showed a similar irradiated structure whereas the glass evolutions were controlled by the electronic energy loss in the ion track formation regime for Kr-ion irradiation or by the nuclear energy loss for Au and OSIRIS irradiation. The similar irradiated structure despite different irradiation routes, suggests that the final structural state of this sodium borosilicate glass is mainly controlled by the glass reconstruction after the energy deposition step. (authors)

  1. The effect of spark plasma sintering on lithium disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mansour, Fatima; Karpukhina, Natalia; Grasso, Salvatore; Wilson, Rory M; Reece, Mike J; Cattell, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of spark plasma sintering (SPS) on the microstructure of lithium disilicate glass-ceramics. IPS e.max CAD glass-ceramic samples were processed using spark plasma sintering (SPS) and conventionally sintered (CS) as a comparison. Specimens were sintered at varying temperatures (T1: 840°C, T2: 820°C, T3: 800°C), heating rates (HR1: 150°C/min, HR2: 300°C/min, HR3: 500°C/min) and pressures (P1: 15MPa, P2: 50MPa, P3: 70MPa). IPS e.max Press glass powder samples were densified at 750 and 800°C (50 or 200MPa pressure). Samples were characterized using XRD, HTXRD, and SEM and quantitative image analysis. There was a significant increase in median crystal size (MCS) between the CS and the SPS T1 groups. A statistical difference (p>0.05) in MCS between SPS T1 and SPS T2 groups was observed. The SPS HR3 sample produced a smaller MCS than the CS, SPS HR1 and HR2 groups (pglass samples resulted in fine fibrils or graduated lithium disilicate crystals. The effects of SPS were used to refine the microstructure of IPS e.max CAD lithium disilicate glass-ceramics. Densification by SPS of IPS e.max Press glass resulted in textured and fine nano-crystalline microstructures. SPS generated glass-ceramic microstructures may have unique properties and could be useful in the production of CAD/CAM materials for dentistry. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  3. Effect of magnesium aluminum silicate glass on the thermal shock resistance of BN matrix composite ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Delong; Jia, Dechang; Yang, Zhihua; Zhu, Qishuai; Ocelik, Vaclav; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; Zhou, Yu

    The effects of magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass on the thermal shock resistance and the oxidation behavior of h-BN matrix composites were systematically investigated at temperature differences from 600 degrees C up to 1400 degrees C. The retained strength rate of the composites rose with the

  4. Mathematical modeling of photoinitiated coating degradation: Effects of coating glass transition temperature and light stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; G.de With, R.A.T.M.Van Benthem

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model, describing coating degradation mechanisms of thermoset coatings exposed to ultraviolet radiation and humidity at constant temperature, was extended to simulate the behavior of a coating with a low glass transition temperature. The effects of adding light stabilizers (a UV...

  5. Greenhouse Effect: Temperature of a Metal Sphere Surrounded by a Glass Shell and Heated by Sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuc H.; Matzner, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    We study the greenhouse effect on a model satellite consisting of a tungsten sphere surrounded by a thin spherical, concentric glass shell, with a small gap between the sphere and the shell. The system sits in vacuum and is heated by sunlight incident along the "z"-axis. This development is a generalization of the simple treatment of the…

  6. Effect of water uptake on the fracture behavior of low-k organosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyu Guo; Joseph E. Jakes; Samer Banna; Yoshio Nishi; J. Leon Shohet

    2014-01-01

    Water uptake in porous low-k dielectrics has become a significant challenge for both back-end-of-the-line integration and circuit reliability. This work examines the effects of water uptake on the fracture behavior of nanoporous low-k organosilicate glass. By using annealing dehydration and humidity conditioning, the roles of different water types...

  7. Task-selective memory effects for successfully implemented encoding strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Leshikar

    Full Text Available Previous behavioral evidence suggests that instructed strategy use benefits associative memory formation in paired associate tasks. Two such effective encoding strategies--visual imagery and sentence generation--facilitate memory through the production of different types of mediators (e.g., mental images and sentences. Neuroimaging evidence suggests that regions of the brain support memory reflecting the mental operations engaged at the time of study. That work, however, has not taken into account self-reported encoding task success (i.e., whether participants successfully generated a mediator. It is unknown, therefore, whether task-selective memory effects specific to each strategy might be found when encoding strategies are successfully implemented. In this experiment, participants studied pairs of abstract nouns under either visual imagery or sentence generation encoding instructions. At the time of study, participants reported their success at generating a mediator. Outside of the scanner, participants further reported the quality of the generated mediator (e.g., images, sentences for each word pair. We observed task-selective memory effects for visual imagery in the left middle occipital gyrus, the left precuneus, and the lingual gyrus. No such task-selective effects were observed for sentence generation. Intriguingly, activity at the time of study in the left precuneus was modulated by the self-reported quality (vividness of the generated mental images with greater activity for trials given higher ratings of quality. These data suggest that regions of the brain support memory in accord with the encoding operations engaged at the time of study.

  8. A Bayesian Model of the Memory Colour Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Witzel, Christoph; Olkkonen, Maria; Gegenfurtner, Karl R.

    2018-01-01

    According to the memory colour effect, the colour of a colour-diagnostic object is not perceived independently of the object itself. Instead, it has been shown through an achromatic adjustment method that colour-diagnostic objects still appear slightly in their typical colour, even when they are colourimetrically grey. Bayesian models provide a promising approach to capture the effect of prior knowledge on colour perception and to link these effects to more general effects of cue integration....

  9. A Bayesian model of the memory colour effect.

    OpenAIRE

    Witzel, Christoph; Olkkonen, Maria; Gegenfurtner, Karl R.

    2018-01-01

    According to the memory colour effect, the colour of a colour-diagnostic object is not perceived independently of the object itself. Instead, it has been shown through an achromatic adjustment method that colour-diagnostic objects still appear slightly in their typical colour, even when they are colourimetrically grey. Bayesian models provide a promising approach to capture the effect of prior knowledge on colour perception and to link these effects to more general effects of cue integration....

  10. The effect of divided attention on false memory depends on how memory is tested.

    OpenAIRE

    Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Barry, Christopher; Swannell, Ellen R.; Holmes, Selina J.; Bathurst, Gemma J.

    2007-01-01

    In three experiments, we investigated the effects of divided attention on false memory, using the Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants studied six DRM lists with full attention and six in one of two divided-attention conditions (random number generation or digit monitoring). Both divided-attention conditions increased false recall of related words (Experiment 1) but reduced false recognition (Experiment 2). These results were confirmed in Experiment 3,...

  11. Impact of Zn, Mg, Ni and Co elements on glass alteration: Additive effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aréna, H., E-mail: helene.arena@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, LCLT, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze Cedex (France); Godon, N. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, LCLT, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze Cedex (France); Rébiscoul, D.; Podor, R. [ICSM-UMR5257 CNRS/CEA/UM2/ENCSM, Site de Marcoule, Bat. 426, 30207 Bagnols/Cèze (France); Garcès, E. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, LCLT, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze Cedex (France); Cabie, M. [Aix-Marseille Université, CP2M, F-13397 Marseille (France); Mestre, J.-P. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, LCLT, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze Cedex (France)

    2016-03-15

    The minor elements present in the nuclear glass composition or coming from the groundwater of the future repository may impact glass alteration. In this study, the effects of Zn, Mg, Ni and Co on the International Simple Glass (ISG) alteration were studied throughout 511 days of aqueous leaching experiments. The aim was to determine their additive or competitive effect on glass alteration and the nature of the alteration products. The four elements were introduced separately or altogether in solution as XCl{sub 2} chloride salts (X = Zn, Mg, Ni or Co) with monthly additions to compensate for their consumption. The alteration kinetics were determined by leachate analyses (ICP-AES) and alteration products were characterized in terms of composition, morphology and microstructure (SEM, TEM-EDX, ToF-SIMS and XRD). Results indicate that when they are introduced separately, Zn, Mg, Ni and Co have the same qualitative and quantitative effect on glass alteration kinetics and on pH: they form secondary phases leading to a pH decrease and a significant increase in glass alteration. The secondary phases were identified as silicates of the added X element: trioctahedral smectites with a stoichiometry of[(Si{sub (4-a)} Al{sub a}) (X{sub (3-b)} Al{sub b}) O{sub 10} (OH){sub 2}]{sup (a+b)−} [X{sub c} Na{sub d} Ca{sub e}] {sup (2c+d+2e) +} with a = 0.11 to 0.45, b = 0.00 to 0.29, c = 0, d = 0.19 to 0.74 and e = 0.10 to 0.14. . It was shown that as pH stabilizes at a minimum value, X-silicates no longer precipitate, thus leading to a significant drop in the glass alteration rate. This pH value depends on X and it has been identified as being 8 for Mg-silicates, probably around 7.3 for Ni and Co-silicates and less than 6.2 for Zn-silicates. When tested together, the effects of these four elements on glass alteration are additive and lead to the formation of a mix of X-silicates that precipitate as long as their constitutive elements are available and the pH is above

  12. Effect of Ga2O3 on the spectroscopic properties of erbium-doped boro-bismuth glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zhou; Ya-Xun, Zhou; Shi-Xun, Dai; Tie-Feng, Xu; Qiu-Hua, Nie; Xiang, Shen

    2007-11-01

    The spectroscopic properties and thermal stability of Er3+-doped Bi2O3-B2O3-Ga2O3 glasses are investigated experimentally. The effect of Ga2O3 content on absorption spectra, the Judd-Ofelt parameters Omega t (t=2, 4, 6), fluorescence spectra and the lifetimes of Er3+:4I 13/2 level are also investigated, and the stimulated emission cross-section is calculated from McCumber theory. With the increasing of Ga2O3 content in the glass composition, the Omega t (t=2, 4, 6) parameters, fluorescence full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the 4I 13/2 lifetimes of Er3+ first increase, reach its maximum at Ga2O3=8 mol.%, and then decrease. The results show that Er3+-doped 50Bi2O3-42B2O3-8Ga2O3 glass has the broadest FWHM (81nm) and large stimulated emission cross-section (1.03 x1 0(-20)cm2) in these glass samples. Compared with other glass hosts, the gain bandwidth properties of Er+3-doped Bi2O3-B2O3-Ga2O3 glass is better than tellurite, silicate, phosphate and germante glasses. In addition, the lifetime of 4I 13/2 level of Er(3+) in bismuth-based glass, compared with those in other glasses, is relative low due to the high-phonon energy of the B-O bond, the large refractive index of the host and the existence of OH* in the glass. At the same time, the glass thermal stability is improved in which the substitution of Ga2O3 for B2O3 strengthens the network structure. The suitability of bismuth-based glass as a host for a Er3+-doped broadband amplifier and its advantages over other glass hosts are also discussed.

  13. Understanding the effects of alpha self-irradiation on the glass structure by coupling spectroscopic studies and atomistic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, G.

    2008-12-01

    Our objective was to assess irradiation effects on nuclear containment glass in order to guarantee glass performance when subjected to high alpha decay doses. Experimental studies and molecular dynamics modeling provided a better understanding of the impact of cumulative alpha decay on the structural behavior of complex nuclear glass formulations and of simplified glass models. A mechanism typical of sodium borosilicate glass was identified in response to nuclear interactions or ballistic collisions. The glass local order is slightly modified by the conversion of a fraction of the boron atoms from coordination number IV to III, releasing charge-compensating alkali ions that become available as network modifiers, and resulting in a slight increase in the number of non bridging oxygen atoms. The medium-range order shifts toward increasing disorder in the glass as indicated by broadening of the angular, radial, and size distributions. A model of accumulated quasi-thermal quenching is proposed to account for these changes, based on the two steps describing the reaction of the glass to the alpha decay recoil nucleus: a cascade generates a ballistic phase that completely destabilizes the glass structure with no short and medium-range order, resulting in the loss of the initial structure; glass reconstruction is controlled only by the 'quenching rate' in the displacement cascade, i.e. by its thermal history and the corresponding relaxation options. From this standpoint the final glass structure is the consequence of the ballistic changes and the regenerative capacity of the glass structure, resulting in a higher fictive-temperature glass corresponding to the structural changes identified in this study. (author)

  14. Beneficial effects of semantic memory support on older adults' episodic memory: Differential patterns of support of item and associative information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Praggyan Pam; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Ratneshwar, Srinivasan

    2016-02-01

    The effects of two types of semantic memory support-meaningfulness of an item and relatedness between items-in mitigating age-related deficits in item and associative, memory are examined in a marketing context. In Experiment 1, participants studied less (vs. more) meaningful brand logo graphics (pictures) paired with meaningful brand names (words) and later were assessed by item (old/new) and associative (intact/recombined) memory recognition tests. Results showed that meaningfulness of items eliminated age deficits in item memory, while equivalently boosting associative memory for older and younger adults. Experiment 2, in which related and unrelated brand logo graphics and brand name pairs served as stimuli, revealed that relatedness between items eliminated age deficits in associative memory, while improving to the same degree item memory in older and younger adults. Experiment 2 also provided evidence for a probable boundary condition that could reconcile seemingly contradictory extant results. Overall, these experiments provided evidence that although the two types of semantic memory support can improve both item and associative memory in older and younger adults, older adults' memory deficits can be eliminated when the type of support provided is compatible with the type of information required to perform well on the test. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Age differences and format effects in working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foos, Paul W; Goolkasian, Paula

    2010-07-01

    Format effects refer to lower recall of printed words from working memory when compared to spoken words or pictures. These effects have been attributed to an attenuation of attention to printed words. The present experiment compares younger and older adults' recall of three or six items presented as pictures, spoken words, printed words, and alternating case WoRdS. The latter stimuli have been shown to increase attention to printed words and, thus, reduce format effects. The question of interest was whether these stimuli would also reduce format effects for older adults whose working memory capacity has fewer attentional resources to allocate. Results showed that older adults performed as well as younger adults with three items but less well with six and that format effects were reduced for both age groups, but more for young, when alternating case words were used. Other findings regarding executive control of working memory are discussed. The obtained differences support models of reduced capacity in older adult working memory.

  16. Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Aging on Long-Term and Remote Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Park, Alan J.; Khatib, Nora; Abel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) following hippocampus-dependent learning in young mice impairs memory when tested the following day. Here, we examined the effects of SD on remote memory in both young and aged mice. In young mice, we found that memory is still impaired 1 mo after training. SD also impaired memory in aged mice 1 d after training, but, by a…

  17. Effect of Cistanche deserticola Ma extract on memory of aged mice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age-related learning and memory disorders have ... Plant material and extraction ... The plant extract (CDME) was obtained by steeping the dried Cistanche deserticola Ma in 60 °C water for. 1 h. ... glass bottle, labeled, and stored in a deep.

  18. Investigation of bioactivity and cell effects of nano-porous sol–gel derived bioactive glass film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhijun, E-mail: mokuu@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Ji, Huijiao [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310028 (China); Hu, Xiaomeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Teng, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Zhao, Guiyun; Mo, Lijuan; Zhao, Xiaoli [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310028 (China); Chen, Weibo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Qiu, Jianrong, E-mail: qjr@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Zhang, Ming, E-mail: zhangming201201@126.com [College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310028 (China)

    2013-11-01

    In orthopedic surgery, bioactive glass film coating is extensively studied to improve the synthetic performance of orthopedic implants. A lot of investigations have confirmed that nano-porous structure in bioactive glasses can remarkably improve their bioactivity. Nevertheless, researches on preparation of nano-porous bioactive glasses in the form of film coating and their cell response activities are scarce. Herein, we report the preparation of nano-porous bioactive glass film on commercial glass slide based on a sol–gel technique, together with the evaluation of its in vitro bioactivity through immersion in simulated body fluid and monitoring the precipitation of apatite-like layer. Cell responses of the samples, including attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, were also investigated using BMSCS (bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) as a model. The results presented here provide some basic information on structural influence of bioactive glass film on the improvement of bioactivity and cellular effects.

  19. Investigation of bioactivity and cell effects of nano-porous sol-gel derived bioactive glass film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhijun; Ji, Huijiao; Hu, Xiaomeng; Teng, Yu; Zhao, Guiyun; Mo, Lijuan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Chen, Weibo; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhang, Ming

    2013-11-01

    In orthopedic surgery, bioactive glass film coating is extensively studied to improve the synthetic performance of orthopedic implants. A lot of investigations have confirmed that nano-porous structure in bioactive glasses can remarkably improve their bioactivity. Nevertheless, researches on preparation of nano-porous bioactive glasses in the form of film coating and their cell response activities are scarce. Herein, we report the preparation of nano-porous bioactive glass film on commercial glass slide based on a sol-gel technique, together with the evaluation of its in vitro bioactivity through immersion in simulated body fluid and monitoring the precipitation of apatite-like layer. Cell responses of the samples, including attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, were also investigated using BMSCS (bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) as a model. The results presented here provide some basic information on structural influence of bioactive glass film on the improvement of bioactivity and cellular effects.

  20. Effect of silane coupling agent on interfacial adhesion of copper/glass fabric/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langroudi, A. E.; Yousefi, A. A.; Kabiri, Kourosh

    2003-01-01

    The effect of silane coupling agent on the peel strength of copper/prep reg/copper composites was investigated. The composite consisted of one or two sheets of prepress covered by two copper plates. The prep reg was prepared by hand dry-lay-up technique using an epoxy resin and an electrical resistant glass fabric (e-glass style 2165). 4,4'-methylene dianiline. An aromatic amine, was used as curing agent. curing times for prep reg and composite at 120 d ig C and 170 d ig C were 15 min and 1 h, respectively. γ-aminopropyl trimethoxy silane was used as coupling agent. The effect of aminopropyl trimethoxy silane on the adhesion of epoxy/glass and epoxy/copper interfaces was investigated by two methods. In the first method, the surface of the glass fabric and/or the copper plates were treated by aminopropyl trimethoxy silane. In the second method, aminopropyl trimethoxy silane was directly added to epoxy resin. In addition, the effect of additional resin on the adhesion strength was also studied by the latter method

  1. Intraoral Temperature Triggered Shape-Memory Effect and Sealing Capability of A Transpolyisoprene-Based Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gakuji Tsukada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In dentistry, pure gutta-percha (trans-1,4-polyisoprene (TPI is widely used as a main component of root canal filling materials. TPI has an interesting shape memory formed through cross-linking, and this characteristic is expected to be very effective for development of novel dental treatments; in particular, modification of the shape recovery temperature to the intraoral temperature (37 °C will enhance the applicability of the shape-memory effect of TPI in root canal filling. In this study, trial test specimens consisting of varying proportions of TPI, cis-polyisoprene, zinc oxide, stearic acid, sulfur and dicumyl peroxide were prepared and the temperature dependence of their shape recovery, recovery stress and relaxation modulus were measured. Additionally, their sealing abilities were tested using glass tubing and a bovine incisor. As the ratio of cross-linking agent in the specimens increased, a decrease in recovery temperature and an increase in recovery stress and recovery speed were observed. In addition, the test specimen containing the highest concentration of cross-linking agent showed superior sealing ability under a thermal stimulus of 37 °C in both sealing ability tests.

  2. Study of the mixed alkali effect in lithium and sodium metaphosphate glass-forming liquids by photon correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changstrom, J R; Sidebottom, D L

    2008-01-01

    We report results of an extensive study of the structural relaxation occurring in mixed alkali metaphosphate liquids obtained by photon correlation spectroscopy. Values for the glass transition temperature, the fragility index, and the heterogeneity parameter (also known as the Kohlrausch exponent) are extracted from the measurements and are all shown to exhibit a mixed alkali effect wherein nonlinear variations with mixing occur. The depression in the glass transition temperature is shown to be the direct result of mechanical relaxations, present in the solid, which prematurely loosen the glass structure. A minimum in the fragility index is believed to be an artifact of the resulting depression of the glass transition temperature

  3. Effects of container material on PCT leach test results for high-level nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, S.B.; Pegg, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    A glass-based waste form used for the immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes should exhibit good resistance to aqueous corrosion since typically this is the primary process by which radionucleides could be released into the environment upon failure of other barriers. In the USA, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) provides a set of requirements to ensure the consistency of the waste forms produced and specifies the Product Consistency Test (PCT) as a measure of relative chemical durability. While the PCT procedure permits usage of both Teflon and stainless steel vessels for testing of simulated development glasses, Teflon is not permitted for testing of production glasses due to radiative degradation. The results presented in this paper indicate that there are very significant differences between tests conducted in the two types of vessels due to the well-known permeability of Teflon to atmospheric carbon dioxide which results in lowering of the solution pH and a consequent reduction in the leach rate of silicate glasses. A wide range of nuclear waste glass compositions was subjected to the PCT procedure using both Teflon and stainless steel vessels. The magnitude of the effect (up to a factor of four for B, Na, Li concentrations) depends strongly on glass composition, therefore the isolated checks performed previously were inconclusive. The permeability to CO, of two types of Teflon vessels specified in the PCT procedure was directly measured using buffer solutions: ingress of CO, is linear in time, strongly pH-dependent, and was as high as 100 ppm after 7 days. In actual PCT tests in Teflon vessels, the total CO, content was 560 ppm after 87 days and 1930 ppm after one year

  4. Emotional stimuli exert parallel effects on attention and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Deborah; Ziegler, Marilyne; Hawksworth, Jade; Lalani, Safina; Herman, C Peter; Moscovitch, Morris

    2013-01-01

    Because emotional and neutral stimuli typically differ on non-emotional dimensions, it has been difficult to determine conclusively which factors underlie the ability of emotional stimuli to enhance immediate long-term memory. Here we induced arousal by varying participants' goals, a method that removes many potential confounds between emotional and non-emotional items. Hungry and sated participants encoded food and clothing images under divided attention conditions. Sated participants attended to and recalled food and clothing images equivalently. Hungry participants performed worse on the concurrent tone-discrimination task when they viewed food relative to clothing images, suggesting enhanced attention to food images, and they recalled more food than clothing images. A follow-up regression analysis of the factors predicting memory for individual pictures revealed that food images had parallel effects on attention and memory in hungry participants, so that enhanced attention to food images did not predict their enhanced memory. We suggest that immediate long-term memory for food is enhanced in the hungry state because hunger leads to more distinctive processing of food images rendering them more accessible during retrieval.

  5. The effects of cholesterol on learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Bernard G

    2010-07-01

    Cholesterol is vital to normal brain function including learning and memory but that involvement is as complex as the synthesis, metabolism and excretion of cholesterol itself. Dietary cholesterol influences learning tasks from water maze to fear conditioning even though cholesterol does not cross the blood brain barrier. Excess cholesterol has many consequences including peripheral pathology that can signal brain via cholesterol metabolites, pro-inflammatory mediators and antioxidant processes. Manipulations of cholesterol within the central nervous system through genetic, pharmacological, or metabolic means circumvent the blood brain barrier and affect learning and memory but often in animals already otherwise compromised. The human literature is no less complex. Cholesterol reduction using statins improves memory in some cases but not others. There is also controversy over statin use to alleviate memory problems in Alzheimer's disease. Correlations of cholesterol and cognitive function are mixed and association studies find some genetic polymorphisms are related to cognitive function but others are not. In sum, the field is in flux with a number of seemingly contradictory results and many complexities. Nevertheless, understanding cholesterol effects on learning and memory is too important to ignore.

  6. Effects of emotional content on working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Katie E; Schmeichel, Brandon J

    2018-02-13

    Emotional events tend to be remembered better than neutral events, but emotional states and stimuli may also interfere with cognitive processes that underlie memory performance. The current study investigated the effects of emotional content on working memory capacity (WMC), which involves both short term storage and executive attention control. We tested competing hypotheses in a preregistered experiment (N = 297). The emotional enhancement hypothesis predicts that emotional stimuli attract attention and additional processing resources relative to neutral stimuli, thereby making it easier to encode and store emotional information in WMC. The emotional impairment hypothesis, by contrast, predicts that emotional stimuli interfere with attention control and the active maintenance of information in working memory. Participants completed a common measure of WMC (the operation span task; Turner, M. L., & Engle, R. W. [1989]. Is working memory capacity task dependent? Journal of Memory and Language, 28, 127-154) that included either emotional or neutral words. Results revealed that WMC was reduced for emotional words relative to neutral words, consistent with the emotional impairment hypothesis.

  7. Neutron irradiation effect on thermomechanical properties of shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.Ya.; Ionajtis, R.R.; Kotov, V.V.; Loguntsev, E.N.; Ushakov, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    Alloys of Ti-Ni, Ti-Ni-Pd, Fe-Mn-Si, Mn-Cu-Cr, Mn-Cu, Cu-Al-Mn, Cu-Al-Ni systems are investigated after irradiation in IVV-2M reactor at various temperatures with neutron fluence of 10 19 - 10 20 cm -2 . The degradation of shape memory effect in titanium nickelide base alloys is revealed after irradiation. Mn-Cu and Mn-Cu-Cr alloys show the best results. Trends in shape memory alloy behaviour depending on irradiation temperature are found. A consideration is given to the possibility of using these alloys for components of power reactor control and protection systems [ru

  8. Dynamics of Quantum Entanglement in Reservoir with Memory Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiang; Sha Jinqiao; Sun Jian; Zhu Shiqun

    2012-01-01

    The non-Markovian dynamics of quantum entanglement is studied by the Shabani-Lidar master equation when one of entangled quantum systems is coupled to a local reservoir with memory effects. The completely positive reduced dynamical map can be constructed in the Kraus representation. Quantum entanglement decays more slowly in the non-Markovian environment. The decoherence time for quantum entanglement can be markedly increased with the change of the memory kernel. It is found out that the entanglement sudden death between quantum systems and entanglement sudden birth between the system and reservoir occur at different instants. (general)

  9. Memory for Pictorial Information and the Picture Superiority Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisto, Albert A.; Queen, Debbie Elaine

    1992-01-01

    The performance of 53 younger adults (mean age 20.7) and 52 older adults (mean age 68.3) was compared in a memory task involving pictures, words, and pictures-plus-words. Results showed (1) significantly higher recall scores for younger adults; (2) equivalent picture superiority effect for both groups; and (3) decline in older adults' performance…

  10. Effects of Skill Training on Working Memory Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuh-shiow; Lu, Min-ju; Ko, Hsiu-ping

    2007-01-01

    In this study we examined the effects of skill training, in particular mental abacus and music training, on working memory. Two groups of participants--children who had received mental abacus training and their controls--participated in Experiment 1. All participants performed the following span tasks: forward digit span, backward digit span,…

  11. Effect of background music on auditory-verbal memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Matloubi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Music exists in all cultures; many scientists are seeking to understand how music effects cognitive development such as comprehension, memory, and reading skills. More recently, a considerable number of neuroscience studies on music have been developed. This study aimed to investigate the effects of null and positive background music in comparison with silence on auditory-verbal memory performance.Methods: Forty young adults (male and female with normal hearing, aged between 18 and 26, participated in this comparative-analysis study. An auditory and speech evaluation was conducted in order to investigate the effects of background music on working memory. Subsequently, the Rey auditory-verbal learning test was performed for three conditions: silence, positive, and null music.Results: The mean score of the Rey auditory-verbal learning test in silence condition was higher than the positive music condition (p=0.003 and the null music condition (p=0.01. The tests results did not reveal any gender differences.Conclusion: It seems that the presence of competitive music (positive and null music and the orientation of auditory attention have negative effects on the performance of verbal working memory. It is possibly owing to the intervention of music with verbal information processing in the brain.

  12. Context-Dependent Repetition Effects on Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    One widely acknowledged way to improve our memory performance is to repeatedly study the to be learned material. One aspect that has received little attention in past research regards the context sensitivity of this repetition effect, that is whether the item is repeated within the same or within different contexts. The predictions of a…

  13. Effects of Aging and IQ on Item and Associative Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Roger; Thapar, Anjali; McKoon, Gail

    2011-01-01

    The effects of aging and IQ on performance were examined in 4 memory tasks: item recognition, associative recognition, cued recall, and free recall. For item and associative recognition, accuracy and the response time (RT) distributions for correct and error responses were explained by Ratcliff's (1978) diffusion model at the level of individual…

  14. Effects of Methylphenidate on Working Memory Components: Influence of Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Anne-Claude; Jain, Umesh; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Tannock, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    Background: To investigate the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) on components of working memory (WM) in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and determine the responsiveness of WM measures to MPH. Methods: Participants were a clinical sample of 50 children and adolescents with ADHD, aged 6 to 16 years old, who participated in an acute…

  15. Effects of cannabis on eyewitness memory : A field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredeveldt, Annelies; Charman, Steve D.; den Blanken, Aukje; Hooydonk, Maren

    2018-01-01

    Eyewitnesses to crimes are regularly under the influence of drugs, such as cannabis. Yet there is very little research on how the use of cannabis affects eyewitness memory. In the present study, we assessed the effects of cannabis on eyewitness recall and lineup identification performance in a field

  16. Effect of Magnesium Administration on Passive Avoidance Memory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, one study has discussed the effect of diabetes on behavior, memory and learning [7]. Pain caused by peripheral nerve neuropathy is also one of the major clinical complaints described by patients with diabetes, and this affects the quality life of those concerned. Thus, alleviation of pain in these patients is of prime.

  17. Dissipative nucleus-nucleus collisions: study of memory effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, K.C.; Yadav, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Dissipative collisions between two heavy nuclei are described in terms of a macroscopic dynamical model within the framework of a multi-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The reaction 86 Kr(8.18 MeV/u) + 166 Er has been used as a prototype to study and demonstrate the memory effects for dissipation and diffusion processes

  18. Infants' Memory Processing of a Serial List: List Length Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulya, Michele; Sweeney, Becky; Rovee-Collier, Carolyn

    1999-01-01

    Three experiments demonstrated that increasing the length of a mobile serial list impaired 6-month olds' memory for serial order. Findings indicated that the primacy effect was absent on a 24-hour delayed recognition test and was exhibited on a reactivation test, adding to growing evidence that young infants possess two functionally distinct…

  19. Effect of Magnesium Administration on Passive Avoidance Memory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of oral consumption of magnesium on the memory and pain sensation of diabetic rats. Methods: A total of ... There was also a significant reduction in mean LT of untreated diabetic group (p < 0.001) as indicated by the increased number of animals that entered the dark compartment. Plasma ...

  20. Simulation for memory effect of Fick's first law†

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    firmed by means of the 3D Monte Carlo simulation, where τ is the relaxation time, J is the flux of the diffus- ing particles, D is ... Fick's first law; memory effects; relaxation time; second sound; Monte Carlo simulation. 1. ..... According to the theory of the fluctuation of numbers ... example, the existing probability of a diffusing par-.

  1. Blinks of the mind : Memory effects of attentional processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, S; Wolters, G; van Raamsdonk, M

    2002-01-01

    If 2 words are presented successively within 500 ms, subjects often miss the 2nd word. This attentional blink. reflects a limited capacity to attend to incoming information. Memory effects were studied for words that fell within an attentional blink. Unrelated words were presented in a modified

  2. Vantage perspective during encoding: The effects on phenomenological memory characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooren, N.; Krans, J.; Näring, G.W.B.; Moulds, M.L.; Minnen, A. van

    2016-01-01

    The vantage perspective from which a memory is retrieved influences the memory’s emotional impact, intrusiveness, and phenomenological characteristics. This study tested whether similar effects are observed when participants were instructed to imagine the events from a specific perspective. Fifty

  3. Effects of noise and working memory capacity on memory processing of speech for hearing-aid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning; Rudner, Mary; Lunner, Thomas; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2013-07-01

    It has been shown that noise reduction algorithms can reduce the negative effects of noise on memory processing in persons with normal hearing. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether a similar effect can be obtained for persons with hearing impairment and whether such an effect is dependent on individual differences in working memory capacity. A sentence-final word identification and recall (SWIR) test was conducted in two noise backgrounds with and without noise reduction as well as in quiet. Working memory capacity was measured using a reading span (RS) test. Twenty-six experienced hearing-aid users with moderate to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss. Noise impaired recall performance. Competing speech disrupted memory performance more than speech-shaped noise. For late list items the disruptive effect of the competing speech background was virtually cancelled out by noise reduction for persons with high working memory capacity. Noise reduction can reduce the adverse effect of noise on memory for speech for persons with good working memory capacity. We argue that the mechanism behind this is faster word identification that enhances encoding into working memory.

  4. The quintuple-shape memory effect in electrospun nanofiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-08-01

    Shape memory fibrous membranes (SMFMs) are an emerging class of active polymers, which are capable of switching from a temporary shape to their permanent shape upon appropriate stimulation. Quintuple-shape memory membranes based on the thermoplastic polymer Nafion, with a stable fibrous structure, are achieved via electrospinning technology, and possess a broad transition temperature. The recovery of multiple temporary shapes of electrospun membranes can be triggered by heat in a single triple-, quadruple-, quintuple-shape memory cycle, respectively. The fiber morphology and nanometer size provide unprecedented design flexibility for the adjustable morphing effect. SMFMs enable complex deformations at need, having a wide potential application field including smart textiles, artificial intelligence robots, bio-medical engineering, aerospace technologies, etc in the future.

  5. The effects of cardiovascular exercise on human memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Nordbrandt, Sasja; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the evidence for the use of cardiovascular exercise to improve memory and explored potential mechanisms. Data from 29 and 21 studies including acute and long-term cardiovascular interventions were retrieved. Meta-analyses revealed that acute exercise had moderate (SMD=0.26; 95% CI=0.0.......03, 0.49; p=0.03; N=22) whereas long-term had small (SMD=0.15; 95% CI=0.02, 0.27; p=0.02; N=37) effects on short-term memory. In contrast, acute exercise showed moderate to large (SMD=0.52; 95% CI=0.28, 0.75; p......We reviewed the evidence for the use of cardiovascular exercise to improve memory and explored potential mechanisms. Data from 29 and 21 studies including acute and long-term cardiovascular interventions were retrieved. Meta-analyses revealed that acute exercise had moderate (SMD=0.26; 95% CI=0...

  6. The emotional memory effect: differential processing or item distinctiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stephen R; Saari, Bonnie

    2007-12-01

    A color-naming task was followed by incidental free recall to investigate how emotional words affect attention and memory. We compared taboo, nonthreatening negative-affect, and neutral words across three experiments. As compared with neutral words, taboo words led to longer color-naming times and better memory in both within- and between-subjects designs. Color naming of negative-emotion nontaboo words was slower than color naming of neutral words only during block presentation and at relatively short interstimulus intervals (ISIs). The nontaboo emotion words were remembered better than neutral words following blocked and random presentation and at both long and short ISIs, but only in mixed-list designs. Our results support multifactor theories of the effects of emotion on attention and memory. As compared with neutral words, threatening stimuli received increased attention, poststimulus elaboration, and benefit from item distinctiveness, whereas nonthreatening emotional stimuli benefited only from increased item distinctiveness.

  7. The quintuple-shape memory effect in electrospun nanofiber membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory fibrous membranes (SMFMs) are an emerging class of active polymers, which are capable of switching from a temporary shape to their permanent shape upon appropriate stimulation. Quintuple-shape memory membranes based on the thermoplastic polymer Nafion, with a stable fibrous structure, are achieved via electrospinning technology, and possess a broad transition temperature. The recovery of multiple temporary shapes of electrospun membranes can be triggered by heat in a single triple-, quadruple-, quintuple-shape memory cycle, respectively. The fiber morphology and nanometer size provide unprecedented design flexibility for the adjustable morphing effect. SMFMs enable complex deformations at need, having a wide potential application field including smart textiles, artificial intelligence robots, bio-medical engineering, aerospace technologies, etc in the future. (paper)

  8. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO{sub 2} fuel reprocessing waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, J C

    1993-05-01

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of {sup 129}I, {sup 85}Kr and {sup 14}C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs.

  9. Are animacy effects in episodic memory independent of encoding instructions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, Margaux; Bugaiska, Aurélia; Méot, Alain; Bonin, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive view of human memory [Nairne, J. S. 2010. Adaptive memory: Evolutionary constraints on remembering. In B. H. Ross (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation (Vol. 53 pp. 1-32). Burlington: Academic Press; Nairne, J. S., & Pandeirada, J. N. S. 2010a. Adaptive memory: Ancestral priorities and the mnemonic value of survival processing. Cognitive Psychology, 61, 1-22, 2010b; Memory functions. In The Corsini encyclopedia of psychology and behavioral science, (Vol 3, 4th ed. pp. 977-979). Hokoben, NJ: John Wiley & Sons] assumes that animates (e.g., baby, rabbit presented as words or pictures) are better remembered than inanimates (e.g., bottle, mountain) because animates are more important for fitness than inanimates. In four studies, we investigated whether the animacy effect in episodic memory (i.e., the better remembering of animates over inanimates) is independent of encoding instructions. Using both a factorial (Studies 1 and 3) and a multiple regression approach (Study 2), three studies tested whether certain contexts drive people to attend to inanimate more than to animate things (or the reverse), and therefore lead to differential animacy effects. The findings showed that animacy effects on recall performance were observed in the grassland-survival scenario used by Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada (2007. Adaptive memory: Survival processing enhances retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 33, 263-273) (Studies 1-3), when words were rated for their pleasantness (Study 2), and in explicit learning (Study 3). In the non-survival scenario of moving to a foreign land (Studies 1-2), animacy effects on recall rates were not reliable in Study 1, but were significant in Study 2, whereas these effects were reliable in the non-survival scenario of planning a trip as a tour guide (Study 3). A final (control) study (Study 4) was conducted to test specifically whether animacy effects are related to the more organised

  10. Formation of black glass to be used in solar collectors as absorbent and CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}'s effect on this glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colak, Sadiye Cetinkaya; Birdogan, Selcuk; Aral, Ertunc; Kilic, Gokhan [Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Meselik, 26480 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2009-06-15

    Solar energy has the highest potential among novel and renewable energies. In order for solar energy to be used it should first be collected. In this study, a black glass was formed by doping silicate glass with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} at a high concentration to be used as absorbent, and in addition, this black glass was also doped with CuO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Optical absorptions, electrical conductivities, thermal diffusion coefficients, SEM images and EDX spectra of all glasses were obtained and effects of transition metal oxides on glass were examined. (author)

  11. Colored noise and memory effects on formal spiking neuron models

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, L. A.; Vilela, R. D.

    2015-06-01

    Simplified neuronal models capture the essence of the electrical activity of a generic neuron, besides being more interesting from the computational point of view when compared to higher-dimensional models such as the Hodgkin-Huxley one. In this work, we propose a generalized resonate-and-fire model described by a generalized Langevin equation that takes into account memory effects and colored noise. We perform a comprehensive numerical analysis to study the dynamics and the point process statistics of the proposed model, highlighting interesting new features such as (i) nonmonotonic behavior (emergence of peak structures, enhanced by the choice of colored noise characteristic time scale) of the coefficient of variation (CV) as a function of memory characteristic time scale, (ii) colored noise-induced shift in the CV, and (iii) emergence and suppression of multimodality in the interspike interval (ISI) distribution due to memory-induced subthreshold oscillations. Moreover, in the noise-induced spike regime, we study how memory and colored noise affect the coherence resonance (CR) phenomenon. We found that for sufficiently long memory, not only is CR suppressed but also the minimum of the CV-versus-noise intensity curve that characterizes the presence of CR may be replaced by a maximum. The aforementioned features allow to interpret the interplay between memory and colored noise as an effective control mechanism to neuronal variability. Since both variability and nontrivial temporal patterns in the ISI distribution are ubiquitous in biological cells, we hope the present model can be useful in modeling real aspects of neurons.

  12. Effects of high-temperature gas dealkalization on surface mechanical properties of float glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Ufuk

    The surface topography, and the near-surface structure and mechanical property changes on float glass, that was treated in atmospheres containing SOsb2, HCl, and 1,1 difluoroethane (DFE) gases, at temperatures in the glass transition region, were studied. Structure was investigated using surface sensitive infrared spectroscopy techniques (attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and diffuse reflectance (DRIFT)) and the topography was evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results obtained from the two FTIR methods were in agreement with each other. Mechanical property characteristics of the surface were determined by measuring microhardness using a recording microindentation set-up. A simple analysis performed on the three hardness calculation methods-LVH, LVHsb2, and Lsb2VH-indicated that LVH and LVHsb2 are less effected by measurement errors and are better suited for the calculation of hardness. Contact damage characteristics of the treated glass was also studied by monitoring the crack initiation behavior during indentation, using acoustic emission. The results of the studies, aiming for the understanding of the structure, topography, and hardness property changes indicate that the treatment parameters-temperature, time, and treatment atmosphere conditions-are significant factors influencing these properties. The analysis of these results suggest a relation to exist between the three properties. This relation is used in understanding the surface mechanical properties of the treated float glasses. The difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between the dealkalized surface and bulk, the nature of surface structure changes, structural relaxation, surface water content, and glass transformation temperature are identified as the major factors having an influence on the properties. A model connecting these features is suggested. A difference in the structure, hardness, and topography on the air and tin sides of float glass is also shown to exist. The

  13. Glass–water interaction: Effect of high-valence cations on glass structure and chemical durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopf, J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Angeli, F.; Charpentier, Thibault M.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, Bernard P.; Windisch, Charles F.; Burton, Sarah D.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2016-05-15

    Borosilicate glass is a durable solid, but it dissolves when in contact with aqueous fluids. The dissolution mechanism, which involves a variety of sequential reactions that occur at the solid-fluid interface, has important implications for the corrosion resistance of industrial and nuclear waste glasses. In this study, spectroscopic measurements, dissolution experiments, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the effect of high–valence cations (HVC) on the mechanisms of glass dissolution under dilute and near-saturated conditions. Raman and NMR spectroscopy were used to determine the structural changes that occur in glass, specifically network formers (e.g., Al, Si, and B), with the addition of the HVC element hafnium in the Na2O–Al2O3–B2O3–HfO2–SiO2 system (e.g., Na/[Al+B] = 1.0 and HfO2/SiO2 from 0.0 to 0.42). Spectroscopic measurements revealed that increasing hafnium content decreases N4 (tetrahedral boron/total boron) and increases the amount of Si—O—Hf moieties in the glass. Results from flow–through experiments conducted under dilute and near–saturated conditions show a decrease of approximately 100× or more in the dissolution rate over the series from 0 to 20 mol% HfO2. Comparing the average steady-state rates obtained under dilute conditions to the rates obtained for near-saturated conditions reveals a divergence in the magnitude between the average steady state rates measured in these different conditions. The reason for this divergence was investigated more thoroughly using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations indicate that the divergence in glass dissolution behavior under dilute and near-saturated conditions result from the stronger binding of Si sites that deposit on the surface from the influent when Hf is present in the glass. As a result, the residence time at the glass surface of these newly-formed Si sites is longer in the presence of Hf, which increases the density of anchor sites from which altered layers

  14. Effect of similar elements on improving glass-forming ability of La-Ce-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao; Li Ran; Pang Shujie

    2009-01-01

    To date the effect of unlike component elements on glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys have been studied extensively, and it is generally recognized that the main consisting elements of the alloys with high GFA usually have large difference in atomic size and atomic interaction (large negative heat of mixing) among them. In our recent work, a series of rare earth metal-based alloy compositions with superior GFA were found through the approach of coexistence of similar constituent elements. The quinary (La 0.5 Ce 0.5 ) 65 Al 10 (Co 0.6 Cu 0.4 ) 25 bulk metallic glass (BMG) in a rod form with a diameter up to 32 mm was synthesized by tilt-pour casting, for which the glass-forming ability is significantly higher than that for ternary Ln-Al-TM alloys (Ln = La or Ce; TM = Co or Cu) with critical diameters for glass-formation of several millimeters. We suggest that the strong frustration of crystallization by utilizing the coexistence of La-Ce and Co-Cu to complicate competing crystalline phases is helpful to construct BMG component with superior GFA. The results of our present work indicate that similar elements (elements with similar atomic size and chemical properties) have significant effect on GFA of alloys.

  15. Suppressing my memories by listening to yours: The effect of socially triggered context-based prediction error on memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasceanu, Madalina; Drach, Rae; Coman, Alin

    2018-05-03

    The mind is a prediction machine. In most situations, it has expectations as to what might happen. But when predictions are invalidated by experience (i.e., prediction errors), the memories that generate these predictions are suppressed. Here, we explore the effect of prediction error on listeners' memories following social interaction. We find that listening to a speaker recounting experiences similar to one's own triggers prediction errors on the part of the listener that lead to the suppression of her memories. This effect, we show, is sensitive to a perspective-taking manipulation, such that individuals who are instructed to take the perspective of the speaker experience memory suppression, whereas individuals who undergo a low-perspective-taking manipulation fail to show a mnemonic suppression effect. We discuss the relevance of these findings for our understanding of the bidirectional influences between cognition and social contexts, as well as for the real-world situations that involve memory-based predictions.

  16. Recognition Memory and Source Memory in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Study of the Intention Superiority and Enactment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Catherine; Williams, David M.; Lind, Sophie E.

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that neurotypical individuals generally show better memory for actions they have performed than actions they have observed others perform or merely read about, a so-called "enactment effect." Strikingly, research has also shown that neurotypical individuals demonstrate superior memory for actions they…

  17. Memory systems in the rat: effects of reward probability, context, and congruency between working and reference memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William A; Guitar, Nicole A; Marsh, Heidi L; MacDonald, Hayden

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of working and reference memory was studied in rats on an eight-arm radial maze. In two experiments, rats were trained to perform working memory and reference memory tasks. On working memory trials, they were allowed to enter four randomly chosen arms for reward in a study phase and then had to choose the unentered arms for reward in a test phase. On reference memory trials, they had to learn to visit the same four arms on the maze on every trial for reward. Retention was tested on working memory trials in which the interval between the study and test phase was 15 s, 15 min, or 30 min. At each retention interval, tests were performed in which the correct WM arms were either congruent or incongruent with the correct RM arms. Both experiments showed that congruency interacted with retention interval, yielding more forgetting at 30 min on incongruent trials than on congruent trials. The effect of reference memory strength on the congruency effect was examined in Experiment 1, and the effect of associating different contexts with working and reference memory on the congruency effect was studied in Experiment 2.

  18. Effectiveness of high temperature innovative geometry fixed ceramic matrix regenerators used in glass furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wołkowycki Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effectiveness of waste heat recovery regenerators equipped with innovative ceramic matrix forming an integral part of a real glass furnace. The paper full description of the regenerators’ matrix structure with its dimensions, thermo-physical properties and operating parameters is included experimentally determined was the effectiveness of the regenerators has been descrbed using the obtained experimental data such as the operating temperature, gas flows as well as the gases generated during the liquid glass manufacturing process. The effectiveness values refer not only to the heating cycle when the regenerator matrix is heated by combustion gases but also to the cooling cycle in which the matrix is cooled as a result of changes in the direction of the flowing gas. On the basis of the determined effectiveness values for both cycles and measurement uncertainties it was possible, to calculate the weighted average efficiency for each of the regenerators.

  19. Rose or black-coloured glasses? Altered neural processing of positive events during memory formation is a trait marker of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, J.F.; Fitzgerald, D.A.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Rinck, M.; Eling, P.A.T.M.; Becker, E.S.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Tendolkar, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Valence-specific memory enhancement is one of the core cognitive functions that causes and maintains Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). While previous neuroimaging studies have elucidated the neural underpinnings of this emotional enhancement effect in depressed patients, this study aimed

  20. Rose or black-coloured glasses? Altered neural processing of positive events during memory formation is a trait marker of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, J.F.; Fitzgerald, D.A.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Rinck, M.; Eling, P.A.; Becker, E.S.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Tendolkar, I.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Valence-specific memory enhancement is one of the core cognitive functions that causes and maintains Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). While previous neuroimaging studies have elucidated the neural underpinnings of this emotional enhancement effect in depressed patients, this study aimed