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Sample records for memory based model

  1. A Memory-Based Hysteresis Model in Piezoelectric Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical memory-based model is proposed to capture the hysteresis behavior in piezoelectric actuators. It is observed that the ascending (descending hysteresis curves are alike and converge to one point without memory saturation. Therefore, two, dominant curves are determined and expressed as continuous functions, and the other hysteresis curves are modeled using two dominant curves through nonlinear transforming of coordinate axis. In the event of memory saturation, a new converging point is used to compensate the model prediction error. The experimental study has been carried out and our proposed model prediction method is compared with PI model and the linear model. It shows that the proposed model prediction method is better than other two methods.

  2. A memory-based model of posttraumatic stress disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, David C.; Berntsen, Dorthe; Johansen, Marlene Klindt

    2008-01-01

    In the mnemonic model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the current memory of a negative event, not the event itself, determines symptoms. The model is an alternative to the current event-based etiology of PTSD represented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed...... objective information about the trauma and peritraumatic emotions but uses retrospective memory reports that can have substantial biases. Negative events and emotions that do not satisfy the current diagnostic criteria for a trauma can be followed by symptoms that would otherwise qualify for PTSD....... Predisposing factors that affect the current memory have large effects on symptoms. The inability-to-recall-an-important-aspect-of-the-trauma symptom does not correlate with other symptoms. Loss or enhancement of the trauma memory affects PTSD symptoms in predictable ways. Special mechanisms that apply only...

  3. Towards Modeling False Memory With Computational Knowledge Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Justin; Kohanyi, Emma

    2017-01-01

    One challenge to creating realistic cognitive models of memory is the inability to account for the vast common-sense knowledge of human participants. Large computational knowledge bases such as WordNet and DBpedia may offer a solution to this problem but may pose other challenges. This paper explores some of these difficulties through a semantic network spreading activation model of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott false memory task. In three experiments, we show that these knowledge bases only capture a subset of human associations, while irrelevant information introduces noise and makes efficient modeling difficult. We conclude that the contents of these knowledge bases must be augmented and, more important, that the algorithms must be refined and optimized, before large knowledge bases can be widely used for cognitive modeling. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  4. Electronic implementation of associative memory based on neural network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moopenn, A.; Lambe, John; Thakoor, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    An electronic embodiment of a neural network based associative memory in the form of a binary connection matrix is described. The nature of false memory errors, their effect on the information storage capacity of binary connection matrix memories, and a novel technique to eliminate such errors with the help of asymmetrical extra connections are discussed. The stability of the matrix memory system incorporating a unique local inhibition scheme is analyzed in terms of local minimization of an energy function. The memory's stability, dynamic behavior, and recall capability are investigated using a 32-'neuron' electronic neural network memory with a 1024-programmable binary connection matrix.

  5. Attention, Working Memory, and Long-Term Memory in Multimedia Learning: An Integrated Perspective Based on Process Models of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweppe, Judith; Rummer, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models of multimedia learning such as the Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (Mayer 2009) or the Cognitive Load Theory (Sweller 1999) are based on different cognitive models of working memory (e.g., Baddeley 1986) and long-term memory. The current paper describes a working memory model that has recently gained popularity in basic…

  6. Novel associative-memory-based self-learning neurocontrol model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke

    1992-09-01

    Intelligent control is an important field of AI application, which is closely related to machine learning, and the neurocontrol is a kind of intelligent control that controls actions of a physical system or a plant. Linear associative memory model is a good analytic tool for artificial neural networks. In this paper, we present a novel self-learning neurocontrol on the basis of the linear associative memory model to support intelligent control. Using our self-learning neurocontrol model, the learning process is viewed as an extension of one of J. Piaget's developmental stages. After a particular linear associative model developed by us is presented, a brief introduction to J. Piaget's cognitive theory is described as the basis of our self-learning style control. It follows that the neurocontrol model is presented, which usually includes two learning stages, viz. primary learning and high-level learning. As a demonstration of our neurocontrol model, an example is also presented with simulation techniques, called that `bird' catches an aim. The tentative experimental results show that the learning and controlling performance of this approach is surprisingly good. In conclusion, future research is pointed out to improve our self-learning neurocontrol model and explore other areas of application.

  7. Computational Model-Based Prediction of Human Episodic Memory Performance Based on Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    Subjects' episodic memory performance is not simply reflected by eye movements. We use a ‘theta phase coding’ model of the hippocampus to predict subjects' memory performance from their eye movements. Results demonstrate the ability of the model to predict subjects' memory performance. These studies provide a novel approach to computational modeling in the human-machine interface.

  8. Compact Modeling Solutions for Oxide-Based Resistive Switching Memories (OxRAM

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    Marc Bocquet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging non-volatile memories based on resistive switching mechanisms attract intense R&D efforts from both academia and industry. Oxide-based Resistive Random Acces Memories (OxRAM gather noteworthy performances, such as fast write/read speed, low power and high endurance outperforming therefore conventional Flash memories. To fully explore new design concepts such as distributed memory in logic, OxRAM compact models have to be developed and implemented into electrical simulators to assess performances at a circuit level. In this paper, we present compact models of the bipolar OxRAM memory based on physical phenomenons. This model was implemented in electrical simulators for single device up to circuit level.

  9. A model for memory systems based on processing modes rather than consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Katharina

    2010-07-01

    Prominent models of human long-term memory distinguish between memory systems on the basis of whether learning and retrieval occur consciously or unconsciously. Episodic memory formation requires the rapid encoding of associations between different aspects of an event which, according to these models, depends on the hippocampus and on consciousness. However, recent evidence indicates that the hippocampus mediates rapid associative learning with and without consciousness in humans and animals, for long-term and short-term retention. Consciousness seems to be a poor criterion for differentiating between declarative (or explicit) and non declarative (or implicit) types of memory. A new model is therefore required in which memory systems are distinguished based on the processing operations involved rather than by consciousness.

  10. A Memory-Based Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Evaluating Basic Assumptions Underlying the PTSD Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David C.; Berntsen, Dorthe; Bohni, Malene Klindt

    2008-01-01

    In the mnemonic model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the current memory of a negative event, not the event itself, determines symptoms. The model is an alternative to the current event-based etiology of PTSD represented in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association,…

  11. On dynamic selection of households for direct marketing based on Markov chain models with memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, Pieter W.

    A simple, dynamic selection procedure is proposed, based on conditional, expected profits using Markov chain models with memory. The method is easy to apply, only frequencies and mean values have to be calculated or estimated. The method is empirically illustrated using a data set from a charitable

  12. Model Considerations for Memory-based Automatic Music Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Štěpán; Šmídl, Václav

    2009-12-01

    The problem of automatic music description is considered. The recorded music is modeled as a superposition of known sounds from a library weighted by unknown weights. Similar observation models are commonly used in statistics and machine learning. Many methods for estimation of the weights are available. These methods differ in the assumptions imposed on the weights. In Bayesian paradigm, these assumptions are typically expressed in the form of prior probability density function (pdf) on the weights. In this paper, commonly used assumptions about music signal are summarized and complemented by a new assumption. These assumptions are translated into pdfs and combined into a single prior density using combination of pdfs. Validity of the model is tested in simulation using synthetic data.

  13. Memory as the "whole brain work": a large-scale model based on "oscillations in super-synergy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, Erol

    2005-01-01

    According to recent trends, memory depends on several brain structures working in concert across many levels of neural organization; "memory is a constant work-in progress." The proposition of a brain theory based on super-synergy in neural populations is most pertinent for the understanding of this constant work in progress. This report introduces a new model on memory basing on the processes of EEG oscillations and Brain Dynamics. This model is shaped by the following conceptual and experimental steps: 1. The machineries of super-synergy in the whole brain are responsible for formation of sensory-cognitive percepts. 2. The expression "dynamic memory" is used for memory processes that evoke relevant changes in alpha, gamma, theta and delta activities. The concerted action of distributed multiple oscillatory processes provides a major key for understanding of distributed memory. It comprehends also the phyletic memory and reflexes. 3. The evolving memory, which incorporates reciprocal actions or reverberations in the APLR alliance and during working memory processes, is especially emphasized. 4. A new model related to "hierarchy of memories as a continuum" is introduced. 5. The notions of "longer activated memory" and "persistent memory" are proposed instead of long-term memory. 6. The new analysis to recognize faces emphasizes the importance of EEG oscillations in neurophysiology and Gestalt analysis. 7. The proposed basic framework called "Memory in the Whole Brain Work" emphasizes that memory and all brain functions are inseparable and are acting as a "whole" in the whole brain. 8. The role of genetic factors is fundamental in living system settings and oscillations and accordingly in memory, according to recent publications. 9. A link from the "whole brain" to "whole body," and incorporation of vegetative and neurological system, is proposed, EEG oscillations and ultraslow oscillations being a control parameter.

  14. Development of prospective memory: tasks based on the prefrontal-lobe model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Heather; Shum, David; McKinlay, Lynne; Baker-Tweney, Simone; Wallace, Geoff

    2005-12-01

    This study investigated the development of prospective memory using tasks based on the prefrontal-lobe model. Three groups each of 30 children, adolescents, and young adults were compared on prospective-memory performance using ongoing tasks with two levels of cognitive demand (low and high), and two levels of importance (unstressed and stressed) of remembering prospective cues. The Self-Ordered Pointing Task (SOPT), Stroop Color Word Interference Test, and Tower of London were also used to assess relationships between prospective memory and prefrontal-lobe functions. The children remembered fewer prospective cues than either the adolescents or adults, but the adolescents and adults remembered equally well. This trend increased significantly as the cognitive demand of the ongoing tasks increased. However, stressing or not stressing the importance of remembering made no difference to prospective-memory performance. Performance on the SOPT and Stroop Colour Word Interference predicted performance on the high- but not on the low-demand condition. These findings implicate the maturation of the brain's prefrontal region in the development of prospective memory.

  15. The Cognitive Processes Underlying Event-Based Prospective Memory In School Age Children and Young Adults: A Formal Model-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Rebekah E.; Bayen, Ute Johanna; Martin, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Fifty 7-year-olds (29 female), 53 10-year-olds (29 female), and 36 young adults (19 female), performed a computerized event-based prospective memory task. All three groups differed significantly in prospective memory performance with adults showing the best performance and 7-year-olds the poorest performance. We used a formal multinomial process tree model of event-based prospective memory to decompose age differences in cognitive processes that jointly contribute to prospective memory perfor...

  16. Working-memory capacity protects model-based learning from stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, A Ross; Raio, Candace M; Chiang, Alice; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2013-12-24

    Accounts of decision-making have long posited the operation of separate, competing valuation systems in the control of choice behavior. Recent theoretical and experimental advances suggest that this classic distinction between habitual and goal-directed (or more generally, automatic and controlled) choice may arise from two computational strategies for reinforcement learning, called model-free and model-based learning. Popular neurocomputational accounts of reward processing emphasize the involvement of the dopaminergic system in model-free learning and prefrontal, central executive-dependent control systems in model-based choice. Here we hypothesized that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress response--believed to have detrimental effects on prefrontal cortex function--should selectively attenuate model-based contributions to behavior. To test this, we paired an acute stressor with a sequential decision-making task that affords distinguishing the relative contributions of the two learning strategies. We assessed baseline working-memory (WM) capacity and used salivary cortisol levels to measure HPA axis stress response. We found that stress response attenuates the contribution of model-based, but not model-free, contributions to behavior. Moreover, stress-induced behavioral changes were modulated by individual WM capacity, such that low-WM-capacity individuals were more susceptible to detrimental stress effects than high-WM-capacity individuals. These results enrich existing accounts of the interplay between acute stress, working memory, and prefrontal function and suggest that executive function may be protective against the deleterious effects of acute stress.

  17. On the Entropy Based Associative Memory Model with Higher-Order Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Nakagawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an entropy based associative memory model will be proposed and applied to memory retrievals with an orthogonal learning model so as to compare with the conventional model based on the quadratic Lyapunov functional to be minimized during the retrieval process. In the present approach, the updating dynamics will be constructed on the basis of the entropy minimization strategy which may be reduced asymptotically to the above-mentioned conventional dynamics as a special case ignoring the higher-order correlations. According to the introduction of the entropy functional, one may involve higer-order correlation effects between neurons in a self-contained manner without any heuristic coupling coefficients as in the conventional manner. In fact we shall show such higher order coupling tensors are to be uniquely determined in the framework of the entropy based approach. From numerical results, it will be found that the presently proposed novel approach realizes much larger memory capacity than that of the quadratic Lyapunov functional approach, e.g., associatron.

  18. Experience-driven formation of parts-based representations in a model of layered visual memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenia Jitsev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Growing neuropsychological and neurophysiological evidence suggests that the visual cortex uses parts-based representations to encode, store and retrieve relevant objects. In such a scheme, objects are represented as a set of spatially distributed local features, or parts, arranged in stereotypical fashion. To encode the local appearance and to represent the relations between the constituent parts, there has to be an appropriate memory structure formed by previous experience with visual objects. Here, we propose a model how a hierarchical memory structure supporting efficient storage and rapid recall of parts-based representations can be established by an experience-driven process of self-organization. The process is based on the collaboration of slow bidirectional synaptic plasticity and homeostatic unit activity regulation, both running at the top of fast activity dynamics with winner-take-all character modulated by an oscillatory rhythm. These neural mechanisms lay down the basis for cooperation and competition between the distributed units and their synaptic connections. Choosing human face recognition as a test task, we show that, under the condition of open-ended, unsupervised incremental learning, the system is able to form memory traces for individual faces in a parts-based fashion. On a lower memory layer the synaptic structure is developed to represent local facial features and their interrelations, while the identities of different persons are captured explicitly on a higher layer. An additional property of the resulting representations is the sparseness of both the activity during the recall and the synaptic patterns comprising the memory traces.

  19. A physics-based compact model of ferroelectric tunnel junction for memory and logic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Kang, Wang; Bouchenak-Khelladi, Anes; Zhang, Yue; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Chappert, Claude; Zhang, Youguang

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) is able to store non-volatile data in the spontaneous polarization direction of ferroelectric tunnel barrier. Recent progress has demonstrated its great potential to build up the next generation non-volatile memory and logic (NVM and NVL) thanks to the high OFF/ON resistance ratio, fast operation speed, low write power, non-destructive readout and so on. In this paper, we present the first physics-based compact model for Co/BTO/LSMO FTJ nanopillar, which was reported experimentally to exhibit excellent NVM performance. This model integrates related physical models of tunnel resistance, static switching voltage and dynamic switching delay. Its accuracy is shown by the good agreement between numerical model simulation and experimental measurements. This compact model has been developed in Verilog-A language and validated by single-cell simulation on Cadence Virtuoso Platform. Hybrid simulations based on 40 nm-technology node of FTJ memory arrays and non-volatile full adder were performed to demonstrate the efficiency of our compact model for the simulation and analysis of CMOS/FTJ integrated circuits. (paper)

  20. A physics-based compact model of ferroelectric tunnel junction for memory and logic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Kang, Wang; Bouchenak-Khelladi, Anes; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Youguang; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Ravelosona, Dafiné; Chappert, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ) is able to store non-volatile data in the spontaneous polarization direction of ferroelectric tunnel barrier. Recent progress has demonstrated its great potential to build up the next generation non-volatile memory and logic (NVM and NVL) thanks to the high OFF/ON resistance ratio, fast operation speed, low write power, non-destructive readout and so on. In this paper, we present the first physics-based compact model for Co/BTO/LSMO FTJ nanopillar, which was reported experimentally to exhibit excellent NVM performance. This model integrates related physical models of tunnel resistance, static switching voltage and dynamic switching delay. Its accuracy is shown by the good agreement between numerical model simulation and experimental measurements. This compact model has been developed in Verilog-A language and validated by single-cell simulation on Cadence Virtuoso Platform. Hybrid simulations based on 40 nm-technology node of FTJ memory arrays and non-volatile full adder were performed to demonstrate the efficiency of our compact model for the simulation and analysis of CMOS/FTJ integrated circuits.

  1. A Memory Hierarchy Model Based on Data Reuse for Full-Search Motion Estimation on High-Definition Digital Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Sandyra Bezerra Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion estimation is the most complex module in a video encoder requiring a high processing throughput and high memory bandwidth, mainly when the focus is high-definition videos. The throughput problem can be solved increasing the parallelism in the internal operations. The external memory bandwidth may be reduced using a memory hierarchy. This work presents a memory hierarchy model for a full-search motion estimation core. The proposed memory hierarchy model is based on a data reuse scheme considering the full search algorithm features. The proposed memory hierarchy expressively reduces the external memory bandwidth required for the motion estimation process, and it provides a very high data throughput for the ME core. This throughput is necessary to achieve real time when processing high-definition videos. When considering the worst bandwidth scenario, this memory hierarchy is able to reduce the external memory bandwidth in 578 times. A case study for the proposed hierarchy, using 32×32 search window and 8×8 block size, was implemented and prototyped on a Virtex 4 FPGA. The results show that it is possible to reach 38 frames per second when processing full HD frames (1920×1080 pixels using nearly 299 Mbytes per second of external memory bandwidth.

  2. Sensory Dissonance Using Memory Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Music may occur concurrently or in temporal sequences. Current machine-based methods for the estimation of qualities of the music are unable to take into account the influence of temporal context. A method for calculating dissonance from audio, called sensory dissonance is improved by the use...... of a memory model. This approach is validated here by the comparison of the sensory dissonance using memory model to data obtained using human subjects....

  3. Petri Nets Based Modelling of Control Flow for Memory-Aid Interactive Programs in Telemedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Khoromskaia, V K

    2004-01-01

    Petri Nets (PN) based modelling of the control flow for the interactive memory assistance programs designed for personal pocket computers and having special requirements for robustness is considered. The proposed concept allows one to elaborate the programs which can give users a variety of possibilities for a day-time planning in the presence of environmental and time restrictions. First, a PN model for a known simple algorithm is constructed and analyzed using the corresponding state equations and incidence matrix. Then a PN graph for a complicated algorithm with overlapping actions and choice possibilities is designed, supplemented by an example of its analysis. Dynamic behaviour of this graph is tested by tracing of all possible paths of the flow of control using the PN simulator. It is shown that PN based modelling provides reliably predictable performance of interactive algorithms with branched structures and concurrency requirements.

  4. A Comparative Study of the Effects of the Neurocognitive-Based Model and the Conventional Model on Learner Attention, Working Memory and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikoon, Sanit; Bunterm, Tassanee; Nethanomsak, Teerachai; Ngang, Tang Keow

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The attention, working memory, and mood of learners are the most important abilities in the learning process. This study was concerned with the comparison of contextualized attention, working memory, and mood through a neurocognitive-based model (5P) and a conventional model (5E). It sought to examine the significant change in attention,…

  5. Hysteresis Modeling of Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy Actuator Based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaolei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new type of intelligent material, magnetically shape memory alloy (MSMA has a good performance in its applications in the actuator manufacturing. Compared with traditional actuators, MSMA actuator has the advantages as fast response and large deformation; however, the hysteresis nonlinearity of the MSMA actuator restricts its further improving of control precision. In this paper, an improved Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii (KP model is used to establish the hysteresis model of MSMA actuator. To identify the weighting parameters of the KP operators, an improved gradient correction algorithm and a variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are proposed in this paper. In order to demonstrate the validity of the proposed modeling approach, simulation experiments are performed, simulations with improved gradient correction algorithm and variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are studied, respectively. Simulation results of both identification algorithms demonstrate that the proposed modeling approach in this paper can establish an effective and accurate hysteresis model for MSMA actuator, and it provides a foundation for improving the control precision of MSMA actuator.

  6. A macroscopic multi-mechanism based constitutive model for the thermo-mechanical cyclic degeneration of shape memory effect of NiTi shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua

    2017-06-01

    A macroscopic based multi-mechanism constitutive model is constructed in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics to describe the degeneration of shape memory effect occurring in the thermo-mechanical cyclic deformation of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs). Three phases, austenite A, twinned martensite Mt and detwinned martensite Md, as well as the phase transitions occurring between each pair of phases (A→ M t, Mt→ A, A→ M d, Md→ A, and Mt→ M d) are considered in the proposed model. Meanwhile, two kinds of inelastic deformation mechanisms, martensite transformation-induced plasticity and reorientation-induced plasticity, are used to explain the degeneration of shape memory effects of NiTi SMAs. The evolution equations of internal variables are proposed by attributing the degeneration of shape memory effect to the interaction between the three phases ( A, Mt, and Md) and plastic deformation. Finally, the capability of the proposed model is verified by comparing the predictions with the experimental results of NiTi SMAs. It is shown that the degeneration of shape memory effect and its dependence on the loading level can be reasonably described by the proposed model.

  7. The Cognitive Processes Underlying Event-Based Prospective Memory In School Age Children and Young Adults: A Formal Model-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebekah E.; Bayen, Ute Johanna; Martin, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Fifty 7-year-olds (29 female), 53 10-year-olds (29 female), and 36 young adults (19 female), performed a computerized event-based prospective memory task. All three groups differed significantly in prospective memory performance with adults showing the best performance and 7-year-olds the poorest performance. We used a formal multinomial process tree model of event-based prospective memory to decompose age differences in cognitive processes that jointly contribute to prospective memory performance. The formal modeling results demonstrated that adults differed significantly from the 7-year-olds and 10-year-olds on both the prospective component and the retrospective component of the task. The 7-year-olds and 10-year-olds differed only in the ability to recognize prospective memory target events. The prospective memory task imposed a cost to ongoing activities in all three age groups. PMID:20053020

  8. Model for a flexible motor memory based on a self-active recurrent neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Kim Joris; Wagner, Heiko; Prieske, Markus; de Lussanet, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Using recent recurrent network architecture based on the reservoir computing approach, we propose and numerically simulate a model that is focused on the aspects of a flexible motor memory for the storage of elementary movement patterns into the synaptic weights of a neural network, so that the patterns can be retrieved at any time by simple static commands. The resulting motor memory is flexible in that it is capable to continuously modulate the stored patterns. The modulation consists in an approximately linear inter- and extrapolation, generating a large space of possible movements that have not been learned before. A recurrent network of thousand neurons is trained in a manner that corresponds to a realistic exercising scenario, with experimentally measured muscular activations and with kinetic data representing proprioceptive feedback. The network is "self-active" in that it maintains recurrent flow of activation even in the absence of input, a feature that resembles the "resting-state activity" found in the human and animal brain. The model involves the concept of "neural outsourcing" which amounts to the permanent shifting of computational load from higher to lower-level neural structures, which might help to explain why humans are able to execute learned skills in a fluent and flexible manner without the need for attention to the details of the movement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy-based fatigue model for shape memory alloys including thermomechanical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yahui; Zhu, Jihong; Moumni, Ziad; Van Herpen, Alain; Zhang, Weihong

    2016-03-01

    This paper is aimed at developing a low cycle fatigue criterion for pseudoelastic shape memory alloys to take into account thermomechanical coupling. To this end, fatigue tests are carried out at different loading rates under strain control at room temperature using NiTi wires. Temperature distribution on the specimen is measured using a high speed thermal camera. Specimens are tested to failure and fatigue lifetimes of specimens are measured. Test results show that the fatigue lifetime is greatly influenced by the loading rate: as the strain rate increases, the fatigue lifetime decreases. Furthermore, it is shown that the fatigue cracks initiate when the stored energy inside the material reaches a critical value. An energy-based fatigue criterion is thus proposed as a function of the irreversible hysteresis energy of the stabilized cycle and the loading rate. Fatigue life is calculated using the proposed model. The experimental and computational results compare well.

  10. The Effect of Task Duration on Event-Based Prospective Memory: A Multinomial Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Tang, Weihai; Liu, Xiping

    2017-01-01

    Remembering to perform an action when a specific event occurs is referred to as Event-Based Prospective Memory (EBPM). This study investigated how EBPM performance is affected by task duration by having university students ( n = 223) perform an EBPM task that was embedded within an ongoing computer-based color-matching task. For this experiment, we separated the overall task's duration into the filler task duration and the ongoing task duration. The filler task duration is the length of time between the intention and the beginning of the ongoing task, and the ongoing task duration is the length of time between the beginning of the ongoing task and the appearance of the first Prospective Memory (PM) cue. The filler task duration and ongoing task duration were further divided into three levels: 3, 6, and 9 min. Two factors were then orthogonally manipulated between-subjects using a multinomial processing tree model to separate the effects of different task durations on the two EBPM components. A mediation model was then created to verify whether task duration influences EBPM via self-reminding or discrimination. The results reveal three points. (1) Lengthening the duration of ongoing tasks had a negative effect on EBPM performance while lengthening the duration of the filler task had no significant effect on it. (2) As the filler task was lengthened, both the prospective and retrospective components show a decreasing and then increasing trend. Also, when the ongoing task duration was lengthened, the prospective component decreased while the retrospective component significantly increased. (3) The mediating effect of discrimination between the task duration and EBPM performance was significant. We concluded that different task durations influence EBPM performance through different components with discrimination being the mediator between task duration and EBPM performance.

  11. The Effect of Task Duration on Event-Based Prospective Memory: A Multinomial Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Remembering to perform an action when a specific event occurs is referred to as Event-Based Prospective Memory (EBPM. This study investigated how EBPM performance is affected by task duration by having university students (n = 223 perform an EBPM task that was embedded within an ongoing computer-based color-matching task. For this experiment, we separated the overall task’s duration into the filler task duration and the ongoing task duration. The filler task duration is the length of time between the intention and the beginning of the ongoing task, and the ongoing task duration is the length of time between the beginning of the ongoing task and the appearance of the first Prospective Memory (PM cue. The filler task duration and ongoing task duration were further divided into three levels: 3, 6, and 9 min. Two factors were then orthogonally manipulated between-subjects using a multinomial processing tree model to separate the effects of different task durations on the two EBPM components. A mediation model was then created to verify whether task duration influences EBPM via self-reminding or discrimination. The results reveal three points. (1 Lengthening the duration of ongoing tasks had a negative effect on EBPM performance while lengthening the duration of the filler task had no significant effect on it. (2 As the filler task was lengthened, both the prospective and retrospective components show a decreasing and then increasing trend. Also, when the ongoing task duration was lengthened, the prospective component decreased while the retrospective component significantly increased. (3 The mediating effect of discrimination between the task duration and EBPM performance was significant. We concluded that different task durations influence EBPM performance through different components with discrimination being the mediator between task duration and EBPM performance.

  12. Computational Modeling of the Negative Priming Effect Based on Inhibition Patterns and Working Memory

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    Dongil eChung

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Negative priming (NP, slowing down of the response for target stimuli that have been previously exposed, but ignored, has been reported in multiple psychological paradigms including the Stroop task. Although NP likely results from the interplay of selective attention, episodic memory retrieval, working memory, and inhibition mechanisms, a comprehensive theoretical account of NP is currently unavailable. This lacuna may result from the complexity of stimuli combinations in NP. Thus, we aimed to investigate the presence of different degrees of the NP effect according to prime-probe combinations within a classic Stroop task. We recorded reaction times (RTs from 66 healthy participants during Stroop task performance and examined three different NP subtypes, defined according to the type of the Stroop probe in prime-probe pairs. Our findings show significant RT differences among NP subtypes that are putatively due to the presence of differential disinhibition, i.e., release from inhibition. Among the several potential origins for differential subtypes of NP, we investigated the involvement of selective attention and/or working memory using a parallel distributed processing (PDP model (employing selective attention only and a modified PDP model with working memory (PDP-WM, employing both selective attention and working memory. Our findings demonstrate that, unlike the conventional PDP model, the PDP-WM successfully simulates different levels of NP effects that closely follow the behavioral data. This outcome suggests that working memory engages in the re-accumulation of the evidence for target response and induces differential NP effects. Our computational model complements earlier efforts and may pave the road to further insights into an integrated theoretical account of complex NP effects.

  13. Memory-Based Expert Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    relevant cases quickly from a large memory -plus the requirement for an explicit theory of index content in the complex social domain where relevance often...Sep 89 - 31 Jan 92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS " MEMORY -BASED EXPERT SYSTEMS" (U) 61102F 2304/A7 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Roger C. Schank 7...three problems: (1) The development of a robust memory -based parsing technology (Direct Memory Access Parsing, or DMP), (2) The development of case

  14. Models of wave memory

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchenko, Serguey

    2015-01-01

    This monograph examines in detail models of neural systems described by delay-differential equations. Each element of the medium (neuron) is an oscillator that generates, in standalone mode, short impulses also known as spikes. The book discusses models of synaptic interaction between neurons, which lead to complex oscillatory modes in the system. In addition, it presents a solution to the problem of choosing the parameters of interaction in order to obtain attractors with predetermined structure. These attractors are represented as images encoded in the form of autowaves (wave memory). The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but it will also be beneficial for graduate students.

  15. Neurophysiological bases of exponential sensory decay and top-down memory retrieval: a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Zylberberg

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral observations suggest that multiple sensory elements can be maintained for a short time, forming a perceptual buffer which fades after a few hundred milliseconds. Only a subset of this perceptual buffer can be accessed under top-down control and broadcasted to working memory and consciousness. In turn, single-cell studies in awake-behaving monkeys have identified two distinct waves of response to a sensory stimulus: a first transient response largely determined by stimulus properties and a second wave dependent on behavioral relevance, context and learning. Here we propose a simple biophysical scheme which bridges these observations and establishes concrete predictions for neurophsyiological experiments in which the temporal interval between stimulus presentation and top-down allocation is controlled experimentally. Inspired in single-cell observations, the model involves a first transient response and a second stage of amplification and retrieval, which are implemented biophysically by distinct operational modes of the same circuit, regulated by external currents. We explicitly investigated the neuronal dynamics, the memory trace of a presented stimulus and the probability of correct retrieval, when these two stages were bracketed by a temporal gap. The model predicts correctly the dependence of performance with response times in interference experiments suggesting that sensory buffering does not require a specific dedicated mechanism and establishing a direct link between biophysical manipulations and behavioral observations leading to concrete predictions.

  16. Models of Working Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyake, Akira

    1997-01-01

    .... Understanding the mechanisms and structures underlying working memory is, hence, one of the most important scientific issues that need to be addressed to improve the efficiency and performance...

  17. Shape-memory-alloy-based smart knee spacer for total knee arthroplasty: 3D CAD modelling and a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Arvind; Callejas, Miguel A; Acharyya, Amit; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2018-03-22

    This study introduced a shape memory alloy (SMA)-based smart knee spacer for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Subsequently, a 3D CAD model of a smart tibial component of TKA was designed in Solidworks software, and verified using a finite element analysis in ANSYS Workbench. The two major properties of the SMA (NiTi), the pseudoelasticity (PE) and shape memory effect (SME), were exploited, modelled, and analysed for a TKA application. The effectiveness of the proposed model was verified in ANSYS Workbench through the finite element analysis (FEA) of the maximum deformation and equivalent (von Mises) stress distribution. The proposed model was also compared with a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based spacer for the upper portion of the tibial component for three subjects with body mass index (BMI) of 23.88, 31.09, and 38.39. The proposed SMA -based smart knee spacer contained 96.66978% less deformation with a standard deviation of 0.01738 than that of the corresponding PMMA based counterpart for the same load and flexion angle. Based on the maximum deformation analysis, the PMMA-based spacer had 30 times more permanent deformation than that of the proposed SMA-based spacer for the same load and flexion angle. The SME property of the lower portion of the tibial component for fixation of the spacer at its position was verified by an FEA in ANSYS. Wherein, a strain life-based fatigue analysis was performed and tested for the PE and SME built spacers through the FEA. Therefore, the SMA-based smart knee spacer eliminated the drawbacks of the PMMA-based spacer, including spacer fracture, loosening, dislocation, tilting or translation, and knee subluxation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Models of Working Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyake, Akira

    1997-01-01

    Working memory is a basic cognitive mechanism (or set of mechanisms) that is responsible for keeping track of multiple task related goals and subgoals, or integrating multiple sources of information...

  19. Mesomechanical modeling of shape memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokoun, David; Kafka, Vratislav

    1999-06-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are well known materials. There is a lot of technical applications making use of their unique properties. Most of the significant applications are based on use of the thermomechancial properties. Growing number of those applications causes a need for an universal mathematical model with ability to describe all thermomechancial properties of SMA by relatively simple final set of constitutive equations that could be helpful for development of further sophisticated shape memory applications. Unfortunately, a lot of attention has been paid to metallurgical research of shape memory alloys in a few last decades and less attention was dedicated to shape memory modeling. Our model does not claim to be a universal model, but only one contribution to modeling of shape memory effect for binary SMA. The model is adapted for the most applied SMA -- nitinol and is based on the hypothesis that in the course of shape memory effect the distances of first atomic neighbors (Ni-Ti) remain nearly unchanged, whereas the distances of second neighbors (Ti-Ti and Ni-Ni) change substantially. Consequently, we consider some mechanical properties of Ni-substructure and Ti- substructure separately. The mechanical behavior of Ti- substructure is modeled as elastic whereas that of Ni- substructure as elasto-plastic. The resulting relatively simple differential constitutive equations express relationship among internal stress tensors, macroscopic stress tensors, macroscopic strain tensors and temperature.

  20. The Memory State Heuristic: A Formal Model Based on Repeated Recognition Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castela, Marta; Erdfelder, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    The recognition heuristic (RH) theory predicts that, in comparative judgment tasks, if one object is recognized and the other is not, the recognized one is chosen. The memory-state heuristic (MSH) extends the RH by assuming that choices are not affected by recognition judgments per se, but by the memory states underlying these judgments (i.e.,…

  1. Solvable models of working memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    MéZard, M.; Nadal, J. P.; Toulouse, G.

    1987-11-01

    We consider a family of models, which generalizes the Hopfield model of neural networks, and can be solved likewise. This family contains palimpsestic schemes, which give memories that behave in a similar way as a working (short-term) memory. The replica method leads to a simple formalism that allows for a detailed comparison between various schemes, and the study of various effects, such as repetitive learning.

  2. Modeling the learning of the English past tense with memory-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noord, Rik; Spenader, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling the acquisition and final state of English past tense inflection has been an ongoing challenge since the mid-eighties. A number of rule-based and connectionist models have been proposed over the years, but the former usually have no explanation of how the rules are learned and the latter

  3. A model of memory for incidental learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browse, Roger A.; Drewell, Lisa Y.

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes a radial basis memory system that is used to model the performance of human participants in a task of learning to traverse mazes in a virtual environment. The memory model is a multiple-trace system, in which each event is stored as a separate memory trace. In the modeling of the maze traversal task, the events that are stored as memories are the perceptions and decisions taken at the intersections of the maze. As the virtual agent traverses the maze, it makes decisions based upon all of its memories, but those that match best to the current perceptual situation, and which were successful in the past, have the greatest influence. As the agent carries out repeated attempts to traverse the same maze, memories of successful decisions accumulate, and performance gradually improves. The system uses only three free parameters, which most importantly includes adjustments to the standard deviation of the underlying Gaussian used as the radial basis function. It is demonstrated that adjustments of these parameters can easily result in exact modeling of the average human performance in the same task, and that variation of the parameters matches the variation in human performance. We conclude that human memory interaction that does not involve conscious memorization, as in learning navigation routes, may be much more primitive and simply explained than has been previously thought.

  4. Location-based prospective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rear, Andrea E; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2018-02-01

    This study explores location-based prospective memory. People often have to remember to do things when in a particular location, such as buying tissues the next time they are in the supermarket. For event cognition theory, location is important for structuring events. However, because event cognition has not been used to examine prospective memory, the question remains of how multiple events will influence prospective memory performance. In our experiments, people delivered messages from store to store in a virtual shopping mall as an ongoing task. The prospective tasks were to do certain activities in certain stores. For Experiment 1, each trial involved one prospective memory task to be done in a single location at one of three delays. The virtual environment and location cues were effective for prospective memory, and performance was unaffected by delay. For Experiment 2, each trial involved two prospective memory tasks, given in either one or two instruction locations, and to be done in either one or two store locations. There was improved performance when people received instructions from two locations and did both tasks in one location relative to other combinations. This demonstrates that location-based event structure influences how well people perform on prospective memory tasks.

  5. Wavelet-based associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2004-04-01

    Faces provide important characteristics of a person"s identification. In security checks, face recognition still remains the method in continuous use despite other approaches (i.e. fingerprints, voice recognition, pupil contraction, DNA scanners). With an associative memory, the output data is recalled directly using the input data. This can be achieved with a Nonlinear Holographic Associative Memory (NHAM). This approach can also distinguish between strongly correlated images and images that are partially or totally enclosed by others. Adaptive wavelet lifting has been used for Content-Based Image Retrieval. In this paper, adaptive wavelet lifting will be applied to face recognition to achieve an associative memory.

  6. A carrier transport model in the high-resistance state of lead-methylamine iodide-based resistive memory devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwoo Kwon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Methylamine lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3, which has recently been in the spotlight as a solar cell material, has also recently shown promise for use as an active material in resistive memory cells with ultralow operation voltages, good transparencies, and flexibilities. The material’s defects, which govern its properties, differ vastly depending on the fabrication process. However, the defect chemistry is not yet entirely understood. We have therefore established a macroscopic transport model with defect-related model parameters, such as trap density, trap energy level, and Fermi level, in order to estimate these parameters for fabricated samples based on their electrical data. Our model will serve as an efficient way to analyze the properties of the active material.

  7. Graph-Theoretic Properties of Networks Based on Word Association Norms: Implications for Models of Lexical Semantic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenenfelder, Thomas M.; Recchia, Gabriel; Rubin, Tim; Jones, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the ability of three different contextual models of lexical semantic memory (BEAGLE, Latent Semantic Analysis, and the Topic model) and of a simple associative model (POC) to predict the properties of semantic networks derived from word association norms. None of the semantic models were able to accurately predict all of the network…

  8. Relaxed memory models: an operational approach

    OpenAIRE

    Boudol , Gérard; Petri , Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Memory models define an interface between programs written in some language and their implementation, determining which behaviour the memory (and thus a program) is allowed to have in a given model. A minimal guarantee memory models should provide to the programmer is that well-synchronized, that is, data-race free code has a standard semantics. Traditionally, memory models are defined axiomatically, setting constraints on the order in which memory operations are allow...

  9. Models of memory: information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysenck, M W

    1988-01-01

    A complete understanding of human memory will necessarily involve consideration of the active processes involved at the time of learning and of the organization and nature of representation of information in long-term memory. In addition to process and structure, it is important for theory to indicate the ways in which stimulus-driven and conceptually driven processes interact with each other in the learning situation. Not surprisingly, no existent theory provides a detailed specification of all of these factors. However, there are a number of more specific theories which are successful in illuminating some of the component structures and processes. The working memory model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch (1974) and modified subsequently has shown how the earlier theoretical construct of the short-term store should be replaced with the notion of working memory. In essence, working memory is a system which is used both to process information and to permit the transient storage of information. It comprises a number of conceptually distinct, but functionally interdependent components. So far as long-term memory is concerned, there is evidence of a number of different kinds of representation. Of particular importance is the distinction between declarative knowledge and procedural knowledge, a distinction which has received support from the study of amnesic patients. Kosslyn has argued for a distinction between literal representation and propositional representation, whereas Tulving has distinguished between episodic and semantic memories. While Tulving's distinction is perhaps the best known, there is increasing evidence that episodic and semantic memory differ primarily in content rather than in process, and so the distinction may be of less theoretical value than was originally believed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. A simplified computational memory model from information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanhua; Zhang, Dongsheng; Deng, Yuqin; Ding, Xiaoqian; Wang, Yan; Tang, Yiyuan; Sun, Baoliang

    2016-11-23

    This paper is intended to propose a computational model for memory from the view of information processing. The model, called simplified memory information retrieval network (SMIRN), is a bi-modular hierarchical functional memory network by abstracting memory function and simulating memory information processing. At first meta-memory is defined to express the neuron or brain cortices based on the biology and graph theories, and we develop an intra-modular network with the modeling algorithm by mapping the node and edge, and then the bi-modular network is delineated with intra-modular and inter-modular. At last a polynomial retrieval algorithm is introduced. In this paper we simulate the memory phenomena and functions of memorization and strengthening by information processing algorithms. The theoretical analysis and the simulation results show that the model is in accordance with the memory phenomena from information processing view.

  11. A simplified computational memory model from information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanhua; Zhang, Dongsheng; Deng, Yuqin; Ding, Xiaoqian; Wang, Yan; Tang, Yiyuan; Sun, Baoliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper is intended to propose a computational model for memory from the view of information processing. The model, called simplified memory information retrieval network (SMIRN), is a bi-modular hierarchical functional memory network by abstracting memory function and simulating memory information processing. At first meta-memory is defined to express the neuron or brain cortices based on the biology and graph theories, and we develop an intra-modular network with the modeling algorithm by mapping the node and edge, and then the bi-modular network is delineated with intra-modular and inter-modular. At last a polynomial retrieval algorithm is introduced. In this paper we simulate the memory phenomena and functions of memorization and strengthening by information processing algorithms. The theoretical analysis and the simulation results show that the model is in accordance with the memory phenomena from information processing view. PMID:27876847

  12. Forward Behavioral Modeling of a Three-Way Amplitude Modulator-Based Transmitter Using an Augmented Memory Polynomial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Chatrath

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Reconfigurable and multi-standard RF front-ends for wireless communication and sensor networks have gained importance as building blocks for the Internet of Things. Simpler and highly-efficient transmitter architectures, which can transmit better quality signals with reduced impairments, are an important step in this direction. In this regard, mixer-less transmitter architecture, namely, the three-way amplitude modulator-based transmitter, avoids the use of imperfect mixers and frequency up-converters, and their resulting distortions, leading to an improved signal quality. In this work, an augmented memory polynomial-based model for the behavioral modeling of such mixer-less transmitter architecture is proposed. Extensive simulations and measurements have been carried out in order to validate the accuracy of the proposed modeling strategy. The performance of the proposed model is evaluated using normalized mean square error (NMSE for long-term evolution (LTE signals. NMSE for a LTE signal of 1.4 MHz bandwidth with 100,000 samples for digital combining and analog combining are recorded as −36.41 dB and −36.9 dB, respectively. Similarly, for a 5 MHz signal the proposed models achieves −31.93 dB and −32.08 dB NMSE using digital and analog combining, respectively. For further validation of the proposed model, amplitude-to-amplitude (AM-AM, amplitude-to-phase (AM-PM, and the spectral response of the modeled and measured data are plotted, reasonably meeting the desired modeling criteria.

  13. Forward Behavioral Modeling of a Three-Way Amplitude Modulator-Based Transmitter Using an Augmented Memory Polynomial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrath, Jatin; Aziz, Mohsin; Helaoui, Mohamed

    2018-03-03

    Reconfigurable and multi-standard RF front-ends for wireless communication and sensor networks have gained importance as building blocks for the Internet of Things. Simpler and highly-efficient transmitter architectures, which can transmit better quality signals with reduced impairments, are an important step in this direction. In this regard, mixer-less transmitter architecture, namely, the three-way amplitude modulator-based transmitter, avoids the use of imperfect mixers and frequency up-converters, and their resulting distortions, leading to an improved signal quality. In this work, an augmented memory polynomial-based model for the behavioral modeling of such mixer-less transmitter architecture is proposed. Extensive simulations and measurements have been carried out in order to validate the accuracy of the proposed modeling strategy. The performance of the proposed model is evaluated using normalized mean square error (NMSE) for long-term evolution (LTE) signals. NMSE for a LTE signal of 1.4 MHz bandwidth with 100,000 samples for digital combining and analog combining are recorded as -36.41 dB and -36.9 dB, respectively. Similarly, for a 5 MHz signal the proposed models achieves -31.93 dB and -32.08 dB NMSE using digital and analog combining, respectively. For further validation of the proposed model, amplitude-to-amplitude (AM-AM), amplitude-to-phase (AM-PM), and the spectral response of the modeled and measured data are plotted, reasonably meeting the desired modeling criteria.

  14. Neural mechanisms underlying the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces: a tentative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In our daily lives, we form some impressions of other people. Although those impressions are affected by many factors, face-based affective signals such as facial expression, facial attractiveness, or trustworthiness are important. Previous psychological studies have demonstrated the impact of facial impressions on remembering other people, but little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying this psychological process. The purpose of this article is to review recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies to investigate the effects of face-based affective signals including facial expression, facial attractiveness, and trustworthiness on memory for faces, and to propose a tentative concept for understanding this affective-cognitive interaction. On the basis of the aforementioned research, three brain regions are potentially involved in the processing of face-based affective signals. The first candidate is the amygdala, where activity is generally modulated by both affectively positive and negative signals from faces. Activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), as the second candidate, increases as a function of perceived positive signals from faces; whereas activity in the insular cortex, as the third candidate, reflects a function of face-based negative signals. In addition, neuroscientific studies have reported that the three regions are functionally connected to the memory-related hippocampal regions. These findings suggest that the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces could be modulated by interactions between the regions associated with the processing of face-based affective signals and the hippocampus as a memory-related region. PMID:22837740

  15. The Cognitive Processes Underlying Event-Based Prospective Memory in School-Age Children and Young Adults: A Formal Model-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebekah E.; Bayen, Ute J.; Martin, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Fifty children 7 years of age (29 girls, 21 boys), 53 children 10 years of age (29 girls, 24 boys), and 36 young adults (19 women, 17 men) performed a computerized event-based prospective memory task. All 3 groups differed significantly in prospective memory performance, with adults showing the best performance and with 7-year-olds showing the…

  16. Blood leakage detection during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with array photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Xing; Huang, Ping-Tzan; Li, Chien-Ming

    2018-01-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious life-threatening complications occurring during dialysis therapy. These events have been of concerns to both healthcare givers and patients. More than 40% of adult blood volume can be lost in just a few minutes, resulting in morbidities and mortality. The authors intend to propose the design of a warning tool for the detection of blood leakage/blood loss during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with an array of photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory (HAM) model. Photocell sensors are arranged in an array on a flexible substrate to detect blood leakage via the resistance changes with illumination in the visible spectrum of 500–700 nm. The HAM model is implemented to design a virtual alarm unit using electricity changes in an embedded system. The proposed warning tool can indicate the risk level in both end-sensing units and remote monitor devices via a wireless network and fog/cloud computing. The animal experimental results (pig blood) will demonstrate the feasibility. PMID:29515815

  17. Blood leakage detection during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with array photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Xing; Huang, Ping-Tzan; Lin, Chia-Hung; Li, Chien-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious life-threatening complications occurring during dialysis therapy. These events have been of concerns to both healthcare givers and patients. More than 40% of adult blood volume can be lost in just a few minutes, resulting in morbidities and mortality. The authors intend to propose the design of a warning tool for the detection of blood leakage/blood loss during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with an array of photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory (HAM) model. Photocell sensors are arranged in an array on a flexible substrate to detect blood leakage via the resistance changes with illumination in the visible spectrum of 500-700 nm. The HAM model is implemented to design a virtual alarm unit using electricity changes in an embedded system. The proposed warning tool can indicate the risk level in both end-sensing units and remote monitor devices via a wireless network and fog/cloud computing. The animal experimental results (pig blood) will demonstrate the feasibility.

  18. A wavelet-based Bayesian approach to regression models with long memory errors and its application to FMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jaesik; Vannucci, Marina; Ko, Kyungduk

    2013-03-01

    This article considers linear regression models with long memory errors. These models have been proven useful for application in many areas, such as medical imaging, signal processing, and econometrics. Wavelets, being self-similar, have a strong connection to long memory data. Here we employ discrete wavelet transforms as whitening filters to simplify the dense variance-covariance matrix of the data. We then adopt a Bayesian approach for the estimation of the model parameters. Our inferential procedure uses exact wavelet coefficients variances and leads to accurate estimates of the model parameters. We explore performances on simulated data and present an application to an fMRI data set. In the application we produce posterior probability maps (PPMs) that aid interpretation by identifying voxels that are likely activated with a given confidence. Copyright © 2013, The International Biometric Society.

  19. An Improved Dissonance Measure Based on Auditory Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer; Hjortkjær, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Dissonance is an important feature in music audio analysis. We present here a dissonance model that accounts for the temporal integration of dissonant events in auditory short term memory. We compare the memory-based dissonance extracted from musical audio sequences to the response of human...... listeners. In a number of tests, the memory model predicts listener’s response better than traditional dissonance measures....

  20. Memory-Based Simple Heuristics as Attribute Substitution: Competitive Tests of Binary Choice Inference Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hidehito; Matsuka, Toshihiko; Ueda, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Some researchers on binary choice inference have argued that people make inferences based on simple heuristics, such as recognition, fluency, or familiarity. Others have argued that people make inferences based on available knowledge. To examine the boundary between heuristic and knowledge usage, we examine binary choice inference processes in…

  1. A study of the Correlation between Primary School Students’ Reading Comprehension Performance and the Learning Styles Based on Memory Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Erginer, Ergin

    2014-01-01

    A review of literature on learning styles suggest that they are often focused on determining learning styles on the basis of learning preferences, while the number of studies there are fewer studies which determine learning styles on the basis of memory modeling. In addition, the number of studies on the correlation between reading comprehension skills and learning styles remains limited. Designed to determine the correlation between the former and the latter, the present study seeks an answe...

  2. Organic nonvolatile memory devices based on ferroelectricity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, R.C.G.; Asadi, K.; Blom, P.W.M.; Leeuw, D.M. de; Boer, B. de

    2010-01-01

    A memory functionality is a prerequisite for many applications of electronic devices. Organic nonvolatile memory devices based on ferroelectricity are a promising approach toward the development of a low-cost memory technology. In this Review Article we discuss the latest developments in this area

  3. The effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on affective memory recall dynamics in depression: a mechanistic model of rumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Karlijn Van Vugt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Converging research suggests that mindfulness training exerts its therapeutic effectson depression by reducing rumination. Theoretically, rumination is a multifaceted construct thataggregates multiple neurocognitive aspects of depression, including poor executive control,negative and overgeneral memory bias, and persistence or stickiness of negative mind states.Current measures of rumination, most often self-reports, do not capture these different aspects ofruminative tendencies, and therefore are limited in providing detailed information about themechanisms of mindfulness.Methods: We developed new insights into the potential mechanisms of rumination, based onthree model-based metrics of free recall dynamics. These three measures reflect the patterns ofmemory retrieval of valenced information: The probability of first recall (Pstart whichrepresents initial affective bias, the probability of staying with the same valence category ratherthan switching, which indicates strength of positive or negative association networks (Pstay;and probability of stopping (Pstop or ending recall within a given valence, which indicatesdrift persistence or stickiness of a mind state. We then investigated the effects of MBCT(N=29 vs wait-list control (N=23 on these recall dynamics in a Randomized Controlled Trial(RCT in individuals with recurrent depression. Participants completed a standard laboratorystressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST, to induce negative mood and activate ruminativetendencies. Then, participants completed a free recall task consisting of three word lists. Thisassessment was conducted both before and after treatment or wait-list.Results: While MBCT participant’s Pstart remained relatively stable, controls showed multipleindications of depression-related deterioration towards more negative and less positive bias.Following the intervention, MBCT participants decreased in their tendency to sustain trains ofnegative words

  4. Finite Memory Model for Haptic Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    both help and hinder the memory process. If the spatial information must be remembered independently, and thus occupies slots in the memory register...psychologists. The memory experiment appears to have succeeded in eliminating the influence of spatial relations and feature identification error. The...7 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, Califormia AD-A245 342 THESIS Finite Memory Model for Haptic Recognition by Philip G. Beieri December 1991

  5. Category Accessibility Effects in a Simulated Exemplar-Based Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    memory , social cognition, social categorization 05 10 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) " A quantitative...model of long-term memory is applied, in the form of a computer simulation, in an attempt to reproduce several known properties of social priming or...Classification) Category accessibility effects in a simulated exemplar-based memory 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Smith, Eliot R. 13a TYPE QF REPORT 13b TIME

  6. The AIP Model of EMDR Therapy and Pathogenic Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hase

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR therapy has been widely recognized as an efficacious treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In the last years more insight has been gained regarding the efficacy of EMDR therapy in a broad field of mental disorders beyond PTSD. The cornerstone of EMDR therapy is its unique model of pathogenesis and change: the adaptive information processing (AIP model. The AIP model developed by F. Shapiro has found support and differentiation in recent studies on the importance of memories in the pathogenesis of a range of mental disorders beside PTSD. However, theoretical publications or research on the application of the AIP model are still rare. The increasing acceptance of ideas that relate the origin of many mental disorders to the formation and consolidation of implicit dysfunctional memory lead to formation of the theory of pathogenic memories. Within the theory of pathogenic memories these implicit dysfunctional memories are considered to form basis of a variety of mental disorders. The theory of pathogenic memories seems compatible to the AIP model of EMDR therapy, which offers strategies to effectively access and transmute these memories leading to amelioration or resolution of symptoms. Merging the AIP model with the theory of pathogenic memories may initiate research. In consequence, patients suffering from such memory-based disorders may be earlier diagnosed and treated more effectively.

  7. The AIP Model of EMDR Therapy and Pathogenic Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hase, Michael; Balmaceda, Ute M; Ostacoli, Luca; Liebermann, Peter; Hofmann, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy has been widely recognized as an efficacious treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In the last years more insight has been gained regarding the efficacy of EMDR therapy in a broad field of mental disorders beyond PTSD. The cornerstone of EMDR therapy is its unique model of pathogenesis and change: the adaptive information processing (AIP) model. The AIP model developed by F. Shapiro has found support and differentiation in recent studies on the importance of memories in the pathogenesis of a range of mental disorders beside PTSD. However, theoretical publications or research on the application of the AIP model are still rare. The increasing acceptance of ideas that relate the origin of many mental disorders to the formation and consolidation of implicit dysfunctional memory lead to formation of the theory of pathogenic memories. Within the theory of pathogenic memories these implicit dysfunctional memories are considered to form basis of a variety of mental disorders. The theory of pathogenic memories seems compatible to the AIP model of EMDR therapy, which offers strategies to effectively access and transmute these memories leading to amelioration or resolution of symptoms. Merging the AIP model with the theory of pathogenic memories may initiate research. In consequence, patients suffering from such memory-based disorders may be earlier diagnosed and treated more effectively.

  8. Modeling the shape memory effect of shape memory polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Liu, Yanju; Wang, Zhenqing; Leng, Jin-Song

    2009-07-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) tests are conducted on the styrene-based shape memory polymer (SMP) to investigate its state transition behaviors. Tensile tests at various constant temperatures are carried out to reveal the stressstrain- temperature relationship of the styrene-based SMP. A new mechanical constitutive equation is developed to describe the stress-strain-temperature relationship of the styrene-based SMP. Numerical calculations illustrate the proposed theory well describes the thermo-mechanical cycle of shape memory of styrene-based SMP, such as deformation at high temperature, shape fixity, unloading at low temperature and shape recovery.

  9. Thermomechanical macroscopic model of shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.E.; Sakharov, V.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenological macroscopic model of the mechanical behaviour of the titanium nickelide-type shape memory alloys is proposed. The model contains as a parameter the average phase shear deformation accompanying the martensite formation. It makes i possible to describe correctly a number of functional properties of the shape memory alloys, in particular, the pseudoelasticity ferroplasticity, plasticity transformation and shape memory effects in the stressed and unstressed samples [ru

  10. Logistic map with memory from economic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasova, Valentina V.; Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2017-01-01

    A generalization of the economic model of logistic growth, which takes into account the effects of memory and crises, is suggested. Memory effect means that the economic factors and parameters at any given time depend not only on their values at that time, but also on their values at previous times. For the mathematical description of the memory effects, we use the theory of derivatives of non-integer order. Crises are considered as sharp splashes (bursts) of the price, which are mathematically described by the delta-functions. Using the equivalence of fractional differential equations and the Volterra integral equations, we obtain discrete maps with memory that are exact discrete analogs of fractional differential equations of economic processes. We derive logistic map with memory, its generalizations, and “economic” discrete maps with memory from the fractional differential equations, which describe the economic natural growth with competition, power-law memory and crises.

  11. Resistive content addressable memory based in-memory computation architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Khaled N.

    2016-12-08

    Various examples are provided examples related to resistive content addressable memory (RCAM) based in-memory computation architectures. In one example, a system includes a content addressable memory (CAM) including an array of cells having a memristor based crossbar and an interconnection switch matrix having a gateless memristor array, which is coupled to an output of the CAM. In another example, a method, includes comparing activated bit values stored a key register with corresponding bit values in a row of a CAM, setting a tag bit value to indicate that the activated bit values match the corresponding bit values, and writing masked key bit values to corresponding bit locations in the row of the CAM based on the tag bit value.

  12. Synthetic vision and memory model for virtual human - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Kang, Jinsheng; Wright, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and case studies of a novel synthetic vision and memory model for virtual human. The synthetic vision module simulates the biological / optical abilities and limitations of the human vision. The module is based on a series of collision detection between the boundary of virtual humans field of vision (FOV) volume and the surface of objects in a recreated 3D environment. The memory module simulates a short-term memory capability by employing a simplified memory structure (first-in-first-out stack). The synthetic vision and memory model has been integrated into a virtual human modelling project, Intelligent Virtual Modelling. The project aimed to improve the realism and autonomy of virtual humans.

  13. Memory Driven Feature-Based Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    memory , measures of similarity, and the question of how to manage remembering and recollecting on the basis of similarity [18]. There is a large body...is also influenced by the Dynamic Memory ideas of Schank [20], by the episodic memory ideas of Kolodner [21], and by the Case-based planning approach...AD-A264 697 WL-TR-93-4021 MEMORY DRIVEN FEATURE-BASED DESIGN DTIC Y.H. PAO AY 11993 F.L. MERAT G.M. RADACK CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY ELECTRICAL

  14. Resource allocation models of auditory working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Sabine; Teki, Sundeep; Kumar, Sukhbinder; Husain, Masud; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2016-06-01

    Auditory working memory (WM) is the cognitive faculty that allows us to actively hold and manipulate sounds in mind over short periods of time. We develop here a particular perspective on WM for non-verbal, auditory objects as well as for time based on the consideration of possible parallels to visual WM. In vision, there has been a vigorous debate on whether WM capacity is limited to a fixed number of items or whether it represents a limited resource that can be allocated flexibly across items. Resource allocation models predict that the precision with which an item is represented decreases as a function of total number of items maintained in WM because a limited resource is shared among stored objects. We consider here auditory work on sequentially presented objects of different pitch as well as time intervals from the perspective of dynamic resource allocation. We consider whether the working memory resource might be determined by perceptual features such as pitch or timbre, or bound objects comprising multiple features, and we speculate on brain substrates for these behavioural models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling Coevolution between Language and Memory Capacity during Language Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Memory is essential to many cognitive tasks including language. Apart from empirical studies of memory effects on language acquisition and use, there lack sufficient evolutionary explorations on whether a high level of memory capacity is prerequisite for language and whether language origin could influence memory capacity. In line with evolutionary theories that natural selection refined language-related cognitive abilities, we advocated a coevolution scenario between language and memory capacity, which incorporated the genetic transmission of individual memory capacity, cultural transmission of idiolects, and natural and cultural selections on individual reproduction and language teaching. To illustrate the coevolution dynamics, we adopted a multi-agent computational model simulating the emergence of lexical items and simple syntax through iterated communications. Simulations showed that: along with the origin of a communal language, an initially-low memory capacity for acquired linguistic knowledge was boosted; and such coherent increase in linguistic understandability and memory capacities reflected a language-memory coevolution; and such coevolution stopped till memory capacities became sufficient for language communications. Statistical analyses revealed that the coevolution was realized mainly by natural selection based on individual communicative success in cultural transmissions. This work elaborated the biology-culture parallelism of language evolution, demonstrated the driving force of culturally-constituted factors for natural selection of individual cognitive abilities, and suggested that the degree difference in language-related cognitive abilities between humans and nonhuman animals could result from a coevolution with language.

  16. Phone Routing using the Dynamic Memory Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Claus Nicolaj; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    In earlier studies a genetic algorithm (GA) extended with the dynamic memory model has shown remarkable performance on real-world-like problems. In this paper we experiment with routing in communication networks and show that the dynamic memory GA performs remarkable well compared to ant colony...

  17. Real-time stereo matching architecture based on 2D MRF model: a memory-efficient systolic array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Sungchan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is a growing need in computer vision applications for stereopsis, requiring not only accurate distance but also fast and compact physical implementation. Global energy minimization techniques provide remarkably precise results. But they suffer from huge computational complexity. One of the main challenges is to parallelize the iterative computation, solving the memory access problem between the big external memory and the massive processors. Remarkable memory saving can be obtained with our memory reduction scheme, and our new architecture is a systolic array. If we expand it into N's multiple chips in a cascaded manner, we can cope with various ranges of image resolutions. We have realized it using the FPGA technology. Our architecture records 19 times smaller memory than the global minimization technique, which is a principal step toward real-time chip implementation of the various iterative image processing algorithms with tiny and distributed memory resources like optical flow, image restoration, etc.

  18. Superposition of episodic memories: overdistribution and quantum models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, Charles J; Wang, Zheng; Reyna, Valerie F

    2013-10-01

    Memory exhibits episodic superposition, an analog of the quantum superposition of physical states: Before a cue for a presented or unpresented item is administered on a memory test, the item has the simultaneous potential to occupy all members of a mutually exclusive set of episodic states, though it occupies only one of those states after the cue is administered. This phenomenon can be modeled with a nonadditive probability model called overdistribution (OD), which implements fuzzy-trace theory's distinction between verbatim and gist representations. We show that it can also be modeled based on quantum probability theory. A quantum episodic memory (QEM) model is developed, which is derived from quantum probability theory but also implements the process conceptions of global matching memory models. OD and QEM have different strengths, and the current challenge is to identify contrasting empirical predictions that can be used to pit them against each other. © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Research on Associative Memory Models of Emotional Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Associative memory is essential to realize man-machine cooperation in the natural interaction between humans and robots. The establishment of associative memory model is to solve the problem. First, based on the theory of emotional energy, mood spontaneous metastasis model and stimulate metastasis model are put forward. Then we can achieve affective computing on the external excitation combining with Markov chain model which is about emotions of spontaneous metastasis and HMM model which is about stimulating metastasis. Second, based on the neural network, the associative memory model which is applied in emotional robots is put forward by calculating the emotional state of the robot's dynamic change of mind and considering their own needs at the same time. Finally, the model was applied to the emotional robot platform which we developed. The effect is validated better.

  20. Shape memory alloy based motor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Duerig et al 1990) of the alloy. Unlike conventional materials, which show only, limited effect on stress–strain behaviour (Duerig et al 1990; Mellor 1989), SMA shows marked temperature dependence, because of reversible austenite to martensite transformation. The underlying phenomenon of the shape memory effect is ...

  1. Ciliary neurotrophic factor cell-based delivery prevents synaptic impairment and improves memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Pierre; Youssef, Ihsen; Utvik, Jo K; Florent-Béchard, Sabrina; Barthélémy, Vanassa; Malaplate-Armand, Catherine; Kriem, Badreddine; Stenger, Christophe; Koziel, Violette; Olivier, Jean-Luc; Escanye, Marie-Christine; Hanse, Marine; Allouche, Ahmad; Desbène, Cédric; Yen, Frances T; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Oster, Thierry; Niclou, Simone P; Pillot, Thierry

    2010-06-02

    The development of novel therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents one of the biggest unmet medical needs today. Application of neurotrophic factors able to modulate neuronal survival and synaptic connectivity is a promising therapeutic approach for AD. We aimed to determine whether the loco-regional delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) could prevent amyloid-beta (Abeta) oligomer-induced synaptic damages and associated cognitive impairments that typify AD. To ensure long-term administration of CNTF in the brain, we used recombinant cells secreting CNTF encapsulated in alginate polymers. The implantation of these bioreactors in the brain of Abeta oligomer-infused mice led to a continuous secretion of recombinant CNTF and was associated with the robust improvement of cognitive performances. Most importantly, CNTF led to full recovery of cognitive functions associated with the stabilization of synaptic protein levels in the Tg2576 AD mouse model. In vitro as well as in vivo, CNTF activated a Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription-mediated survival pathway that prevented synaptic and neuronal degeneration. These preclinical studies suggest that CNTF and/or CNTF receptor-associated pathways may have AD-modifying activity through protection against progressive Abeta-related memory deficits. Our data also encourage additional exploration of ex vivo gene transfer for the prevention and/or treatment of AD.

  2. Switching characteristics for ferroelectric random access memory based on RC model in poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene ultrathin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChangLi Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The switching characteristic of the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethlene (P(VDF-TrFE films have been studied at different ranges of applied electric field. It is suggest that the increase of the switching speed upon nucleation protocol and the deceleration of switching could be related to the presence of a non-ferroelectric layer. Remarkably, a capacitor and resistor (RC links model plays significant roles in the polarization switching dynamics of the thin films. For P(VDF-TrFE ultrathin films with electroactive interlayer, it is found that the switching dynamic characteristics are strongly affected by the contributions of resistor and non-ferroelectric (non-FE interface factors. A corresponding experiment is designed using poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene:poly(styrene sulfonic (PEDOT-PSSH as interlayer with different proton concentrations, and the testing results show that the robust switching is determined by the proton concentration in interlayer and lower leakage current in circuit to reliable applications of such polymer films. These findings provide a new feasible method to enhance the polarization switching for the ferroelectric random access memory.

  3. Switching characteristics for ferroelectric random access memory based on RC model in poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ultrathin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, ChangLi [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Complex and Intelligent System Research Center, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, XueJun [Complex and Intelligent System Research Center, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, XiuLi [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); School of Fundamental Studies, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Du, XiaoLi [School of Fundamental Studies, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Xu, HaiSheng, E-mail: hsxu@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Kunshan Hisense Electronics Co., Ltd., Kunshan, Jiangsu 215300 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The switching characteristic of the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethlene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) films have been studied at different ranges of applied electric field. It is suggest that the increase of the switching speed upon nucleation protocol and the deceleration of switching could be related to the presence of a non-ferroelectric layer. Remarkably, a capacitor and resistor (RC) links model plays significant roles in the polarization switching dynamics of the thin films. For P(VDF-TrFE) ultrathin films with electroactive interlayer, it is found that the switching dynamic characteristics are strongly affected by the contributions of resistor and non-ferroelectric (non-FE) interface factors. A corresponding experiment is designed using poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic) (PEDOT-PSSH) as interlayer with different proton concentrations, and the testing results show that the robust switching is determined by the proton concentration in interlayer and lower leakage current in circuit to reliable applications of such polymer films. These findings provide a new feasible method to enhance the polarization switching for the ferroelectric random access memory.

  4. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  5. A revised limbic system model for memory, emotion and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Marco; Dell'acqua, Flavio; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel

    2013-09-01

    Emotion, memories and behaviour emerge from the coordinated activities of regions connected by the limbic system. Here, we propose an update of the limbic model based on the seminal work of Papez, Yakovlev and MacLean. In the revised model we identify three distinct but partially overlapping networks: (i) the Hippocampal-diencephalic and parahippocampal-retrosplenial network dedicated to memory and spatial orientation; (ii) The temporo-amygdala-orbitofrontal network for the integration of visceral sensation and emotion with semantic memory and behaviour; (iii) the default-mode network involved in autobiographical memories and introspective self-directed thinking. The three networks share cortical nodes that are emerging as principal hubs in connectomic analysis. This revised network model of the limbic system reconciles recent functional imaging findings with anatomical accounts of clinical disorders commonly associated with limbic pathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Abnormal Fear Memory as a Model for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Aline; Marighetto, Aline; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    For over a century, clinicians have consistently described the paradoxical co-existence in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) of sensory intrusive hypermnesia and declarative amnesia for the same traumatic event. Although this amnesia is considered as a critical etiological factor of the development and/or persistence of PTSD, most current animal models in basic neuroscience have focused exclusively on the hypermnesia, i.e., the persistence of a strong fear memory, neglecting the qualitative alteration of fear memory. The latest is characterized by an underrepresentation of the trauma in the context-based declarative memory system in favor of its overrepresentation in a cue-based sensory/emotional memory system. Combining psychological and neurobiological data as well as theoretical hypotheses, this review supports the idea that contextual amnesia is at the core of PTSD and its persistence and that altered hippocampal-amygdalar interaction may contribute to such pathologic memory. In a first attempt to unveil the neurobiological alterations underlying PTSD-related hypermnesia/amnesia, we describe a recent animal model mimicking in mice some critical aspects of such abnormal fear memory. Finally, this line of argument emphasizes the pressing need for a systematic comparison between normal/adaptive versus abnormal/maladaptive fear memory to identify biomarkers of PTSD while distinguishing them from general stress-related, potentially adaptive, neurobiological alterations. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Generalized Quantum Episodic Memory Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueblood, Jennifer S; Hemmer, Pernille

    2017-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that experienced events are often mapped to too many episodic states, including those that are logically or experimentally incompatible with one another. For example, episodic over-distribution patterns show that the probability of accepting an item under different mutually exclusive conditions violates the disjunction rule. A related example, called subadditivity, occurs when the probability of accepting an item under mutually exclusive and exhaustive instruction conditions sums to a number >1. Both the over-distribution effect and subadditivity have been widely observed in item and source-memory paradigms. These phenomena are difficult to explain using standard memory frameworks, such as signal-detection theory. A dual-trace model called the over-distribution (OD) model (Brainerd & Reyna, 2008) can explain the episodic over-distribution effect, but not subadditivity. Our goal is to develop a model that can explain both effects. In this paper, we propose the Generalized Quantum Episodic Memory (GQEM) model, which extends the Quantum Episodic Memory (QEM) model developed by Brainerd, Wang, and Reyna (2013). We test GQEM by comparing it to the OD model using data from a novel item-memory experiment and a previously published source-memory experiment (Kellen, Singmann, & Klauer, 2014) examining the over-distribution effect. Using the best-fit parameters from the over-distribution experiments, we conclude by showing that the GQEM model can also account for subadditivity. Overall these results add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that quantum probability theory is a valuable tool in modeling recognition memory. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  8. Implicit Schemata and Categories in Memory-Based Language Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Antal; Daelemans, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Memory-based language processing (MBLP) is an approach to language processing based on exemplar storage during learning and analogical reasoning during processing. From a cognitive perspective, the approach is attractive as a model for human language processing because it does not make any assumptions about the way abstractions are shaped, nor any…

  9. Irrelevant sensory stimuli interfere with working memory storage: evidence from a computational model of prefrontal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Tyler D; Hockley, William E; Servos, Philip

    2013-03-01

    The encoding of irrelevant stimuli into the memory store has previously been suggested as a mechanism of interference in working memory (e.g., Lange & Oberauer, Memory, 13, 333-339, 2005; Nairne, Memory & Cognition, 18, 251-269, 1990). Recently, Bancroft and Servos (Experimental Brain Research, 208, 529-532, 2011) used a tactile working memory task to provide experimental evidence that irrelevant stimuli were, in fact, encoded into working memory. In the present study, we replicated Bancroft and Servos's experimental findings using a biologically based computational model of prefrontal neurons, providing a neurocomputational model of overwriting in working memory. Furthermore, our modeling results show that inhibition acts to protect the contents of working memory, and they suggest a need for further experimental research into the capacity of vibrotactile working memory.

  10. The Perceptual Root of Object-Based Storage: An Interactive Model of Perception and Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tao; Gao, Zaifeng; Li, Jie; Sun, Zhongqiang; Shen, Mowei

    2011-01-01

    Mainstream theories of visual perception assume that visual working memory (VWM) is critical for integrating online perceptual information and constructing coherent visual experiences in changing environments. Given the dynamic interaction between online perception and VWM, we propose that how visual information is processed during visual…

  11. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Nenert

    Full Text Available Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA. All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN. Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  12. A model for visual memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenert, Rodolphe; Allendorfer, Jane B; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2014-01-01

    Memory encoding engages multiple concurrent and sequential processes. While the individual processes involved in successful encoding have been examined in many studies, a sequence of events and the importance of modules associated with memory encoding has not been established. For this reason, we sought to perform a comprehensive examination of the network for memory encoding using data driven methods and to determine the directionality of the information flow in order to build a viable model of visual memory encoding. Forty healthy controls ages 19-59 performed a visual scene encoding task. FMRI data were preprocessed using SPM8 and then processed using independent component analysis (ICA) with the reliability of the identified components confirmed using ICASSO as implemented in GIFT. The directionality of the information flow was examined using Granger causality analyses (GCA). All participants performed the fMRI task well above the chance level (>90% correct on both active and control conditions) and the post-fMRI testing recall revealed correct memory encoding at 86.33 ± 5.83%. ICA identified involvement of components of five different networks in the process of memory encoding, and the GCA allowed for the directionality of the information flow to be assessed, from visual cortex via ventral stream to the attention network and then to the default mode network (DMN). Two additional networks involved in this process were the cerebellar and the auditory-insular network. This study provides evidence that successful visual memory encoding is dependent on multiple modules that are part of other networks that are only indirectly related to the main process. This model may help to identify the node(s) of the network that are affected by a specific disease processes and explain the presence of memory encoding difficulties in patients in whom focal or global network dysfunction exists.

  13. Living Memorials: Understanding the Social Meanings of Community-Based Memorials to September 11, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika S. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2010-01-01

    Living memorials are landscaped spaces created by people to memorialize individuals, places, and events. Hundreds of stewardship groups across the United States of America created living memorials in response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. This study sought to understand how stewards value, use, and talk about their living, community-based memorials....

  14. Microplane modelling of shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadkhodaei, M; Salimi, M; Rajapakse, R K N D; Mahzoon, M

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on a statically constrained microplane theory with volumetric-deviatoric split is proposed for polycrystalline shape memory alloys (SMAs) under multiaxial loading paths. Microplane governing equations are 1D stress-strain relations for normal and shear stresses on each microplane, in which suitable relationships between the microscopic and macroscopic quantities are considered so that switching between elastic and inelastic local responses automatically occurs according to the macroscopic response of SMA without additional constraint. Shear stress on each microplane is expressed by the resultant shear component within the plane to overcome directional bias and to prevent the appearance of shear strain in a pure axial loading or axial strain in a pure shear loading while microplane formulations based on two shear directions may predict such impractical results. The behaviour of SMA under simple and complicated loadings has been studied. In nonproportional loading paths, the model shows interaction between stress components, as well as deviation from normality. Predicted results from the model are in good agreement with those of the existing theoretical and experimental investigations

  15. Secure Virtualization Environment Based on Advanced Memory Introspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhui Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Most existing virtual machine introspection (VMI technologies analyze the status of a target virtual machine under the assumption that the operating system (OS version and kernel structure information are known at the hypervisor level. In this paper, we propose a model of virtual machine (VM security monitoring based on memory introspection. Using a hardware-based approach to acquire the physical memory of the host machine in real time, the security of the host machine and VM can be diagnosed. Furthermore, a novel approach for VM memory forensics based on the virtual machine control structure (VMCS is put forward. By analyzing the memory of the host machine, the running VMs can be detected and their high-level semantic information can be reconstructed. Then, malicious activity in the VMs can be identified in a timely manner. Moreover, by mutually analyzing the memory content of the host machine and VMs, VM escape may be detected. Compared with previous memory introspection technologies, our solution can automatically reconstruct the comprehensive running state of a target VM without any prior knowledge and is strongly resistant to attacks with high reliability. We developed a prototype system called the VEDefender. Experimental results indicate that our system can handle the VMs of mainstream Linux and Windows OS versions with high efficiency and does not influence the performance of the host machine and VMs.

  16. A Limited-Memory BFGS Algorithm Based on a Trust-Region Quadratic Model for Large-Scale Nonlinear Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Yuan, Gonglin; Wei, Zengxin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a trust-region algorithm is proposed for large-scale nonlinear equations, where the limited-memory BFGS (L-M-BFGS) update matrix is used in the trust-region subproblem to improve the effectiveness of the algorithm for large-scale problems. The global convergence of the presented method is established under suitable conditions. The numerical results of the test problems show that the method is competitive with the norm method.

  17. Single Canonical Model of Reflexive Memory and Spatial Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saumil S; Red, Stuart; Lin, Eric; Sereno, Anne B

    2015-10-23

    Many neurons in the dorsal and ventral visual stream have the property that after a brief visual stimulus presentation in their receptive field, the spiking activity in these neurons persists above their baseline levels for several seconds. This maintained activity is not always correlated with the monkey's task and its origin is unknown. We have previously proposed a simple neural network model, based on shape selective neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex, which predicts the valence and time course of reflexive (bottom-up) spatial attention. In the same simple model, we demonstrate here that passive maintained activity or short-term memory of specific visual events can result without need for an external or top-down modulatory signal. Mutual inhibition and neuronal adaptation play distinct roles in reflexive attention and memory. This modest 4-cell model provides the first simple and unified physiologically plausible mechanism of reflexive spatial attention and passive short-term memory processes.

  18. Operational Semantics of a Weak Memory Model inspired by Go

    OpenAIRE

    Fava, Daniel Schnetzer; Stolz, Volker; Valle, Stian

    2017-01-01

    A memory model dictates which values may be returned when reading from memory. In a parallel computing setting, the memory model affects how processes communicate through shared memory. The design of a proper memory model is a balancing act. On one hand, memory models must be lax enough to allow common hardware and compiler optimizations. On the other, the more lax the model, the harder it is for developers to reason about their programs. In order to alleviate the burden on programmers, a wea...

  19. Beyond long memory in heart rate variability: An approach based on fractionally integrated autoregressive moving average time series models with conditional heteroscedasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Argentina; Paula Rocha, Ana; Eduarda Silva, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) series exhibit long memory and time-varying conditional variance. This work considers the Fractionally Integrated AutoRegressive Moving Average (ARFIMA) models with Generalized AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroscedastic (GARCH) errors. ARFIMA-GARCH models may be used to capture and remove long memory and estimate the conditional volatility in 24 h HRV recordings. The ARFIMA-GARCH approach is applied to fifteen long term HRV series available at Physionet, leading to the discrimination among normal individuals, heart failure patients, and patients with atrial fibrillation.

  20. A thermodynamically consistent model of shape-memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benešová, Barbora

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2011), s. 355-356 ISSN 1617-7061 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : slape memory alloys * model based on relaxation * thermomechanic coupling Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pamm.201110169/abstract

  1. The Development of Time-Based Prospective Memory in Childhood: The Role of Working Memory Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Babett; Mahy, Caitlin E. V.; Ellis, Judi; Schnitzspahn, Katharina; Krause, Ivonne; Altgassen, Mareike; Kliegel, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    This large-scale study examined the development of time-based prospective memory (PM) across childhood and the roles that working memory updating and time monitoring play in driving age effects in PM performance. One hundred and ninety-seven children aged 5 to 14 years completed a time-based PM task where working memory updating load was…

  2. Weak Memory Models: Balancing Definitional Simplicity and Implementation Flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sizhuo; Vijayaraghavan, Muralidaran; Arvind

    2017-01-01

    The memory model for RISC-V, a newly developed open source ISA, has not been finalized yet and thus, offers an opportunity to evaluate existing memory models. We believe RISC-V should not adopt the memory models of POWER or ARM, because their axiomatic and operational definitions are too complicated. We propose two new weak memory models: WMM and WMM-S, which balance definitional simplicity and implementation flexibility differently. Both allow all instruction reorderings except overtaking of...

  3. Neural Circuitry Based on Single Electron Transistors and Single Electron Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïmen BOUBAKER

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and explain a neural circuitry based on single electron transistors ‘SET’ which can be used in classification and recognition. We implement, after that, a Winner-Take-All ‘WTA’ neural network with lateral inhibition architecture. The original idea of this work is reflected, first, in the proposed new single electron memory ‘SEM’ design by hybridising two promising Single Electron Memory ‘SEM’ and the MTJ/Ring memory and second, in modeling and simulation results of neural memory based on SET. We prove the charge storage in quantum dot in two types of memories.

  4. Episodic grammar: a computational model of the interaction between episodic and semantic memory in language processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, G.; Zuidema, W.; Carlson, L.; Hoelscher, C.; Shipley, T.F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of the interaction of semantic and episodic memory in language processing. Our work shows how language processing can be understood in terms of memory retrieval. We point out that the perceived dichotomy between rule-based versus exemplar-based language modelling can be

  5. Changing Behavior by Memory Aids: A Social Psychological Model of Prospective Memory and Habit Development Tested with Dynamic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a social psychological model of prospective memory and habit development. The model is based on relevant research literature, and its dynamics were investigated by computer simulations. Time-series data from a behavior-change campaign in Cuba were used for calibration and validation of the model. The model scored well in…

  6. Why does brain damage impair memory? A connectionist model of object recognition memory in perirhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Rosemary A; Bussey, Timothy J; Saksida, Lisa M

    2006-11-22

    Object recognition is the canonical test of declarative memory, the type of memory putatively impaired after damage to the temporal lobes. Studies of object recognition memory have helped elucidate the anatomical structures involved in declarative memory, indicating a critical role for perirhinal cortex. We offer a mechanistic account of the effects of perirhinal cortex damage on object recognition memory, based on the assumption that perirhinal cortex stores representations of the conjunctions of visual features possessed by complex objects. Such representations are proposed to play an important role in memory when it is difficult to solve a task using representations of only individual visual features of stimuli, thought to be stored in regions of the ventral visual stream caudal to perirhinal cortex. The account is instantiated in a connectionist model, in which development of object representations with visual experience provides a mechanism for judgment of previous occurrence. We present simulations addressing the following empirical findings: (1) that impairments after damage to perirhinal cortex (modeled by removing the "perirhinal cortex" layer of the network) are exacerbated by lengthening the delay between presentation of to-be-remembered items and test, (2) that such impairments are also exacerbated by lengthening the list of to-be-remembered items, and (3) that impairments are revealed only when stimuli are trial unique rather than repeatedly presented. This study shows that it may be possible to account for object recognition impairments after damage to perirhinal cortex within a hierarchical, representational framework, in which complex conjunctive representations in perirhinal cortex play a critical role.

  7. Parallel models of associative memory

    CERN Document Server

    Hinton, Geoffrey E

    2014-01-01

    This update of the 1981 classic on neural networks includes new commentaries by the authors that show how the original ideas are related to subsequent developments. As researchers continue to uncover ways of applying the complex information processing abilities of neural networks, they give these models an exciting future which may well involve revolutionary developments in understanding the brain and the mind -- developments that may allow researchers to build adaptive intelligent machines. The original chapters show where the ideas came from and the new commentaries show where they are going

  8. Event-based prospective memory performance in autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Altgassen, Mareike; Schmitz-H?bsch, Maren; Kliegel, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate event-based prospective memory performance in individuals with autism spectrum disorder and to explore possible relations between laboratory-based prospective memory performance and everyday performance. Nineteen children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and 19 matched neurotypical controls participated. The laboratory-based prospective memory test was embedded in a visuo-spatial working memory test and required participants to ...

  9. A dual-trace model for visual sensory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappiello, Marcus; Zhang, Weiwei

    2016-11-01

    Visual sensory memory refers to a transient memory lingering briefly after the stimulus offset. Although previous literature suggests that visual sensory memory is supported by a fine-grained trace for continuous representation and a coarse-grained trace of categorical information, simultaneous separation and assessment of these traces can be difficult without a quantitative model. The present study used a continuous estimation procedure to test a novel mathematical model of the dual-trace hypothesis of visual sensory memory according to which visual sensory memory could be modeled as a mixture of 2 von Mises (2VM) distributions differing in standard deviation. When visual sensory memory and working memory (WM) for colors were distinguished using different experimental manipulations in the first 3 experiments, the 2VM model outperformed Zhang and Luck (2008) standard mixture model (SM) representing a mixture of a single memory trace and random guesses, even though SM outperformed 2VM for WM. Experiment 4 generalized 2VM's advantages of fitting visual sensory memory data over SM from color to orientation. Furthermore, a single trace model and 4 other alternative models were ruled out, suggesting the necessity and sufficiency of dual traces for visual sensory memory. Together these results support the dual-trace model of visual sensory memory and provide a preliminary inquiry into the nature of information loss from visual sensory memory to WM. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. EDITORIAL: Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures Non-volatile memory based on nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Sergei; Yang, J. Joshua; Demming, Anna

    2011-06-01

    Non-volatile memory refers to the crucial ability of computers to store information once the power source has been removed. Traditionally this has been achieved through flash, magnetic computer storage and optical discs, and in the case of very early computers paper tape and punched cards. While computers have advanced considerably from paper and punched card memory devices, there are still limits to current non-volatile memory devices that restrict them to use as secondary storage from which data must be loaded and carefully saved when power is shut off. Denser, faster, low-energy non-volatile memory is highly desired and nanostructures are the critical enabler. This special issue on non-volatile memory based on nanostructures describes some of the new physics and technology that may revolutionise future computers. Phase change random access memory, which exploits the reversible phase change between crystalline and amorphous states, also holds potential for future memory devices. The chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is a promising material in this field because it combines a high activation energy for crystallization and a relatively low crystallization temperature, as well as a low melting temperature and low conductivity, which accommodates localized heating. Doping is often used to lower the current required to activate the phase change or 'reset' GST but this often aggravates other problems. Now researchers in Korea report in-depth studies of SiO2-doped GST and identify ways of optimising the material's properties for phase-change random access memory [1]. Resistance switching is an area that has attracted a particularly high level of interest for non-volatile memory technology, and a great deal of research has focused on the potential of TiO2 as a model system in this respect. Researchers at HP labs in the US have made notable progress in this field, and among the work reported in this special issue they describe means to control the switch resistance and show

  11. Modeling and Predistortion of Envelope Tracking Power Amplifiers using a Memory Binomial Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafuri, Felice Francesco; Sira, Daniel; Larsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    . The model definition is based on binomial series, hence the name of memory binomial model (MBM). The MBM is here applied to measured data-sets acquired from an ET measurement set-up. When used as a PA model the MBM showed an NMSE (Normalized Mean Squared Error) as low as −40dB and an ACEPR (Adjacent Channel...

  12. 3D Printed Photoresponsive Devices Based on Shape Memory Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Leow, Wan Ru; Wang, Ting; Wang, Juan; Yu, Jiancan; He, Ke; Qi, Dianpeng; Wan, Changjin; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    Compared with traditional stimuli-responsive devices with simple planar or tubular geometries, 3D printed stimuli-responsive devices not only intimately meet the requirement of complicated shapes at macrolevel but also satisfy various conformation changes triggered by external stimuli at the microscopic scale. However, their development is limited by the lack of 3D printing functional materials. This paper demonstrates the 3D printing of photoresponsive shape memory devices through combining fused deposition modeling printing technology and photoresponsive shape memory composites based on shape memory polymers and carbon black with high photothermal conversion efficiency. External illumination triggers the shape recovery of 3D printed devices from the temporary shape to the original shape. The effect of materials thickness and light density on the shape memory behavior of 3D printed devices is quantified and calculated. Remarkably, sunlight also triggers the shape memory behavior of these 3D printed devices. This facile printing strategy would provide tremendous opportunities for the design and fabrication of biomimetic smart devices and soft robotics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Model-Driven Study of Visual Memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sekuler, Robert

    2004-01-01

    .... We synthesized concepts, insights, and methods from memory research, and from vision research, working within a coherent, quantitative framework for understanding episodic visual recognition memory...

  14. Optical quantum memory based on electromagnetically induced transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Slattery, Oliver; Tang, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a promising approach to implement quantum memory in quantum communication and quantum computing applications. In this paper, following a brief overview of the main approaches to quantum memory, we provide details of the physical principle and theory of quantum memory based specifically on EIT. We discuss the key technologies for implementing quantum memory based on EIT and review important milestones, from the first experimental demonstration to current applications in quantum information systems.

  15. Activation and Binding in Verbal Working Memory: A Dual-Process Model for the Recognition of Nonwords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberauer, Klauss; Lange, Elke B.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents a mathematical model of short-term recognition based on dual-process models and the three-component theory of working memory [Oberauer, K. (2002). Access to information in working memory: Exploring the focus of attention. "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 28", 411-421]. Familiarity arises…

  16. Weak Memory Models with Matching Axiomatic and Operational Definitions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sizhuo; Vijayaraghavan, Muralidaran; Lustig, Dan; Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Memory consistency models are notorious for being difficult to define precisely, to reason about, and to verify. More than a decade of effort has gone into nailing down the definitions of the ARM and IBM Power memory models, and yet there still remain aspects of those models which (perhaps surprisingly) remain unresolved to this day. In response to these complexities, there has been somewhat of a recent trend in the (general-purpose) architecture community to limit new memory models to being ...

  17. Predictors of Time-Based Prospective Memory in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinlay, Rachael J.; Kliegel, Matthias; Mantyla, Timo

    2009-01-01

    This study identified age differences in time-based prospective memory performance in school-aged children and explored possible cognitive correlates of age-related performance. A total of 56 7- to 12-year-olds performed a prospective memory task in which prospective memory accuracy, ongoing task performance, and time monitoring were assessed.…

  18. Embedded Memory Hierarchy Exploration Based on Magnetic Random Access Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Vitório Cargnini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Static random access memory (SRAM is the most commonly employed semiconductor in the design of on-chip processor memory. However, it is unlikely that the SRAM technology will have a cell size that will continue to scale below 45 nm, due to the leakage current that is caused by the quantum tunneling effect. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM is a candidate technology to replace SRAM, assuming appropriate dimensioning given an operating threshold voltage. The write current of spin transfer torque (STT-MRAM is a known limitation; however, this has been recently mitigated by leveraging perpendicular magnetic tunneling junctions. In this article, we present a comprehensive comparison of spin transfer torque-MRAM (STT-MRAM and SRAM cache set banks. The non-volatility of STT-MRAM allows the definition of new instant on/off policies and leakage current optimizations. Through our experiments, we demonstrate that STT-MRAM is a candidate for the memory hierarchy of embedded systems, due to the higher densities and reduced leakage of MRAM.We demonstrate that adopting STT-MRAM in L1 and L2 caches mitigates the impact of higher write latencies and increased current draw due to the use of MRAM. With the correct system-on-chip (SoC design, we believe that STT-MRAM is a viable alternative to SRAM, which minimizes leakage current and the total power consumed by the SoC.

  19. A Mathematical Model for the Hippocampus: Towards the Understanding of Episodic Memory and Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, I.; Yamaguti, Y.; Kuroda, S.; Fukushima, Y.; Tsukada, M.

    How does the brain encode episode? Based on the fact that the hippocampus is responsible for the formation of episodic memory, we have proposed a mathematical model for the hippocampus. Because episodic memory includes a time series of events, an underlying dynamics for the formation of episodic memory is considered to employ an association of memories. David Marr correctly pointed out in his theory of archecortex for a simple memory that the hippocampal CA3 is responsible for the formation of associative memories. However, a conventional mathematical model of associative memory simply guarantees a single association of memory unless a rule for an order of successive association of memories is given. The recent clinical studies in Maguire's group for the patients with the hippocampal lesion show that the patients cannot make a new story, because of the lack of ability of imagining new things. Both episodic memory and imagining things include various common characteristics: imagery, the sense of now, retrieval of semantic information, and narrative structures. Taking into account these findings, we propose a mathematical model of the hippocampus in order to understand the common mechanism of episodic memory and imagination.

  20. All-printed paper-based memory

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2016-06-16

    All-printed paper-based substrate memory devices are described which can be prepared by a process that includes coating, using a screen printer, one or more areas of a paper substrate (102) with a conductor material (104), such as a carbon paste, to form a first electrode, depositing, with an ink jet printer, a layer of resistance switching insulator material (106), such as titanium dioxide, over one or more areas of the conductor material, and depositing, with an ink jet printer, a layer of metal (108), such as silver, over one or more areas of the titanium dioxide to form a second electrode.

  1. Research about Memory Detection Based on the Embedded Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Chu, Jian

    As is known to us all, the resources of memory detection of the embedded systems are very limited. Taking the Linux-based embedded arm as platform, this article puts forward two efficient memory detection technologies according to the characteristics of the embedded software. Especially for the programs which need specific libraries, the article puts forwards portable memory detection methods to help program designers to reduce human errors,improve programming quality and therefore make better use of the valuable embedded memory resource.

  2. A Cerebellar-model Associative Memory as a Generalized Random-access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1989-01-01

    A versatile neural-net model is explained in terms familiar to computer scientists and engineers. It is called the sparse distributed memory, and it is a random-access memory for very long words (for patterns with thousands of bits). Its potential utility is the result of several factors: (1) a large pattern representing an object or a scene or a moment can encode a large amount of information about what it represents; (2) this information can serve as an address to the memory, and it can also serve as data; (3) the memory is noise tolerant--the information need not be exact; (4) the memory can be made arbitrarily large and hence an arbitrary amount of information can be stored in it; and (5) the architecture is inherently parallel, allowing large memories to be fast. Such memories can become important components of future computers.

  3. A Scratchpad Memory Allocation Scheme for Dataflow Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-25

    perform via static analysis of C/C++. We use the heterochronous dataflow (HDF) model of computation [16, 39] in Ptolemy II [11] as a means to specify the...buffer data) as the key memory requirements [9]. 4.1 Structure of an HDF Model We use Ptolemy II’s graphical interface and the HDF domain to specify...algorithm. The allocation algorithm was implemented in Ptolemy II [11], a Java-based framework for studying modeling, simulation and design of concurrent

  4. A Hamiltonian driven quantum-like model for overdistribution in episodic memory recollection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Jan B.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2017-06-01

    While people famously forget genuine memories over time, they also tend to mistakenly over-recall equivalent memories concerning a given event. The memory phenomenon is known by the name of episodic overdistribution and occurs both in memories of disjunctions and partitions of mutually exclusive events and has been tested, modeled and documented in the literature. The total classical probability of recalling exclusive sub-events most often exceeds the probability of recalling the composed event, i.e. a subadditive total. We present a Hamiltonian driven propagation for the Quantum Episodic Memory model developed by Brainerd (et al., 2015) for the episodic memory overdistribution in the experimental immediate item false memory paradigm (Brainerd and Reyna, 2008, 2010, 2015). Following the Hamiltonian method of Busemeyer and Bruza (2012) our model adds time-evolution of the perceived memory state through the stages of the experimental process based on psychologically interpretable parameters - γ_c for recollection capability of cues, κ_p for bias or description-dependence by probes and β for the average gist component in the memory state at start. With seven parameters the Hamiltonian model shows good accuracy of predictions both in the EOD-disjunction and in the EOD-subadditivity paradigm. We noticed either an outspoken preponderance of the gist over verbatim trace, or the opposite, in the initial memory state when β is real. Only for complex β a mix of both traces is present in the initial state for the EOD-subadditivity paradigm.

  5. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Faure, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The immune system (IS) and the central nervous system (CNS) are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self) of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit) memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e., danger-fear) memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e., the taste of the Proust's madeleine cake) by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model's approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  6. A Hamiltonian Driven Quantum-Like Model for Overdistribution in Episodic Memory Recollection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B. Broekaert

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While people famously forget genuine memories over time, they also tend to mistakenly over-recall equivalent memories concerning a given event. The memory phenomenon is known by the name of episodic overdistribution and occurs both in memories of disjunctions and partitions of mutually exclusive events and has been tested, modeled and documented in the literature. The total classical probability of recalling exclusive sub-events most often exceeds the probability of recalling the composed event, i.e., a subadditive total. We present a Hamiltonian driven propagation for the Quantum Episodic Memory model developed by Brainerd et al. [1] for the episodic memory overdistribution in the experimental immediate item false memory paradigm [1–3]. Following the Hamiltonian method of Busemeyer and Bruza [4] our model adds time-evolution of the perceived memory state through the stages of the experimental process based on psychologically interpretable parameters—γc for recollection capability of cues, κp for bias or description-dependence by probes and β for the average gist component in the memory state at start. With seven parameters the Hamiltonian model shows good accuracy of predictions both in the EOD-disjunction and in the EOD-subadditivity paradigm. We noticed either an outspoken preponderance of the gist over verbatim trace, or the opposite, in the initial memory state when β is real. Only for complex β a mix of both traces is present in the initial state for the EOD-subadditivity paradigm.

  7. The Development of Time-Based Prospective Memory in Childhood: The Role of Working Memory Updating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voigt, B.; Mahy, C.E.V.; Ellis, J.; Schnitzspahn, K.M.; Krause, I.; Altgassen, A.M.; Kliegel, M.

    2014-01-01

    This large-scale study examined the development of time-based prospective memory (PM) across childhood and the roles that working memory updating and time monitoring play in driving age effects in PM performance. One hundred and ninety-seven children aged 5 to 14 years completed a time-based PM task

  8. Agreement Dynamics of Memory-Based Naming Game with Forgetting Curve of Ebbinghaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Jie-Fang

    2009-04-01

    We propose a memory-based naming game (MBNG) model with two-state variables in full-connected networks, which is like some previous opinion propagation models. It is found that this model is deeply affected by the memory decision parameter, and then its dynamical behaviour can be partly analysed by using numerical simulation and analytical argument. We also report a modified MBNG model with the forgetting curve of Ebbinghaus in the memory. With deletion of one parameter in the MBNG model, it can converge to success rate S(t) = 1 and the average sum E(t) is decided by the size of network N.

  9. Generalized memory associativity in a network model for the neuroses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemann, Roseli S.; Donangelo, Raul; de Carvalho, Luís A. V.

    2009-03-01

    We review concepts introduced in earlier work, where a neural network mechanism describes some mental processes in neurotic pathology and psychoanalytic working-through, as associative memory functioning, according to the findings of Freud. We developed a complex network model, where modules corresponding to sensorial and symbolic memories interact, representing unconscious and conscious mental processes. The model illustrates Freud's idea that consciousness is related to symbolic and linguistic memory activity in the brain. We have introduced a generalization of the Boltzmann machine to model memory associativity. Model behavior is illustrated with simulations and some of its properties are analyzed with methods from statistical mechanics.

  10. Natural DNA-Based Nonvolatile Resistive Switching Memory (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-06

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0510 NATURAL DNA-BASED NONVOLATILE RESISTIVE SWITCHING MEMORY (PREPRINT) Huei-Yau Jeng, Tzu-Chien Yang , Li...2017 Interim 24 January 2014 – 6 November 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATURAL DNA-BASED NONVOLATILE RESISTIVE SWITCHING MEMORY (PREPRINT) 5a...study, we present a resistive switching memory device based on natural DNA biomaterial. The structure consists of a DNA layer sandwiched by two

  11. Modeling Change in Memory Performance and Memory Perceptions: Findings from the ACTIVE Study

    OpenAIRE

    Parisi, Jeanine M.; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Crowe, Michael; Cook, Sarah E.; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Sartori, Andrea; Unverzagt, Fredrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Within the context of the ACTIVE study, the current investigation explored the relationships between objective memory and two components of subjective memory (frequency of forgetting and use of external aids) over a five-year period. Relationships were assessed using parallel process latent growth curve models. Results indicated that changes in objective memory were associated with changes in perceived frequency of forgetting, but not with use of external aids (calendars, reminder notes) over...

  12. A neural model of retrospective attention in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Paul M; Taylor, Robert

    2018-02-01

    An informative cue that directs attention to one of several items in working memory improves subsequent recall of that item. Here we examine the mechanism of this retro-cue effect using a model of short-term memory based on neural population coding. Our model describes recalled feature values as the output of an optimal decoding of spikes generated by a tuned population of neurons. This neural model provides a better account of human recall data than an influential model that assumes errors can be described as a mixture of normally distributed noise and random guesses. The retro-cue benefit is revealed to be consistent with a higher firing rate of the population encoding the cued versus uncued items, with no difference in tuning specificity. Additionally, a retro-cued item is less likely to be swapped with another item in memory, an effect that can also be explained by greater activity of the underlying population. These results provide a parsimonious account of the effects of retrospective attention on recall and demonstrate a principled method for investigating neural representations with behavioral tasks. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The computational implementation of the landscape model: modeling inferential processes and memory representations of text comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yuhtsuen; van den Broek, Paul; Kendeou, Panayiota; Lee, Chengyuan

    2005-05-01

    The complexity of text comprehension demands a computational approach to describe the cognitive processes involved. In this article, we present the computational implementation of the landscape model of reading. This model captures both on-line comprehension processes during reading and the off-line memory representation after reading is completed, incorporating both memory-based and coherence-based mechanisms of comprehension. The overall architecture and specific parameters of the program are described, and a running example is provided. Several studies comparing computational and behavioral data indicate that the implemented model is able to account for cycle-by-cycle comprehension processes and memory for a variety of text types and reading situations.

  14. Thermomechanical model for NiTi-based shape memory alloys including R-phase and material anisotropy under multi-axial loadings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Petr; Frost, Miroslav; Benešová, Barbora; Zineb, T.B.; Šittner, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, DEC 2012 (2012), s. 132-151 ISSN 0749-6419 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/1296; GA ČR GA106/09/1573; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR GAP107/12/0800 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : shape memory alloys * constitutive modeling * R-phase * non-proportional loading * dissipation function Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics; JJ - Other Materials (FZU-D) Impact factor: 4.356, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749641912001027

  15. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eSánchez-Ramón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The immune system (IS and the central nervous system (CNS are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e. danger-fear memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e. the taste of the Proust’s madeleine cake by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model’s approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  16. A Computationally-Efficient, Multi-Mechanism Based Framework for the Comprehensive Modeling of the Evolutionary Behavior of Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Vaidyanathan, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The report summarizes the accomplishments made during the 4-year duration of the project. Here, the major emphasis is placed on the different tasks performed by the two research teams; i.e., the modeling activities by the University of Akron (UA) team and the experimental and neutron diffraction studies conducted by the University of Central Florida (UCF) team, during this 4-year period. Further technical details are given in the upcoming sections by UA and UCF for each of the milestones/years (together with the corresponding figures and captions).The project majorly involved the development, validation, and application of a general theoretical model that is capable of capturing the nonlinear hysteretic responses, including pseudoelasticity, shape memory effect, rate-dependency, multi-axiality, asymmetry in tension versus compression response of shape memory alloys. Among the targeted goals for the SMA model was its ability to account for the evolutionary character response (including transient and long term behavior under sustained cycles) for both conventional and high temperature (HT) SMAs, as well as being able to simulate some of the devices which exploit these unique material systems. This required extensive (uniaxial and multi-axial) experiments needed to guide us in calibrating and characterizing the model. Moreover, since the model is formulated on the theoretical notion of internal state variables (ISVs), neutron diffraction experiments were needed to establish the linkage between the micromechanical changes and these ISVs. In addition, the design of the model should allow easy implementation in large scale finite element application to study the behavior of devices making use of these SMA materials under different loading controls. Summary of the activities, progress/achievements made during this period is given below in details for the University of Akron and the University (Section 2.0) of Central Florida (Section 3.0).

  17. Episodic memories predict adaptive value-based decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, Vishnu; FeldmanHall, Oriel; Hunter, Lindsay E.; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Davachi, Lila

    2016-01-01

    Prior research illustrates that memory can guide value-based decision-making. For example, previous work has implicated both working memory and procedural memory (i.e., reinforcement learning) in guiding choice. However, other types of memories, such as episodic memory, may also influence decision-making. Here we test the role for episodic memory—specifically item versus associative memory—in supporting value-based choice. Participants completed a task where they first learned the value associated with trial unique lotteries. After a short delay, they completed a decision-making task where they could choose to re-engage with previously encountered lotteries, or new never before seen lotteries. Finally, participants completed a surprise memory test for the lotteries and their associated values. Results indicate that participants chose to re-engage more often with lotteries that resulted in high versus low rewards. Critically, participants not only formed detailed, associative memories for the reward values coupled with individual lotteries, but also exhibited adaptive decision-making only when they had intact associative memory. We further found that the relationship between adaptive choice and associative memory generalized to more complex, ecologically valid choice behavior, such as social decision-making. However, individuals more strongly encode experiences of social violations—such as being treated unfairly, suggesting a bias for how individuals form associative memories within social contexts. Together, these findings provide an important integration of episodic memory and decision-making literatures to better understand key mechanisms supporting adaptive behavior. PMID:26999046

  18. A Probabilistic Model of Visual Working Memory: Incorporating Higher Order Regularities into Working Memory Capacity Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Timothy F.; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2013-01-01

    When remembering a real-world scene, people encode both detailed information about specific objects and higher order information like the overall gist of the scene. However, formal models of change detection, like those used to estimate visual working memory capacity, assume observers encode only a simple memory representation that includes no…

  19. A heuristic model for working memory deficit in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhen; Yu, Gina P; Tretter, Felix; Pogarell, Oliver; Grace, Anthony A; Voit, Eberhard O

    2016-11-01

    The life of schizophrenia patients is severely affected by deficits in working memory. In various brain regions, the reciprocal interactions between excitatory glutamatergic neurons and inhibitory GABAergic neurons are crucial. Other neurotransmitters, in particular dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, and norepinephrine, modulate the local balance between glutamate and GABA and therefore regulate the function of brain regions. Persistent alterations in the balances between the neurotransmitters can result in working memory deficits. Here we present a heuristic computational model that accounts for interactions among neurotransmitters across various brain regions. The model is based on the concept of a neurochemical interaction matrix at the biochemical level and combines this matrix with a mobile model representing physiological dynamic balances among neurotransmitter systems associated with working memory. The comparison of clinical and simulation results demonstrates that the model output is qualitatively very consistent with the available data. In addition, the model captured how perturbations migrated through different neurotransmitters and brain regions. Results showed that chronic administration of ketamine can cause a variety of imbalances, and application of an antagonist of the D2 receptor in PFC can also induce imbalances but in a very different manner. The heuristic computational model permits a variety of assessments of genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological perturbations and serves as an intuitive tool for explaining clinical and biological observations. The heuristic model is more intuitive than biophysically detailed models. It can serve as an important tool for interdisciplinary communication and even for psychiatric education of patients and relatives. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "System Genetics" Guest Editor: Dr. Yudong Cai and Dr. Tao Huang. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Amphoteric trap modeling of multidielectric scaled SONOS nonvolatile memory structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libsch, Frank R.; Roy, Anirban; White, Marvin H.

    1987-10-01

    We have characterized multidielectric scaled SONOS nonvolatile memory structures with the quasi-static linear voltage ramp (LVR) technique and dynamic pulse measurements. We have formulated physically-based ERASE/WRITE and retention methods with deep level amphoteric traps which capture and emit carriers to the bands in the silicon nitride film. Amphoteric trap parameters are extracted by the LVR technique. ERASE/WRITE and retention amphoteric trap model simulations agree well with the experimental dynamic pulse measurements. Experimental scaled SONOS structures have been fabricated with tunnel oxide XOT=20 Å, nitride XN=30 Å and blocking oxide XOB=55 Å and demonstrated a static flatband shift of 3.6 V with ±5 V programming voltages. These structures may be used as the nonvolatile memory element in high density VLSI circuits.

  1. A Java Reference Model of Transacted Memory for Smart Cards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, Erik; Hartel, Pieter H.; de Jong, Eduard

    2002-01-01

    Transacted Memory offers persistence, undoability and auditing. We present a Java/JML Reference Model of the Transacted Memory system on the basis of our earlier separate Z model and C implementation. We conclude that Java/JML combines the advantages of a high level specification in the JML part

  2. A Java Reference Model of Transacted Memory for Smart Cards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, Erik; Hartel, Pieter H.; de Jong, Eduard

    Transacted Memory offers persistence, undoability and auditing. We present a Java/JML Reference Model of the Transacted Memory system on the basis of our earlier separate Z model and C implementation. We conclude that Java/JML combines the advantages of a high level specification in the JML part

  3. A memory-based shallow parser for spoken Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canisius, S.V.M.; van den Bosch, A.; Decadt, B.; Hoste, V.; De Pauw, G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the development of a Dutch memory-based shallow parser. The availability of large treebanks for Dutch, such as the one provided by the Spoken Dutch Corpus, allows memory-based learners to be trained on examples of shallow parsing taken from the treebank, and act as a shallow parser after

  4. Event-based prospective memory performance in autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altgassen, A.M.; Schmitz-Hübsch, M.; Kliegel, M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate event-based prospective memory performance in individuals with autism spectrum disorder and to explore possible relations between laboratory-based prospective memory performance and everyday performance. Nineteen children and adolescents with

  5. Transfer after process-based object-location memory training in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kathrin; von Bastian, Claudia C; Röcke, Christina; Martin, Mike; Eschen, Anne

    2016-11-01

    A substantial part of age-related episodic memory decline has been attributed to the decreasing ability of older adults to encode and retrieve associations among simultaneously processed information units from long-term memory. In addition, this ability seems to share unique variance with reasoning. In this study, we therefore examined whether process-based training of the ability to learn and remember associations has the potential to induce transfer effects to untrained episodic memory and reasoning tasks in healthy older adults (60-75 years). For this purpose, the experimental group (n = 36) completed 30 sessions of process-based object-location memory training, while the active control group (n = 31) practiced visual perception on the same material. Near (spatial episodic memory), intermediate (verbal episodic memory), and far transfer effects (reasoning) were each assessed with multiple tasks at four measurements (before, midway through, immediately after, and 4 months after training). Linear mixed-effects models revealed transfer effects on spatial episodic memory and reasoning that were still observed 4 months after training. These results provide first empirical evidence that process-based training can enhance healthy older adults' associative memory performance and positively affect untrained episodic memory and reasoning abilities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Event-based prospective memory performance in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altgassen, Mareike; Schmitz-Hübsch, Maren; Kliegel, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate event-based prospective memory performance in individuals with autism spectrum disorder and to explore possible relations between laboratory-based prospective memory performance and everyday performance. Nineteen children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and 19 matched neurotypical controls participated. The laboratory-based prospective memory test was embedded in a visuo-spatial working memory test and required participants to remember to respond to a cue-event. Everyday planning performance was assessed with proxy ratings. Although parents of the autism group rated their children's everyday performance as significantly poorer than controls' parents, no group differences were found in event-based prospective memory. Nevertheless, individual differences in laboratory-based and everyday performances were related. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Ising formulation of associative memory models and quantum annealing recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Siddhartha; Shehab, Omar; Balu, Radhakrishnan

    2017-12-01

    Associative memory models, in theoretical neuro- and computer sciences, can generally store at most a linear number of memories. Recalling memories in these models can be understood as retrieval of the energy minimizing configuration of classical Ising spins, closest in Hamming distance to an imperfect input memory, where the energy landscape is determined by the set of stored memories. We present an Ising formulation for associative memory models and consider the problem of memory recall using quantum annealing. We show that allowing for input-dependent energy landscapes allows storage of up to an exponential number of memories (in terms of the number of neurons). Further, we show how quantum annealing may naturally be used for recall tasks in such input-dependent energy landscapes, although the recall time may increase with the number of stored memories. Theoretically, we obtain the radius of attractor basins R (N ) and the capacity C (N ) of such a scheme and their tradeoffs. Our calculations establish that for randomly chosen memories the capacity of our model using the Hebbian learning rule as a function of problem size can be expressed as C (N ) =O (eC1N) , C1≥0 , and succeeds on randomly chosen memory sets with a probability of (1 -e-C2N) , C2≥0 with C1+C2=(0.5-f ) 2/(1 -f ) , where f =R (N )/N , 0 ≤f ≤0.5 , is the radius of attraction in terms of the Hamming distance of an input probe from a stored memory as a fraction of the problem size. We demonstrate the application of this scheme on a programmable quantum annealing device, the D-wave processor.

  8. An improved car-following model considering headway changes with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Shi, Zhongke

    2015-03-01

    To describe car-following behaviors in complex situations better, increase roadway traffic mobility and minimize cars' fuel consumptions, the linkage between headway changes with memory and car-following behaviors was explored with the field car-following data by using the gray correlation analysis method, and then an improved car-following model considering headway changes with memory on a single lane was proposed based on the full velocity difference model. Some numerical simulations were carried out by employing the improved car-following model to explore how headway changes with memory affected each car's velocity, acceleration, headway and fuel consumptions. The research results show that headway changes with memory have significant effects on car-following behaviors and fuel consumptions and that considering headway changes with memory in designing the adaptive cruise control strategy can improve the traffic flow stability and minimize cars' fuel consumptions.

  9. Hardware emulation of Memristor based Ternary Content Addressable Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Bahloul, Mohamed A.

    2017-12-13

    MTCAM (Memristor Ternary Content Addressable Memory) is a special purpose storage medium in which data could be retrieved based on the stored content. Using Memristors as the main storage element provides the potential of achieving higher density and more efficient solutions than conventional methods. A key missing item in the validation of such approaches is the wide spread availability of hardware emulation platforms that can provide reliable and repeatable performance statistics. In this paper, we present a hardware MTCAM emulation based on 2-Transistors-2Memristors (2T2M) bit-cell. It builds on a bipolar memristor model with storing and fetching capabilities based on the actual current-voltage behaviour. The proposed design offers a flexible verification environment with quick design revisions, high execution speeds and powerful debugging techniques. The proposed design is modeled using VHDL and prototyped on Xilinx Virtex® FPGA.

  10. Fast decision tree-based method to index large DNA-protein sequence databases using hybrid distributed-shared memory programming model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Khalid Mohammad; Abdullah, Rosni; Rashid, Nur'Aini Abdul

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, the size of biological databases has increased significantly, with the continuous growth in the number of users and rate of queries; such that some databases have reached the terabyte size. There is therefore, the increasing need to access databases at the fastest rates possible. In this paper, the decision tree indexing model (PDTIM) was parallelised, using a hybrid of distributed and shared memory on resident database; with horizontal and vertical growth through Message Passing Interface (MPI) and POSIX Thread (PThread), to accelerate the index building time. The PDTIM was implemented using 1, 2, 4 and 5 processors on 1, 2, 3 and 4 threads respectively. The results show that the hybrid technique improved the speedup, compared to a sequential version. It could be concluded from results that the proposed PDTIM is appropriate for large data sets, in terms of index building time.

  11. Memory detection 2.0: the first web-based memory detection test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Bennett; Verschuere, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that reaction times (RTs) can be used to detect recognition of critical (e.g., crime) information. A limitation of this research base is its reliance upon small samples (average n = 24), and indications of publication bias. To advance RT-based memory detection, we report upon the development of the first web-based memory detection test. Participants in this research (Study1: n = 255; Study2: n = 262) tried to hide 2 high salient (birthday, country of origin) and 2 low salient (favourite colour, favourite animal) autobiographical details. RTs allowed to detect concealed autobiographical information, and this, as predicted, more successfully so than error rates, and for high salient than for low salient items. While much remains to be learned, memory detection 2.0 seems to offer an interesting new platform to efficiently and validly conduct RT-based memory detection research.

  12. Memory detection 2.0: the first web-based memory detection test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett Kleinberg

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that reaction times (RTs can be used to detect recognition of critical (e.g., crime information. A limitation of this research base is its reliance upon small samples (average n = 24, and indications of publication bias. To advance RT-based memory detection, we report upon the development of the first web-based memory detection test. Participants in this research (Study1: n = 255; Study2: n = 262 tried to hide 2 high salient (birthday, country of origin and 2 low salient (favourite colour, favourite animal autobiographical details. RTs allowed to detect concealed autobiographical information, and this, as predicted, more successfully so than error rates, and for high salient than for low salient items. While much remains to be learned, memory detection 2.0 seems to offer an interesting new platform to efficiently and validly conduct RT-based memory detection research.

  13. Knowledge Loss: A Defensive Model In Nuclear Research Organization Memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Safuan Bin Sulaiman; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge is an essential part of research based organization. It should be properly managed to ensure that any pitfalls of knowledge retention due to knowledge loss of both tacit and explicit is mitigated. Audit of the knowledge entities exist in the organization is important to identify the size of critical knowledge. It is very much related to how much know-what, know-how and know-why experts exist in the organization. This study conceptually proposed a defensive model for Nuclear Malaysia's organization memory and application of Knowledge Loss Risk Assessment (KLRA) as an important tool for critical knowledge identification. (author)

  14. Modeling the Cyclic Behavior of Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waimann, Johanna; Junker, Philipp; Hackl, Klaus

    2017-06-01

    The phenomenon of functional fatigue occurs during cyclic loading of pseudoelastic shape memory alloys. We model this effect by considering an irreversible martensitic volume fraction in addition to the reversible amounts of austenite and martensite based on variational principles. The inclusion of irreversible martensitic volume fractions coincides with experimental observations and enables the model to be easily calibrated without any fitting functions. In our previous studies, we modeled the polycrystalline material structure by static discretization of a relatively large number of randomly chosen grain orientations, which required much numerical effort. In contrast, we now apply a dynamic representation of the orientation distribution function to the modeling of functional fatigue which has proven to be beneficial regarding the numerical performance. To this end, we take into account an averaged grain orientation parameterized by three Euler angles that serve as additional internal variables. This results in an extremely reduced numerical effort. The model derivation is given along with the numerical implementation and computer experiments on the cyclic behavior of shape memory alloys.

  15. Graphene based non-volatile memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomu; Xie, Weiguang; Xu, Jian-Bin

    2014-08-20

    With the continuous advance of modern electronics, the demand for non-volatile memory cells rapidly grows. As a promising material for post-silicon electronic applications, graphene non-volatile memory cells have received renewed interest due to its outstanding electronic and other physical properties. This research news briefly summarizes the recent progress in this area. Appealing research activities and technical trends are highlighted. Afterwards, requirements and aims of future graphene non-volatile memory cells that may possibly influence their commercialization are also discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. FPGA Based Intelligent Co-operative Processor in Memory Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Zaki; Sotudeh, Reza; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing effort to improve computer system performance, Processor-In-Memory (PIM) architecture has emerged as an alternative solution. PIM architecture incorporates computational units and control logic directly on the memory to provide immediate access to the data. To exploit the potential...... benefits of PIM, a concept of Co-operative Intelligent Memory (CIM) was developed by the intelligent system group of University of Hertfordshire, based on the previously developed Co-operative Pseudo Intelligent Memory (CPIM). This paper provides an overview on previous works (CPIM, CIM) and realization...

  17. Non-volatile memory based on the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; You, Lu; Zhou, Yang; Lim, Zhi Shiuh; Zou, Xi; Chen, Lang; Ramesh, R; Wang, Junling

    2013-01-01

    The quest for a solid state universal memory with high-storage density, high read/write speed, random access and non-volatility has triggered intense research into new materials and novel device architectures. Though the non-volatile memory market is dominated by flash memory now, it has very low operation speed with ~10 μs programming and ~10 ms erasing time. Furthermore, it can only withstand ~10(5) rewriting cycles, which prevents it from becoming the universal memory. Here we demonstrate that the significant photovoltaic effect of a ferroelectric material, such as BiFeO3 with a band gap in the visible range, can be used to sense the polarization direction non-destructively in a ferroelectric memory. A prototype 16-cell memory based on the cross-bar architecture has been prepared and tested, demonstrating the feasibility of this technique.

  18. Non-volatile memory based on the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; You, Lu; Zhou, Yang; Shiuh Lim, Zhi; Zou, Xi; Chen, Lang; Ramesh, R.; Wang, Junling

    2013-01-01

    The quest for a solid state universal memory with high-storage density, high read/write speed, random access and non-volatility has triggered intense research into new materials and novel device architectures. Though the non-volatile memory market is dominated by flash memory now, it has very low operation speed with ~10 μs programming and ~10 ms erasing time. Furthermore, it can only withstand ~105 rewriting cycles, which prevents it from becoming the universal memory. Here we demonstrate that the significant photovoltaic effect of a ferroelectric material, such as BiFeO3 with a band gap in the visible range, can be used to sense the polarization direction non-destructively in a ferroelectric memory. A prototype 16-cell memory based on the cross-bar architecture has been prepared and tested, demonstrating the feasibility of this technique. PMID:23756366

  19. Estimating and Forecasting Generalized Fractional Long Memory Stochastic Volatility Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Peiris (Shelton); M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years fractionally differenced processes have received a great deal of attention due to its flexibility in financial applications with long memory. This paper considers a class of models generated by Gegenbauer polynomials, incorporating the long memory in stochastic volatility

  20. A bio-inspired memory model for structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Yong

    2009-01-01

    Long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) systems need intelligent management of the monitoring data. By analogy with the way the human brain processes memories, we present a bio-inspired memory model (BIMM) that does not require prior knowledge of the structure parameters. The model contains three time-domain areas: a sensory memory area, a short-term memory area and a long-term memory area. First, the initial parameters of the structural state are specified to establish safety criteria. Then the large amount of monitoring data that falls within the safety limits is filtered while the data outside the safety limits are captured instantly in the sensory memory area. Second, disturbance signals are distinguished from danger signals in the short-term memory area. Finally, the stable data of the structural balance state are preserved in the long-term memory area. A strategy for priority scheduling via fuzzy c-means for the proposed model is then introduced. An experiment on bridge tower deformation demonstrates that the proposed model can be applied for real-time acquisition, limited-space storage and intelligent mining of the monitoring data in a long-term SHM system

  1. The construction of semantic memory: grammar based representations learned from relational episodic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco P Battaglia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available After acquisition, memories underlie a process of consolidation, making them more resistant to interference and brain injury. Memory consolidation involves systems-level interactions, most importantly between the hippocampus and associated structures, which takes part in the initial encoding of memory, and the neocortex, which supports long-term storage. This dichotomy parallels the contrast between episodic memory (tied to the hippocampal formation, collecting an autobiographical stream of experiences, and semantic memory, a repertoire of facts and statistical regularities about the world, involving the neocortex at large. Experimental evidence points to a gradual transformation of memories, following encoding, from an episodic to a semantic character. This may require an exchange of information between different memory modules during inactive periods. We propose a theory for such interactions and for the formation of semantic memory, in which episodic memory is encoded as relational data. Semantic memory is modeled as a modified stochastic grammar, which learns to parse episodic configurations expressed as an association matrix. The grammar produces tree-like representations of episodes, describing the relationships between its main constituents at multiple levels of categorization, based on its current knowledge of world regularities. These regularities are learned by the grammar from episodic memory information, through an expectation-maximization procedure, analogous to the inside-outside algorithm for stochastic context-free grammars. We propose that a Monte-Carlo sampling version of this algorithm can be mapped on the dynamics of ``sleep replay'' of previously acquired information in the hippocampus and neocortex. We propose that the model can reproduce several properties of semantic memory such as decontextualization, top-down processing, and creation of schemata.

  2. The Construction of Semantic Memory: Grammar-Based Representations Learned from Relational Episodic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Francesco P.; Pennartz, Cyriel M. A.

    2011-01-01

    After acquisition, memories underlie a process of consolidation, making them more resistant to interference and brain injury. Memory consolidation involves systems-level interactions, most importantly between the hippocampus and associated structures, which takes part in the initial encoding of memory, and the neocortex, which supports long-term storage. This dichotomy parallels the contrast between episodic memory (tied to the hippocampal formation), collecting an autobiographical stream of experiences, and semantic memory, a repertoire of facts and statistical regularities about the world, involving the neocortex at large. Experimental evidence points to a gradual transformation of memories, following encoding, from an episodic to a semantic character. This may require an exchange of information between different memory modules during inactive periods. We propose a theory for such interactions and for the formation of semantic memory, in which episodic memory is encoded as relational data. Semantic memory is modeled as a modified stochastic grammar, which learns to parse episodic configurations expressed as an association matrix. The grammar produces tree-like representations of episodes, describing the relationships between its main constituents at multiple levels of categorization, based on its current knowledge of world regularities. These regularities are learned by the grammar from episodic memory information, through an expectation-maximization procedure, analogous to the inside–outside algorithm for stochastic context-free grammars. We propose that a Monte-Carlo sampling version of this algorithm can be mapped on the dynamics of “sleep replay” of previously acquired information in the hippocampus and neocortex. We propose that the model can reproduce several properties of semantic memory such as decontextualization, top-down processing, and creation of schemata. PMID:21887143

  3. Dynamic Memory Model for Non-Stationary Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Claus Nørgaard; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    Real-world problems are often nonstationary and can cause cyclic, repetitive patterns in the search landscape. For this class of problems, we introduce a new GA with dynamic explicit memory, which showed superior performance compared to a classic GA and a previously introduced memory-based GA for...

  4. Dynamic Memory Model for Non-Stationary Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Claus Nørgaard; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    Real-world problems are often nonstationary and can cause cyclic, repetitive patterns in the search landscape. For this class of problems, we introduce a new GA with dynamic explicit memory, which showed superior performance compared to a classic GA and a previously introduced memory-based GA...

  5. Dynamic intersectoral models with power-law memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Valentina V.; Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2018-01-01

    Intersectoral dynamic models with power-law memory are proposed. The equations of open and closed intersectoral models, in which the memory effects are described by the Caputo derivatives of non-integer orders, are derived. We suggest solutions of these equations, which have the form of linear combinations of the Mittag-Leffler functions and which are characterized by different effective growth rates. Examples of intersectoral dynamics with power-law memory are suggested for two sectoral cases. We formulate two principles of intersectoral dynamics with memory: the principle of changing of technological growth rates and the principle of domination change. It has been shown that in the input-output economic dynamics the effects of fading memory can change the economic growth rate and dominant behavior of economic sectors.

  6. Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  7. Formation of model-free motor memories during motor adaptation depends on perturbation schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban de Xivry, Jean-Jacques; Lefèvre, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Motor adaptation to an external perturbation relies on several mechanisms such as model-based, model-free, strategic, or repetition-dependent learning. Depending on the experimental conditions, each of these mechanisms has more or less weight in the final adaptation state. Here we focused on the conditions that lead to the formation of a model-free motor memory (Huang VS, Haith AM, Mazzoni P, Krakauer JW. Neuron 70: 787-801, 2011), i.e., a memory that does not depend on an internal model or on the size or direction of the errors experienced during the learning. The formation of such model-free motor memory was hypothesized to depend on the schedule of the perturbation (Orban de Xivry JJ, Ahmadi-Pajouh MA, Harran MD, Salimpour Y, Shadmehr R. J Neurophysiol 109: 124-136, 2013). Here we built on this observation by directly testing the nature of the motor memory after abrupt or gradual introduction of a visuomotor rotation, in an experimental paradigm where the presence of model-free motor memory can be identified (Huang VS, Haith AM, Mazzoni P, Krakauer JW. Neuron 70: 787-801, 2011). We found that relearning was faster after abrupt than gradual perturbation, which suggests that model-free learning is reduced during gradual adaptation to a visuomotor rotation. In addition, the presence of savings after abrupt introduction of the perturbation but gradual extinction of the motor memory suggests that unexpected errors are necessary to induce a model-free motor memory. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that different perturbation schedules do not lead to a more or less stabilized motor memory but to distinct motor memories with different attributes and neural representations. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. The multi-component model of working memory: explorations in experimental cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repovs, G; Baddeley, A

    2006-04-28

    There are a number of ways one can hope to describe and explain cognitive abilities, each of them contributing a unique and valuable perspective. Cognitive psychology tries to develop and test functional accounts of cognitive systems that explain the capacities and properties of cognitive abilities as revealed by empirical data gathered by a range of behavioral experimental paradigms. Much of the research in the cognitive psychology of working memory has been strongly influenced by the multi-component model of working memory [Baddeley AD, Hitch GJ (1974) Working memory. In: Recent advances in learning and motivation, Vol. 8 (Bower GA, ed), pp 47-90. New York: Academic Press; Baddeley AD (1986) Working memory. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press; Baddeley A. Working memory: Thought and action. Oxford: Oxford University Press, in press]. By expanding the notion of a passive short-term memory to an active system that provides the basis for complex cognitive abilities, the model has opened up numerous questions and new lines of research. In this paper we present the current revision of the multi-component model that encompasses a central executive, two unimodal storage systems: a phonological loop and a visuospatial sketchpad, and a further component, a multimodal store capable of integrating information into unitary episodic representations, termed episodic buffer. We review recent empirical data within experimental cognitive psychology that has shaped the development of the multicomponent model and the understanding of the capacities and properties of working memory. Research based largely on dual-task experimental designs and on neuropsychological evidence has yielded valuable information about the fractionation of working memory into independent stores and processes, the nature of representations in individual stores, the mechanisms of their maintenance and manipulation, the way the components of working memory relate to each other, and the role they play in other

  9. Hippocampal PET activations of memory encoding and retrieval: the HIPER model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, M; Habib, R; Tulving, E

    1998-01-01

    A meta-analysis of experimentally induced changes in blood flow ("activations") in positron emission tomography (PET) studies of memory has revealed an orderly functional anatomic pattern: Activations in the hippocampal region associated with episodic memory encoding are located primarily in the rostral portions of the region, whereas activations associated with episodic memory retrieval are located primarily in the caudal portions. These findings are based on an analysis of a sample of 54 "hippocampal encoding and retrieval" activations that were culled from an overall database consisting of 52 published PET studies of memory. We refer to this general pattern of rostrocaudal gradient of encoding and retrieval PET activations as the HIPER (Hippocampal Encoding/Retrieval) model. The model suggests a division of memory-related labor between the rostral and caudal portions of the hippocampal formation. Because functional anatomic pattern of encoding and retrieval activation that defines the HIPER model was unprecedented and unexpected, it is difficult to relate the model to what is already known or thought about functional neuroanatomy of episodic memory in the hippocampal regions. The model is interesting primarily because its exploration may yield fresh insights into the neural basis of human memory.

  10. CD4+ T cells play a critical role in the generation of primary and memory antitumor immune responses elicited by SA-4-1BBL and TAA-based vaccines in mouse tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajesh K; Yolcu, Esma S; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Shirwan, Haval

    2013-01-01

    The role of CD4(+) T cells in the generation of therapeutic primary and memory immune responses in cancer diverse immunotherapy settings remains ambiguous. We herein investigated this issue using two vaccine formulations containing a novel costimulatory molecule, SA-4-1BBL, as adjuvant and HPV E7 or survivin (SVN) as tumor associated antigens (TAAs) in two mouse transplantable tumor models; the TC-1 cervical cancer expressing xenogeneic HPV E7 and 3LL lung carcinoma overexpressing autologous SVN. Single vaccination with optimized SA-4-1BBL/TAA formulations resulted in the eradication of 6-day established TC-1 and 3LL tumors in >70% of mice in both models. The in vivo depletion of CD4(+) T cells one day before tumor challenge resulted in compromised vaccine efficacy in both TC-1 (25%) and 3LL (12.5%) tumor models. In marked contrast, depletion of CD4(+) T cells 5 days post-tumor challenge and one day prior to vaccination did not significantly alter the therapeutic efficacy of these vaccines. However, long-term immunological memory was compromised in the 3LL, but not in TC-1 model as a significant number (85.7%) of tumor free-mice succumbed to tumor growth when rechallenged with 3LL cells 60 days after the initial tumor inoculation. Collectively, these results demonstrate the indispensable role CD4(+) T cells play in the generation of therapeutic primary immune responses elicited by SA-4-1BBL/TAA-based vaccines irrespective of the nature of TAAs and establish the importance of CD4(+) T cells for long-term immune memory against 3LL tumor expressing self-antigen SVN, but not TC-1 expressing xenogeneic viral antigen E7.

  11. Reward associations magnify memory-based biases on perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doallo, Sonia; Patai, Eva Zita; Nobre, Anna Christina

    2013-02-01

    Long-term spatial contextual memories are a rich source of predictions about the likely locations of relevant objects in the environment and should enable tuning of neural processing of unfolding events to optimize perception and action. Of particular importance is whether and how the reward outcome of past events can impact perception. We combined behavioral measures with recordings of brain activity with high temporal resolution to test whether the previous reward outcome associated with a memory could modulate the impact of memory-based biases on perception, and if so, the level(s) at which visual neural processing is biased by reward-associated memory-guided attention. Data showed that past rewards potentiate the effects of spatial memories upon the discrimination of target objects embedded within complex scenes starting from early perceptual stages. We show that a single reward outcome of learning impacts on how we perceive events in our complex environments.

  12. A Working Memory Test Battery: Java-Based Collection of Seven Working Memory Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Stone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Working memory is a key construct within cognitive science. It is an important theory in its own right, but the influence of working memory is enriched due to the widespread evidence that measures of its capacity are linked to a variety of functions in wider cognition. To facilitate the active research environment into this topic, we describe seven computer-based tasks that provide estimates of short-term and working memory incorporating both visuospatial and verbal material. The memory span tasks provided are; digit span, matrix span, arrow span, reading span, operation span, rotation span, and symmetry span. These tasks are built to be simple to use, flexible to adapt to the specific needs of the research design, and are open source. All files can be downloaded from the project website http://www.cognitivetools.uk and the source code is available via Github.

  13. From canonical Hamiltonian to Port-Hamiltonian modeling application to magnetic shape memory alloys actuators.

    OpenAIRE

    Calchand, Nandish; Hubert, Arnaud; Le Gorrec, Yann; Maschke, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents the modelling of an actuator based on Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys (MSMA). The actuation principle relies on the ability of the material to change its shape under the application of a magnetic field. Previous models proposed by authors were based on canonical (symplectic) Hamiltonian modeling and thermodynamics of irreversible processes. These models, though physically cogent, are non-minimal differential algebraic dynamical models and hence less ad...

  14. Validation of a colour rendering index based on memory colours

    OpenAIRE

    Smet, Kevin; Jost-Boissard, Sophie; Ryckaert, Wouter; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a colour rendering index based on memory colours is investigated in comparison with the current CIE Colour Rendering Index, the NIST Colour Quality Scale and visual appreciation results obtained at CNRS at Lyon University for a set of 3000K and 4000K LED light sources. The Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients between each colour rendering metric and the two sets of visual results were calculated. It was found that the memory colour based colour render...

  15. Evolution of Models of Working Memory and Cognitive Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to trace the evolution of models of working memory and cognitive resources from the early 20th century to today. Linear flow models of information processing common in the 1960s and 1970s centered on the transfer of verbal information from a limited-capacity short-term memory store to long-term memory through rehearsal. Current conceptions see working memory as a dynamic system that includes both maintaining and manipulating information through a series of interactive components that include executive control and attentional resources. These models also reflect the evolution from an almost exclusive concentration on working memory for verbal materials to inclusion of a visual working memory component. Although differing in postulated mechanisms and emphasis, these evolving viewpoints all share the recognition that human information processing is a limited-capacity system with limits on the amount of information that can be attended to, remain activated in memory, and utilized at one time. These limitations take on special importance in spoken language comprehension, especially when the stimuli have complex linguistic structures or listening effort is increased by poor acoustic quality or reduced hearing acuity.

  16. Empirical Memory-Access Cost Models in Multicore NUMA Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Patrick S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Braithwaite, Ryan Karl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feng, Wu-chun [Virginia Tech

    2011-01-01

    Data location is of prime importance when scheduling tasks in a non-uniform memory access (NUMA) architecture. The characteristics of the NUMA architecture must be understood so tasks can be scheduled onto processors that are close to the task's data. However, in modern NUMA architectures, such as AMD Magny-Cours and Intel Nehalem, there may be a relatively large number of memory controllers with sockets that are connected in a non-intuitive manner, leading to performance degradation due to uninformed task-scheduling decisions. In this paper, we provide a method for experimentally characterizing memory-access costs for modern NUMA architectures via memory latency and bandwidth microbenchmarks. Using the results of these benchmarks, we propose a memory-access cost model to improve task-scheduling decisions by scheduling tasks near the data they need. Simple task-scheduling experiments using the memory-access cost models validate the use of empirical memory-access cost models to significantly improve program performance.

  17. Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  18. Hysteresis behaviour of thermoelastic alloys: some shape memory alloys models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lexcellent, C.; Torra, V.; Raniecki, B.

    1993-01-01

    The hysteretic behaviour of shape memory alloys (SMA) needs a more and more thin analysis because of its importance for technological applications. The comparison between different approaches allows to explicite the specifity of every model (macroscopic approach, micro-macro level, local description, phenomenological approach) and their points of convergence. On one hand, a thermodynamic treatment with a free energy expression as a mixing rule of each phase (parent or austenite phase and martensite) by adding a coupling term: the configurational energy, allowes modelling of material hysteresis loops. On the other hand, a phenomenological treatment based on a local investigation of two single crystals with a visualisation of microscopic parameters allows to perceive the phase transition mechanisms (nucleation, growth). All the obtained results show the importance of entropy production (or of the definition of the configurational energy term) for the correct description of hysteresis loops (subloops or external). (orig.)

  19. Estimating and Forecasting Generalized Fractional Long Memory Stochastic Volatility Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelton Peiris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a flexible class of time series models generated by Gegenbauer polynomials incorporating the long memory in stochastic volatility (SV components in order to develop the General Long Memory SV (GLMSV model. We examine the corresponding statistical properties of this model, discuss the spectral likelihood estimation and investigate the finite sample properties via Monte Carlo experiments. We provide empirical evidence by applying the GLMSV model to three exchange rate return series and conjecture that the results of out-of-sample forecasts adequately confirm the use of GLMSV model in certain financial applications.

  20. Recollection- and familiarity-based decisions reflect memory strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wiesmann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We used event-related fMRI to investigate whether recollection- and familiarity-based memory judgments are modulated by the degree of visual similarity between old and new art paintings. Subjects performed a flower detection task, followed by a Remember/Know/New surprise memory test. The old paintings were randomly presented with new paintings, which were either visually similar or visually different. Consistent with our prediction, subjects were significantly faster and more accurate to reject new, visually different paintings than new, visually similar ones. The proportion of false alarms, namely remember and know responses to new paintings, was significantly reduced with decreased visual similarity. The retrieval task evoked activation in multiple visual, parietal and prefrontal regions, within which remember judgments elicited stronger activation than know judgments. New, visually different paintings evoked weaker activation than new, visually similar items in the intraparietal sulcus. Contrasting recollection with familiarity revealed activation predominantly within the precuneus, where the BOLD response elicited by recollection peaked significantly earlier than the BOLD response evoked by familiarity judgments. These findings suggest that successful memory retrieval of pictures is mediated by activation in a distributed cortical network, where memory strength is manifested by differential hemodynamic profiles. Recollection- and familiarity-based memory decisions may therefore reflect strong memories and weak memories, respectively.

  1. Noise Reduction in EIT Quantum Memories based Cs Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Slattery, Oliver; Tang, Xiao; quantum communication project Team

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a widely used approach for quantum memories. In an EIT-based quantum memory, a strong residual control beam comes out together with a read-out signal at single-photon level. The strong residual control beam becomes a main noise source in the system. Noise reduction becomes critical for the quantum memory because noise reduces the quantum information fidelity. For an operational EIT quantum memory, the strong residual power of the control beam must be greatly reduced. In an EIT quantum memory based on warm atoms, the signal and control beams propagate in the same direction, and with very small frequency difference, so noise reduction becomes a very challenging issue. To solve this problem, three types of filtration including a polarization filter, an F-P etalon filter and an optically pumped absorption atomic filter have been developed in our lab. The overall noise reduction reaches 125 dB, which satisfies the requirement of quantum memory applications. By using the developed filtration elements, our quantum memory successfully demonstrated storage and retrieval of quantum signals at a single photon level with high fidelity.

  2. Memory detection 2.0: The first web-based memory detection test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinberg, B.; Verschuere, B.

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that reaction times (RTs) can be used to detect recognition of critical (e.g., crime) information. A limitation of this research base is its reliance upon small samples (average n = 24), and indications of publication bias. To advance RT-based memory detection, we

  3. Dorsoventral and Proximodistal Hippocampal Processing Account for the Influences of Sleep and Context on Memory (Reconsolidation: A Connectionist Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Lines

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The context in which learning occurs is sufficient to reconsolidate stored memories and neuronal reactivation may be crucial to memory consolidation during sleep. The mechanisms of context-dependent and sleep-dependent memory (reconsolidation are unknown but involve the hippocampus. We simulated memory (reconsolidation using a connectionist model of the hippocampus that explicitly accounted for its dorsoventral organization and for CA1 proximodistal processing. Replicating human and rodent (reconsolidation studies yielded the following results. (1 Semantic overlap between memory items and extraneous learning was necessary to explain experimental data and depended crucially on the recurrent networks of dorsal but not ventral CA3. (2 Stimulus-free, sleep-induced internal reactivations of memory patterns produced heterogeneous recruitment of memory items and protected memories from subsequent interference. These simulations further suggested that the decrease in memory resilience when subjects were not allowed to sleep following learning was primarily due to extraneous learning. (3 Partial exposure to the learning context during simulated sleep (i.e., targeted memory reactivation uniformly increased memory item reactivation and enhanced subsequent recall. Altogether, these results show that the dorsoventral and proximodistal organization of the hippocampus may be important components of the neural mechanisms for context-based and sleep-based memory (reconsolidations.

  4. Memristor-based memory: The sneak paths problem and solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2012-10-29

    In this paper, we investigate the read operation of memristor-based memories. We analyze the sneak paths problem and provide a noise margin metric to compare the various solutions proposed in the literature. We also analyze the power consumption associated with these solutions. Moreover, we study the effect of the aspect ratio of the memory array on the sneak paths. Finally, we introduce a new technique for solving the sneak paths problem by gating the memory cell using a three-terminal memistor device.

  5. Plant-based torsional actuator with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Nayomi; Zelinka, Samuel L.; Stone, Don S.; Jakes, Joseph E.

    2013-07-01

    A bundle of a few loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) cells are moisture-activated torsional actuators that twist multiple revolutions per cm length in direct proportion to moisture content. The bundles generate 10 N m kg-1 specific torque during both twisting and untwisting, which is higher than an electric motor. Additionally, the bundles exhibit a moisture-activated, shape memory twist effect. Over 70% of the twist in a wetted bundle can be locked-in by drying under constraint and then released by rewetting the bundle. Our results indicate that hemicelluloses dominate the shape fixity mechanism and lignin is primarily responsible for remembering the bundle’s original form. The bundles demonstrate proof of a high specific torque actuator with large angles of rotation and shape memory twist capabilities that can be used in microactuators, sensors, and energy harvesters.

  6. On the Use of Memory Models in Audio Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    Audio feature estimation is potentially improved by including higher- level models. One such model is the Short Term Memory (STM) model. A new paradigm of audio feature estimation is obtained by adding the influence of notes in the STM. These notes are identified when the perceptual spectral flux......, and an initial experiment with sensory dissonance has been undertaken with good results....

  7. Modeling Students' Memory for Application in Adaptive Educational Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelánek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Human memory has been thoroughly studied and modeled in psychology, but mainly in laboratory setting under simplified conditions. For application in practical adaptive educational systems we need simple and robust models which can cope with aspects like varied prior knowledge or multiple-choice questions. We discuss and evaluate several models of…

  8. Music Genre Classification using an Auditory Memory Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    Audio feature estimation is potentially improved by including higher- level models. One such model is the Auditory Short Term Memory (STM) model. A new paradigm of audio feature estimation is obtained by adding the influence of notes in the STM. These notes are identified when the perceptual...... results, and an initial experiment with sensory dissonance has been undertaken with good results. The parameters obtained form the auditory memory model, along with the dissonance measure, are shown here to be of interest in genre classification....

  9. Computational modelling of memory retention from synapse to behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rossum, Mark C W; Shippi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    One of our most intriguing mental abilities is the capacity to store information and recall it from memory. Computational neuroscience has been influential in developing models and concepts of learning and memory. In this tutorial review we focus on the interplay between learning and forgetting. We discuss recent advances in the computational description of the learning and forgetting processes on synaptic, neuronal, and systems levels, as well as recent data that open up new challenges for statistical physicists. (paper)

  10. Long Memory Models to Generate Synthetic Hydrological Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Armando de Almeida Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, much of the energy production comes from hydroelectric plants whose planning is not trivial due to the strong dependence on rainfall regimes. This planning is accomplished through optimization models that use inputs such as synthetic hydrologic series generated from the statistical model PAR(p (periodic autoregressive. Recently, Brazil began the search for alternative models able to capture the effects that the traditional model PAR(p does not incorporate, such as long memory effects. Long memory in a time series can be defined as a significant dependence between lags separated by a long period of time. Thus, this research develops a study of the effects of long dependence in the series of streamflow natural energy in the South subsystem, in order to estimate a long memory model capable of generating synthetic hydrologic series.

  11. Memory phenomenon in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ye; Huang, Wei Min; Zhao, Yong; Ding, Zhen; Li, Yan; Tor, Shu Beng; Liu, Erjia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate two memory phenomena in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass (BMG). While the temperature memory effect (TME) is not found by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) test, shape recovery is observed in samples indented at both low and high temperatures. In terms of shape memory related characteristics, this BMG shares some features of shape memory alloys (SMAs) due to its metal nature, and some other features of shape memory polymers (SMPs) owing to its glassy–rubbery transition. The formation of protrusion in the polished sample after heating to super-cooled liquid region (SCLR) indicates that surface tension is not a necessarily positive contributor for shape recovery. Release of internal elastic stress is concluded as the major player. Although the amorphous nature of BMGs enables for storing appreciable amount of internal elastic stress upon deformation, without the presence of cross-linker as in typical SMPs, the shape recovery in BMGs is rather limited. - Highlights: • Experimental investigation of shape recovery in BMG. • Surface tension is not the major reason for shape recovery in BMG. • Release of internal stress is the major contributor for shape recovery. • Comparison of shape memory features of BMG with other shape memory materials.

  12. Investigating Phase Transform Behavior in Indium Selenide Based RAM and Its Validation as a Memory Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Sourav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase transform properties of Indium Selenide (In2Se3 based Random Access Memory (RAM have been explored in this paper. Phase change random access memory (PCRAM is an attractive solid-state nonvolatile memory that possesses potential to meet various current technology demands of memory design. Already reported PCRAM models are mainly based upon Germanium-Antimony-Tellurium (Ge2Sb2Te5 or GST materials as their prime constituents. However, PCRAM using GST material lacks some important memory attributes required for memory elements such as larger resistance margin between the highly resistive amorphous and highly conductive crystalline states in phase change materials. This paper investigates various electrical and compositional properties of the Indium Selenide (In2Se3 material and also draws comparison with its counterpart mainly focusing on phase transform properties. To achieve this goal, a SPICE model of In2Se3 based PCRAM model has been reported in this work. The reported model has been also validated to act as a memory cell by associating it with a read/write circuit proposed in this work. Simulation results demonstrate impressive retentivity and low power consumption by requiring a set pulse of 208 μA for a duration of 100 μs to set the PCRAM in crystalline state. Similarly, a reset pulse of 11.7 μA for a duration of 20 ns can set the PCRAM in amorphous state. Modeling of In2Se3 based PCRAM has been done in Verilog-A and simulation results have been extensively verified using SPICE simulator.

  13. Role of connectivity in immune and neural network models: memory development and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remondini, Daniel; Bazzani, Armando; Franceschi, Claudio; Bersani, Ferdinando; Verondini, Ettore; Castellani, Gastone

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed how connectivity (defined as number of connections between network elements) can affect the memory capacity of a network-based model of the Immune System (IS) and of a model of the Nervous System (NS) synaptic plasticity (BCM model). The key point is the concept of competition between the characteristic variables that represent the response of such systems to environmental stimuli: the clonal concentrations for the IS, and the neuron responses for the BCM model. The memory states of both systems are characterized by a high selectivity to specific input patterns, reflecting a similar behaviour of their development rules. This selectivity property of memory states can be controlled by changing the degree of the internal connectivity in each system. We can explain the changes occurring in IS memory states during lifespan as due to a reshaping of its internal connectivity. This assumption is in agreement with experimental observations, reporting an increase of IS memory cells during lifespan. The change of connectivity in the BCM model leads to the introduction of quasilocal variables governing the plasticity of groups of synaptic junctions. This could be interpreted as the result of a refinement of neuron internal mechanisms during development, or it could be seen as a different learning rule deriving from the original BCM theory. We argue that connectivity seems to play an important role in a large class of biological systems controlled by competition mechanisms. Moreover, changes in connectivity may lead to changes in memory properties during development and aging.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Memristance Defined Exponential Model for Multi-bits Titanium Dioxide Memristor Memory Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAOUD, A. A. D.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to store multiple bits in a single memristor based memory cell is a key feature for high-capacity memory packages. Studying multi-bit memristor circuits requires high accuracy in modelling the memristance change. A memristor model based on a novel definition of memristance is proposed. A design of a single memristor memory cell using the proposed model for the platinum electrodes titanium dioxide memristor is illustrated. A specific voltage pulse is used with varying its parameters (amplitude or pulse width to store different number of states in a single memristor. New state variation parameters associated with the utilized model are provided and their effects on write and read processes of memristive multi-states are analysed. PSPICE simulations are also held, and they show a good agreement with the data obtained from the analysis.

  15. Transistor and memory devices based on novel organic and biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jia-Hung

    Organic semiconductor devices have aroused considerable interest because of the enormous potential in many technological applications. Organic electroluminescent devices have been extensively applied in display technology. Rapid progress has also been made in transistor and memory devices. This thesis considers aspects of the transistor based on novel organic single crystals and memory devices using hybrid nanocomposites comprising polymeric/inorganic nanoparticles, and biomolecule/quantum dots. Organic single crystals represent highly ordered structures with much less imperfections compared to amorphous thin films for probing the intrinsic charge transport in transistor devices. We demonstrate that free-standing, thin organic single crystals with natural flexing ability can be fabricated as flexible transistors. We study the surface properties of the organic crystals to determine a nearly perfect surface leading to high performance transistors. The flexible transistors can maintain high performance under reversible bending conditions. Because of the high quality crystal technique, we further develop applications on organic complementary circuits and organic single crystal photovoltaics. In the second part, two aspects of memory devices are studied. We examine the charge transfer process between conjugated polymers and metal nanoparticles. This charge transfer process is essential for the conductance switching in nanoseconds to induce the memory effect. Under the reduction condition, the charge transfer process is eliminated as well as the memory effect, raising the importance of coupling between conjugated systems and nanoparticle accepters. The other aspect of memory devices focuses on the interaction of virus biomolecules with quantum dots or metal nanoparticles in the devices. We investigate the impact of memory function on the hybrid bio-inorganic system. We perform an experimental analysis of the charge storage activation energy in tobacco mosaic virus with

  16. Short-Term Memory for Serial Order: A Recurrent Neural Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvinick, Matthew M.; Plaut, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Despite a century of research, the mechanisms underlying short-term or working memory for serial order remain uncertain. Recent theoretical models have converged on a particular account, based on transient associations between independent item and context representations. In the present article, the authors present an alternative model, according…

  17. MUC (Memory, Unification, Control): A model on the neurobiology of language beyond single word processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagoort, P.; Hickok, G.; Small, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    A neurobiological model of language is discussed that overcomes the shortcomings of the classical Wernicke-Lichtheim-Geschwind model. It is based on a subdivision of language processing into three components: Memory, Unification, and Control. The functional components as well as the neurobiological

  18. Asymmetric cross-domain interference between two working memory tasks : Implications for models of working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morey, Candice C.; Morey, Richard D.; van der Reijden, Madeleine; Holweg, Margot

    2013-01-01

    Observations of higher dual-task costs for within-domain than cross-domain task combinations constitute classic evidence for multi-component models of working memory (e.g., Baddeley, 1986; Logie, 2011). However, we report an asymmetric pattern of interference between verbal and visual-spatial tasks,

  19. Model Equations of Shape Memory Effect - Nitinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Vela

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Even it has been already confirmed that SMA’s have high potential for robotic actuators, actuators included in space robotics, underwater robotics, robotics for logistics, safety, as well as “green robotics” (robotics for the environment, energy conservation, sustainable development or agriculture, the number of applications of SMA-based actuators is still quite small, especially in applications in which their large strains, high specific work output and structural integration potential are useful,. The paper presents a formulated mathematical model calculated for binary SMA (Ni-Ti, helpful to estimate the stress distribution along with the transformation ratio of a SMA active element.

  20. Sleep Deprivation and Time-Based Prospective Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Maria José; Occhionero, Miranda; Cicogna, PierCarla

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of sleep deprivation on time-based prospective memory performance, that is, realizing delayed intentions at an appropriate time in the future (e.g., to take a medicine in 30 minutes). Between-subjects experimental design. The experimental group underwent 24 h of total sleep deprivation, and the control group had a regular sleep-wake cycle. Participants were tested at 08:00. Laboratory. Fifty healthy young adults (mean age 22 ± 2.1, 31 female). 24 h of total sleep deprivation. Participants were monitored by wrist actigraphy for 3 days before the experimental session. The following cognitive tasks were administered: one time-based prospective memory task and 3 reasoning tasks as ongoing activity. Objective and subjective vigilance was assessed by the psychomotor vigilance task and a visual analog scale, respectively. To measure the time-based prospective memory task we assessed compliance and clock checking behavior (time monitoring). Sleep deprivation negatively affected time-based prospective memory compliance (P sleep deprivation on human behavior, particularly the ability to perform an intended action after a few minutes. Sleep deprivation strongly compromises time-based prospective memory compliance but does not affect time check frequency. Sleep deprivation may impair the mechanism that allows the integration of information related to time monitoring with the prospective intention. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. Lower Bounds in the Asymmetric External Memory Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Riko; Sitchinava, Nodari

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the asymmetric read and write costs of emerging non-volatile memory technologies, we study lower bounds for the problems of sorting, permuting and multiplying a sparse matrix by a dense vector in the asymmetric external memory model (AEM). Given an AEM with internal (symmetric) memory...... of size M, transfers between symmetric and asymmetric memory in blocks of size B and the ratio ω between write and read costs, we show Ω(min (N, ωN/B logω M/B N/B) lower bound for the cost of permuting N input elements. This lower bound also applies to the problem of sorting N elements. This proves...

  2. No Evidence for Improved Associative Memory Performance Following Process-Based Associative Memory Training in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellander, Martin; Eschen, Anne; Lövdén, Martin; Martin, Mike; Bäckman, Lars; Brehmer, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Studies attempting to improve episodic memory performance with strategy instructions and training have had limited success in older adults: their training gains are limited in comparison to those of younger adults and do not generalize to untrained tasks and contexts. This limited success has been partly attributed to age-related impairments in associative binding of information into coherent episodes. We therefore investigated potential training and transfer effects of process-based associative memory training (i.e., repeated practice). Thirty-nine older adults (Mage = 68.8) underwent 6 weeks of either adaptive associative memory training or item recognition training. Both groups improved performance in item memory, spatial memory (object-context binding) and reasoning. A disproportionate effect of associative memory training was only observed for item memory, whereas no training-related performance changes were observed for associative memory. Self-reported strategies showed no signs of spontaneous development of memory-enhancing associative memory strategies. Hence, the results do not support the hypothesis that process-based associative memory training leads to higher associative memory performance in older adults. PMID:28119597

  3. Orbitofrontal Cortex Encodes Memories within Value-Based Schemas and Represents Contexts That Guide Memory Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farovik, Anja; Place, Ryan J.; McKenzie, Sam; Porter, Blake; Munro, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    There are a substantial number of studies showing that the orbitofrontal cortex links events to reward values, whereas the hippocampus links events to the context in which they occur. Here we asked how the orbitofrontal cortex contributes to memory where context determines the reward values associated with events. After rats learned object–reward associations that differed depending on the spatial context in which the objects were presented, neuronal ensembles in orbitofrontal cortex represented distinct value-based schemas, each composed of a systematic organization of the representations of objects in the contexts and positions where they were associated with reward or nonreward. Orbitofrontal ensembles also represent the different spatial contexts that define the mappings of stimuli to actions that lead to reward or nonreward. These findings, combined with observations on complementary memory representation within the hippocampus, suggest mechanisms through which prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus interact in support of context-guided memory. PMID:26019346

  4. Insights into Working Memory from The Perspective of The EPIC Architecture for Modeling Skilled Perceptual-Motor and Cognitive Human Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kieras, David

    1998-01-01

    Computational modeling of human perceptual-motor and cognitive performance based on a comprehensive detailed information- processing architecture leads to new insights about the components of working memory...

  5. Detecting peripheral-based attacks on the host memory

    CERN Document Server

    Stewin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This work addresses stealthy peripheral-based attacks on host computers and presents a new approach to detecting them. Peripherals can be regarded as separate systems that have a dedicated processor and dedicated runtime memory to handle their tasks. The book addresses the problem that peripherals generally communicate with the host via the host’s main memory, storing cryptographic keys, passwords, opened files and other sensitive data in the process – an aspect attackers are quick to exploit.  Here, stealthy malicious software based on isolated micro-controllers is implemented to conduct an attack analysis, the results of which provide the basis for developing a novel runtime detector. The detector reveals stealthy peripheral-based attacks on the host’s main memory by exploiting certain hardware properties, while a permanent and resource-efficient measurement strategy ensures that the detector is also capable of detecting transient attacks, which can otherwise succeed when the applied strategy only me...

  6. Colored noise and memory effects on formal spiking neuron models

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, L. A.; Vilela, R. D.

    2015-06-01

    Simplified neuronal models capture the essence of the electrical activity of a generic neuron, besides being more interesting from the computational point of view when compared to higher-dimensional models such as the Hodgkin-Huxley one. In this work, we propose a generalized resonate-and-fire model described by a generalized Langevin equation that takes into account memory effects and colored noise. We perform a comprehensive numerical analysis to study the dynamics and the point process statistics of the proposed model, highlighting interesting new features such as (i) nonmonotonic behavior (emergence of peak structures, enhanced by the choice of colored noise characteristic time scale) of the coefficient of variation (CV) as a function of memory characteristic time scale, (ii) colored noise-induced shift in the CV, and (iii) emergence and suppression of multimodality in the interspike interval (ISI) distribution due to memory-induced subthreshold oscillations. Moreover, in the noise-induced spike regime, we study how memory and colored noise affect the coherence resonance (CR) phenomenon. We found that for sufficiently long memory, not only is CR suppressed but also the minimum of the CV-versus-noise intensity curve that characterizes the presence of CR may be replaced by a maximum. The aforementioned features allow to interpret the interplay between memory and colored noise as an effective control mechanism to neuronal variability. Since both variability and nontrivial temporal patterns in the ISI distribution are ubiquitous in biological cells, we hope the present model can be useful in modeling real aspects of neurons.

  7. Short-Term Memory and Its Biophysical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Kai; Tang, Xiao-wei

    1996-12-01

    The capacity of short-term memory has been studied using an integrate-and-fire neuronal network model. It is found that the storage of events depend on the manner of the correlation between the events, and the capacity is dominated by the value of after-depolarization potential. There is a monotonic increasing relationship between the value of after-depolarization potential and the memory numbers. The biophysics relevance of the network model is discussed and different kinds of the information processes are studied too.

  8. Memory-induced resonancelike suppression of spike generation in a resonate-and-fire neuron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankin, Romi; Paekivi, Sander

    2018-01-01

    The behavior of a stochastic resonate-and-fire neuron model based on a reduction of a fractional noise-driven generalized Langevin equation (GLE) with a power-law memory kernel is considered. The effect of temporally correlated random activity of synaptic inputs, which arise from other neurons forming local and distant networks, is modeled as an additive fractional Gaussian noise in the GLE. Using a first-passage-time formulation, in certain system parameter domains exact expressions for the output interspike interval (ISI) density and for the survival probability (the probability that a spike is not generated) are derived and their dependence on input parameters, especially on the memory exponent, is analyzed. In the case of external white noise, it is shown that at intermediate values of the memory exponent the survival probability is significantly enhanced in comparison with the cases of strong and weak memory, which causes a resonancelike suppression of the probability of spike generation as a function of the memory exponent. Moreover, an examination of the dependence of multimodality in the ISI distribution on input parameters shows that there exists a critical memory exponent αc≈0.402 , which marks a dynamical transition in the behavior of the system. That phenomenon is illustrated by a phase diagram describing the emergence of three qualitatively different structures of the ISI distribution. Similarities and differences between the behavior of the model at internal and external noises are also discussed.

  9. Parallel constraint satisfaction in memory-based decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckner, Andreas; Hodges, Sara D

    2011-01-01

    Three studies sought to investigate decision strategies in memory-based decisions and to test the predictions of the parallel constraint satisfaction (PCS) model for decision making (Glöckner & Betsch, 2008). Time pressure was manipulated and the model was compared against simple heuristics (take the best and equal weight) and a weighted additive strategy. From PCS we predicted that fast intuitive decision making is based on compensatory information integration and that decision time increases and confidence decreases with increasing inconsistency in the decision task. In line with these predictions we observed a predominant usage of compensatory strategies under all time-pressure conditions and even with decision times as short as 1.7 s. For a substantial number of participants, choices and decision times were best explained by PCS, but there was also evidence for use of simple heuristics. The time-pressure manipulation did not significantly affect decision strategies. Overall, the results highlight intuitive, automatic processes in decision making and support the idea that human information-processing capabilities are less severely bounded than often assumed.

  10. [A neuropsychoanalytic freudian model of psychic trauma and memory. Theoretical and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Diego; Basili, Rubén; Sharpin de Basili, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    The traumatic memory is conceptualized by means of an amplified Freudian neuropsychoanalytic model using a contemporary memory system based on its contents, conscious and unconscious recollection (explicit and implicit memories) highlighting the validity of the Freudian discoveries. This is then related to the psychoanalytical theories of consciousness, affects and thinking. Particular importance is given to Freud's seduction theory, its relation to memory and the clinical application of these concepts to the basic organization of the personality, together with the relation to Bowlby's concept of emotional deprivation. The development and working trough of trauma is postulated as a vector to make "real" or phantasized trauma unconscious through repression in neurosis, splitting in borderline personality organization, and primitive mechanisms of projection in psychosis.

  11. Modeling of strain effects on the device behaviors of ferroelectric memory field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Feng; Hu, Guangda; Wu, Weibing; Yang, Changhong; Wu, Haitao; Tang, Minghua

    2013-01-01

    The influence of strains on the channel current–gate voltage behaviors and memory windows of ferroelectric memory field-effect transistors (FeMFETs) were studied using an improved model based on the Landau–Devonshire theory. ‘Channel potential–gate voltage’ ferroelectric polarization and silicon surface potential diagrams were constructed for strained single-domain BaTiO 3 FeMFETs. The compressive strains can increase (or decrease) the amplitude of transistor currents and enlarge memory windows. However, tensile strains only decrease the maximum value of transistor currents and compress memory windows. Mismatch strains were found to have a significant influence on the electrical behaviors of the devices, therefore, they must be considered in FeMFET device designing. (fast track communication)

  12. High frequency electromechanical memory cells based on telescoping carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A M; Lozovik, Y E; Kulish, A S; Bichoutskaia, E

    2010-07-01

    A new method to increase the operational frequency of electromechanical memory cells based on the telescoping motion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes through the selection of the form of the switching voltage pulse is proposed. The relative motion of the walls of carbon nanotubes can be controlled through the shape of the interwall interaction energy surface. This allows the use of the memory cells in nonvolatile or volatile regime, depending on the structure of carbon nanotube. Simulations based on ab initio and semi-empirical calculations of the interwall interaction energies are used to estimate the switching voltage and the operational frequency of volatile cells with the electrodes made of carbon nanotubes. The lifetime of nonvolatile memory cells is also predicted.

  13. Memory-based snowdrift game on a square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Feng; Liu, Xingwen; Fang, Kai; Chen, Hao

    2018-04-01

    Spatial reciprocity is an effective way widely accepted to facilitate cooperation. In the case of snowdrift game, some researches showed that spatial reciprocity inhibits cooperation for a very wide range of cost-to-benefit ratio r. However, some other researches found that based on the spatial reciprocity, a wider range of r is helpful to achieve a high cooperation level. Thus, how to enlarge the range of r for the purpose of promoting cooperation becomes a hot topic recently. This paper proposes a new memory-based method, in which each individual compares with its own previous payoffs to find out the maximal one as virtual payoff and then randomly compares with one of its neighbours to obtain the optimal strategy according to the given updating rules. It shows the positive effect of spatial reciprocity in the context of memory. Specifically, in this situation, not only the lower ratio can appear a high cooperation level, but also the larger ratio r can emerge a high cooperation level. That is, an expected cooperation level can be achieved simultaneously for small and large r. Furthermore, the scenarios of both constant-size memory and size-varying memory are investigated. An interesting phenomenon is discovered that the cooperation level drops down gradually as the memory size increases.

  14. Modeling Active Aging and Explicit Memory: An Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de León, Laura Ponce; Lévy, Jean Pierre; Fernández, Tomás; Ballesteros, Soledad

    2015-08-01

    The rapid growth of the population of older adults and their concomitant psychological status and health needs have captured the attention of researchers and health professionals. To help fill the void of literature available to social workers interested in mental health promotion and aging, the authors provide a model for active aging that uses psychosocial variables. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationships among the latent variables of the state of explicit memory, the perception of social resources, depression, and the perception of quality of life in a sample of 184 older adults. The results suggest that explicit memory is not a direct indicator of the perception of quality of life, but it could be considered an indirect indicator as it is positively correlated with perception of social resources and negatively correlated with depression. These last two variables influenced the perception of quality of life directly, the former positively and the latter negatively. The main outcome suggests that the perception of social support improves explicit memory and quality of life and reduces depression in active older adults. The findings also suggest that gerontological professionals should design memory training programs, improve available social resources, and offer environments with opportunities to exercise memory.

  15. Object-based Encoding in Visual Working Memory: Evidence from Memory-driven Attentional Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zaifeng; Yu, Shixian; Zhu, Chengfeng; Shui, Rende; Weng, Xuchu; Li, Peng; Shen, Mowei

    2016-03-09

    Visual working memory (VWM) adopts a specific manner of object-based encoding (OBE) to extract perceptual information: Whenever one feature-dimension is selected for entry into VWM, the others are also extracted. Currently most studies revealing OBE probed an 'irrelevant-change distracting effect', where changes of irrelevant-features dramatically affected the performance of the target feature. However, the existence of irrelevant-feature change may affect participants' processing manner, leading to a false-positive result. The current study conducted a strict examination of OBE in VWM, by probing whether irrelevant-features guided the deployment of attention in visual search. The participants memorized an object's colour yet ignored shape and concurrently performed a visual-search task. They searched for a target line among distractor lines, each embedded within a different object. One object in the search display could match the shape, colour, or both dimensions of the memory item, but this object never contained the target line. Relative to a neutral baseline, where there was no match between the memory and search displays, search time was significantly prolonged in all match conditions, regardless of whether the memory item was displayed for 100 or 1000 ms. These results suggest that task-irrelevant shape was extracted into VWM, supporting OBE in VWM.

  16. Muscle memory and a new cellular model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Memory is a process in which information is encoded, stored, and retrieved. For vertebrates, the modern view has been that it occurs only in the brain. This review describes a cellular memory in skeletal muscle in which hypertrophy is 'remembered' such that a fibre that has previously been large, but subsequently lost its mass, can regain mass faster than naive fibres. A new cell biological model based on the literature, with the most reliable methods for identifying myonuclei, can explain this phenomenon. According to this model, previously untrained fibres recruit myonuclei from activated satellite cells before hypertrophic growth. Even if subsequently subjected to grave atrophy, the higher number of myonuclei is retained, and the myonuclei seem to be protected against the elevated apoptotic activity observed in atrophying muscle tissue. Fibres that have acquired a higher number of myonuclei grow faster when subjected to overload exercise, thus the nuclei represent a functionally important 'memory' of previous strength. This memory might be very long lasting in humans, as myonuclei are stable for at least 15 years and might even be permanent. However, myonuclei are harder to recruit in the elderly, and if the long-lasting muscle memory also exists in humans, one should consider early strength training as a public health advice. In addition, myonuclei are recruited during steroid use and encode a muscle memory, at least in rodents. Thus, extending the exclusion time for doping offenders should be considered. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Development of elastic properties of Cu-based shape memory alloys during martensitic transformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Václav; Landa, Michal; Šittner, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2004), s. 363 ISSN 1155-4339 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : Cu-based shape memory alloy s * elastic properties * elastic constants * modelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.294, year: 2004

  18. Time-based prospective memory in young children-Exploring executive functions as a developmental mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Anett; Voigt, Babett; Friedrich, Sylva; Pfeiffer, Kathrin; Kliegel, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated time-based prospective memory (PM) during the transition from kindergarten/preschool to school age and applied mediation models to test the impact of executive functions (working memory, inhibitory control) and time monitoring on time-based PM development. Twenty-five preschool (age: M = 5.75, SD = 0.28) and 22 primary school children (age: M = 7.83, SD = 0.39) participated. To examine time-based PM, children had to play a computer-based driving game requiring them to drive a car on a road without hitting others cars (ongoing task) and to refill the car regularly according to a fuel gauge, which serves as clock equivalent (PM task). The level of gas that was still left in the fuel gauge was not displayed on the screen and children had to monitor it via a button press (time monitoring). Results revealed a developmental increase in time-based PM performance from preschool to school age. Applying the mediation models, only working memory was revealed to influence PM development. Neither inhibitory control alone nor the mediation paths leading from both executive functions to time monitoring could explain the link between age and time-based PM. Thus, results of the present study suggest that working memory may be one key cognitive process driving the developmental growth of time-based PM during the transition from preschool to school age.

  19. Protein-Based Three-Dimensional Memories and Associative Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Robert

    2008-03-01

    The field of bioelectronics has benefited from the fact that nature has often solved problems of a similar nature to those which must be solved to create molecular electronic or photonic devices that operate with efficiency and reliability. Retinal proteins show great promise in bioelectronic devices because they operate with high efficiency (˜0.65%), high cyclicity (>10^7), operate over an extended wavelength range (360 -- 630 nm) and can convert light into changes in voltage, pH, absorption or refractive index. This talk will focus on a retinal protein called bacteriorhodopsin, the proton pump of the organism Halobacterium salinarum. Two memories based on this protein will be described. The first is an optical three-dimensional memory. This memory stores information using volume elements (voxels), and provides as much as a thousand-fold improvement in effective capacity over current technology. A unique branching reaction of a variant of bacteriorhodopsin is used to turn each protein into an optically addressed latched AND gate. Although three working prototypes have been developed, a number of cost/performance and architectural issues must be resolved prior to commercialization. The major issue is that the native protein provides a very inefficient branching reaction. Genetic engineering has improved performance by nearly 500-fold, but a further order of magnitude improvement is needed. Protein-based holographic associative memories will also be discussed. The human brain stores and retrieves information via association, and human intelligence is intimately connected to the nature and enormous capacity of this associative search and retrieval process. To a first order approximation, creativity can be viewed as the association of two seemingly disparate concepts to form a totally new construct. Thus, artificial intelligence requires large scale associative memories. Current computer hardware does not provide an optimal environment for creating artificial

  20. Heterogeneous Agent Model with Memory and Asset Price Behaviour

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vošvrda, Miloslav; Vácha, Lukáš

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2003), s. 155-168 ISSN 1210-0455 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/00/0439; GA ČR GA402/01/0034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : efficient markets hypothesis * technical trading rules * heterogeneous agent model with memory and learning Subject RIV: AH - Economics

  1. Thermomechanical Modeling of Shape Memory Alloys and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexcellent, C.; Leclercq, S.

    The aim of the present paper is a general macroscopic description of the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloys (SMA). We use for framework the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. This model is efficient for describing the behavior of "smart" structures as a bronchial, a tentacle element and an prosthesis hybrid structure made of Ti Ni SMA wires embedded in a resin epoxy matrix.

  2. Uncertainty Relation Based on Skew Information with Quantum Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Fei, Shaoming

    2017-01-01

    We present a new uncertainty relation by defining a measure of uncertainty based on skew information. For bipartite systems, we establish uncertainty relations with the existence of a quantum memory. A general relation between quantum correlations and tight bounds of uncertainty has been presented.

  3. The Visual Memory-Based Memorization Techniques in Piano Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucetoker, Izzet

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Johann Sebastian Bach is one of the leading composers of the baroque period. In addition to his huge contributions in the artistic dimension, he also served greatly in the field of education. This study has been done for determining the impact of visual memory-based memorization practices in the piano education on the visual…

  4. Nano-islands Based Charge Trapping Memory: A Scalability Study

    KAUST Repository

    Elatab, Nazek

    2017-10-19

    Zinc-oxide (ZnO) and zirconia (ZrO2) metal oxides have been studied extensively in the past few decades with several potential applications including memory devices. In this work, a scalability study, based on the ITRS roadmap, is conducted on memory devices with ZnO and ZrO2 nano-islands charge trapping layer. Both nano-islands are deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD), however, the different sizes, distribution and properties of the materials result in different memory performance. The results show that at the 32-nm node charge trapping memory with 127 ZrO2 nano-islands can provide a 9.4 V memory window. However, with ZnO only 31 nano-islands can provide a window of 2.5 V. The results indicate that ZrO2 nano-islands are more promising than ZnO in scaled down devices due to their higher density, higher-k, and absence of quantum confinement effects.

  5. Object-based Encoding in Visual Working Memory: Evidence from Memory-driven Attentional Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zaifeng; Yu, Shixian; Zhu, Chengfeng; Shui, Rende; Weng, Xuchu; Li, Peng; Shen, Mowei

    2016-01-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) adopts a specific manner of object-based encoding (OBE) to extract perceptual information: Whenever one feature-dimension is selected for entry into VWM, the others are also extracted. Currently most studies revealing OBE probed an ?irrelevant-change distracting effect?, where changes of irrelevant-features dramatically affected the performance of the target feature. However, the existence of irrelevant-feature change may affect participants? processing manner, lea...

  6. Lifetime-Based Memory Management for Distributed Data Processing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Lu; Shi, Xuanhua; Zhou, Yongluan

    2016-01-01

    create a large amount of long-living data objects in the heap, which may quickly saturate the garbage collector, especially when handling a large dataset, and hence would limit the scalability of the system. To eliminate this problem, we propose a lifetime-based memory management framework, which......, by automatically analyzing the user-defined functions and data types, obtains the expected lifetime of the data objects, and then allocates and releases memory space accordingly to minimize the garbage collection overhead. In particular, we present Deca, a concrete implementation of our proposal on top of Spark...... the garbage collection time by up to 99.9%, 2) to achieve up to 22.7x speed up in terms of execution time in cases without data spilling and 41.6x speedup in cases with data spilling, and 3) to consume up to 46.6% less memory....

  7. The welding characteristics of Fe-based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.C.; Lin, K.M.; Chuang, Y.C.; Chen, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    After TIG and laser welding, the microstructure, shape memory effect and chemical corrosion resistance of Fe-30Mn-6Si and Fe-30Mn-6Si-5Cr shape memory alloys have been investigated. Experimental results show that the welded zones exhibit dendrite structures. The as-welded alloys still have an excellent shape memory effect. The corrosion resistance of welded zones is found to be worse than that of the base-material for both Fe-30Mn-6Si and Fe-30Mn-6Si-5Cr alloys. The degradation of corrosion resistance is more obvious for laser-welded zone than that for TIG-welded zone. After annealing treatment of 1100 C x 2h for these welded alloys, the dendrite structures in the welded zones disappear and the corrosion resistance is improved. (orig.)

  8. High Density Memory Based on Quantum Device Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWagt, Paul; Frazier, Gary; Tang, Hao

    1995-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of ultra-high density memory based on quantum devices. Starting from overall constraints on chip area, power consumption, access speed, and noise margin, we deduce boundaries on single cell parameters such as required operating voltage and standby current. Next, the possible role of quantum devices is examined. Since the most mature quantum device, the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) can easily be integrated vertically, it naturally leads to the issue of 3D integrated memory. We propose a novel method of addressing vertically integrated bistable two-terminal devices, such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) and Esaki diodes, that avoids individual physical contacts. The new concept has been demonstrated experimentally in memory cells of field effect transistors (FET's) and stacked RTD's.

  9. Can We Efficiently Check Concurrent Programs Under Relaxed Memory Models in Maude?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arrahman, Yehia Abd; Andric, Marina; Beggiato, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    to the state space explosion. Several techniques have been proposed to mitigate those problems so to make verification under relaxed memory models feasible. We discuss how to adopt some of those techniques in a Maude-based approach to language prototyping, and suggest the use of other techniques that have been...

  10. Modelling of shape memory alloy oscillator and its application to middle ear structural reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinek, Rafal; Rekas, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents numerical research of a reconstructed middle ear system using the element made of shape memory alloy. The material is modelled based on a hysteretic nonlinear theory where strain rate is taken into account. Bifurcation analysis of the system reveals different kinds of solutions starting from regular and ending with chaotic vibrations depending on external excitation.

  11. Modeling High Frequency Data with Long Memory and Structural Change: A-HYEGARCH Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlin Shi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an Adaptive Hyperbolic EGARCH (A-HYEGARCH model to estimate the long memory of high frequency time series with potential structural breaks. Based on the original HYGARCH model, we use the logarithm transformation to ensure the positivity of conditional variance. The structural change is further allowed via a flexible time-dependent intercept in the conditional variance equation. To demonstrate its effectiveness, we perform a range of Monte Carlo studies considering various data generating processes with and without structural changes. Empirical testing of the A-HYEGARCH model is also conducted using high frequency returns of S&P 500, FTSE 100, ASX 200 and Nikkei 225. Our simulation and empirical evidence demonstrate that the proposed A-HYEGARCH model outperforms various competing specifications and can effectively control for structural breaks. Therefore, our model may provide more reliable estimates of long memory and could be a widely useful tool for modelling financial volatility in other contexts.

  12. Development of an engineering model for ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Yoshiaki; Todaka, Takashi; Enokizono, Masato

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a relationship among stress, temperature and magnetic properties of a ferromagnetic shape memory alloy. In order to derive an engineering model of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys, we have developed a measuring system of the relationship among stress, temperature and magnetic properties. The samples used in this measurement are Fe68-Ni10-Cr9-Mn7-Si6 wt% ferromagnetic shape memory alloy. They are thin ribbons made by rapid cooling in air. In the measurement, the ribbon sample is inserted into a sample holder winding consisting of the B-coil and compensation coils, and magnetized in an open solenoid coil. The ribbon is stressed with attachment weights and heated with a heating wire. The specific susceptibility was increased by applying tension, and slightly increased by heating below the Curie temperature

  13. First Principles Modelling of Shape Memory Alloys Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Materials sciences relate the macroscopic properties of materials to their microscopic structure and postulate the need for holistic multiscale research. The investigation of shape memory alloys is a prime example in this regard. This particular class of materials exhibits strong coupling of temperature, strain and stress, determined by solid state phase transformations of their metallic lattices. The present book presents a collection of simulation studies of this behaviour. Employing conceptually simple but comprehensive models, the fundamental material properties of shape memory alloys are qualitatively explained from first principles. Using contemporary methods of molecular dynamics simulation experiments, it is shown how microscale dynamics may produce characteristic macroscopic material properties. The work is rooted in the materials sciences of shape memory alloys and  covers  thermodynamical, micro-mechanical  and crystallographical aspects. It addresses scientists in these research fields and thei...

  14. Induction of T-cell memory by a dendritic cell vaccine: a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Francesco; Pennisi, Marzio; Ricupito, Alessia; Topputo, Francesco; Bellone, Matteo

    2014-07-01

    Although results from phase III clinical trials substantially support the use of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against cancer, what has yet to be defined is how many and how frequent boosts are needed to sustain a long-lasting and protecting memory T-cell response against tumor antigens. Common experience is that such preclinical tests require the sacrifice of a relatively large number of animals, and are particularly time- and money-consuming. As a first step to overcome these hurdles, we have developed an ordinary differential equation model that includes all relevant entities (such as activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and memory T cells), and investigated the induction of immunological memory in the context of wild-type mice injected with a dendritic cell-based vaccine. We have simulated the biological behavior both in the presence and in the absence of memory T cells. Comparing results of ex vivo and in silico experiments, we show that the model is able to envisage the expansion and persistence of antigen-specific memory T cells. The model might be applicable to more complex vaccination schedules and substantially in any biological condition of prime-boosting. The model is fully described in the article. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A mathematical model of mechanotransduction reveals how mechanical memory regulates mesenchymal stem cell fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Liu, Linan; MacLean, Adam L; Wong, Chi Wut; Zhao, Weian; Nie, Qing

    2017-05-16

    Mechanical and biophysical properties of the cellular microenvironment regulate cell fate decisions. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) fate is influenced by past mechanical dosing (memory), but the mechanisms underlying this process have not yet been well defined. We have yet to understand how memory affects specific cell fate decisions, such as the differentiation of MSCs into neurons, adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. We study a minimal gene regulatory network permissive of multi-lineage MSC differentiation into four cell fates. We present a continuous model that is able to describe the cell fate transitions that occur during differentiation, and analyze its dynamics with tools from multistability, bifurcation, and cell fate landscape analysis, and via stochastic simulation. Whereas experimentally, memory has only been observed during osteogenic differentiation, this model predicts that memory regions can exist for each of the four MSC-derived cell lineages. We can predict the substrate stiffness ranges over which memory drives differentiation; these are directly testable in an experimental setting. Furthermore, we quantitatively predict how substrate stiffness and culture duration co-regulate the fate of a stem cell, and we find that the feedbacks from the differentiating MSC onto its substrate are critical to preserve mechanical memory. Strikingly, we show that re-seeding MSCs onto a sufficiently soft substrate increases the number of cell fates accessible. Control of MSC differentiation is crucial for the success of much-lauded regenerative therapies based on MSCs. We have predicted new memory regions that will directly impact this control, and have quantified the size of the memory region for osteoblasts, as well as the co-regulatory effects on cell fates of substrate stiffness and culture duration. Taken together, these results can be used to develop novel strategies to better control the fates of MSCs in vitro and following transplantation.

  16. Constitutive model for a stress- and thermal-induced phase transition in a shape memory polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Zhou, Bo; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, increasing applications of shape memory polymers have pushed forward the development of appropriate constitutive models for smart materials such as the shape memory polymer. During the heating process, the phase transition, which is a continuous time-dependent process, happens in the shape memory polymer, and various individual phases will form at different configuration temperatures. In addition, these phases can generally be divided into two parts: the frozen and active phase (Liu Y et al 2006 Int. J. Plast. 22 279–313). During the heating or cooling process, the strain will be stored or released with the occurring phase transition between these two parts. Therefore, a shape memory effect emerges. In this paper, a new type of model was developed to characterize the variation of the volume fraction in a shape memory polymer during the phase transition. In addition to the temperature variation, the applied stress was also taken as a significant influence factor on the phase transition. Based on the experimental results, an exponential equation was proposed to describe the relationship between the stress and phase transition temperature. For the sake of describing the mechanical behaviors of the shape memory polymer, a three-dimensional constitutive model was established. Also, the storage strain, which was the key factor of the shape memory effect, was also discussed in detail. Similar to previous works, we first explored the effect of applied stress on storage strain. Through comparisons with the DMA and the creep experimental results, the rationality and accuracy of the new phase transition and constitutive model were finally verified. (paper)

  17. Tree Memory Networks for Modelling Long-term Temporal Dependencies

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, Tharindu; Denman, Simon; McFadyen, Aaron; Sridharan, Sridha; Fookes, Clinton

    2017-01-01

    In the domain of sequence modelling, Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN) have been capable of achieving impressive results in a variety of application areas including visual question answering, part-of-speech tagging and machine translation. However this success in modelling short term dependencies has not successfully transitioned to application areas such as trajectory prediction, which require capturing both short term and long term relationships. In this paper, we propose a Tree Memory Networ...

  18. Orthodontic applications of a superelastic shape-memory alloy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, R.W.; Enlow, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    During orthodontic treatment, dental appliances (braces) made of shape memory alloys have the potential to provide nearly uniform low level stresses to dentitions during tooth movement over a large range of tooth displacement. In this paper we model superelastic behaviour of dental appliances using the finite element method and constitutive equations developed by F. Auricchio et al. Results of the mathematical model for 3-point bending and several promising 'closing loop' designs are compared with laboratory results for the same configurations. (orig.)

  19. Dynamic State Space Partitioning for External Memory Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelista, Sami; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    2009-01-01

    We describe a dynamic partitioning scheme usable by model checking techniques that divide the state space into partitions, such as most external memory and distributed model checking algorithms. The goal of the scheme is to reduce the number of transitions that link states belonging to different...... partitions, and thereby limit the amount of disk access and network communication. We report on several experiments made with our verification platform ASAP that implements the dynamic partitioning scheme proposed in this paper....

  20. Thermomechanical constitutive modeling of polyurethane-series shape memory polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobushi, H.; Ito, N.; Takata, K. [Aichi Inst. of Technol., Nagoya (Japan). Dept. of Mech. Eng.; Hayashi, S. [Nagoya Research and Development Center, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    In order to describe the thermomechanical properties in shape memory polymer of polyurethane series, a thermomechanical constitutive model was developed. In order to describe the variation in mechanical properties due to the glass transition, coefficients in the model were expressed by a single exponential function of temperature. The proposed theory expressed well the thermomechanical properties of the material, such as shape fixity and shape recovery. (orig.)

  1. Stresses related to the shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si-based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caenegem, N. van; Duprez, L.; Verbeken, K.; Segers, D.; Houbaert, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The shape memory behaviour of two Fe-Mn-Si-based alloys has been investigated. Two compositions were studied, i.e. Fe29Mn7Si and Fe29Mn7Si5Cr (numbers indicate mass%). Characterizations of the martensitic transformation and the different structural constituents were performed using optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. Transformation temperatures were determined by thermodilatometry on undeformed and deformed samples. The shape recovery was quantified by means of bending tests and dilatometry experiments on compressed samples. A procedure was designed to measure the recovery stresses caused by the dimensional changes of the sample due to the shape memory effect. The recovery stress is defined as the stress that is generated when the recovery of deformation is impeded under constraint. The mechanical results are discussed on the basis of the underlying transformation and deformation processes

  2. Memory and learning in a class of neural network models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The author discusses memory and learning properties of the neural network model now identified with Hopfield's work. The model, how it attempts to abstract some key features of the nervous system, and the sense in which learning and memory are identified in the model are described. A brief report is presented on the important role of phase transitions in the model and their implications for memory capacity. The results of numerical simulations obtained using the ICL Distributed Array Processors at Edinburgh are presented. A summary is presented on how the fraction of images which are perfectly stored, depends on the number of nodes and the number of nominal images which one attempts to store using the prescription in Hopfield's paper. Results are presented on the second phase transition in the model, which corresponds to almost total loss of storage capacity as the number of nominal images is increased. Results are given on the performance of a new iterative algorithm for exact storage of up to N images in an N node model

  3. Interference in memory for tonal pitch: implications for a working-memory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechmann, T; Mohr, G

    1992-05-01

    The degree of interference caused by different kinds of stimuli on memory for tonal pitch was studied. Musically trained and untrained subjects heard a sequence of two tones separated by an interval of 5 sec. The tones were either identical in pitch or differed by a semitone. Subjects had to decide whether the tones were identical or not. The interval was filled with tonal, verbal, or visual material under attended and unattended conditions. The results revealed clear group differences. Musically trained subjects' retention of the first test tone was only affected by the interposition of other tones. In contrast, the performance of musically untrained subjects was also affected by verbal and visual items. The findings are discussed in the framework of Baddeley's (1986) working-memory model.

  4. Thermoplastic shape-memory polyurethanes based on natural oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saralegi, Ainara; Foster, E. Johan; Weder, Christoph; Eceiza, Arantxa; Corcuera, Maria Angeles

    2014-02-01

    A new family of segmented thermoplastic polyurethanes with thermally activated shape-memory properties was synthesized and characterized. Polyols derived from castor oil with different molecular weights but similar chemical structures and a corn-sugar-based chain extender (propanediol) were used as starting materials in order to maximize the content of carbon from renewable resources in the new materials. The composition was systematically varied to establish a structure-property map and identify compositions with desirable shape-memory properties. The thermal characterization of the new polyurethanes revealed a microphase separated structure, where both the soft (by convention the high molecular weight diol) and the hard phases were highly crystalline. Cyclic thermo-mechanical tensile tests showed that these polymers are excellent candidates for use as thermally activated shape-memory polymers, in which the crystalline soft segments promote high shape fixity values (close to 100%) and the hard segment crystallites ensure high shape recovery values (80-100%, depending on the hard segment content). The high proportion of components from renewable resources used in the polyurethane formulation leads to the synthesis of bio-based polyurethanes with shape-memory properties.

  5. Shape Memory Polyurethanes Based on Zwitterionic Hard Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqin Fu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at elucidating the influence of zwitterionic hard segments on the structures and properties of shape memory polyurethanes (SMPUs. A series of zwitterionic SMPUs was successfully prepared with N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA, 1,3-propanesultone (1,3-PS, 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI and polyethylene glycol (PEG6000. The influence of MDEA-PS-based zwitterionic hard segment on structure, morphology, thermal property, shape memory property and cytocompatibility were systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the PEG-based zwitterionic SMPUs (PEG-ZSMPUs formed phase separation structure consisting of crystalline soft phase and amorphous hard phase. The MDEA-PS zwitterionic segments showed a tendency to form ionic clusters in hard segments, which served as reinforced net points. Shape memory analysis showed that zwitterionic PEG-ZSMPUs containing a high content of zwitterionic segments had thermal-induced shape memory effects. Finally, cytotoxic assays demonstrated that MDEA-PS zwitterionic segment improved the biocompatibility of PEG-ZSMPUs. The zwitterionic PEG-ZSMPUs could thus have a promising application in smart biomedical fields.

  6. A phenomenological memristor model for short-term/long-term memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ling, E-mail: 2006chenling2006@163.com [College of Computer Science, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Li, Chuandong, E-mail: licd@cqu.edu.cn [College of Computer Science, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Huang, Tingwen [Texas A and M University at Qatar, Doha, B.O. Box 23874 (Qatar); Ahmad, Hafiz Gulfam [College of Computer Science, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Yiran [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2014-08-14

    Memristor is considered to be a natural electrical synapse because of its distinct memory property and nanoscale. In recent years, more and more similar behaviors are observed between memristors and biological synapse, e.g., short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM). The traditional mathematical models are unable to capture the new emerging behaviors. In this article, an updated phenomenological model based on the model of the Hewlett–Packard (HP) Labs has been proposed to capture such new behaviors. The new dynamical memristor model with an improved ion diffusion term can emulate the synapse behavior with forgetting effect, and exhibit the transformation between the STM and the LTM. Further, this model can be used in building new type of neural networks with forgetting ability like biological systems, and it is verified by our experiment with Hopfield neural network. - Highlights: • We take the Fick diffusion and the Soret diffusion into account in the ion drift theory. • We develop a new model based on the old HP model. • The new model can describe the forgetting effect and the spike-rate-dependent property of memristor. • The new model can solve the boundary effect of all window functions discussed in [13]. • A new Hopfield neural network with the forgetting ability is built by the new memristor model.

  7. A phenomenological memristor model for short-term/long-term memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ling; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen; Ahmad, Hafiz Gulfam; Chen, Yiran

    2014-01-01

    Memristor is considered to be a natural electrical synapse because of its distinct memory property and nanoscale. In recent years, more and more similar behaviors are observed between memristors and biological synapse, e.g., short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM). The traditional mathematical models are unable to capture the new emerging behaviors. In this article, an updated phenomenological model based on the model of the Hewlett–Packard (HP) Labs has been proposed to capture such new behaviors. The new dynamical memristor model with an improved ion diffusion term can emulate the synapse behavior with forgetting effect, and exhibit the transformation between the STM and the LTM. Further, this model can be used in building new type of neural networks with forgetting ability like biological systems, and it is verified by our experiment with Hopfield neural network. - Highlights: • We take the Fick diffusion and the Soret diffusion into account in the ion drift theory. • We develop a new model based on the old HP model. • The new model can describe the forgetting effect and the spike-rate-dependent property of memristor. • The new model can solve the boundary effect of all window functions discussed in [13]. • A new Hopfield neural network with the forgetting ability is built by the new memristor model

  8. Reactivation in working memory: an attractor network model of free recall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Lansner

    Full Text Available The dynamic nature of human working memory, the general-purpose system for processing continuous input, while keeping no longer externally available information active in the background, is well captured in immediate free recall of supraspan word-lists. Free recall tasks produce several benchmark memory phenomena, like the U-shaped serial position curve, reflecting enhanced memory for early and late list items. To account for empirical data, including primacy and recency as well as contiguity effects, we propose here a neurobiologically based neural network model that unifies short- and long-term forms of memory and challenges both the standard view of working memory as persistent activity and dual-store accounts of free recall. Rapidly expressed and volatile synaptic plasticity, modulated intrinsic excitability, and spike-frequency adaptation are suggested as key cellular mechanisms underlying working memory encoding, reactivation and recall. Recent findings on the synaptic and molecular mechanisms behind early LTP and on spiking activity during delayed-match-to-sample tasks support this view.

  9. Reactivation in Working Memory: An Attractor Network Model of Free Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansner, Anders; Marklund, Petter; Sikström, Sverker; Nilsson, Lars-Göran

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of human working memory, the general-purpose system for processing continuous input, while keeping no longer externally available information active in the background, is well captured in immediate free recall of supraspan word-lists. Free recall tasks produce several benchmark memory phenomena, like the U-shaped serial position curve, reflecting enhanced memory for early and late list items. To account for empirical data, including primacy and recency as well as contiguity effects, we propose here a neurobiologically based neural network model that unifies short- and long-term forms of memory and challenges both the standard view of working memory as persistent activity and dual-store accounts of free recall. Rapidly expressed and volatile synaptic plasticity, modulated intrinsic excitability, and spike-frequency adaptation are suggested as key cellular mechanisms underlying working memory encoding, reactivation and recall. Recent findings on the synaptic and molecular mechanisms behind early LTP and on spiking activity during delayed-match-to-sample tasks support this view. PMID:24023690

  10. Music-Based Memory Enhancement in Alzheimer’s Disease: Promise and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons-Stern, Nicholas R.; Deason, Rebecca G.; Brandler, Brian J.; Frustace, Bruno S.; O’Connor, Maureen K.; Ally, Brandon A.; Budson, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study (Simmons-Stern, Budson, & Ally 2010), we found that patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) better recognized visually presented lyrics when the lyrics were also sung rather than spoken at encoding. The present study sought to further investigate the effects of music on memory in patients with AD by making the content of the song lyrics relevant for the daily life of an older adult and by examining how musical encoding alters several different aspects of episodic memory. Patients with AD and healthy older adults studied visually presented novel song lyrics related to instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) that were accompanied by either a sung or a spoken recording. Overall, participants performed better on a memory test of general lyric content for lyrics that were studied sung as compared to spoken. However, on a memory test of specific lyric content, participants performed equally well for sung and spoken lyrics. We interpret these results in terms of a dual-process model of recognition memory such that the general content questions represent a familiarity-based representation that is preferentially sensitive to enhancement via music, while the specific content questions represent a recollection-based representation unaided by musical encoding. Additionally, in a test of basic recognition memory for the audio stimuli, patients with AD demonstrated equal discrimination for sung and spoken stimuli. We propose that the perceptual distinctiveness of musical stimuli enhanced metamemorial awareness in AD patients via a non-selective distinctiveness heuristic, thereby reducing false recognition while at the same time reducing true recognition and eliminating the mnemonic benefit of music. These results are discussed in the context of potential music-based memory enhancement interventions for the care of patients with AD. PMID:23000133

  11. Music-based memory enhancement in Alzheimer's disease: promise and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons-Stern, Nicholas R; Deason, Rebecca G; Brandler, Brian J; Frustace, Bruno S; O'Connor, Maureen K; Ally, Brandon A; Budson, Andrew E

    2012-12-01

    In a previous study (Simmons-Stern, Budson & Ally, 2010), we found that patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) better recognized visually presented lyrics when the lyrics were also sung rather than spoken at encoding. The present study sought to further investigate the effects of music on memory in patients with AD by making the content of the song lyrics relevant for the daily life of an older adult and by examining how musical encoding alters several different aspects of episodic memory. Patients with AD and healthy older adults studied visually presented novel song lyrics related to instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) that were accompanied by either a sung or a spoken recording. Overall, participants performed better on a memory test of general lyric content for lyrics that were studied sung as compared to spoken. However, on a memory test of specific lyric content, participants performed equally well for sung and spoken lyrics. We interpret these results in terms of a dual-process model of recognition memory such that the general content questions represent a familiarity-based representation that is preferentially sensitive to enhancement via music, while the specific content questions represent a recollection-based representation unaided by musical encoding. Additionally, in a test of basic recognition memory for the audio stimuli, patients with AD demonstrated equal discrimination for sung and spoken stimuli. We propose that the perceptual distinctiveness of musical stimuli enhanced metamemorial awareness in AD patients via a non-selective distinctiveness heuristic, thereby reducing false recognition while at the same time reducing true recognition and eliminating the mnemonic benefit of music. These results are discussed in the context of potential music-based memory enhancement interventions for the care of patients with AD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Writing to and reading from a nano-scale crossbar memory based on memristors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vontobel, Pascal O; Robinett, Warren; Kuekes, Philip J; Stewart, Duncan R; Straznicky, Joseph; Stanley Williams, R

    2009-01-01

    We present a design study for a nano-scale crossbar memory system that uses memristors with symmetrical but highly nonlinear current-voltage characteristics as memory elements. The memory is non-volatile since the memristors retain their state when un-powered. In order to address the nano-wires that make up this nano-scale crossbar, we use two coded demultiplexers implemented using mixed-scale crossbars (in which CMOS-wires cross nano-wires and in which the crosspoint junctions have one-time configurable memristors). This memory system does not utilize the kind of devices (diodes or transistors) that are normally used to isolate the memory cell being written to and read from in conventional memories. Instead, special techniques are introduced to perform the writing and the reading operation reliably by taking advantage of the nonlinearity of the type of memristors used. After discussing both writing and reading strategies for our memory system in general, we focus on a 64 x 64 memory array and present simulation results that show the feasibility of these writing and reading procedures. Besides simulating the case where all device parameters assume exactly their nominal value, we also simulate the much more realistic case where the device parameters stray around their nominal value: we observe a degradation in margins, but writing and reading is still feasible. These simulation results are based on a device model for memristors derived from measurements of fabricated devices in nano-scale crossbars using Pt and Ti nano-wires and using oxygen-depleted TiO 2 as the switching material.

  13. Generalized transport model for phase transition with memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chi; Ciucci, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    A general model for phenomenological transport in phase transition is derived, which extends Jäckle and Frisch model of phase transition with memory and the Cahn–Hilliard model. In addition to including interfacial energy to account for the presence of interfaces, we introduce viscosity and relaxation contributions, which result from incorporating memory effect into the driving potential. Our simulation results show that even without interfacial energy term, the viscous term can lead to transient diffuse interfaces. From the phase transition induced hysteresis, we discover different energy dissipation mechanism for the interfacial energy and the viscosity effect. In addition, by combining viscosity and interfacial energy, we find that if the former dominates, then the concentration difference across the phase boundary is reduced; conversely, if the interfacial energy is greater then this difference is enlarged.

  14. Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-Based Launch Lock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2014-01-01

    Most NASA missions require the use of a launch lock for securing moving components during the launch or securing the payload before release. A launch lock is a device used to prevent unwanted motion and secure the controlled components. The current launch locks are based on pyrotechnic, electro mechanically or NiTi driven pin pullers and they are mostly one time use mechanisms that are usually bulky and involve a relatively high mass. Generally, the use of piezoelectric actuation provides high precession nanometer accuracy but it relies on friction to generate displacement. During launch, the generated vibrations can release the normal force between the actuator components allowing shaft's free motion which could result in damage to the actuated structures or instruments. This problem is common to other linear actuators that consist of a ball screw mechanism. The authors are exploring the development of a novel launch lock mechanism that is activated by a shape memory alloy (SMA) material ring, a rigid element and an SMA ring holding flexure. The proposed design and analytical model will be described and discussed in this paper.

  15. Forming mechanism of Te-based conductive-bridge memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M. Kazar; Martinez, E.; Marty, A.; Veillerot, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Gassilloud, R.; Bernard, M.; Renault, O.; Barrett, N.

    2018-02-01

    We investigated origins of the resistivity change during the forming of ZrTe/Al2O3 based conductive-bridge resistive random access memories. Non-destructive hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate redox processes with sufficient depth sensitivity. Results highlighted the reduction of alumina correlated to the oxidation of zirconium at the interface between the solid electrolyte and the active electrode. In addition the resistance switching caused a decrease of Zr-Te bonds and an increase of elemental Te showing an enrichment of tellurium at the ZrTe/Al2O3 interface. XPS depth profiling using argon clusters ion beam confirmed the oxygen diffusion towards the top electrode. A four-layer capacitor model showed an increase of both the ZrO2 and AlOx interfacial layers, confirming the redox process located at the ZrTe/Al2O3 interface. Oxygen vacancies created in the alumina help the filament formation by acting as preferential conductive paths. This study provides a first direct evidence of the physico-chemical phenomena involved in resistive switching of such devices.

  16. On a Model of Associative Memory with Huge Storage Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircigil, Mete; Heusel, Judith; Löwe, Matthias; Upgang, Sven; Vermet, Franck

    2017-07-01

    In Krotov et al. (in: Lee (eds) Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems, Curran Associates, Inc., Red Hook, 2016) Krotov and Hopfield suggest a generalized version of the well-known Hopfield model of associative memory. In their version they consider a polynomial interaction function and claim that this increases the storage capacity of the model. We prove this claim and take the "limit" as the degree of the polynomial becomes infinite, i.e. an exponential interaction function. With this interaction we prove that model has an exponential storage capacity in the number of neurons, yet the basins of attraction are almost as large as in the standard Hopfield model.

  17. Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Wager, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    This chapter will explore a response to traumatic victimisation which has divided the opinions of psychologists at an exponential rate. We will be examining amnesia for memories of childhood sexual abuse and the potential to recover these memories in adulthood. Whilst this phenomenon is generally accepted in clinical circles, it is seen as highly contentious amongst research psychologists, particularly experimental cognitive psychologists. The chapter will begin with a real case study of a wo...

  18. Applications of Case Based Organizational Memory Supported by the PAbMM Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the aim to manage and retrieve the organizational knowledge, in the last years numerous proposals of models and tools for knowledge management and knowledge representation have arisen. However, most of them store knowledge in a non-structured or semi-structured way, hindering the semantic and automatic processing of this knowledge. In this paper we present a more detailed case-based organizational memory ontology, which aims at contributing to the design of an organizational memory based on cases, so that it can be used to learn, reasoning, solve problems, and as support to better decision making as well. The objective of this Organizational Memory is to serve as base for the organizational knowledge exchange in a processing architecture specialized in the measurement and evaluation. In this way, our processing architecture is based on the C-INCAMI framework (Context-Information Need, Concept model, Attribute, Metric and Indicator for defining the measurement projects. Additionally, the proposal architecture uses a big data repository to make available the data for consumption and to manage the Organizational Memory, which allows a feedback mechanism in relation with online processing. In order to illustrate its utility, two practical cases are explained: A pasture predictor system, using the data of the weather radar (WR of the Experimental Agricultural Station (EAS INTA Anguil (La Pampa State, Argentina and an outpatient monitoring scenario. Future trends and concluding remarks are extended.

  19. Modelling, characterisation and uncertainties of stabilised pseudoelastic shape memory alloy helical springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar; Savi, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical behaviour of pseudoelastic shape memory alloy helical springs is of concern discussing stabilised and cyclic responses. Constitutive description of the shape memory alloy is based on the framework developed by Lagoudas and co-workers incorporating two modifications related...... the global spring behaviour in spite of complex stress–strain distributions. The experiments are carried out considering different deflection amplitudes, frequencies and ambient temperatures, which influence the spring behaviour to different extents. The model is fitted against a calibration data set...

  20. Thermoregulatory model of sleep control: losing the heat memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, M; McGinty, D; Szymusiak, R; Yamamoto, M

    1999-12-01

    Thermoregulatory mechanisms were hypothesized to provide primary control of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREM). On the basis of this hypothesis, we incorporated the thermoregulatory feedback loops mediated by the "heat memory," heat load, and loss processes associated with sleep-wake cycles, which were modulated by two circadian oscillators. In addition, hypnogenic warm-sensitive neurons (HWSNs) were assumed to integrate thermoregulation and NREM control. The heat memory described above could be mediated by some sleep-promoting substances. In this paper, considering the possible carrier of the heat memory, its losing process is newly included in the model. The newly developed model can generate the appropriate features of human sleep-wake patterns. One of the special features of the model is to generate the bimodal distribution of the sleepiness. This bimodality becomes distinct, as the losing rate of the heat memory decreases or the amplitude of the Y oscillator increases. The theoretical analysis shows the losing rate of the heat memory control's rapidity of model response to a thermal perturbation, which is confirmed by simulating the responses with various losing rates to transient heat loads ("heat load pulse"). The sleepiness exhibits large responses to the heat load pulses applied in the early and late phases of wake period, while the response is significantly reduced to the pulse applied in the supposed wake-maintenance zone. This bimodality of the response appears to reflect the sensitivity of the HWSNs. In addition, the early pulse raises the immediate sleepiness rather than the nocturnal sleepiness, while the heat load pulse applied in the later phase of waking period significantly raises the sleepiness during a nocturnal sleep. In simulations of sleep deprivation, the discontinuous relationship between recovery sleep length and deprivation time is reproduced, where the critical sleep deprivation time at which the recovery sleep length jumps is extended

  1. Dimension-based attention in visual short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Michael; Barrett, Doug J K

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how dimension-based attention influences visual short-term memory (VSTM). This was done through examining the effects of cueing a feature dimension in two perceptual comparison tasks (change detection and sameness detection). In both tasks, a memory array and a test array consisting of a number of colored shapes were presented successively, interleaved by a blank interstimulus interval (ISI). In Experiment 1 (change detection), the critical event was a feature change in one item across the memory and test arrays. In Experiment 2 (sameness detection), the critical event was the absence of a feature change in one item across the two arrays. Auditory cues indicated the feature dimension (color or shape) of the critical event with 80 % validity; the cues were presented either prior to the memory array, during the ISI, or simultaneously with the test array. In Experiment 1, the cue validity influenced sensitivity only when the cue was given at the earliest position; in Experiment 2, the cue validity influenced sensitivity at all three cue positions. We attributed the greater effectiveness of top-down guidance by cues in the sameness detection task to the more active nature of the comparison process required to detect sameness events (Hyun, Woodman, Vogel, Hollingworth, & Luck, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 35; 1140-1160, 2009).

  2. Creating a Recollection-Based Memory Through Drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wammes, Jeffrey D; Meade, Melissa E; Fernandes, Myra A

    2017-11-02

    Drawing a picture of to-be-remembered information substantially boosts memory performance in free-recall tasks. In the current work, we sought to test the notion that drawing confers its benefit to memory performance by creating a detailed recollection of the encoding context. In Experiments 1 and 2, we demonstrated that for both pictures and words, items that were drawn by the participant at encoding were better recognized in a later test than were words that were written out. Moreover, participants' source memory (in this experiment, correct identification of whether the word was drawn or written) was superior for items drawn relative to written at encoding. In Experiments 3A and 3B, we used a remember-know paradigm to demonstrate again that drawn words were better recognized than written words, and further showed that this effect was driven by a greater proportion of recollection-, rather than familiarity-based responses. Lastly, in Experiment 4 we implemented a response deadline procedure, and showed that when recognition responses were speeded, thereby reducing participants' capacity for recollection, the benefit of drawing was substantially smaller. Taken together, our findings converge on the idea that drawing improves memory as a result of providing vivid contextual information which can be later called upon to aid retrieval. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Memory sparing, fast scattering formalism for rigorous diffraction modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iff, W.; Kämpfe, T.; Jourlin, Y.; Tishchenko, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The basics and algorithmic steps of a novel scattering formalism suited for memory sparing and fast electromagnetic calculations are presented. The formalism, called ‘S-vector algorithm’ (by analogy with the known scattering-matrix algorithm), allows the calculation of the collective scattering spectra of individual layered micro-structured scattering objects. A rigorous method of linear complexity is applied to model the scattering at individual layers; here the generalized source method (GSM) resorting to Fourier harmonics as basis functions is used as one possible method of linear complexity. The concatenation of the individual scattering events can be achieved sequentially or in parallel, both having pros and cons. The present development will largely concentrate on a consecutive approach based on the multiple reflection series. The latter will be reformulated into an implicit formalism which will be associated with an iterative solver, resulting in improved convergence. The examples will first refer to 1D grating diffraction for the sake of simplicity and intelligibility, with a final 2D application example.

  4. Smart materials based on shape memory alloys: examples from Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotthardt, R.; Scherrer, P.

    2000-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have become increasingly attractive as embedded actuators in polymers yielding adaptive composite structures. In particular, SMA-elements have been used to actively or passively control shape, elastic modules, internal stress level and damping capacity of such smart composites. In the passive approach, copper-base SMA-plates can be used as temperature-sensitive damping elements, an interesting solution to improve the vibrational behaviour of alpine skis for example. Active materials are obtained by the integration of pre-strained Ni-Ti-base thin wires in polymer matrix composites enabling control of the vibrational behaviour through the recovery-stress tuning technique. In this paper, some results of national research programmes in Belgium and Switzerland, mainly concerning the damping capacity, are shown and a new European project entitled ''adaptive composites with embedded shape memory alloy wires'' is presented in which partners from Belgium, Germany, Greece, Great Britain and Switzerland are collaborating. (orig.)

  5. A macroscopic model for magnetic shape-memory single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bessoud, A. L.; Kružík, Martin; Stefanelli, U.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2013), s. 343-359 ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : magneto striction * evolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.214, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/kruzik-a macroscopic model for magnetic shape-memory single crystals.pdf

  6. Alternative conceptions, memory, & mental models in physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyoungho; Shin, Jongho; Park, Jiyeon; Song, Sangho; Kim, Yeounsoo; Bao, Lei

    2005-09-01

    There are two somewhat independent research traditions, which converge to suggest a form of students' knowledge: alternative conceptions and mental models. However we have little literature that explains what they are different from each other and from memory. This study tried to describe these issues with some thoughts about how cognitive psychology and science education approaches can be best synthesized in order to approach these questions.

  7. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Marco Fabrizio; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-06-11

    In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement.

  8. Music Genre Classification using an Auditory Memory Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    Audio feature estimation is potentially improved by including higher- level models. One such model is the Auditory Short Term Memory (STM) model. A new paradigm of audio feature estimation is obtained by adding the influence of notes in the STM. These notes are identified when the perceptual spectral flux has a peak, and the spectral content that is increased by the new note is added to the STM. The STM is exponentially fading with time span and number of elements, and each note only belongs ...

  9. Musical Memories: translating evidence-based gerontological nursing into a children's picture book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdner, Linda A; Buckwalter, Kathleen C

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often cared for within multigenerational families. More specifically, 26% of family caregivers have children younger than 18 living with them. This article describes an innovative model for translation of an evidence-based intervention into an engaging, realistic picture book that serves as a teaching tool for children and their families. The book, Musical Memories, focuses on the relationship between a granddaughter and her grandmother who has AD. The story applies basic principles of the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold model to explain the underlying cause of grandmother's behaviors and models the evidence-based guideline "Individualized Music for Elders with Dementia" to empower the granddaughter in maintaining a relationship with her grandmother. Musical Memories is intended to serve as a valuable resource for families and the gerontological nurses who serve them. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Inhibiting corticosterone synthesis during fear memory formation exacerbates cued fear extinction memory deficits within the single prolonged stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Samantha M; Schreiber, William B; Stanfield, Briana R; Knox, Dayan

    2015-01-01

    Using the single prolonged stress (SPS) animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), previous studies suggest that enhanced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression leads to cued fear extinction retention deficits. However, it is unknown how the endogenous ligand of GRs, corticosterone (CORT), may contribute to extinction retention deficits in the SPS model. Given that CORT synthesis during fear learning is critical for fear memory consolidation and SPS enhances GR expression, CORT synthesis during fear memory formation could strengthen fear memory in SPS rats by enhancing GR activation during fear learning. In turn, this could lead to cued fear extinction retention deficits. We tested the hypothesis that CORT synthesis during fear learning leads to cued fear extinction retention deficits in SPS rats by administering the CORT synthesis inhibitor metyrapone to SPS and control rats prior to fear conditioning, and observed the effect this had on extinction memory. Inhibiting CORT synthesis during fear memory formation in control rats tended to decrease cued freezing, though this effect never reached statistical significance. Contrary to our hypothesis, inhibiting CORT synthesis during fear memory formation disrupted extinction retention in SPS rats. This finding suggests that even though SPS exposure leads to cued fear extinction memory deficits, CORT synthesis during fear memory formation enhances extinction retention in SPS rats. This suggests that stress-induced CORT synthesis in previously stressed rats can be beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. My Experience with Ti-Ni-Based and Ti-Based Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Shuichi

    2017-12-01

    The present author has been studying shape memory alloys including Cu-Al-Ni, Ti-Ni-based, and Ni-free Ti-based alloys since 1979. This paper reviews the present author's research results for the latter two materials since 1981. The topics on the Ti-Ni-based alloys include the achievement of superelasticity in Ti-Ni alloys through understanding of the role of microstructures consisting of dislocations and precipitates, followed by the contribution to the development of application market of shape memory effect and superelasticity, characterization of the R-phase and monoclinic martensitic transformations, clarification of the basic characteristics of fatigue properties, development of sputter-deposited shape memory thin films and fabrication of prototypes of microactuators utilizing thin films, development of high temperature shape memory alloys, and so on. The topics of Ni-free Ti-based shape memory alloys include the characterization of the orthorhombic phase martensitic transformation and related shape memory effect and superelasticity, the effects of texture, omega phase and adding elements on the martensitic transformation and shape memory properties, clarification of the unique effects of oxygen addition to induce non-linear large elasticity, Invar effect and heating-induced martensitic transformation, and so on.

  12. Constitutive modeling of SMA SMP multifunctional high performance smart adaptive shape memory composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarali, Chetan S; Raja, S; Upadhya, A R

    2010-01-01

    Materials design involving the thermomechanical constitutive modeling of shape memory alloy (SMA) and shape memory polymer (SMP) composites is a key topic in the development of smart adaptive shape memory composites (SASMC). In this work, a constitutive model for SASMC is developed. First, a one-dimensional SMA model, which can simulate the pseudoelastic (PE) and shape memory effects (SME) is presented. Subsequently, a one-dimensional SMP model able to reproduce the SME is addressed. Both SMA and SMP models are based on a single internal state variable, namely the martensite fraction and the frozen fraction, which can be expressed as a function of temperature. A consistent form of the analytical solution for the SMP model is obtained using the fourth-order Runge–Kutta method. Finally, the SASMC constitutive model is proposed, following two analytical homogenization approaches. One approach is based on an equivalent inclusion method and the other approach is the rule of mixtures. The SMA and SMP constitutive models are validated independently with experimental results. However, the validation of the composite model is performed using the two homogenization approaches and a close agreement in results is observed. Results regarding the isothermal and thermomechanical stress–strain responses are analyzed as a function of SMA volume fraction. Further, it is concluded that the proposed composite model is able to reproduce consistently the overall composite response by taking into consideration not only the phase transformations, variable modulus and transformation stresses in SMA but also the variable modulus, the evolution of stored strain and thermal strain in the SMP

  13. Storage and recall capabilities of fuzzy morphological associative memories with adjunction-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Marcos Eduardo; Sussner, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We recently employed concepts of mathematical morphology to introduce fuzzy morphological associative memories (FMAMs), a broad class of fuzzy associative memories (FAMs). We observed that many well-known FAM models can be classified as belonging to the class of FMAMs. Moreover, we developed a general learning strategy for FMAMs using the concept of adjunction of mathematical morphology. In this paper, we describe the properties of FMAMs with adjunction-based learning. In particular, we characterize the recall phase of these models. Furthermore, we prove several theorems concerning the storage capacity, noise tolerance, fixed points, and convergence of auto-associative FMAMs. These theorems are corroborated by experimental results concerning the reconstruction of noisy images. Finally, we successfully employ FMAMs with adjunction-based learning in order to implement fuzzy rule-based systems in an application to a time-series prediction problem in industry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cortical dynamics of visual change detection based on sensory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Tomokazu; Inui, Koji; Yamashiro, Koya; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2010-08-01

    Detecting a visual change was suggested to relate closely to the visual sensory memory formed by visual stimuli before the occurrence of the change, because change detection involves identifying a difference between ongoing and preceding sensory conditions. Previous neuroimaging studies showed that an abrupt visual change activates the middle occipital gyrus (MOG). However, it still remains to be elucidated whether the MOG is related to visual change detection based on sensory memory. Here we tried to settle this issue using a new method of stimulation with blue and red LEDs to emphasize a memory-based change detection process. There were two stimuli, a standard trial stimulus and a deviant trial stimulus. The former was a red light lasting 500 ms, and the latter was a red light lasting 250 ms immediately followed by a blue light lasting 250 ms. Effects of the trial-trial interval, 250 approximately 2000 ms, were investigated to know how cortical responses to the abrupt change (from red to blue) were affected by preceding conditions. The brain response to the deviant trial stimulus was recorded by magnetoencephalography. Results of a multi-dipole analysis showed that the activity in the MOG, peaking at around 150 ms after the change onset, decreased in amplitude as the interval increased, but the earlier activity in BA 17/18 was not affected by the interval. These results suggested that the MOG is an important cortical area relating to the sensory memory-based visual change-detecting system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fechner’s law in metacognition: a quantitative model of visual working memory confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Ronald; Yoo, Aspen H.; Ma, Wei Ji

    2016-01-01

    Although visual working memory (VWM) has been studied extensively, it is unknown how people form confidence judgments about their memories. Peirce (1878) speculated that Fechner’s law – which states that sensation is proportional to the logarithm of stimulus intensity – might apply to confidence reports. Based on this idea, we hypothesize that humans map the precision of their VWM contents to a confidence rating through Fechner’s law. We incorporate this hypothesis into the best available model of VWM encoding and fit it to data from a delayed-estimation experiment. The model provides an excellent account of human confidence rating distributions as well as the relation between performance and confidence. Moreover, the best-fitting mapping in a model with a highly flexible mapping closely resembles the logarithmic mapping, suggesting that no alternative mapping exists that accounts better for the data than Fechner's law. We propose a neural implementation of the model and find that this model also fits the behavioral data well. Furthermore, we find that jointly fitting memory errors and confidence ratings boosts the power to distinguish previously proposed VWM encoding models by a factor of 5.99 compared to fitting only memory errors. Finally, we show that Fechner's law also accounts for metacognitive judgments in a word recognition memory task, which is a first indication that it may be a general law in metacognition. Our work presents the first model to jointly account for errors and confidence ratings in VWM and could lay the groundwork for understanding the computational mechanisms of metacognition. PMID:28221087

  16. Fechner's law in metacognition: A quantitative model of visual working memory confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Ronald; Yoo, Aspen H; Ma, Wei Ji

    2017-03-01

    Although visual working memory (VWM) has been studied extensively, it is unknown how people form confidence judgments about their memories. Peirce (1878) speculated that Fechner's law-which states that sensation is proportional to the logarithm of stimulus intensity-might apply to confidence reports. Based on this idea, we hypothesize that humans map the precision of their VWM contents to a confidence rating through Fechner's law. We incorporate this hypothesis into the best available model of VWM encoding and fit it to data from a delayed-estimation experiment. The model provides an excellent account of human confidence rating distributions as well as the relation between performance and confidence. Moreover, the best-fitting mapping in a model with a highly flexible mapping closely resembles the logarithmic mapping, suggesting that no alternative mapping exists that accounts better for the data than Fechner's law. We propose a neural implementation of the model and find that this model also fits the behavioral data well. Furthermore, we find that jointly fitting memory errors and confidence ratings boosts the power to distinguish previously proposed VWM encoding models by a factor of 5.99 compared to fitting only memory errors. Finally, we show that Fechner's law also accounts for metacognitive judgments in a word recognition memory task, which is a first indication that it may be a general law in metacognition. Our work presents the first model to jointly account for errors and confidence ratings in VWM and could lay the groundwork for understanding the computational mechanisms of metacognition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Parallel calculations on shared memory, NUMA-based computers using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkiewski, Marcin; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2014-05-01

    Achieving satisfactory computational performance in numerical simulations on modern computer architectures can be a complex task. Multi-core design makes it necessary to parallelize the code. Efficient parallelization on NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory Access) shared memory architectures necessitates explicit placement of the data in the memory close to the CPU that uses it. In addition, using more than 8 CPUs (~100 cores) requires a cluster solution of interconnected nodes, which involves (expensive) communication between the processors. It takes significant effort to overcome these challenges even when programming in low-level languages, which give the programmer full control over data placement and work distribution. Instead, many modelers use high-level tools such as MATLAB, which severely limit the optimization/tuning options available. Nonetheless, the advantage of programming simplicity and a large available code base can tip the scale in favor of MATLAB. We investigate whether MATLAB can be used for efficient, parallel computations on modern shared memory architectures. A common approach to performance optimization of MATLAB programs is to identify a bottleneck and migrate the corresponding code block to a MEX file implemented in, e.g. C. Instead, we aim at achieving a scalable parallel performance of MATLABs core functionality. Some of the MATLABs internal functions (e.g., bsxfun, sort, BLAS3, operations on vectors) are multi-threaded. Achieving high parallel efficiency of those may potentially improve the performance of significant portion of MATLABs code base. Since we do not have MATLABs source code, our performance tuning relies on the tools provided by the operating system alone. Most importantly, we use custom memory allocation routines, thread to CPU binding, and memory page migration. The performance tests are carried out on multi-socket shared memory systems (2- and 4-way Intel-based computers), as well as a Distributed Shared Memory machine with 96 CPU

  18. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  19. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-09-02

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  20. New memory devices based on the proton transfer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzbowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Memory devices operating due to the fast proton transfer (PT) process are proposed by the means of first-principles calculations. Writing  information is performed using the electrostatic potential of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Reading information is based on the effect of the local magnetization induced at the zigzag graphene nanoribbon (Z-GNR) edge—saturated with oxygen or the hydroxy group—and can be realized with the use of giant magnetoresistance (GMR), a magnetic tunnel junction or spin-transfer torque devices. The energetic barriers for the hop forward and backward processes can be tuned by the distance and potential of the STM tip; this thus enables us to tailor the non-volatile logic states. The proposed system enables very dense packing of the logic cells and could be used in random access and flash memory devices. (paper)

  1. New memory devices based on the proton transfer process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Memory devices operating due to the fast proton transfer (PT) process are proposed by the means of first-principles calculations. Writing information is performed using the electrostatic potential of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Reading information is based on the effect of the local magnetization induced at the zigzag graphene nanoribbon (Z-GNR) edge—saturated with oxygen or the hydroxy group—and can be realized with the use of giant magnetoresistance (GMR), a magnetic tunnel junction or spin-transfer torque devices. The energetic barriers for the hop forward and backward processes can be tuned by the distance and potential of the STM tip; this thus enables us to tailor the non-volatile logic states. The proposed system enables very dense packing of the logic cells and could be used in random access and flash memory devices.

  2. Field-effect transistor memories based on ferroelectric polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujia; Wang, Haiyang; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaomeng; Guo, Yu; Sun, Huabin; Li, Yun

    2017-11-01

    Field-effect transistors based on ferroelectrics have attracted intensive interests, because of their non-volatile data retention, rewritability, and non-destructive read-out. In particular, polymeric materials that possess ferroelectric properties are promising for the fabrications of memory devices with high performance, low cost, and large-area manufacturing, by virtue of their good solubility, low-temperature processability, and good chemical stability. In this review, we discuss the material characteristics of ferroelectric polymers, providing an update on the current development of ferroelectric field-effect transistors (Fe-FETs) in non-volatile memory applications. Program supported partially by the NSFC (Nos. 61574074, 61774080), NSFJS (No. BK20170075), and the Open Partnership Joint Projects of NSFC-JSPS Bilateral Joint Research Projects (No. 61511140098).

  3. Silicon nano crystal-based non-volatile memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.Y.; Chen, T.P.; Sreeduth, D.; Chen, Q.; Ding, L.; Du, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the performance and reliability of a Flash memory based on silicon nanocrystal synthesized with very-low energy ion beams. The devices are fabricated with a conventional CMOS process and the size of the nanocrystal is ∼ 4 nm as determined from TEM measurement. Electrical properties of the devices with a tunnel oxide of either 3 nm or 7 nm are evaluated. The devices exhibit good endurance up to 10 5 W/E cycles even at the high operation temperature of 85 deg. C for both the tunnel oxide thicknesses. For the thicker tunnel oxide (i.e., the 7-nm tunnel oxide), a good retention performance with an extrapolated 10-year memory window of ∼ 0.3 V (or ∼ 20% of charge lose after 10 years) is achieved. However, ∼ 70% of charge loss after 10 years is expected for the thinner tunnel oxide (i.e., the 3-nm tunnel oxide)

  4. Modeling aspects of human memory for scientific study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico); Watson, Patrick (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); McDaniel, Mark A. (Washington University); Eichenbaum, Howard B. (Boston University); Cohen, Neal J. (University of Illinois - Champaign-Urbana Beckman Institute); Vineyard, Craig Michael; Taylor, Shawn Ellis; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Morrow, James Dan; Verzi, Stephen J.

    2009-10-01

    Working with leading experts in the field of cognitive neuroscience and computational intelligence, SNL has developed a computational architecture that represents neurocognitive mechanisms associated with how humans remember experiences in their past. The architecture represents how knowledge is organized and updated through information from individual experiences (episodes) via the cortical-hippocampal declarative memory system. We compared the simulated behavioral characteristics with those of humans measured under well established experimental standards, controlling for unmodeled aspects of human processing, such as perception. We used this knowledge to create robust simulations of & human memory behaviors that should help move the scientific community closer to understanding how humans remember information. These behaviors were experimentally validated against actual human subjects, which was published. An important outcome of the validation process will be the joining of specific experimental testing procedures from the field of neuroscience with computational representations from the field of cognitive modeling and simulation.

  5. Estimating Memory Deterioration Rates Following Neurodegeneration and Traumatic Brain Injuries in a Hopfield Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Weber

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injuries (TBI are among the main causes of cognitive dysfunction in humans. At a neuronal network level, they both extensively exhibit focal axonal swellings (FAS, which in turn, compromise the information encoded in spike trains and lead to potentially severe functional deficits. There are currently no satisfactory quantitative predictors of decline in memory-encoding neuronal networks based on the impact and statistics of FAS. Some of the challenges of this translational approach include our inability to access small scale injuries with non-invasive methods, the overall complexity of neuronal pathologies, and our limited knowledge of how networks process biological signals. The purpose of this computational study is three-fold: (i to extend Hopfield's model for associative memory to account for the effects of FAS, (ii to calibrate FAS parameters from biophysical observations of their statistical distribution and size, and (iii to systematically evaluate deterioration rates for different memory-recall tasks as a function of FAS injury. We calculate deterioration rates for a face-recognition task to account for highly correlated memories and also for a discrimination task of random, uncorrelated memories with a size at the capacity limit of the Hopfield network. While it is expected that the performance of any injured network should decrease with injury, our results link, for the first time, the memory recall ability to observed FAS statistics. This allows for plausible estimates of cognitive decline for different stages of brain disorders within neuronal networks, bridging experimental observations following neurodegeneration and TBI with compromised memory recall. The work lends new insights to help close the gap between theory and experiment on how biological signals are processed in damaged, high-dimensional functional networks, and towards positing new diagnostic tools to measure cognitive

  6. Estimating Memory Deterioration Rates Following Neurodegeneration and Traumatic Brain Injuries in a Hopfield Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Melanie; Maia, Pedro D.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are among the main causes of cognitive dysfunction in humans. At a neuronal network level, they both extensively exhibit focal axonal swellings (FAS), which in turn, compromise the information encoded in spike trains and lead to potentially severe functional deficits. There are currently no satisfactory quantitative predictors of decline in memory-encoding neuronal networks based on the impact and statistics of FAS. Some of the challenges of this translational approach include our inability to access small scale injuries with non-invasive methods, the overall complexity of neuronal pathologies, and our limited knowledge of how networks process biological signals. The purpose of this computational study is three-fold: (i) to extend Hopfield's model for associative memory to account for the effects of FAS, (ii) to calibrate FAS parameters from biophysical observations of their statistical distribution and size, and (iii) to systematically evaluate deterioration rates for different memory-recall tasks as a function of FAS injury. We calculate deterioration rates for a face-recognition task to account for highly correlated memories and also for a discrimination task of random, uncorrelated memories with a size at the capacity limit of the Hopfield network. While it is expected that the performance of any injured network should decrease with injury, our results link, for the first time, the memory recall ability to observed FAS statistics. This allows for plausible estimates of cognitive decline for different stages of brain disorders within neuronal networks, bridging experimental observations following neurodegeneration and TBI with compromised memory recall. The work lends new insights to help close the gap between theory and experiment on how biological signals are processed in damaged, high-dimensional functional networks, and towards positing new diagnostic tools to measure cognitive deficits. PMID

  7. Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  8. Instrumental learning: an animal model for sleep dependent memory enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaars, Cathalijn H C; Girardi, Carlos E N; Joosten, Ruud N J M A; Lako, Irene M; Ruimschotel, Emma; Hanegraaf, Maaike A J; Dematteis, Maurice; Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2013-07-15

    The relationship between learning and sleep is multifaceted; learning influences subsequent sleep characteristics, which may in turn influence subsequent memory. Studies in humans indicate that sleep may not only prevent degradation of acquired memories, but even enhance performance without further practice. In a rodent instrumental learning task, individual differences occur in how fast rats learn to associate lever pressing with food reward. Rats habitually sleep between learning sessions, and may differ in this respect. The current study assessed if the instrumental leaning paradigm could serve as a model to study sleep-dependent memory enhancement. Male Wistar rats performed 2 sessions of instrumental learning per day for 1-3 days. Electroencephalography was recorded both before and after the sessions. Sleep deprivation (3 h) was applied between the first and second session in a subgroup of rats. Measurements comprised the number of lever presses in each session, slow wave sleep (SWS) duration, Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (REMS) duration and sleep spindles. Baseline sleep parameters were similar for fast and slow learning rats. Task-exposure increased REMS-duration. The increase in REMS-duration was observed specifically after sessions in which learning occurred, but not after a later session. Sleep deprivation during the 3h period between the initial two sessions interfered with performance enhancement, but did not prevent this in all rats. Our considered movement control protocol induced partial sleep deprivation and also interfered with performance enhancement. The classic instrumental learning task provides a practical model for animal studies on sleep-dependent memory enhancement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pandemics and immune memory in the noisy Penna model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrat, Stanisław; Bonkowska, Katarzyna; Biecek, Przemysław

    2007-06-01

    In the noisy Penna model of ageing, instead of counting the number of defective loci which eventually kill an individual, the noise describing the health status of individuals is introduced. This white noise is composed of two components: the environmental one and the personal one. If the sum of both trespasses the limit set for the individuals homeodynamics the individual dies. The energy of personal fluctuations depends on the number of defective loci expressed in the individuals genome. Environmental fluctuations, the same for all individuals can include some signals, corresponding to the exposition to pathogens which could be dangerous for a fraction of the organisms. Personal noise and the component of random environmental fluctuations, when superimposed on the signal can be life threatening if they are stronger than the limit set for individuals homeodynamics. Nevertheless, some organisms survive the period of dangerous signal and they may remember the signal in the future, like antigens are remembered by our immune systems. Unfortunately, this memory weakens with time and, even worse, some additional defective genes are switched on during the ageing. If the same pathogens (signals) emerge during the lifespan of the population, a fraction of the population could remember it and could respond by increasing the resistance to it. Again, unfortunately for some individuals, their memory could be too weak and their own health status has worsened due to the accumulated mutations, they have to die. Though, a fraction of individuals can survive the pandemics due to the immune memory, but a fraction of population has no such a memory because they were born after the last pandemic or they didnt notice this pandemic. Our simple model, by implementing the noise instead of deterministic threshold of genetic defects, describes how the impact of pandemics on populations depends on the time which elapsed between the two incidents and how the different age groups of

  10. Age-related differences in sleep-based memory consolidation: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Wen-Jun; Li, Hui-Jie; Guo, Yu-Hua; Peng, Peng; Lei, Xu; Yu, Jing

    2017-03-01

    A period of post-learning sleep benefits memory consolidation compared with an equal-length wake interval. However, whether this sleep-based memory consolidation changes as a function of age remains controversial. Here we report a meta-analysis that investigates the age differences in the sleep-based memory consolidation in two types of memory: declarative memory and procedural memory. The meta-analysis included 22 comparisons of the performance between young adults (N =640) and older adults (N =529) on behavioral tasks measuring sleep-based memory consolidation. Our results showed a significant overall sleep-based beneficial effect in young adults but not in older adults. However, further analyses suggested that the age differences were mainly manifested in sleep-based declarative memory consolidation but not in procedural memory consolidation. We discussed the possible underlying mechanisms for the age-related degradation in sleep-based memory consolidation. Further research is needed to determine the crucial components for sleep-related memory consolidation in older adults such as age-related changes in neurobiological and cardiovascular functions, which may play an important role in this context and have the potential to delineate the interrelationships between age-related changes in sleep and memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling and numerical analysis of a three-dimensional shape memory alloy shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengtao; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Wang, Mingyi; Nie, Rui

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, modeling and numerical analysis of a three dimensional shell structure made of shape memory alloy (SMA) are introduced. As a new smart material, SMA material has been applied in many fields due to two significant macroscopic phenomena which are called the shape memory effect (SME) and pseudoelasticity. The material of SMA exhibits two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) after undergoing especial heat treatment and thermo-mechanical training. This work investigates the numerical simulation and application of the SMA component: SMA strip, which has been pre-curved in the room temperature. The component is expected to extend upon heating and shorten on cooling along the curve. Hence the shape memory effect can be used to change the shape of the structure. The return mapping algorithm of the 3-D SMA thermomechanical constitutive equations based on Boyd-Lagoudas model is used in the finite element analysis to describe the material features of the SMA. In this paper, the ABAQUS finite element program has been utilized with a user material subroutine (UMAT) which is written in the FORTRAN code for the modeling of the SMA strip. The SMA component which has a certain initial transformation strain can emerge considerable deflection during the reverse phase transformation inducing by the temperature.

  12. A mathematical model of capacious and efficient memory that survives trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vipin; Edwards, S. F.

    2004-02-01

    The brain's memory system can store without any apparent constraint, it recalls stored information efficiently and it is robust against lesion. Existing models of memory do not fully account for all these features. The model due to Hopfield (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79 (1982) 2554) based on Hebbian learning (The Organization of Behaviour, Wiley, New York, 1949) shows an early saturation of memory with the retrieval from memory becoming slow and unreliable before collapsing at this limit. Our hypothesis (Physica A 276 (2000) 352) that the brain might store orthogonalized information improved the situation in many ways but was still constrained in that the information to be stored had to be linearly independent, i.e., signals that could be expressed as linear combinations of others had to be excluded. Here we present a model that attempts to address the problem quite comprehensively in the background of the above attributes of the brain. We demonstrate that if the brain devolves incoming signals in analogy with Fourier analysis, the noise created by interference of stored signals diminishes systematically (which yields prompt retrieval) and most importantly it can withstand partial damages to the brain.

  13. Shape memory polymers: three-dimensional isotropic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Olaniyi; Mo, Changki

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive three-dimensional isotropic numerical simulation for a thermo-mechanical constitutive model of shape memory polymers (SMPs). In order to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of SMPs, a one-dimensional rheological thermo-mechanical constitutive model is adopted, translated into a three-dimensional form and a time discrete form of the three-dimensional model is then presented. Numerical simulation of this model was developed using the UMAT subroutine capabilities of the finite element software ABAQUS. Evolution of the analysis was conducted by making use of the backward difference scheme, which was applied to all quantities within the model, including the material properties. A comparison of the numerical simulation results was carried out with the available experimental data. Numerical simulation results clearly exhibit the thermo-mechanical properties of the material which include shape fixity, shape recovery, and recovery stress. Finally, a prediction for the transverse and shear directions of the material is presented.

  14. A Scalable Unsegmented Multiport Memory for FPGA-Based Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Townsend

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On-chip multiport memory cores are crucial primitives for many modern high-performance reconfigurable architectures and multicore systems. Previous approaches for scaling memory cores come at the cost of operating frequency, communication overhead, and logic resources without increasing the storage capacity of the memory. In this paper, we present two approaches for designing multiport memory cores that are suitable for reconfigurable accelerators with substantial on-chip memory or complex communication. Our design approaches tackle these challenges by banking RAM blocks and utilizing interconnect networks which allows scaling without sacrificing logic resources. With banking, memory congestion is unavoidable and we evaluate our multiport memory cores under different memory access patterns to gain insights about different design trade-offs. We demonstrate our implementation with up to 256 memory ports using a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA. Our experimental results report high throughput memories with resource usage that scales with the number of ports.

  15. Uncertainty-Dependent Extinction of Fear Memory in an Amygdala-mPFC Neural Circuit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhe; Nakae, Ken; Ishii, Shin; Naoki, Honda

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty of fear conditioning is crucial for the acquisition and extinction of fear memory. Fear memory acquired through partial pairings of a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) is more resistant to extinction than that acquired through full pairings; this effect is known as the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE). Although the PREE has been explained by psychological theories, the neural mechanisms underlying the PREE remain largely unclear. Here, we developed a neural circuit model based on three distinct types of neurons (fear, persistent and extinction neurons) in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In the model, the fear, persistent and extinction neurons encode predictions of net severity, of unconditioned stimulus (US) intensity, and of net safety, respectively. Our simulation successfully reproduces the PREE. We revealed that unpredictability of the US during extinction was represented by the combined responses of the three types of neurons, which are critical for the PREE. In addition, we extended the model to include amygdala subregions and the mPFC to address a recent finding that the ventral mPFC (vmPFC) is required for consolidating extinction memory but not for memory retrieval. Furthermore, model simulations led us to propose a novel procedure to enhance extinction learning through re-conditioning with a stronger US; strengthened fear memory up-regulates the extinction neuron, which, in turn, further inhibits the fear neuron during re-extinction. Thus, our models increased the understanding of the functional roles of the amygdala and vmPFC in the processing of uncertainty in fear conditioning and extinction. PMID:27617747

  16. Uncertainty-Dependent Extinction of Fear Memory in an Amygdala-mPFC Neural Circuit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhe Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty of fear conditioning is crucial for the acquisition and extinction of fear memory. Fear memory acquired through partial pairings of a conditioned stimulus (CS and an unconditioned stimulus (US is more resistant to extinction than that acquired through full pairings; this effect is known as the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE. Although the PREE has been explained by psychological theories, the neural mechanisms underlying the PREE remain largely unclear. Here, we developed a neural circuit model based on three distinct types of neurons (fear, persistent and extinction neurons in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. In the model, the fear, persistent and extinction neurons encode predictions of net severity, of unconditioned stimulus (US intensity, and of net safety, respectively. Our simulation successfully reproduces the PREE. We revealed that unpredictability of the US during extinction was represented by the combined responses of the three types of neurons, which are critical for the PREE. In addition, we extended the model to include amygdala subregions and the mPFC to address a recent finding that the ventral mPFC (vmPFC is required for consolidating extinction memory but not for memory retrieval. Furthermore, model simulations led us to propose a novel procedure to enhance extinction learning through re-conditioning with a stronger US; strengthened fear memory up-regulates the extinction neuron, which, in turn, further inhibits the fear neuron during re-extinction. Thus, our models increased the understanding of the functional roles of the amygdala and vmPFC in the processing of uncertainty in fear conditioning and extinction.

  17. DESTINY: A Comprehensive Tool with 3D and Multi-Level Cell Memory Modeling Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparsh Mittal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To enable the design of large capacity memory structures, novel memory technologies such as non-volatile memory (NVM and novel fabrication approaches, e.g., 3D stacking and multi-level cell (MLC design have been explored. The existing modeling tools, however, cover only a few memory technologies, technology nodes and fabrication approaches. We present DESTINY, a tool for modeling 2D/3D memories designed using SRAM, resistive RAM (ReRAM, spin transfer torque RAM (STT-RAM, phase change RAM (PCM and embedded DRAM (eDRAM and 2D memories designed using spin orbit torque RAM (SOT-RAM, domain wall memory (DWM and Flash memory. In addition to single-level cell (SLC designs for all of these memories, DESTINY also supports modeling MLC designs for NVMs. We have extensively validated DESTINY against commercial and research prototypes of these memories. DESTINY is very useful for performing design-space exploration across several dimensions, such as optimizing for a target (e.g., latency, area or energy-delay product for a given memory technology, choosing the suitable memory technology or fabrication method (i.e., 2D v/s 3D for a given optimization target, etc. We believe that DESTINY will boost studies of next-generation memory architectures used in systems ranging from mobile devices to extreme-scale supercomputers. The latest source-code of DESTINY is available from the following git repository: https://bitbucket.org/sparshmittal/destinyv2.

  18. Generation-based memory synchronization in a multiprocessor system with weakly consistent memory accesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-09

    In a multiprocessor system, a central memory synchronization module coordinates memory synchronization requests responsive to memory access requests in flight, a generation counter, and a reclaim pointer. The central module communicates via point-to-point communication. The module includes a global OR reduce tree for each memory access requesting device, for detecting memory access requests in flight. An interface unit is implemented associated with each processor requesting synchronization. The interface unit includes multiple generation completion detectors. The generation count and reclaim pointer do not pass one another.

  19. Learning and memory impairments in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavie eDarcet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive disturbances are often reported as serious incapacitating symptoms by patients suffering from major depressive disorders. Such deficits have been observed in various animal models based on environmental stress.Here, we performed a complete characterization of cognitive functions in a neuroendocrine mouse model of depression based on a chronic (4 weeks corticosterone administration (CORT. Cognitive performances were assessed using behavioral tests measuring episodic (novel object recognition test, NORT, associative (one-trial contextual fear conditioning, CFC and visuo-spatial (Morris water maze, MWM; Barnes maze, BM learning/memory. Altered emotional phenotype after chronic corticosterone treatment was confirmed in mice using tests predictive of anxiety or depression-related behaviors.In the NORT, CORT-treated mice showed a decrease in time exploring the novel object during the test session and a lower discrimination index compared to control mice, characteristic of recognition memory impairment. Associative memory was also impaired, as observed with a decrease in freezing duration in CORT-treated mice in the CFC, thus pointing out the cognitive alterations in this model. In the MWM and in the BM, spatial learning performance but also short-term spatial memory were altered in CORT-treated mice. In the MWM, unlike control animals, CORT-treated animals failed to learn a new location during the reversal phase, suggesting a loss of cognitive flexibility. Finally, in the BM, the lack of preference for the target quadrant during the recall probe trial in animals receiving corticosterone regimen demonstrates that long-term retention was also affected in this paradigm. Taken together, our results highlight that CORT-induced anxio-depressive-like phenotype is associated with a cognitive deficit affecting all aspects of memory tested.

  20. Extending distributed shared memory for the cell broadband engine to a channel model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovhede, Kenneth; Larsen, Morten Nørgaard; Vinter, Brian

    2010-01-01

    at the price of a quite complex programming model. In this paper we present an easy-to-use, CSP-like, communication method, which enables transfers of shared memory objects. The channel based communication method can significantly reduce the complexity of massively parallel programs. By implementing a few...... scientific computational cores we show that performance and scalability of the system is acceptable for most problems....

  1. Enhanced stability of car-following model upon incorporation of short-term driving memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da-Wei; Shi, Zhong-Ke; Ai, Wen-Huan

    2017-06-01

    Based on the full velocity difference model, a new car-following model is developed to investigate the effect of short-term driving memory on traffic flow in this paper. Short-term driving memory is introduced as the influence factor of driver's anticipation behavior. The stability condition of the newly developed model is derived and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation is constructed to describe the traffic behavior near the critical point. Via numerical method, evolution of a small perturbation is investigated firstly. The results show that the improvement of this new car-following model over the previous ones lies in the fact that the new model can improve the traffic stability. Starting and breaking processes of vehicles in the signalized intersection are also investigated. The numerical simulations illustrate that the new model can successfully describe the driver's anticipation behavior, and that the efficiency and safety of the vehicles passing through the signalized intersection are improved by considering short-term driving memory.

  2. An UV photochromic memory effect in proton-based WO3 electrochromic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Lee, S.-H.; Mascarenhas, A.; Deb, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    We report an UV photochromic memory effect on a standard proton-based WO 3 electrochromic device. It exhibits two memory states, associated with the colored and bleached states of the device, respectively. Such an effect can be used to enhance device performance (increasing the dynamic range), re-energize commercial electrochromic devices, and develop memory devices

  3. An UV photochromic memory effect in proton-based WO3 electrochromic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Lee, S.-H.; Mascarenhas, A.; Deb, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    We report an UV photochromic memory effect on a standard proton-based WO3 electrochromic device. It exhibits two memory states, associated with the colored and bleached states of the device, respectively. Such an effect can be used to enhance device performance (increasing the dynamic range), re-energize commercial electrochromic devices, and develop memory devices.

  4. Time-Based Prospective Memory in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altgassen, A.M.; Williams, T.I.; Bölte, S.; Kliegel, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, for the first time, prospective memory was investigated in 11 school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders and 11 matched neurotypical controls. A computerised time-based prospective memory task was embedded in a visuospatial working memory test and required participants to

  5. PLS-based memory control scheme for enhanced process monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-01-20

    Fault detection is important for safe operation of various modern engineering systems. Partial least square (PLS) has been widely used in monitoring highly correlated process variables. Conventional PLS-based methods, nevertheless, often fail to detect incipient faults. In this paper, we develop new PLS-based monitoring chart, combining PLS with multivariate memory control chart, the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) monitoring chart. The MEWMA are sensitive to incipient faults in the process mean, which significantly improves the performance of PLS methods and widen their applicability in practice. Using simulated distillation column data, we demonstrate that the proposed PLS-based MEWMA control chart is more effective in detecting incipient fault in the mean of the multivariate process variables, and outperform the conventional PLS-based monitoring charts.

  6. How brain oscillations form memories--a processing based perspective on oscillatory subsequent memory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Staudigl, Tobias

    2014-01-15

    Brain oscillations are increasingly recognized by memory researchers as a useful tool to unravel the neural mechanisms underlying the formation of a memory trace. However, the increasing numbers of published studies paint a rather complex picture of the relation between brain oscillations and memory formation. Concerning oscillatory amplitude, for instance, increases as well as decreases in various frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta and gamma) were associated with memory formation. These results cast doubt on frameworks putting forward the idea of an oscillatory signature that is uniquely related to memory formation. In an attempt to clarify this issue we here provide an alternative perspective, derived from classic cognitive frameworks/principles of memory. On the basis of Craik's levels of processing framework and Tulving's encoding specificity principle we hypothesize that brain oscillations during encoding might primarily reflect the perceptual and cognitive processes engaged by the encoding task. These processes may then lead to later successful retrieval depending on their overlap with the processes engaged by the memory test. As a consequence, brain oscillatory correlates of memory formation could vary dramatically depending on how the memory is encoded, and on how it is being tested later. Focusing on oscillatory amplitude changes and on theta-to-gamma cross-frequency coupling, we here review recent evidence showing how brain oscillatory subsequent memory effects can be modulated, and sometimes even be reversed, by varying encoding tasks, and the contextual overlap between encoding and retrieval. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. FPGA-based prototype storage system with phase change memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gezi; Chen, Xiaogang; Chen, Bomy; Li, Shunfen; Zhou, Mi; Han, Wenbing; Song, Zhitang

    2016-10-01

    With the ever-increasing amount of data being stored via social media, mobile telephony base stations, and network devices etc. the database systems face severe bandwidth bottlenecks when moving vast amounts of data from storage to the processing nodes. At the same time, Storage Class Memory (SCM) technologies such as Phase Change Memory (PCM) with unique features like fast read access, high density, non-volatility, byte-addressability, positive response to increasing temperature, superior scalability, and zero standby leakage have changed the landscape of modern computing and storage systems. In such a scenario, we present a storage system called FLEET which can off-load partial or whole SQL queries to the storage engine from CPU. FLEET uses an FPGA rather than conventional CPUs to implement the off-load engine due to its highly parallel nature. We have implemented an initial prototype of FLEET with PCM-based storage. The results demonstrate that significant performance and CPU utilization gains can be achieved by pushing selected query processing components inside in PCM-based storage.

  8. Neuronal model with distributed delay: analysis and simulation study for gamma distribution memory kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmeshu; Gupta, Varun; Kadambari, K V

    2011-06-01

    A single neuronal model incorporating distributed delay (memory)is proposed. The stochastic model has been formulated as a Stochastic Integro-Differential Equation (SIDE) which results in the underlying process being non-Markovian. A detailed analysis of the model when the distributed delay kernel has exponential form (weak delay) has been carried out. The selection of exponential kernel has enabled the transformation of the non-Markovian model to a Markovian model in an extended state space. For the study of First Passage Time (FPT) with exponential delay kernel, the model has been transformed to a system of coupled Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) in two-dimensional state space. Simulation studies of the SDEs provide insight into the effect of weak delay kernel on the Inter-Spike Interval(ISI) distribution. A measure based on Jensen-Shannon divergence is proposed which can be used to make a choice between two competing models viz. distributed delay model vis-á-vis LIF model. An interesting feature of the model is that the behavior of (CV(t))((ISI)) (Coefficient of Variation) of the ISI distribution with respect to memory kernel time constant parameter η reveals that neuron can switch from a bursting state to non-bursting state as the noise intensity parameter changes. The membrane potential exhibits decaying auto-correlation structure with or without damped oscillatory behavior depending on the choice of parameters. This behavior is in agreement with empirically observed pattern of spike count in a fixed time window. The power spectral density derived from the auto-correlation function is found to exhibit single and double peaks. The model is also examined for the case of strong delay with memory kernel having the form of Gamma distribution. In contrast to fast decay of damped oscillations of the ISI distribution for the model with weak delay kernel, the decay of damped oscillations is found to be slower for the model with strong delay kernel.

  9. Spatial memory impairments in a prediabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, E; Prediger, R D; Nunes, S; Castro, A A; Viana, S D; Lemos, C; De Souza, C M; Agostinho, P; Cunha, R A; Carvalho, E; Fontes Ribeiro, C A; Reis, F; Pereira, F C

    2013-10-10

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for brain disorders, namely cognitive impairments associated with hippocampal dysfunction underlying diabetic encephalopathy. However, the impact of a prediabetic state on cognitive function is unknown. Therefore, we now investigated whether spatial learning and memory deficits and the underlying hippocampal dysfunction were already present in a prediabetic animal model. Adult Wistar rats drinking high-sucrose (HSu) diet (35% sucrose solution during 9 weeks) were compared to controls' drinking water. HSu rats exhibited fasting normoglycemia accompanied by hyperinsulinemia and hypertriglyceridemia in the fed state, and insulin resistance with impaired glucose tolerance confirming them as a prediabetic rodent model. HSu rats displayed a poorer performance in hippocampal-dependent short- and long-term spatial memory performance, assessed with the modified Y-maze and Morris water maze tasks, respectively; this was accompanied by a reduction of insulin receptor-β density with normal levels of insulin receptor substrate-1 pSer636/639, and decreased hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor levels without changes of the plasma corticosterone levels. Importantly, HSu animals exhibited increased hippocampal levels of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits GluA1 and GLUN1, respectively, whereas the levels of protein markers related to nerve terminals (synaptophysin) and oxidative stress/inflammation (HNE, RAGE, TNF-α) remained unaltered. These findings indicate that 9 weeks of sucrose consumption resulted in a metabolic condition suggestive of a prediabetic state, which translated into short- and long-term spatial memory deficits accompanied by alterations in hippocampal glutamatergic neurotransmission and abnormal glucocorticoid signaling. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neural field model of memory-guided search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P; Poll, Daniel B

    2017-12-01

    Many organisms can remember locations they have previously visited during a search. Visual search experiments have shown exploration is guided away from these locations, reducing redundancies in the search path before finding a hidden target. We develop and analyze a two-layer neural field model that encodes positional information during a search task. A position-encoding layer sustains a bump attractor corresponding to the searching agent's current location, and search is modeled by velocity input that propagates the bump. A memory layer sustains persistent activity bounded by a wave front, whose edges expand in response to excitatory input from the position layer. Search can then be biased in response to remembered locations, influencing velocity inputs to the position layer. Asymptotic techniques are used to reduce the dynamics of our model to a low-dimensional system of equations that track the bump position and front boundary. Performance is compared for different target-finding tasks.

  11. Neural field model of memory-guided search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Poll, Daniel B.

    2017-12-01

    Many organisms can remember locations they have previously visited during a search. Visual search experiments have shown exploration is guided away from these locations, reducing redundancies in the search path before finding a hidden target. We develop and analyze a two-layer neural field model that encodes positional information during a search task. A position-encoding layer sustains a bump attractor corresponding to the searching agent's current location, and search is modeled by velocity input that propagates the bump. A memory layer sustains persistent activity bounded by a wave front, whose edges expand in response to excitatory input from the position layer. Search can then be biased in response to remembered locations, influencing velocity inputs to the position layer. Asymptotic techniques are used to reduce the dynamics of our model to a low-dimensional system of equations that track the bump position and front boundary. Performance is compared for different target-finding tasks.

  12. Modeling Permanent Deformations of Superelastic and Shape Memory Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fabrizio Urbano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a modification of the polycrystalline shape memory alloy constitutive model originally proposed by Souza. By introducing a transformation strain energy with two different hardening coefficients, we are able to take into account the effect of the martensitic transformation of unfavorably oriented grains occurring after the main plateau. By choosing a proper second hardening coefficient, it is possible to reproduce the correct stress strain behavior of the material after the plateau without the need of introducing a much smaller Young modulus for martensite. The proposed modification is introduced in the model comprising permanent deformation effects. Model results for uniaxial stress tests are compared to experimental results showing good agreement.

  13. Models for Total-Dose Radiation Effects in Non-Volatile Memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Philip Montgomery; Wix, Steven D.

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this work is to develop models to predict radiation effects in non- volatile memory: flash memory and ferroelectric RAM. In flash memory experiments have found that the internal high-voltage generators (charge pumps) are the most sensitive to radiation damage. Models are presented for radiation effects in charge pumps that demonstrate the experimental results. Floating gate models are developed for the memory cell in two types of flash memory devices by Intel and Samsung. These models utilize Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and hot electron injection to charge and erase the floating gate. Erase times are calculated from the models and compared with experimental results for different radiation doses. FRAM is less sensitive to radiation than flash memory, but measurements show that above 100 Krad FRAM suffers from a large increase in leakage current. A model for this effect is developed which compares closely with the measurements.

  14. An extended continuum model considering optimal velocity change with memory and numerical tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingtao, Zhai; Hongxia, Ge; Rongjun, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, an extended continuum model of traffic flow is proposed with the consideration of optimal velocity changes with memory. The new model's stability condition and KdV-Burgers equation considering the optimal velocities change with memory are deduced through linear stability theory and nonlinear analysis, respectively. Numerical simulation is carried out to study the extended continuum model, which explores how optimal velocity changes with memory affected velocity, density and energy consumption. Numerical results show that when considering the effects of optimal velocity changes with memory, the traffic jams can be suppressed efficiently. Both the memory step and sensitivity parameters of optimal velocity changes with memory will enhance the stability of traffic flow efficiently. Furthermore, numerical results demonstrates that the effect of optimal velocity changes with memory can avoid the disadvantage of historical information, which increases the stability of traffic flow on road, and so it improve the traffic flow stability and minimize cars' energy consumptions.

  15. Linking Memories across Time via Neuronal and Dendritic Overlaps in Model Neurons with Active Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kastellakis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Memories are believed to be stored in distributed neuronal assemblies through activity-induced changes in synaptic and intrinsic properties. However, the specific mechanisms by which different memories become associated or linked remain a mystery. Here, we develop a simplified, biophysically inspired network model that incorporates multiple plasticity processes and explains linking of information at three different levels: (1 learning of a single associative memory, (2 rescuing of a weak memory when paired with a strong one, and (3 linking of multiple memories across time. By dissecting synaptic from intrinsic plasticity and neuron-wide from dendritically restricted protein capture, the model reveals a simple, unifying principle: linked memories share synaptic clusters within the dendrites of overlapping populations of neurons. The model generates numerous experimentally testable predictions regarding the cellular and sub-cellular properties of memory engrams as well as their spatiotemporal interactions.

  16. A digital memories based user authentication scheme with privacy preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, JunLiang; Lyu, Qiuyun; Wang, Qiuhua; Yu, Xiangxiang

    2017-01-01

    The traditional username/password or PIN based authentication scheme, which still remains the most popular form of authentication, has been proved insecure, unmemorable and vulnerable to guessing, dictionary attack, key-logger, shoulder-surfing and social engineering. Based on this, a large number of new alternative methods have recently been proposed. However, most of them rely on users being able to accurately recall complex and unmemorable information or using extra hardware (such as a USB Key), which makes authentication more difficult and confusing. In this paper, we propose a Digital Memories based user authentication scheme adopting homomorphic encryption and a public key encryption design which can protect users' privacy effectively, prevent tracking and provide multi-level security in an Internet & IoT environment. Also, we prove the superior reliability and security of our scheme compared to other schemes and present a performance analysis and promising evaluation results.

  17. A digital memories based user authentication scheme with privacy preservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JunLiang Liu

    Full Text Available The traditional username/password or PIN based authentication scheme, which still remains the most popular form of authentication, has been proved insecure, unmemorable and vulnerable to guessing, dictionary attack, key-logger, shoulder-surfing and social engineering. Based on this, a large number of new alternative methods have recently been proposed. However, most of them rely on users being able to accurately recall complex and unmemorable information or using extra hardware (such as a USB Key, which makes authentication more difficult and confusing. In this paper, we propose a Digital Memories based user authentication scheme adopting homomorphic encryption and a public key encryption design which can protect users' privacy effectively, prevent tracking and provide multi-level security in an Internet & IoT environment. Also, we prove the superior reliability and security of our scheme compared to other schemes and present a performance analysis and promising evaluation results.

  18. Scientific developments of liquid crystal-based optical memory: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jai; Chandran, Achu; Biradar, Ashok M.

    2017-01-01

    The memory behavior in liquid crystals (LCs), although rarely observed, has made very significant headway over the past three decades since their discovery in nematic type LCs. It has gone from a mere scientific curiosity to application in variety of commodities. The memory element formed by numerous LCs have been protected by patents, and some commercialized, and used as compensation to non-volatile memory devices, and as memory in personal computers and digital cameras. They also have the low cost, large area, high speed, and high density memory needed for advanced computers and digital electronics. Short and long duration memory behavior for industrial applications have been obtained from several LC materials, and an LC memory with interesting features and applications has been demonstrated using numerous LCs. However, considerable challenges still exist in searching for highly efficient, stable, and long-lifespan materials and methods so that the development of useful memory devices is possible. This review focuses on the scientific and technological approach of fascinating applications of LC-based memory. We address the introduction, development status, novel design and engineering principles, and parameters of LC memory. We also address how the amalgamation of LCs could bring significant change/improvement in memory effects in the emerging field of nanotechnology, and the application of LC memory as the active component for futuristic and interesting memory devices.

  19. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN x -based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10 5  s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10 6 cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN x -based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices

  20. Picture-based memory impairment screen for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe; Noone, Mohan L; Johnson, Beena; Ambrose, Anne F; Wang, Cuiling; Buschke, Herman; Pradeep, Vayyattu G; Abdul Salam, Kizhakkaniyakath; Shaji, Kunnukatil S; Mathuranath, Pavagada S

    2012-11-01

    To develop and validate a picture-based memory impairment screen (PMIS) for the detection of dementia. Cross-sectional. Outpatient clinics, Baby Memorial Hospital, Kozhikode city in the southern Indian state of Kerala. Three hundred four community-residing adults aged 55 to 94 with a mean education level of 8 years; 65 were diagnosed with dementia. PMIS: a culture-fair picture-based cognitive screen designed to be administered by nonspecialists. Diagnostic accuracy estimates (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive power) of PMIS cut-scores in detecting dementia (range 0-8). PMIS scores were worse in participants with dementia (1.5) than in controls (7.7, P < .001). At the optimal cut-score of 5, PMIS had a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 90.3-100.0%) and a specificity of 99.2% (95% CI = 98.0-100.0%) for detecting dementia. In the 167 participants with <10 years of education, PMIS scores of five or less had a sensitivity of 97.8% (95% CI = 93.6-100.0%) and specificity of 99.2% (95% CI = 97.6-100.0%). The PMIS had better specificity than the Mini-Mental State Examination in detecting dementia, especially in older adults with low education. The PMIS is a brief and reliable screen for dementia in elderly populations with variable literacy rates. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Are survival processing memory advantages based on ancestral priorities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderstrom, Nicholas C; McCabe, David P

    2011-06-01

    Recent research has suggested that our memory systems are especially tuned to process information according to its survival relevance, and that inducing problems of "ancestral priorities" faced by our ancestors should lead to optimal recall performance (Nairne & Pandeirada, Cognitive Psychology, 2010). The present study investigated the specificity of this idea by comparing an ancestor-consistent scenario and a modern survival scenario that involved threats that were encountered by human ancestors (e.g., predators) or threats from fictitious creatures (i.e., zombies). Participants read one of four survival scenarios in which the environment and the explicit threat were either consistent or inconsistent with ancestrally based problems (i.e., grasslands-predators, grasslands-zombies, city-attackers, city-zombies), or they rated words for pleasantness. After rating words based on their survival relevance (or pleasantness), the participants performed a free recall task. All survival scenarios led to better recall than did pleasantness ratings, but recall was greater when zombies were the threat, as compared to predators or attackers. Recall did not differ for the modern (i.e., city) and ancestral (i.e., grasslands) scenarios. These recall differences persisted when valence and arousal ratings for the scenarios were statistically controlled as well. These data challenge the specificity of ancestral priorities in survival-processing advantages in memory.

  2. Tunable and processable shape memory composites based on degradable polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xi; Geven, Mike A.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Peijs, Ton; Gautrot, Julien E.

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable shape memory polymers are attractive materials for the design of biomedical scaffolds as they allow deploying implants remotely with minimal intervention, whilst allowing degradation and tissue repair. However, shape memory properties are difficult to design from common degradable

  3. Top-down attention based on object representation and incremental memory for knowledge building and inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bumhwi; Ban, Sang-Woo; Lee, Minho

    2013-10-01

    Humans can efficiently perceive arbitrary visual objects based on an incremental learning mechanism with selective attention. This paper proposes a new task specific top-down attention model to locate a target object based on its form and color representation along with a bottom-up saliency based on relativity of primitive visual features and some memory modules. In the proposed model top-down bias signals corresponding to the target form and color features are generated, which draw the preferential attention to the desired object by the proposed selective attention model in concomitance with the bottom-up saliency process. The object form and color representation and memory modules have an incremental learning mechanism together with a proper object feature representation scheme. The proposed model includes a Growing Fuzzy Topology Adaptive Resonance Theory (GFTART) network which plays two important roles in object color and form biased attention; one is to incrementally learn and memorize color and form features of various objects, and the other is to generate a top-down bias signal to localize a target object by focusing on the candidate local areas. Moreover, the GFTART network can be utilized for knowledge inference which enables the perception of new unknown objects on the basis of the object form and color features stored in the memory during training. Experimental results show that the proposed model is successful in focusing on the specified target objects, in addition to the incremental representation and memorization of various objects in natural scenes. In addition, the proposed model properly infers new unknown objects based on the form and color features of previously trained objects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A robust cellular associative memory for pattern recognitions using composite trigonometric chaotic neuron models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimol San-Um

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robust cellular associative memory for pattern recognitions using composite trigonometric chaotic neuron models. Robust chaotic neurons are designed through a scan of positive Lyapunov Exponent (LE bifurcation structures, which indicate the quantitative measure of chaoticity for one-dimensional discrete-time dynamical systems. The proposed chaotic neuron model is a composite of sine and cosine chaotic maps, which are independent from the output activation function. Dynamics behaviors are demonstrated through bifurcation diagrams and LE-based bifurcation structures. An application to associative memories of binary patterns in Cellular Neural Networks (CNN topology is demonstrated using a signum output activation function. Examples of English alphabets are stored using symmetric auto-associative matrix of n-binary patterns. Simulation results have demonstrated that the cellular neural network can quickly and effectively restore the distorted pattern to expected information.

  5. Establishing normative data for multi-trial memory tests: the multivariate regression-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Elst, Wim; Molenberghs, Geert; van Tetering, Marleen; Jolles, Jelle

    Multi-trial memory tests are widely used in research and clinical practice because they allow for assessing different aspects of memory and learning in a single comprehensive test procedure. However, the use of multi-trial memory tests also raises some key data analysis issues. Indeed, the different trial scores are typically all correlated, and this correlation has to be properly accounted for in the statistical analyses. In the present paper, the focus is on the setting where normative data have to be established for multi-trial memory tests. At present, normative data for such tests are typically based on a series of univariate analyses, i.e. a statistical model is fitted for each of the test scores separately. This approach is suboptimal because (1) the correlated nature of the data is not accounted for, (2) multiple testing issues may arise, and (3) the analysis is not parsimonious. Here, a normative approach that is not hampered by these issues is proposed (the so-called multivariate regression-based approach). The methodology is exemplified in a sample of N = 221 Dutch-speaking children (aged between 5.82 and 15.49 years) who were administered Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test. An online Appendix that details how the analyses can be conducted in practice (using the R software) is also provided. The multivariate normative regression-based approach has some substantial methodological advantages over univariate regression-based methods. In addition, the method allows for testing substantive hypotheses that cannot be addressed in a univariate framework (e.g. trial by covariate interactions can be modeled).

  6. A Constitutive Model for Superelastic Shape Memory Alloys Considering the Influence of Strain Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are a relatively new class of functional materials, exhibiting special thermomechanical behaviors, such as shape memory effect and superelasticity, which enable their applications in seismic engineering as energy dissipation devices. This paper investigates the properties of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys, emphasizing the influence of strain rate on superelastic behavior under various strain amplitudes by cyclic tensile tests. A novel constitutive equation based on Graesser and Cozzarelli’s model is proposed to describe the strain-rate-dependent hysteretic behavior of superelastic SMAs at different strain levels. A stress variable including the influence of strain rate is introduced into Graesser and Cozzarelli’s model. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed constitutive equation, experiments on superelastic NiTi wires with different strain rates and strain levels are conducted. Numerical simulation results based on the proposed constitutive equation and experimental results are in good agreement. The findings in this paper will assist the future design of superelastic SMA-based energy dissipation devices for seismic protection of structures.

  7. Phase-change memory: A continuous multilevel compact model of subthreshold conduction and threshold switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Corentin; Gilibert, Fabien; Reyboz, Marina; Bocquet, Marc; Zuliani, Paola; Portal, Jean-Michel

    2018-04-01

    Phase-change memory (PCM) compact modeling of the threshold switching based on a thermal runaway in Poole–Frenkel conduction is proposed. Although this approach is often used in physical models, this is the first time it is implemented in a compact model. The model accuracy is validated by a good correlation between simulations and experimental data collected on a PCM cell embedded in a 90 nm technology. A wide range of intermediate states is measured and accurately modeled with a single set of parameters, allowing multilevel programing. A good convergence is exhibited even in snapback simulation owing to this fully continuous approach. Moreover, threshold properties extraction indicates a thermally enhanced switching, which validates the basic hypothesis of the model. Finally, it is shown that this model is compliant with a new drift-resilient cell-state metric. Once enriched with a phase transition module, this compact model is ready to be implemented in circuit simulators.

  8. Olfactory memory is impaired in a triple transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Tommaso; Romano, Adele; Macheda, Teresa; Colangeli, Roberto; Cimmino, Concetta Stefania; Petrella, Antonio; LaFerla, Frank M; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Gaetani, Silvana

    2011-10-31

    Olfactory memory dysfunctions were investigated in the triple-transgenic murine model of Alzheimer's disease (3 × Tg-AD). In the social transmission of food preference test, 3 × Tg-AD mice presented severe deficits in odor-based memory, without gross changes in general odor-ability. Aβ and tau immunoreactivity was not observed in the primary processing regions for odor, the olfactory bulbs (OBs), whereas marked immunostaining was present in the piriform, entorhinal, and orbitofrontal cortex, as well as in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that the impairment in olfactory-based information processing might arise from degenerative mechanisms mostly affecting higher cortical regions and limbic areas, such as the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A 3D finite strain phenomenological constitutive model for shape memory alloys considering martensite reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghavani, J.; Auricchio, F.; Naghdabadi, R.; Reali, A.; Sohrabpour, S.

    2010-06-01

    Most devices based on shape memory alloys experience both finite deformations and non-proportional loading conditions in engineering applications. This motivates the development of constitutive models considering finite strain as well as martensite variant reorientation. To this end, in the present article, based on the principles of continuum thermodynamics with internal variables, a three-dimensional finite strain phenomenological constitutive model is proposed taking its basis from the recent model in the small strain regime proposed by Panico and Brinson (J Mech Phys Solids 55:2491-2511, 2007). In the finite strain constitutive model derivation, a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into elastic and inelastic parts, together with an additive decomposition of the inelastic strain rate tensor into transformation and reorientation parts is adopted. Moreover, it is shown that, when linearized, the proposed model reduces exactly to the original small strain model.

  10. Laser memory (hologram) and coincident redundant multiplex memory (CRM-memory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostojic, Branko

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that besides the memory which remembers the object by memorising of the phases of the interferenting waves of the light (i.e. hologram) it is possible to construct the memory which remembers the object by memorising of the phases of the interferenting impulses (CFM-memory). It is given the mathematical description of the memory, based on the experimental model. Although in the paper only the technical aspect of CRM memory is given. It is mentioned the possibility that the human memory has the same principle and that the invention of CRM memory is due to cybernetical analysis of the system human eye-visual cortex

  11. Instrumental learning: An animal model for sleep dependent memory enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Girardi, Carlos E. N.; Joosten, Ruud N. J. M. A.; Lako, Irene M.; Ruimschotel, Emma; Hanegraaf, Maaike A. J.; Dematteis, Maurice; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; van Someren, Eus J. W.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between learning and sleep is multifaceted; learning influences subsequent sleep characteristics, which may in turn influence subsequent memory. Studies in humans indicate that sleep may not only prevent degradation of acquired memories, but even enhance performance without further

  12. Community-based memorials to September 11, 2001: environmental stewardship as memory work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika S. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    This chapter investigates how people use trees, parks, gardens, and other natural resources as raw materials in and settings for memorials to September 11, 2001. In particular, we focus on 'found space living memorials', which we define as sites that are community-managed, re-appropriated from their prior use, often carved out of the public right-of-way, and...

  13. Disentangling the effect of event-based cues on children's time-based prospective memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, Jonathan; Henry, Julie D; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Previous time-based prospective memory research, both with children and with other groups, has measured the ability to perform an action with the arrival of a time-dependent yet still event-based cue (e.g., the occurrence of a specific clock pattern) while also engaged in an ongoing activity. Here we introduce a novel means of operationalizing time-based prospective memory and assess children's growing capacities when the availability of an event-based cue is varied. Preschoolers aged 3, 4, and 5years (N=72) were required to ring a bell when a familiar 1-min sand timer had completed a cycle under four conditions. In a 2×2 within-participants design, the timer was either visible or hidden and was either presented in the context of a single task or embedded within a dual picture-naming task. Children were more likely to ring the bell before 2min had elapsed in the visible-timer and single-task conditions, with performance improving with age across all conditions. These results suggest a divergence in the development of time-based prospective memory in the presence versus absence of event-based cues, and they also suggest that performance on typical time-based tasks may be partly driven by event-based prospective memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Can improving working memory prevent academic difficulties? A school based randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gehan; Quach, Jon; Gold, Lisa; Anderson, Peter; Rickards, Field; Mensah, Fiona; Ainley, John; Gathercole, Susan; Wake, Melissa

    2011-06-20

    Low academic achievement is common and is associated with adverse outcomes such as grade repetition, behavioural disorders and unemployment. The ability to accurately identify these children and intervene before they experience academic failure would be a major advance over the current 'wait to fail' model. Recent research suggests that a possible modifiable factor for low academic achievement is working memory, the ability to temporarily store and manipulate information in a 'mental workspace'. Children with working memory difficulties are at high risk of academic failure. It has recently been demonstrated that working memory can be improved with adaptive training tasks that encourage improvements in working memory capacity. Our trial will determine whether the intervention is efficacious as a selective prevention strategy for young children at risk of academic difficulties and is cost-effective. This randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 440 children with low working memory after a school-based screening of 2880 children in Grade one. We will approach caregivers of all children from 48 participating primary schools in metropolitan Melbourne for consent. Children with low working memory will be randomised to usual care or the intervention. The intervention will consist of 25 computerised working memory training sessions, which take approximately 35 minutes each to complete. Follow-up of children will be conducted at 6, 12 and 24 months post-randomisation through child face-to-face assessment, parent and teacher surveys and data from government authorities. The primary outcome is academic achievement at 12 and 24 months, and other outcomes include child behaviour, attention, health-related quality of life, working memory, and health and educational service utilisation. A successful start to formal learning in school sets the stage for future academic, psychological and economic well-being. If this preventive intervention can be shown to be efficacious, then

  15. Can improving working memory prevent academic difficulties? a school based randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Peter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low academic achievement is common and is associated with adverse outcomes such as grade repetition, behavioural disorders and unemployment. The ability to accurately identify these children and intervene before they experience academic failure would be a major advance over the current 'wait to fail' model. Recent research suggests that a possible modifiable factor for low academic achievement is working memory, the ability to temporarily store and manipulate information in a 'mental workspace'. Children with working memory difficulties are at high risk of academic failure. It has recently been demonstrated that working memory can be improved with adaptive training tasks that encourage improvements in working memory capacity. Our trial will determine whether the intervention is efficacious as a selective prevention strategy for young children at risk of academic difficulties and is cost-effective. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 440 children with low working memory after a school-based screening of 2880 children in Grade one. We will approach caregivers of all children from 48 participating primary schools in metropolitan Melbourne for consent. Children with low working memory will be randomised to usual care or the intervention. The intervention will consist of 25 computerised working memory training sessions, which take approximately 35 minutes each to complete. Follow-up of children will be conducted at 6, 12 and 24 months post-randomisation through child face-to-face assessment, parent and teacher surveys and data from government authorities. The primary outcome is academic achievement at 12 and 24 months, and other outcomes include child behaviour, attention, health-related quality of life, working memory, and health and educational service utilisation. Discussion A successful start to formal learning in school sets the stage for future academic, psychological and economic well-being. If

  16. A model of shape memory materials with hierarchical twinning: Statics and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Shenoy, S.R. [International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Wu, Y.; Lookman, T. [Western Ontario Univ., London, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Applied Mathematics

    1995-07-01

    We consider a model of shape memory material in which hierarchical twinning near the habit plane (austenite-martensite interface) is a new and crucial ingredient. The model includes (1) a triple-well potential ({phi} model) in local shear strain, (2) strain gradient terms up to second order in strain and fourth order in gradient, and (3) all symmetry allowed compositional fluctuation induced strain gradient terms. The last term favors hierarchy which enables communication between macroscopic (cm) and microscopic ({Angstrom}) regions essential for shape memory. Hierarchy also stabilizes between formation (critical pattern of twins). External stress or pressure (pattern) modulates the spacing of domain walls. Therefore the ``pattern`` is encoded in the modulated hierarchical variation of the depth and width of the twins. This hierarchy of length scales provides a hierarchy of time scales and thus the possibility of non-exponential decay. The four processes of the complete shape memory cycle -- write, record, erase and recall -- are explained within this model. Preliminary results based on 2D Langevin dynamics are shown for tweed and hierarchy formation.

  17. Modeling Brain Responses in an Arithmetic Working Memory Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Aini Ismafairus Abd; Yusoff, Ahmad Nazlim; Mukari, Siti Zamratol-Mai Sarah; Mohamad, Mazlyfarina; Manan, Hanani Abdul; Hamid, Khairiah Abdul

    2010-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate brain responses due to arithmetic working memory. Nine healthy young male subjects were given simple addition and subtraction instructions in noise and in quiet. The general linear model (GLM) and random field theory (RFT) were implemented in modelling the activation. The results showed that addition and subtraction evoked bilateral activation in Heschl's gyrus (HG), superior temporal gyrus (STG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), supramarginal gyrus (SG) and precentral gyrus (PCG). The HG, STG, SG and PCG activate higher number of voxels in noise as compared to in quiet for addition and subtraction except for IFG that showed otherwise. The percentage of signal change (PSC) in all areas is higher in quiet as compared to in noise. Surprisingly addition (not subtraction) exhibits stronger activation.

  18. Evolutive masing model, cyclic plasticity, ageing and memory effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidoroff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Many models are proposed for the mechanical description of the cyclic behaviour of metals and used for structure analysis under cyclic loading. Such a model must include two basic features: Dissipative behaviour on each cycle (hysteresis loop); evolution of this behaviour during the material's life (cyclic hardening or softening, aging,...). However, if both aspects are present in most existing models, the balance between them may be quite different. Many metallurgical investigations have been performed about the microstructure and its evolution during cyclic loading, and it is desirable to introduce these informations in phenomenological models. The evolutive Masing model has been proposed to combine: the accuracy of hereditary models for the description of hysteresis on each cycle, the versatility of internal variables for the state description and evolution, a sufficient microstructural basis to make the interaction easier with microstructural investigations. The purpose of the present work is to discuss this model and to compare different evolution assumptions with respect to some memory effects (cyclic hardening and softening, multilevel tests, aging). Attention is limited to uniaxial, rate independent elasto-plastic behaviour

  19. A Developmental Psychopathology Model of Overgeneral Autobiographical Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM) is a phenomenon that refers to difficulty retrieving specific autobiographical memories. The tendency to be overgeneral in autobiographical memory recall has been commonly observed among individuals with emotional disorders compared to those without emotional disorders. Despite significant advances in identifying…

  20. A Shape Memory Alloy Based Cryogenic Thermal Conduction Switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, V.B.; Singh, J.D.; Woodruff, T.R.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Notardonato, W.U.

    2004-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) can produce large strains when deformed (e.g., up to 8%). Heating results in a phase transformation and associated recovery of all the accumulated strain. This strain recovery can occur against large forces, resulting in their use as actuators. Thus an SMA element can integrate both sensory and actuation functions, by inherently sensing a change in temperature and actuating by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. Two aspects of our work on cryogenic SMAs are addressed here. First - a shape memory alloy based cryogenic thermal conduction switch for operation between dewars of liquid methane and liquid oxygen in a common bulkhead arrangement is discussed. Such a switch integrates the sensor element and the actuator element and can be used to create a variable thermal sink to other cryogenic tanks for liquefaction, densification, and zero boil-off systems for advanced spaceport applications. Second - fabrication via arc-melting and subsequent materials testing of SMAs with cryogenic transformation temperatures for use in the aforementioned switch is discussed

  1. A Dynamical Model of Pitch Memory Provides an Improved Basis for Implied Harmony Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Chul

    2017-01-01

    Tonal melody can imply vertical harmony through a sequence of tones. Current methods for automatic chord estimation commonly use chroma-based features extracted from audio signals. However, the implied harmony of unaccompanied melodies can be difficult to estimate on the basis of chroma content in the presence of frequent nonchord tones. Here we present a novel approach to automatic chord estimation based on the human perception of pitch sequences. We use cohesion and inhibition between pitches in auditory short-term memory to differentiate chord tones and nonchord tones in tonal melodies. We model short-term pitch memory as a gradient frequency neural network, which is a biologically realistic model of auditory neural processing. The model is a dynamical system consisting of a network of tonotopically tuned nonlinear oscillators driven by audio signals. The oscillators interact with each other through nonlinear resonance and lateral inhibition, and the pattern of oscillatory traces emerging from the interactions is taken as a measure of pitch salience. We test the model with a collection of unaccompanied tonal melodies to evaluate it as a feature extractor for chord estimation. We show that chord tones are selectively enhanced in the response of the model, thereby increasing the accuracy of implied harmony estimation. We also find that, like other existing features for chord estimation, the performance of the model can be improved by using segmented input signals. We discuss possible ways to expand the present model into a full chord estimation system within the dynamical systems framework. PMID:28522983

  2. Differential Impact of Visuospatial Working Memory on Rule-based and Information-integration Category Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qiang; Sun, Hailong

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the category learning system is a mechanism with multiple processing systems, and that working memory has different effects on category learning. But how does visuospatial working memory affect perceptual category learning? As there is no definite answer to this question, we conducted three experiments. In Experiment 1, the dual-task paradigm with sequential presentation was adopted to investigate the influence of visuospatial working memory on rule-based and information-integration category learning. The results showed that visuospatial working memory interferes with rule-based but not information-integration category learning. In Experiment 2, the dual-task paradigm with simultaneous presentation was used, in which the categorization task was integrated into the visuospatial working memory task. The results indicated that visuospatial working memory affects information-integration category learning but not rule-based category learning. In Experiment 3, the dual-task paradigm with simultaneous presentation was employed, in which visuospatial working memory was integrated into the category learning task. The results revealed that visuospatial working memory interferes with both rule-based and information-integration category learning. Through these three experiments, we found that, regarding the rule-based category learning, working memory load is the main mechanism by which visuospatial working memory influences the discovery of the category rules. In addition, regarding the information-integration category learning, visual resources mainly operates on the category representation.

  3. Implications of the Declarative/Procedural Model for Improving Second Language Learning: The Role of Memory Enhancement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Michael T.; Lovelett, Jarrett T.

    2018-01-01

    The declarative/procedural (DP) model posits that the learning, storage, and use of language critically depend on two learning and memory systems in the brain: declarative memory and procedural memory. Thus, on the basis of independent research on the memory systems, the model can generate specific and often novel predictions for language. Till…

  4. Qualitative Characteristics of Memories for Real, Imagined, and Media-Based Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ruthanna; Gerrig, Richard J.; Franklin, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    People's memories must be able to represent experiences with multiple types of origins--including the real world and our own imaginations, but also printed texts (prose-based media), movies, and television (screen-based media). This study was intended to identify cues that distinguish prose- and screen-based media memories from each other, as well…

  5. Concept of dynamic memory in economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Valentina V.; Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we discuss a concept of dynamic memory and an application of fractional calculus to describe the dynamic memory. The concept of memory is considered from the standpoint of economic models in the framework of continuous time approach based on fractional calculus. We also describe some general restrictions that can be imposed on the structure and properties of dynamic memory. These restrictions include the following three principles: (a) the principle of fading memory; (b) the principle of memory homogeneity on time (the principle of non-aging memory); (c) the principle of memory reversibility (the principle of memory recovery). Examples of different memory functions are suggested by using the fractional calculus. To illustrate an application of the concept of dynamic memory in economics we consider a generalization of the Harrod-Domar model, where the power-law memory is taken into account.

  6. Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Arthur H.; de Sousa, Marcelo V.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language, and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enabled the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis. PMID:27790611

  7. Mass Spectrometry-based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Henriques Pontes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS have enable the identification and quantification of thousand of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-based Approaches to Understand the Molecular Basis of Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Arthur; de Sousa, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    The central nervous system is responsible for an array of cognitive functions such as memory, learning, language and attention. These processes tend to take place in distinct brain regions; yet, they need to be integrated to give rise to adaptive or meaningful behavior. Since cognitive processes result from underlying cellular and molecular changes, genomics and transcriptomics assays have been applied to human and animal models to understand such events. Nevertheless, genes and RNAs are not the end products of most biological functions. In order to gain further insights toward the understanding of brain processes, the field of proteomics has been of increasing importance in the past years. Advancements in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have enable the identification and quantification of thousand of proteins with high accuracy and sensitivity, fostering a revolution in the neurosciences. Herein, we review the molecular bases of explicit memory in the hippocampus. We outline the principles of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, highlighting the use of this analytical tool to study memory formation. In addition, we discuss MS-based targeted approaches as the future of protein analysis.

  9. Factors influencing shape memory effect and phase transformation behaviour of Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Dunne, D.; Kennon, N.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research work was to investigate the factors influencing the shape memory effect and phase transformation behaviour of three Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys: Fe-28Mn-6Si, Fe-13Mn-5Si-10Cr-6Ni and Fe-20Mn-6Si-7Cr-1Cu. The research results show that the shape memory capacity of Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys varies with annealing temperature, and this effect can be explained in terms of the effect of annealing on γ ε transformation. The nature and concentration of defects in austenite are strongly affected by annealing conditions. A high annealing temperature results in a low density of stacking faults, leading to a low nucleation rate during stress induced γ→ε transformation. The growth of ε martensite plates is favoured rather than the formation of new ε martensite plates. Coarse martensite plates produce high local transformation strains which can be accommodated by local slip deformation, leading to a reduction in the reversibility of the martensitic transformation and to a degradation of the shape memory effect. Annealing at low temperatures (≤673 K) for reasonable times does not eliminate complex defects (dislocation jogs, kinks and vacancy clusters) created by hot and cold working strains. These defects can retard the movement and rearrangement of Shockley partial dislocations, i.e. suppress γ→ε transformation, also leading to a degradation of shape memory effect. Annealing at about 873 K was found to be optimal to form the dislocation structures which are favourable for stress induced martensitic transformation, thus resulting in the best shape memory behaviour. (orig.)

  10. Short-ranged memory model with preferential growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaigorodsky, Ana L.; Perotti, Juan I.; Almeira, Nahuel; Billoni, Orlando V.

    2018-02-01

    In this work we introduce a variant of the Yule-Simon model for preferential growth by incorporating a finite kernel to model the effects of bounded memory. We characterize the properties of the model combining analytical arguments with extensive numerical simulations. In particular, we analyze the lifetime and popularity distributions by mapping the model dynamics to corresponding Markov chains and branching processes, respectively. These distributions follow power laws with well-defined exponents that are within the range of the empirical data reported in ecologies. Interestingly, by varying the innovation rate, this simple out-of-equilibrium model exhibits many of the characteristics of a continuous phase transition and, around the critical point, it generates time series with power-law popularity, lifetime and interevent time distributions, and nontrivial temporal correlations, such as a bursty dynamics in analogy with the activity of solar flares. Our results suggest that an appropriate balance between innovation and oblivion rates could provide an explanatory framework for many of the properties commonly observed in many complex systems.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group-Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0726 TITLE: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group-Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI PRINCIPAL...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Group-Based Modified Story Memory Technique in TBI 5b. GRANT...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Impairments in new learning and memory (NLM

  12. A Probabilistic Model of Social Working Memory for Information Retrieval in Social Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyuan; Xu, Qianli; Gan, Tian; Tan, Cheston; Lim, Joo-Hwee

    2018-05-01

    Social working memory (SWM) plays an important role in navigating social interactions. Inspired by studies in psychology, neuroscience, cognitive science, and machine learning, we propose a probabilistic model of SWM to mimic human social intelligence for personal information retrieval (IR) in social interactions. First, we establish a semantic hierarchy as social long-term memory to encode personal information. Next, we propose a semantic Bayesian network as the SWM, which integrates the cognitive functions of accessibility and self-regulation. One subgraphical model implements the accessibility function to learn the social consensus about IR-based on social information concept, clustering, social context, and similarity between persons. Beyond accessibility, one more layer is added to simulate the function of self-regulation to perform the personal adaptation to the consensus based on human personality. Two learning algorithms are proposed to train the probabilistic SWM model on a raw dataset of high uncertainty and incompleteness. One is an efficient learning algorithm of Newton's method, and the other is a genetic algorithm. Systematic evaluations show that the proposed SWM model is able to learn human social intelligence effectively and outperforms the baseline Bayesian cognitive model. Toward real-world applications, we implement our model on Google Glass as a wearable assistant for social interaction.

  13. Numerical analysis of a polysilicon-based resistive memory device

    KAUST Repository

    Berco, Dan

    2018-03-08

    This study investigates a conductive bridge resistive memory device based on a Cu top electrode, 10-nm polysilicon resistive switching layer and a TiN bottom electrode, by numerical analysis for $$10^{3}$$103 programming and erase simulation cycles. The low and high resistive state values in each cycle are calculated, and the analysis shows that the structure has excellent retention reliability properties. The presented Cu species density plot indicates that Cu insertion occurs almost exclusively along grain boundaries resulting in a confined isomorphic conductive filament that maintains its overall shape and electric properties during cycling. The superior reliability of this structure may thus be attributed to the relatively low amount of Cu migrating into the RSL during initial formation. In addition, the results show a good match and help to confirm experimental measurements done over a previously demonstrated device.

  14. Plant oil-based shape memory polymer using acrylic monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsujimoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the synthesis of a plant oil-based material using acrylic monolith. An acrylic monolith bearing oxirane groups was prepared via simple technique that involved the dissolution of poly(glycidyl methacrylate-comethyl methacrylate (PGMA in ethanolic – aqueous solution by heating and subsequent cooling. The PGMA monolith had topologically porous structure, which was attributed to the phase separation of the polymer solution. The PGMA monolith was impregnated by epoxidized soybean oil (ESO containing thermally-latent catalyst, and the subsequent curing produced a crosslinked material with relatively good transparency. The Young’s modulus and the tensile strength of polyESO/PGMA increased compared with the ESO homopolymer. The strain at break of polyESO/PGMA was larger than that of the ESO homopolymer and crosslinked PGMA. Furthermore, polyESO/PGMA exhibited good shape memory-recovery behavior.

  15. A triple quantum dot based nano-electromechanical memory device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozner, R.; Lifshitz, E.; Peskin, U.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are free-standing nano-structures with chemically tunable electronic properties. This tunability offers intriguing possibilities for nano-electromechanical devices. In this work, we consider a nano-electromechanical nonvolatile memory (NVM) device incorporating a triple quantum dot (TQD) cluster. The device operation is based on a bias induced motion of a floating quantum dot (FQD) located between two bound quantum dots (BQDs). The mechanical motion is used for switching between two stable states, “ON” and “OFF” states, where ligand-mediated effective interdot forces between the BQDs and the FQD serve to hold the FQD in each stable position under zero bias. Considering realistic microscopic parameters, our quantum-classical theoretical treatment of the TQD reveals the characteristics of the NVM

  16. A novel ternary content addressable memory design based on resistive random access memory with high intensity and low search energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Runze; Shen, Wensheng; Huang, Peng; Zhou, Zheng; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng

    2018-04-01

    A novel ternary content addressable memory (TCAM) design based on resistive random access memory (RRAM) is presented. Each TCAM cell consists of two parallel RRAM to both store and search for ternary data. The cell size of the proposed design is 8F2, enable a ∼60× cell area reduction compared with the conventional static random access memory (SRAM) based implementation. Simulation results also show that the search delay and energy consumption of the proposed design at the 64-bit word search are 2 ps and 0.18 fJ/bit/search respectively at 22 nm technology node, where significant improvements are achieved compared to previous works. The desired characteristics of RRAM for implementation of the high performance TCAM search chip are also discussed.

  17. Is prospective memory related to depression and anxiety? A hierarchical MPT modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Nina R; Bayen, Ute J; Böhm, Mateja F

    2015-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) refers to remembering to perform an action in the future. One hundred and twenty-nine students completed a laboratory event-based PM task as well as depression and anxiety questionnaires. The data were analysed with the beta-MPT version of the multinomial processing tree model of event-based PM. Thereby, the prospective and retrospective components of PM were estimated for each participant and were then correlated with depression and anxiety. State anxiety was negatively correlated with the prospective component of PM. Neither depression nor trait anxiety were related to either component of PM.

  18. Translation techniques for distributed-shared memory programming models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Douglas James [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The high performance computing community has experienced an explosive improvement in distributed-shared memory hardware. Driven by increasing real-world problem complexity, this explosion has ushered in vast numbers of new systems. Each new system presents new challenges to programmers and application developers. Part of the challenge is adapting to new architectures with new performance characteristics. Different vendors release systems with widely varying architectures that perform differently in different situations. Furthermore, since vendors need only provide a single performance number (total MFLOPS, typically for a single benchmark), they only have strong incentive initially to optimize the API of their choice. Consequently, only a fraction of the available APIs are well optimized on most systems. This causes issues porting and writing maintainable software, let alone issues for programmers burdened with mastering each new API as it is released. Also, programmers wishing to use a certain machine must choose their API based on the underlying hardware instead of the application. This thesis argues that a flexible, extensible translator for distributed-shared memory APIs can help address some of these issues. For example, a translator might take as input code in one API and output an equivalent program in another. Such a translator could provide instant porting for applications to new systems that do not support the application's library or language natively. While open-source APIs are abundant, they do not perform optimally everywhere. A translator would also allow performance testing using a single base code translated to a number of different APIs. Most significantly, this type of translator frees programmers to select the most appropriate API for a given application based on the application (and developer) itself instead of the underlying hardware.

  19. Bessel functions in mass action modeling of memories and remembrances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Walter J. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3206 (United States); Capolupo, Antonio [Dipartimento di Fisica, E.R. Caianiello Universitá di Salerno, and INFN Gruppo collegato di Salerno, Fisciano 84084 (Italy); Kozma, Robert [Department of Mathematics, Memphis University, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Olivares del Campo, Andrés [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Vitiello, Giuseppe, E-mail: vitiello@sa.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, E.R. Caianiello Universitá di Salerno, and INFN Gruppo collegato di Salerno, Fisciano 84084 (Italy)

    2015-10-02

    Data from experimental observations of a class of neurological processes (Freeman K-sets) present functional distribution reproducing Bessel function behavior. We model such processes with couples of damped/amplified oscillators which provide time dependent representation of Bessel equation. The root loci of poles and zeros conform to solutions of K-sets. Some light is shed on the problem of filling the gap between the cellular level dynamics and the brain functional activity. Breakdown of time-reversal symmetry is related with the cortex thermodynamic features. This provides a possible mechanism to deduce lifetime of recorded memory. - Highlights: • We consider data from observations of impulse responses of cortex to electric shocks. • These data are fitted by Bessel functions which may be represented by couples of damped/amplified oscillators. • We study the data by using couples of damped/amplified oscillators. • We discuss lifetime and other properties of the considered brain processes.

  20. Thermomechanical model for NiTi shape memory wires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frost, Miroslav; Sedlák, Petr; Sippola, M.; Šittner, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2010), s. 1-10 ISSN 0964-1726 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/09/1573; GA ČR(CZ) GP106/09/P302; GA ČR GAP108/10/1296 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : shape memory alloys * modeling * proportional loading Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.094, year: 2010 http://apps.isiknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=WOS&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=3&SID=U2fe5mHN9p3gHClCdF1&page=1&doc=1

  1. A Stochastic Memory Model for ADL Detection in Human Households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Clement

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Many Human Activity Recognition (HAR systems are able to detect sequential executed Activity of Daily Living (ADL. However, a person is capable of doing two things in parallel or pausing one ADL and finishing it later. Thus, a HAR system must be capable of remembering and deciding which ADL is completed and which might be continued after the current ADL. We address this case by combining a stochastic Markov model and a psychological memory function to detect parallel ADL. For the evaluation, we use an input dataset and a publicly available benchmark. Our approach outperforms the leading HAR systems for the used benchmark by 5%, while using a more cost-effective installation environment. Furthermore, we address an unsupervised learning method to train the HAR system and explain the algorithm of parallel ADL detection in detail.

  2. Low-field Switching Four-state Nonvolatile Memory Based on Multiferroic Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, H. M.; Yan, Z. B.; Chan, N. Y.; Au, K.; Wong, C. M.; Leung, C. W.; Zhang, F. Y.; Gao, X. S.; Dai, J. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Multiferroic tunneling junction based four-state non-volatile memories are very promising for future memory industry since this kind of memories hold the advantages of not only the higher density by scaling down memory cell but also the function of magnetically written and electrically reading. In this work, we demonstrate a success of this four-state memory in a material system of NiFe/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 with improved memory characteristics such as lower switching field and larger tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Ferroelectric switching induced resistive change memory with OFF/ON ratio of 16 and 0.3% TMR effect have been achieved in this multiferroic tunneling structure.

  3. The neurobiological bases of memory formation: from physiological conditions to psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaz, Reto; Travaglia, Alessio; Alberini, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    The formation of long-term memories is a function necessary for an adaptive survival. In the last two decades, great progress has been made in the understanding of the biological bases of memory formation. The identification of mechanisms necessary for memory consolidation and reconsolidation, the processes by which the posttraining and postretrieval fragile memory traces become stronger and insensitive to disruption, has indicated new approaches for investigating and treating psychopathologies. In this review, we will discuss some key biological mechanisms found to be critical for memory consolidation and strengthening, the role/s and mechanisms of memory reconsolidation, and how the interference with consolidation and/or reconsolidation can modulate the retention and/or storage of memories that are linked to psychopathologies. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Feature-based memory-driven attentional capture: Visual working memory content affects visual attention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivers, C.N.L.; Meijer, F.; Theeuwes, J.

    2006-01-01

    In 7 experiments, the authors explored whether visual attention (the ability to select relevant visual information) and visual working memory (the ability to retain relevant visual information) share the same content representations. The presence of singleton distractors interfered more strongly

  5. Exploring Neural Network Models with Hierarchical Memories and Their Use in Modeling Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja

    Energy landscapes are often used as metaphors for phenomena in biology, social sciences and finance. Different methods have been implemented in the past for the construction of energy landscapes. Neural network models based on spin glass physics provide an excellent mathematical framework for the construction of energy landscapes. This framework uses a minimal number of parameters and constructs the landscape using data from the actual phenomena. In the past neural network models were used to mimic the storage and retrieval process of memories (patterns) in the brain. With advances in the field now, these models are being used in machine learning, deep learning and modeling of complex phenomena. Most of the past literature focuses on increasing the storage capacity and stability of stored patterns in the network but does not study these models from a modeling perspective or an energy landscape perspective. This dissertation focuses on neural network models both from a modeling perspective and from an energy landscape perspective. I firstly show how the cellular interconversion phenomenon can be modeled as a transition between attractor states on an epigenetic landscape constructed using neural network models. The model allows the identification of a reaction coordinate of cellular interconversion by analyzing experimental and simulation time course data. Monte Carlo simulations of the model show that the initial phase of cellular interconversion is a Poisson process and the later phase of cellular interconversion is a deterministic process. Secondly, I explore the static features of landscapes generated using neural network models, such as sizes of basins of attraction and densities of metastable states. The simulation results show that the static landscape features are strongly dependent on the correlation strength and correlation structure between patterns. Using different hierarchical structures of the correlation between patterns affects the landscape features

  6. Learning Quantum Chemical Model with Learning Media Concept Map and Power Point Viewed from Memory and Creativity Skills Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Wahidi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is experimental, using first class learning a quantum model of learning with concept maps media and the second media using real environments by power point presentation. The population is all class XI Science, number 2 grade. The sampling technique is done by purposive random sampling. Data collection techniques to test for cognitive performance and memory capabilities, with a questionnaire for creativity. Hypothesis testing using three-way ANOVA different cells with the help of software Minitab 15.Based on the results of data processing, concluded: (1 there is no influence of the quantum model of learning with media learning concept maps and real environments for learning achievement chemistry, (2 there is a high impact memory ability and low on student achievement, (3 there is no the effect of high and low creativity in student performance, (4 there is no interaction learning model quantum media learning concept maps and real environments with memory ability on student achievement, (5 there is no interaction learning model quantum media learning concept maps and real environments with creativity of student achievement, (6 there is no interaction memory skills and creativity of student achievement, (7 there is no interaction learning model quantum media learning concept maps and real environments, memory skills, and creativity on student achievement.

  7. The retention characteristics of nonvolatile SNOS memory transistors in a radiation environment: Experiment and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhorter, P.J.; Miller, S.L.; Dellin, T.A.; Axness, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data and a model to accurately and quantitatively predict the data are presented for retention of SNOS memory devices over a wide range of dose rates. A wide range of SNOS stack geometries are examined. The model is designed to aid in screening nonvolatile memories for use in a radiation environment

  8. A Buffer Model of Memory Encoding and Temporal Correlations in Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Melissa; Malmberg, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Atkinson and Shiffrin's (1968) dual-store model of memory includes structural aspects of memory along with control processes. The rehearsal buffer is a process by which items are kept in mind and long-term episodic traces are formed. The model has been both influential and controversial. Here, we describe a novel variant of Atkinson and Shiffrin's…

  9. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular structures...

  10. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular structures...

  11. Experimental characterization and computational modeling of unimorph shape memory polymer actuators incorporating transverse curvature in the substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Jason T.

    This document outlines in detail the research performed by applying shape memory polymers in a generic unimorph actuator configuration. A set of experiments designed to investigate the influence of transverse curvature, the relative widths of shape memory polymer and composite substrates, and shape memory polymer thickness on actuator recoverability after multiple thermo-mechanical cycles is presented in detail. A theoretical model of the moment required to maintain shape fixity with minimal shape retention loss was developed and experimentally validated for unimorph composite actuators of varying cross-sectional areas. Theoretical models were also developed and evaluated to determine the relationship between the materials neutral axes and thermal stability during a thermo-mechanical cycle. Research was conducted on the incorporation of shape memory polymers on micro air vehicle wings to maximize shape fixity and shape recoverability while minimizing the volume of shape memory polymer on the wing surface. Applications based research also included experimentally evaluating the feasibility of shape memory polymers on deployable satellite antenna ribs both with and without resistance heaters which could be utilized to assist in antenna deployment.

  12. Sleep does not cause false memories on a story-based test of suggestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, Elaine; Carter, Neil; McMurtrie, Hazel; Willner, Paul; Blagrove, Mark T

    2017-07-01

    Sleep contributes to the consolidation of memories. This process may involve extracting the gist of learned material at the expense of details. It has thus been proposed that sleep might lead to false memory formation. Previous research examined the effect of sleep on false memory using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Mixed results were found, including increases and decreases in false memory after sleep relative to wake. It has been questioned whether DRM false memories occur by the same processes as real-world false memories. Here, the effect of sleep on false memory was investigated using the Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale. Veridical memory deteriorated after a 12-h period of wake, but not after a 12-h period including a night's sleep. No difference in false memory was found between conditions. Although the literature supports sleep-dependent memory consolidation, the results here call into question extending this to a gist-based false memory effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Event-based prospective memory across the lifespan: Do all age groups benefit from salient prospective memory cues?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretschmer-Trendowicz, A.; Altgassen, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated effects of cognitive control demands on prospective memory (PM) performance across the lifespan. Four different age groups (children, adolescents, young adults, old adults) worked on a computer-based picture categorization task as ongoing activity, while PM cue

  14. Statistical Language Modeling for Historical Documents using Weighted Finite-State Transducers and Long Short-Term Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Al Azawi, Mayce

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop statistical natural language models and processing techniques based on Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN), especially the recently introduced Long Short- Term Memory (LSTM). Due to their adapting and predicting abilities, these methods are more robust, and easier to train than traditional methods, i.e., words list and rule-based models. They improve the output of recognition systems and make them more accessible to users for browsing and reading...

  15. Memories reactivated under ketamine are subsequently stronger: A potential pre-clinical behavioral model of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsberger, Michael J; Taylor, Jane R; Corlett, Philip R

    2015-05-01

    Sub-anesthetic doses of the NMDA antagonist ketamine have been shown to model the formation and stability of delusion in human subjects. The latter has been predicted to be due to aberrant prediction error resulting in enhanced destabilization of beliefs. To extend the scope of this model, we investigated the effect of administration of low dose systemic ketamine on memory in a rodent model of memory reconsolidation. Systemic ketamine was administered either prior to or immediately following auditory fear memory reactivation in rats. Memory strength was assessed by measuring freezing behavior 24h later. Follow up experiments were designed to investigate an effect of pre-reactivation ketamine on short-term memory (STM), closely related memories, and basolateral amygdala (BLA) specific destabilization mechanisms. Rats given pre-reactivation, but not post-reactivation, ketamine showed larger freezing responses 24h later compared to vehicle. This enhancement was not observed 3h after the memory reactivation, nor was it seen in a closely related contextual memory. Prior inhibition of a known destabilization mechanism in the BLA blocked the effect of pre-reactivation ketamine. Pre- but not post-reactivation ketamine enhances fear memory. These data together with recent data in human subjects supports a model of delusion fixity that proposes that aberrant prediction errors result in enhanced destabilization and strengthening of delusional belief. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Testing the effectiveness of group-based memory rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie A; Radford, Kylie

    2014-01-01

    Memory complaints are common after stroke, yet there have been very few studies of the outcome of memory rehabilitation in these patients. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a new manualised, group-based memory training programme. Forty outpatients with a single-stroke history and ongoing memory complaints were enrolled. The six-week course involved education and strategy training and was evaluated using a wait-list crossover design, with three assessments conducted 12 weeks apart. Outcome measures included: tests of anterograde memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test: RAVLT; Complex Figure Test) and prospective memory (Royal Prince Alfred Prospective Memory Test); the Comprehensive Assessment of Prospective Memory (CAPM) questionnaire and self-report of number of strategies used. Significant training-related gains were found on RAVLT learning and delayed recall and on CAPM informant report. Lower baseline scores predicted greater gains for several outcome measures. Patients with higher IQ or level of education showed more gains in number of strategies used. Shorter time since onset was related to gains in prospective memory, but no other stroke-related variables influenced outcome. Our study provides evidence that a relatively brief, group-based training intervention can improve memory functioning in chronic stroke patients and clarified some of the baseline factors that influence outcome.

  17. Adding memory processing behaviors to the fuzzy behaviorist-based navigation of mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pin, F.G.; Bender, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    Most fuzzy logic-based reasoning schemes developed for robot control are fully reactive, i.e., the reasoning modules consist of fuzzy rule bases that represent direct mappings from the stimuli provided by the perception systems to the responses implemented by the motion controllers. Due to their totally reactive nature, such reasoning systems can encounter problems such as infinite loops and limit cycles. In this paper, we proposed an approach to remedy these problems by adding a memory and memory-related behaviors to basic reactive systems. Three major types of memory behaviors are addressed: memory creation, memory management, and memory utilization. These are first presented, and examples of their implementation for the recognition of limit cycles during the navigation of an autonomous robot in a priori unknown environments are then discussed.

  18. FPGA Based Intelligent Co-operative Processor in Memory Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Zaki; Sotudeh, Reza; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing effort to improve computer system performance, Processor-In-Memory (PIM) architecture has emerged as an alternative solution. PIM architecture incorporates computational units and control logic directly on the memory to provide immediate access to the data. To exploit the potentia...

  19. Deficit of the "primacy effect" in parkinsonians interpreted by means of the working memory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Sala, S; Pasetti, C; Sempio, P

    1987-01-01

    29 Parkinsonians and 29 controls matched for age and schooling were tested for memory by means of a free recall test (serial position curve) and two spans (verbal and non-verbal). The free recall test yields three measures: primacy (item 1); secondary memory (items 2-7) and recency (items 8-12). The Parkinsonians displayed a selective deficit of primacy, which is taken to be evidence of defective functioning of the Central Executive in the Working Memory model.

  20. Non-volatile organic transistor memory devices using the poly(4-vinylpyridine)-based supramolecular electrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Y-H; Chiu, Y-C; Lee, W-Y; Chen, W-C

    2015-02-14

    Supramolecular electrets consisting of poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) and conjugated molecules of phenol, 2-naphthol and 2-hydroxyanthracene were investigated for non-volatile transistor memory applications. The memory windows of these supramolecular electret devices were significantly enhanced upon increasing the π-conjugation size of the molecule. A high ON/OFF current ratio of more than 10(7) over 10(4) s was achieved on the supramolecule based memory devices.

  1. Differential Impact of Visuospatial Working Memory on Rule-based and Information-integration Category Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Qiang; Sun, Hailong

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the category learning system is a mechanism with multiple processing systems, and that working memory has different effects on category learning. But how does visuospatial working memory affect perceptual category learning? As there is no definite answer to this question, we conducted three experiments. In Experiment 1, the dual-task paradigm with sequential presentation was adopted to investigate the influence of visuospatial working memory on rule-based ...

  2. Investigation of thermal distortion and control of spacecraft based on shape memory materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongwei; Du, Xingwen; Tan, Huifeng

    2009-07-01

    Gossamer space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space thermal environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna under space thermal environments. To maintain the required accuracy of the reflector under orbital temperature changes, the Gossamer space structures will utilize an active control system, consisting of boundary control actuators and an electrostatic figure control system with a real time closed loop feedback. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with photogrammetric measurement technique and Bragg fiber grating (FBG) sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing small amplitude distortion of Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna based on the active components made of shape memory alloy (SMA) and shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) material. Then, simulations are finished by NASTRAN finite element software with active effect which is considered to be deformation applied on the analytical model. The amplitude of distortion is obtained by the simulations. Both the experimental and numerical solution show that the amplitude of accuracy are developed which proves the feasibility of shape control using shape memory materials and this investigation explores the feasibility of utilizing an active cable based control system of shape memory materials to reduce global distortion due to thermal loading. It is found that through proper assemble of cable lengths and attachment points, significant thermal distortion reduction is achieved. Specifically, radial distortion due to on-orbit thermal loading .

  3. A Multivariate Asymmetric Long Memory Conditional Volatility Model with X, Regularity and Asymptotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe paper derives a Multivariate Asymmetric Long Memory conditional volatility model with Exogenous Variables (X), or the MALMX model, with dynamic conditional correlations, appropriate regularity conditions, and associated asymptotic theory. This enables checking of internal consistency

  4. Working Memory Capacity and Categorization: Individual Differences and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowsky, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Working memory is crucial for many higher-level cognitive functions, ranging from mental arithmetic to reasoning and problem solving. Likewise, the ability to learn and categorize novel concepts forms an indispensable part of human cognition. However, very little is known about the relationship between working memory and categorization, and…

  5. Nonvolatile Perovskite-Based Photomemory with a Multilevel Memory Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jung-Yao; Chiu, Yu-Cheng; Li, Yen-Ting; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Chen, Wen-Chang

    2017-09-01

    Solution-processable organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials with a wealth of exotic semiconducting properties have appeared as the promising front-runners for next-generation electronic devices. Further, regarding its well photoresponsibility, various perovskite-based photosensing devices are prosperously developed in recent years. However, most exploited devices to date only transiently transduce the optical signals into electrical circuits while under illumination, which necessitates using additional converters to further store the output signals for recording the occurrence of light stimulation. Herein, a nonvolatile perovskite-based floating-gate photomemory with a multilevel memory behavior is demonstrated, for which a floating gate comprising a polymer matrix impregnated with perovskite nanoparticles is employed. Owing to the well photoresponsibility introduced by the embedded nanoparticles, the device is enabled to access multiple wavelength response and the functionalities of recording power/time-dependent illumination under no vertical electrical field. Intriguingly, a nonvolatility of photorecording exceeding three months with a high On/Off current ratio over 10 4 can be achieved. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Serial recall of colors: Two models of memory for serial order applied to continuous visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteranderl, Sonja; Oberauer, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of serial position and temporal distinctiveness on serial recall of simple visual stimuli. Participants observed lists of five colors presented at varying, unpredictably ordered interitem intervals, and their task was to reproduce the colors in their order of presentation by selecting colors on a continuous-response scale. To control for the possibility of verbal labeling, articulatory suppression was required in one of two experimental sessions. The predictions were derived through simulation from two computational models of serial recall: SIMPLE represents the class of temporal-distinctiveness models, whereas SOB-CS represents event-based models. According to temporal-distinctiveness models, items that are temporally isolated within a list are recalled more accurately than items that are temporally crowded. In contrast, event-based models assume that the time intervals between items do not affect recall performance per se, although free time following an item can improve memory for that item because of extended time for the encoding. The experimental and the simulated data were fit to an interference measurement model to measure the tendency to confuse items with other items nearby on the list-the locality constraint-in people as well as in the models. The continuous-reproduction performance showed a pronounced primacy effect with no recency, as well as some evidence for transpositions obeying the locality constraint. Though not entirely conclusive, this evidence favors event-based models over a role for temporal distinctiveness. There was also a strong detrimental effect of articulatory suppression, suggesting that verbal codes can be used to support serial-order memory of simple visual stimuli.

  7. Multiscale computer modeling of textured shape memory material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarenkov, D.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    The general aim of this work was to create a computer model, predicting the strain to be accumulated and then recovered by nitinol superelastic textured sheets upon the reversible martensitic transformation. With the aid of an experimental orientation distribution function (ODF), connecting the microscale (grain) and macroscale (semiproduct) levels, it was realized through the following steps. Tensile loading was consecutively applied to the shape memory nitinol sheet in all directions from those rolling to transverse. An external stress was transferred to micro level (each grain), where the crystallographic strain obeying the minimal strain energy condition has been chosen. Then these accumulated deformations were translated backwards to the macrolevel through the orientation distribution function. At this point, to obtain the macrostrain accumulated by the whole sheet, direct weighted summation of grain-accumulated strains was used, i.e., an input from each grain orientation is assumed to be proportional to the corresponding ODF coefficient. The new HELENE model was then validated for its isotropy in a case of the constant ODF; and also for anisotropy effects arising from the typical experimental ODF. It was also demonstrated how the step-by-step texture sharpening continuously increase the strain anisotropy until the complete single crystal strain distribution of the unique grain orientation in the sheet plane. (author)

  8. Neurocognitive architecture of working memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Johan; Vogel, Edward K.; Lansner, Anders; Bergström, Fredrik; Nyberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The crucial role of working memory for temporary information processing and guidance of complex behavior has been recognized for many decades. There is emerging consensus that working memory maintenance results from the interactions among long-term memory representations and basic processes, including attention, that are instantiated as reentrant loops between frontal and posterior cortical areas, as well as subcortical structures. The nature of such interactions can account for capacity limitations, lifespan changes, and restricted transfer after working-memory training. Recent data and models indicate that working memory may also be based on synaptic plasticity, and that working memory can operate on non-consciously perceived information. PMID:26447571

  9. Attending to auditory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jacqueline F; Moscovitch, Morris; Alain, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Attention to memory describes the process of attending to memory traces when the object is no longer present. It has been studied primarily for representations of visual stimuli with only few studies examining attention to sound object representations in short-term memory. Here, we review the interplay of attention and auditory memory with an emphasis on 1) attending to auditory memory in the absence of related external stimuli (i.e., reflective attention) and 2) effects of existing memory on guiding attention. Attention to auditory memory is discussed in the context of change deafness, and we argue that failures to detect changes in our auditory environments are most likely the result of a faulty comparison system of incoming and stored information. Also, objects are the primary building blocks of auditory attention, but attention can also be directed to individual features (e.g., pitch). We review short-term and long-term memory guided modulation of attention based on characteristic features, location, and/or semantic properties of auditory objects, and propose that auditory attention to memory pathways emerge after sensory memory. A neural model for auditory attention to memory is developed, which comprises two separate pathways in the parietal cortex, one involved in attention to higher-order features and the other involved in attention to sensory information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inferring spatial memory and spatiotemporal scaling from GPS data: comparing red deer Cervus elaphus movements with simulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautestad, Arild O; Loe, Leif E; Mysterud, Atle

    2013-05-01

    1. Increased inference regarding underlying behavioural mechanisms of animal movement can be achieved by comparing GPS data with statistical mechanical movement models such as random walk and Lévy walk with known underlying behaviour and statistical properties. 2. GPS data are typically collected with ≥ 1 h intervals not exactly tracking every mechanistic step along the movement path, so a statistical mechanical model approach rather than a mechanistic approach is appropriate. However, comparisons require a coherent framework involving both scaling and memory aspects of the underlying process. Thus, simulation models have recently been extended to include memory-guided returns to previously visited patches, that is, site fidelity. 3. We define four main classes of movement, differing in incorporation of memory and scaling (based on respective intervals of the statistical fractal dimension D and presence/absence of site fidelity). Using three statistical protocols to estimate D and site fidelity, we compare these main movement classes with patterns observed in GPS data from 52 females of red deer (Cervus elaphus). 4. The results show best compliance with a scale-free and memory-enhanced kind of space use; that is, a power law distribution of step lengths, a fractal distribution of the spatial scatter of fixes and site fidelity. 5. Our study thus demonstrates how inference regarding memory effects and a hierarchical pattern of space use can be derived from analysis of GPS data. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  11. Two-bit memory devices based on single-wall carbon nanotubes: demonstration and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ao; Fu Yunyi; Wang Chuan; Guan Lunhui; Liu Jia; Shi Zujin; Gu Zhennan; Huang Ru; Zhang Xing

    2007-01-01

    Two-bit memory devices of SWNTs, based on the hysteresis effect, have been demonstrated for the first time. The pertinent memory behaviours seem to originate from the capacitive effect due to polarization of molecules, especially the surface-bound water molecules on SiO 2 in close proximity to carbon nanotubes. Our investigations are intimately linked with ultrahigh-density memory applications, and possibly go a long way in broadening the memory applications of SWNTs, for example from nonvolatile to volatile cells

  12. Role of samarium additions on the shape memory behavior of iron based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakoor, R.A.; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Kang, Kisuk

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The effect of samarium contents on shape memory behavior has been studied. → Addition of samarium increases the strength, c/a ratio and ε (hcp martensite). → Addition of samarium retards the nucleation of α (bcc martensite). → Improvement in shape memory effect with the increase in samarium contents. - Abstract: The effect of samarium contents on shape memory behavior of iron based shape memory alloys has been studied. It is found that the strength of the alloys increases with the increase in samarium contents. This effect can be attributed to the solid solution strengthening of austenite by samarium addition. It is also noticed that the shape memory effect increases with the increase in samarium contents. This improvement in shape memory effect presumably can be regarded as the effect of improvement in strength, increase in c/a ratio and obstruction of nucleation of α in the microstructure.

  13. Moringa oleifera Mitigates Memory Impairment and Neurodegeneration in Animal Model of Age-Related Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatchada Sutalangka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the preventive strategy against dementia is still essential due to the rapid growth of its prevalence and the limited therapeutic efficacy. Based on the crucial role of oxidative stress in age-related dementia and the antioxidant and nootropic activities of Moringa oleifera, the enhancement of spatial memory and neuroprotection of M. oleifera leaves extract in animal model of age-related dementia was determined. The possible underlying mechanism was also investigated. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–220 g, were orally given M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg at a period of 7 days before and 7 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of AF64A bilaterally. Then, they were assessed memory, neuron density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, and AChE in hippocampus. The results showed that the extract improved spatial memory and neurodegeneration in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of hippocampus together with the decreased MDA level and AChE activity but increased SOD and CAT activities. Therefore, our data suggest that M. oleifera leaves extract is the potential cognitive enhancer and neuroprotectant. The possible mechanism might occur partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the enhanced cholinergic function. However, further explorations concerning active ingredient(s are still required.

  14. A single-system model predicts recognition memory and repetition priming in amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berry, C.J.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Wester, A.J.; Shanks, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    We challenge the claim that there are distinct neural systems for explicit and implicit memory by demonstrating that a formal single-system model predicts the pattern of recognition memory (explicit) and repetition priming (implicit) in amnesia. In the current investigation, human participants with

  15. A computational model of fMRI activity in the intraparietal sulcus that supports visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domijan, Dražen

    2011-12-01

    A computational model was developed to explain a pattern of results of fMRI activation in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) supporting visual working memory for multiobject scenes. The model is based on the hypothesis that dendrites of excitatory neurons are major computational elements in the cortical circuit. Dendrites enable formation of a competitive queue that exhibits a gradient of activity values for nodes encoding different objects, and this pattern is stored in working memory. In the model, brain imaging data are interpreted as a consequence of blood flow arising from dendritic processing. Computer simulations showed that the model successfully simulates data showing the involvement of inferior IPS in object individuation and spatial grouping through representation of objects' locations in space, along with the involvement of superior IPS in object identification through representation of a set of objects' features. The model exhibits a capacity limit due to the limited dynamic range for nodes and the operation of lateral inhibition among them. The capacity limit is fixed in the inferior IPS regardless of the objects' complexity, due to the normalization of lateral inhibition, and variable in the superior IPS, due to the different encoding demands for simple and complex shapes. Systematic variation in the strength of self-excitation enables an understanding of the individual differences in working memory capacity. The model offers several testable predictions regarding the neural basis of visual working memory.

  16. Moderate exercise ameliorates dysregulated hippocampal glycometabolism and memory function in a rat model of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Takeru; Matsui, Takashi; Jesmin, Subrina; Okamoto, Masahiro; Soya, Mariko; Inoue, Koshiro; Liu, Yu-Fan; Torres-Aleman, Ignacio; McEwen, Bruce S; Soya, Hideaki

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes is likely to be an independent risk factor for hippocampal-based memory dysfunction, although this complication has yet to be investigated in detail. As dysregulated glycometabolism in peripheral tissues is a key symptom of type 2 diabetes, it is hypothesised that diabetes-mediated memory dysfunction is also caused by hippocampal glycometabolic dysfunction. If so, such dysfunction should also be ameliorated with moderate exercise by normalising hippocampal glycometabolism, since 4 weeks of moderate exercise enhances memory function and local hippocampal glycogen levels in normal animals. The hippocampal glycometabolism in OLETF rats (model of human type 2 diabetes) was assessed and, subsequently, the effects of exercise on memory function and hippocampal glycometabolism were investigated. OLETF rats, which have memory dysfunction, exhibited higher levels of glycogen in the hippocampus than did control rats, and breakdown of hippocampal glycogen with a single bout of exercise remained unimpaired. However, OLETF rats expressed lower levels of hippocampal monocarboxylate transporter 2 (MCT2, a transporter for lactate to neurons). Four weeks of moderate exercise improved spatial memory accompanied by further increase in hippocampal glycogen levels and restoration of MCT2 expression independent of neurotrophic factor and clinical symptoms in OLETF rats. Our findings are the first to describe detailed profiles of glycometabolism in the type 2 diabetic hippocampus and to show that 4 weeks of moderate exercise improves memory dysfunction in type 2 diabetes via amelioration of dysregulated hippocampal glycometabolism. Dysregulated hippocampal lactate-transport-related glycometabolism is a possible aetiology of type-2-diabetes-mediated memory dysfunction.

  17. Observation of long term potentiation in papain-based memory devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bag, A.

    2014-06-01

    Biological synaptic behavior in terms of long term potentiation has been observed in papain-based (plant protein) memory devices (memristors) for the first time. Improvement in long term potentiation depends on pulse amplitude and width (duration). Continuous/repetitive dc voltage sweep leads to an increase in memristor conductivity leading to a long term memory in the \\'learning\\' processes.

  18. Event-based prospective memory in depression: The impact of cue focality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altgassen, A.M.; Kliegel, M.; Martin, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study is the first to compare event-based prospective memory performance in individuals with depression and healthy controls. The degree to which self-initiated processing is required to perform the prospective memory task was varied. Twenty-eight individuals with depression and 32 healthy

  19. Recall of Remote Episodic Memories Can Appear Deficient because of a Gist-Based Retrieval Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoy, John D.; Weintraub, Sandra; Paller, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    Determining whether patients with amnesia can succeed in remembering their distant past has pivotal implications for theories of memory storage. However, various factors influence recall. We speculated that some patients with anterograde amnesia adopt a gist-based retrieval orientation for memories from all time periods, thereby exaggerating…

  20. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  1. Shape Memory Alloy-Based Periodic Cellular Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II effort will continue to develop and demonstrate an innovative shape memory alloy (SMA) periodic cellular structural technology. Periodic cellular...

  2. Characterization and Modeling of Charge Trapping and Retention in Novel Multi-Dielectric Nonvolatile Semiconductor Memory Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anirban

    This dissertation deals with the synthesis and analysis of new multidielectric memory devices to identify a viable low voltage programmable (5-10V) electrically erasable programmable read only memory (EEPROM) cell for memory densities exceeding 1MB/chip. The memory devices are variations of the triple dielectric silicon dioxide -silicon nitride-silicon dioxide (ONO) structure, where the silicon nitride is the "memory layer". We have developed physically based analytical and numerical models to explain the charge trapping and storage in the scaled down nitride (~100 A) layer. The recombination kinetics in the nitride is modeled with amphoteric traps acting as "memory" centers for electrons and holes injected through the tunneling oxide during programming. We have investigated electron and hole charge separation at the silicon-insulator interface. Surface channel or buried channel transistors can only separate electrons and holes under one gate bias polarity. We have demonstrated, for the first time, charge separation for both gate polarities with the specially designed dual channel (n-buried channel and p-surface channel under the same gate) transistor. We have gained evidence to prove that the memory properties of thin-oxide SONOS devices is dominated by electron and hole recombination in the nitride bulk. We have fabricated ONO memory capacitors and transistors with bottom(tunneling) oxide thicknesses in the range of 15-23A, nitride thicknesses in the range of 50-205A and top(blocking) oxide thicknesses in the range of 17-56A. We have demonstrated 5-10V programming on both uniform and graded(Si-rich composition bounded by N-rich composition) nitride ONO memory devices. We have shown that the graded nitride devices are better than uniform composition nitride for long term (>10 years) charge retention. We have shown that a Au gate electrode reduces electron injection from the gate for large negative gate bias, when compared with Al or n^+ poly gate electrodes. Based

  3. Recent Progress on Modeling Slip Deformation in Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehitoglu, H.; Alkan, S.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of slip deformation in shape memory alloys. The performance of shape memory alloys depends on their slip resistance often quantified through the Critical Resolved Shear Stress (CRSS) or the flow stress. We highlight previous studies that identify the active slip systems and then proceed to show how non-Schmid effects can be dominant in shape memory slip behavior. The work is mostly derived from our recent studies while we highlight key earlier works on slip deformation. We finally discuss the implications of understanding the role of slip on curtailing the transformation strains and also the temperature range over which superelasticity prevails.

  4. PIMS: Memristor-Based Processing-in-Memory-and-Storage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Jeanine

    2018-02-01

    Continued progress in computing has augmented the quest for higher performance with a new quest for higher energy efficiency. This has led to the re-emergence of Processing-In-Memory (PIM) ar- chitectures that offer higher density and performance with some boost in energy efficiency. Past PIM work either integrated a standard CPU with a conventional DRAM to improve the CPU- memory link, or used a bit-level processor with Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) control, but neither matched the energy consumption of the memory to the computation. We originally proposed to develop a new architecture derived from PIM that more effectively addressed energy efficiency for high performance scientific, data analytics, and neuromorphic applications. We also originally planned to implement a von Neumann architecture with arithmetic/logic units (ALUs) that matched the power consumption of an advanced storage array to maximize energy efficiency. Implementing this architecture in storage was our original idea, since by augmenting storage (in- stead of memory), the system could address both in-memory computation and applications that accessed larger data sets directly from storage, hence Processing-in-Memory-and-Storage (PIMS). However, as our research matured, we discovered several things that changed our original direc- tion, the most important being that a PIM that implements a standard von Neumann-type archi- tecture results in significant energy efficiency improvement, but only about a O(10) performance improvement. In addition to this, the emergence of new memory technologies moved us to propos- ing a non-von Neumann architecture, called Superstrider, implemented not in storage, but in a new DRAM technology called High Bandwidth Memory (HBM). HBM is a stacked DRAM tech- nology that includes a logic layer where an architecture such as Superstrider could potentially be implemented.

  5. Long-term working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, K A; Kintsch, W

    1995-04-01

    To account for the large demands on working memory during text comprehension and expert performance, the traditional models of working memory involving temporary storage must be extended to include working memory based on storage in long-term memory. In the proposed theoretical framework cognitive processes are viewed as a sequence of stable states representing end products of processing. In skilled activities, acquired memory skills allow these end products to be stored in long-term memory and kept directly accessible by means of retrieval cues in short-term memory, as proposed by skilled memory theory. These theoretical claims are supported by a review of evidence on memory in text comprehension and expert performance in such domains as mental calculation, medical diagnosis, and chess.

  6. Examining the influence of working memory on updating mental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadao, Derick F; Anderson, Britt; Danckert, James

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately build and update mental representations of our environment depends on our ability to integrate information over a variety of time scales and detect changes in the regularity of events. As such, the cognitive mechanisms that support model building and updating are likely to interact with those involved in working memory (WM). To examine this, we performed three experiments that manipulated WM demands concurrently with the need to attend to regularities in other stimulus properties (i.e., location and shape). That is, participants completed a prediction task while simultaneously performing an n-back WM task with either no load or a moderate load. The distribution of target locations (Experiment 1) or shapes (Experiments 2 and 3) included some level of probabilistic regularity, which, unbeknown to participants, changed abruptly within each block. Moderate WM load hampered the ability to benefit from target regularities and to adapt to changes in those regularities (i.e., the prediction task). This was most pronounced when both prediction and WM requirements shared the same target feature. Our results show that representational updating depends on free WM resources in a domain-specific fashion.

  7. Photo-reactive charge trapping memory based on lanthanide complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiaqing; Lo, Wai-Sum; Zhou, Li; Sun, Qi-Jun; Chan, Chi-Fai; Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Ka-Leung; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Traditional utilization of photo-induced excitons is popularly but restricted in the fields of photovoltaic devices as well as photodetectors, and efforts on broadening its function have always been attempted. However, rare reports are available on organic field effect transistor (OFET) memory employing photo-induced charges. Here, we demonstrate an OFET memory containing a novel organic lanthanide complex Eu(tta)3ppta (Eu(tta)3 = Europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, ppta = 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine), in which the photo-induced charges can be successfully trapped and detrapped. The luminescent complex emits intense red emission upon ultraviolet (UV) light excitation and serves as a trapping element of holes injected from the pentacene semiconductor layer. Memory window can be significantly enlarged by light-assisted programming and erasing procedures, during which the photo-induced excitons in the semiconductor layer are separated by voltage bias. The enhancement of memory window is attributed to the increasing number of photo-induced excitons by the UV light. The charges are stored in this luminescent complex for at least 104 s after withdrawing voltage bias. The present study on photo-assisted novel memory may motivate the research on a new type of light tunable charge trapping photo-reactive memory devices.

  8. The speed of memory errors shows the influence of misleading information: Testing the diffusion model and discrete-state models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starns, Jeffrey J; Dubé, Chad; Frelinger, Matthew E

    2018-05-01

    In this report, we evaluate single-item and forced-choice recognition memory for the same items and use the resulting accuracy and reaction time data to test the predictions of discrete-state and continuous models. For the single-item trials, participants saw a word and indicated whether or not it was studied on a previous list. The forced-choice trials had one studied and one non-studied word that both appeared in the earlier single-item trials and both received the same response. Thus, forced-choice trials always had one word with a previous correct response and one with a previous error. Participants were asked to select the studied word regardless of whether they previously called both words "studied" or "not studied." The diffusion model predicts that forced-choice accuracy should be lower when the word with a previous error had a fast versus a slow single-item RT, because fast errors are associated with more compelling misleading memory retrieval. The two-high-threshold (2HT) model does not share this prediction because all errors are guesses, so error RT is not related to memory strength. A low-threshold version of the discrete state approach predicts an effect similar to the diffusion model, because errors are a mixture of responses based on misleading retrieval and guesses, and the guesses should tend to be slower. Results showed that faster single-trial errors were associated with lower forced-choice accuracy, as predicted by the diffusion and low-threshold models. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Web Based VRML Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.; Sarfraz, M.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a method to connect VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java components in a Web page using EAI (External Authoring Interface), which makes it possible to interactively generate and edit VRML meshes. The meshes used are based on regular grids, to provide an interaction and modeling

  10. Web Based VRML Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.; Banissi, E.; Khosrowshahi, F.; Sarfraz, M.; Ursyn, A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a method to connect VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java components in a Web page using EAI (External Authoring Interface), which makes it possible to interactively generate and edit VRML meshes. The meshes used are based on regular grids, to provide an interaction and modeling

  11. Working Memory and Decision-Making in a Frontoparietal Circuit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John D; Jaramillo, Jorge; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2017-12-13

    Working memory (WM) and decision-making (DM) are fundamental cognitive functions involving a distributed interacting network of brain areas, with the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) at the core. However, the shared and distinct roles of these areas and the nature of their coordination in cognitive function remain poorly understood. Biophysically based computational models of cortical circuits have provided insights into the mechanisms supporting these functions, yet they have primarily focused on the local microcircuit level, raising questions about the principles for distributed cognitive computation in multiregional networks. To examine these issues, we developed a distributed circuit model of two reciprocally interacting modules representing PPC and PFC circuits. The circuit architecture includes hierarchical differences in local recurrent structure and implements reciprocal long-range projections. This parsimonious model captures a range of behavioral and neuronal features of frontoparietal circuits across multiple WM and DM paradigms. In the context of WM, both areas exhibit persistent activity, but, in response to intervening distractors, PPC transiently encodes distractors while PFC filters distractors and supports WM robustness. With regard to DM, the PPC module generates graded representations of accumulated evidence supporting target selection, while the PFC module generates more categorical responses related to action or choice. These findings suggest computational principles for distributed, hierarchical processing in cortex during cognitive function and provide a framework for extension to multiregional models. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Working memory and decision-making are fundamental "building blocks" of cognition, and deficits in these functions are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. These cognitive functions engage distributed networks with prefrontal cortex (PFC) and posterior parietal

  12. Shape memory alloy wire-based smart natural rubber bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayati Dezfuli, F; Shahria Alam, M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two types of smart elastomeric bearings are presented using shape memory alloy (SMA) wires. Due to the unique characteristics of SMAs, such as the superelastic effect and the recentering capability, the residual deformation in SMA-based natural rubber bearings (SMA-NRBs) is significantly reduced whereas the energy dissipation capacity is increased. Two different configurations of SMA wires incorporated in elastomeric bearings are considered. The effect of several parameters, including the shear strain amplitude, the type of SMA, the aspect ratio of the base isolator, the thickness of SMA wire, and the amount of pre-strain in the wires on the performance of SMA-NRBs is investigated. Rubber bearings are composed of natural rubber layers bonded to steel shims as reinforcement. Results show that ferrous SMA wire, FeNiCuAlTaB, with 13.5% superelastic strain and a very low austenite finish temperature (−62 °C), is the best candidate to be used in SMA-NRBs subjected to high shear strain amplitudes. In terms of the lateral flexibility and wire strain level, the smart rubber bearing with a cross configuration of SMA wires is more efficient. Moreover, the cross configuration can be implemented in high-aspect-ratio elastomeric bearings since the strain induced in the wire does not exceed the superelastic range. When cross SMA wires with 2% pre-strain are used in a smart NRB, the dissipated energy is increased by 74% and the residual deformation is decreased by 15%. (paper)

  13. Sleep-based memory processing facilitates grammatical generalization: Evidence from targeted memory reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterink, Laura J; Paller, Ken A

    2017-04-01

    Generalization-the ability to abstract regularities from specific examples and apply them to novel instances-is an essential component of language acquisition. Generalization not only depends on exposure to input during wake, but may also improve offline during sleep. Here we examined whether targeted memory reactivation during sleep can influence grammatical generalization. Participants gradually acquired the grammatical rules of an artificial language through an interactive learning procedure. Then, phrases from the language (experimental group) or stimuli from an unrelated task (control group) were covertly presented during an afternoon nap. Compared to control participants, participants re-exposed to the language during sleep showed larger gains in grammatical generalization. Sleep cues produced a bias, not necessarily a pure gain, suggesting that the capacity for memory replay during sleep is limited. We conclude that grammatical generalization was biased by auditory cueing during sleep, and by extension, that sleep likely influences grammatical generalization in general. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Different effects of color-based and location-based selection on visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Saiki, Jun

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated how feature- and location-based selection influences visual working memory (VWM) encoding and maintenance. In Experiment 1, cue type (color, location) and cue timing (precue, retro-cue) were manipulated in a change detection task. The stimuli were color-location conjunction objects, and binding memory was tested. We found a significantly greater effect for color precues than for either color retro-cues or location precues, but no difference between location pre- and retro-cues, consistent with previous studies (e.g., Griffin & Nobre in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 15, 1176-1194, 2003). We also found no difference between location and color retro-cues. Experiment 2 replicated the color precue advantage with more complex color-shape-location conjunction objects. Only one retro-cue effect was different from that in Experiment 1: Color retro-cues were significantly less effective than location retro-cues in Experiment 2, which may relate to a structural property of multidimensional VWM representations. In Experiment 3, a visual search task was used, and the result of a greater location than color precue effect suggests that the color precue advantage in a memory task is related to the modulation of VWM encoding rather than of sensation and perception. Experiment 4, using a task that required only memory for individual features but not for feature bindings, further confirmed that the color precue advantage is specific to binding memory. Together, these findings reveal new aspects of the interaction between attention and VWM and provide potentially important implications for the structural properties of VWM representations.

  15. Knowledge and method base for shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welp, E.G.; Breidert, J. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute of Engineering Design, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    It is often impossible for design engineers to decide whether it is possible to use shape memory alloys (SMA) for a particular task. In case of a decision to use SMA for product development, design engineers normally do not know in detail how to proceed in a correct and beneficial way. In order to support design engineers who have no previous knowledge about SMA and to assist in the transfer of results from basic research to industrial practice, an essential knowledge and method base has been developed. Through carefully conducted literature studies and patent analysis material and design information could be collected. All information is implemented into a computer supported knowledge and method base that provides design information with a particular focus on the conceptual and embodiment design phase. The knowledge and method base contains solution principles and data about effects, material and manufacturing as well as design guidelines and calculation methods for dimensioning and optimization. A browser-based user interface ensures that design engineers have immediate access to the latest version of the knowledge and method base. In order to ensure a user friendly application, an evaluation with several test users has been carried out. Reactions of design engineers from the industrial sector underline the need for support related to knowledge on SMA. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Fuer Konstrukteure ist es haeufig schwierig zu entscheiden, ob sich der Einsatz von Formgedaechtnislegierungen (FGL) fuer eine bestimmte Aufgabe eignet. Fuer den Fall, dass FGL fuer die Produktentwicklung genutzt werden sollen, besitzen Ingenieure zumeist nur unzureichende Detailkenntnisse, um Formgedaechtnislegierungen richtig und in vorteilhafter Weise anwenden zu koennen. Zur Unterstuetzung von Konstrukteuren, die ueber kein Vorwissen und keine Erfahrungen zu FGL verfuegen und zum Transfer von Forschungsergebnissen in die industrielle Praxis, ist eine

  16. Nonlinear analysis of an improved continuum model considering headway change with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Wang, Jufeng; Ge, Hongxia; Li, Zhipeng

    2018-01-01

    Considering the effect of headway changes with memory, an improved continuum model of traffic flow is proposed in this paper. By means of linear stability theory, the new model’s linear stability with the effect of headway changes with memory is obtained. Through nonlinear analysis, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line. Numerical simulation is carried out to study the improved traffic flow model, which explores how the headway changes with memory affected each car’s velocity, density and energy consumption. Numerical results show that when considering the effects of headway changes with memory, the traffic jams can be suppressed efficiently. Furthermore, research results demonstrate that the effect of headway changes with memory can avoid the disadvantage of historical information, which will improve the stability of traffic flow and minimize car energy consumption.

  17. Why are you telling me that? A conceptual model of the social function of autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alea, Nicole; Bluck, Susan

    2003-03-01

    In an effort to stimulate and guide empirical work within a functional framework, this paper provides a conceptual model of the social functions of autobiographical memory (AM) across the lifespan. The model delineates the processes and variables involved when AMs are shared to serve social functions. Components of the model include: lifespan contextual influences, the qualitative characteristics of memory (emotionality and level of detail recalled), the speaker's characteristics (age, gender, and personality), the familiarity and similarity of the listener to the speaker, the level of responsiveness during the memory-sharing process, and the nature of the social relationship in which the memory sharing occurs (valence and length of the relationship). These components are shown to influence the type of social function served and/or, the extent to which social functions are served. Directions for future empirical work to substantiate the model and hypotheses derived from the model are provided.

  18. A fast and low-power microelectromechanical system-based non-volatile memory device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Park, Seung Joo; Campbell, Eleanor E B; Park, Yung Woo

    2011-01-01

    Several new generation memory devices have been developed to overcome the low performance of conventional silicon-based flash memory. In this study, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile memory design based on the electromechanical motion of a cantilever to provide fast charging and discharging of a floating-gate electrode. The operation is demonstrated by using an electromechanical metal cantilever to charge a floating gate that controls the charge transport through a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. The set and reset currents are unchanged after more than 11 h constant operation. Over 500 repeated programming and erasing cycles were demonstrated under atmospheric conditions at room temperature without degradation. Multinary bit programming can be achieved by varying the voltage on the cantilever. The operation speed of the device is faster than a conventional flash memory and the power consumption is lower than other memory devices.

  19. Air-stable memory array of bistable rectifying diodes based on ferroelectric-semiconductor polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manasvi; Sharifi Dehsari, Hamed; Anwar, Saleem; Asadi, Kamal

    2018-03-01

    Organic bistable diodes based on phase-separated blends of ferroelectric and semiconducting polymers have emerged as promising candidates for non-volatile information storage for low-cost solution processable electronics. One of the bottlenecks impeding upscaling is stability and reliable operation of the array in air. Here, we present a memory array fabricated with an air-stable amine-based semiconducting polymer. Memory diode fabrication and full electrical characterizations were carried out in atmospheric conditions (23 °C and 45% relative humidity). The memory diodes showed on/off ratios greater than 100 and further exhibited robust and stable performance upon continuous write-read-erase-read cycles. Moreover, we demonstrate a 4-bit memory array that is free from cross-talk with a shelf-life of several months. Demonstration of the stability and reliable air operation further strengthens the feasibility of the resistance switching in ferroelectric memory diodes for low-cost applications.

  20. The charge storage characteristics of ZrO2 nanocrystallite-based charge trap nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhen-Jie; Li Rong; Yin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    ZrO 2 nanocrystallite-based charge trap flash memory capacitors incorporating a (ZrO 2 ) 0.6 (SiO 2 ) 0.4 pseudobinary high-k oxide film as the charge trapping layer were prepared and investigated. The precipitation reaction in the charge trapping layer, forming ZrO 2 nanocrystallites during rapid thermal annealing, was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was observed that a ZrO 2 nanocrystallite-based memory capacitor after post-annealing at 850 °C for 60 s exhibits a maximum memory window of about 6.8 V, good endurance and a low charge loss of ∼25% over a period of 10 years (determined by extrapolating the charge loss curve measured experimentally), even at 85 °C. Such 850 °C-annealed memory capacitors appear to be candidates for future nonvolatile flash memory device applications

  1. Memory-based robust adaptive control of a variable length stepping nanomanipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidpourazar, Reza; Jalili, Nader

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents the modeling and memory-based robust adaptive control of a variable length stepping nanomanipulator. A three degree of freedom (3DOF) nanomanipulator with revolute revolute prismatic (RRP) actuator structure, namely here MM3A, is utilized for a variety of nanomanipulation tasks. Unlike widely used Cartesian-structure nanomanipulators, the MM3A is equipped with revolute-piezoelectric actuators which result in outstanding performance for controlling the nanomanipulator's tip alignment during the nanomanipulation process. However, the RRP structure of the nanomanipulator introduces complicity in kinematic and dynamic equations of the system which needs to be addressed in order to control the nanomanipulation process. Dissimilar to the ordinary piezoelectric actuators which provide only a couple of micrometers working range, the piezoelectric actuators utilized in MM3A, namely Nanomotors, provide wide range of action (120° in revolute actuators and 12mm in prismatic actuator) with sub-nano scale precision (0.1 μrad in revolute actuators and 0.25 nm in prismatic actuator). This wide range of action combined with sub-nano scale precision is achieved using a special stick/slip moving principle of the Nanomotors. However, such stick/slip motion results in stepping movement of the MM3A. Hence, due to the RRP structure and stepping movement principle of the MM3A nanomanipulator, controller design for the nanomanipulation process is not a trivial task. In this paper, a novel memory-based robust adaptive controller is proposed to overcome these shortfalls. Following the development of the memory-based robust adaptive controller, numerical simulations of the proposed controller are preformed to demonstrate the positioning performance capability of the controller in nanomanipulation tasks.

  2. The Effects of Emotion on Episodic Memory for TV Commercials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Esther; Friestad, Marian

    Based on the associational nature of memory, the distinction between episodic and semantic memory, and the notion of memory strength, a model was developed of the role of emotion in the memory of television commercials. The model generated the following hypotheses: (1) emotional commercials will more likely be recalled than nonemotional…

  3. Impacts of post-metallization annealing on the memory performance of Ti/HfO2-based resistive memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pang-Shiu; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lee, Heng-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Impacts of post-metallization annealing (PMA) on bipolar resistance switching of Ti/HfO x stacked films were investigated. A Ti capping film as a scavenging layer with assistance of PMA is used to tune the dielectric strength of the 10-nm-thick HfO x layer. The polycrystalline microstructure of 10-nm-thick HfO x seems immune to the temperature of PMA in this work. The initial resistance and forming voltage in the Ti/HfO x devices mitigate as the increment of the annealing temperature. With enough annealing temperature (>450 °C), the device shows a good on/off ratio, high temperature operation ability and robust endurance (>10 6 cycles). Through the reaction between Ti and HfO x at 500 °C, the abundant oxygen ions are depleted from the insulator and the left charge-defects building conductive percolative paths in the dielectric layer. The operation-polarity independence of the form-free HfO x device in initial state is demonstrated. The forming-free memory with initial low resistance of 800 Ω at 0.1 V can be operated with stable bipolar resistance switching via initially positive or negative voltage sweep. The formless device with 10 nm thick HfO x also exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory performances, including enough on/off ratio, improved HRS uniformity and good high temperature retention (3 × 10 4 s at 200 °C). The results of this work suggest that the PMA temperature will affect the memory window and cycling reliability of the Ti/HfO x -based resistive memory. Optimum temperature (450 °C) will improve the memory performance of the Ti/HfO x stacked layer. (paper)

  4. The Interplay of Hippocampus and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Memory-Based Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina A. Weilbächer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory and value-based decision making are two central and intensively studied research domains in cognitive neuroscience, but we are just beginning to understand how they interact to enable memory-based decisions. The two brain regions that have been associated with episodic memory and value-based decision making are the hippocampus and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, respectively. In this review article, we first give an overview of these brain–behavior associations and then focus on the mechanisms of potential interactions between the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex that have been proposed and tested in recent neuroimaging studies. Based on those possible interactions, we discuss several directions for future research on the neural and cognitive foundations of memory-based decision making.

  5. Quantum dissipation from power-law memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2012-01-01

    A new quantum dissipation model based on memory mechanism is suggested. Dynamics of open and closed quantum systems with power-law memory is considered. The processes with power-law memory are described by using integration and differentiation of non-integer orders, by methods of fractional calculus. An example of quantum oscillator with linear friction and power-law memory is considered. - Highlights: ► A new quantum dissipation model based on memory mechanism is suggested. ► The generalization of Lindblad equation is considered. ► An exact solution of generalized Lindblad equation for quantum oscillator with linear friction and power-law memory is derived.

  6. Cooperation in memory-based prisoner's dilemma game on interdependent networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Liu, Hong; Shao, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Memory or so-called experience normally plays the important role to guide the human behaviors in real world, that is essential for rational decisions made by individuals. Hence, when the evolutionary behaviors of players with bounded rationality are investigated, it is reasonable to make an assumption that players in system are with limited memory. Besides, in order to unravel the intricate variability of complex systems in real world and make a highly integrative understanding of their dynamics, in recent years, interdependent networks as a comprehensive network structure have obtained more attention in this community. In this article, the evolution of cooperation in memory-based prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) on interdependent networks composed by two coupled square lattices is studied. Herein, all or part of players are endowed with finite memory ability, and we focus on the mutual influence of memory effect and interdependent network reciprocity on cooperation of spatial PDG. We show that the density of cooperation can be significantly promoted within an optimal region of memory length and interdependent strength. Furthermore, distinguished by whether having memory ability/external links or not, each kind of players on networks would have distinct evolutionary behaviors. Our work could be helpful to understand the emergence and maintenance of cooperation under the evolution of memory-based players on interdependent networks.

  7. A review on the neural bases of episodic odor memory: from laboratory-based to autobiographical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saive, Anne-Lise; Royet, Jean-Pierre; Plailly, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Odors are powerful cues that trigger episodic memories. However, in light of the amount of behavioral data describing the characteristics of episodic odor memory, the paucity of information available on the neural substrates of this function is startling. Furthermore, the diversity of experimental paradigms complicates the identification of a generic episodic odor memory network. We conduct a systematic review of the literature depicting the current state of the neural correlates of episodic odor memory in healthy humans by placing a focus on the experimental approaches. Functional neuroimaging data are introduced by a brief characterization of the memory processes investigated. We present and discuss laboratory-based approaches, such as odor recognition and odor associative memory, and autobiographical approaches, such as the evaluation of odor familiarity and odor-evoked autobiographical memory. We then suggest the development of new laboratory-ecological approaches allowing for the controlled encoding and retrieval of specific multidimensional events that could open up new prospects for the comprehension of episodic odor memory and its neural underpinnings. While large conceptual differences distinguish experimental approaches, the overview of the functional neuroimaging findings suggests relatively stable neural correlates of episodic odor memory. PMID:25071494

  8. Social importance enhances prospective memory: evidence from an event-based task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Stefan; Meier, Beat

    2017-07-01

    Prospective memory performance can be enhanced by task importance, for example by promising a reward. Typically, this comes at costs in the ongoing task. However, previous research has suggested that social importance (e.g., providing a social motive) can enhance prospective memory performance without additional monitoring costs in activity-based and time-based tasks. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of social importance in an event-based task. We compared four conditions: social importance, promising a reward, both social importance and promising a reward, and standard prospective memory instructions (control condition). The results showed enhanced prospective memory performance for all importance conditions compared to the control condition. Although ongoing task performance was slowed in all conditions with a prospective memory task when compared to a baseline condition with no prospective memory task, additional costs occurred only when both the social importance and reward were present simultaneously. Alone, neither social importance nor promising a reward produced an additional slowing when compared to the cost in the standard (control) condition. Thus, social importance and reward can enhance event-based prospective memory at no additional cost.

  9. Optimized dynamical decoupling in a model quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biercuk, Michael J; Uys, Hermann; VanDevender, Aaron P; Shiga, Nobuyasu; Itano, Wayne M; Bollinger, John J

    2009-04-23

    Any quantum system, such as those used in quantum information or magnetic resonance, is subject to random phase errors that can dramatically affect the fidelity of a desired quantum operation or measurement. In the context of quantum information, quantum error correction techniques have been developed to correct these errors, but resource requirements are extraordinary. The realization of a physically tractable quantum information system will therefore be facilitated if qubit (quantum bit) error rates are far below the so-called fault-tolerance error threshold, predicted to be of the order of 10(-3)-10(-6). The need to realize such low error rates motivates a search for alternative strategies to suppress dephasing in quantum systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate massive suppression of qubit error rates by the application of optimized dynamical decoupling pulse sequences, using a model quantum system capable of simulating a variety of qubit technologies. We demonstrate an analytically derived pulse sequence, UDD, and find novel sequences through active, real-time experimental feedback. The latter sequences are tailored to maximize error suppression without the need for a priori knowledge of the ambient noise environment, and are capable of suppressing errors by orders of magnitude compared to other existing sequences (including the benchmark multi-pulse spin echo). Our work includes the extension of a treatment to predict qubit decoherence under realistic conditions, yielding strong agreement between experimental data and theory for arbitrary pulse sequences incorporating nonidealized control pulses. These results demonstrate the robustness of qubit memory error suppression through dynamical decoupling techniques across a variety of qubit technologies.

  10. Modeling of mechanical properties for ferrous shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Manabu; Ide, Yusuke; Mizote, Shinichiro; Naoi, Hisashi; Tsukimori, Kazuyuki

    2002-08-01

    In order to acquire technical data that are necessary for manufacture and design of the simulation test device for analyzing the core mechanics of Fast Breeder Reactor, ferrous shape memory alloy of Fe-28%Mn-6%Si-5%Cr is melted, forged and heat-treated. The microstructures are austenite. The specimens are deformed of up to 16% work-strain by tensile and compressive test, resulting in appearance of epsilon-martensite that is induced by stress. Then, heating at 673K for 10 minutes causes austenitic transformation from epsilon-martensite and shape memory strains are measured. We also investigate shape memory character of specimens, which are given, so called 'training treatment' of 5% pre-strain and recovery heat treatment. As a result, there is little difference between tensile and compressive test without training treatment and shape memory strain is 2% after being given 5% work-strain and recovery heat treatment. On the other hand, training treatment is remarkable and shape memory strain reaches to 3.7% after 5% work-strain. We analyze shape recovery character of this alloy specimen at three-point bending by using finite element method, and indicate possibility that its deformation behavior can be estimated from mechanical properties' data obtained at tensile and compressive test. (author)

  11. The Effects of Age and Cue-Action Reminders on Event-Based Prospective Memory Performance in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegel, Matthias; Jager, Theodor

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated event-based prospective memory in five age groups of preschoolers (i.e., 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds). Applying a laboratory-controlled prospective memory procedure, the data showed that event-based prospective memory performance improves across the preschool years, at least between 3 and 6 years of age. However,…

  12. Radiation Hardened Nanobridge based Non-volatile Memory for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I SBIR program would develop and demonstrate radiation hardened nanobridge based non-volatile memory (NVM) for space applications. Specifically, we...

  13. Time-based prospective memory difficulties in children with ADHD and the role of time perception and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioni, Giovanna; Santon, Silvia; Stablum, Franca; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2017-07-01

    Time-based prospective memory (PM) is the ability to remember to perform an intended action at a given time in the future. It is a competence that is crucial for effective performance in everyday life and may be one of the main causes of problems for individuals who have difficulty in planning and organizing their life, such as children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study systematically examines different aspects of time-based PM performance in a task that involves taking an action at a given future time in a group of 23 children with ADHD who were compared with a matched group of typically-developing (TD) children. The children were asked to watch a cartoon and then answer a questionnaire about its content (ongoing task). They were also asked to press a key every 2 minutes while watching the cartoon (PM task). The relationships of time perception and verbal working memory with PM performance were examined by administering appropriate tasks. The results showed that the children with ADHD were less accurate than the TD children in the PM task and exhibited less strategic time-monitoring behavior. Time perception was found to predict PM accuracy, whereas working memory was mainly involved in time-monitoring behavior, but this applied more to the TD group than to the ADHD group, suggesting that children with ADHD are less able to use their cognitive resources when meeting a PM request.

  14. Optimization of pentacene double floating gate memories based on charge injection regulated by SAM functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Guérin, D.; Lenfant, S.; Lmimouni, K.

    2018-02-01

    Pentacene based double nano-floating gate memories (NFGM) by using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets as charge trapping layers are prepared and demonstrated. Particularly, the NFGM chemically treated by 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzenethiol (PFBT) self-assembled monolayers (SAM) exhibits excellent memory performances, including high mobility of 0.23 cm2V-1s-1, the large memory window of 51 V, and the stable retention property more than 108 s. Comparing the performances of NFGM without treating with PFBT SAM, the improving performances of the memory devices by SAM modification are explained by the increase of charge injection, which could be further investigated by XPS and UPS. In particular, the results highlight the utility of SAM modulations and controlling of charge transport in the development of organic transistor memories.

  15. Thermomechanical treatment and deformation behavior of iron based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakoor, R.A.; Khalid, F.A.; Draper, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    The thermomechanical treatment (training) and deformation behavior of iron based shape memory alloys have been studied. The thermomechanical treatment results in improvement of shape memory effect. This improvement in shape memory effect can be attributed to the formation of lamellar structure of (lambda)/(epsilon) and to an increase in the volume fraction of epsilon martensite (epsilon). It is also found that excessive training may result in the nucleation of bcc martensite (alpha) along with epsilon martensite (epsilon) which degrades the shape memory effect. Also the shape memory effect decreases with the increase in amount of strain, which presumably can be regarded as the effect of increasing tendency of deformation to occur through slip and formation of (alpha) which reduces the reversibility of (epsilon) into (lambda). (author)

  16. Optimization of pentacene double floating gate memories based on charge injection regulated by SAM functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pentacene based double nano-floating gate memories (NFGM by using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs and reduced graphene oxide (rGO sheets as charge trapping layers are prepared and demonstrated. Particularly, the NFGM chemically treated by 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzenethiol (PFBT self-assembled monolayers (SAM exhibits excellent memory performances, including high mobility of 0.23 cm2V-1s-1, the large memory window of 51 V, and the stable retention property more than 108 s. Comparing the performances of NFGM without treating with PFBT SAM, the improving performances of the memory devices by SAM modification are explained by the increase of charge injection, which could be further investigated by XPS and UPS. In particular, the results highlight the utility of SAM modulations and controlling of charge transport in the development of organic transistor memories.

  17. Model Based Temporal Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Marla J.; Spinrad, Paul R.; Fall, Thomas C.

    1988-03-01

    Systems that assess the real world must cope with evidence that is uncertain, ambiguous, and spread over time. Typically, the most important function of an assessment system is to identify when activities are occurring that are unusual or unanticipated. Model based temporal reasoning addresses both of these requirements. The differences among temporal reasoning schemes lies in the methods used to avoid computational intractability. If we had n pieces of data and we wanted to examine how they were related, the worst case would be where we had to examine every subset of these points to see if that subset satisfied the relations. This would be 2n, which is intractable. Models compress this; if several data points are all compatible with a model, then that model represents all those data points. Data points are then considered related if they lie within the same model or if they lie in models that are related. Models thus address the intractability problem. They also address the problem of determining unusual activities if the data do not agree with models that are indicated by earlier data then something out of the norm is taking place. The models can summarize what we know up to that time, so when they are not predicting correctly, either something unusual is happening or we need to revise our models. The model based reasoner developed at Advanced Decision Systems is thus both intuitive and powerful. It is currently being used on one operational system and several prototype systems. It has enough power to be used in domains spanning the spectrum from manufacturing engineering and project management to low-intensity conflict and strategic assessment.

  18. An informatics approach to transformation temperatures of NiTi-based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Dezhen; Xue, Deqing; Yuan, Ruihao; Zhou, Yumei; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun; Lookman, Turab

    2017-01-01

    The martensitic transformation serves as the basis for applications of shape memory alloys (SMAs). The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions of the transformation temperature of SMAs is therefore of much practical importance. In this study, we demonstrate that a statistical learning approach using three features or material descriptors related to the chemical bonding and atomic radii of the elements in the alloys, provides a means to predict transformation temperatures. Together with an adaptive design framework, we show that iteratively learning and improving the statistical model can accelerate the search for SMAs with targeted transformation temperatures. The possible mechanisms underlying the dependence of the transformation temperature on these features is discussed based on a Landau-type phenomenological model.

  19. A single-system model predicts recognition memory and repetition priming in amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Christopher J; Kessels, Roy P C; Wester, Arie J; Shanks, David R

    2014-08-13

    We challenge the claim that there are distinct neural systems for explicit and implicit memory by demonstrating that a formal single-system model predicts the pattern of recognition memory (explicit) and repetition priming (implicit) in amnesia. In the current investigation, human participants with amnesia categorized pictures of objects at study and then, at test, identified fragmented versions of studied (old) and nonstudied (new) objects (providing a measure of priming), and made a recognition memory judgment (old vs new) for each object. Numerous results in the amnesic patients were predicted in advance by the single-system model, as follows: (1) deficits in recognition memory and priming were evident relative to a control group; (2) items judged as old were identified at greater levels of fragmentation than items judged new, regardless of whether the items were actually old or new; and (3) the magnitude of the priming effect (the identification advantage for old vs new items) overall was greater than that of items judged new. Model evidence measures also favored the single-system model over two formal multiple-systems models. The findings support the single-system model, which explains the pattern of recognition and priming in amnesia primarily as a reduction in the strength of a single dimension of memory strength, rather than a selective explicit memory system deficit. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410963-12$15.00/0.

  20. Phases stability of shape memory alloys Cu based under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelaya, Maria Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on the relative phase stability of phases related by a martensitic transformation in copper based shape memory alloys were studied in this work.Different kind of particles and energies were employed in the irradiation experiments.The first kind of irradiation was performed with 2,6 MeV electrons, the second one with 170 keV and 300 keV Cu ions and the third one with swift heavy ions (Kr, Xe, Au) with energies between 200 and 600 MeV.Stabilization of the 18 R martensite in Cu-Zn-Al-Ni induced by electron irradiation was studied.The results were compared to those of the stabilization induced by quenching and ageing in the same alloy, and the ones obtained by irradiation in 18 R-Cu-Zn-Al alloys.The effects of Cu irradiation over b phase were analyzed with several electron microscopy techniques including: scanning electron microscopy (S E M), high resolution electron microscopy (H R E M), micro diffraction and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (E D S). Structural changes in Cu-Zn-Al b phase into a closed packed structure were induced by Cu ion implantation.The closed packed structures depend on the irradiation fluence.Based on these results, the interface between these structures (closed packed and b) and the stability of disordered phases were analyzed. It was also compared the evolution of long range order in the Cu-Zn-Al and in the Cu-Zn-Al-Ni b phase as a function of fluence.The evolution of the g phase was also compared. Both results were discussed in terms of the mobility of irradiation induced point defects.Finally, the effects induced by swift heavy ions in b phase and 18 R martensite were studied. The results of the irradiation in b phase were qualitatively similar to those produced by irradiation with lower energies. On the contrary, nano metric defects were found in the irradiated 18 R martensite.These defects were characterized by H R E M.The characteristic contrast of the defects was associated to a local change in the

  1. NI Based System for Seu Testing of Memory Chips for Avionics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boruzdina Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of implementation of National Instrument based system for Single Event Upset testing of memory chips into neutron generator experimental facility, which used for SEU tests for avionics purposes. Basic SEU testing algorithm with error correction and constant errors detection is presented. The issues of radiation shielding of NI based system are discussed and solved. The examples of experimental results show the applicability of the presented system for SEU memory testing under neutrons influence.

  2. Dynamic Delayed Duplicate Detection for External Memory Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelista, Sami

    2008-01-01

    Duplicate detection is an expensive operation of disk-based model checkers. It consists of comparing some potentially new states, the candidate states, to previous visited states. We propose a new approach to this technique called dynamic delayed duplicate detection. This one exploits some typical...

  3. Memory-Based Quantity Discrimination in Coyotes (Canis latrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salif Mahamane

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that the ratio between competing quantities of food significantly mediates coyotes‘ (Canis latrans ability to choose the larger of two food options. These previous findings are consistent with predictions made by Weber‘s Law and indicate that coyotes possess quantity discrimination abilities that are similar to other species. Importantly, coyotes‘ discrimination abilities are similar to domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris, indicating that quantitative discrimination may remain stable throughout certain species‘ evolution. However, while previously shown in two domestic dogs, it is unknown whether coyotes possess the ability to discriminate visual quantities from memory. Here, we address this question by displaying different ratios of food quantities to 14 coyotes before placing the choices out of sight. The coyotes were then allowed to select one of either non-visible food quantities. Coyotes‘ discrimination of quantity from memory does not follow Weber‘s Law in this particular task. These results suggest that working memory in coyotes may not be adapted to maintain information regarding quantity as well as in domestic dogs. The likelihood of a coyote‘s choosing the large option increased when it was presented with difficult ratios of food options first, before it was later presented with trials using more easily discriminable ratios, and when the large option was placed on one particular side. This suggests that learning or motivation increased across trials when coyotes experienced difficult ratios first, and that location of food may have been more salient in working memory than quantity of food.

  4. Ferroelectric memory based on molybdenum disulfide and ferroelectric hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Wui Chung; Jiang, Hao; Xia, Qiangfei; Zhu, Wenjuan

    Recently, ferroelectric hafnium oxide (HfO2) was discovered as a new type of ferroelectric material with the advantages of high coercive field, excellent scalability (down to 2.5 nm), and good compatibility with CMOS processing. In this work, we demonstrate, for the first time, 2D ferroelectric memories with molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as the channel material and aluminum doped HfO2 as the ferroelectric gate dielectric. A 16 nm thick layer of HfO2, doped with 5.26% aluminum, was deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), then subjected to rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 1000 °C, and the polarization-voltage characteristics of the resulting metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitors were measured, showing a remnant polarization of 0.6 μC/cm2. Ferroelectric memories with embedded ferroelectric hafnium oxide stacks and monolayer MoS2 were fabricated. The transfer characteristics after program and erase pulses revealed a clear ferroelectric memory window. In addition, endurance (up to 10,000 cycles) of the devices were tested and effects associated with ferroelectric materials, such as the wake-up effect and polarization fatigue, were observed. This research can potentially lead to advances of 2D materials in low-power logic and memory applications.

  5. Phase change memory based on SnSe4 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karanja, J.M.; Karimi, P.M.; Njoroge, W.K.; Wamwangi, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    A phase change alloy has been synthesized and characterized. The reversible phase transitions between amorphous and crystalline states of SnSe 4 films have been studied using variable electrical pulses and X-ray diffraction. Temperature dependent sheet resistance measurements have shown two distinct resistivity states of more than two orders of magnitude. This high electrical contrast makes the alloy suitable for nonvolatile phase change memory applications. X-ray diffraction has attributed the large electrical contrast to an amorphous–crystalline phase transition. The nonvolatile memory cells have been fabricated using a simple sandwich structure (metal/chalcogenide thin film/metal). A threshold voltage of 3.71 V has been determined for this phase change random access memory cell. Memory switching was initiated using the voltage pulses of 3.71 V, 90 ns, 1.3 V and 26 μs, for the crystallization and amorphization process, respectively. - Highlights: ► Phase transition of SnSe 4 alloys with high set resistivity of 1.43 Ωm ► High transition temperatures of 174 °C ► Transition due to amorphous–crystalline changes ► Threshold switching at a high threshold voltage of 3.71 V

  6. A Chinese Chan-based Mind-Body Intervention Improves Memory of Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S. Chan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the adoption of lifestyle interventions to remediate age-related declines in memory functioning and physical and psychological health among older adults. This study aimed to investigate whether a Chinese Chan-based lifestyle intervention, the Dejian Mind-Body Intervention (DMBI, leads to positive benefits for memory functioning in older adults. Fifty-six adults aged 60 years or older with subjective memory complaints (SMC were randomly assigned to receive the DMBI or a control intervention (i.e., a conventional memory intervention; MI once a week for 10 weeks; 48 of the adults completed the intervention. Participants’ verbal and visual memory functioning before and after the intervention were compared. In addition, changes in the participants’ subjective feelings about their memory performance and physical and psychological health after the intervention were examined. The results showed that both the DMBI and MI resulted in significant improvements in both verbal and visual memory functioning and that the extent of the improvements was correlated with participants’ level of performance at baseline. In addition, compared to the MI group, the DMBI group had significantly greater improvements in subjective physical and psychological health after the intervention. In summary, the present findings support the potential of the DMBI as an alternative lifestyle intervention for improving memory functioning, subjective physical and psychological health of older adults with SMC.

  7. Dietary inflammatory index and memory function: population-based national sample of elderly Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Emily; Shivappa, Nitin; Mann, Joshua R; Hébert, James R; Wirth, Michael D; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between dietary inflammatory potential and memory and cognitive functioning among a representative sample of the US older adult population. Cross-sectional data from the 2011-2012 and 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were utilised to identify an aggregate sample of adults 60-85 years of age (n 1723). Dietary inflammatory index (DII®) scores were calculated using 24-h dietary recall interviews. Three memory-related assessments were employed, including the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD) Word Learning subset, the Animal Fluency test and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST). Inverse associations were observed between DII scores and the different memory parameters. Episodic memory (CERAD) (b adjusted=-0·39; 95 % CI -0·79, 0·00), semantic-based memory (Animal Fluency Test) (b adjusted=-1·18; 95 % CI -2·17, -0·20) and executive function and working-memory (DSST) (b adjusted=-2·80; 95 % CI -5·58, -0·02) performances were lowest among those with the highest mean DII score. Though inverse relationships were observed between DII scores and memory and cognitive functioning, future work is needed to further explore the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the complex relationship between inflammation-related dietary behaviour and memory and cognition.

  8. Shape memory alloy-based small crawling robots inspired by C. elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Honggu; Jo, Sungho, E-mail: shjo@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: j_shin@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Computer Science, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Inspired by its simple musculature, actuation and motion mechanisms, we have developed a small crawling robot that closely mimics the model organism of our choice: Caenorhabditis elegans. A thermal shape memory alloy (SMA) was selected as an actuator due to the similarities of its properties to C. elegans muscles. Based on the anatomy of C. elegans, a 12-unit robot was designed to generate a sinusoidal undulating motion. Each body unit consisting of a pair of SMA actuators is serially connected by rigid links with an embedded motion control circuit. A simple binary operation-based motion control mechanism was implemented using a microcontroller. The assembled robot can execute C. elegans-like motion with a 0.17 Hz undulation frequency. Its motion is comparable to that of a real worm.

  9. Breaking boundaries: optimizing reconsolidation-based interventions for strong and old memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, James W B; Kindt, Merel

    2017-09-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that consolidated memories can enter a temporary labile state after reactivation, requiring restabilization in order to persist. This process, known as reconsolidation, potentially allows for the modification and disruption of memory. Much interest in reconsolidation stems from the possibility that maladaptive memory traces-a core feature of several psychiatric conditions-could be tackled by disrupting their reconsolidation. However, research has indicated a range of supposed boundary conditions on the induction of reconsolidation. Stronger memories, often resulting from exposure to stressful conditions, or older memories, appear to be relatively resistant to undergoing reconsolidation. This may be taken as a potential stumbling block for reconsolidation-based interventions: in clinical practice, old and strong maladaptive memories are the norm rather than the exception. Yet, boundary conditions have been derived from limited experimental evidence, are not unique to reconsolidation-based interventions, and do not seem to be absolute. In this paper, we review a range of experimental studies that have aimed to disrupt old memories, or memories that were strengthened by stress manipulations, through reconsolidation. Such research highlights several techniques that could be used to optimize reconsolidation-based approaches and overcome putative boundary conditions. We supplement this review of experimental literature with a case study of a reconsolidation-based treatment of a strong and decades-old phobia for mice, further suggesting that age and strength of memory may not be insurmountable barriers. Translating findings from basic science, to human experiments, to clinical applications and back again, can potentially unlock powerful new treatments for the many people who suffer daily from anxiety disorders. © 2017 Elsey and Kindt; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Thermomechanical behavior of thermoset shape memory polymer programmed by cold-compression: Testing and constitutive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Xu, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Programming is a key process for thermally activated stress or strain recovery of shape memory polymers (SMPs). Typically, programming requires an initial heating above the glass transition temperature ( Tg), subsequent cooling below Tg and removal of the applied load, in order to fix a temporary shape. This work adopted a new approach to program thermoset SMPs directly at temperatures well below Tg, which effectively simplified the shape fixing process. 1-D compression programming below Tg and free shape recovery of a thermoset SMP were experimentally investigated. Functional stability of the shape fixity under various environmental attacks was also experimentally evaluated. A mechanism-based thermoviscoelastic-thermoviscoplastic constitutive model incorporating structural and stress relaxation was then developed to predict the nonlinear shape memory behavior of the SMP trained below Tg. Comparison between the prediction and the experiment showed good agreement. The structure dependence of the thermomechanical behavior of the SMP was further discussed through a parametric study per the validated constitutive model. This study validates that programming by cold-compression is a viable alternative for thermally responsive thermoset SMPs.

  11. Deception and Cognitive Load: Expanding our Horizon with a Working Memory Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Ludwig Sporer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Deception and Cognitive Load: Expanding our Horizon with a Working Memory ModelAbstractRecently, studies on deception and its detection have increased dramatically. Many of these studies rely on the cognitive load approach as the sole explanatory principle to understand deception. These studies have been exclusively on lies about negative actions (usually lies of suspects of [mock] crimes. Instead, we need to re-focus more generally on the cognitive processes involved in generating both lies and truths, not just on manipulations of cognitive load. Using Baddeley's (2000, 2007, 2012 working memory model, which integrates verbal and visual processes in working memory with retrieval from long-term memory and control of action, not only verbal content cues but also nonverbal, paraverbal and linguistic cues can be investigated within a single framework. The proposed model considers long-term semantic, episodic and autobiographical memory and their connections with working memory and action. It also incorporates ironic processes of mental control (Wegner, 1994, 2009, the role of scripts and schemata and retrieval cues and retrieval processes. Specific predictions of the model are outlined and support from selective studies is presented. The model is applicable to different types of reports, particularly about lies and truths about complex events, and to different modes of production (oral, hand-written, typed. Predictions regarding several moderator variables and methods to investigate them are proposed.

  12. A phenomenological two-phase constitutive model for porous shape memory alloys

    KAUST Repository

    El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2012-07-01

    We present a two-phase constitutive model for pseudoelastoplastic behavior of porous shape memory alloys (SMAs). The model consists of a dense SMA phase and a porous plasticity phase. The overall response of the porous SMA is obtained by a weighted average of responses of individual phases. Based on the chosen constitutive model parameters, the model incorporates the pseudoelastic and pseudoplastic behavior simultaneously (commonly reported for porous SMAs) as well as sequentially (i.e. dense SMAs; pseudoelastic deformation followed by the pseudoplastic deformation until failure). The presented model also incorporates failure due to the deviatoric (shear band formation) and volumetric (void growth and coalescence) plastic deformation. The model is calibrated by representative volume elements (RVEs) with different sizes of spherical voids that are solved by unit cell finite element calculations. The overall response of the model is tested against experimental results from literature. Finally, application of the presented constitutive model has been presented by performing finite element simulations of the deformation and failure in unaixial dog-bone shaped specimen and compact tension (CT) test specimen. Results show a good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reorganization of pathological control functions of memory-A neural model for tissue healing by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, Othmar

    2005-04-01

    Since 1980 shock waves have proven effective in the field of extracorporeal lithotripsy. More than 10 years ago shock waves were successfully applied for various indications such as chronic pain, non-unions and, recently, for angina pectoris. These fields do not profit from the disintegration power but from stimulating and healing effects of shock waves. Increased metabolism and neo-vascularization are reported after shock wave application. According to C. J. Wang, a biological cascade is initiated, starting with a stimulating effect of physical energy resulting in increased circulation and metabolism. Pathological memory of neural control patterns is considered the reason for different pathologies characterized by insufficient metabolism. This paper presents a neural model for reorganization of pathological reflex patterns. The model acts on associative memory functions of the brain based on modification of synaptic junctions. Accordingly, pathological memory effects of the autonomous nervous system are reorganized by repeated application of shock waves followed by development of normal reflex patterns. Physiologic control of muscle and vascular tone is followed by increased metabolism and tissue repair. The memory model may explain hyper-stimulation effects in pain therapy.

  14. An analytical model for shape memory alloy fiber-reinforced composite thin-walled beam undergoing large deflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The structural model of the thin-walled laminated beams with integral shape memory alloy active fibers and accounting for geometrically nonlinear is presented in this article. The structural modeling is split into two parts: a two-dimensional analysis over the cross section and a geometrically nonlinear analysis of a beam along the beam span. The variational asymptotic method is used to formulate the force–deformation relationship equations taking into account the presence of active shape memory alloy fibers distributed along the cross section of the beam. The geometrically nonlinear governing equations are derived using variational principle and based on the von Kármán-type nonlinear strain–displacement relations. The equations are then solved using Galerkin’s method and an incremental Newton–Raphson method. The validation for the proposed model has been carried out by comparison of the present results with those available in the literature. The results show that significant extension, bending, and twisting coupled nonlinear deflections occur during the phase transformation due to shape memory alloy actuation. The effects of the volume fraction of the shape memory alloy fiber and ply angle are also addressed.

  15. An evidence-based approach to working-memory based training in secondary education to improve reasoning test achievements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariës, Roel J.F.

    2018-01-01

    Secondary school teachers regularly observe that adolescent students have insufficient reasoning skills to properly answer reasoning test questions. One potentially effective strategy is developing learning strategies based on working memory training. This thesis contributes to our knowledge and

  16. An evidence-based approach to working memory based training in secondary education to improve reasoning test achievements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariës, Roel

    2018-01-01

    Secondary school teachers regularly observe that adolescent students have insufficient reasoning skills to properly answer reasoning test questions. One potentially effective strategy is developing learning strategies based on working memory training. This thesis contributes to our knowledge and

  17. Dataflow models for shared memory access latency analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staschulat, Jan; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit

    2009-01-01

    Performance analysis of applications in multi-core platforms is challenging because of temporal interference while accessing shared resources. Especially, memory arbiters introduce a non-constant delay which signicantly in uences the execution time of a task. In this paper, we selected a

  18. Memory in cultured cortical networks: experiment and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Tim; van Veenendaal, Tamar; le Feber, Jakob; Sergeev, A.

    The mechanism behind memory is one of the mysteries in neuroscience. Here we unravel part of the mechanism by showing that cultured neuronal networks develop an activity connectivity balance. External inputs disturb this balance and induce connectivity changes. The new connectivity is no longer

  19. Electrophysiological Evidence for a Sensory Recruitment Model of Somatosensory Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katus, Tobias; Grubert, Anna; Eimer, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Sensory recruitment models of working memory assume that information storage is mediated by the same cortical areas that are responsible for the perceptual processing of sensory signals. To test this assumption, we measured somatosensory event-related brain potentials (ERPs) during a tactile delayed match-to-sample task. Participants memorized a tactile sample set at one task-relevant hand to compare it with a subsequent test set on the same hand. During the retention period, a sustained negativity (tactile contralateral delay activity, tCDA) was elicited over primary somatosensory cortex contralateral to the relevant hand. The amplitude of this component increased with memory load and was sensitive to individual limitations in memory capacity, suggesting that the tCDA reflects the maintenance of tactile information in somatosensory working memory. The tCDA was preceded by a transient negativity (N2cc component) with a similar contralateral scalp distribution, which is likely to reflect selection of task-relevant tactile stimuli at the encoding stage. The temporal sequence of N2cc and tCDA components mirrors previous observations from ERP studies of working memory in vision. The finding that the sustained somatosensory delay period activity varies as a function of memory load supports a sensory recruitment model for spatial working memory in touch. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Sharing Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Nielsen, Emil Byskov; Nielsen, Jonathan Bernstorff

    2018-01-01

    For people suffering from aphasia, everyday verbal and bodily interpersonal communication is challenging. To increase aphasics' ability to share memories, an assistive technology (the MemoryBook) was conceptualized based on explicit, observable and tacit knowledge gathered from the practices...

  1. Bayesian Inference on the Memory Parameter for Gamma-Modulated Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plinio Andrade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a Bayesian methodology to make inferences for the memory parameter and other characteristics under non-standard assumptions for a class of stochastic processes. This class generalizes the Gamma-modulated process, with trajectories that exhibit long memory behavior, as well as decreasing variability as time increases. Different values of the memory parameter influence the speed of this decrease, making this heteroscedastic model very flexible. Its properties are used to implement an approximate Bayesian computation and MCMC scheme to obtain posterior estimates. We test and validate our method through simulations and real data from the big earthquake that occurred in 2010 in Chile.

  2. Ambipolar organic thin-film transistor-based nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jinhua; Wang, Wei; Ying, Jun; Xie, Wenfa

    2014-01-01

    An ambipolar organic thin-film transistor-based nano-floating-gate nonvolatile memory was demonstrated, with discrete distributed gold nanoparticles, tetratetracontane (TTC), pentacene as the floating-gate layer, tunneling layer, and active layer, respectively. The electron traps at the TTC/pentacene interface were significantly suppressed, which resulted in an ambipolar operation in present memory. As both electrons and holes were supplied in the channel and trapped in the floating-gate by programming/erasing operations, respectively, i.e., one type of charge carriers was used to overwrite the other, trapped, one, a large memory window, extending on both sides of the initial threshold voltage, was realized

  3. Electrophysiological correlates of strategic monitoring in event-based and time-based prospective memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Cona

    Full Text Available Prospective memory (PM is the ability to remember to accomplish an action when a particular event occurs (i.e., event-based PM, or at a specific time (i.e., time-based PM while performing an ongoing activity. Strategic Monitoring is one of the basic cognitive functions supporting PM tasks, and involves two mechanisms: a retrieval mode, which consists of maintaining active the intention in memory; and target checking, engaged for verifying the presence of the PM cue in the environment. The present study is aimed at providing the first evidence of event-related potentials (ERPs associated with time-based PM, and at examining differences and commonalities in the ERPs related to Strategic Monitoring mechanisms between event- and time-based PM tasks.The addition of an event-based or a time-based PM task to an ongoing activity led to a similar sustained positive modulation of the ERPs in the ongoing trials, mainly expressed over prefrontal and frontal regions. This modulation might index the retrieval mode mechanism, similarly engaged in the two PM tasks. On the other hand, two further ERP modulations were shown specifically in an event-based PM task. An increased positivity was shown at 400-600 ms post-stimulus over occipital and parietal regions, and might be related to target checking. Moreover, an early modulation at 130-180 ms post-stimulus seems to reflect the recruitment of attentional resources for being ready to respond to the event-based PM cue. This latter modulation suggests the existence of a third mechanism specific for the event-based PM; that is, the "readiness mode".

  4. Effects on locomotion and memory in 2 models of cerebral hypoperfusion in male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Díaz, J A; García, L I; Hernández, M E; Aranda-Abreu, G E

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral ischaemia is one of the most common neurological diseases worldwide. Its many sequelae range from motor and sensory symptoms to cognitive decline and dementia. Animal models of cerebral ischaemia/hypoperfusion elicit effects on long term memory; however, the effects of these procedures on short term memory are not clearly understood and effects induced by alternative hypoperfusion models are completely unknown. We evaluated the effects of 2 cerebral hyperperfusion models on memory in 3-month-old male rats. Episodic memory and working memory were assessed using the new object recognition test and the spontaneous alteration test, respectively. Neurological assessment was also performed, along with an open field test to evaluate locomotor activity. Rats in both hyperperfusion models displayed no cognitive changes. Rats with unilateral left-sided ligation plus temporary ligation of the right carotid tended to show slightly impaired performance on the new object recognition test on the second day after the procedure. In contrast, the group with permanent unilateral ligation tended to display alterations in working and episodic memory 9 days after the procedure, but they subsequently recovered. Despite these differences, both hypoperfusion groups displayed clear signs of motor impairment 2 days after the procedure, as reflected by their decreased locomotor activity during the open field test. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling spatial-temporal operations with context-dependent associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizraji, Eduardo; Lin, Juan

    2015-10-01

    We organize our behavior and store structured information with many procedures that require the coding of spatial and temporal order in specific neural modules. In the simplest cases, spatial and temporal relations are condensed in prepositions like "below" and "above", "behind" and "in front of", or "before" and "after", etc. Neural operators lie beneath these words, sharing some similarities with logical gates that compute spatial and temporal asymmetric relations. We show how these operators can be modeled by means of neural matrix memories acting on Kronecker tensor products of vectors. The complexity of these memories is further enhanced by their ability to store episodes unfolding in space and time. How does the brain scale up from the raw plasticity of contingent episodic memories to the apparent stable connectivity of large neural networks? We clarify this transition by analyzing a model that flexibly codes episodic spatial and temporal structures into contextual markers capable of linking different memory modules.

  6. The Role of Human Relations and Interactions in Designing Memory-Related Models for Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim MAHMOOD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the use of Wireless Sensor Networks has become substantial in most of our life aspects. These networks have many issues and challenges at the design phase (e.g., memory and power consumption. There exists a huge amount of works and studies that offer and provide solutions for many of these challenges. However, the issues of predicting memory requirements and memory management have not received enough attention in sensor networks literature. Yet, most of the studies in this field focus on issues related to power consumption and connectivity of sensor nodes. This paper has two main purposes: first, we propose a metric for measuring the strength of a relation between two sensors. In the proposed metric, we involve three important characteristics of human relations and interactions: encounter frequencies, duration of encounters, and regularities of encounters. We then exploit this metric in predicting memory requirements in a sensor network. Second, based on the estimated memory size, we propose an approach for memory management in a sensor network. The proposed approach is based on two concepts: social capital in sociology and preferential return in human mobility. The results show that our approach is effective in managing sensor memories comparing to other approaches in the literature.

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Induces Odor Preference Memory Extension and Maintains Enhanced AMPA Receptor Expression in the Rat Pup Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sriya; Mukherjee, Bandhan; Doré, Jules J. E.; Yuan, Qi; Harley, Carolyn W.; McLean, John H.

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) plays a role in synaptic plasticity and long-term memory formation. We hypothesized that trichostatin-A (TSA), an HDAC inhibitor, would promote long-term odor preference memory and maintain enhanced GluA1 receptor levels that have been hypothesized to support memory. We used an early odor preference learning model in…

  8. Optimal colour quality of LED clusters based on memory colours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Kevin; Ryckaert, Wouter R; Pointer, Michael R; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2011-03-28

    The spectral power distributions of tri- and tetrachromatic clusters of Light-Emitting-Diodes, composed of simulated and commercially available LEDs, were optimized with a genetic algorithm to maximize the luminous efficacy of radiation and the colour quality as assessed by the memory colour quality metric developed by the authors. The trade-off of the colour quality as assessed by the memory colour metric and the luminous efficacy of radiation was investigated by calculating the Pareto optimal front using the NSGA-II genetic algorithm. Optimal peak wavelengths and spectral widths of the LEDs were derived, and over half of them were found to be close to Thornton's prime colours. The Pareto optimal fronts of real LED clusters were always found to be smaller than those of the simulated clusters. The effect of binning on designing a real LED cluster was investigated and was found to be quite large. Finally, a real LED cluster of commercially available AlGaInP, InGaN and phosphor white LEDs was optimized to obtain a higher score on memory colour quality scale than its corresponding CIE reference illuminant.

  9. Memory and learning behaviors mimicked in nanogranular SiO2-based proton conductor gated oxide-based synaptic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2013-11-07

    In neuroscience, signal processing, memory and learning function are established in the brain by modifying ionic fluxes in neurons and synapses. Emulation of memory and learning behaviors of biological systems by nanoscale ionic/electronic devices is highly desirable for building neuromorphic systems or even artificial neural networks. Here, novel artificial synapses based on junctionless oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid transistors gated by nanogranular phosphorus-doped SiO2-based proton-conducting films are fabricated on glass substrates by a room-temperature process. Short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) are mimicked by tuning the pulse gate voltage amplitude. The LTM process in such an artificial synapse is due to the proton-related interfacial electrochemical reaction. Our results are highly desirable for building future neuromorphic systems or even artificial networks via electronic elements.

  10. Retrospective cues based on object features improve visual working memory performance in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Amanda L; Duarte, Audrey; Verhaeghen, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Research with younger adults has shown that retrospective cues can be used to orient top-down attention toward relevant items in working memory. We examined whether older adults could take advantage of these cues to improve memory performance. Younger and older adults were presented with visual arrays of five colored shapes; during maintenance, participants were presented either with an informative cue based on an object feature (here, object shape or color) that would be probed, or with an uninformative, neutral cue. Although older adults were less accurate overall, both age groups benefited from the presentation of an informative, feature-based cue relative to a neutral cue. Surprisingly, we also observed differences in the effectiveness of shape versus color cues and their effects upon post-cue memory load. These results suggest that older adults can use top-down attention to remove irrelevant items from visual working memory, provided that task-relevant features function as cues.

  11. Natural memory beyond the storage model: Repression, trauma, and the construction of a personal past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Axmacher

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring memory processes show features which are difficult to investigate by conventional cognitive neuroscience paradigms. Distortions of memory for problematic contents are described both by psychoanalysis (internal conflicts and research on post-traumatic stress disorder (external traumata. Typically, declarative memory for these contents is impaired – possibly due to repression in the case of internal conflicts or due to dissociation in the case of external traumata – but they continue to exert an unconscious pathological influence: neurotic symptoms or psychosomatic disorders after repression or flashbacks and intrusions in post-traumatic stress disorder after dissociation. Several experimental paradigms aim at investigating repression in healthy control subjects. We argue that these paradigms do not adequately operationalize the clinical process of repression, because they rely on an intentional inhibition of random stimuli (suppression. Furthermore, these paradigms ignore that memory distortions due to repression or dissociation are most accurately characterized by a lack of self-referential processing, resulting in an impaired integration of these contents into the self. This aspect of repression and dissociation cannot be captured by the concept of memory as a storage device which is usually employed in the cognitive neurosciences. It can only be assessed within the framework of a constructivist memory concept, according to which successful memory involves a reconstruction of experiences such that they fit into a representation of the self. We suggest several experimental paradigms that allow for the investigation of the neural correlates of repressed memories and trauma-induced memory distortions based on a constructivist memory concept.

  12. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  13. Memory consolidation from seconds to weeks: A three-stage neural network model with autonomous reinstatement dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eFiebig

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Declarative long-term memories are not created at an instant. Gradual stabilization and temporally shifting dependence of acquired declarative memories on different brain regions - called systems consolidation - can be tracked in time by lesion experiments. The observation of temporally graded retrograde amnesia following hippocampal lesions, points to a gradual transfer of memory from hippocampus to neocortical long-term memory. Spontaneous reactivations of hippocampal memories, as observed in place cell reactivations during slow-wave-sleep, are supposed to drive neocortical reinstatements and facilitate this process.We propose a functional neural network implementation of these ideas and furthermore suggest an extended three-stage framework that also includes the prefrontal cortex and bridges the temporal chasm between working memory percepts on the scale of seconds and consolidated long-term memory on the scale of weeks or months.We show that our three-stage model can autonomously produce the necessary stochastic reactivation dynamics for successful episodic memory consolidation. The resulting learning system is shown to exhibit classical memory effects seen in experimental studies, such as retrograde and anterograde amnesia after simulated hippocampal lesioning; furthermore the model reproduces peculiar biological findings on memory modulation, such as retrograde facilitation of memory after suppressed acquisition of new long-term memories - similar to the effects of benzodiazepines on memory.

  14. A model of cognitive and operational memory of organizations in changing worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Dosi; Luigi Marengo; Evita Paraskevopoulou; Marco Valente

    2015-01-01

    This work analyzes and models the nature and dynamics of organizational memory, as such an essential ingredient of organizational capabilities. There are two sides to it, namely a cognitive side, involving the beliefs and interpretative frameworks by which the organization categorizes the states of the world and its own internal states, and an operational one, including routines and procedures that store the knowledge of how to do things. We formalize both types of memory by means of evolving...

  15. Associative memory based on synchronized firing of spiking neurons with time-delayed interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Masahiko; Shiino, Masatoshi

    1998-09-01

    We study associative memory of a neural network of spiking neurons with time-delayed synaptic interactions incorporating the time taken by an action potential to propagate along the axon. Individual spiking neurons are described by a set of nonlinear differential equations capable of exhibiting excitability such as that of Hodgkin-Huxley and FitzHugh neurons. When a simple learning rule of the autocorrelation type based on random patterns is assumed, memory retrieval is shown to be accompanied by synchronized firing of neurons. The reduced dynamics with a few degrees of freedom of the network with a finite number of stored patterns is analytically derived in the limit of infinitely many neurons. The dependence of the appearance of retrieval states on the distribution of time delay and on the size of refractory period given implicitly in the model is obtained, showing good agreement between the result of numerical simulations and that obtained from the reduced dynamics. The behavior of the network with an extensive number of patterns is also investigated and an approximate analysis is presented to discuss the storage capacity.

  16. Serotonergic modulation of spatial working memory: predictions from a computational network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eCano-Colino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT receptors of types 1A and 2A are massively expressed in prefrontal cortex (PFC neurons, an area associated with cognitive function. Hence, 5-HT could be effective in modulating prefrontal-dependent cognitive functions, such as spatial working memory (SWM. However, a direct association between 5-HT and SWM has proved elusive in psycho-pharmacological studies. Recently, a computational network model of the PFC microcircuit was used to explore the relationship between 5‑HT and SWM (Cano-Colino et al. 2013. This study found that both excessive and insufficient 5-HT levels lead to impaired SWM performance in the network, and it concluded that analyzing behavioral responses based on confidence reports could facilitate the experimental identification of SWM behavioral effects of 5‑HT neuromodulation. Such analyses may have confounds based on our limited understanding of metacognitive processes. Here, we extend these results by deriving three additional predictions from the model that do not rely on confidence reports. Firstly, only excessive levels of 5-HT should result in SWM deficits that increase with delay duration. Secondly, excessive 5-HT baseline concentration makes the network vulnerable to distractors at distances that were robust to distraction in control conditions, while the network still ignores distractors efficiently for low 5‑HT levels that impair SWM. Finally, 5-HT modulates neuronal memory fields in neurophysiological experiments: Neurons should be better tuned to the cued stimulus than to the behavioral report for excessive 5-HT levels, while the reverse should happen for low 5-HT concentrations. In all our simulations agonists of 5-HT1A receptors and antagonists of 5-HT2A receptors produced behavioral and physiological effects in line with global 5-HT level increases. Our model makes specific predictions to be tested experimentally and advance our understanding of the neural basis of SWM and its neuromodulation

  17. Partition-Based Hardware Transactional Memory for Many-Core Processors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xinwei; Wang, Yonghui; Qian, Depei; Chen, Yali; Wu, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Part 4: Session 4: Multi-core Computing and GPU; International audience; Transactional memory is an appealing technology which frees programmer from lock-based programming. However, most of current hardware transactional memory systems are proposed for multi-core processors, and may face some challenges with the increasing of processor cores in many-core systems, such as inefficient utilization of transactional buffers, unsolved problem of transactional buffer overflow, etc. This paper propos...

  18. Uncertainty Relation Based on Wigner–Yanase–Dyson Skew Information with Quantum Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present uncertainty relations based on Wigner–Yanase–Dyson skew information with quantum memory. Uncertainty inequalities both in product and summation forms are derived. It is shown that the lower bounds contain two terms: one characterizes the degree of compatibility of two measurements, and the other is the quantum correlation between the measured system and the quantum memory. Detailed examples are given for product, separable and entangled states.

  19. Uncertainty Relation Based on Wigner–Yanase–Dyson Skew Information with Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2018-02-01

    We present uncertainty relations based on Wigner--Yanase--Dyson skew information with quantum memory. Uncertainty inequalities both in product and summation forms are derived. \\mbox{It is} shown that the lower bounds contain two terms: one characterizes the degree of compatibility of two measurements, and the other is the quantum correlation between the measured system and the quantum memory. Detailed examples are given for product, separable and entangled states.

  20. Composite holographic associative recall model (CHARM) and blended memories in eyewitness testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, J

    1990-06-01

    The idea that compositing or blending occurs in human episodic memory stems from two sources: (a) distributed memory models and (b) studies on the errors that occur in eyewitness testimony. These two traditions of research--theoretical and empirical--have been independent and distinct. Here, data from the eyewitness testimony paradigm are simulated by the distributed model CHARM (Composite Holographic Associative Recall Model). Of focal concern are Loftus's studies, which have been interpreted in favor of the blending hypothesis, and McCloskey and Zaragoza's studies, which have been interpreted as refuting Loftus's position. Both of these seemingly contradictory results, as well as recent findings with yes/no recognition, fall out of the model. Finally, the model predicts empirically found color shifts and provides specifications for when blends and memory impairments will and will not be expected.

  1. Memory conformity affects inaccurate memories more than accurate memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Daniel B; Villalba, Daniella K

    2012-01-01

    After controlling for initial confidence, inaccurate memories were shown to be more easily distorted than accurate memories. In two experiments groups of participants viewed 50 stimuli and were then presented with these stimuli plus 50 fillers. During this test phase participants reported their confidence that each stimulus was originally shown. This was followed by computer-generated responses from a bogus participant. After being exposed to this response participants again rated the confidence of their memory. The computer-generated responses systematically distorted participants' responses. Memory distortion depended on initial memory confidence, with uncertain memories being more malleable than confident memories. This effect was moderated by whether the participant's memory was initially accurate or inaccurate. Inaccurate memories were more malleable than accurate memories. The data were consistent with a model describing two types of memory (i.e., recollective and non-recollective memories), which differ in how susceptible these memories are to memory distortion.

  2. A QDWH-Based SVD Software Framework on Distributed-Memory Manycore Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a high performance software framework for computing a dense SVD on distributed- memory manycore systems. Originally introduced by Nakatsukasa et al. (Nakatsukasa et al. 2010; Nakatsukasa and Higham 2013), the SVD solver relies on the polar decomposition using the QR Dynamically-Weighted Halley algorithm (QDWH). Although the QDWH-based SVD algorithm performs a significant amount of extra floating-point operations compared to the traditional SVD with the one-stage bidiagonal reduction, the inherent high level of concurrency associated with Level 3 BLAS compute-bound kernels ultimately compensates for the arithmetic complexity overhead. Using the ScaLAPACK two-dimensional block cyclic data distribution with a rectangular processor topology, the resulting QDWH-SVD further reduces excessive communications during the panel factorization, while increasing the degree of parallelism during the update of the trailing submatrix, as opposed to relying to the default square processor grid. After detailing the algorithmic complexity and the memory footprint of the algorithm, we conduct a thorough performance analysis and study the impact of the grid topology on the performance by looking at the communication and computation profiling trade-offs. We report performance results against state-of-the-art existing QDWH software implementations (e.g., Elemental) and their SVD extensions on large-scale distributed-memory manycore systems based on commodity Intel x86 Haswell processors and Knights Landing (KNL) architecture. The QDWH-SVD framework achieves up to 3/8-fold on the Haswell/KNL-based platforms, respectively, against ScaLAPACK PDGESVD and turns out to be a competitive alternative for well and ill-conditioned matrices. We finally come up herein with a performance model based on these empirical results. Our QDWH-based polar decomposition and its SVD extension are freely available at https://github.com/ecrc/qdwh.git and https

  3. Cognitive components underpinning the development of model-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Tracey C S; Bryce, Nessa V; Hartley, Catherine A

    2017-06-01

    Reinforcement learning theory distinguishes "model-free" learning, which fosters reflexive repetition of previously rewarded actions, from "model-based" learning, which recruits a mental model of the environment to flexibly select goal-directed actions. Whereas model-free learning is evident across development, recruitment of model-based learning appears to increase with age. However, the cognitive processes underlying the development of model-based learning remain poorly characterized. Here, we examined whether age-related differences in cognitive processes underlying the construction and flexible recruitment of mental models predict developmental increases in model-based choice. In a cohort of participants aged 9-25, we examined whether the abilities to infer sequential regularities in the environment ("statistical learning"), maintain information in an active state ("working memory") and integrate distant concepts to solve problems ("fluid reasoning") predicted age-related improvements in model-based choice. We found that age-related improvements in statistical learning performance did not mediate the relationship between age and model-based choice. Ceiling performance on our working memory assay prevented examination of its contribution to model-based learning. However, age-related improvements in fluid reasoning statistically mediated the developmental increase in the recruitment of a model-based strategy. These findings suggest that gradual development of fluid reasoning may be a critical component process underlying the emergence of model-based learning. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanoscale superconducting memory based on the kinetic inductance of asymmetric nanowire loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Andrew; Bezryadin, Alexey; Averin, Dmitri V

    2017-01-01

    The demand for low-dissipation nanoscale memory devices is as strong as ever. As Moore’s law is staggering, and the demand for a low-power-consuming supercomputer is high, the goal of making information processing circuits out of superconductors is one of the central goals of modern technology and physics. So far, digital superconducting circuits could not demonstrate their immense potential. One important reason for this is that a dense superconducting memory technology is not yet available. Miniaturization of traditional superconducting quantum interference devices is difficult below a few micrometers because their operation relies on the geometric inductance of the superconducting loop. Magnetic memories do allow nanometer-scale miniaturization, but they are not purely superconducting (Baek et al 2014 Nat. Commun. 5 3888). Our approach is to make nanometer scale memory cells based on the kinetic inductance (and not geometric inductance) of superconducting nanowire loops, which have already shown many fascinating properties (Aprili 2006 Nat. Nanotechnol. 1 15; Hopkins et al 2005 Science 308 1762). This allows much smaller devices and naturally eliminates magnetic-field cross-talk. We demonstrate that the vorticity, i.e., the winding number of the order parameter, of a closed superconducting loop can be used for realizing a nanoscale nonvolatile memory device. We demonstrate how to alter the vorticity in a controlled fashion by applying calibrated current pulses. A reliable read-out of the memory is also demonstrated. We present arguments that such memory can be developed to operate without energy dissipation. (paper)

  5. Magnetic shape-memory alloys: thermomechanical modelling and analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Stefanelli, U.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2014), s. 783-810 ISSN 0935-1175 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : magnetic shape-memory alloys * martensitic phase transformation * ferro/paramagnetic phase transformation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.779, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00161-014-0339-8#

  6. Status and Prospects of ZnO-Based Resistive Switching Memory Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanjuntak, Firman Mangasa; Panda, Debashis; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2016-08-01

    In the advancement of the semiconductor device technology, ZnO could be a prospective alternative than the other metal oxides for its versatility and huge applications in different aspects. In this review, a thorough overview on ZnO for the application of resistive switching memory (RRAM) devices has been conducted. Various efforts that have been made to investigate and modulate the switching characteristics of ZnO-based switching memory devices are discussed. The use of ZnO layer in different structure, the different types of filament formation, and the different types of switching including complementary switching are reported. By considering the huge interest of transparent devices, this review gives the concrete overview of the present status and prospects of transparent RRAM devices based on ZnO. ZnO-based RRAM can be used for flexible memory devices, which is also covered here. Another challenge in ZnO-based RRAM is that the realization of ultra-thin and low power devices. Nevertheless, ZnO not only offers decent memory properties but also has a unique potential to be used as multifunctional nonvolatile memory devices. The impact of electrode materials, metal doping, stack structures, transparency, and flexibility on resistive switching properties and switching parameters of ZnO-based resistive switching memory devices are briefly compared. This review also covers the different nanostructured-based emerging resistive switching memory devices for low power scalable devices. It may give a valuable insight on developing ZnO-based RRAM and also should encourage researchers to overcome the challenges.

  7. Preservation of memory-based automaticity in reading for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Katherine A; Touron, Dayna R

    2015-12-01

    Concerning age-related effects on cognitive skill acquisition, the modal finding is that older adults do not benefit from practice to the same extent as younger adults in tasks that afford a shift from slower algorithmic processing to faster memory-based processing. In contrast, Rawson and Touron (2009) demonstrated a relatively rapid shift to memory-based processing in the context of a reading task. The current research extended beyond this initial study to provide more definitive evidence for relative preservation of memory-based automaticity in reading tasks for older adults. Younger and older adults read short stories containing unfamiliar noun phrases (e.g., skunk mud) followed by disambiguating information indicating the combination's meaning (either the normatively dominant meaning or an alternative subordinate meaning). Stories were repeated across practice blocks, and then the noun phrases were presented in novel sentence frames in a transfer task. Both age groups shifted from computation to retrieval after relatively few practice trials (as evidenced by convergence of reading times for dominant and subordinate items). Most important, both age groups showed strong evidence for memory-based processing of the noun phrases in the transfer task. In contrast, older adults showed minimal shifting to retrieval in an alphabet arithmetic task, indicating that the preservation of memory-based automaticity in reading was task-specific. Discussion focuses on important implications for theories of memory-based automaticity in general and for specific theoretical accounts of age effects on memory-based automaticity, as well as fruitful directions for future research. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Memory effects on epidemic evolution: The susceptible-infected-recovered epidemic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedian, M.; Khalighi, M.; Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Jafari, G. R.; Ausloos, M.

    2017-02-01

    Memory has a great impact on the evolution of every process related to human societies. Among them, the evolution of an epidemic is directly related to the individuals' experiences. Indeed, any real epidemic process is clearly sustained by a non-Markovian dynamics: memory effects play an essential role in the spreading of diseases. Including memory effects in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) epidemic model seems very appropriate for such an investigation. Thus, the memory prone SIR model dynamics is investigated using fractional derivatives. The decay of long-range memory, taken as a power-law function, is directly controlled by the order of the fractional derivatives in the corresponding nonlinear fractional differential evolution equations. Here we assume "fully mixed" approximation and show that the epidemic threshold is shifted to higher values than those for the memoryless system, depending on this memory "length" decay exponent. We also consider the SIR model on structured networks and study the effect of topology on threshold points in a non-Markovian dynamics. Furthermore, the lack of access to the precise information about the initial conditions or the past events plays a very relevant role in the correct estimation or prediction of the epidemic evolution. Such a "constraint" is analyzed and discussed.

  9. Why a neuromaturational model of memory fails: exuberant learning in early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovee-Collier, Carolyn; Giles, Amy

    2010-02-01

    The characteristics of memory in infants and adults seem vastly different. The neuromaturational model attributes these differences to an ontogenetic change in the basic memory process, namely, to the hierarchical maturation of two distinct memory systems. The early-maturing (implicit) system is functional during the first third of infancy and supports the gradual learning of perceptual and motor skills; the late-maturing (explicit) system supports representations of contextually specific events, relationships, and associations. An alternative model holds that the basic memory process does not change, but what infants and adults select to encode for learning does. This ontogenetic change in selective attention has been mistaken for an ontogenetic shift in the basic memory process. Over the last 25 years, evidence from transfer studies with developing rats and human infants has revealed that the first third of infancy is actually a period of exuberant learning that ends, not coincidentally, at the same age that the late-maturing memory system presumably emerges. This article reviews data from recent studies of sensory preconditioning, potentiation, associative chains, and transitive inference with human infants that support this conclusion-data for which the neuromaturational model cannot account. Fast mapping is a general learning mechanism that accounts for this evidence. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inferring Soil Moisture Memory from Streamflow Observations Using a Simple Water Balance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Koster, Randal Dean; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture is known for its integrative behavior and resulting memory characteristics. Soil moisture anomalies can persist for weeks or even months into the future, making initial soil moisture a potentially important contributor to skill in weather forecasting. A major difficulty when investigating soil moisture and its memory using observations is the sparse availability of long-term measurements and their limited spatial representativeness. In contrast, there is an abundance of long-term streamflow measurements for catchments of various sizes across the world. We investigate in this study whether such streamflow measurements can be used to infer and characterize soil moisture memory in respective catchments. Our approach uses a simple water balance model in which evapotranspiration and runoff ratios are expressed as simple functions of soil moisture; optimized functions for the model are determined using streamflow observations, and the optimized model in turn provides information on soil moisture memory on the catchment scale. The validity of the approach is demonstrated with data from three heavily monitored catchments. The approach is then applied to streamflow data in several small catchments across Switzerland to obtain a spatially distributed description of soil moisture memory and to show how memory varies, for example, with altitude and topography.

  11. Decoding the Traumatic Memory among Women with PTSD: Implications for Neurocircuitry Models of PTSD and Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh M Cisler

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD is characterized by intrusive recall of the traumatic memory. While numerous studies have investigated the neural processing mechanisms engaged during trauma memory recall in PTSD, these analyses have only focused on group-level contrasts that reveal little about the predictive validity of the identified brain regions. By contrast, a multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA approach towards identifying the neural mechanisms engaged during trauma memory recall would entail testing whether a multivariate set of brain regions is reliably predictive of (i.e., discriminates whether an individual is engaging in trauma or non-trauma memory recall. Here, we use a MVPA approach to test 1 whether trauma memory vs neutral memory recall can be predicted reliably using a multivariate set of brain regions among women with PTSD related to assaultive violence exposure (N=16, 2 the methodological parameters (e.g., spatial smoothing, number of memory recall repetitions, etc. that optimize classification accuracy and reproducibility of the feature weight spatial maps, and 3 the correspondence between brain regions that discriminate trauma memory recall and the brain regions predicted by neurocircuitry models of PTSD. Cross-validation classification accuracy was significantly above chance for all methodological permutations tested; mean accuracy across participants was 76% for the methodological parameters selected as optimal for both efficiency and accuracy. Classification accuracy was significantly better for a voxel-wise approach relative to voxels within restricted regions-of-interest (ROIs; classification accuracy did not differ when using PTSD-related ROIs compared to randomly generated ROIs. ROI-based analyses suggested the reliable involvement of the left hippocampus in discriminating memory recall across participants and that the contribution of the left amygdala to the decision function was dependent upon PTSD symptom

  12. Memory and communication support in dementia: research-based strategies for caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erin R; Broughton, Megan; Baker, Rosemary; Pachana, Nancy A; Angwin, Anthony J; Humphreys, Michael S; Mitchell, Leander; Byrne, Gerard J; Copland, David A; Gallois, Cindy; Hegney, Desley; Chenery, Helen J

    2011-03-01

    Difficulties with memory and communication are prominent and distressing features of dementia which impact on the person with dementia and contribute to caregiver stress and burden. There is a need to provide caregivers with strategies to support and maximize memory and communication abilities in people with dementia. In this project, a team of clinicians, researchers and educators in neuropsychology, psychogeriatrics, nursing and speech pathology translated research-based knowledge from these fields into a program of practical strategies for everyday use by family and professional caregivers. From the available research evidence, the project team identified compensatory or facilitative strategies to assist with common areas of difficulty, and structured these under the mnemonics RECAPS (for memory) and MESSAGE (for communication). This information was adapted for presentation in a DVD-based education program in accordance with known characteristics of effective caregiver education. The resultant DVD comprises (1) information on the nature and importance of memory and communication in everyday life; (2) explanations of common patterns of difficulty and preserved ability in memory and communication across the stages of dementia; (3) acted vignettes demonstrating the strategies, based on authentic samples of speech in dementia; and (4) scenarios to prompt the viewer to consider the benefits of using the strategies. Using a knowledge-translation framework, information and strategies can be provided to family and professional caregivers to help them optimize residual memory and communication in people with dementia. Future development of the materials, incorporating consumer feedback, will focus on methods for enabling wider dissemination.

  13. ERP correlates of source memory: unitized source information increases familiarity-based retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Rachel A; Van den Boom, Wijnand; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Ranganath, Charan

    2011-01-07

    Source memory tests typically require subjects to make decisions about the context in which an item was encoded and are thought to depend on recollection of details from the study episode. Although it is generally believed that familiarity does not contribute to source memory, recent behavioral studies have suggested that familiarity may also support source recognition when item and source information are integrated, or "unitized," during study (Diana, Yonelinas, and Ranganath, 2008). However, an alternative explanation of these behavioral findings is that unitization affects the manner in which recollection contributes to performance, rather than increasing familiarity-based source memory. To discriminate between these possibilities, we conducted an event-related potential (ERP) study testing the hypothesis that unitization increases the contribution of familiarity to source recognition. Participants studied associations between words and background colors using tasks that either encouraged or discouraged unitization. ERPs were recorded during a source memory test for background color. The results revealed two distinct neural correlates of source recognition: a frontally distributed positivity that was associated with familiarity-based source memory in the high-unitization condition only and a parietally distributed positivity that was associated with recollection-based source memory in both the high- and low-unitization conditions. The ERP and behavioral findings provide converging evidence for the idea that familiarity can contribute to source recognition, particularly when source information is encoded as an item detail. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Incidental Learning: A Brief, Valid Measure of Memory Based on the WAIS-IV Vocabulary and Similarities Subtests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert J; Reckow, Jaclyn; Drag, Lauren L; Bieliauskas, Linas A

    2016-12-01

    We assessed the validity of a brief incidental learning measure based on the Similarities and Vocabulary subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). Most neuropsychological assessments for memory require intentional learning, but incidental learning occurs without explicit instruction. Incidental memory tests such as the WAIS-III Symbol Digit Coding subtest have existed for many years, but few memory studies have used a semantically processed incidental learning model. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 37 veterans with traumatic brain injury, referred for outpatient neuropsychological testing at a Veterans Affairs hospital. As part of their evaluation, the participants completed the incidental learning tasks. We compared their incidental learning performance to their performance on traditional memory measures. Incidental learning scores correlated strongly with scores on the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II) and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R). After we conducted a partial correlation that controlled for the effects of age, incidental learning correlated significantly with the CVLT-II Immediate Free Recall, CVLT-II Short-Delay Recall, CVLT-II Long-Delay Recall, and CVLT-II Yes/No Recognition Hits, and with the BVMT-R Delayed Recall and BVMT-R Recognition Discrimination Index. Our incidental learning procedures derived from subtests of the WAIS-IV Edition are an efficient and valid way of measuring memory. These tasks add minimally to testing time and capitalize on the semantic encoding that is inherent in completing the Similarities and Vocabulary subtests.

  15. Normal aging affects movement execution but not visual motion working memory and decision-making delay during cue-dependent memory-based smooth-pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kikuro; Barnes, Graham R; Ito, Norie; Olley, Peter M; Warabi, Tateo

    2014-07-01

    Aging affects virtually all functions including sensory/motor and cognitive activities. While retinal image motion is the primary input for smooth-pursuit, its efficiency/accuracy depends on cognitive processes. Elderly subjects exhibit gain decrease during initial and steady-state pursuit, but reports on latencies are conflicting. Using a cue-dependent memory-based smooth-pursuit task, we identified important extra-retinal mechanisms for initial pursuit in young adults including cue information priming and extra-retinal drive components (Ito et al. in Exp Brain Res 229:23-35, 2013). We examined aging effects on parameters for smooth-pursuit using the same tasks. Elderly subjects were tested during three task conditions as previously described: memory-based pursuit, simple ramp-pursuit just to follow motion of a single spot, and popping-out of the correct spot during memory-based pursuit to enhance retinal image motion. Simple ramp-pursuit was used as a task that did not require visual motion working memory. To clarify aging effects, we then compared the results with the previous young subject data. During memory-based pursuit, elderly subjects exhibited normal working memory of cue information. Most movement-parameters including pursuit latencies differed significantly between memory-based pursuit and simple ramp-pursuit and also between young and elderly subjects. Popping-out of the correct spot motion was ineffective for enhancing initial pursuit in elderly subjects. However, the latency difference between memory-based pursuit and simple ramp-pursuit in individual subjects, which includes decision-making delay in the memory task, was similar between the two groups. Our results suggest that smooth-pursuit latencies depend on task conditions and that, although the extra-retinal mechanisms were functional for initial pursuit in elderly subjects, they were less effective.

  16. Brivaracetam, but not ethosuximide, reverses memory impairments in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Haakon B; Kaufman, Adam C; Sekine-Konno, Tomoko; Huh, Linda L; Going, Hilary; Feldman, Samantha J; Kostylev, Mikhail A; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that several strains of transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice overexpressing the amyloid precursor protein (APP) have cortical hyperexcitability, and their results have suggested that this aberrant network activity may be a mechanism by which amyloid-β (Aβ) causes more widespread neuronal dysfunction. Specific anticonvulsant therapy reverses memory impairments in various transgenic mouse strains, but it is not known whether reduction of epileptiform activity might serve as a surrogate marker of drug efficacy for memory improvement in AD mouse models. Transgenic AD mice (APP/PS1 and 3xTg-AD) were chronically implanted with dural electroencephalography electrodes, and epileptiform activity was correlated with spatial memory function and transgene-specific pathology. The antiepileptic drugs ethosuximide and brivaracetam were tested for their ability to suppress epileptiform activity and to reverse memory impairments and synapse loss in APP/PS1 mice. We report that in two transgenic mouse models of AD (APP/PS1 and 3xTg-AD), the presence of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) correlated with impairments in spatial memory. Both ethosuximide and brivaracetam reduce mouse SWDs, but only brivaracetam reverses memory impairments in APP/PS1 mice. Our data confirm an intriguing therapeutic role of anticonvulsant drugs targeting synaptic vesicle protein 2A across AD mouse models. Chronic ethosuximide dosing did not reverse spatial memory impairments in APP/PS1 mice, despite reduction of SWDs. Our data indicate that SWDs are not a reliable surrogate marker of appropriate target engagement for reversal of memory dysfunction in APP/PS1 mice.

  17. Capacity for patterns and sequences in Kanerva's SDM as compared to other associative memory models. [Sparse, Distributed Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, James D.

    1988-01-01

    The information capacity of Kanerva's Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) and Hopfield-type neural networks is investigated. Under the approximations used here, it is shown that the total information stored in these systems is proportional to the number connections in the network. The proportionality constant is the same for the SDM and Hopfield-type models independent of the particular model, or the order of the model. The approximations are checked numerically. This same analysis can be used to show that the SDM can store sequences of spatiotemporal patterns, and the addition of time-delayed connections allows the retrieval of context dependent temporal patterns. A minor modification of the SDM can be used to store correlated patterns.

  18. Computational memory architectures for autobiographic agents interacting in a complex virtual environment: a working model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wan Ching; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Nehaniv, Chrystopher

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss the concept of autobiographic agent and how memory may extend an agent's temporal horizon and increase its adaptability. These concepts are applied to an implementation of a scenario where agents are interacting in a complex virtual artificial life environment. We present computational memory architectures for autobiographic virtual agents that enable agents to retrieve meaningful information from their dynamic memories which increases their adaptation and survival in the environment. The design of the memory architectures, the agents, and the virtual environment are described in detail. Next, a series of experimental studies and their results are presented which show the adaptive advantage of autobiographic memory, i.e. from remembering significant experiences. Also, in a multi-agent scenario where agents can communicate via stories based on their autobiographic memory, it is found that new adaptive behaviours can emerge from an individual's reinterpretation of experiences received from other agents whereby higher communication frequency yields better group performance. An interface is described that visualises the memory contents of an agent. From an observer perspective, the agents' behaviours can be understood as individually structured, and temporally grounded, and, with the communication of experience, can be seen to rely on emergent mixed narrative reconstructions combining the experiences of several agents. This research leads to insights into how bottom-up story-telling and autobiographic reconstruction in autonomous, adaptive agents allow temporally grounded behaviour to emerge. The article concludes with a discussion of possible implications of this research direction for future autobiographic, narrative agents.

  19. Thermomechanical Characterization and Modeling of Superelastic Shape Memory Alloy Beams and Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ryan

    Of existing applications, the majority of shape memory alloy (SMA) devices consist of beam (orthodontic wire, eye glasses frames, catheter guide wires) and framed structures (cardiovascular stents, vena cava filters). Although uniaxial tension data is often sufficient to model basic beam behavior (which has been the main focus of the research community), the tension-compression asymmetry and complex phase transformation behavior of SMAs suggests more information is necessary to properly model higher complexity states of loading. In this work, SMA beams are experimentally characterized under general loading conditions (including tension, compression, pure bending, and buckling); furthermore, a model is developed with respect to general beam deformation based on the relevant phenomena observed in the experimental characterization. Stress induced phase transformation within superelastic SMA beams is shown to depend on not only the loading mode, but also kinematic constraints imposed by beam geometry (such as beam cross-section and length). In the cases of tension and pure bending, the structural behavior is unstable and corresponds to phase transformation localization and propagation. This unstable behavior is the result of a local level up--down--up stress/strain response in tension, which is measured here using a novel composite-based experimental technique. In addition to unstable phase transformation, intriguing post-buckling straightening is observed in short SMA columns during monotonic loading (termed unbuckling here). Based on this phenomenological understanding of SMA beam behavior, a trilinear based material law is developed in the context of a Shanley column model and is found to capture many of the relevant features of column buckling, including the experimentally observed unbuckling behavior. Due to the success of this model, it is generalized within the context of beam theory and, in conjunction with Bloch wave stability analysis, is used to model and

  20. In vivo response to an implanted shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N; Clubb, Fred J; Wilson, Thomas S; Miller, Matthew W; Fossum, Theresa W; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane-based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology, and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy imaging after 0, 30, and 90 days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time 0 (<1 h exposure to blood before euthanization), partial healing was observed at 30 days, and almost complete healing had occurred at 90 days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.