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Sample records for membranes quantitative image

  1. Quantitative Imaging of Cell Membrane-associated Effective Mass Density Using Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Choi, Ji Sun; Marin, Thibault; Yu, Hojeong; Harley, Brendan A.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion is a critical cellular process that contributes to migration, apoptosis, differentiation, and division. It is followed by the redistribution of cellular materials at the cell membrane or at the cell-surface interface for cells interacting with surfaces, such as basement membranes. Dynamic and quantitative tracking of changes in cell adhesion mass redistribution is challenging because cells are rapidly moving, inhomogeneous, and nonequilibrium objects, whose physical and mechanical properties are difficult to measure or predict. Here, we report a novel biosensor based microscopy approach termed Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) that enables the movement of cellular materials at the plasma membrane of individual live cells to be dynamically monitored and quantitatively imaged. PCEM utilizes a photonic crystal biosensor surface, which can be coated with arbitrary extracellular matrix materials to facilitate cellular interactions, within a modified brightfield microscope with a low intensity non-coherent light source. Benefiting from the high sensitivity, narrow resonance peak, and tight spatial confinement of the evanescent field atop the photonic crystal biosensor, PCEM enables label-free live cell imaging with high sensitivity and high lateral and axial spatial-resolution, thereby allowing dynamic adhesion phenotyping of single cells without the use of fluorescent tags or stains. We apply PCEM to investigate adhesion and the early stage migration of different types of stem cells and cancer cells. By applying image processing algorithms to analyze the complex spatiotemporal information generated by PCEM, we offer insight into how the plasma membrane of anchorage dependent cells is dynamically organized during cell adhesion. The imaging and analysis results presented here provide a new tool for biologists to gain a deeper understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved with cell adhesion and concurrent or subsequent migration events. PMID

  2. Surface characterization of dialyzer polymer membranes by imaging ToF-SIMS and quantitative XPS line scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzweber, Markus; Lippitz, Andreas; Krueger, Katharina; Jankowski, Joachim; Unger, Wolfgang E S

    2015-03-24

    The surfaces of polymeric dialyzer membranes consisting of polysulfone and polyvinylpyrrolidone were investigated regarding the lateral distribution and quantitative surface composition using time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass-spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Knowledge of the distribution and composition on the outer surface region is of utmost importance for understanding the biocompatibility of such dialyzer membranes. Both flat membranes and hollow fiber membranes were studied.

  3. Quantitative image analysis of laminin immunoreactivity in skin basement membrane irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon iron particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, S; Streuli, C H; Barcellos-Hoff, M H

    2000-10-01

    We previously reported that laminin immunoreactivity in mouse mammary epithelium is altered shortly after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy from 600 MeV/nucleon iron ions but is unaffected after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. This observation led us to propose that the effect could be due to protein damage from the high ionization density of the ion tracks. If so, we predicted that it would be evident soon after radiation exposure in basement membranes of other tissues and would depend on ion fluence. To test this hypothesis, we used immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and image segmentation techniques to quantify changes in the basement membrane of mouse skin epidermis. At 1 h after exposure to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions with doses from 0.03 to 1.6 Gy, neither the visual appearance nor the mean pixel intensity of laminin in the basement membrane of mouse dorsal skin epidermis was altered compared to sham-irradiated tissue. This result does not support the hypothesis that particle traversal directly affects laminin protein integrity. However, the mean pixel intensity of laminin immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in epidermal basement membrane at 48 and 96 h after exposure to 0.8 Gy 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. We confirmed this effect with two additional antibodies raised against affinity-purified laminin 1 and the E3 fragment of the long-arm of laminin 1. In contrast, collagen type IV, another component of the basement membrane, was unaffected. Our studies demonstrate quantitatively that densely ionizing radiation elicits changes in skin microenvironments distinct from those induced by sparsely ionizing radiation. Such effects may might contribute to the carcinogenic potential of densely ionizing radiation by altering cellular signaling cascades mediated by cell-extracellular matrix interactions.

  4. Quantitative assessment of angiogenesis in the chick embryo and its chorioallantoic membrane by computerised analysis of angiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforidis, G.; Papazafiropoulos, D.; Siablis, D.; Karnabatidis, D.; Hatjikondi, O.; Dimopoulos, J.

    1999-01-01

    We studied, in vivo, the angiogenesis process in the chick embryo and its chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in conjunction with computer-assisted image analysis. In a series of fertilised eggs, angiography was carried out at days 8, 10, 12 and 14 of embryonic development. The angiographic images were digitised and subsequently processed for a specific image analysis. A set of specific morphological parameters has been defined to allow an analytical characterisation of the vascularity status. Vessels were classified into three categories according to their diameter (50-100, 100-200, and >200 μm). The data were normalised and statistically evaluated. Graphs showing the development of angiogenesis were obtained. Total vascular area revealed a continuous rise, whereas, total vascular length increased until day 12 and then it started decreasing. These morphometric parameters in the first two vessel categories progressively increased throughout the entire period of development, whereas in the third category they increased until day 10 and then they started decreasing. By applying a vascular casting technique CAM vessels were visualised and compared with those extracted from the processed angiographic image. The comparison revealed that there is exact matching for the first two vessel categories (diameters higher than 100 μm) while the matching of the third category (diameters between 50 and 100 μm) is approximate

  5. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted A.G. Steemers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared. By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  6. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  7. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  8. Quantitative image restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkova, Irina; Grossberg, Michael; Shahriar, Fazlul

    2010-04-01

    Even with the most extensive precautions and careful planning, space based imagers will inevitably experience problems resulting in partial data corruption and possible loss. Such a loss occurs, for example, when individual image detectors are damaged. For a scanning imager this results in missing lines in the image. Images with missing lines can wreak havoc since algorithms not typically designed to handle missing pixels. Currently the metadata stores the locations of missing data, and naive spatial interpolation is used to fill it in. Naive interpolation methods can create image artifacts and even statistically or physically implausible image values. We present a general method, which uses non-linear statistical regression to estimate the values of the missing data in a principled manner. A statistically based estimate is desirable because it will preserve the statistical structure of the uncorrupted data and avoid the artifacts of naive interpolation. It also means that the restored images are suitable as input for higher-level statistical products. Previous methods replaced the missing values with those of a single closely related band, by applying a function or lookup table. We propose to use the redundant information in multiple bands to restore the lost information. The estimator we present in this paper uses values in a neighborhood of the pixel to be estimated, and propose a value based on training data from the uncorrupted pixels. Since we use the spatial variations in other channels, we avoid the blurring inherent spatial interpolation, which have implicit smoothness priors.

  9. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging as marker of synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy: a one year follow up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ejbjerg, B; Stoltenberg, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: By repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other (non-RA) causes of persistent knee joint synovitis. METHODS: Contrast enhanced...... at two months. No significant differences between volumes in RA and non-RA knees were seen. Synovial membrane volumes at two months were significantly inversely correlated with the duration of clinical remission, for all knees considered together (Spearman's correlation r(s)=-0.67; p

  10. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging as marker of synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy: a one year follow up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ejbjerg, B; Stoltenberg, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: By repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other (non-RA) causes of persistent knee joint synovitis. METHODS: Contrast enhanced...... MRI was performed in 15 knees (nine RA, six non-RA) before and one day, seven days, two months, and 12 months after arthroscopic synovectomy. Synovial membrane volumes, joint effusion volumes, and cartilage and bone destruction were assessed on each MRI set. Baseline microscopic and macroscopic...... assessments of synovitis and baseline and follow up standard clinical and biochemical examinations were available. RESULTS: Synovial membrane and joint fluid volumes were significantly reduced two and 12 months after synovectomy. However, MRI signs of recurrent synovitis were already present in most knees...

  11. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  12. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers of NAFLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Sonja; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR), play an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by allowing noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis. However, conventional imaging modalities are limited as biomarkers of NAFLD for various reasons. Multi-parametric quantitative MRI techniques overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional imaging and allow comprehensive and objective evaluation of NAFLD. MRI can provide unconfounded biomarkers of hepatic fat, iron, and fibrosis in a single examination—a virtual biopsy has become a clinical reality. In this article, we will review the utility and limitation of conventional US, CT, and MR imaging for the diagnosis NAFLD. Recent advances in imaging biomarkers of NAFLD are also discussed with an emphasis in multi-parametric quantitative MRI. PMID:26848588

  13. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy.

  14. GPC and quantitative phase imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Banas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    2016-01-01

    shaper followed by the potential of GPC for biomedical and multispectral applications where we experimentally demonstrate the active light shaping of a supercontinuum laser over most of the visible wavelength range. Finally, we discuss how GPC can be advantageously applied for Quantitative Phase Imaging...

  15. Infrared thermography quantitative image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouroliakou, A.; Kalatzis, I.; Kalyvas, N.; Grivas, TB

    2017-11-01

    Infrared thermography is an imaging technique that has the ability to provide a map of temperature distribution of an object’s surface. It is considered for a wide range of applications in medicine as well as in non-destructive testing procedures. One of its promising medical applications is in orthopaedics and diseases of the musculoskeletal system where temperature distribution of the body’s surface can contribute to the diagnosis and follow up of certain disorders. Although the thermographic image can give a fairly good visual estimation of distribution homogeneity and temperature pattern differences between two symmetric body parts, it is important to extract a quantitative measurement characterising temperature. Certain approaches use temperature of enantiomorphic anatomical points, or parameters extracted from a Region of Interest (ROI). A number of indices have been developed by researchers to that end. In this study a quantitative approach in thermographic image processing is attempted based on extracting different indices for symmetric ROIs on thermograms of the lower back area of scoliotic patients. The indices are based on first order statistical parameters describing temperature distribution. Analysis and comparison of these indices result in evaluating the temperature distribution pattern of the back trunk expected in healthy, regarding spinal problems, subjects.

  16. Computer-assisted assessment of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 immunohistochemical assay in imaged histologic sections using a membrane isolation algorithm and quantitative analysis of positive controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianosi-Irimie Monica

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancers that overexpress the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 are eligible for effective biologically targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab. However, accurately determining HER2 overexpression, especially in immunohistochemically equivocal cases, remains a challenge. Manual analysis of HER2 expression is dependent on the assessment of membrane staining as well as comparisons with positive controls. In spite of the strides that have been made to standardize the assessment process, intra- and inter-observer discrepancies in scoring is not uncommon. In this manuscript we describe a pathologist assisted, computer-based continuous scoring approach for increasing the precision and reproducibility of assessing imaged breast tissue specimens. Methods Computer-assisted analysis on HER2 IHC is compared with manual scoring and fluorescence in situ hybridization results on a test set of 99 digitally imaged breast cancer cases enriched with equivocally scored (2+ cases. Image features are generated based on the staining profile of the positive control tissue and pixels delineated by a newly developed Membrane Isolation Algorithm. Evaluation of results was performed using Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC analysis. Results A computer-aided diagnostic approach has been developed using a membrane isolation algorithm and quantitative use of positive immunostaining controls. By incorporating internal positive controls into feature analysis a greater Area Under the Curve (AUC in ROC analysis was achieved than feature analysis without positive controls. Evaluation of HER2 immunostaining that utilized membrane pixels, controls, and percent area stained showed significantly greater AUC than manual scoring, and significantly less false positive rate when used to evaluate immunohistochemically equivocal cases. Conclusion It has been shown that by incorporating both a membrane isolation algorithm and analysis of known

  17. Computer-assisted assessment of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 immunohistochemical assay in imaged histologic sections using a membrane isolation algorithm and quantitative analysis of positive controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Bonnie H; Ianosi-Irimie, Monica; Javidian, Parisa; Chen, Wenjin; Ganesan, Shridar; Foran, David J

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancers that overexpress the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are eligible for effective biologically targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab. However, accurately determining HER2 overexpression, especially in immunohistochemically equivocal cases, remains a challenge. Manual analysis of HER2 expression is dependent on the assessment of membrane staining as well as comparisons with positive controls. In spite of the strides that have been made to standardize the assessment process, intra- and inter-observer discrepancies in scoring is not uncommon. In this manuscript we describe a pathologist assisted, computer-based continuous scoring approach for increasing the precision and reproducibility of assessing imaged breast tissue specimens. Computer-assisted analysis on HER2 IHC is compared with manual scoring and fluorescence in situ hybridization results on a test set of 99 digitally imaged breast cancer cases enriched with equivocally scored (2+) cases. Image features are generated based on the staining profile of the positive control tissue and pixels delineated by a newly developed Membrane Isolation Algorithm. Evaluation of results was performed using Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis. A computer-aided diagnostic approach has been developed using a membrane isolation algorithm and quantitative use of positive immunostaining controls. By incorporating internal positive controls into feature analysis a greater Area Under the Curve (AUC) in ROC analysis was achieved than feature analysis without positive controls. Evaluation of HER2 immunostaining that utilized membrane pixels, controls, and percent area stained showed significantly greater AUC than manual scoring, and significantly less false positive rate when used to evaluate immunohistochemically equivocal cases. It has been shown that by incorporating both a membrane isolation algorithm and analysis of known positive controls a computer-assisted diagnostic algorithm was

  18. 3D Membrane Imaging and Porosity Visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2016-03-03

    Ultrafiltration asymmetric porous membranes were imaged by two microscopy methods, which allow 3D reconstruction: Focused Ion Beam and Serial Block Face Scanning Electron Microscopy. A new algorithm was proposed to evaluate porosity and average pore size in different layers orthogonal and parallel to the membrane surface. The 3D-reconstruction enabled additionally the visualization of pore interconnectivity in different parts of the membrane. The method was demonstrated for a block copolymer porous membrane and can be extended to other membranes with application in ultrafiltration, supports for forward osmosis, etc, offering a complete view of the transport paths in the membrane.

  19. Quantitative image analysis of synovial tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hall, Pascal O.; Kraan, Maarten C.; Tak, Paul Peter

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative image analysis is a form of imaging that includes microscopic histological quantification, video microscopy, image analysis, and image processing. Hallmarks are the generation of reliable, reproducible, and efficient measurements via strict calibration and step-by-step control of the

  20. Quantitative Phase Imaging Using Hard X Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, K.A.; Gureyev, T.E.; Cookson, D.J.; Paganin, D.; Barnea, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The quantitative imaging of a phase object using 16keV xrays is reported. The theoretical basis of the techniques is presented along with its implementation using a synchrotron x-ray source. We find that our phase image is in quantitative agreement with independent measurements of the object. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Methods in quantitative image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, M; Ostreicher, M; Christen, H; Brühlmann, M

    1996-05-01

    The main steps of image analysis are image capturing, image storage (compression), correcting imaging defects (e.g. non-uniform illumination, electronic-noise, glare effect), image enhancement, segmentation of objects in the image and image measurements. Digitisation is made by a camera. The most modern types include a frame-grabber, converting the analog-to-digital signal into digital (numerical) information. The numerical information consists of the grey values describing the brightness of every point within the image, named a pixel. The information is stored in bits. Eight bits are summarised in one byte. Therefore, grey values can have a value between 0 and 256 (2(8)). The human eye seems to be quite content with a display of 5-bit images (corresponding to 64 different grey values). In a digitised image, the pixel grey values can vary within regions that are uniform in the original scene: the image is noisy. The noise is mainly manifested in the background of the image. For an optimal discrimination between different objects or features in an image, uniformity of illumination in the whole image is required. These defects can be minimised by shading correction [subtraction of a background (white) image from the original image, pixel per pixel, or division of the original image by the background image]. The brightness of an image represented by its grey values can be analysed for every single pixel or for a group of pixels. The most frequently used pixel-based image descriptors are optical density, integrated optical density, the histogram of the grey values, mean grey value and entropy. The distribution of the grey values existing within an image is one of the most important characteristics of the image. However, the histogram gives no information about the texture of the image. The simplest way to improve the contrast of an image is to expand the brightness scale by spreading the histogram out to the full available range. Rules for transforming the grey value

  2. Quantitative measurement and visualization of biofilm O 2 consumption rates in membrane filtration systems

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, Emmanuelle I E C

    2012-03-01

    There is a strong need for techniques enabling direct assessment of biological activity of biofouling in membrane filtration systems. Here we present a new quantitative and non-destructive method for mapping O 2 dynamics in biofilms during biofouling studies in membrane fouling simulators (MFS). Transparent planar O 2 optodes in combination with a luminescence lifetime imaging system were used to map the two-dimensional distribution of O 2 concentrations and consumption rates inside the MFS. The O 2 distribution was indicative for biofilm development. Biofilm activity was characterized by imaging of O 2 consumption rates, where low and high activity areas could be clearly distinguished. The spatial development of O 2 consumption rates, flow channels and stagnant areas could be determined. This can be used for studies on concentration polarization, i.e. salt accumulation at the membrane surface resulting in increased salt passage and reduced water flux. The new optode-based O 2 imaging technique applied to MFS allows non-destructive and spatially resolved quantitative biological activity measurements (BAM) for on-site biofouling diagnosis and laboratory studies. The following set of complementary tools is now available to study development and control of biofouling in membrane systems: (i) MFS, (ii) sensitive pressure drop measurement, (iii) magnetic resonance imaging, (iv) numerical modelling, and (v) biological activity measurement based on O 2 imaging methodology. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Radiological interpretation 2020: Toward quantitative image assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, John M.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of medical images by radiologists is primarily and fundamentally a subjective activity, but there are a number of clinical applications such as tumor imaging where quantitative imaging (QI) metrics (such as tumor growth rate) would be valuable to the patient’s care. It is predicted that the subjective interpretive environment of the past will, over the next decade, evolve toward the increased use of quantitative metrics for evaluating patient health from images. The increasing sophistication and resolution of modern tomographic scanners promote the development of meaningful quantitative end points, determined from images which are in turn produced using well-controlled imaging protocols. For the QI environment to expand, medical physicists, physicians, other researchers and equipment vendors need to work collaboratively to develop the quantitative protocols for imaging, scanner calibrations, and robust analytical software that will lead to the routine inclusion of quantitative parameters in the diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of human health. Most importantly, quantitative metrics need to be developed which have genuine impact on patient diagnosis and welfare, and only then will QI techniques become integrated into the clinical environment.

  4. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  5. Quantitative imaging of brain chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    We can now measure how chemicals affect different regions of the human brain. One area involves the study of drugs - in-vivo neuro-pharmacology; another involves the study of toxic chemical effects - in vivo neurotoxicology. The authors approach is to label drugs with positron-emitting radioactive tracers - chiefly carbon-11 with a half-life of 20 minutes and fluorine-18 with a half-life of 110 minutes. The labeled drugs are injected intravenously and a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is used to map out the distribution of the radioactivity within the brain from the moment of injection until about 90 minutes later. Mathematical models are used to calculate receptor concentrations and the affinity of the receptors for the injected radioactive tracer. By means of PET scanning, they look at cross sections or visual slices throughout the human brain, obtaining computer-generated images in any plane. The authors are investigating the functions of specific drugs or specific receptors, as well as looking at the metabolic activity in different parts of the brain as revealed in glucose metabolism. For example, the authors are studying opiate receptors in patients with a variety of conditions: those who suffer from chronic pain, those who are congenitally insensitive to pain and drug addicts. They are studying patients with schizophrenia, tardive dyskinesia, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, depressed patients and sex-offenders. They are relating the state of the neurotransmitter/neuroreceptor systems to behavior. In essence, they believe that they can now examine in living human beings what relates the structure of the brain to the function of the mind that is chemistry

  6. Quantitative imaging with a mobile phone microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunan Skandarajah

    Full Text Available Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone-based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications.

  7. Quantitative Imaging with a Mobile Phone Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandarajah, Arunan; Reber, Clay D.; Switz, Neil A.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Use of optical imaging for medical and scientific applications requires accurate quantification of features such as object size, color, and brightness. High pixel density cameras available on modern mobile phones have made photography simple and convenient for consumer applications; however, the camera hardware and software that enables this simplicity can present a barrier to accurate quantification of image data. This issue is exacerbated by automated settings, proprietary image processing algorithms, rapid phone evolution, and the diversity of manufacturers. If mobile phone cameras are to live up to their potential to increase access to healthcare in low-resource settings, limitations of mobile phone–based imaging must be fully understood and addressed with procedures that minimize their effects on image quantification. Here we focus on microscopic optical imaging using a custom mobile phone microscope that is compatible with phones from multiple manufacturers. We demonstrate that quantitative microscopy with micron-scale spatial resolution can be carried out with multiple phones and that image linearity, distortion, and color can be corrected as needed. Using all versions of the iPhone and a selection of Android phones released between 2007 and 2012, we show that phones with greater than 5 MP are capable of nearly diffraction-limited resolution over a broad range of magnifications, including those relevant for single cell imaging. We find that automatic focus, exposure, and color gain standard on mobile phones can degrade image resolution and reduce accuracy of color capture if uncorrected, and we devise procedures to avoid these barriers to quantitative imaging. By accommodating the differences between mobile phone cameras and the scientific cameras, mobile phone microscopes can be reliably used to increase access to quantitative imaging for a variety of medical and scientific applications. PMID:24824072

  8. Quantitative mapping of intracellular cations in the human amniotic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Razafindrabe, L.; Bara, M.; Guiet-Bara, A.

    1993-05-01

    The effect of magnesium and taurine on the permeability of cell membranes to monovalent cations has been investigated using the Bordeaux nuclear microprobe. PIXE and RBS techniques have been used to provide quantitative measurements and ion distributions in the isolated amniotic membrane. This physiological model for cellular exchanges allowed us to reveal the distribution of most elements involved in cellular pathways and the modifications under different experimental conditions of incubation in physiological fluids. The PIXE microanalysis provided an original viewpoint on these mechanisms. Following this first study, the amnion compact lamina was found to play a role which was not, up to now, taken into account in the interpretation of electrophysiological experimentations. The release of some ionic species, such as K +, from the epithelial cells, during immersion in isotonic fluids, could have been hitherto underestimated.

  9. Quantitative visualization of passive transport across bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, John M. A.; Edwards, Martin A.; Rudd, Nicola C.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict and interpret membrane permeation coefficients is of critical importance, particularly because passive transport is crucial for the effective delivery of many pharmaceutical agents to intracellular targets. We present a method for the quantitative measurement of the permeation coefficients of protonophores by using laser confocal scanning microscopy coupled to microelectrochemistry, which is amenable to precise modeling with the finite element method. The technique delivers well defined and high mass transport rates and allows rapid visualization of the entire pH distribution on both the cis and trans side of model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). A homologous series of carboxylic acids was investigated as probe molecules for BLMs composed of soybean phosphatidylcholine. Significantly, the permeation coefficient decreased with acyl tail length contrary to previous work and to Overton's rule. The reasons for this difference are considered, and we suggest that the applicability of Overton's rule requires re-evaluation. PMID:18787114

  10. Quantitative image processing in fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Lambertus; Helman, James; Ning, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The current status of digital image processing in fluid flow research is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to a comprehensive approach to the extraction of quantitative data from multivariate databases and examples of recent developments. The discussion covers numerical simulations and experiments, data processing, generation and dissemination of knowledge, traditional image processing, hybrid processing, fluid flow vector field topology, and isosurface analysis using Marching Cubes.

  11. Finger joint synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: quantitative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Lorenzen, I

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess quantitatively, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the synovial membrane volume in second to fifth metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls, and to compare the synovial membrane volumes with a more easily obtained semi-quan...... to clinical signs of synovitis, but also that the volumes may vary more than what can be accounted for by the clinical appearances. A semi-quantitative score may be sufficient for more routine purposes....

  12. Some exercises in quantitative NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, C.J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The articles represented in this thesis result from a series of investigations that evaluate the potential of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool. In the first article the possible use of proton spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 in tissue characterization, tumor recognition and monitoring tissue response to radiotherapy is explored. The next article addresses the question whether water proton spin-lattice relaxation curves of biological tissues are adequately described by a single time constant T 1 , and analyzes the implications of multi-exponentiality for quantitative NMR imaging. In the third article the use of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool is discussed on the basis of phantom experiments. The fourth article describes a method which enables unambiguous retrieval of sign information in a set of magnetic resonance images of the inversion recovery type. The next article shows how this method can be adapted to allow accurate calculation of T 1 pictures on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The sixth article, finally, describes a simulation procedure which enables a straightforward determination of NMR imaging pulse sequence parameters for optimal tissue contrast. (orig.)

  13. The quantitative imaging network: the role of quantitative imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Pushpa; Nordstrom, Robert J.; Clark, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    The potential value of modern medical imaging methods has created a need for mechanisms to develop, translate and disseminate emerging imaging technologies and, ideally, to quantitatively correlate those with other related laboratory methods, such as the genomics and proteomics analyses required to support clinical decisions. One strategy to meet these needs efficiently and cost effectively is to develop an international network to share and reach consensus on best practices, imaging protocols, common databases, and open science strategies, and to collaboratively seek opportunities to leverage resources wherever possible. One such network is the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) started by the National Cancer Institute, USA. The mission of the QIN is to improve the role of quantitative imaging for clinical decision making in oncology by the development and validation of data acquisition, analysis methods, and other quantitative imaging tools to predict or monitor the response to drug or radiation therapy. The network currently has 24 teams (two from Canada and 22 from the USA) and several associate members, including one from Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. Each QIN team collects data from ongoing clinical trials and develops software tools for quantitation and validation to create standards for imaging research, and for use in developing models for therapy response prediction and measurement and tools for clinical decision making. The members of QIN are addressing a wide variety of cancer problems (Head and Neck cancer, Prostrate, Breast, Brain, Lung, Liver, Colon) using multiple imaging modalities (PET, CT, MRI, FMISO PET, DW-MRI, PET-CT). (author)

  14. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  15. Quantitative preclinical PET imaging: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eKuntner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available PET imaging of metabolism involves many choices, from hardware settings, software options to animal handling considerations. How to decide what settings or conditions to use is not straightforward, as the experimental design is dependent on the particular science being investigated. There is no single answer, yet there are factors that are common to all experiments that are the subject of this review. From physics to physiology, there are many factors to consider, each of which can have a significant impact upon measurements of metabolism in vivo. This review examines the most common factors related to all types of quantitative PET imaging.

  16. Chemical Imaging of the Cell Membrane by NanoSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P K; Kraft, M L; Frisz, J F; Carpenter, K J; Hutcheon, I D

    2010-02-23

    Cameca NanoSIMS 50 to probe membrane organization and test microdomain hypotheses. The NanoSIMS is an imaging secondary ion mass spectrometer with an unprecedented combination of spatial resolution, sensitivity and mass specificity. It has 50 nm lateral resolution and is capable of detecting 1 in 20 nitrogen atoms while excluding near-neighbor isobaric interferences. The tightly focused cesium ion beam is rastered across the sample to produce simultaneous, quantitative digital images of up to five different masses. By labeling each specific components of a membrane with a unique rare stable isotope or element and mapping the location of the labels with the NanoSIMS, the location of the each labeled component can be determined and quantified. This new approach to membrane composition analysis allows molecular interactions of biological membranes to be probed at length-scales relevant to lipid rafts (10s to 100s of nm) that were not previously possible. Results from our most recent experiments analyzing whole cells will be presented.

  17. Quantitative Ultrasonic Imaging for Materials Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoup, Thomas Arnold

    This thesis addresses the physical basis of the propagation and detection of ultrasound for quantitative imaging. The expanding use of ultrasonic evaluations has focused attention on techniques used in making quantitative measurements. Experimental methods for imaging in inhomogeneous material are presented which address the problems of the frequency dependent ultrasonic beamwidth and of characterizing the field at an aperture. Improvements gained with these methods are demonstrated by a study of fatigue and impact damage in composites using quantitative images. Images which show the altered ultrasonic properties as a result of fatigue or impact or both are presented. Broadband measurements have been shown previously to yield accurate estimates of the ultransonic properties of materials. Such measurements introduce distortion in images as a result of the finite, frequency dependent beamwidth. We examine three digital filters for deconvolving the effects of the finite beamwidth and demonstrate improvements obtained with the Wiener filter. Characterizing the field at an aperture is considered for both phase sensitive and phase insensitive detection methods. For measurements in which waves with distorted phasefronts are to be received, phase insensitive techniques have been shown to be advantageous. We present the response characteristics of a phase insensitive hybrid acoustoelectric receiver which exhibits increased sensitivity over that obtained with single crystal CdS-based devices. As an alternate method of characterizing the ultrasonic field we examine the applicability of sampling an aperture with an array transducer and calculating the spatial moments of the ultrasonic intensity distribution over the aperture. The spatial moments provide information concerning average properties of the field, such as intensity or beamwidth. Simulations are carried out to calculate the pressure for several geometries of interest, and spatial moments of these fields are

  18. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. As effort has, therefore, been made to place the reviews provided in this book in a broader context. The effort to do this is reflected by the inclusion of introductory chapters that address basic principles of nuclear medicine imaging, followed by overview of issues that are closely related to quantitative nuclear imaging and its potential role in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. ...

  19. EUV lithography imaging using novel pellicle membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollentier, Ivan; Vanpaemel, Johannes; Lee, Jae Uk; Adelmann, Christoph; Zahedmanesh, Houman; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Gallagher, Emily E.

    2016-03-01

    EUV mask protection against defects during use remains a challenge for EUV lithography. A stand-off protective membrane - a pellicle - is targeted to prevent yield losses in high volume manufacturing during handling and exposure, just as it is for 193nm lithography. The pellicle is thin enough to transmit EUV exposure light, yet strong enough to remain intact and hold any particles out of focus during exposure. The development of pellicles for EUV is much more challenging than for 193nm lithography for multiple reasons including: high absorption of most materials at EUV wavelength, pump-down sequences in the EUV vacuum system, and exposure to high intensity EUV light. To solve the problems of transmission and film durability, various options have been explored. In most cases a thin core film is considered, since the deposition process for this is well established and because it is the simplest option. The transmission specification typically dictates that membranes are very thin (~50nm or less), which makes both fabrication and film mechanical integrity difficult. As an alternative, low density films (e.g. including porosity) will allow thicker membranes for a given transmission specification, which is likely to improve film durability. The risk is that the porosity could influence the imaging. At imec, two cases of pellicle concepts based on reducing density have been assessed : (1) 3D-patterned SiN by directed self-assembly (DSA), and (2) carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanosheets (CNS). The first case is based on SiN membranes that are 3D-patterned by Directed Self Assembly (DSA). The materials are tested relative to the primary specifications: EUV transmission and film durability. A risk assessment of printing performance is provided based on simulations of scattered energy. General conclusions on the efficacy of various approaches will provided.

  20. Quantitative assessment of structural image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Adon F G; Roalf, David R; Ruparel, Kosha; Blake, Jason; Seelaus, Kevin; Villa, Lakshmi P; Ciric, Rastko; Cook, Philip A; Davatzikos, Christos; Elliott, Mark A; Garcia de La Garza, Angel; Gennatas, Efstathios D; Quarmley, Megan; Schmitt, J Eric; Shinohara, Russell T; Tisdall, M Dylan; Craddock, R Cameron; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Satterthwaite, Theodore D

    2017-12-24

    Data quality is increasingly recognized as one of the most important confounding factors in brain imaging research. It is particularly important for studies of brain development, where age is systematically related to in-scanner motion and data quality. Prior work has demonstrated that in-scanner head motion biases estimates of structural neuroimaging measures. However, objective measures of data quality are not available for most structural brain images. Here we sought to identify quantitative measures of data quality for T1-weighted volumes, describe how these measures relate to cortical thickness, and delineate how this in turn may bias inference regarding associations with age in youth. Three highly-trained raters provided manual ratings of 1840 raw T1-weighted volumes. These images included a training set of 1065 images from Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC), a test set of 533 images from the PNC, as well as an external test set of 242 adults acquired on a different scanner. Manual ratings were compared to automated quality measures provided by the Preprocessed Connectomes Project's Quality Assurance Protocol (QAP), as well as FreeSurfer's Euler number, which summarizes the topological complexity of the reconstructed cortical surface. Results revealed that the Euler number was consistently correlated with manual ratings across samples. Furthermore, the Euler number could be used to identify images scored "unusable" by human raters with a high degree of accuracy (AUC: 0.98-0.99), and out-performed proxy measures from functional timeseries acquired in the same scanning session. The Euler number also was significantly related to cortical thickness in a regionally heterogeneous pattern that was consistent across datasets and replicated prior results. Finally, data quality both inflated and obscured associations with age during adolescence. Taken together, these results indicate that reliable measures of data quality can be automatically derived from T1

  1. Quantitative imaging of coronary blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Alessio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Adam M. Alessio received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 2003. During his graduate studies he developed tomographic reconstruction methods for correlated data and helped construct a high-resolution PET system. He is currently a Research Assistant Professor in Radiology at the University of Washington. His research interests focus on improved data processing and reconstruction algorithms for PET/CT systems with an emphasis on quantitative imaging. Erik Butterworth recieved the BA degree in Mathematics from the University of Chicago in 1977. Between 1977 and 1987 he worked as a computer programmer/analyst for several small commercial software firms. Since 1988, he has worked as a software engineer on various research projects at the University of Washington. Between 1988 and 1993 he developed a real-time data aquisition for the analysis of estuarine sediment transport in the department of Geophysics. Between 1988 and 2002 he developed I4, a system for the display and analysis of cardic PET images in the department of Cardiology. Since 1993 he has worked on physiological simulation systems (XSIM from 1993 to 1999, JSim since 1999 at the National Simulation Resource Facility in Cirulatory Mass Transport and Exchange, in the Department of Bioengineering. His research interests include simulation systems and medical imaging. James H. Caldwell, MD, University of Missouri-Columbia 1970, is Professor of Medicine (Cardiology and Radiology and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Acting Head, Division of Cardiology and Director of Nuclear Cardiology for the University of Washington Hospitals, Seattle WA, USA. James B. Bassingthwaighte, MD, Toronto 1955, PhD Mayo Grad Sch Med 1964, was Professor of Physiology and of Medicine at Mayo Clinic until 1975 when he moved to the University of Washington to chair Bioengineering. He is Professor of Bioengineering and

  2. Quantitative MR Image Analysis for Brian Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shboul, Zeina A; Reza, Sayed M S; Iftekharuddin, Khan M

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated quantitative MR image analysis framework to include all necessary steps such as MRI inhomogeneity correction, feature extraction, multiclass feature selection and multimodality abnormal brain tissue segmentation respectively. We first obtain mathematical algorithm to compute a novel Generalized multifractional Brownian motion (GmBm) texture feature. We then demonstrate efficacy of multiple multiresolution texture features including regular fractal dimension (FD) texture, and stochastic texture such as multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) and GmBm features for robust tumor and other abnormal tissue segmentation in brain MRI. We evaluate these texture and associated intensity features to effectively delineate multiple abnormal tissues within and around the tumor core, and stroke lesions using large scale public and private datasets.

  3. Quantitative aspects of myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion measurements have traditionally been performed in a quantitative fashion using application of the Sapirstein, Fick, Kety-Schmidt, or compartmental analysis principles. Although global myocardial blood flow measurements have not proven clinically useful, regional determinations have substantially advanced our understanding of and ability to detect myocardial ischemia. With the introduction of thallium-201, such studies have become widely available, although these have generally undergone qualitative evaluation. Using computer-digitized data, several methods for the quantification of myocardial perfusion images have been introduced. These include orthogonal and polar coordinate systems and anatomically oriented region of interest segmentation. Statistical ranges of normal and time-activity analyses have been applied to these data, resulting in objective and reproducible means of data evaluation

  4. Hepatic iron overload: Quantitative MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomori, J.M.; Horev, G.; Tamary, H.; Zandback, J.; Kornreich, L.; Zaizov, R.; Freud, E.; Krief, O.; Ben-Meir, J.; Rotem, H.

    1991-01-01

    Iron deposits demonstrate characteristically shortened T2 relaxation times. Several previously published studies reported poor correlation between the in vivo hepatic 1/T2 measurements made by means of midfield magnetic resonance (MR) units and the hepatic iron content of iron-overloaded patients. In this study, the authors assessed the use of in vivo 1/T2 measurements obtained by means of MR imaging at 0.5 T using short echo times (13.4 and 30 msec) and single-echo-sequences as well as computed tomographic (CT) attenuation as a measure of liver iron concentration in 10 severely iron-overloaded patients with beta-thalassemia major. The iron concentrations in surgical wedge biopsy samples of the liver, which varied between 3 and 9 mg/g of wet weight (normal, less than or equal to 0.5 mg/g), correlated well (r = .93, P less than or equal to .0001) with the preoperative in vivo hepatic 1/T2 measurements. The CT attenuation did not correlate with liver iron concentration. Quantitative MR imaging is a readily available noninvasive method for the assessment of hepatic iron concentration in iron-overloaded patients, reducing the need for needle biopsies of the liver

  5. Forearm interosseous membrane imaging and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, Joseph C.; Roach, Neil; Gaughan, John P.; Kozin, Scott H.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the regional thickness variation of the interosseous membrane (IOM) along the forearm and validate magnetic resonance imaging of the IOM with laser micrometry. Axial thickness measurements of 12 cadaver forearms were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at radial, central, and ulnar locations. The specimens were dissected, and IOM thickness measured using a laser micrometer. MRI and laser measurements of the main and oblique IOM bundles were compared. An axial thickness profile was plotted versus forearm length, and radial, central, and ulnar positions were compared. The main bundle thickness was 2.18±0.20 mm using laser micrometry, which was not significantly different from MRI measurements (1.86±0.25 mm, p=0.11, power = 0.84). The dorsal oblique bundle thickness was not significantly different between measurement methods (2.93±0.77 mm and 3.30±1.64 mm using laser micrometry and MRI respectively, p=0.75, power = 0.04). Both methods demonstrated a progressive increase in thickness proximally within the forearm. MRI measurements demonstrated a significantly greater thickness increase in the radial location compared to the central location (slope = 2.26 and 1.05, r 2 =0.31 and 0.12 respectively, p 2 =0.02, p>0.05). Our findings describe the varying IOM anatomy using MRI, and determined the location of the clinically important IOM fiber bundles. This study confirms the accuracy of MR imaging of the IOM by comparison with a laser micrometer, and demonstrates the thickness variation along the forearm. This information may be used to identify changes in IOM anatomy with both acute IOM injury and chronic fiber attenuation. (orig.)

  6. Forearm interosseous membrane imaging and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Joseph C; Roach, Neil; Gaughan, John P; Kozin, Scott H

    2004-10-01

    To determine the regional thickness variation of the interosseous membrane (IOM) along the forearm and validate magnetic resonance imaging of the IOM with laser micrometry. Axial thickness measurements of 12 cadaver forearms were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at radial, central, and ulnar locations. The specimens were dissected, and IOM thickness measured using a laser micrometer. MRI and laser measurements of the main and oblique IOM bundles were compared. An axial thickness profile was plotted versus forearm length, and radial, central, and ulnar positions were compared. The main bundle thickness was 2.18+/-0.20 mm using laser micrometry, which was not significantly different from MRI measurements (1.86+/-0.25 mm, p=0.11, power = 0.84). The dorsal oblique bundle thickness was not significantly different between measurement methods (2.93+/-0.77 mm and 3.30+/-1.64 mm using laser micrometry and MRI respectively, p=0.75, power = 0.04). Both methods demonstrated a progressive increase in thickness proximally within the forearm. MRI measurements demonstrated a significantly greater thickness increase in the radial location compared to the central location (slope = 2.26 and 1.05, r(2)=0.31 and 0.12 respectively, p0.05). Our findings describe the varying IOM anatomy using MRI, and determined the location of the clinically important IOM fiber bundles. This study confirms the accuracy of MR imaging of the IOM by comparison with a laser micrometer, and demonstrates the thickness variation along the forearm. This information may be used to identify changes in IOM anatomy with both acute IOM injury and chronic fiber attenuation.

  7. Forearm interosseous membrane imaging and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinley, Joseph C. [Temple University, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roach, Neil [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Gaughan, John P. [Temple University, Department of Biostatistics, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kozin, Scott H. [Shriners Hospitals for Children, Pediatric Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery, Philadelphia (United States); Temple University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2004-10-01

    To determine the regional thickness variation of the interosseous membrane (IOM) along the forearm and validate magnetic resonance imaging of the IOM with laser micrometry. Axial thickness measurements of 12 cadaver forearms were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at radial, central, and ulnar locations. The specimens were dissected, and IOM thickness measured using a laser micrometer. MRI and laser measurements of the main and oblique IOM bundles were compared. An axial thickness profile was plotted versus forearm length, and radial, central, and ulnar positions were compared. The main bundle thickness was 2.18{+-}0.20 mm using laser micrometry, which was not significantly different from MRI measurements (1.86{+-}0.25 mm, p=0.11, power = 0.84). The dorsal oblique bundle thickness was not significantly different between measurement methods (2.93{+-}0.77 mm and 3.30{+-}1.64 mm using laser micrometry and MRI respectively, p=0.75, power = 0.04). Both methods demonstrated a progressive increase in thickness proximally within the forearm. MRI measurements demonstrated a significantly greater thickness increase in the radial location compared to the central location (slope = 2.26 and 1.05, r{sup 2}=0.31 and 0.12 respectively, p<0.05). The ulnar slope was not significantly different from zero (r{sup 2}=0.02, p>0.05). Our findings describe the varying IOM anatomy using MRI, and determined the location of the clinically important IOM fiber bundles. This study confirms the accuracy of MR imaging of the IOM by comparison with a laser micrometer, and demonstrates the thickness variation along the forearm. This information may be used to identify changes in IOM anatomy with both acute IOM injury and chronic fiber attenuation. (orig.)

  8. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Guyader, J.-M.; Klaassen, R.; Coolen, B. F.; van Kranenburg, M.; van Geuns, R. J. M.; Uitterdijk, A.; Polfliet, M.; Vandemeulebroucke, J.; Leemans, A.; Niessen, W. J.; Klein, S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T5 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different

  9. Imaging of blood plasma coagulation at supported lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxälv, Lars; Hume, Jasmin; Kasemo, Bengt; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-12-15

    The blood coagulation system relies on lipid membrane constituents to act as regulators of the coagulation process upon vascular trauma, and in particular the 2D configuration of the lipid membranes is known to efficiently catalyze enzymatic activity of blood coagulation factors. This work demonstrates a new application of a recently developed methodology to study blood coagulation at lipid membrane interfaces with the use of imaging technology. Lipid membranes with varied net charges were formed on silica supports by systematically using different combinations of lipids where neutral phosphocholine (PC) lipids were mixed with phospholipids having either positively charged ethylphosphocholine (EPC), or negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) headgroups. Coagulation imaging demonstrated that negatively charged SiO(2) and membrane surfaces exposing PS (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of PS) had coagulation times which were significantly shorter than those for plain PC membranes and EPC exposing membrane surfaces (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of EPC). Coagulation times decreased non-linearly with increasing negative surface charge for lipid membranes. A threshold value for shorter coagulation times was observed below a PS content of ∼6%. We conclude that the lipid membranes on solid support studied with the imaging setup as presented in this study offers a flexible and non-expensive solution for coagulation studies at biological membranes. It will be interesting to extend the present study towards examining coagulation on more complex lipid-based model systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of COPD: Is there a role for quantitative imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Miranda; Beek, Edwin J.R. van; Seo, Joon Beom; Biederer, Juergen; Nakano, Yasutaka; Coxson, Harvey O.; Parraga, Grace

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Multicentre studies with CT are enabling a better understanding of COPD phenotypes. • New pulmonary MRI techniques have emerged that provide sensitive COPD biomarkers. • OCT is the only imaging modality that can directly quantify the small airways. • Imaging may identify phenotypes for effective COPD management to improve outcomes. - Abstract: While the recent development of quantitative imaging methods have led to their increased use in the diagnosis and management of many chronic diseases, medical imaging still plays a limited role in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this review we highlight three pulmonary imaging modalities: computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging and the COPD biomarkers that may be helpful for managing COPD patients. We discussed the current role imaging plays in COPD management as well as the potential role quantitative imaging will play by identifying imaging phenotypes to enable more effective COPD management and improved outcomes.

  11. Management of COPD: Is there a role for quantitative imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Miranda [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); UBC James Hogg Research Center & The Institute of Heart and Lung Health, St. Paul' s Hospital, Vancouver (Canada); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Biederer, Juergen [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Lung Research Center (DZL) (Germany); Radiologie Darmstadt, Gross-Gerau County Hospital (Germany); Nakano, Yasutaka [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga (Japan); Coxson, Harvey O. [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); UBC James Hogg Research Center & The Institute of Heart and Lung Health, St. Paul' s Hospital, Vancouver (Canada); Parraga, Grace, E-mail: gparraga@robarts.ca [Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Multicentre studies with CT are enabling a better understanding of COPD phenotypes. • New pulmonary MRI techniques have emerged that provide sensitive COPD biomarkers. • OCT is the only imaging modality that can directly quantify the small airways. • Imaging may identify phenotypes for effective COPD management to improve outcomes. - Abstract: While the recent development of quantitative imaging methods have led to their increased use in the diagnosis and management of many chronic diseases, medical imaging still plays a limited role in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this review we highlight three pulmonary imaging modalities: computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging and the COPD biomarkers that may be helpful for managing COPD patients. We discussed the current role imaging plays in COPD management as well as the potential role quantitative imaging will play by identifying imaging phenotypes to enable more effective COPD management and improved outcomes.

  12. A quantitative reconstruction software suite for SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namías, Mauro; Jeraj, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Quantitative Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) imaging allows for measurement of activity concentrations of a given radiotracer in vivo. Although SPECT has usually been perceived as non-quantitative by the medical community, the introduction of accurate CT based attenuation correction and scatter correction from hybrid SPECT/CT scanners has enabled SPECT systems to be as quantitative as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems. We implemented a software suite to reconstruct quantitative SPECT images from hybrid or dedicated SPECT systems with a separate CT scanner. Attenuation, scatter and collimator response corrections were included in an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) algorithm. A novel scatter fraction estimation technique was introduced. The SPECT/CT system was calibrated with a cylindrical phantom and quantitative accuracy was assessed with an anthropomorphic phantom and a NEMA/IEC image quality phantom. Accurate activity measurements were achieved at an organ level. This software suite helps increasing quantitative accuracy of SPECT scanners.

  13. Database design and implementation for quantitative image analysis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew S; Shah, Sumit K; Pais, Richard C; Lee, Yeng-Zhong; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Goldin, Jonathan G; Cardenas, Alfonso F; Aberle, Denise R

    2005-03-01

    Quantitative image analysis (QIA) goes beyond subjective visual assessment to provide computer measurements of the image content, typically following image segmentation to identify anatomical regions of interest (ROIs). Commercially available picture archiving and communication systems focus on storage of image data. They are not well suited to efficient storage and mining of new types of quantitative data. In this paper, we present a system that integrates image segmentation, quantitation, and characterization with database and data mining facilities. The paper includes generic process and data models for QIA in medicine and describes their practical use. The data model is based upon the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data hierarchy, which is augmented with tables to store segmentation results (ROIs) and quantitative data from multiple experiments. Data mining for statistical analysis of the quantitative data is described along with example queries. The database is implemented in PostgreSQL on a UNIX server. Database requirements and capabilities are illustrated through two quantitative imaging experiments related to lung cancer screening and assessment of emphysema lung disease. The system can manage the large amounts of quantitative data necessary for research, development, and deployment of computer-aided diagnosis tools.

  14. Quantitative reconstruction from a single diffraction-enhanced image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganin, D.M.; Lewis, R.A.; Kitchen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We develop an algorithm for using a single diffraction-enhanced image (DEI) to obtain a quantitative reconstruction of the projected thickness of a single-material sample which is embedded within a substrate of approximately constant thickness. This algorithm is used to quantitatively map inclusions in a breast phantom, from a single synchrotron DEI image. In particular, the reconstructed images quantitatively represent the projected thickness in the bulk of the sample, in contrast to DEI images which greatly emphasise sharp edges (high spatial frequencies). In the context of an ultimate aim of improved methods for breast cancer detection, the reconstructions are potentially of greater diagnostic value compared to the DEI data. Lastly, we point out that the methods of analysis presented here are also applicable to the quantitative analysis of differential interference contrast (DIC) images

  15. Quantitative live-cell imaging of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgärtel, Viola; Müller, Barbara; Lamb, Don C

    2012-05-01

    Advances in fluorescence methodologies make it possible to investigate biological systems in unprecedented detail. Over the last few years, quantitative live-cell imaging has increasingly been used to study the dynamic interactions of viruses with cells and is expected to become even more indispensable in the future. Here, we describe different fluorescence labeling strategies that have been used to label HIV-1 for live cell imaging and the fluorescence based methods used to visualize individual aspects of virus-cell interactions. This review presents an overview of experimental methods and recent experiments that have employed quantitative microscopy in order to elucidate the dynamics of late stages in the HIV-1 replication cycle. This includes cytosolic interactions of the main structural protein, Gag, with itself and the viral RNA genome, the recruitment of Gag and RNA to the plasma membrane, virion assembly at the membrane and the recruitment of cellular proteins involved in HIV-1 release to the nascent budding site.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative imaging in microgravity combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the imaging techniques implemented by researchers in the microgravity combustion program shows that for almost any system, imaging of the flame may be accomplished in a variety of ways. Standard and intensified video, high speed, and infrared cameras and fluorescence, laser schlieren, rainbow schlieren, soot volume fraction, and soot temperature imaging have all been used in the laboratory and many in reduced gravity to make the necessary experimental measurements.

  17. Ultrafast quantitative time-stretch imaging flow cytometry of phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Queenie T. K.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive quantification of phytoplankton abundance, sizes and other parameters, e.g. biomasses, has been an important, yet daunting task in aquatic sciences and biofuel research. It is primarily because of the lack of effective tool to image and thus accurately profile individual microalgae in a large population. The phytoplankton species are highly diversified and heterogeneous in terms of their sizes and the richness in morphological complexity. This fact makes time-stretch imaging, a new ultrafast real-time optical imaging technology, particularly suitable for ultralarge-scale taxonomic classification of phytoplankton together with quantitative image recognition and analysis. We here demonstrate quantitative imaging flow cytometry of single phytoplankton based on quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) - a new time-stretch imaging modality for label-free quantitative phase imaging without interferometric implementations. Sharing the similar concept of Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM accesses multiple phase-gradient contrasts of each single phytoplankton, from which the quantitative phase profile is computed. We employ such system to capture, at an imaging line-scan rate of 11.6 MHz, high-resolution images of two phytoplankton populations (scenedesmus and chlamydomonas) in ultrafast microfluidic flow (3 m/s). We further perform quantitative taxonomic screening analysis enabled by this technique. More importantly, the system can also generate quantitative phase images of single phytoplankton. This is especially useful for label-free quantification of biomasses (e.g. lipid droplets) of the particular species of interest - an important task adopted in biofuel applications. Combining machine learning for automated classification, Q-ATOM could be an attractive platform for continuous and real-time ultralarge-scale single-phytoplankton analysis.

  18. Multimodal quantitative phase and fluorescence imaging of cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinye; Zuo, Chao; Yan, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescence microscopy, utilizing fluorescence labeling, has the capability to observe intercellular changes which transmitted and reflected light microscopy techniques cannot resolve. However, the parts without fluorescence labeling are not imaged. Hence, the processes simultaneously happen in these parts cannot be revealed. Meanwhile, fluorescence imaging is 2D imaging where information in the depth is missing. Therefore the information in labeling parts is also not complete. On the other hand, quantitative phase imaging is capable to image cells in 3D in real time through phase calculation. However, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction and cannot observe intercellular changes below 200 nanometers. In this work, fluorescence imaging and quantitative phase imaging are combined to build a multimodal imaging system. Such system has the capability to simultaneously observe the detailed intercellular phenomenon and 3D cell morphology. In this study the proposed multimodal imaging system is used to observe the cell behavior in the cell apoptosis. The aim is to highlight the limitations of fluorescence microscopy and to point out the advantages of multimodal quantitative phase and fluorescence imaging. The proposed multimodal quantitative phase imaging could be further applied in cell related biomedical research, such as tumor.

  19. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography for imaging the tympanic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Anke; Walther, Julia; Cimalla, Peter; Bornitz, Matthias; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality that enables micrometer-scale contactless subsurface imaging of biological tissue. Endoscopy, as another imaging method, has the potential of imaging tubular organs and cavities and therefore has opened up several application areas not accessible before. The combination of OCT and endoscopy uses the advantages of both methods and consequently allows additional imaging of structures beneath surfaces inside cavities. Currently, visual investigations on the surface of the human tympanic membrane are possible but only with expert eyes. up to now, visual imaging of the outer ear up to the tympanic membrane can be carried out by an otoscope, an operating microscope or an endoscope. In contrast to these devices, endoscopy has the advantage of imaging the whole tympanic membrane with one view. The intention of this research is the development of an endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) device for imaging the tympanic membrane depth-resolved and structures behind it. Detection of fluids in the middle ear, which function as an indicator for otitis media, could help to avoid the application of antibiotics. It is possible to detect a congeries of fluids with the otoscope but the ambition is to the early detection by OCT. The developed scanner head allows imaging in working distances in the range from zero up to 5 mm with a field of view of 2 mm. In the next step, the scanner head should be improved to increase the working distance and the field of view.

  20. Quantitative Image Restoration in Bright Field Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Sánchez Miranda, Manuel de Jesús

    2017-11-07

    Bright field (BF) optical microscopy is regarded as a poor method to observe unstained biological samples due to intrinsic low image contrast. We introduce quantitative image restoration in bright field (QRBF), a digital image processing method that restores out-of-focus BF images of unstained cells. Our procedure is based on deconvolution, using a point spread function modeled from theory. By comparing with reference images of bacteria observed in fluorescence, we show that QRBF faithfully recovers shape and enables quantify size of individual cells, even from a single input image. We applied QRBF in a high-throughput image cytometer to assess shape changes in Escherichia coli during hyperosmotic shock, finding size heterogeneity. We demonstrate that QRBF is also applicable to eukaryotic cells (yeast). Altogether, digital restoration emerges as a straightforward alternative to methods designed to generate contrast in BF imaging for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dances with Membranes: Breakthroughs from Super-resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curthoys, Nikki M.; Parent, Matthew; Mlodzianoski, Michael; Nelson, Andrew J.; Lilieholm, Jennifer; Butler, Michael B.; Valles, Matthew; Hess, Samuel T.

    2017-01-01

    Biological membrane organization mediates numerous cellular functions and has also been connected with an immense number of human diseases. However, until recently, experimental methodologies have been unable to directly visualize the nanoscale details of biological membranes, particularly in intact living cells. Numerous models explaining membrane organization have been proposed, but testing those models has required indirect methods; the desire to directly image proteins and lipids in living cell membranes is a strong motivation for the advancement of technology. The development of super-resolution microscopy has provided powerful tools for quantification of membrane organization at the level of individual proteins and lipids, and many of these tools are compatible with living cells. Previously inaccessible questions are now being addressed, and the field of membrane biology is developing rapidly. This chapter discusses how the development of super-resolution microscopy has led to fundamental advances in the field of biological membrane organization. We summarize the history and some models explaining how proteins are organized in cell membranes, and give an overview of various super-resolution techniques and methods of quantifying super-resolution data. We discuss the application of super-resolution techniques to membrane biology in general, and also with specific reference to the fields of actin and actin-binding proteins, virus infection, mitochondria, immune cell biology, and phosphoinositide signaling. Finally, we present our hopes and expectations for the future of super-resolution microscopy in the field of membrane biology. PMID:26015281

  2. Quantitative real-time imaging of glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutathione plays many important roles in biological processes; however, the dynamic changes of glutathione concentrations in living cells remain largely unknown. Here, we report a reversible reaction-based fluorescent probe—designated as RealThiol (RT)—that can quantitatively monitor the real-time ...

  3. Porosity determination on pyrocarbon using automatic quantitative image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizlik, K.; Uhlenbruck, U.; Delle, W.; Nickel, H.

    Methods of porosity determination are reviewed and applied to the measurement of the porosity of pyrocarbon. Specifically, the mathematical basis of stereology and the procedures involved in quantitative image analysis are detailed

  4. Imaging of Conductive Hearing Loss With a Normal Tympanic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Hugh D

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an approach to imaging conductive hearing loss in patients with normal tympanic membranes and discusses entities that should be checked as the radiologist evaluates this potentially complicated issue. Conductive hearing loss in a patient with a normal tympanic membrane is a complicated condition that requires a careful imaging approach. Imaging should focus on otosclerosis, and possible mimics and potential surgical considerations should be evaluated. The radiologist should examine the ossicular chain and the round window and keep in mind that a defect in the superior semicircular canal can disturb the hydraulic integrity of the labyrinth.

  5. Quantitative Image Simulation and Analysis of Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    Microscopy (HRTEM) has become a routine analysis tool for structural characterization at atomic resolution, and with the recent development of in-situ TEMs, it is now possible to study catalytic nanoparticles under reaction conditions. However, the connection between an experimental image, and the underlying...... of strain measurements from TEM images, and investigate the stability of these measurements to microscope parameters. This is followed by our efforts toward simulating metal nanoparticles on a metal-oxide support using the Charge Optimized Many Body (COMB) interatomic potential. The simulated interface...

  6. Improving quantitative neutron radiography through image restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussey, D.S., E-mail: daniel.hussey@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Coakley, K.J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Baltic, E.; Jacobson, D.L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Commonly in neutron image experiments, the interpretation of the point spread function (PSF) is limited to describing the achievable spatial resolution in an image. In this article it is shown that for various PSF models, the resulting blurring due to the PSF affects the quantification of the neutron transmission of an object and that the effect is separate from the scattered neutron field from the sample. The effect is observed in several neutron imaging detector configurations using different neutron scintillators and light sensors. In the context of estimation of optical densities with an algorithm that assumes a parallel beam, the effect of blurring fractionates the neutron signal spatially and introduces an effective background that scales with the area of the detector illuminated by neutrons. Examples are provided that demonstrate that the illuminated field of view can alter the observed neutron transmission for nearly purely absorbing objects. It is found that by accurately modeling the PSF, image restoration methods can yield more accurate estimates of the neutron attenuation by an object.

  7. Improving quantitative neutron radiography through image restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, D. S.; Coakley, K. J.; Baltic, E.; Jacobson, D. L.

    2013-11-01

    Commonly in neutron image experiments, the interpretation of the point spread function (PSF) is limited to describing the achievable spatial resolution in an image. In this article it is shown that for various PSF models, the resulting blurring due to the PSF affects the quantification of the neutron transmission of an object and that the effect is separate from the scattered neutron field from the sample. The effect is observed in several neutron imaging detector configurations using different neutron scintillators and light sensors. In the context of estimation of optical densities with an algorithm that assumes a parallel beam, the effect of blurring fractionates the neutron signal spatially and introduces an effective background that scales with the area of the detector illuminated by neutrons. Examples are provided that demonstrate that the illuminated field of view can alter the observed neutron transmission for nearly purely absorbing objects. It is found that by accurately modeling the PSF, image restoration methods can yield more accurate estimates of the neutron attenuation by an object.

  8. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging of two-photon absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardsley, Patrick; Ren, Kui; Zhang, Rongting

    2018-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality where we intend to reconstruct optical properties of heterogeneous media from measured ultrasound signals generated by the photoacoustic effect. In recent years, there have been considerable interests in using PAT to image two-photon absorption, in addition to the usual single-photon absorption, inside diffusive media. We present a mathematical model for quantitative image reconstruction in two-photon photoacoustic tomography (TP-PAT). We propose a computational strategy for the reconstruction of the optical absorption coefficients and provide some numerical evidences based on synthetic photoacoustic acoustic data to demonstrate the feasibility of quantitative reconstructions in TP-PAT.

  9. Quantitative Imaging of Single, Unstained Viruses with Coherent X Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Changyong; Jiang Huaidong; Mancuso, Adrian; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Miao Jianwei; Peng Li; Sun Ren; Shah, Sanket S.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    We report the recording and reconstruction of x-ray diffraction patterns from single, unstained viruses, for the first time. By separating the diffraction pattern of the virus particles from that of their surroundings, we performed quantitative and high-contrast imaging of a single virion. The structure of the viral capsid inside a virion was visualized. This work opens the door for quantitative x-ray imaging of a broad range of specimens from protein machineries and viruses to cellular organelles. Moreover, our experiment is directly transferable to the use of x-ray free electron lasers, and represents an experimental milestone towards the x-ray imaging of large protein complexes

  10. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  11. Scanning laser 'en face' retinal imaging of epiretinal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznicek, Lukas; Dabov, Simeon; Kayat, Bader; Liegl, Raffael; Kampik, Anselm; Ulbig, Michael; Kernt, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Comparison of scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) based 'en face' imaging techniques of patients with epiretinal membranes (ERM) and evaluation of the accuracy of preoperative diagnostic imaging. A consecutive, prospective series of 53 study eyes of 46 patients with clinically diagnosed and in optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed symptomatic ERMs were included in this study. Spectral domain (SD-) OCT volume scans (20° × 20° with 49 horizontal sections, ART 15) including SLO en face and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images of the macula were obtained with HRA2 (Heidelberg Retina Angiograph-Optical Coherence Tomography, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). In addition, wide-field SLO color and FAF images (Optomap 200Tx, Optos PLC, Dunfermline, UK) were performed also covering the macular area. En face images of both devices were graded for each included study eye based on SD-OCT cross sectional scans. Grading of SD-OCT (HRA2) based SLO en face green-blue enhanced multi-color, green reflectance, blue reflectance and standard multi-color visualization revealed a better detectability of ERM than SD-OCT-based en face infrared or FAF images or wide-field SLO (Optomap) based pseudo-color, red laser separation, green laser separation, or FAF images. Both FAF visualizations, HRA2 and Optomap based, achieved low mean scores. SD-OCT based en face thickness map visualization revealed good visualization but poor demarcation of epiretinal membranes. In summary, en face regular or enhanced multicolor SLO images acquired with HRA2 allow a better visualization of epiretinal membranes for preoperative evaluation compared to SD-OCT based en face thickness map or pseudo-color images acquired with Optomap while infrared or FAF images are least suitable to depict epiretinal membranes.

  12. Informatics methods to enable sharing of quantitative imaging research data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mia A; Freymann, John B; Kirby, Justin S; Fedorov, Andriy; Fennessy, Fiona M; Eschrich, Steven A; Berglund, Anders E; Fenstermacher, David A; Tan, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaotao; Casavant, Thomas L; Brown, Bartley J; Braun, Terry A; Dekker, Andre; Roelofs, Erik; Mountz, James M; Boada, Fernando; Laymon, Charles; Oborski, Matt; Rubin, Daniel L

    2012-11-01

    The National Cancer Institute Quantitative Research Network (QIN) is a collaborative research network whose goal is to share data, algorithms and research tools to accelerate quantitative imaging research. A challenge is the variability in tools and analysis platforms used in quantitative imaging. Our goal was to understand the extent of this variation and to develop an approach to enable sharing data and to promote reuse of quantitative imaging data in the community. We performed a survey of the current tools in use by the QIN member sites for representation and storage of their QIN research data including images, image meta-data and clinical data. We identified existing systems and standards for data sharing and their gaps for the QIN use case. We then proposed a system architecture to enable data sharing and collaborative experimentation within the QIN. There are a variety of tools currently used by each QIN institution. We developed a general information system architecture to support the QIN goals. We also describe the remaining architecture gaps we are developing to enable members to share research images and image meta-data across the network. As a research network, the QIN will stimulate quantitative imaging research by pooling data, algorithms and research tools. However, there are gaps in current functional requirements that will need to be met by future informatics development. Special attention must be given to the technical requirements needed to translate these methods into the clinical research workflow to enable validation and qualification of these novel imaging biomarkers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative Measurements using Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    scanner for pulsating flow mimicking the femoral artery from a CompuFlow 1000 pump (Shelley Medical). Data were used in four estimators based on directional transverse oscillation for velocity, flow angle, volume flow, and turbulence estimation and their respective precisions. An adaptive lag scheme gave...... the ability to estimate a large velocity range, or alternatively measure at two sites to find e.g. stenosis degree in a vessel. The mean angle at the vessel center was estimated to 90.9◦±8.2◦ indicating a laminar flow from a turbulence index being close to zero (0.1 ±0.1). Volume flow was 1.29 ±0.26 mL/stroke...... (true: 1.15 mL/stroke, bias: 12.2%). Measurements down to 160 mm were obtained with a relative standard deviation and bias of less than 10% for the lateral component for stationary, parabolic flow. The method can, thus, find quantitative velocities, angles, and volume flows at sites currently...

  14. Biostatistical analysis of quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, C; Albrecht, M A; Lam, V; Takechi, R; Mamo, J C

    2016-12-01

    Semiquantitative immunofluorescence microscopy has become a key methodology in biomedical research. Typical statistical workflows are considered in the context of avoiding pseudo-replication and marginalising experimental error. However, immunofluorescence microscopy naturally generates hierarchically structured data that can be leveraged to improve statistical power and enrich biological interpretation. Herein, we describe a robust distribution fitting procedure and compare several statistical tests, outlining their potential advantages/disadvantages in the context of biological interpretation. Further, we describe tractable procedures for power analysis that incorporates the underlying distribution, sample size and number of images captured per sample. The procedures outlined have significant potential for increasing understanding of biological processes and decreasing both ethical and financial burden through experimental optimization. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Quantitative multimodality imaging in cancer research and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Abramson, Richard G; Quarles, C Chad

    2014-11-01

    Advances in hardware and software have enabled the realization of clinically feasible, quantitative multimodality imaging of tissue pathophysiology. Earlier efforts relating to multimodality imaging of cancer have focused on the integration of anatomical and functional characteristics, such as PET-CT and single-photon emission CT (SPECT-CT), whereas more-recent advances and applications have involved the integration of multiple quantitative, functional measurements (for example, multiple PET tracers, varied MRI contrast mechanisms, and PET-MRI), thereby providing a more-comprehensive characterization of the tumour phenotype. The enormous amount of complementary quantitative data generated by such studies is beginning to offer unique insights into opportunities to optimize care for individual patients. Although important technical optimization and improved biological interpretation of multimodality imaging findings are needed, this approach can already be applied informatively in clinical trials of cancer therapeutics using existing tools. These concepts are discussed herein.

  16. A quantitative assessment of the membrane-integral sub-proteome of a bacterial magnetic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschdorf, Oliver; Bonn, Florian; Zeytuni, Natalie; Zarivach, Raz; Becher, Dörte; Schüler, Dirk

    2018-02-10

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of complex membrane-bound organelles that direct the biomineralization of magnetic nanoparticles and serve for magnetic field navigation. These magnetosome compartments have recently emerged as a model for studying the subcellular organization of prokaryotic organelles. Previous studies indicated the presence of specific proteins with various functions in magnetosome biosynthesis. However, the exact composition and stoichiometry of the magnetosome subproteome have remained unknown. In order to quantify and unambiguously identify all proteins specifically targeted to the magnetosome membrane of the Alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, we analyzed the protein composition of several cellular fractions by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. We found that nearly all genuine magnetosome membrane-integral proteins belong to a well-defined set of previously identified proteins encoded by gene clusters within a genomic island, indicating a highly controlled protein composition. Magnetosome proteins were present in different quantities with up to 120 copies per particle as estimated by correlating our results with available quantitative Western blot data. This high abundance suggests an unusually crowded protein composition of the membrane and a tight packing with transmembrane domains of integral proteins. Our findings will help to further define the structure of the organelle and contribute to the elucidation of magnetosome biogenesis. Magnetosomes are one of the most complex bacterial organelles and consist of membrane-bounded crystals of magnetic minerals. The exact composition and stoichiometry of the associated membrane integral proteins are of major interest for a deeper understanding of prokaryotic organelle assembly; however, previous proteomic studies failed to reveal meaningful estimations due to the lack of precise and quantitative data, and the inherently high degree of accumulated protein contaminants in

  17. Studying membrane properties using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöckl, M.T.; Bizzarri, R.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Mely, Y.; Duportail, G.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful tool to investigate the structure and composition of biological membranes. A wide variety of fluorescent probes suitable for FLIM experiments have been described. These compounds differ strongly in the details of their incorporation into

  18. Developments in Dynamic Analysis for quantitative PIXE true elemental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic Analysis (DA) is a method for projecting quantitative major and trace element images from PIXE event data-streams (off-line or on-line) obtained using the Nuclear Microprobe. The method separates full elemental spectral signatures to produce images that strongly reject artifacts due to overlapping elements, detector effects (such as escape peaks and tailing) and background. The images are also quantitative, stored in ppm-charge units, enabling images to be directly interrogated for the concentrations of all elements in areas of the images. Recent advances in the method include the correction for changing X-ray yields due to varying sample compositions across the image area and the construction of statistical variance images. The resulting accuracy of major element concentrations extracted directly from these images is better than 3% relative as determined from comparisons with electron microprobe point analysis. These results are complemented by error estimates derived from the variance images together with detection limits. This paper provides an update of research on these issues, introduces new software designed to make DA more accessible, and illustrates the application of the method to selected geological problems.

  19. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  20. Quantitation of water in membranes by neutron diffraction and X-ray techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, R B; Schoenborn, B P

    1986-01-01

    The general principle of placing neutron and X-ray scattering density profiles on an absolute scale is being applied to an increasing number of problems in structural biology. This maximizes the information from the experiments by facilitating the identification of various molecular species. The greater detail available on the membrane water distribution has been highlighted in this chapter. The quantitative analysis of water in the headgroup region and the intermembrane water layer provides valuable information on membrane structure and function. The single most important limitation of the method is the lack of resolution. Improvements in experimental techniques will improve the resolution in a number of situations.

  1. Generalized PSF modeling for optimized quantitation in PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Jha, Abhinav K.; Casey, Michael E.; Kadrmas, Dan J.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    Point-spread function (PSF) modeling offers the ability to account for resolution degrading phenomena within the PET image generation framework. PSF modeling improves resolution and enhances contrast, but at the same time significantly alters image noise properties and induces edge overshoot effect. Thus, studying the effect of PSF modeling on quantitation task performance can be very important. Frameworks explored in the past involved a dichotomy of PSF versus no-PSF modeling. By contrast, the present work focuses on quantitative performance evaluation of standard uptake value (SUV) PET images, while incorporating a wide spectrum of PSF models, including those that under- and over-estimate the true PSF, for the potential of enhanced quantitation of SUVs. The developed framework first analytically models the true PSF, considering a range of resolution degradation phenomena (including photon non-collinearity, inter-crystal penetration and scattering) as present in data acquisitions with modern commercial PET systems. In the context of oncologic liver FDG PET imaging, we generated 200 noisy datasets per image-set (with clinically realistic noise levels) using an XCAT anthropomorphic phantom with liver tumours of varying sizes. These were subsequently reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with varying PSF modelled kernels. We focused on quantitation of both SUVmean and SUVmax, including assessment of contrast recovery coefficients, as well as noise-bias characteristics (including both image roughness and coefficient of-variability), for different tumours/iterations/PSF kernels. It was observed that overestimated PSF yielded more accurate contrast recovery for a range of tumours, and typically improved quantitative performance. For a clinically reasonable number of iterations, edge enhancement due to PSF modeling (especially due to over-estimated PSF) was in fact seen to lower SUVmean bias in small tumours. Overall, the results indicate that exactly matched PSF

  2. Quantitative Comparison of Y-90 and Ge-68 PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sangkeun; Kwak, Shin Hye; Lee, Jeong A; Song, Han Kyeol; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lim, Sang Moo; KIm, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute of Raiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Su Young [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess statistical characteristics and to improve count rate of image for enhancing Y-90 image quality by using non-parametric bootstrap method. The results showed that Y-90 PET image can be improved using non-parametric bootstrap method. PET data was able to be improved using non-parametric bootstrap method and it was verified with showing improved prompts rate. Y-90 PET image quality was improved and bias indicated that the bootstrapped image was more similar to the gold standard than other images. The non-parametric bootstrap method will be useful tool for enhancing Y-90 PET image and it will be expected to reduce time for acquisition and to elevate performance for diagnosis and treatment. Yttrium-90 (Y-90) radioembolization is one of the treatment methods unrespectable stage of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic colon cancer to the liver. However, Y-90 radioembolization is a catheter-based therapy that delivers internal radiation to tumors, it results in greater radiation exposure to the tumors than using external radiation. Also, unlike other current therapies for the treatment of unresectable liver tumors, Y-90 radioembolization is much less often associated with toxicities such as abdominal pain, fever, nausea, and vomiting. Therefore Y-90 has been received much interest and studied by many researchers. Imaging of Y-90 has been conducted using most commonly gamma camera but quantitative PET imaging is required due to low sensitivity and resolution. Y-90 imaging is generally performed with SPECT by Bremsstrahlung photons. Unfortunately, the low image quality due to the nature of the Bremsstrahlung photon limits the quantitative accuracy of Y-90 SPECT. To overcome this limitation in SPECT imaging, Y-90 PET has been suggested as an alternative.

  3. Quantitative biological imaging by ptychographic X-ray diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Beerlink, Andre; Salditt, Tim [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Thibault, Pierre; Dierolf, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department Physik (E17), Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Kewish, Cameron M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    Mesoscopic structures with specific functions are abundant in many cellular systems and have been well characterized by electron microscopy in the past. However, the quantitative study of the three-dimensional structure and density of subcellular components remains a difficult problem. In this contribution we show how these limitations could be overcome in the future by the application of recently introduced and now rapidly evolving coherent X-ray imaging techniques for quantitative biological imaging on the nanoscale. More specifically, we report on a recent scanning (ptychographic) diffraction experiment on unstained and unsliced freeze-dried cells of the bacterium Deinococcus radiourans using only a pinhole as beam defining optical element. As a result quantitative density projections well below optical resolution have been achieved.

  4. CMOS APS detector characterization for quantitative X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrizzi, Marco, E-mail: m.endrizzi@ucl.ac.uk [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Oliva, Piernicola [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, via Piandanna 4, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Golosio, Bruno [Sezione di Matematica, Fisica e Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Università di Sassari, via Piandanna 4, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Delogu, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi”, Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Imaging detector based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor and structured scintillator is characterized for quantitative X-ray imaging in the energy range 11–30 keV. Linearity, dark noise, spatial resolution and flat-field correction are the characteristics of the detector subject of investigation. The detector response, in terms of mean Analog-to-Digital Unit and noise, is modeled as a function of the energy and intensity of the X-rays. The model is directly tested using monochromatic X-ray beams and it is also indirectly validated by means of polychromatic X-ray-tube spectra. Such a characterization is suitable for quantitative X-ray imaging and the model can be used in simulation studies that take into account the actual performance of the detector.

  5. Quantitative fetal fibronectin predicts preterm birth in women with bulging fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Francesco; Isted, Alexander; Hezelgrave, Natasha L; Shennan, Andrew H

    2016-08-01

    To assess the predictive value of quantitative fetal fibronectin (fFN) concentration in cervicovaginal fluid for spontaneous preterm birth in women with bulging fetal membranes. This was a prospective observational study from five UK tertiary centres of a cohort of women with singleton pregnancy and bulging fetal membranes presenting between 18 and 32 weeks of gestation (n=62), in the period 2010-2014. fFN concentrations in cervicovaginal fluid were measured both quantitatively and qualitatively at presentation in all women. Predictive statistics and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for both tests to predict spontaneous preterm birth within 14 days from testing and before 34 weeks of gestation. 62 eligible women with bulging fetal membranes were recruited from screening of 2571 women at high risk of preterm birth. The median gestational age was 24(+0) (LQ-UQ, 21(+2)-25(+3)) at presentation and 34(+4) (25(+2)-39(+0)) at delivery, with a median time from testing to delivery of 58 days (17-110). Concentration of quantitative fFN at presentation correlated negatively with time to delivery (Spearman's rs=-0.615, pmembranes, suggesting that fFN leakage could potentially be an active process. This may aid the clinical management of this high-risk group in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing the Reliability of Quantitative Imaging of Sm-153

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Zijie; Dagan, Maáyan; Veldman, Jeanette; Trees, Brad

    2013-03-01

    Samarium-153 is used for palliation of and recently has been investigated for therapy for bone metastases. Patient specific dosing of Sm-153 is based on quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and knowing the accuracy and precision of image-based estimates of the in vivo activity distribution. Physical phantom studies are useful for estimating these in simple objects, but do not model realistic activity distributions. We are using realistic Monte Carlo simulations combined with a realistic digital phantom modeling human anatomy to assess the accuracy and precision of Sm-153 SPECT. Preliminary data indicates that we can simulate projection images and reconstruct them with compensation for various physical image degrading factors, such as attenuation and scatter in the body as well as non-idealities in the imaging system, to provide realistic SPECT images.

  7. Some selected quantitative methods of thermal image analysis in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a new algorithm based on some selected automatic quantitative methods for analysing thermal images. It shows the practical implementation of these image analysis methods in Matlab. It enables to perform fully automated and reproducible measurements of selected parameters in thermal images. The paper also shows two examples of the use of the proposed image analysis methods for the area of ​​the skin of a human foot and face. The full source code of the developed application is also provided as an attachment. The main window of the program during dynamic analysis of the foot thermal image. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Application of multispectral imaging in quantitative immunohistochemistry study of breast cancer: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Lou; Wang, Lin-Wei; Chen, Jia-Mei; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Xiang, Qing-Ming; Yang, Gui-Fang; Qu, Ai-Ping; Liu, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) based on imaging and spectroscopy, as relatively novel to the field of histopathology, has been used in biomedical multidisciplinary researches. We analyzed and compared the utility of multispectral (MS) versus conventional red-green-blue (RGB) images for immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining to explore the advantages of MSI in clinical-pathological diagnosis. The MS images acquired of IHC-stained membranous marker human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytoplasmic marker cytokeratin5/6 (CK5/6), and nuclear marker estrogen receptor (ER) have higher resolution, stronger contrast, and more accurate segmentation than the RGB images. The total signal optical density (OD) values for each biomarker were higher in MS images than in RGB images (all P images (AUC = 0.91, 89.1 %, 83.2 %) than RGB images (AUC = 0.87, 84.5, and 81.8 %). There was no significant difference between quantitative results of RGB images and clinico-pathological characteristics (P > 0.05). However, by quantifying MS images, the total signal OD values of HER2 positive expression were correlated with lymph node status and histological grades (P = 0.02 and 0.04). Additionally, the consistency test results indicated the inter-observer agreement was more robust in MS images for HER2 (inter-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.95, r s = 0.94), CK5/6 (ICC = 0.90, r s = 0.88), and ER (ICC = 0.94, r s = 0.94) (all P images for HER2 (ICC = 0.91, r s = 0.89), CK5/6 (ICC = 0.85, r s = 0.84), and ER (ICC = 0.90, r s = 0.89) (all P images in quantitative IHC analysis could obtain higher accuracy, reliability, and more information of protein expression in relation to clinico-pathological characteristics versus conventional RGB images. It may become an optimal IHC digital imaging system used in quantitative pathology.

  9. Multiparametric Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging in Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Perlman, Alan; Kalache, Safa; Berman, Nathaniel; Seshan, Surya; Salvatore, Steven; Smith, Lindsey; Wehrli, Natasha; Waldron, Levi; Kodali, Hanish; Chevalier, James

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the value of multiparametric quantitative ultrasound imaging in assessing chronic kidney disease (CKD) using kidney biopsy pathologic findings as reference standards. We prospectively measured multiparametric quantitative ultrasound markers with grayscale, spectral Doppler, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in 25 patients with CKD before kidney biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers. Based on all pathologic (glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, arteriosclerosis, and edema) scores, the patients with CKD were classified into mild (no grade 3 and quantitative ultrasound parameters included kidney length, cortical thickness, pixel intensity, parenchymal shear wave velocity, intrarenal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index. We tested the difference in quantitative ultrasound parameters among mild CKD, moderate to severe CKD, and healthy controls using analysis of variance, analyzed correlations of quantitative ultrasound parameters with pathologic scores and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using Pearson correlation coefficients, and examined the diagnostic performance of quantitative ultrasound parameters in determining moderate CKD and an estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences in cortical thickness, pixel intensity, PSV, and EDV among the 3 groups (all P quantitative ultrasound parameters, the top areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PSV and EDV were 0.88 and 0.97, respectively, for determining pathologic moderate to severe CKD, and 0.76 and 0.86 for estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Moderate to good correlations were found for PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity with pathologic scores and estimated GFR. The PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity are valuable in determining moderate to severe CKD. The value of shear wave velocity in

  10. Clinical application of quantitative 99Tcm-pertechnetate thyroid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yongju; Xie Jian; Yan Xinhui; Wand Jiebin; Zhu Xuanmin; Liu Lin; Sun Haizhou

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of quantitative 99 Tc m -pertechnetate thyroid imaging for the diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation in patients with thyroid disease. Methods: With the Siemens Orbit SPECT, 99 Tc m sodium pertechnetate thyroid imaging was performed on a control group and 108 patients with Graves' disease, 58 patients with Hashimoto's disease, 41 patients with subacute thyroiditis. Three functional parameters were calculated as follows: AR=5 min thyroid count/1 min thyroid count; UI=20 min thyroid count/thigh count; T d =imaging interval between carotid and thyroid. Results: 1) Three functional parameters were basically concordant with serological parameters in patients with Graves' disease. While uptake was high in patients who had contracted Graves' disease for ≤0.5 year, for those whose disease relapsed within 2 years the 99 Tc m thyroid uptake increased when the antithyroid medication was stopped. 2) Thyroid images of hyperthyroid patients with Hashimoto's disease showed increased perfusion and 99 Tc m uptake, a pattern similar to that found in Graves' disease. Differences in T d , AR , UI were not significant among euthyroid, subclinical hypothyroid patients with Hashimoto's disease, so uptake ratios could indicate the thyroid activity. 3) Delayed thyroid image and diffuse uptake decrease were found in hyperthyroid patients with SAT, however, focal damages were observed in euthyroid patients. Conclusion: Quantitative 99 Tc m -pertechnetate thyroid imaging is a significantly helpful technique in the diagnosis and treatment for common thyroid disorders

  11. Planar gamma camera imaging and quantitation of Yttrium-90 bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, S.; DeNardo, G.L.; Yuan, A.

    1994-01-01

    Yttrium-90 is a promising radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy of cancer because of its energetic beta emissions. Therapeutic management requires quantitative imaging to assess the pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry of the 90 Y-labeled antibody. Conventional gamma photon imaging methods cannot be easily applied to imaging of 90 Y-bremsstrahlung because of its continuous energy spectrum. The sensitivity, resolution and source-to-background signal ratio (S/B) of the detector system for 90 Y-bremsstrahlung were investigated for various collimators and energy windows in order to determine optimum conditions for quantitative imaging. After these conditions were determined, the accuracy of quantitation of 90 Y activity in an Alderson abdominal phantom was examined. When the energy-window width was increased, the benefit of increased sensitivity outweighed degradation in resolution and S/B ratio until the manufacturer's energy specifications for the collimator were exceeded. Using the same energy window, the authors improved resolution and S/B for the medium-energy (ME) collimator when compared to the low-energy, all-purpose (LEAP) collimator, and there was little additional improvement using the high-energy (HE) collimator. Camera sensitivity under tissue equivalent conditions was 4.2 times greater for the LEAP and 1.7 times greater for the ME collimators when compared to the HE collimator. Thus, the best, most practical selections were found to be the ME collimator and an energy window of 55-285 keV. When they used these optimal conditions for image acquisition, the estimation of 90 Y activity in organs and tumors was within 15% of the true activities. The results for this study suggest that reasonable accuracy can be achieved in clinical radioimmunotherapy using 90 Y-bremsstrahlung quantitation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  12. Fast automatic quantitative cell replication with fluorescent live cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ching-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background live cell imaging is a useful tool to monitor cellular activities in living systems. It is often necessary in cancer research or experimental research to quantify the dividing capabilities of cells or the cell proliferation level when investigating manipulations of the cells or their environment. Manual quantification of fluorescence microscopic image is difficult because human is neither sensitive to fine differences in color intensity nor effective to count and average fluorescence level among cells. However, auto-quantification is not a straightforward problem to solve. As the sampling location of the microscopy changes, the amount of cells in individual microscopic images varies, which makes simple measurement methods such as the sum of stain intensity values or the total number of positive stain within each image inapplicable. Thus, automated quantification with robust cell segmentation techniques is required. Results An automated quantification system with robust cell segmentation technique are presented. The experimental results in application to monitor cellular replication activities show that the quantitative score is promising to represent the cell replication level, and scores for images from different cell replication groups are demonstrated to be statistically significantly different using ANOVA, LSD and Tukey HSD tests (p-value Conclusion A robust automated quantification method of live cell imaging is built to measure the cell replication level, providing a robust quantitative analysis system in fluorescent live cell imaging. In addition, the presented unsupervised entropy based cell segmentation for live cell images is demonstrated to be also applicable for nuclear segmentation of IHC tissue images.

  13. Quantitative muscle ultrasound versus quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Barbara H; Pillen, Sigrid; Voet, Nicoline B M; Heerschap, Arend; van Engelen, Baziel G M; van Alfen, Nens

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are non-invasive methods that can be performed repeatedly and without discomfort. In the assessment of neuromuscular disorders it is unknown if they provide complementary information. In this study we tested this for patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). We performed quantitative muscle ultrasound (QMUS) and quantitative MRI (QMRI) of the legs in 5 men with FSHD. The correlation between QMUS-determined z-scores and QMRI-determined muscle fraction and T1 signal intensity (SI) was very high. QMUS had a wider dynamic range than QMRI, whereas QMRI could detect inhomogeneous distribution of pathology over the length of the muscles. Both QMUS and QMRI are well suited for imaging muscular dystrophy. The wider dynamic range of QMUS can be advantageous in the follow-up of advanced disease stages, whereas QMRI seems preferable in pathologies such as FSHD that affect deep muscle layers and show inhomogeneous abnormality distributions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Characterization of cerebral white matter properties using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Andrew L; Hurley, Samuel A; Samsonov, Alexey A; Adluru, Nagesh; Hosseinbor, Ameer Pasha; Mossahebi, Pouria; Tromp, Do P M; Zakszewski, Elizabeth; Field, Aaron S

    2011-01-01

    The image contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive to several mechanisms that are modulated by the properties of the tissue environment. The degree and type of contrast weighting may be viewed as image filters that accentuate specific tissue properties. Maps of quantitative measures of these mechanisms, akin to microstructural/environmental-specific tissue stains, may be generated to characterize the MRI and physiological properties of biological tissues. In this article, three quantitative MRI (qMRI) methods for characterizing white matter (WM) microstructural properties are reviewed. All of these measures measure complementary aspects of how water interacts with the tissue environment. Diffusion MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging, characterizes the diffusion of water in the tissues and is sensitive to the microstructural density, spacing, and orientational organization of tissue membranes, including myelin. Magnetization transfer imaging characterizes the amount and degree of magnetization exchange between free water and macromolecules like proteins found in the myelin bilayers. Relaxometry measures the MRI relaxation constants T1 and T2, which in WM have a component associated with the water trapped in the myelin bilayers. The conduction of signals between distant brain regions occurs primarily through myelinated WM tracts; thus, these methods are potential indicators of pathology and structural connectivity in the brain. This article provides an overview of the qMRI stain mechanisms, acquisition and analysis strategies, and applications for these qMRI stains.

  15. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Yoshitaka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example, while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  16. Quantitative methods for the analysis of electron microscope images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skands, Peter Ulrik Vallø

    1996-01-01

    in a number work cases. These mainly falls in the three categories: (i) Description of coarse scale measures to quantify surface structure or texture (topography); (ii) Characterization of fracture surfaces in steels (fractography); (iii) Grain boundary segmentation in sintered ceramics. The theoretical...... foundation of the thesis fall in the areas of: 1) Mathematical Morphology; 2) Distance transforms and applications; and 3) Fractal geometry. Image analysis opens in general the possibility of a quantitative and statistical well founded measurement of digital microscope images. Herein lies also the conditions...

  17. Realizing the quantitative potential of the radioisotope image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.J.G.; Britton, K.E.; Cruz, F.R.

    1977-01-01

    The sophistication and accuracy of a clinical strategy depends on the accuracy of the results of the tests used. When numerical values are given in the test report powerful clinical strategies can be developed. The eye is well able to perceive structures in a high-quality grey-scale image. However, the degree of difference in density between two points cannot be estimated quantitatively by eye. This creates a problem particularly when there is only a small difference between the count-rate at a suspicious point or region and the count-rate to be expected there if the image were normal. To resolve this problem methods of quantitation of the amplitude of a feature, defined as the difference between the observed and expected values at the region of the feature, have been developed. The eye can estimate the frequency of light entering it very accurately (perceived as colour). Thus, if count-rate data are transformed into colour in a systematic way then information about realtive count-rate can be perceived. A computer-driven, interactive colour display system is used in which the count-rate range of each colour is computed as a percentage of a reference count-rate value. This can be used to obtain quantitative estimates of the amplitude of an image feature. The application of two methods to normal and pathological data are described and the results discussed. (author)

  18. Quantitative subsurface analysis using frequency modulated thermal wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, S. K.; Suresh, B.; Ghali, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    Quantitative depth analysis of the anomaly with an enhanced depth resolution is a challenging task towards the estimation of depth of the subsurface anomaly using thermography. Frequency modulated thermal wave imaging introduced earlier provides a complete depth scanning of the object by stimulating it with a suitable band of frequencies and further analyzing the subsequent thermal response using a suitable post processing approach to resolve subsurface details. But conventional Fourier transform based methods used for post processing unscramble the frequencies with a limited frequency resolution and contribute for a finite depth resolution. Spectral zooming provided by chirp z transform facilitates enhanced frequency resolution which can further improves the depth resolution to axially explore finest subsurface features. Quantitative depth analysis with this augmented depth resolution is proposed to provide a closest estimate to the actual depth of subsurface anomaly. This manuscript experimentally validates this enhanced depth resolution using non stationary thermal wave imaging and offers an ever first and unique solution for quantitative depth estimation in frequency modulated thermal wave imaging.

  19. Cancer imaging phenomics toolkit: quantitative imaging analytics for precision diagnostics and predictive modeling of clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzikos, Christos; Rathore, Saima; Bakas, Spyridon; Pati, Sarthak; Bergman, Mark; Kalarot, Ratheesh; Sridharan, Patmaa; Gastounioti, Aimilia; Jahani, Nariman; Cohen, Eric; Akbari, Hamed; Tunc, Birkan; Doshi, Jimit; Parker, Drew; Hsieh, Michael; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Li, Hongming; Ou, Yangming; Doot, Robert K; Bilello, Michel; Fan, Yong; Shinohara, Russell T; Yushkevich, Paul; Verma, Ragini; Kontos, Despina

    2018-01-01

    The growth of multiparametric imaging protocols has paved the way for quantitative imaging phenotypes that predict treatment response and clinical outcome, reflect underlying cancer molecular characteristics and spatiotemporal heterogeneity, and can guide personalized treatment planning. This growth has underlined the need for efficient quantitative analytics to derive high-dimensional imaging signatures of diagnostic and predictive value in this emerging era of integrated precision diagnostics. This paper presents cancer imaging phenomics toolkit (CaPTk), a new and dynamically growing software platform for analysis of radiographic images of cancer, currently focusing on brain, breast, and lung cancer. CaPTk leverages the value of quantitative imaging analytics along with machine learning to derive phenotypic imaging signatures, based on two-level functionality. First, image analysis algorithms are used to extract comprehensive panels of diverse and complementary features, such as multiparametric intensity histogram distributions, texture, shape, kinetics, connectomics, and spatial patterns. At the second level, these quantitative imaging signatures are fed into multivariate machine learning models to produce diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers. Results from clinical studies in three areas are shown: (i) computational neuro-oncology of brain gliomas for precision diagnostics, prediction of outcome, and treatment planning; (ii) prediction of treatment response for breast and lung cancer, and (iii) risk assessment for breast cancer.

  20. Quantitative 7T phase imaging in premanifest Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, A C; Possin, K L; Satris, G; Johnson, E; Lupo, J M; Jakary, A; Wong, K; Kelley, D A C; Kang, G A; Sha, S J; Kramer, J H; Geschwind, M D; Nelson, S J; Hess, C P

    2014-09-01

    In vivo MR imaging and postmortem neuropathologic studies have demonstrated elevated iron concentration and atrophy within the striatum of patients with Huntington disease, implicating neuronal loss and iron accumulation in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. We used 7T MR imaging to determine whether quantitative phase, a measurement that reflects both iron content and tissue microstructure, is altered in subjects with premanifest Huntington disease. Local field shift, calculated from 7T MR phase images, was quantified in 13 subjects with premanifest Huntington disease and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. All participants underwent 3T and 7T MR imaging, including volumetric T1 and 7T gradient recalled-echo sequences. Local field shift maps were created from 7T phase data and registered to caudate ROIs automatically parcellated from the 3T T1 images. Huntington disease-specific disease burden and neurocognitive and motor evaluations were also performed and compared with local field shift. Subjects with premanifest Huntington disease had smaller caudate volume and higher local field shift than controls. A significant correlation between these measurements was not detected, and prediction accuracy for disease state improved with inclusion of both variables. A positive correlation between local field shift and genetic disease burden was also found, and there was a trend toward significant correlations between local field shift and neurocognitive tests of working memory and executive function. Subjects with premanifest Huntington disease exhibit differences in 7T MR imaging phase within the caudate nuclei that correlate with genetic disease burden and trend with neurocognitive assessments. Ultra-high-field MR imaging of quantitative phase may be a useful approach for monitoring neurodegeneration in premanifest Huntington disease. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Quantitative imaging features to predict cancer status in lung nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Atwater, Thomas; Antic, Sanja; Li, Qian; Walker, Ronald; Smith, Gary T.; Massion, Pierre P.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Background: We propose a systematic methodology to quantify incidentally identified lung nodules based on observed radiological traits on a point scale. These quantitative traits classification model was used to predict cancer status. Materials and Methods: We used 102 patients' low dose computed tomography (LDCT) images for this study, 24 semantic traits were systematically scored from each image. We built a machine learning classifier in cross validation setting to find best predictive imaging features to differentiate malignant from benign lung nodules. Results: The best feature triplet to discriminate malignancy was based on long axis, concavity and lymphadenopathy with average AUC of 0.897 (Accuracy of 76.8%, Sensitivity of 64.3%, Specificity of 90%). A similar semantic triplet optimized on Sensitivity/Specificity (Youden's J index) included long axis, vascular convergence and lymphadenopathy which had an average AUC of 0.875 (Accuracy of 81.7%, Sensitivity of 76.2%, Specificity of 95%). Conclusions: Quantitative radiological image traits can differentiate malignant from benign lung nodules. These semantic features along with size measurement enhance the prediction accuracy.

  2. Image based quantitative reader for Lateral flow immunofluorescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Kaushik Basak; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIA) have wide range of applications in point-of-care testing (POCT). An integrated, motion-free, accurate, reliable reader that performs automated quantitative analysis of LFIA is essential for POCT diagnosis. We demonstrate an image based quantitative method to read the lateral flow immunofluorescence test strips. The developed reader uses line laser diode module to illuminate the LFIA test strip having fluorescent dye. Fluorescence light coming from the region of interest (ROI) of the LFIA test strip was filtered using an emission filter and imaged using a camera following which images were processed in computer. A dedicated control program was developed that automated the entire process including illumination of the test strip using laser diode, capturing the ROI of the test strip, processing and analyzing the images and displaying of results. Reproducibility of the reader has been evaluated using few reference cartridges and HbA1c (Glycated haemoglobin) test cartridges. The proposed system can be upgraded to a compact reader for widespread testing of LFIA test strips.

  3. Quantitative imaging analysis of posterior fossa ependymoma location in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Noah D; Merchant, Thomas E; Li, Xingyu; Li, Yimei; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A; Ellison, David W; Ogg, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Imaging descriptions of posterior fossa ependymoma in children have focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal and local anatomic relationships with imaging location only recently used to classify these neoplasms. We developed a quantitative method for analyzing the location of ependymoma in the posterior fossa, tested its effectiveness in distinguishing groups of tumors, and examined potential associations of distinct tumor groups with treatment and prognostic factors. Pre-operative MRI examinations of the brain for 38 children with histopathologically proven posterior fossa ependymoma were analyzed. Tumor margin contours and anatomic landmarks were manually marked and used to calculate the centroid of each tumor. Landmarks were used to calculate a transformation to align, scale, and rotate each patient's image coordinates to a common coordinate space. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the location and morphological variables was performed to detect multivariate patterns in tumor characteristics. The ependymomas were also characterized as "central" or "lateral" based on published radiological criteria. Therapeutic details and demographic, recurrence, and survival information were obtained from medical records and analyzed with the tumor location and morphology to identify prognostic tumor characteristics. Cluster analysis yielded two distinct tumor groups based on centroid location The cluster groups were associated with differences in PFS (p = .044), "central" vs. "lateral" radiological designation (p = .035), and marginally associated with multiple operative interventions (p = .064). Posterior fossa ependymoma can be objectively classified based on quantitative analysis of tumor location, and these classifications are associated with prognostic and treatment factors.

  4. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging; Quantitative Perfusionsbildgebung in der Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Computerunterstuetzte Klinische Medizin, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zeichnet sich durch einen ueberlegenen Gewebekontrast aus, waehrend sie nichtinvasiv und frei von ionisierender Strahlung ist. Sie bietet Zugang zu Gewebe- und Organfunktion. Eine dieser funktionellen bildgebenden Verfahren ist die Perfusionsbildgebung. Mit dieser Technik koennen u. a. Gewebeperfusion und Kapillarpermeabilitaet aus dynamischen Bilddaten bestimmt werden. Perfusionsbildgebung mithilfe der MRT kann durch 2 Ansaetze, naemlich ''arterial spin labeling'' (ASL) und dynamische kontrastverstaerkte (DCE-)MRT durchgefuehrt werden. Waehrend die erste Methode magnetisch

  5. Quantitative elemental distribution image of a carbon nano-tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, H.; Isoda, S.; Kobayashi, T.

    1995-01-01

    Energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy was applied to carbon nano-tubes in order to investigate quantitative property of elemental maps obtained by inelastically scattered electrons corresponding to the carbon K-edge. An 1 MeV high-resolution electron microscope (JEOL, ARM-1000) equipped with a GATAN imaging filter was employed. Because of a cylindrical structure of nano-tubes the number of carbon atoms contributing to the image changes across the tube axis. We could detect the contrast difference due to 20 carbon atoms in the carbon distribution image of 6 layers tube. Furthermore, we examined the carbon mapping from a conical tip region with progressive closure of carbon layers, where an intensity profile clearly distinguishes the difference of 6 graphene sheets. From the consideration of signal-to-noise ratio, the detection limit is concluded to be less than 22 carbon atoms in the present experimental conditions. (authors). 18 refs., 7 figs

  6. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  7. The Digital Image Processing And Quantitative Analysis In Microscopic Image Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardisasmita, M. Syamsa

    2000-01-01

    Many electron microscopes although have produced digital images, but not all of them are equipped with a supporting unit to process and analyse image data quantitatively. Generally the analysis of image has to be made visually and the measurement is realized manually. The development of mathematical method for geometric analysis and pattern recognition, allows automatic microscopic image analysis with computer. Image processing program can be used for image texture and structure periodic analysis by the application of Fourier transform. Because the development of composite materials. Fourier analysis in frequency domain become important for measure the crystallography orientation. The periodic structure analysis and crystal orientation are the key to understand many material properties like mechanical strength. stress, heat conductivity, resistance, capacitance and other material electric and magnetic properties. In this paper will be shown the application of digital image processing in microscopic image characterization and analysis in microscopic image

  8. Hyperspectral imaging and quantitative analysis for prostate cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma V.; Schuster, David M.; Osunkoya, Adeboye; Master, Viraj; Nieh, Peter T.; Chen, Georgia Z.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging modality for various medical applications. Its spectroscopic data might be able to be used to noninvasively detect cancer. Quantitative analysis is often necessary in order to differentiate healthy from diseased tissue. We propose the use of an advanced image processing and classification method in order to analyze hyperspectral image data for prostate cancer detection. The spectral signatures were extracted and evaluated in both cancerous and normal tissue. Least squares support vector machines were developed and evaluated for classifying hyperspectral data in order to enhance the detection of cancer tissue. This method was used to detect prostate cancer in tumor-bearing mice and on pathology slides. Spatially resolved images were created to highlight the differences of the reflectance properties of cancer versus those of normal tissue. Preliminary results with 11 mice showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the hyperspectral image classification method are 92.8% to 2.0% and 96.9% to 1.3%, respectively. Therefore, this imaging method may be able to help physicians to dissect malignant regions with a safe margin and to evaluate the tumor bed after resection. This pilot study may lead to advances in the optical diagnosis of prostate cancer using HSI technology. PMID:22894488

  9. Quantitative analysis and classification of AFM images of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurden, S P; Monteiro, V F; Longo, E; Ferreira, M M C

    2004-07-01

    The surface topography of human hair, as defined by the outer layer of cellular sheets, termed cuticles, largely determines the cosmetic properties of the hair. The condition of the cuticles is of great cosmetic importance, but also has the potential to aid diagnosis in the medical and forensic sciences. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been demonstrated to offer unique advantages for analysis of the hair surface, mainly due to the high image resolution and the ease of sample preparation. This article presents an algorithm for the automatic analysis of AFM images of human hair. The cuticular structure is characterized using a series of descriptors, such as step height, tilt angle and cuticle density, allowing quantitative analysis and comparison of different images. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated by a classification study. Thirty-eight AFM images were measured, consisting of hair samples from (a) untreated and bleached hair samples, and (b) the root and distal ends of the hair fibre. The multivariate classification technique partial least squares discriminant analysis is used to test the ability of the algorithm to characterize the images according to the properties of the hair samples. Most of the images (86%) were found to be classified correctly.

  10. Green light for quantitative live-cell imaging in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Krebs, Melanie; Maizel, Alexis; Stahl, Yvonne; Vermeer, Joop E M; Ott, Thomas

    2018-01-29

    Plants exhibit an intriguing morphological and physiological plasticity that enables them to thrive in a wide range of environments. To understand the cell biological basis of this unparalleled competence, a number of methodologies have been adapted or developed over the last decades that allow minimal or non-invasive live-cell imaging in the context of tissues. Combined with the ease to generate transgenic reporter lines in specific genetic backgrounds or accessions, we are witnessing a blooming in plant cell biology. However, the imaging of plant cells entails a number of specific challenges, such as high levels of autofluorescence, light scattering that is caused by cell walls and their sensitivity to environmental conditions. Quantitative live-cell imaging in plants therefore requires adapting or developing imaging techniques, as well as mounting and incubation systems, such as micro-fluidics. Here, we discuss some of these obstacles, and review a number of selected state-of-the-art techniques, such as two-photon imaging, light sheet microscopy and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy that allow high performance and minimal invasive live-cell imaging in plants. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Quantitative analysis of plasma membrane proteome using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenqiang

    2012-01-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) controls cell's exchange of both material and information with the outside environment, and PM-associated proteins play key roles in cellular regulation. Numerous cell surface receptors allow cells to perceive and respond to various signals from neighbor cells, pathogens, or the environment; large numbers of transporter and channel proteins control material uptake or release. Quantitative proteomic analysis of PM-associated proteins can identify key proteins involved in signal transduction and cellular regulation. Here, we describe a protocol for quantitative proteomic analysis of PM proteins using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. The protocol has been successfully employed to identify new components of the brassinosteroid signaling pathway, and should also be applicable to the studies of other plant signal transduction pathways and regulatory mechanisms.

  12. MR imaging of Minamata disease. Qualitative and quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korogi, Yukunori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Sumi, Minako; Hirai, Toshinori; Okuda, Tomoko; Shinzato, Jintetsu; Okajima, Toru.

    1994-01-01

    Minamata disease (MD), a result of methylmercury poisoning, is a neurological illness caused by ingestion of contaminated seafood. We evaluated MR findings of patients with MD qualitatively and quantitatively. Magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla was performed in seven patients with MD and in eight control subjects. All of our patients showed typical neurological findings like sensory disturbance, constriction of the visual fields, and ataxia. In the quantitative image analysis, inferior and middle parts of the cerebellar vermis and cerebellar hemispheres were significantly atrophic in comparison with the normal controls. There were no significant differences in measurements of the basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles, corpus callosum, or cerebral hemispheres between MD and the normal controls. The calcarine sulci and central sulci were significantly dilated, reflecting atrophy of the visual cortex and postcentral cortex, respectively. The lesions located in the calcarine area, cerebellum, and postcentral gyri were related to three characteristic manifestations of this disease, constriction of the visual fields, ataxia, and sensory disturbance, respectively. MR imaging has proved to be useful in evaluating the CNS abnormalities of methylmercury poisoning. (author)

  13. Elastography as a hybrid imaging technique : coupling with photoacoustics and quantitative imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widlak, T.G.

    2015-01-01

    While classical imaging methods, such as ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, are well-known and mathematically understood, a host of physiological parameters relevant for diagnostic purposes cannot be obtained by them. This gap is recently being closed by the introduction of hybrid, or coupled-physics imaging methods. They connect more then one physical modality, and aim to provide quantitative information on optical, electrical or mechanical parameters with high resolution. Central to this thesis is the mechanical contrast of elastic tissue, especially Young’s modulus or the shear modulus. Different methods of qualitative elastography provide interior information of the mechanical displacement field. From this interior data the nonlinear inverse problem of quantitative elastography aims to reconstruct the shear modulus. In this thesis, the elastography problem is seen from a hybrid imaging perspective; methods from coupled-physics inspired literature and regularization theory have been employed to recover displacement and shear modulus information. The overdetermined systems approach by G. Bal is applied to the quantitative problem, and ellipticity criteria are deduced, for one and several measurements, as well as injectivity results. Together with the geometric theory of G. Chavent, the results are used for analyzing convergence of Tikhonov regularization. Also, a convergence analysis for the Levenberg Marquardt method is provided. As a second mainstream project in this thesis, elastography imaging is developed for extracting displacements from photoacoustic images. A novel method is provided for texturizing the images, and the optical flow problem for motion estimation is shown to be regularized with this texture generation. The results are tested in cooperation with the Medical University Vienna, and the methods for quantitative determination of the shear modulus evaluated in first experiments. In summary, the overdetermined systems

  14. Quantitative iodine-123 IMP imaging of brain perfusion in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.B.; Lake, R.R.; Graham, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    Decreased perfusion in the frontal lobes of patients with chronic schizophrenia has been reported by multiple observes using a variety of techniques. Other observers have been unable to confirm this finding using similar techniques. In this study quantitative single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging was performed using p,5n [ 123 I]IMP in five normal subjects and ten chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. The acquisition data were preprocessed with an image dependent Metz filter and reconstructed using a ramp filtered back projection technique. The uptake in each of 50 regions of interest in each subject was normalized to the uptake in the cerebellum. There were no significant confirmed differences in the comparable ratios of normal subjects and patients with schizophrenia even at the p = 0.15 level. Hypofrontality was not observed

  15. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Kallepitis, Charalambos

    2017-03-22

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell–material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  16. Quantitative image analysis of WE43-T6 cracking behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A; Yahya, Z

    2013-01-01

    Environment-assisted cracking of WE43 cast magnesium (4.2 wt.% Yt, 2.3 wt.% Nd, 0.7% Zr, 0.8% HRE) in the T6 peak-aged condition was induced in ambient air in notched specimens. The mechanism of fracture was studied using electron backscatter diffraction, serial sectioning and in situ observations of crack propagation. The intermetallic (rare earthed-enriched divorced intermetallic retained at grain boundaries and predominantly at triple points) material was found to play a significant role in initiating cracks which leads to failure of this material. Quantitative measurements were required for this project. The populations of the intermetallic and clusters of intermetallic particles were analyzed using image analysis of metallographic images. This is part of the work to generate a theoretical model of the effect of notch geometry on the static fatigue strength of this material.

  17. Characterisation of a phantom for multiwavelength quantitative photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, M; Zeqiri, B; Beard, P C; Cox, B T

    2016-07-07

    Quantitative photoacoustic imaging (qPAI) has the potential to provide high- resolution in vivo images of chromophore concentration, which may be indicative of tissue function and pathology. Many strategies have been proposed recently for extracting quantitative information, but many have not been experimentally verified. Experimental phantom-based validation studies can be used to test the robustness and accuracy of such algorithms in order to ensure reliable in vivo application is possible. The phantoms used in such studies must have well-characterised optical and acoustic properties similar to tissue, and be versatile and stable. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) has been suggested as a phantom for quality control and system evaluation. By characterising its multiwavelength optical properties, broadband acoustic properties and thermoelastic behaviour, this paper examines its potential as a phantom for qPAI studies too. PVCP's acoustic properties were assessed for various formulations, as well as its intrinsic optical absorption, and scattering with added TiO2, over a range of wavelengths from 400-2000 nm. To change the absorption coefficient, pigment-based chromophores that are stable during the phantom fabrication process, were used. These yielded unique spectra analogous to tissue chromophores and linear with concentration. At the high peak powers typically used in photoacoustic imaging, nonlinear optical absorption was observed. The Grüneisen parameter was measured to be [Formula: see text]  =  1.01  ±  0.05, larger than typically found in tissue, though useful for increased PA signal. Single and multiwavelength 3D PA imaging of various fabricated PVCP phantoms were demonstrated.

  18. Quantitative proteomics analysis of eggshell membrane proteins during chick embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Cristianne M M; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2016-01-01

    The avian eggshell membrane (ESM) is a meshwork made up of highly cross-linked protein fibers and it is a scaffold upon which biomineralization of the eggshell is initiated. The ESM and associated shell participates in embryonic development by providing physical and chemical protection against pathogen invasion. We performed quantitative proteomic analysis of ESM proteins on multiple days during the three phases of embryonic development. The ESMs were stripped from both fertilized and unfertilized eggs at different days of incubation, and solubilized in a novel manner using TCEP-HCl (Tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine hydrochloride). The changes in ESM proteins between occurred during incubation were analyzed. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that of the 12 functional protein clusters identified, protease inhibitors were present at all phases of chick development. A group of proteins involved in calcium binding and oxygen transport were only present during the second phase. Extracellular matrix, cell adhesion proteins related to the vascularization of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), antimicrobial proteins and proteins involved in the binding and transport of lipids were found in the second and third phases of development. These findings provide insight into the functionality and evolving nature of ESM associated proteins involved in chick embryonic development. The eggshell membranes (ESMs) are a fibrous scaffold that consists of highly crosslinked collagens (types I, V but mainly X), glycoproteins and CREMPs (cysteine-rich eggshell membrane proteins). The ESMs aid in the development of the chick embryo and protect it against pathogen invasion. This biopolymeric fibrous net functions as a platform for nucleation of the calcitic eggshell which provides a primary physical barrier against bacterial ingress. Comparative proteomic analyses of proteins in the ESMs from fertilized eggs and unfertilized eggs showed changes in their levels which varied between the specific

  19. [Quantitative Analysis of Power Doppler Images in Lateral Humeral Enthesopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, P; Paša, L; Pavliska, L

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The evaluation of efficiency of power Doppler sonography in the diagnosis of lateral humeral enthesopathy, role of correct assessment of Doppler sonographic images with the method of quantitative analysis, assessment of statistical differences between a group of patients with lateral humeral enthesopathy and a control group of healthy subjects and assessment of the diagnostic power of this test. In addition, consideration of the relevance of each area of the lateral compartment for assessment and diagnosis making in lateral humeral enthesopathy. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 41 subjects, aged 18 to 60 years, entered the study. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with lateral humeral enthesopathy on the basis of clinical tests and a positive reaction of the lateral humeral epicondylus to administration of local anaesthetic. The control group consisted of 28 subjects without clinical signs of lateral humeral enthesopathy and subjective complaints. Power Doppler activity was evaluated in the whole region studied and in sub-regions involving the enthesis of the common extensor tendon and the periosteum of the lateral epicondyle with the area distal to it. The evaluation was based on calculating the overall surface with power Doppler activity using the method of quantitative image analysis. Each patient was measured on three occasions and the median of values obtained was used in calculation. To assess the diagnostic power of this test, all values obtained from the whole power Doppler region measured were used. The optimal dividing criterion at which the method had a maximum of sensitivity and specificity was determined. RESULTS The most evident, statistically significant difference between the patient and the control group was recorded in the whole "Range of Interest" (ROI) region (p=1.34x10-6). A significant difference was also found in sub-regions corresponding chiefly to the tendon of the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle and to the

  20. Magnetic Resonance-based Motion Correction for Quantitative PET in Simultaneous PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2017-07-01

    Motion degrades image quality and quantitation of PET images, and is an obstacle to quantitative PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a tool that can be used for correcting the motion in PET images by using anatomic information from MR imaging acquired concurrently. Motion correction can be performed by transforming a set of reconstructed PET images into the same frame or by incorporating the transformation into the system model and reconstructing the motion-corrected image. Several phantom and patient studies have validated that MR-based motion correction strategies have great promise for quantitative PET imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative interpretation of SEM image using digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladra, Dawid; Kopernik, Magdalena

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the this study is improvement of qualitative and quantitative analysis of scanning electron microscope micrographs by development of computer program, which enables automatic crack analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. Micromechanical tests of pneumatic ventricular assist devices result in a large number of micrographs. Therefore, the analysis must be automatic. Tests for athrombogenic titanium nitride/gold coatings deposited on polymeric substrates (Bionate II) are performed. These tests include microshear, microtension and fatigue analysis. Anisotropic surface defects observed in the SEM micrographs require support for qualitative and quantitative interpretation. Improvement of qualitative analysis of scanning electron microscope images was achieved by a set of computational tools that includes binarization, simplified expanding, expanding, simple image statistic thresholding, the filters Laplacian 1, and Laplacian 2, Otsu and reverse binarization. Several modifications of the known image processing techniques and combinations of the selected image processing techniques were applied. The introduced quantitative analysis of digital scanning electron microscope images enables computation of stereological parameters such as area, crack angle, crack length, and total crack length per unit area. This study also compares the functionality of the developed computer program of digital image processing with existing applications. The described pre- and postprocessing may be helpful in scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy surface investigations. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Quantitative analysis of histopathological findings using image processing software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, Yasushi; Kakimoto, Tetsuhiro; Takemoto, Kana; Tanaka, Masaharu

    2017-10-01

    In evaluating pathological changes in drug efficacy and toxicity studies, morphometric analysis can be quite robust. In this experiment, we examined whether morphometric changes of major pathological findings in various tissue specimens stained with hematoxylin and eosin could be recognized and quantified using image processing software. Using Tissue Studio, hypertrophy of hepatocytes and adrenocortical cells could be quantified based on the method of a previous report, but the regions of red pulp, white pulp, and marginal zones in the spleen could not be recognized when using one setting condition. Using Image-Pro Plus, lipid-derived vacuoles in the liver and mucin-derived vacuoles in the intestinal mucosa could be quantified using two criteria (area and/or roundness). Vacuoles derived from phospholipid could not be quantified when small lipid deposition coexisted in the liver and adrenal cortex. Mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver could be quantified to some extent, except for specimens with many clustered infiltrating cells. Adipocyte size and the mean linear intercept could be quantified easily and efficiently using morphological processing and the macro tool equipped in Image-Pro Plus. These methodologies are expected to form a base system that can recognize morphometric features and analyze quantitatively pathological findings through the use of information technology.

  3. Quantitation of left ventricular asynchrony on radionuclide angiography phase images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfano, B.; Betocchi, S.; Pace, L.; Perrone-Filardi, P.; Chiariello, M.; Salvatore, M.; Naples Univ.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitation of left ventricular (LV) asynchrony is relevant in clinical cardiology, as well as in evaluating LV mechanical properties. Radionuclide angiography (RA) phase images are extensively used, and asynchrony is usually assessed by computing the standard deviation of phase angle distribution (SD). However, SD is dependent on count statistics and does not take into account the spatial distribution of asynchrony. In this study a new index to evaluate asynchrony on phase images is presented (differential uniformity parameter, DUP). DUP is based on the frequency analysis of phase images. Diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility of either SD or DUP were tested. Reproducibility was evaluated in 15 patients studied by RA twice within a few minutes. DUP showed a better reproducibility than SD. Diagnostic accuracy was estimated in 84 patients, divided into four subgroups on the basis of coronary arteriography and contrast ventriculogrpahy findings: (a) 25 control subjects, (b) 16 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and normal LV wall motion, (c) 23 patients with CAD and LV hypokinesia and (d) 20 patients with CAD and LV dyskinesia. Relative diagnostic ability was assessed by comparing the areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves. DUP's area was larger than SD's when group D was tested against all the other groups (DUP's area=87%±5%, SD's area=76%±7%; P<0.01). Thus, our study indicates that DUP is more reproducible and more accurate than SD in identifying patients with CAD and LV dyskinesia. (orig.)

  4. Extracting quantitative parameters from images in multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerley, Maxwell Stuart

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy allows for fast, three-dimensionally resolved detection of molecules based on vibrational contrast. In CARS, the generated signal is nonlinearly dependent upon the concentration of the vibrational mode of interest. This makes it challenging to extract quantitative parameters (such as the concentration or orientation) from CARS images of biological and synthetic samples. Because of this, many investigations which employ CARS microscopy generally only report qualitative information extracted from these images. In this thesis, three methods have been developed to extract the quantitative concentration information from CARS images. In the first, the ratio of the forward-propagating and back-reflected CARS signal generated in tissue is used to monitor the percolation of DMSO into excised human cadaver skin. Through this, we find that the maximum clearing of skin with DMSO occurs at 40% v/v. We also combine CARS with second harmonic generation (SHG) to investigate the effects of DMSO on collagen. Up to a 20% v/v concentration of DMSO in the skin, the collagen becomes disrupted, resulting in a significant drop in the generated SHG. In the second method, the ratio between the CARS resonance peak and dip is correlated with the concentration to measure the concentration of water and deuterated glycine in hair. Both molecules are found to distribute throughout the hair fiber homogenously, water at a 34% v/v concentration, and d-glycine with a 0.22 M concentration. In the final method, CARS spectra over one vibrational mode are used to extract the imaginary part of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility. This quantity is linearly dependent upon the concentration of the vibrational mode of interest. This procedure is used to determine the degree of conversion of two-photon polymerized microstructures synthesized with varying writing powers. A sigmoidal relationship is observed between the applied intensity and the degree

  5. Quantitative analysis of supported membrane composition using the NanoSIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, M L; Fishel, S F; Marxer, C G; Weber, P K; Hutcheon, I D; Boxer, S G

    2009-06-02

    We have improved methods reported earlier [1] for sample preparation, imaging and quantifying components in supported lipid bilayers using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry performed with the NanoSIMS 50. By selectively incorporating a unique stable isotope into each component of interest, a component-specific image is generated from the location and intensity of the unique secondary ion signals exclusively produced by each molecule. Homogeneous supported lipid bilayers that systematically varied in their isotopic enrichment levels were freeze-dried and analyzed with the NanoSIMS 50. The molecule-specific secondary ion signal intensities had an excellent linear correlation to the isotopically labeled lipid content. Statistically indistinguishable calibration curves were obtained using different sample sets analyzed months apart. Fluid bilayers can be patterned using lithographic methods and the composition of each corralled region varied systematically by simple microfluidic methods. The resulting composition variations can be imaged and quantified. This approach opens the possibility of imaging and quantifying the composition of microdomains within membranes, including protein components, without using bulky labels and with very high lateral resolution and sensitivity.

  6. Quantitative vertebral CT scan imaging in 105 women with osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laval-Jeantet, A.M.; Miravet, L.; Bergot, C.; Vernejoul, M.C. de; Kuntz, D.; Laval-Jentet, M.

    Quantitative vertebral CT scan imaging is a method developed to provide direct measurements of mineralization of vertebral body spongy tissue, and is presently the most precise procedure for the early detection of spinal osteoporosis. A fracture threshold has been defined below which are found 95% of patients with a crushed vertebra: it is situated at 70% of the value for mineralization normal for the age of patients. Patients with marked reductions in their level of mineralization can be kept under surveillance before the onset of fracture. In patients with vertebral collapses the density is correlated significantly with the number of crush fractures. In addition, measurement of vertebral spongy bone density has allowed the importance of the vertebral lesion to be determined in various osteoporotic disorders, including those with only cortical fractures, and in this way to differentiate them.

  7. Quantitative imaging of subcellular metabolism with stable isotopes and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) is the quantitative imaging of stable isotope labels in cells with a new type of secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS). The power of the methodology is attributable to (i) the immense advantage of using non-toxic stable isotope labels, (ii) high resolution imaging that approaches the resolution of usual transmission electron microscopy and (iii) the precise quantification of label down to 1 part-per-million and spanning several orders of magnitude. Here we review the basic elements of MIMS and describe new applications of MIMS to the quantitative study of metabolic processes including protein and nucleic acid synthesis in model organisms ranging from microbes to humans. PMID:23660233

  8. Brain Injury Lesion Imaging Using Preconditioned Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping without Skull Stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, S; Liu, Z; Kim, G; Nemec, U; Holdsworth, S J; Main, K; Lee, B; Kolakowsky-Hayner, S; Selim, M; Furst, A J; Massaband, P; Yesavage, J; Adamson, M M; Spincemallie, P; Moseley, M; Wang, Y

    2018-04-01

    Identifying cerebral microhemorrhage burden can aid in the diagnosis and management of traumatic brain injury, stroke, hypertension, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. MR imaging susceptibility-based methods are more sensitive than CT for detecting cerebral microhemorrhage, but methods other than quantitative susceptibility mapping provide results that vary with field strength and TE, require additional phase maps to distinguish blood from calcification, and depict cerebral microhemorrhages as bloom artifacts. Quantitative susceptibility mapping provides universal quantification of tissue magnetic property without these constraints but traditionally requires a mask generated by skull-stripping, which can pose challenges at tissue interphases. We evaluated the preconditioned quantitative susceptibility mapping MR imaging method, which does not require skull-stripping, for improved depiction of brain parenchyma and pathology. Fifty-six subjects underwent brain MR imaging with a 3D multiecho gradient recalled echo acquisition. Mask-based quantitative susceptibility mapping images were created using a commonly used mask-based quantitative susceptibility mapping method, and preconditioned quantitative susceptibility images were made using precondition-based total field inversion. All images were reviewed by a neuroradiologist and a radiology resident. Ten subjects (18%), all with traumatic brain injury, demonstrated blood products on 3D gradient recalled echo imaging. All lesions were visible on preconditioned quantitative susceptibility mapping, while 6 were not visible on mask-based quantitative susceptibility mapping. Thirty-one subjects (55%) demonstrated brain parenchyma and/or lesions that were visible on preconditioned quantitative susceptibility mapping but not on mask-based quantitative susceptibility mapping. Six subjects (11%) demonstrated pons artifacts on preconditioned quantitative susceptibility mapping and mask-based quantitative susceptibility mapping

  9. Quantitative ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for the assessment of vascular parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Meiburger, Kristen M

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the development of quantitative techniques for ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging in the assessment of architectural and vascular parameters. It presents morphological vascular research based on the development of quantitative imaging techniques for the use of clinical B-mode ultrasound images, and preclinical architectural vascular investigations on quantitative imaging techniques for ultrasounds and photoacoustics. The book is divided into two main parts, the first of which focuses on the development and validation of quantitative techniques for the assessment of vascular morphological parameters that can be extracted from B-mode ultrasound longitudinal images of the common carotid artery. In turn, the second part highlights quantitative imaging techniques for assessing the architectural parameters of vasculature that can be extracted from 3D volumes, using both contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and photoacoustic imaging without the addition of any contrast agent. Sharing and...

  10. Whole slide image with image analysis of atypical bile duct brushing: Quantitative features predictive of malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brian T; Weimholt, R Cody

    2015-01-01

    Whole slide images (WSIs) involve digitally capturing glass slides for microscopic computer-based viewing and these are amenable to quantitative image analysis. Bile duct (BD) brushing can show morphologic features that are categorized as indeterminate for malignancy. The study aims to evaluate quantitative morphologic features of atypical categories of BD brushing by WSI analysis for the identification of criteria predictive of malignancy. Over a 3-year period, BD brush specimens with indeterminate diagnostic categorization (atypical to suspicious) were subjected to WSI analysis. Ten well-visualized groups with morphologic atypical features were selected per case and had the quantitative analysis performed for group area, individual nuclear area, the number of nuclei per group, N: C ratio and nuclear size differential. There were 28 cases identified with 17 atypical and 11 suspicious. The average nuclear area was 63.7 µm(2) for atypical and 80.1 µm(2) for suspicious (+difference 16.4 µm(2); P = 0.002). The nuclear size differential was 69.7 µm(2) for atypical and 88.4 µm(2) for suspicious (+difference 18.8 µm(2); P = 0.009). An average nuclear area >70 µm(2) had a 3.2 risk ratio for suspicious categorization. The quantitative criteria findings as measured by image analysis on WSI showed that cases categorized as suspicious had more nuclear size pleomorphism (+18.8 µm(2)) and larger nuclei (+16.4 µm(2)) than those categorized as atypical. WSI with morphologic image analysis can demonstrate quantitative statistically significant differences between atypical and suspicious BD brushings and provide objective criteria that support the diagnosis of carcinoma.

  11. Quantitative Image Analysis Techniques with High-Speed Schlieren Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Victoria J.; Herron, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Optical flow visualization techniques such as schlieren and shadowgraph photography are essential to understanding fluid flow when interpreting acquired wind tunnel test data. Output of the standard implementations of these visualization techniques in test facilities are often limited only to qualitative interpretation of the resulting images. Although various quantitative optical techniques have been developed, these techniques often require special equipment or are focused on obtaining very precise and accurate data about the visualized flow. These systems are not practical in small, production wind tunnel test facilities. However, high-speed photography capability has become a common upgrade to many test facilities in order to better capture images of unsteady flow phenomena such as oscillating shocks and flow separation. This paper describes novel techniques utilized by the authors to analyze captured high-speed schlieren and shadowgraph imagery from wind tunnel testing for quantification of observed unsteady flow frequency content. Such techniques have applications in parametric geometry studies and in small facilities where more specialized equipment may not be available.

  12. Quantitative 3D Optical Imaging: Applications in Dosimetry and Biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andrew Stephen

    Optical-CT has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the two very different spheres of biologists and radiation therapy physicists, but it has yet to live up to that potential. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical-CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters, but it is yet to be a clinically relevant tool as the technology is too slow to be considered practical. Biologists have used the technique for structural imaging, but have struggled with emission tomography as the reality of photon attenuation for both excitation and emission have made the images quantitatively irrelevant. Dosimetry. The DLOS (Duke Large field of view Optical-CT Scanner) was designed and constructed to make 3D dosimetry utilizing optical-CT a fast and practical tool while maintaining the accuracy of readout of the previous, slower readout technologies. Upon construction/optimization/implementation of several components including a diffuser, band pass filter, registration mount & fluid filtration system the dosimetry system provides high quality data comparable to or exceeding that of commercial products. In addition, a stray light correction algorithm was tested and implemented. The DLOS in combination with the 3D dosimeter it was designed for, PREAGETM, then underwent rigorous commissioning and benchmarking tests validating its performance against gold standard data including a set of 6 irradiations. DLOS commissioning tests resulted in sub-mm isotropic spatial resolution (MTF >0.5 for frequencies of 1.5lp/mm) and a dynamic range of ˜60dB. Flood field uniformity was 10% and stable after 45minutes. Stray light proved to be small, due to telecentricity, but even the residual can be removed through deconvolution. Benchmarking tests showed the mean 3D passing gamma rate (3%, 3mm, 5% dose threshold) over the 6 benchmark data sets was 97.3% +/- 0.6% (range 96%-98%) scans totaling ˜10 minutes, indicating excellent ability to perform 3D dosimetry while improving the speed of

  13. Quantitative phase imaging and differential interference contrast imaging for biological TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allman, B.E.; McMahon, P.J.; Barone-Nugent, E.D.; Nugent, E.D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Phase microscopy is a central technique in science. An experienced microscopist uses this effect to visualise (edge) structure within transparent samples by slightly defocusing the microscope. Although widespread in optical microscopy, phase contrast transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has not been widely adopted. TEM for biological specimens has largely relied on staining techniques to yield sufficient contrast. We show here a simple method for quantitative TEM phase microscopy that quantifies this phase contrast effect. Starting with conventional, digital, bright field images of the sample, our algorithm provides quantitative phase information independent of the sample's bright field intensity image. We present TEM phase images of a range of stained and unstained, biological and material science specimens. This independent phase and intensity information is then used to emulate a range of phase visualisation images familiar to optical microscopy, e.g. differential interference contrast. The phase images contain features not visible with the other imaging modalities. Further, if the TEM samples have been prepared on a microtome to a uniform thickness, the phase information can be converted into refractive index structure of the specimen. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  14. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Lee

    Full Text Available With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data

  15. A green approach to ethyl acetate: Quantitative conversion of ethanol through direct dehydrogenation in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Gaofeng

    2012-11-07

    Pincers do the trick: The conversion of ethanol to ethyl acetate and hydrogen was achieved using a pincer-Ru catalyst in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor. Near quantitative conversions and yields could be achieved without the need for acid or base promoters or hydrogen acceptors (see scheme). © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-21

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq 18 F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  17. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-01

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq 18F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  18. Membrane-interaction quantitative structure--activity relationship (MI-QSAR) analyses of skin penetration enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tao; Hopfinger, A J; Esposito, Emilio X; Liu, Jianzhong; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2008-06-01

    Membrane-interaction quantitative structure-activity relationship (MI-QSAR) models for two skin penetration enhancer data sets of 61 and 42 compounds were constructed and compared to QSAR models constructed for the same two data sets using only classic intramolecular QSAR descriptors. These two data sets involve skin penetration enhancement of hydrocortisone and hydrocortisone acetate, and the enhancers are generally similar in structure to lipids and surfactants. A new MI-QSAR descriptor, the difference in the integrated cylindrical distribution functions over the phospholipid monolayer model, in and out of the presence of the skin penetration enhancer, DeltaSigma h(r), was developed. This descriptor is dominant in the optimized MI-QSAR models of both training sets studied and greatly reduces the size and complexity of the MI-QSAR models as compared to those QSAR models developed using the classic intramolecular descriptors. The MI-QSAR models indicate that good penetration enhancers make bigger "holes" in the monolayer and are less aqueous-soluble, so as to preferentially enter the monolayer, than are poor penetration enhancers. The skin penetration enhancer thus alters the structure and organization of the monolayer. This space and time alteration in the structure and dynamics of the membrane monolayer is captured by DeltaSigma h(r) and is simplistically referred to as "holes" in the monolayer. The MI-QSAR models explain 70-80% of the variance in skin penetration enhancement across each of the two training sets and are stable predictive models using accepted diagnostic measures of robustness and predictivity.

  19. Quantitative structure-retention relationships of flavonoids unraveled by immobilized artificial membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Adriana Leandra; Carrilho, Emanuel; Lanças, Fernando Mauro; Montanari, Carlos Alberto

    2016-06-10

    The pharmacokinetic properties of flavonoids with differing degrees of lipophilicity were investigated using immobilized artificial membranes (IAMs) as the stationary phase in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For each flavonoid compound, we investigated whether the type of column used affected the correlation between the retention factors and the calculated octanol/water partition (log Poct). Three-dimensional (3D) molecular descriptors were calculated from the molecular structure of each compound using i) VolSurf software, ii) the GRID method (computational procedure for determining energetically favorable binding sites in molecules of known structure using a probe for calculating the 3D molecular interaction fields, between the probe and the molecule), and iii) the relationship between partition and molecular structure, analyzed in terms of physicochemical descriptors. The VolSurf built-in Caco-2 model was used to estimate compound permeability. The extent to which the datasets obtained from different columns differ both from each other and from both the calculated log Poct and the predicted permeability in Caco-2 cells was examined by principal component analysis (PCA). The immobilized membrane partition coefficients (kIAM) were analyzed using molecular descriptors in partial least square regression (PLS) and a quantitative structure-retention relationship was generated for the chromatographic retention in the cholesterol column. The cholesterol column provided the best correlation with the permeability predicted by the Caco-2 cell model and a good fit model with great prediction power was obtained for its retention data (R(2)=0.96 and Q(2)=0.85 with four latent variables). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative Clinical Imaging Methods for Monitoring Intratumoral Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeun; Gatenby, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    images in landscape ecology and, with appropriate application of Darwinian first principles and sophisticated image analytic methods, can be used to estimate regional variations in the molecular properties of cancer cells.We have initially examined this technique in glioblastoma, a malignant brain neoplasm which is morphologically complex and notorious for a fast progression from diagnosis to recurrence and death, making a suitable subject of noninvasive, rapidly repeated assessment of intratumoral evolution. Quantitative imaging analysis of routine clinical MRIs from glioblastoma has identified macroscopic morphologic characteristics which correlate with proteogenomics and prognosis. The key to the accurate detection and forecasting of intratumoral evolution using quantitative imaging analysis is likely to be in the understanding of the synergistic interactions between observable intratumoral subregions and the resulting tumor behavior.

  1. Thermography as a quantitative imaging method for assessing postoperative inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J; Matzen, LH; Vaeth, M; Schou, S; Wenzel, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in skin temperature between the operated and control side of the face after mandibular third molar surgery using thermography. Methods 127 patients had 1 mandibular third molar removed. Before the surgery, standardized thermograms were taken of both sides of the patient's face using a Flir ThermaCam™ E320 (Precisions Teknik AB, Halmstad, Sweden). The imaging procedure was repeated 2 days and 7 days after surgery. A region of interest including the third molar region was marked on each image. The mean temperature within each region of interest was calculated. The difference between sides and over time were assessed using paired t-tests. Results No significant difference was found between the operated side and the control side either before or 7 days after surgery (p > 0.3). The temperature of the operated side (mean: 32.39 °C, range: 28.9–35.3 °C) was higher than that of the control side (mean: 32.06 °C, range: 28.5–35.0 °C) 2 days after surgery [0.33 °C, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22–0.44 °C, p 0.1). After 2 days, the operated side was not significantly different from the temperature pre-operatively (p = 0.12), whereas the control side had a lower temperature (0.57 °C, 95% CI: 0.29–0.86 °C, p Thermography seems useful for quantitative assessment of inflammation between the intervention side and the control side after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. However, thermography cannot be used to assess absolute temperature changes due to normal variations in skin temperature over time. PMID:22752326

  2. Comprehensive quantitative comparison of the membrane proteome, phosphoproteome, and sialiome of human embryonic and neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo-Braga, Marcella Nunes; Schulz, Melanie; Liu, Qiuyue

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into neural stem cells (NSCs), which can further be differentiated into neurons and glia cells. Therefore, these cells have huge potential as source for treatment of neurological diseases. Membrane-associated proteins are very important......ESCs and NSCs as well as to investigate potential new markers for these two cell stages, we performed large-scale quantitative membrane-proteomic of hESCs and NSCs. This approach employed membrane purification followed by peptide dimethyl labeling and peptide enrichment to study the membrane subproteome as well...... in which 78% of phosphopeptides were identified with ≥99% confidence in site assignment and 1810 unique formerly sialylated N-linked glycopeptides. Several proteins were identified as significantly regulated in hESCs and NSC, including proteins involved in the early embryonic and neural development...

  3. Quantitative chemical-shift MR imaging cutoff value: Benign versus malignant vertebral compression – Initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Z. Zidan

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Quantitative chemical shift MR imaging could be a valuable addition to standard MR imaging techniques and represent a rapid problem solving tool in differentiating benign from malignant vertebral compression, especially in patients with known primary malignancies.

  4. Toward objective and quantitative evaluation of imaging systems using images of phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Gallas, Brandon D.; Myers, Kyle J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of imaging phantoms is a common method of evaluating image quality in the clinical setting. These evaluations rely on a subjective decision by a human observer with respect to the faintest detectable signal(s) in the image. Because of the variable and subjective nature of the human-observer scores, the evaluations manifest a lack of precision and a potential for bias. The advent of digital imaging systems with their inherent digital data provides the opportunity to use techniques that do not rely on human-observer decisions and thresholds. Using the digital data, signal-detection theory (SDT) provides the basis for more objective and quantitative evaluations which are independent of a human-observer decision threshold. In a SDT framework, the evaluation of imaging phantoms represents a 'signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly' ('SKE/BKE') detection task. In this study, we compute the performance of prewhitening and nonprewhitening model observers in terms of the observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for these 'SKE/BKE' tasks. We apply the evaluation methods to a number of imaging systems. For example, we use data from a laboratory implementation of digital radiography and from a full-field digital mammography system in a clinical setting. In addition, we make a comparison of our methods to human-observer scoring of a set of digital images of the CDMAM phantom available from the internet (EUREF--European Reference Organization). In the latter case, we show a significant increase in the precision of the quantitative methods versus the variability in the scores from human observers on the same set of images. As regards bias, the performance of a model observer estimated from a finite data set is known to be biased. In this study, we minimize the bias and estimate the variance of the observer SNR using statistical resampling techniques, namely, 'bootstrapping' and 'shuffling' of the data sets. Our methods provide objective and quantitative evaluation of

  5. Quantitating subcellular metabolism with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bailey, Andrew; Senyo, Samuel E.; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S.; Gould, Alex P.; Lee, Richard T.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter1,2 but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with sub-micron resolution3,4. Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice, and humans. We test the “immortal strand hypothesis,” which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division chromosomes containing older template DNA are segregated to the daughter destined to remain a stem cell, thus insuring lifetime genetic stability. After labeling mice with 15N-thymidine from gestation through post-natal week 8, we find no 15N label retention by dividing small intestinal crypt cells after 4wk chase. In adult mice administered 15N-thymidine pulse-chase, we find that proliferating crypt cells dilute label consistent with random strand segregation. We demonstrate the broad utility of MIMS with proof-of-principle studies of lipid turnover in Drosophila and translation to the human hematopoietic system. These studies show that MIMS provides high-resolution quantitation of stable isotope labels that cannot be obtained using other techniques and that is broadly applicable to biological and medical research. PMID:22246326

  6. Influence of image processing on noise, sharpness and quantitativeness in grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschner, Mathias; Willner, Marian; Hahn, Dieter; Hipp, Alexander [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Herzen, Julia [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Str.1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Chabior, Michael; Pfeiffer, Franz [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Grating-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging provides additional contrast compared to regular absorption based X-ray imaging. The technique has been adapted to work with conventional X-ray tube sources and allows for quantitative imaging. The choice of processing and tomographic reconstruction algorithms influences the image quality and quantitativeness of the computed tomography. We present an overview of different methods for processing and CT-reconstruction (conventional and iterative) as well as subsequent filtering. The comparison focuses on noise, sharpness and quantitativeness using simple phantoms and biomedical samples measured at a grating interferometer equipped with a polychromatic X-ray tube and a photon counting detector.

  7. Real Time Quantitative 3-D Imaging of Diffusion Flame Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Daniel J.; Silver, Joel A.

    1997-01-01

    A low-gravity environment, in space or ground-based facilities such as drop towers, provides a unique setting for study of combustion mechanisms. Understanding the physical phenomena controlling the ignition and spread of flames in microgravity has importance for space safety as well as better characterization of dynamical and chemical combustion processes which are normally masked by buoyancy and other gravity-related effects. Even the use of so-called 'limiting cases' or the construction of 1-D or 2-D models and experiments fail to make the analysis of combustion simultaneously simple and accurate. Ideally, to bridge the gap between chemistry and fluid mechanics in microgravity combustion, species concentrations and temperature profiles are needed throughout the flame. However, restrictions associated with performing measurements in reduced gravity, especially size and weight considerations, have generally limited microgravity combustion studies to the capture of flame emissions on film or video laser Schlieren imaging and (intrusive) temperature measurements using thermocouples. Given the development of detailed theoretical models, more sophisticated studies are needed to provide the kind of quantitative data necessary to characterize the properties of microgravity combustion processes as well as provide accurate feedback to improve the predictive capabilities of the computational models. While there have been a myriad of fluid mechanical visualization studies in microgravity combustion, little experimental work has been completed to obtain reactant and product concentrations within a microgravity flame. This is largely due to the fact that traditional sampling methods (quenching microprobes using GC and/or mass spec analysis) are too heavy, slow, and cumbersome for microgravity experiments. Non-intrusive optical spectroscopic techniques have - up until now - also required excessively bulky, power hungry equipment. However, with the advent of near-IR diode

  8. B1 -sensitivity analysis of quantitative magnetization transfer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Mathieu; Stikov, Nikola; Pike, G Bruce

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) fitted parameters to B 1 inaccuracies, focusing on the difference between two categories of T 1 mapping techniques: B 1 -independent and B 1 -dependent. The B 1 -sensitivity of qMT was investigated and compared using two T 1 measurement methods: inversion recovery (IR) (B 1 -independent) and variable flip angle (VFA), B 1 -dependent). The study was separated into four stages: 1) numerical simulations, 2) sensitivity analysis of the Z-spectra, 3) healthy subjects at 3T, and 4) comparison using three different B 1 imaging techniques. For typical B 1 variations in the brain at 3T (±30%), the simulations resulted in errors of the pool-size ratio (F) ranging from -3% to 7% for VFA, and -40% to > 100% for IR, agreeing with the Z-spectra sensitivity analysis. In healthy subjects, pooled whole-brain Pearson correlation coefficients for F (comparing measured double angle and nominal flip angle B 1 maps) were ρ = 0.97/0.81 for VFA/IR. This work describes the B 1 -sensitivity characteristics of qMT, demonstrating that it varies substantially on the B 1 -dependency of the T 1 mapping method. Particularly, the pool-size ratio is more robust against B 1 inaccuracies if VFA T 1 mapping is used, so much so that B 1 mapping could be omitted without substantially biasing F. Magn Reson Med 79:276-285, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Prospects and challenges of quantitative phase imaging in tumor cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Götte, Martin; Greve, Burkhard; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques provide high resolution label-free quantitative live cell imaging. Here, prospects and challenges of QPI in tumor cell biology are presented, using the example of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). It is shown that the evaluation of quantitative DHM phase images allows the retrieval of different parameter sets for quantification of cellular motion changes in migration and motility assays that are caused by genetic modifications. Furthermore, we demonstrate simultaneously label-free imaging of cell growth and morphology properties.

  10. Chitosan cushioned phospholipid membrane and its application in imaging ellipsometry based-biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yibang; Chen Yanyan; Jin Gang

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan cushion can support the air stability of phospholipid membrane, but the problem of serum solubility of phospholipid membrane prevents it from use in serum detection applications. Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) shielding promises both stability and non-specific adsorption resistance for phospholipid membrane. An air stable phospholipid membrane microarray has been successfully fabricated on chitosan modified silicon wafer. We have demonstrated the potential application of PEGylated phospholipid membrane in imaging ellipsometry-based protein biosensor. Because of the strong resistance against non-specific adsorption of serum, antigens are immobilized onto the membrane surface through chemical activation and further bind their antibodies without using blocking agent. Taking advantage of the multiple and parallel reaction capabilities of microfluidic reactor system, we have assayed the binding by varying both the density of antigen on the membrane surface and the concentration of antibody in solution.

  11. Quantitative image measurements for outcome analysis of lung nodule treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Lee, Ki-Nam; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Huang, H. K.

    1996-04-01

    In this study, we designed and implemented a temporal image database for outcome analysis of lung nodules based on spiral CT images. The software package is composed of three parts. They are, respectively, a database management system which stores patient image data and nodule information; a user-friendly graphical user interface which allows a user to interface with the image database; and image processing tools that are designed to segment out lung nodules in the CT image with a simple mouse click anywhere inside a nodule. The image database uses the relational Sybase database system. Patient images and nodule information are stored in separate tables. Software interface has been designed to allow a user to retrieve any patient study from the picture archiving and communication system into the image database.

  12. Long-Time Plasma Membrane Imaging Based on a Two-Step Synergistic Cell Surface Modification Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hao-Ran; Wang, Hong-Yin; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Chen, Zhan; Wu, Fu-Gen

    2016-03-16

    Long-time stable plasma membrane imaging is difficult due to the fast cellular internalization of fluorescent dyes and the quick detachment of the dyes from the membrane. In this study, we developed a two-step synergistic cell surface modification and labeling strategy to realize long-time plasma membrane imaging. Initially, a multisite plasma membrane anchoring reagent, glycol chitosan-10% PEG2000 cholesterol-10% biotin (abbreviated as "GC-Chol-Biotin"), was incubated with cells to modify the plasma membranes with biotin groups with the assistance of the membrane anchoring ability of cholesterol moieties. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated avidin was then introduced to achieve the fluorescence-labeled plasma membranes based on the supramolecular recognition between biotin and avidin. This strategy achieved stable plasma membrane imaging for up to 8 h without substantial internalization of the dyes, and avoided the quick fluorescence loss caused by the detachment of dyes from plasma membranes. We have also demonstrated that the imaging performance of our staining strategy far surpassed that of current commercial plasma membrane imaging reagents such as DiD and CellMask. Furthermore, the photodynamic damage of plasma membranes caused by a photosensitizer, Chlorin e6 (Ce6), was tracked in real time for 5 h during continuous laser irradiation. Plasma membrane behaviors including cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, and plasma membrane vesiculation could be dynamically recorded. Therefore, the imaging strategy developed in this work may provide a novel platform to investigate plasma membrane behaviors over a relatively long time period.

  13. Bands, Chords, Tendons, and Membranes in the Heart: An Imaging Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Ameya Jagdish; Tavakoli, Sina; Vargas, Daniel; Restrepo, Carlos S

    Crests, bands, chords, and membranes can be seen within the different cardiac chambers, with variable clinical significance. They can be incidental or can have clinical implications by causing hemodynamic disturbance. It is crucial to know the morphology and orientation of normal structures, aberrant or accessory muscles, and abnormal membranes to diagnose the hemodynamic disturbance associated with them. Newer generation computed tomographic scanners and faster magnetic resonance imaging sequences offer high spatial and temporal resolution allowing for acquisition of high resolution images of the cardiac chambers improving identification of small internal structures, such as papillary muscles, muscular bands, chords, and membranes. They also help in identification of other associated complications, malformations, and provide a road map for treatment. In this article, we review cross-sectional cardiac imaging findings of normal anatomical variants and distinctive imaging features of pathologic bands, chords, or membranes, which may produce significant hemodynamic changes and clinical symptomatology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative measurement of holographic image quality using Adobe Photoshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesly, E.

    2013-02-01

    Measurement of the characteristics of image holograms in regards to diffraction efficiency and signal to noise ratio are demonstrated, using readily available digital cameras and image editing software. Illustrations and case studies, using currently available holographic recording materials, are presented.

  15. Quantitative measurement of holographic image quality using Adobe Photoshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesly, E

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of the characteristics of image holograms in regards to diffraction efficiency and signal to noise ratio are demonstrated, using readily available digital cameras and image editing software. Illustrations and case studies, using currently available holographic recording materials, are presented.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of reconstructed images using projections with noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.; Assis, J.T. de

    1988-01-01

    The reconstruction of a two-dimencional image from one-dimensional projections in an analytic algorithm ''convolution method'' is simulated on a microcomputer. In this work it was analysed the effects caused in the reconstructed image in function of the number of projections and noise level added to the projection data. Qualitative and quantitative (distortion and image noise) comparison were done with the original image and the reconstructed images. (author) [pt

  17. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breeuwer, Marcel; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Quist, Marcel

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the

  18. The membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula roots displays qualitative and quantitative changes in response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Cosette; Valot, Benoit; Guillier, Christelle; Mounier, Arnaud; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; van Tuinen, Diederik; Renaut, Jenny; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Recorbet, Ghislaine

    2014-08-28

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis that associates roots of most land plants with soil-borne fungi (Glomeromycota), is characterized by reciprocal nutritional benefits. Fungal colonization of plant roots induces massive changes in cortical cells where the fungus differentiates an arbuscule, which drives proliferation of the plasma membrane. Despite the recognized importance of membrane proteins in sustaining AM symbiosis, the root microsomal proteome elicited upon mycorrhiza still remains to be explored. In this study, we first examined the qualitative composition of the root membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula after microsome enrichment and subsequent in depth analysis by GeLC-MS/MS. The results obtained highlighted the identification of 1226 root membrane protein candidates whose cellular and functional classifications predispose plastids and protein synthesis as prevalent organelle and function, respectively. Changes at the protein abundance level between the membrane proteomes of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots were further monitored by spectral counting, which retrieved a total of 96 proteins that displayed a differential accumulation upon AM symbiosis. Besides the canonical markers of the periarbuscular membrane, new candidates supporting the importance of membrane trafficking events during mycorrhiza establishment/functioning were identified, including flotillin-like proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000875. During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, one of the most widespread mutualistic associations in nature, the endomembrane system of plant roots is believed to undergo qualitative and quantitative changes in order to sustain both the accommodation process of the AM fungus within cortical cells and the exchange of nutrients between symbionts. Large-scale GeLC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of the membrane fractions from mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots of M. truncatula coupled to spectral counting

  19. Quantitative imaging of intracellular signaling for personalized pancreatic cancer therapy in an in vivo avatar (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Schultz, Emily; Park, Yeonjae; Fischer, Dawn; Pogue, Brian W.; Smith, Kerrington; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) are notoriously difficult to treat and in general, molecular targeted therapies have failed even when the targeted protein is overexpressed in the tumor tissue. Genetic mutations in extracellular receptors and downstream signaling proteins (i.e., RAS signaling pathway) and convoluted intracellular cross-talk between cell signaling pathways are likely reasons that these promising therapies fail. Monitoring the complex relationship between intracellular protein signaling is difficult and to-date, standard techniques that are used (Western blot, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, etc.) are invasive, static and do not accurately represent in vivo structure-function relationships. Here, we describe the development of an in ovo avatar using patient derived tumors grown on the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the novel fluorescence-based Quantitative Protein Expression Tracking (QUIET) methodology to bridge the gap between oncology, genomics and patient outcomes. Previously developed paired-agent imaging, was extended to a three-compartment model system in QUIET, which utilizes three types of imaging agents: novel fluorophore conjugated cell permeable targeted and untargeted small molecule paired-agents, in addition to a tumor perfusion agent that is not cell membrane permeable. We have demonstrated the ability to quantify the intracellular binding domain of a trans-membrane protein in vitro using cell permeable fluorescent agents (erlotinib-TRITC and control isotype-BODIPY FL). In addition, we have demonstrated imaging protocols to simultaneously image up to 6 spectrally distinct organic fluorophores in in ovo avatars using the Nuance EX (Perkin Elmer) and established proof-of-principle intracellular and extracellular protein concentrations of epidermal growth factor receptor using QUIET and traditional paired-agent imaging.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Range Image Patches by NEB Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze sampled high dimensional data with the NEB method from a range image database. Select a large random sample of log-valued, high contrast, normalized, 8×8 range image patches from the Brown database. We make a density estimator and we establish 1-dimensional cell complexes from the range image patch data. We find topological properties of 8×8 range image patches, prove that there exist two types of subsets of 8×8 range image patches modelled as a circle.

  1. Quantitative imaging of a non-combusting diesel spray using structured laser illumination planar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, E.; Kristensson, E.; Hottenbach, P.; Aldén, M.; Grünefeld, G.

    2012-12-01

    Due to its transient nature, high atomization process, and rapid generation of fine evaporating droplets, diesel sprays have been, and still remain, one of the most challenging sprays to be fully analyzed and understood by means of non-intrusive diagnostics. The main limitation of laser techniques for quantitative measurements of diesel sprays concerns the detection of the multiple light scattering resulting from the high optical density of such a scattering medium. A second limitation is the extinction of the incident laser radiation as it crosses the spray, as well as the attenuation of the signal which is to be detected. All these issues have strongly motivated, during the past decade, the use of X-ray instead of visible light for dense spray diagnostics. However, we demonstrate in this paper that based on an affordable Nd:YAG laser system, structured laser illumination planar imaging (SLIPI) can provide accurate quantitative description of a non-reacting diesel spray injected at 1,100 bar within a room temperature vessel pressurized at 18.6 bar. The technique is used at λ = 355 nm excitation wavelength with 1.0 mol% TMPD dye concentration, for simultaneous LIF/Mie imaging. Furthermore, a novel dual-SLIPI configuration is tested with Mie scattering detection only. The results confirm that a mapping of both the droplet Sauter mean diameter and extinction coefficient can be obtained by such complementary approaches. These new insights are provided in this article at late times after injection start. It is demonstrated that the application of SLIPI to diesel sprays provides valuable quantitative information which was not previously accessible.

  2. Applying Quantitative CT Image Feature Analysis to Predict Response of Ovarian Cancer Patients to Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danala, Gopichandh; Thai, Theresa; Gunderson, Camille C; Moxley, Katherine M; Moore, Kathleen; Mannel, Robert S; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin; Qiu, Yuchen

    2017-10-01

    The study aimed to investigate the role of applying quantitative image features computed from computed tomography (CT) images for early prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy in the clinical trials for treating ovarian cancer patients. A dataset involving 91 patients was retrospectively assembled. Each patient had two sets of pre- and post-therapy CT images. A computer-aided detection scheme was applied to segment metastatic tumors previously tracked by radiologists on CT images and computed image features. Two initial feature pools were built using image features computed from pre-therapy CT images only and image feature difference computed from both pre- and post-therapy images. A feature selection method was applied to select optimal features, and an equal-weighted fusion method was used to generate a new quantitative imaging marker from each pool to predict 6-month progression-free survival. The prediction accuracy between quantitative imaging markers and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria was also compared. The highest areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve are 0.684 ± 0.056 and 0.771 ± 0.050 when using a single image feature computed from pre-therapy CT images and feature difference computed from pre- and post-therapy CT images, respectively. Using two corresponding fusion-based image markers, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve significantly increased to 0.810 ± 0.045 and 0.829 ± 0.043 (P quantitative imaging markers computed from pre-therapy CT images. However, using image feature difference computed between pre- and post-therapy CT images yielded higher prediction accuracy. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of water distribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cells via Terahertz imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamboon, P.; Buaphad, P.; Thongbai, C.; Saisud, J.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Rhodes, M.W.; Vilaithong, T.

    2011-01-01

    Coherent transition radiation in a THz regime generated from a femtosecond electron bunch is explored for its potential use in imaging applications. Due to water sensitivity, the THz imaging experiment is performed on a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) to assess the ability to quantify water in the flow field of the cell. In this investigation, the PEMFC design and the experimental setup for the THz imaging is described. The results of the THz images in the flow field are also discussed.

  4. A quantitative measure based infrared image enhancement algorithm using plateau histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rui; Yang, Yin-tang; Wang, Bing-jian; Zhou, Hui-xin

    2010-11-01

    A quantitative measure based scene-adaptive contrast enhancement algorithm for an infrared (IR) image is proposed. This method regulates the probability density function (PDF) of the raw image firstly, and then applies an improved plateau histogram equalization method whose plateau threshold is determined by the concavity of the regulated PDF to enhance the raw IR image. In the stepped parameter tuning process of the algorithm, quantitative measure EME is used as the criterion to determine the optimal PDF regulator factor and plateau threshold. The above improvements contribute to the performance promotion of the proposed algorithm, whose effectiveness is validated by the final assessment with visual quality and quantitative measures.

  5. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  6. Imaging fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy: new tools for quantitative bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Nirmalya; Wohland, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) techniques provide information at the single-molecule level with excellent time resolution. Usually applied at a single spot in a sample, they have been recently extended into imaging formats, referred to as imaging FFS. They provide spatial information at the optical diffraction limit and temporal information in the microsecond to millisecond range. This review provides an overview of the different modalities in which imaging FFS techniques have been implemented and discusses present imaging FFS capabilities and limitations. A combination of imaging FFS and nanoscopy would allow one to record information with the detailed spatial information of nanoscopy, which is ∼20 nm and limited only by fluorophore size and labeling density, and the time resolution of imaging FFS, limited by the fluorescence lifetime. This combination would provide new insights into biological events by providing spatiotemporal resolution at unprecedented levels.

  7. Adhesion-related glycocalyx study: quantitative approach with imaging-spectrum in the energy filtering transmission electron microscope (EFTEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, M; Desplat-Jego, S; Vacher, B; Ponsonnet, L; Fraterno, M; Bongrand, P; Martin, J M; Foa, C

    1998-06-05

    Large polysaccharide molecules composing the glycocalyx have been shown to prevent cell adhesion. However, this process was not observed microscopically. Terbium labeling, combined with a new quantitative imaging method based on electron energy loss spectroscopy, allowed specific glycocalyx staining with excellent contrast. Image analysis enabled us to compare glycocalyx structure in free membrane areas and contacts between monocytic cells and bound erythrocytes. Apparent glycocalyx thickness, in contact areas, was half of the sum of glycocalyx thicknesses in free areas without label density increase. Ultrastructural immunogold localization of CD43 molecules, a major component of glycocalyx, was also demonstrated to be excluded from contact areas during adhesion. Thus, both approaches strongly suggest that some glycocalyx elements must exit from contact to allow binding of adhesion molecules.

  8. Quantitative imaging studies with PET VI. Project II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper, M.; Chen, C.T.; Yasillo, N.; Gatley, J.; Ortega, C.; DeJesus, O.; Friedman, A.

    1985-01-01

    This project is focused upon the development of hardware and software to improve PET image analysis and upon clinical applications of PET. In this report the laboratory's progress in various attenuation correction methods for brain imaging are described. The use of time-of-flight information for image reconstruction is evaluated. The location of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in brain was found to be largely in the basal ganghia. 1 tab. (DT)

  9. Mammographic quantitative image analysis and biologic image composition for breast lesion characterization and classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Giger, Maryellen L.; Li, Hui [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Duewer, Fred; Malkov, Serghei; Joe, Bonnie; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A. [Radiology Department, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Flowers, Chris I. [Department of Radiology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Drukteinis, Jennifer S. [Department of Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether biologic image composition of mammographic lesions can improve upon existing mammographic quantitative image analysis (QIA) in estimating the probability of malignancy. Methods: The study population consisted of 45 breast lesions imaged with dual-energy mammography prior to breast biopsy with final diagnosis resulting in 10 invasive ductal carcinomas, 5 ductal carcinomain situ, 11 fibroadenomas, and 19 other benign diagnoses. Analysis was threefold: (1) The raw low-energy mammographic images were analyzed with an established in-house QIA method, “QIA alone,” (2) the three-compartment breast (3CB) composition measure—derived from the dual-energy mammography—of water, lipid, and protein thickness were assessed, “3CB alone”, and (3) information from QIA and 3CB was combined, “QIA + 3CB.” Analysis was initiated from radiologist-indicated lesion centers and was otherwise fully automated. Steps of the QIA and 3CB methods were lesion segmentation, characterization, and subsequent classification for malignancy in leave-one-case-out cross-validation. Performance assessment included box plots, Bland–Altman plots, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions (invasive and DCIS) was 0.81 (standard error 0.07) for the “QIA alone” method, 0.72 (0.07) for “3CB alone” method, and 0.86 (0.04) for “QIA+3CB” combined. The difference in AUC was 0.043 between “QIA + 3CB” and “QIA alone” but failed to reach statistical significance (95% confidence interval [–0.17 to + 0.26]). Conclusions: In this pilot study analyzing the new 3CB imaging modality, knowledge of the composition of breast lesions and their periphery appeared additive in combination with existing mammographic QIA methods for the distinction between different benign and malignant lesion types.

  10. Quantitative analysis of molecular partition towards lipid membranes using surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Tiago N.; Freire, João M.; Cunha-Santos, Catarina; Heras, Montserrat; Gonçalves, João; Moscona, Anne; Porotto, Matteo; Salomé Veiga, Ana; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the interplay between molecules and lipid membranes is fundamental when studying cellular and biotechnological phenomena. Partition between aqueous media and lipid membranes is key to the mechanism of action of many biomolecules and drugs. Quantifying membrane partition, through adequate and robust parameters, is thus essential. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for studying 1:1 stoichiometric interactions but has limited application to lipid membrane partition data. We have developed and applied a novel mathematical model for SPR data treatment that enables determination of kinetic and equilibrium partition constants. The method uses two complementary fitting models for association and dissociation sensorgram data. The SPR partition data obtained for the antibody fragment F63, the HIV fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide, and the endogenous drug kyotorphin towards POPC membranes were compared against data from independent techniques. The comprehensive kinetic and partition models were applied to the membrane interaction data of HRC4, a measles virus entry inhibitor peptide, revealing its increased affinity for, and retention in, cholesterol-rich membranes. Overall, our work extends the application of SPR beyond the realm of 1:1 stoichiometric ligand-receptor binding into a new and immense field of applications: the interaction of solutes such as biomolecules and drugs with lipids.

  11. Quantitative changes in adipocyte plasma membrane in response to nutritional manipulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.S.; Masoro, E.J.; Yu, B.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of changes in adipocyte size and the effects of nutritional manipulations on the quantity of plasma membrane per adipocyte were investigated. A method for estimating the quantity of plasma membrane was developed based on the specific labeling of adipocyte plasma membrane protein with the nonpermeable labeling agent 125I-labeled diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid. By studying rats (ranging in age from 50 to 125 days) fed a standard laboratory chow or a low fat diet or a high fat diet, a wide range of mean fat cell sizes was obtained. It was found that as the volume of the fat cell increased, the amount of plasma membrane increased in a linear fashion and that this linear relationship had the same slope whether the size of the adipocyte increased slowly with age or rapidly in response to a high fat diet. In contrast, fasting for up to 3 days caused a marked decrease in the mean volume of the adipocytes, but either no change or much less change in the amount of plasma membrane per cell than would have been predicted from the linear relationship between adipocytes, but either no change or much less change in the amount of plasma membrane per cell than would have been predicted form the linear relationship between adipocyte volume and amount of plasma membrane per cell obtained with fed rats, i.e., adipocytes from fasted rats contain more plasma membrane per cell than do fat cells of the same size from fed rats. Neither feeding a high fat diet nor fasting caused detectable changes in the protein and lipid composition of the adipocyte plasma membrane

  12. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation......This manuscript discusses basic methodological aspects of optical microscopy and micromanipulation methods to study membranes and reviews methods to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In particular, we focus on the use of fluorescence microscopy and micropipette manipulation techniques...

  13. Electronic imaging systems for quantitative electrophoresis of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is one of the most powerful and widely used methods for the separation of DNA. During the last decade, instruments have been developed that accurately quantitate in digital form the distribution of materials in a gel or on a blot prepared from a gel. In this paper, I review the various physical properties that can be used to quantitate the distribution of DNA on gels or blots and the instrumentation that has been developed to perform these tasks. The emphasis here is on DNA, but much of what is said also applies to RNA, proteins and other molecules. 36 refs

  14. Quantitative image analysis in the assessment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot-Richards, Devon S; Martin, David R; Myers, Orrin B; Czuchlewski, David R; Hunt, Kristin E

    2011-12-01

    Proliferation rates in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been associated with conflicting outcomes in the literature, more often with high proliferation associated with poor prognosis. In most studies, the proliferation rate was estimated by a pathologist using an immunohistochemical stain for the monoclonal antibody Ki-67. We hypothesized that a quantitative image analysis algorithm would give a more accurate estimate of the proliferation rate, leading to better associations with survival. In all, 84 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were selected according to the World Health Organization criteria. Ki-67 percentage positivity estimated by the pathologist was recorded from the original report. The same slides were then scanned using an Aperio ImageScope, and Ki-67 percentage positivity was calculated using a computer-based quantitative immunohistochemistry nuclear algorithm. In addition, chart review was performed and survival time was recorded. The Ki-67 percentage estimated by the pathologist from the original report versus quantitative image analysis was significantly correlated (Pquantitative image analysis (P=0.021). There was less agreement at lower Ki-67 percentages. Comparison of Ki-67 percentage positivity versus survival did not show significant association either with pathologist estimate or quantitative image analysis. However, although not significant, there was a trend of worse survival at higher proliferation rates detected by the pathologist but not by quantitative image analysis. Interestingly, our data suggest that the Ki-67 percentage positivity as assessed by the pathologist may be more closely associated with survival outcome than that identified by quantitative image analysis. This may indicate that pathologists are better at selecting appropriate areas of the slide. More cases are needed to assess whether this finding would be statistically significant. Due to the good correlation between pathologist estimate and quantitative image

  15. Nanoscale imaging of caveolin-1 membrane domains in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A Gabor

    Full Text Available Light microscopy enables noninvasive imaging of fluorescent species in biological specimens, but resolution is generally limited by diffraction to ~200-250 nm. Many biological processes occur on smaller length scales, highlighting the importance of techniques that can image below the diffraction limit and provide valuable single-molecule information. In recent years, imaging techniques have been developed which can achieve resolution below the diffraction limit. Utilizing one such technique, fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM, we demonstrated its ability to construct super-resolution images from single molecules in a living zebrafish embryo, expanding the realm of previous super-resolution imaging to a living vertebrate organism. We imaged caveolin-1 in vivo, in living zebrafish embryos. Our results demonstrate the successful image acquisition of super-resolution images in a living vertebrate organism, opening several opportunities to answer more dynamic biological questions in vivo at the previously inaccessible nanoscale.

  16. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Distinct Differences in the Protein Content of Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterbeemd, van de B.; Mommen, G.P.M.; Pennings, J.L.A.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Pol, van der L.A.; Jong, de A.P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    At present, only vaccines containing outer membrane vesicles (OMV) have successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B epidemics. These vaccines however require detergent-extraction to remove endotoxin, which changes immunogenicity and causes production difficulties. To investigate this in

  17. Quantitative functional optical imaging of the human skin using multi-spectral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainerstorfer, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Light tissue interactions can be described by the physical principles of absorption and scattering. Based on those parameters, different tissue types and analytes can be distinguished. Extracting blood volume and oxygenation is of particular interest in clinical routines for tumor diagnostics and treatment follow up, since they are parameters of angiogenic processes. The quantification of those analytes in tissue can be done by physical modeling of light tissue interaction. The physical model used here is the random walk theory. However, for quantification and clinical usefulness, one has to account for multiple challenges. First, one must consider the effect of topology of the sample on measured physical parameters. Second, diffusion of light inside the tissue is dependent on the structure of the sample imaged. Thus, the structural conformation has to be taken into account. Third, clinical translation of imaging modalities is often hindered due to the complicated post-processing of data, not providing results in real-time. In this thesis, two imaging modalities are being utilized, where the first one, diffuse multi-spectral imaging, is based on absorption contrast and spectral characteristics and the second one, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is based on scattering changes within the tissue. Multi-spectral imaging can provide spatial distributions of blood volume and blood oxygenation and OCT yields 3D structural images with micrometer resolution. In order to address the challenges mentioned above, a curvature correction algorithm for taking the topology into account was developed. Without taking curvature of the object into account, reconstruction of optical properties is not accurate. The method developed removes this artifact and recovers the underlying data, without the necessity of measuring the object's shape. The next step was to recover blood volume and oxygenation values in real time. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on multi spectral images is

  18. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of cortical multiple sclerosis pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tardif, Christine L; Bedell, Barry J; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    2012-01-01

    pathology. The objective of this study was to characterize the MRI signature of CLs to help interpret the changes seen in vivo and elucidate the factors limiting their visualization. A quantitative 3D high-resolution (350 μm isotropic) MRI study at 3 Tesla of a fixed post mortem cerebral hemisphere from...

  19. Quantitative Imaging of Nanoscale Mechanical Properties Using Hybrid Nanoindentation and Force Modulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asif, S. A; Wahl, K. J; Colton, R. J; Warren, O. L

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we present a quantitative stiffness imaging technique and demonstrate its use to directly map the dynamic mechanical properties of materials with nanometer-scale lateral resolution...

  20. Quantitative image analysis of microstructure development during pressure sintering of CoO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miro, A; Notis, M R

    1979-01-01

    An automatic system for quantitative image analysis was developed to study the transition from intermediate to final stage pore structure in pressure-sintered CoO. One of the significant results from this study indicates that the projected length is a good parameter to observe the transition from open cylindrical to closed porosity. Quantitative image analysis indicates that the Zener relationship (r/G approx. P) is obeyed through the entire sintering process.

  1. Image guided interstitial laser thermotherapy: a canine model evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muacevic, A; Peller, M; Ruprecht, L; Berg, D; Fend, L; Sroka, R; Reulen, H J; Reiser, M; Tonn, J Ch; Kreth, F W

    2005-02-01

    To determine the applicability and safety of a new canine model suitable for correlative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and morphological/pathophysiological examination over time after interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT) in brain tissue. A laser fibre (Diode Laser 830 nm) with an integrated temperature feedback system was inserted into the right frontal white matter in 18 dogs using frameless navigation technique. MRI thermometry (phase mapping i.e. chemical shift of the proton resonance frequency) during interstitial heating was compared to simultaneously recorded interstitial fiberoptic temperature readings on the border of the lesion. To study brain capillary function in response to ILTT over time quantitative autoradiography was performed investigating the unidirectional blood-to-tissue transport of carbon-14-labelled alpha amino-isobutyric acid (transfer constant K of AIB) 12, 36 hours, 7, 14 days, 4 weeks and 3 months after ILTT. All laser procedures were well tolerated, laser and temperature fibres could be adequately placed in the right frontal lobe in all animals. In 5 animals MRI-based temperature quantification correlated strongly to invasive temperature measurements. In the remaining animals the temperature fibre was located in the area of susceptibility artifacts, therefore, no temperature correlation was possible. The laser lesions consisted of a central area of calcified necrosis which was surrounded by an area of reactive brain tissue with increased permeability. Quantitative autoradiography indicated a thin and spherical blood brain barrier lesion. The magnitude of K of AIB increased from 12 hours to 14 days after ILTT and decreased thereafter. The mean value of K of AIB was 19 times (2 times) that of normal white matter (cortex), respectively. ILTT causes transient, highly localised areas of increased capillary permeability surrounding the laser lesion. Phase contrast imaging for MRI thermomonitoring can currently not be used for

  2. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging phantoms: A review and the need for a system phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kathryn E; Ainslie, Maureen; Barker, Alex J; Boss, Michael A; Cecil, Kim M; Charles, Cecil; Chenevert, Thomas L; Clarke, Larry; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Finn, Paul; Gembris, Daniel; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Hill, Derek L G; Jack, Clifford R; Jackson, Edward F; Liu, Guoying; Russek, Stephen E; Sharma, Samir D; Steckner, Michael; Stupic, Karl F; Trzasko, Joshua D; Yuan, Chun; Zheng, Jie

    2018-01-01

    The MRI community is using quantitative mapping techniques to complement qualitative imaging. For quantitative imaging to reach its full potential, it is necessary to analyze measurements across systems and longitudinally. Clinical use of quantitative imaging can be facilitated through adoption and use of a standard system phantom, a calibration/standard reference object, to assess the performance of an MRI machine. The International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine AdHoc Committee on Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance was established in February 2007 to facilitate the expansion of MRI as a mainstream modality for multi-institutional measurements, including, among other things, multicenter trials. The goal of the Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance committee was to provide a framework to ensure that quantitative measures derived from MR data are comparable over time, between subjects, between sites, and between vendors. This paper, written by members of the Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance committee, reviews standardization attempts and then details the need, requirements, and implementation plan for a standard system phantom for quantitative MRI. In addition, application-specific phantoms and implementation of quantitative MRI are reviewed. Magn Reson Med 79:48-61, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Quantitative comparison between two geometrical layouts for diffraction enhanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Wanxia; Yuan Qingxi [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Zhu Peiping [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China)], E-mail: zhupp@ihep.ac.cn; Wang Junyue; Shu Hang [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Chen Bo [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Hu Tiandou [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China)], E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2007-07-15

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) with two crystals has been performed at the 4W1A beamline at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). Two different crystal geometrical layouts were used to collect images, in the first layout the rotation axis of the crystal has been set perpendicular to the orbital plane while in the second the axis is parallel to the orbital plane. Performance comparison between the two layouts is discussed in terms of thermal expansion of the crystal induced by the heat load, imaging homogeneity, spatial resolution and angular resolution. From both experimental and theoretical data we show that the best images may be obtained with the optical layout in which the rotation axis of the crystals is perpendicular to the orbital plane.

  4. Quantitative comparison between two geometrical layouts for diffraction enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wanxia; Yuan Qingxi; Zhu Peiping; Wang Junyue; Shu Hang; Chen Bo; Hu Tiandou; Wu Ziyu

    2007-01-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) with two crystals has been performed at the 4W1A beamline at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). Two different crystal geometrical layouts were used to collect images, in the first layout the rotation axis of the crystal has been set perpendicular to the orbital plane while in the second the axis is parallel to the orbital plane. Performance comparison between the two layouts is discussed in terms of thermal expansion of the crystal induced by the heat load, imaging homogeneity, spatial resolution and angular resolution. From both experimental and theoretical data we show that the best images may be obtained with the optical layout in which the rotation axis of the crystals is perpendicular to the orbital plane

  5. Methodology for quantitative evaluation of diagnostic medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, C.

    1980-01-01

    This report deals with the evaluation of the performance of diagnostic medical imaging procedures using the Receiver Operating Characteristic or ROC analysis. The development of new tests for the statistical significance of apparent differences between ROC curves is discussed

  6. Evaluation of six sample preparation procedures for qualitative and quantitative proteomics analysis of milk fat globule membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxin; Anderson, Elizabeth; Zhang, Sheng

    2018-04-12

    Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins is challenged by the proteins solubility and detergent incompatibility with MS analysis. No single perfect protocol can be used to comprehensively characterize the proteome of membrane fraction. Here, we used cow milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteome analysis to assess six sample preparation procedures including one in-gel and five in-solution digestion approaches prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. The largest number of MFGM proteins were identified by suspension trapping (S-Trap) and filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) methods, followed by acetone precipitation without clean-up of tryptic peptides method. Protein identifications with highest average coverage was achieved by Chloroform/MeOH, in-gel and S-Trap methods. Most distinct proteins were identified by FASP method, followed by S-Trap. Analyses by Venn diagram, principal-component analysis, hierarchical clustering and the abundance ranking of quantitative proteins highlight differences in the MFGM fraction by the all sample preparation procedures. These results reveal the biased proteins/peptides loss occurred in each protocol. In this study, we found several novel proteins that were not observed previously by in-depth proteomics characterization of MFGM fraction in milk. Thus, a combination of multiple procedures with orthologous properties of sample preparation was demonstrated to improve the protein sequence coverage and expression level accuracy of membrane samples. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Ultrasound Imaging Based on Molecular Targeting for Quantitative Evaluation of Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, C; Yin, T; Zhang, Y; Lian, Y; You, Y; Wang, K; Zheng, R; Shuai, X

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantitatively diagnose and monitor the therapy response of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) with the use of targeted ultrasound (US) imaging. Targeted microbubbles (MBs) were fabricated, and the binding of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) antibodies to MBs was observed. To establish a quantitative method based on targeted US imaging, contrast-enhanced US was applied for IRI rats. After andrographolide treatment, the IRI rats were subjected to the quantitative targeted US imaging for a therapeutic effect. Effective binding of ICAM-1 antibodies to MBs was observed. According to the quantitative targeted US imaging, the ICAM-1 normalized intensity difference (NID) in the IRI rats (38.74 ± 15.08%) was significantly higher than that in the control rats (10.08 ± 2.52%, p = 0.048). Further, different degrees of IRI (mild IRI, moderate to severe IRI) were distinguished by the use of the NID (37.14 ± 2.14%, 22.34 ± 1.08%, p = 0.002). Analysis of mRNA expression demonstrated the accuracy of analyzing the NID by using quantitative targeted US imaging (R 2  = 0.7434, p quantitative targeted US imaging method for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of IRI. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. Quantitative and real-time effects of carbon quantum dots on single living HeLa cell membrane permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan; Liu, Ruihua; Li, Hao; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Li, Kunyang; Liu, Jian; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2014-05-21

    The interaction between carbon quantum dots (CQDs) and a single living cell was explored in real time. Here, we provide the quantitative data on the permeability of the HeLa cell membrane in the presence of CQDs with different surface functional groups (CQDs terminated with -OH/-COOH (CQD-OH), -PEG (CQD-PEG), and -NH2 (CQD-NH2)). Although these CQDs have very low toxicity towards HeLa cells, they still increase the cell membrane permeability by 8%, 13%, and 19% for CQD-PEG, CQD-OH, and CQD-NH2, respectively, and this kind of permeability was irreversible. These observations are valuable for promoting the bio-applications of carbon nanostructures in living systems.

  9. Delayed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT imaging improves quantitation of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Thomassen, Anders; Takx, Richard A P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine if delayed (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG) PET/CT imaging improves quantitation of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. Blood-pool activity can disturb the arterial (18)FDG signal. With time, blood-pool activity declines. Therefore, delayed imaging can...... potentially improve quantitation of vascular inflammation. METHODS AND RESULTS: 40 subjects were prospectively assessed by dual-time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 90 and 180 minutes after (18)FDG administration. For both time-points, global uptake of (18)FDG was determined in the carotid arteries...... at 180 minutes significant positive relations were observed between SCORE % and carotid (τ = 0.25, P = .045) and aortic (τ = 0.33, P = .008) cSUVMAX. CONCLUSIONS: Delayed (18)FDG PET/CT imaging at 180 minutes improves quantitation of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation over imaging at 90 minutes...

  10. Passive thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging for quantitative imaging of shale gas leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Guyot, Éric; Lagueux, Philippe; Morton, Vince; Giroux, Jean; Chamberland, Martin

    2017-10-01

    There are many types of natural gas fields including shale formations that are common especially in the St-Lawrence Valley (Canada). Since methane (CH4), the major component of shale gas, is odorless, colorless and highly flammable, in addition to being a greenhouse gas, methane emanations and/or leaks are important to consider for both safety and environmental reasons. Telops recently launched on the market the Hyper-Cam Methane, a field-deployable thermal infrared hyperspectral camera specially tuned for detecting methane infrared spectral features under ambient conditions and over large distances. In order to illustrate the benefits of this novel research instrument for natural gas imaging, the instrument was brought on a site where shale gas leaks unexpectedly happened during a geological survey near the Enfant-Jesus hospital in Quebec City, Canada, during December 2014. Quantitative methane imaging was carried out based on methane's unique infrared spectral signature. Optical flow analysis was also carried out on the data to estimate the methane mass flow rate. The results show how this novel technique could be used for advanced research on shale gases.

  11. Quantitative Imaging Test Approval and Biomarker Qualification: Interrelated but Distinct Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresolin, Linda; Dunnick, N. Reed; Sullivan, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative imaging biomarkers could speed the development of new treatments for unmet medical needs and improve routine clinical care. However, it is not clear how the various regulatory and nonregulatory (eg, reimbursement) processes (often referred to as pathways) relate, nor is it clear which data need to be collected to support these different pathways most efficiently, given the time- and cost-intensive nature of doing so. The purpose of this article is to describe current thinking regarding these pathways emerging from diverse stakeholders interested and active in the definition, validation, and qualification of quantitative imaging biomarkers and to propose processes to facilitate the development and use of quantitative imaging biomarkers. A flexible framework is described that may be adapted for each imaging application, providing mechanisms that can be used to develop, assess, and evaluate relevant biomarkers. From this framework, processes can be mapped that would be applicable to both imaging product development and to quantitative imaging biomarker development aimed at increasing the effectiveness and availability of quantitative imaging. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.10100800/-/DC1 PMID:21325035

  12. Online quantitative analysis of multispectral images of human body tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisenko, S A [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-08-31

    A method is developed for online monitoring of structural and morphological parameters of biological tissues (haemoglobin concentration, degree of blood oxygenation, average diameter of capillaries and the parameter characterising the average size of tissue scatterers), which involves multispectral tissue imaging, image normalisation to one of its spectral layers and determination of unknown parameters based on their stable regression relation with the spectral characteristics of the normalised image. Regression is obtained by simulating numerically the diffuse reflectance spectrum of the tissue by the Monte Carlo method at a wide variation of model parameters. The correctness of the model calculations is confirmed by the good agreement with the experimental data. The error of the method is estimated under conditions of general variability of structural and morphological parameters of the tissue. The method developed is compared with the traditional methods of interpretation of multispectral images of biological tissues, based on the solution of the inverse problem for each pixel of the image in the approximation of different analytical models. (biomedical optics)

  13. Quantitative imaging of single upconversion nanoparticles in biological tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Nadort

    Full Text Available The unique luminescent properties of new-generation synthetic nanomaterials, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs, enabled high-contrast optical biomedical imaging by suppressing the crowded background of biological tissue autofluorescence and evading high tissue absorption. This raised high expectations on the UCNP utilities for intracellular and deep tissue imaging, such as whole animal imaging. At the same time, the critical nonlinear dependence of the UCNP luminescence on the excitation intensity results in dramatic signal reduction at (∼1 cm depth in biological tissue. Here, we report on the experimental and theoretical investigation of this trade-off aiming at the identification of optimal application niches of UCNPs e.g. biological liquids and subsurface tissue layers. As an example of such applications, we report on single UCNP imaging through a layer of hemolyzed blood. To extend this result towards in vivo applications, we quantified the optical properties of single UCNPs and theoretically analyzed the prospects of single-particle detectability in live scattering and absorbing bio-tissue using a human skin model. The model predicts that a single 70-nm UCNP would be detectable at skin depths up to 400 µm, unlike a hardly detectable single fluorescent (fluorescein dye molecule. UCNP-assisted imaging in the ballistic regime thus allows for excellent applications niches, where high sensitivity is the key requirement.

  14. Multifunctional-layered materials for creating membrane-restricted nanodomains and nanoscale imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, P., E-mail: prasri@ece.ucsb.edu, E-mail: srinivasan@lifesci.ucsb.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA and Neuroscience Research Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    Experimental platform that allows precise spatial positioning of biomolecules with an exquisite control at nanometer length scales is a valuable tool to study the molecular mechanisms of membrane bound signaling. Using micromachined thin film gold (Au) in layered architecture, it is possible to add both optical and biochemical functionalities in in vitro. Towards this goal, here, I show that docking of complementary DNA tethered giant phospholiposomes on Au surface can create membrane-restricted nanodomains. These nanodomains are critical features to dissect molecular choreography of membrane signaling complexes. The excited surface plasmon resonance modes of Au allow label-free imaging at diffraction-limited resolution of stably docked DNA tethered phospholiposomes, and lipid-detergent bicelle structures. Such multifunctional building block enables realizing rigorously controlled in vitro set-up to model membrane anchored biological signaling, besides serving as an optical tool for nanoscale imaging.

  15. Quantitative Membrane Proteomics in a Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Line Undergoing Osteogenic Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Helle

    . Mesenchymal stem cells are generally isolated based on physical-chemical characteristics such as adherence to plastic, isolating the monocyte fraction. The resultant cultures are often heterogeneous and can contain other cell types, providing a currently poorly defined basis for future clinical use....... We have validated a subset of these markers by antibody-based flourescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), to confirm their presence at the cell surface. In this study, we have obtained a high-resolution profile of the membrane proteome of hMSCs. Furthermore, we have monitored the quantitative changes...

  16. Quantitative imaging of cation adsorption site densities in undisturbed soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Hannes; Strobel, Bjarne W.; Gustafsson, Jon-Petter; Koestel, John

    2017-04-01

    The vast majority of present soil system models assume a homogeneous distribution and accessibility of cation adsorption sites (CAS) within soil structural units like e.g. soil horizons. This is however in conflict with several recent studies finding that CAS in soils are not uniformly but patchily distributed at and below the cm-scale. It is likely that the small-scale distribution of CAS has significant impact on the performance of these models. However, systematic approaches to map CAS densities in undisturbed soil with 3-D resolution that could lead to respective model improvements are still lacking. We therefore investigated the 3-D distribution of the CAS in undisturbed soils using X-ray scanning and barium ions as a contrast agent. We appraised the validity of the approach by comparing X-ray image-derived cation exchange coefficients (CEC) with ones obtained using the ammonium acetate method. In the process, we evaluated whether there were larger CAS concentrations at aggregate and biopore boundaries as it is often hypothesized. We sampled eight small soil cores (approx. 10 ccm) from different locations with contrasting soil texture and organic matter contents. The samples were first saturated with a potassium chloride solution (0.1 mol per liter), whereupon a 3-D X-ray image was taken. Then, the potassium chloride solution was flushed out with a barium chloride solution (0.3 mol per liter) with barium replacing the potassium from the CAS due to its larger exchange affinity. After X-ray images as well as electrical conductivity in the effluent indicated that the entire sample had been saturated with the barium chloride, the sample was again rinsed using the potassium chloride solution. When the rinsing was complete a final 3-D X-ray image was acquired. The difference images between final and initial 3-D X-ray images were interpreted as depicting the adsorbed barium as the density of barium exceeds the one of potassium by more than 2 times. The X-ray image

  17. High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, D S [NIST; Jacobson, D L [NIST; Arif, M [NIST

    2009-01-01

    Water transport in the ionomeric membrane, typically Nafion{reg_sign}, has profound influence on the performance of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, in terms of internal resistance and overall water balance. In this work, high resolution neutron imaging of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane is presented in order to measure water content and through-plane gradients in situ under disparate temperature and humidification conditions.

  18. Quantitative Modeling of Membrane Transport and Anisogamy by Small Groups Within a Large-Enrollment Organismal Biology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Haag

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative modeling is not a standard part of undergraduate biology education, yet is routine in the physical sciences. Because of the obvious biophysical aspects, classes in anatomy and physiology offer an opportunity to introduce modeling approaches to the introductory curriculum. Here, we describe two in-class exercises for small groups working within a large-enrollment introductory course in organismal biology. Both build and derive biological insights from quantitative models, implemented using spreadsheets. One exercise models the evolution of anisogamy (i.e., small sperm and large eggs from an initial state of isogamy. Groups of four students work on Excel spreadsheets (from one to four laptops per group. The other exercise uses an online simulator to generate data related to membrane transport of a solute, and a cloud-based spreadsheet to analyze them. We provide tips for implementing these exercises gleaned from two years of experience.

  19. Quantitative 3-D imaging topogrammetry for telemedicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, Bruce R.

    1994-01-01

    The technology to reliably transmit high-resolution visual imagery over short to medium distances in real time has led to the serious considerations of the use of telemedicine, telepresence, and telerobotics in the delivery of health care. These concepts may involve, and evolve toward: consultation from remote expert teaching centers; diagnosis; triage; real-time remote advice to the surgeon; and real-time remote surgical instrument manipulation (telerobotics with virtual reality). Further extrapolation leads to teledesign and telereplication of spare surgical parts through quantitative teleimaging of 3-D surfaces tied to CAD/CAM devices and an artificially intelligent archival data base of 'normal' shapes. The ability to generate 'topogrames' or 3-D surface numerical tables of coordinate values capable of creating computer-generated virtual holographic-like displays, machine part replication, and statistical diagnostic shape assessment is critical to the progression of telemedicine. Any virtual reality simulation will remain in 'video-game' realm until realistic dimensional and spatial relational inputs from real measurements in vivo during surgeries are added to an ever-growing statistical data archive. The challenges of managing and interpreting this 3-D data base, which would include radiographic and surface quantitative data, are considerable. As technology drives toward dynamic and continuous 3-D surface measurements, presenting millions of X, Y, Z data points per second of flexing, stretching, moving human organs, the knowledge base and interpretive capabilities of 'brilliant robots' to work as a surgeon's tireless assistants becomes imaginable. The brilliant robot would 'see' what the surgeon sees--and more, for the robot could quantify its 3-D sensing and would 'see' in a wider spectral range than humans, and could zoom its 'eyes' from the macro world to long-distance microscopy. Unerring robot hands could rapidly perform machine-aided suturing with

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) reveals highly pure preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Luana; Yu, Lu; Omasits, Ulrich; Rossi, Omar; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R; Saul, Allan; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Gerke, Christiane

    2016-02-01

    Outer membrane blebs are naturally shed by Gram-negative bacteria and are candidates of interest for vaccines development. Genetic modification of bacteria to induce hyperblebbing greatly increases the yield of blebs, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA). The composition of the GMMA from hyperblebbing mutants of Shigella flexneri 2a and Shigella sonnei were quantitatively analyzed using high-sensitivity mass spectrometry with the label-free iBAQ procedure and compared to the composition of the solubilized cells of the GMMA-producing strains. There were 2306 proteins identified, 659 in GMMA and 2239 in bacteria, of which 290 (GMMA) and 1696 (bacteria) were common to both S. flexneri 2a and S. sonnei. Predicted outer membrane and periplasmic proteins constituted 95.7% and 98.7% of the protein mass of S. flexneri 2a and S. sonnei GMMA, respectively. Among the remaining proteins, small quantities of ribosomal proteins collectively accounted for more than half of the predicted cytoplasmic protein impurities in the GMMA. In GMMA, the outer membrane and periplasmic proteins were enriched 13.3-fold (S. flexneri 2a) and 8.3-fold (S. sonnei) compared to their abundance in the parent bacteria. Both periplasmic and outer membrane proteins were enriched similarly, suggesting that GMMA have a similar surface to volume ratio as the surface to periplasmic volume ratio in these mutant bacteria. Results in S. flexneri 2a and S. sonnei showed high reproducibility indicating a robust GMMA-producing process and the low contamination by cytoplasmic proteins support the use of GMMA for vaccines. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002517. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative image analysis for the detection of motion artefacts in coronary artery computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristanto, Wisnumurti; van Ooijen, Peter M.; Dikkers, Riksta; Greuter, Marcel J.; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    Multi detector-row CT (MDCT), the current preferred method for coronary artery disease assessment, is still affected by motion artefacts. To rule out motion artefacts, qualitative image analysis is usually performed. Our study aimed to develop a quantitative image analysis for motion artefacts

  2. Quantitative MR imaging of individual muscle involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, H.E.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Wohlgemuth, M.; Klomp, D.W.J.; Loosbroek-Wagemans, I.C.W.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Heerschap, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement a quantitative MR imaging method for the determination of muscular and fat content in individual skeletal muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Turbo Inversion Recovery Magnitude (TIRM) and multiecho MR images were acquired

  3. Quantitative comparison of OSEM and penalized likelihood image reconstruction using relative difference penalties for clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Asma, Evren; Cheng, Lishui; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M; Ross, Steven G; Miao, Jun; Jin, Xiao; Wollenweber, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is the most widely used algorithm for clinical PET image reconstruction. OSEM is usually stopped early and post-filtered to control image noise and does not necessarily achieve optimal quantitation accuracy. As an alternative to OSEM, we have recently implemented a penalized likelihood (PL) image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET using the relative difference penalty with the aim of improving quantitation accuracy without compromising visual image quality. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated visual image quality including lesion conspicuity in images reconstructed by the PL algorithm is better than or at least as good as that in OSEM images. In this paper we evaluate lesion quantitation accuracy of the PL algorithm with the relative difference penalty compared to OSEM by using various data sets including phantom data acquired with an anthropomorphic torso phantom, an extended oval phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom; clinical data; and hybrid clinical data generated by adding simulated lesion data to clinical data. We focus on mean standardized uptake values and compare them for PL and OSEM using both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF data. The results demonstrate improvements of PL in lesion quantitation accuracy compared to OSEM with a particular improvement in cold background regions such as lungs. (paper)

  4. Quantitative comparison of OSEM and penalized likelihood image reconstruction using relative difference penalties for clinical PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Ross, Steven G; Asma, Evren; Miao, Jun; Jin, Xiao; Cheng, Lishui; Wollenweber, Scott D; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M

    2015-08-07

    Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is the most widely used algorithm for clinical PET image reconstruction. OSEM is usually stopped early and post-filtered to control image noise and does not necessarily achieve optimal quantitation accuracy. As an alternative to OSEM, we have recently implemented a penalized likelihood (PL) image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET using the relative difference penalty with the aim of improving quantitation accuracy without compromising visual image quality. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated visual image quality including lesion conspicuity in images reconstructed by the PL algorithm is better than or at least as good as that in OSEM images. In this paper we evaluate lesion quantitation accuracy of the PL algorithm with the relative difference penalty compared to OSEM by using various data sets including phantom data acquired with an anthropomorphic torso phantom, an extended oval phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom; clinical data; and hybrid clinical data generated by adding simulated lesion data to clinical data. We focus on mean standardized uptake values and compare them for PL and OSEM using both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF data. The results demonstrate improvements of PL in lesion quantitation accuracy compared to OSEM with a particular improvement in cold background regions such as lungs.

  5. MO-A-BRA-01: State of the Art in Quantitative Imaging in CT, PET and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNitt-Gray, M; Kinahan, P; Jackson, E

    2012-06-01

    Diagnostic Imaging is evolving from a modality where the emphasis is on the acquisition and interpretation of image data by radiologists to one where imaging devices may be used as measurement devices that are able to produce quantitative results. Some examples of quantitative measured values are already in clinical practice, including coronary artery calcium scores from CT, Standard Uptake Values (SUV) in PET imaging and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) in MRI. Clinical and clinical research applications of quantitative anatomical and functional imaging biomarkers, including those focused on treatment assessment, have continued to dramatically expand. Studies at single centers have clearly demonstrated the potential of such applications. However, sources of bias and variance of quantitative imaging biomarkers have not previously been adequately investigated, thus limiting the implementation of robust methods to mitigate their effects. Therefore, when it comes to applications of such techniques across vendor platforms, centers, and time, challenges arise due to lack of standards, appropriate phantoms, and protocols. During the past few years, several quantitative imaging initiatives have been instigated. This symposium presentation will review selected applications of quantitative imaging biomarkers, illustrate some of the current challenges in broadening the use of such biomarkers, and discuss some of the current initiatives of various scientific and federal organizations that are focused on the standardization, qualification, and validation of quantitative imaging biomarkers. 1. Understand selected applications of quantitative imaging biomarkers. 2. Understand the factors that currently limit widespread acceptance and use of such quantitative imaging biomarkers, including sources of bias and variance. 3. Understand some of the current initiatives focused on the standardization, qualification, and validation of selected quantitative imaging biomarkers. 1

  6. Experimental study on quantitative evaluation of film-based digital imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Heang Hee; Kim, Eun Kyung

    1994-01-01

    A digital imaging system using Machintosh II ci computer, high resolution Sony XC-77 CCD camera, Quick capture Frame Grabber Board was evaluated for quantitative analysis of standardized periapical film with aluminum step wedge. The results were as follows: 1. Correlation between Al thickness and gray level was high-positively associated (r 2 =0.99, p 2 =0.98 2 was relatively low. On the basis of the above results, it is considered that this digital imaging system using a Macintosh II ci computer and a high resolution CCD monochrome camera will be useful evaluating digitalized image from standardized periapical film quantitatively.

  7. Quantitative label-free sperm imaging by means of transport of intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poola, Praveen Kumar; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Jayaraman, Varshini; John, Renu

    2016-03-01

    Most living cells are optically transparent which makes it difficult to visualize them under bright field microscopy. Use of contrast agents or markers and staining procedures are often followed to observe these cells. However, most of these staining agents are toxic and not applicable for live cell imaging. In the last decade, quantitative phase imaging has become an indispensable tool for morphological characterization of the phase objects without any markers. In this paper, we report noninterferometric quantitative phase imaging of live sperm cells by solving transport of intensity equations with recorded intensity measurements along optical axis on a commercial bright field microscope.

  8. Ultra-fast quantitative imaging using ptychographic iterative engine based digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aihui; Tian, Xiaolin; Kong, Yan; Jiang, Zhilong; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang; Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    As a lensfree imaging technique, ptychographic iterative engine (PIE) method can provide both quantitative sample amplitude and phase distributions avoiding aberration. However, it requires field of view (FoV) scanning often relying on mechanical translation, which not only slows down measuring speed, but also introduces mechanical errors decreasing both resolution and accuracy in retrieved information. In order to achieve high-accurate quantitative imaging with fast speed, digital micromirror device (DMD) is adopted in PIE for large FoV scanning controlled by on/off state coding by DMD. Measurements were implemented using biological samples as well as USAF resolution target, proving high resolution in quantitative imaging using the proposed system. Considering its fast and accurate imaging capability, it is believed the DMD based PIE technique provides a potential solution for medical observation and measurements.

  9. A novel iris transillumination grading scale allowing flexible assessment with quantitative image analysis and visual matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Brancusi, Flavia; Valivullah, Zaheer M; Anderson, Michael G; Cunningham, Denise; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Power, Bradley; Simeonov, Dimitre; Gahl, William A; Zein, Wadih M; Adams, David R; Brooks, Brian

    2018-01-01

    To develop a sensitive scale of iris transillumination suitable for clinical and research use, with the capability of either quantitative analysis or visual matching of images. Iris transillumination photographic images were used from 70 study subjects with ocular or oculocutaneous albinism. Subjects represented a broad range of ocular pigmentation. A subset of images was subjected to image analysis and ranking by both expert and nonexpert reviewers. Quantitative ordering of images was compared with ordering by visual inspection. Images were binned to establish an 8-point scale. Ranking consistency was evaluated using the Kendall rank correlation coefficient (Kendall's tau). Visual ranking results were assessed using Kendall's coefficient of concordance (Kendall's W) analysis. There was a high degree of correlation among the image analysis, expert-based and non-expert-based image rankings. Pairwise comparisons of the quantitative ranking with each reviewer generated an average Kendall's tau of 0.83 ± 0.04 (SD). Inter-rater correlation was also high with Kendall's W of 0.96, 0.95, and 0.95 for nonexpert, expert, and all reviewers, respectively. The current standard for assessing iris transillumination is expert assessment of clinical exam findings. We adapted an image-analysis technique to generate quantitative transillumination values. Quantitative ranking was shown to be highly similar to a ranking produced by both expert and nonexpert reviewers. This finding suggests that the image characteristics used to quantify iris transillumination do not require expert interpretation. Inter-rater rankings were also highly similar, suggesting that varied methods of transillumination ranking are robust in terms of producing reproducible results.

  10. Quantitative assessment of susceptibility weighted imaging processing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningzhi; Wang, Wen-Tung; Sati, Pascal; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate different susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) phase processing methods and parameter selection, thereby improving understanding of potential artifacts, as well as facilitating choice of methodology in clinical settings. Materials and Methods Two major phase processing methods, Homodyne-filtering and phase unwrapping-high pass (HP) filtering, were investigated with various phase unwrapping approaches, filter sizes, and filter types. Magnitude and phase images were acquired from a healthy subject and brain injury patients on a 3T clinical Siemens MRI system. Results were evaluated based on image contrast to noise ratio and presence of processing artifacts. Results When using a relatively small filter size (32 pixels for the matrix size 512 × 512 pixels), all Homodyne-filtering methods were subject to phase errors leading to 2% to 3% masked brain area in lower and middle axial slices. All phase unwrapping-filtering/smoothing approaches demonstrated fewer phase errors and artifacts compared to the Homodyne-filtering approaches. For performing phase unwrapping, Fourier-based methods, although less accurate, were 2–4 orders of magnitude faster than the PRELUDE, Goldstein and Quality-guide methods. Conclusion Although Homodyne-filtering approaches are faster and more straightforward, phase unwrapping followed by HP filtering approaches perform more accurately in a wider variety of acquisition scenarios. PMID:24923594

  11. Quantitative imaging of excised osteoarthritic cartilage using spectral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Kishore; Bateman, Christopher J.; Younis, Raja Aamir; De Ruiter, Niels J.A.; Ramyar, Mohsen; Anderson, Nigel G. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); Loebker, Caroline [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Twente, Department of Developmental BioEngineering, Enschede (Netherlands); Schon, Benjamin S.; Hooper, Gary J.; Woodfield, Tim B.F. [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); Chernoglazov, Alex I. [University of Canterbury, Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, Christchurch (New Zealand); Butler, Anthony P.H. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); MARS Bioimaging, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    To quantify iodine uptake in articular cartilage as a marker of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using multi-energy spectral CT. We incubated a 25-mm strip of excised osteoarthritic human tibial plateau in 50 % ionic iodine contrast and imaged it using a small-animal spectral scanner with a cadmium telluride photon-processing detector to quantify the iodine through the thickness of the articular cartilage. We imaged both spectroscopic phantoms and osteoarthritic tibial plateau samples. The iodine distribution as an inverse marker of GAG content was presented in the form of 2D and 3D images after applying a basis material decomposition technique to separate iodine in cartilage from bone. We compared this result with a histological section stained for GAG. The iodine in cartilage could be distinguished from subchondral bone and quantified using multi-energy CT. The articular cartilage showed variation in iodine concentration throughout its thickness which appeared to be inversely related to GAG distribution observed in histological sections. Multi-energy CT can quantify ionic iodine contrast (as a marker of GAG content) within articular cartilage and distinguish it from bone by exploiting the energy-specific attenuation profiles of the associated materials. (orig.)

  12. Quantitative Image Informatics for Cancer Research (QIICR) | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaging has enormous untapped potential to improve cancer research through software to extract and process morphometric and functional biomarkers. In the era of non-cytotoxic treatment agents, multi- modality image-guided ablative therapies and rapidly evolving computational resources, quantitative imaging software can be transformative in enabling minimally invasive, objective and reproducible evaluation of cancer treatment response. Post-processing algorithms are integral to high-throughput analysis and fine- grained differentiation of multiple molecular targets.

  13. Quantitative TLC-Image Analysis of Urinary Creatinine Using Iodine Staining and RGB Values

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Emily; West, Caroline; Kradtap Hartwell, Supaporn

    2015-01-01

    Digital image analysis of the separation results of colorless analytes on thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates usually involves using specially tailored software to analyze the images generated from either a UV scanner or UV lamp station with a digital camera or a densitometer. Here, a low-cost alternative setup for quantitative TLC-digital image analysis is demonstrated using a universal staining reagent (iodine vapor), an office scanner and a commonly available software (Microsoft Paint) ...

  14. Integrative Analysis of Subcellular Quantitative Proteomics Studies Reveals Functional Cytoskeleton Membrane-Lipid Raft Interactions in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anup D; Inder, Kerry L; Shah, Alok K; Cristino, Alexandre S; McKie, Arthur B; Gabra, Hani; Davis, Melissa J; Hill, Michelle M

    2016-10-07

    Lipid rafts are dynamic membrane microdomains that orchestrate molecular interactions and are implicated in cancer development. To understand the functions of lipid rafts in cancer, we performed an integrated analysis of quantitative lipid raft proteomics data sets modeling progression in breast cancer, melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma. This analysis revealed that cancer development is associated with increased membrane raft-cytoskeleton interactions, with ∼40% of elevated lipid raft proteins being cytoskeletal components. Previous studies suggest a potential functional role for the raft-cytoskeleton in the action of the putative tumor suppressors PTRF/Cavin-1 and Merlin. To extend the observation, we examined lipid raft proteome modulation by an unrelated tumor suppressor opioid binding protein cell-adhesion molecule (OPCML) in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells. In agreement with the other model systems, quantitative proteomics revealed that 39% of OPCML-depleted lipid raft proteins are cytoskeletal components, with microfilaments and intermediate filaments specifically down-regulated. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction network and simulation analysis showed significantly higher interactions among cancer raft proteins compared with general human raft proteins. Collectively, these results suggest increased cytoskeleton-mediated stabilization of lipid raft domains with greater molecular interactions as a common, functional, and reversible feature of cancer cells.

  15. On the benefit of the negative-spherical-aberration imaging technique for quantitative HRTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, C.L.; Houben, L.; Thust, A.; Barthel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Employing an aberration corrector in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, the spherical aberration C S can be tuned to negative values, resulting in a novel imaging technique, which is called the negative C S imaging (NCSI) technique. The image contrast obtained with the NCSI technique is compared quantitatively with the image contrast formed with the traditional positive C S imaging (PCSI) technique. For the case of thin objects negative C S images are superior to positive C S images concerning the magnitude of the obtained contrast, which is due to constructive rather than destructive superposition of fundamental contrast contributions. As a consequence, the image signal obtained with a negative spherical aberration is significantly more robust against noise caused by amorphous surface layers, resulting in a measurement precision of atomic positions which is by a factor of 2-3 better at an identical noise level. The quantitative comparison of the two alternative C S -corrected imaging modes shows that the NCSI mode yields significantly more precise results in quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of thin objects than the traditional PCSI mode.

  16. Study of monocyte membrane proteome perturbation during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2010-07-02

    Human monocytes\\' exposure to low-level lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces temporary monocytic insensitivity to subsequent LPS challenge. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon could have important clinical utilities in preventing and/or treating severe infections. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to comprehensively characterize the membrane proteomes of monocytes before and after LPS exposure. We identified a total of 1651 proteins, of which 53.6% were membrane proteins. Ninety-four percent of the proteins were quantified and 255 proteins were shown to be tightly regulated by LPS. Subcellular location analysis revealed organelle-specific response to LPS exposure: more than 90% of identified mitochondrial membrane proteins were significant downregulated, whereas the majority of proteins from other organelles such as ER, Golgi and ribosome were upregulated. Moreover, we found that the expression of most receptors potentially involved in LPS signal pathway (CD14, toll-like receptor 4, CD11/CD18 complex) were substantially decreased, while the expression of molecules involved in LPS neutralization were enhanced after LPS challenge. Together, these findings could be of significance in understanding the mechanism of LPS tolerance and provide values for designing new approaches for regulating monocytic responses in sepsis patients.

  17. Nanoparticles for biomedical imaging, therapy, and quantitative diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust, Brian G.

    Nanoparticles and nanomaterials are known to exhibit extraordinary characteristics and have a wide range of application which utilizes their unique properties. In particular, nanoparticles have shown great promise towards advancing the state of biological and biomedical techniques such as in vivo and in vitro imaging modalities, biosensing, and disease detection and therapy. Nanocrystalline hosts: NaYF4, KYF4, KGdF4, NaMF3, and KMF3 (M=Mg, Ba, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cr) doped with rare earth ions have been synthesized by thermolysis, solvothermal, and hydrothermal methods. The morphology and spectroscopic properties have been thoroughly characterized. These nanoparticles (NP) are particularly useful for biomedical purposes since both the exciting and emitting wavelengths are in the near-infrared, where most tissues do not strongly absorb or scatter light. In vivo and in vitro imaging was performed with a 980 nm excitation source. Finally, NPs were conjugated with zinc phthalocyanine, a photosensitizer with a large absorption coefficient in the red and NIR regions, to illustrate the efficacy of these NPs as a platform for dual-mode infrared-activated imaging and photodynamic platforms. In addition, nonlinear optical nanomaterials, such as BaTiO3 and Ag@BaTiO3, were also synthesized and characterized. The nonlinear optical properties were investigated, and it is demonstrated that these nanoparticles can produce phase conjugate waves when used in a counterpropagating four wave mixing setup. The third order susceptibility is quantified using the z-scan technique, and the toxicity of these nanoparticles is also explored.

  18. Direct assessment of the effect of the Gly380Arg achondroplasia mutation on FGFR3 dimerization using quantitative imaging FRET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Placone

    Full Text Available The Gly380Arg mutation in FGFR3 is the genetic cause for achondroplasia (ACH, the most common form of human dwarfism. The mutation has been proposed to increase FGFR3 dimerization, but the dimerization propensities of wild-type and mutant FGFR3 have not been compared. Here we use quantitative imaging FRET to characterize the dimerization of wild-type FGFR3 and the ACH mutant in plasma membrane-derived vesicles from HEK293T cells. We demonstrate a small, but statistically significant increase in FGFR3 dimerization due to the ACH mutation. The data are consistent with the idea that the ACH mutation causes a structural change which affects both the stability and the activity of FGFR3 dimers in the absence of ligand.

  19. Direct Assessment of the Effect of the Gly380Arg Achondroplasia Mutation on FGFR3 Dimerization Using Quantitative Imaging FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placone, Jesse; Hristova, Kalina

    2012-01-01

    The Gly380Arg mutation in FGFR3 is the genetic cause for achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of human dwarfism. The mutation has been proposed to increase FGFR3 dimerization, but the dimerization propensities of wild-type and mutant FGFR3 have not been compared. Here we use quantitative imaging FRET to characterize the dimerization of wild-type FGFR3 and the ACH mutant in plasma membrane-derived vesicles from HEK293T cells. We demonstrate a small, but statistically significant increase in FGFR3 dimerization due to the ACH mutation. The data are consistent with the idea that the ACH mutation causes a structural change which affects both the stability and the activity of FGFR3 dimers in the absence of ligand. PMID:23056398

  20. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of (F18)fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), (F18)fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of (F18)-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks.

  1. Quantitating subcellular metabolism with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bailey, Andrew; Senyo, Samuel E.; Guillermier, Christelle; Perlstein, Todd S.; Gould, Alex P.; Lee, Richard T.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry with stable isotope labels has been seminal in discovering the dynamic state of living matter 1,2 but is limited to bulk tissues or cells. We developed multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) that allowed us to view and measure stable isotope incorporation with sub-micron resolution 3,4 . Here we apply MIMS to diverse organisms, including Drosophila, mice, and humans. We test the “immortal strand hypothesis,” which predicts that during asymmetric stem cell division ch...

  2. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of [F18]fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), [F18]fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of [F18]-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks

  3. Nuclear medicine and quantitative imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science): Comprehensive progress report, April 1, 1986-December 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1988-06-01

    This document describes several years research to improve PET imaging and diagnostic techniques in man. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. The reports in the study were processed separately for the data bases

  4. Quantitative assessment of periimplant bone density (HU) on CBCT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jong Gook; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Jae Duk

    2008-01-01

    The primary aims of this retrospective study were to compare subjective bone quality and bone quality based on the Hounsfield scale in different segments of the edentulous jaw, and to establish quantitative and objective assessment of the bone quality. Twenty eight randomly selected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans were analyzed. For evaluation one hundred and twelve edentulous areas were selected. Implant recipient sites were evaluated visually for Lekholm and Zarb classification. The same sites were subsequently evaluated digitally using the Hounsfield scale with Vimplant 2.0 TM , and the results were correlated with visual classification. Data was subject for statistical analysis in order to determine correlation between recorded HU and the regions of the mouth with the Kruskal-Wallis test. The highest unit/mean density value (311 HU) was found in the anterior mandible, followed by 259 HU for the posterior mandible, 216 HU for the anterior maxilla, and 127 HU for the posterior maxilla. These results demonstrate a strong correlation for HU depending on the region of the mouth (p TM with Vimplant TM software.

  5. Quantitative assessment in thermal image segmentation for artistic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Bardia; Sfarra, Stefano; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2017-07-01

    The application of the thermal and infrared technology in different areas of research is considerably increasing. These applications involve Non-destructive Testing (NDT), Medical analysis (Computer Aid Diagnosis/Detection- CAD), Arts and Archaeology among many others. In the arts and archaeology field, infrared technology provides significant contributions in term of finding defects of possible impaired regions. This has been done through a wide range of different thermographic experiments and infrared methods. The proposed approach here focuses on application of some known factor analysis methods such as standard Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) optimized by gradient-descent-based multiplicative rules (SNMF1) and standard NMF optimized by Non-negative least squares (NNLS) active-set algorithm (SNMF2) and eigen decomposition approaches such as Principal Component Thermography (PCT), Candid Covariance-Free Incremental Principal Component Thermography (CCIPCT) to obtain the thermal features. On one hand, these methods are usually applied as preprocessing before clustering for the purpose of segmentation of possible defects. On the other hand, a wavelet based data fusion combines the data of each method with PCT to increase the accuracy of the algorithm. The quantitative assessment of these approaches indicates considerable segmentation along with the reasonable computational complexity. It shows the promising performance and demonstrated a confirmation for the outlined properties. In particular, a polychromatic wooden statue and a fresco were analyzed using the above mentioned methods and interesting results were obtained.

  6. Activation autoradiography: imaging and quantitative determination of endogenous and exogenous oxygen in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, K.; Iwata, R.; Kogure, K.; Ohtomo, H.; Orihara, H.; Ido, T.

    1987-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous oxygen in the rat brain were quantitatively determined using an autoradiographic technique. The oxygen images of frozen and dried rat brain sections were obtained as 18 F images by using the 16 O ( 3 He,p) 18 F reaction for endogenous 16 O images and the 18 O(p,n) 18 F reaction for endogenous and exogenous 18 O images. These autoradiograms demonstrated the different distribution of oxygen between gray and white matter. These images also allowed differentiation of the individual structures of hippocampal formation, owing to the differing water content of the various structures. Local oxygen contents were quantitatively determined from autoradiograms of brain sections and standard sections with known oxygen contents. The estimated values were 75.6 +/- 4.6 wt% in gray matter and 72.2 +/- 4.0 wt% in white matter. The systematic error in the present method was estimated to be 4.9%

  7. Quantitation of Protein Expression and Co-localization Using Multiplexed Immuno-histochemical Staining and Multispectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Ricke, Emily A; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2016-04-08

    Immunohistochemistry is a commonly used clinical and research lab detection technique for investigating protein expression and localization within tissues. Many semi-quantitative systems have been developed for scoring expression using immunohistochemistry, but inherent subjectivity limits reproducibility and accuracy of results. Furthermore, the investigation of spatially overlapping biomarkers such as nuclear transcription factors is difficult with current immunohistochemistry techniques. We have developed and optimized a system for simultaneous investigation of multiple proteins using high throughput methods of multiplexed immunohistochemistry and multispectral imaging. Multiplexed immunohistochemistry is performed by sequential application of primary antibodies with secondary antibodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase or alkaline phosphatase. Different chromogens are used to detect each protein of interest. Stained slides are loaded into an automated slide scanner and a protocol is created for automated image acquisition. A spectral library is created by staining a set of slides with a single chromogen on each. A subset of representative stained images are imported into multispectral imaging software and an algorithm for distinguishing tissue type is created by defining tissue compartments on images. Subcellular compartments are segmented by using hematoxylin counterstain and adjusting the intrinsic algorithm. Thresholding is applied to determine positivity and protein co-localization. The final algorithm is then applied to the entire set of tissues. Resulting data allows the user to evaluate protein expression based on tissue type (ex. epithelia vs. stroma) and subcellular compartment (nucleus vs. cytoplasm vs. plasma membrane). Co-localization analysis allows for investigation of double-positive, double-negative, and single-positive cell types. Combining multispectral imaging with multiplexed immunohistochemistry and automated image acquisition is an

  8. Quantitative MR imaging of normal and leukemic bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinks, R.S.; Dunlap, H.J.; Poon, P.Y.; Curtis, J.; Henkelman, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed and tested a protocol that allows extraction of reliable T1 and T2 relaxation times from imaging data. They have used these methods to study in vivo the bone marrow of healthy volunteers and patients with acute leukemia. Examinations were performed at 6.25 MHz using an interleaved ISE/SE sequence to calculate T1 and an eight echo (TE = 25) sequence to calculate T2. The results are summarized as follows: In leukemic patients, T1 = 476 +- 115 msec; in leukemic patients in remission, T1 = 290 +- 31 msec; in healthy volunteers, T1 = 329 +- 32 msec. The T2 values were not significantly different for the three groups (105 +- 10 msec). Work is underway to evaluate whether T1 values of bone marrow may be used to monitor patients in remission and to detect the onset of relapse

  9. Raman hyperspectral imaging of iron transport across membranes in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anupam; Costa, Xavier Felipe; Khmaladze, Alexander; Barroso, Margarida; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Raman scattering microscopy is a powerful imaging technique used to identify chemical composition, structural and conformational state of molecules of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine and materials science. In this work, we have shown that Raman techniques allow the measurement of the iron content in protein mixtures and cells. Since the mechanisms of iron acquisition, storage, and excretion by cells are not completely understood, improved knowledge of iron metabolism can offer insight into many diseases in which iron plays a role in the pathogenic process, such as diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and metabolic syndrome. Understanding of the processes involved in cellular iron metabolism will improve our knowledge of cell functioning. It will also have a big impact on treatment of diseases caused by iron deficiency (anemias) and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis). Previously, Raman studies have shown substantial differences in spectra of transferrin with and without bound iron, thus proving that it is an appropriate technique to determine the levels of bound iron in the protein mixture. We have extended these studies to obtain hyperspectral images of transferrin in cells. By employing a Raman scanning microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled CCD camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process images of fixed cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss and compare various methods of hyperspectral Raman image analysis and demonstrate the use of these methods to characterize cellular iron content without the need for dye labeling.

  10. Dependence of quantitative accuracy of CT perfusion imaging on system parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Deconvolution is a popular method to calculate parametric perfusion parameters from four dimensional CT perfusion (CTP) source images. During the deconvolution process, the four dimensional space is squeezed into three-dimensional space by removing the temporal dimension, and a prior knowledge is often used to suppress noise associated with the process. These additional complexities confound the understanding about deconvolution-based CTP imaging system and how its quantitative accuracy depends on parameters and sub-operations involved in the image formation process. Meanwhile, there has been a strong clinical need in answering this question, as physicians often rely heavily on the quantitative values of perfusion parameters to make diagnostic decisions, particularly during an emergent clinical situation (e.g. diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke). The purpose of this work was to develop a theoretical framework that quantitatively relates the quantification accuracy of parametric perfusion parameters with CTP acquisition and post-processing parameters. This goal was achieved with the help of a cascaded systems analysis for deconvolution-based CTP imaging systems. Based on the cascaded systems analysis, the quantitative relationship between regularization strength, source image noise, arterial input function, and the quantification accuracy of perfusion parameters was established. The theory could potentially be used to guide developments of CTP imaging technology for better quantification accuracy and lower radiation dose.

  11. Nuclear medicine and imaging research. Instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation. Progress report, January 15, 1984-January 14, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1984-09-01

    This program addresses problems involving the basic science and technology of radioactive tracer methods as they relate to nuclear medicine and imaging. The broad goal is to develop new instruments and methods for image formation, processing, quantitation and display, so as to maximize the diagnostic information per unit of absorbed radiation dose to the patient. Project I addresses problems associated with the quantitative imaging of single-photon emitters; Project II addresses similar problems associated with the quantitative imaging of positron emitters; Project III addresses methodological problems associated with the quantitative evaluation of the efficacy of diagnostic imaging procedures

  12. Quantitative analysis of rib movement based on dynamic chest bone images: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Oda, M.; Mitsutaka, M.; Suzuki, K.; Sakuta, K.; Kawashima, H.

    2014-03-01

    Rib movement during respiration is one of the diagnostic criteria in pulmonary impairments. In general, the rib movement is assessed in fluoroscopy. However, the shadows of lung vessels and bronchi overlapping ribs prevent accurate quantitative analysis of rib movement. Recently, an image-processing technique for separating bones from soft tissue in static chest radiographs, called "bone suppression technique", has been developed. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic bone images created by the bone suppression technique in quantitative analysis of rib movement. Dynamic chest radiographs of 10 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). Bone suppression technique based on a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) was applied to the dynamic chest images to create bone images. Velocity vectors were measured in local areas on the dynamic bone images, which formed a map. The velocity maps obtained with bone and original images for scoliosis and normal cases were compared to assess the advantages of bone images. With dynamic bone images, we were able to quantify and distinguish movements of ribs from those of other lung structures accurately. Limited rib movements of scoliosis patients appeared as reduced rib velocity vectors. Vector maps in all normal cases exhibited left-right symmetric distributions, whereas those in abnormal cases showed nonuniform distributions. In conclusion, dynamic bone images were useful for accurate quantitative analysis of rib movements: Limited rib movements were indicated as a reduction of rib movement and left-right asymmetric distribution on vector maps. Thus, dynamic bone images can be a new diagnostic tool for quantitative analysis of rib movements without additional radiation dose.

  13. Quantitative Imaging Features and Postoperative Hepatic Insufficiency: A Multi-Institutional Expanded Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Linda M; Chakraborty, Jayasree; Gonen, Mithat; Chapman, William C; Do, Richard Kg; Koerkamp, Bas Groot; Verhoef, Kees; Lee, Ser Yee; Massani, Marco; van der Stok, Eric P; Simpson, Amber L

    2018-02-14

    Post-hepatectomy liver insufficiency (PHLI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after liver resection. Quantitative imaging analysis using CT scans measures variations in pixel intensity related to perfusion. A preliminary study demonstrated a correlation between quantitative imaging features of the future liver remnant (FLR) parenchyma from preoperative CT scans and PHLI. The objective of the present study was to explore the potential application of quantitative imaging analysis in PHLI in an expanded, multi-institutional cohort. Patients were retrospectively identified from five high-volume academic centers that developed PHLI after major hepatectomy and were matched to control patients without PHLI (by extent of resection, pre-operative chemotherapy treatment, age (±5 years), and sex). Quantitative imaging features were extracted from the FLR in the preoperative CT scan, and the most discriminatory features were identified using conditional logistic regression. %RLV was defined as follows: (FLR volume)/(total liver volume)x100. Significant clinical and imaging features were combined in a multivariate analysis using conditional logistic regression. From 2000 to 2015, 74 patients with PHLI and 74 matched controls were identified. The most common indications for surgery were colorectal liver metastases (53%), hepatocellular carcinoma (37%), and cholangiocarcinoma (9%). Two CT imaging features (FD1_4: image complexity; ACM1_10: spatial distribution of pixel intensity) were strongly associated with PHLI and remained associated with PHLI on multivariate analysis (p=0.018 and p=0.023, respectively), independent of clinical variables, including preoperative bilirubin and %RLV. Quantitative imaging features are independently associated with PHLI and are a promising preoperative risk stratification tool. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Detection of Prostate Cancer: Quantitative Multiparametric MR Imaging Models Developed Using Registered Correlative Histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Gregory J; Kalavagunta, Chaitanya; Spilseth, Benjamin; Bolan, Patrick J; Li, Xiufeng; Hutter, Diane; Nam, Jung W; Johnson, Andrew D; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Moench, Laura; Konety, Badrinath; Warlick, Christopher A; Schmechel, Stephen C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To develop multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging models to generate a quantitative, user-independent, voxel-wise composite biomarker score (CBS) for detection of prostate cancer by using coregistered correlative histopathologic results, and to compare performance of CBS-based detection with that of single quantitative MR imaging parameters. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer underwent multiparametric MR imaging before surgery for treatment. All MR imaging voxels in the prostate were classified as cancer or noncancer on the basis of coregistered histopathologic data. Predictive models were developed by using more than one quantitative MR imaging parameter to generate CBS maps. Model development and evaluation of quantitative MR imaging parameters and CBS were performed separately for the peripheral zone and the whole gland. Model accuracy was evaluated by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and confidence intervals were calculated with the bootstrap procedure. The improvement in classification accuracy was evaluated by comparing the AUC for the multiparametric model and the single best-performing quantitative MR imaging parameter at the individual level and in aggregate. Results Quantitative T2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume transfer constant (K(trans)), reflux rate constant (kep), and area under the gadolinium concentration curve at 90 seconds (AUGC90) were significantly different between cancer and noncancer voxels (P models demonstrated the best performance in both the peripheral zone (AUC, 0.85; P = .010 vs ADC alone) and whole gland (AUC, 0.77; P = .043 vs ADC alone). Individual-level analysis showed statistically significant improvement in AUC in 82% (23 of 28) and 71% (24 of 34) of patients with peripheral-zone and whole-gland models, respectively, compared with ADC alone. Model-based CBS

  15. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Human Brain at 3 T via Selective Inversion Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Dortch, Richard D.; Li, Ke; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Welch, E. Brian; Dula, Adrienne N.; Tamhane, Ashish A.; Gore, John C.; Smith, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging yields indices describing the interactions between free water protons and immobile, macromolecular protons—including the macromolecular to free pool size ratio (PSR) and the rate of magnetization transfer between pools kmf. This study describes the first implementation of the selective inversion recovery quantitative magnetization transfer method on a clinical 3.0-T scanner in human brain in vivo. Selective inversion recovery data were acquired at 1...

  16. Analysis of membrane proteome and secretome in cells over-expressing ADAM17 using quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, R.; Simabuco, F.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Yokoo, S.; Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Sherman, N. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) protease is involved in proteolytic ectodomain shedding of several membrane-associated proteins and modulation of key cell signaling pathways in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examined the effect of over-expressing the full length human ADAM17 in membrane and secreted proteins. To this end, we constructed a stable Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cells expressing ADAM17 by tetracycline induction. These cells were grown in Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium containing light lysine, arginine or heavy, L-Arg-13C615N4 and L-Lys -13C615N2 (SILAC: stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture) media and they were treated with an ADAM17 activator, phorbolester (PMA). Controls such as Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cell without PMA treatment and without ADAM17 cloned were cultivated in light medium. The ADAM17 overexpression was induced with tetracycline 500 ng/ml for 24 hours. Cells in a heavy condition were treated with PMA 50 ng/ml for 1 hour and vehicle DMSO was used as control in a light cell condition. The extracellular media were collected, concentrated and used to evaluate the secretome and a cell surface biotinylation-based approach was used to capture cell surface-associated proteins. The biotinylated proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol, alkylated with iodoacetamide and then digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis on an ETD enabled Orbitrap Velos instrument. The results showed different proteins up or down regulated in membrane and secretome analysis which might represent potential molecules involved in signaling or ADAM17 regulation events. (author)

  17. The influence of image enhancement and reconstruction on quantitative coronary arteriography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwet, P M; Reiber, J H

    1995-12-01

    In the coming years, cinefilm will gradually be replaced by some digital medium for the archiving of angiographic images. However, not only the question which digital archiving medium will be used in the future is important, but also which images are to be stored. Options are to either archive the raw, unprocessed images, or the enhanced images as they are displayed on the viewing monitor in the catheterization laboratory. In the first case, an off-line workstation will need additional hardware to display the images with the same image quality as they were acquired; in the second case, the question remains whether quantitative analysis programs still provide reliable results. Goal of this study was to investigate the possible effects of image enhancement and reconstruction on the results from quantitative coronary arteriographic (QCA) measurements with the Philips ACA-package (Automated Coronary Analysis). Image enhancement was achieved by an unsharp masking approach; the reconstruction of the original image from the enhanced image was attempted by an iterative deconvolution approach. The evaluation study consisted of two parts; a technical evaluation on eleven phantom tubes with known dimensions, and a clinical evaluation study on 48 coronary lesions. The results of the technical evaluation demonstrate that the measurement errors increase for the smaller vessel sizes (data be archived.

  18. A quantitative measure of myelination development in infants, using MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmody, Dennis P. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Dunn, Stanley M.; Boddie-Willis, Akiza S. [The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); DeMarco, J. Kevin [Laurie Imaging Center, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Lewis, Michael [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Institute for the Study of Child Development, New Brunswick (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure myelination of frontal lobe changes in infants and young children. Twenty-four cases of infants and children (age range 12-121 months) were evaluated by a quantitative assessment of T2-weighted MR image features. Reliable quantitative changes between white and gray matter correlated with developmental age in a group of children with no neurological findings. Myelination appears to be an increasing exponential function with the greatest rate of change occurring over the first 3 years of life. The quantitative changes observed were in accordance with previous qualitative judgments of myelination development. Children with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) showed delays in achieving levels of myelination when compared to normal children and adjusted for chronological age. The quantitative measure of myelination development may prove to be useful in assessing the stages of development and helpful in the quantitative descriptions of white matter disorders such as PVL. (orig.)

  19. An operative quantitative analysis of multispectral images of the eyeground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.; Firago, V. A.; Kubarko, A. I.

    2014-09-01

    In the approximation of a four-layer model of the eyeground, we have studied the information content of photographs of the eyeground obtained in different spectral intervals from the visible range of the spectrum. We have shown that, under conditions of a priori uncertainty of all parameters of the eyeground that affect spectral fluxes of light multiply scattered by the eyeground, the two-dimensional distributions of the following parameters can be determined: (i) the contents of hemoglobin and macular pigment in the retina; (ii) the contents of melanin in the pigment epithelium and choroid; (iii) the degree of blood oxygenation; and (iv) the structural parameter of the retina, which characterizes the volume concentration of its effective scatterers. Based on results of a numerical simulation of the light-transfer process in the medium under study, we have determined regression relationships between parameters of the eyeground and spectral characteristics of its image and have proposed a method for the operative retrieval of parameter maps of the eyeground, which uses the determined regressions.

  20. Quantitative emission tomography by coded aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhem, J.B.

    1982-06-01

    The coded aperture imaging is applied to nuclear medicine, since ten years. However no satisfactory clinical results have been obtained thus for. The reason is that digital reconstruction methods which have been implemented, in particular the method which use deconvolution filtering are not appropriate for quantification. Indeed these methods which all based on the assumption of shift invariance of the coding procedure, which is contradictory to the geometrical recording conditions giving the best depth resolution, do not take into account gamma rays attenuation by tissues and in most cases give tomograms with artefacts from blurred structures. A method is proposed which has not these limitations and considers the reconstruction problem as the ill-conditioned problem of solving a Fredholm integral equation. The main advantage of this method lies in fact that the transmission kernel of the integral equation is obtained experimentally, and the approximate solution of this equation, close enough to the original 3-D radioactive object, can be obtained in spite of the ill-conditioned nature of the problem, by use of singular values decomposition (S. V. D.) of the kernel [fr

  1. Microscopy imaging and quantitative phase contrast mapping in turbid microfluidic channels by digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturzo, Melania; Finizio, Andrea; Memmolo, Pasquale; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea; Ferraro, Pietro

    2012-09-07

    We show that sharp imaging and quantitative phase-contrast microcopy is possible in microfluidics in flowing turbid media by digital holography. In fact, in flowing liquids with suspended colloidal particles, clear vision is hindered and cannot be recovered by any other microscopic imaging technique. On the contrary, using digital holography, clear imaging is possible thanks to the Doppler frequency shift experienced by the photons scattered by the flowing colloidal particles, which do not contribute to the interference process, i.e. the recorded hologram. The method is illustrated and imaging results are demonstrated for pure phase objects, i.e. biological cells in microfluidic channels.

  2. A quantitative performance evaluation of the EM algorithm applied to radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailean, J.C.; Sullivan, B.J.; Giger, M.L.; Chen, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the authors quantitatively evaluate the performance of the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm as a restoration technique for radiographic images. The perceived signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), of simple radiographic patterns processed by the EM algorithm are calculated on the basis of a statistical decision theory model that includes both the observer's visual response function and a noise component internal to the eye-brain system. The relative SNR (ratio of the processed SNR to the original SNR) is calculated and used as a metric to quantitatively compare the effects of the EM algorithm to two popular image enhancement techniques: contrast enhancement (windowing) and unsharp mask filtering

  3. The reproducibility of quantitative measurements in lumbar magnetic resonance imaging of children from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masharawi, Y; Kjær, Per; Bendix, T

    2008-01-01

    . The following parameters were measured using the iQ-VIEW system (IMAGE Information Systems Ltd., version 1.2.2, Plauen, Germany): Linear measurements--zygoappophyseal facets and interfacet widths, and vertebral body (VB), pedicle and intervertebral discs heights, widths, and lengths. Angular measurements......STUDY DESIGN: Quantitative lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements in children were taken twice and analyzed for intra- and intertester reproducibility. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the reproducibility of a variety of lumbar quantitative measurements taken from MRIs of children from...

  4. Automatized image processing of bovine blastocysts produced in vitro for quantitative variable determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, José Celso; Passalia, Felipe José; Matos, Felipe Delestro; Takahashi, Maria Beatriz; Maserati, Marc Peter, Jr.; Alves, Mayra Fernanda; de Almeida, Tamie Guibu; Cardoso, Bruna Lopes; Basso, Andrea Cristina; Nogueira, Marcelo Fábio Gouveia

    2017-12-01

    There is currently no objective, real-time and non-invasive method for evaluating the quality of mammalian embryos. In this study, we processed images of in vitro produced bovine blastocysts to obtain a deeper comprehension of the embryonic morphological aspects that are related to the standard evaluation of blastocysts. Information was extracted from 482 digital images of blastocysts. The resulting imaging data were individually evaluated by three experienced embryologists who graded their quality. To avoid evaluation bias, each image was related to the modal value of the evaluations. Automated image processing produced 36 quantitative variables for each image. The images, the modal and individual quality grades, and the variables extracted could potentially be used in the development of artificial intelligence techniques (e.g., evolutionary algorithms and artificial neural networks), multivariate modelling and the study of defined structures of the whole blastocyst.

  5. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  6. High resolution quantitative phase imaging of live cells with constrained optimization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Khare, Kedar; John, Renu

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) aims at studying weakly scattering and absorbing biological specimens with subwavelength accuracy without any external staining mechanisms. Use of a reference beam at an angle is one of the necessary criteria for recording of high resolution holograms in most of the interferometric methods used for quantitative phase imaging. The spatial separation of the dc and twin images is decided by the reference beam angle and Fourier-filtered reconstructed image will have a very poor resolution if hologram is recorded below a minimum reference angle condition. However, it is always inconvenient to have a large reference beam angle while performing high resolution microscopy of live cells and biological specimens with nanometric features. In this paper, we treat reconstruction of digital holographic microscopy images as a constrained optimization problem with smoothness constraint in order to recover only complex object field in hologram plane even with overlapping dc and twin image terms. We solve this optimization problem by gradient descent approach iteratively and the smoothness constraint is implemented by spatial averaging with appropriate size. This approach will give excellent high resolution image recovery compared to Fourier filtering while keeping a very small reference angle. We demonstrate this approach on digital holographic microscopy of live cells by recovering the quantitative phase of live cells from a hologram recorded with nearly zero reference angle.

  7. Laser scanning cytometry and its applications: a pioneering technology in the field of quantitative imaging cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Melvin; Miller, Bruce; Newmark, Judith; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Holden, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Imaging cytometry plays an increasingly important role in all fields of biological and medical sciences. It has evolved into a complex and powerful discipline amalgamating image acquisition technologies and quantitative digital image analysis. This chapter presents an overview of the complex and ever-developing landscape of imaging cytometry, highlighting the imaging and quantitative performance of a wide range of available instruments based on their methods of sample illumination and the detection technologies they employ. Each of these technologies has inherent advantages and shortcomings stemming from its design. It is therefore paramount to assess the appropriateness of all of the imaging cytometry options available to determine the optimal choice for specific types of studies. Laser scanning cytometry (LSC), the original imaging cytometry technology, is an attractive choice for analysis of both cellular and tissue specimens. Quantitative performance, flexibility, and the benefits of preserving native sample architecture and avoiding the introduction of artificial signals, particularly in cell-signaling studies and multicolor tissue analysis, are speeding the adoption of LSC and opening up new possibilities for developing sophisticated applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Noninhibitory Serpin Maspin on the Actin Cytoskeleton: A Quantitative Image Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamun, Mohammed; Ravenhill, Lorna; Srisukkham, Worawut; Hossain, Alamgir; Fall, Charles; Ellis, Vincent; Bass, Rosemary

    2016-04-01

    Recent developments in quantitative image analysis allow us to interrogate confocal microscopy images to answer biological questions. Clumped and layered cell nuclei and cytoplasm in confocal images challenges the ability to identify subcellular compartments. To date, there is no perfect image analysis method to identify cytoskeletal changes in confocal images. Here, we present a multidisciplinary study where an image analysis model was developed to allow quantitative measurements of changes in the cytoskeleton of cells with different maspin exposure. Maspin, a noninhibitory serpin influences cell migration, adhesion, invasion, proliferation, and apoptosis in ways that are consistent with its identification as a tumor metastasis suppressor. Using different cell types, we tested the hypothesis that reduction in cell migration by maspin would be reflected in the architecture of the actin cytoskeleton. A hybrid marker-controlled watershed segmentation technique was used to segment the nuclei, cytoplasm, and ruffling regions before measuring cytoskeletal changes. This was informed by immunohistochemical staining of cells transfected stably or transiently with maspin proteins, or with added bioactive peptides or protein. Image analysis results showed that the effects of maspin were mirrored by effects on cell architecture, in a way that could be described quantitatively.

  9. Rapid and Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Treatment Response Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assessment of orthotopic tumor models in animals utilizes survival as the primary therapeutic end point. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies [1 ]. Using human tumor cell lines constitutively expressing luciferase, the kinetics of tumor growth and response to therapy have been assessed in intraperitoneal [2], subcutaneous, and intravascular [3] cancer models. However, use of this approach for evaluating orthotopic tumor models has not been demonstrated. In this report, the ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth and therapeuticinduced cell kill of orthotopic rat brain tumors derived from 9L gliosarcoma cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (9LLuc was investigated. Intracerebral tumor burden was monitored over time by quantitation of photon emission and tumor volume using a cryogenically cooled CCD camera and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, respectively. There was excellent correlation (r=0.91 between detected photons and tumor volume. A quantitative comparison of tumor cell kill determined from serial MRI volume measurements and BLI photon counts following 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU treatment revealed that both imaging modalities yielded statistically similar cell kill values (P=.951. These results provide direct validation of BLI imaging as a powerful and quantitative tool for the assessment of antineoplastic therapies in living animals.

  10. Analytical robustness of quantitative NIR chemical imaging for Islamic paper characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Hend; Gilchrist, John R.; Fearn, Thomas; Strlič, Matija

    2017-07-01

    Recently, spectral imaging techniques such as Multispectral (MSI) and Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) have gained importance in the field of heritage conservation. This paper explores the analytical robustness of quantitative chemical imaging for Islamic paper characterization by focusing on the effect of different measurement and processing parameters, i.e. acquisition conditions and calibration on the accuracy of the collected spectral data. This will provide a better understanding of the technique that can provide a measure of change in collections through imaging. For the quantitative model, special calibration target was devised using 105 samples from a well-characterized reference Islamic paper collection. Two material properties were of interest: starch sizing and cellulose degree of polymerization (DP). Multivariate data analysis methods were used to develop discrimination and regression models which were used as an evaluation methodology for the metrology of quantitative NIR chemical imaging. Spectral data were collected using a pushbroom HSI scanner (Gilden Photonics Ltd) in the 1000-2500 nm range with a spectral resolution of 6.3 nm using a mirror scanning setup and halogen illumination. Data were acquired at different measurement conditions and acquisition parameters. Preliminary results showed the potential of the evaluation methodology to show that measurement parameters such as the use of different lenses and different scanning backgrounds may not have a great influence on the quantitative results. Moreover, the evaluation methodology allowed for the selection of the best pre-treatment method to be applied to the data.

  11. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method pro- vided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  12. Quantitative image quality evaluation for kV cone-beam CT-based IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S Y; Zin, Hafiz M

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the image quality of a kV cone-beam CT-based IGRT system (Elekta, XVI) using two commercial CT image quality phantoms, Catphan-600 and CIRS-062QA. Both phantoms consist of similar image quality test modules (uniformity, CT linearity and spatial resolution) but each phantom has different diameter and test pattern design. Each test module was imaged separately using an optimised cone-beam CT imaging parameter. The quality metrics of the reconstructed images were analysed using algorithms developed with MatLab. The image uniformity and the spatial resolution measured with Catphan were of 4% and 40% greater respectively, compared to those measured with CIRS phantom. The differences were due to the beam scattering and hardening originated from the CIRS phantom holder. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values measured with CIRS phantom were at least 2% higher than that of Catphan. The diameter of CIRS phantom is smaller and resulted in lower beam attenuation. The quantitative image quality assessment algorithms developed for both phantoms provided a phantom-specific set of reference values for a cone-beam CT imaging system as recommended by AAPM TG-142. Further investigation will be performed to resolve beam hardening issue arising from the CIRS phantom holder. (paper)

  13. Quantitative method to assess caries via fluorescence imaging from the perspective of autofluorescence spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Xu, Y.; Lin, B.; Chen, H.

    2015-08-01

    A quantitative method to discriminate caries lesions for a fluorescence imaging system is proposed in this paper. The autofluorescence spectral investigation of 39 teeth samples classified by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System levels was performed at 405 nm excitation. The major differences in the different caries lesions focused on the relative spectral intensity range of 565-750 nm. The spectral parameter, defined as the ratio of wavebands at 565-750 nm to the whole spectral range, was calculated. The image component ratio R/(G + B) of color components was statistically computed by considering the spectral parameters (e.g. autofluorescence, optical filter, and spectral sensitivity) in our fluorescence color imaging system. Results showed that the spectral parameter and image component ratio presented a linear relation. Therefore, the image component ratio was graded as 1.62 to quantitatively classify sound, early decay, established decay, and severe decay tissues, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence images of caries were experimentally obtained, and the corresponding image component ratio distribution was compared with the classification result. A method to determine the numerical grades of caries using a fluorescence imaging system was proposed. This method can be applied to similar imaging systems.

  14. Quantitative method to assess caries via fluorescence imaging from the perspective of autofluorescence spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q G; Xu, Y; Zhu, H H; Chen, H; Lin, B

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative method to discriminate caries lesions for a fluorescence imaging system is proposed in this paper. The autofluorescence spectral investigation of 39 teeth samples classified by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System levels was performed at 405 nm excitation. The major differences in the different caries lesions focused on the relative spectral intensity range of 565–750 nm. The spectral parameter, defined as the ratio of wavebands at 565–750 nm to the whole spectral range, was calculated. The image component ratio R/(G + B) of color components was statistically computed by considering the spectral parameters (e.g. autofluorescence, optical filter, and spectral sensitivity) in our fluorescence color imaging system. Results showed that the spectral parameter and image component ratio presented a linear relation. Therefore, the image component ratio was graded as <0.66, 0.66–1.06, 1.06–1.62, and >1.62 to quantitatively classify sound, early decay, established decay, and severe decay tissues, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence images of caries were experimentally obtained, and the corresponding image component ratio distribution was compared with the classification result. A method to determine the numerical grades of caries using a fluorescence imaging system was proposed. This method can be applied to similar imaging systems. (paper)

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Single-Image Super-Resolution in Myocardial Scar Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Estner, Heidi L; Herzka, Daniel A; Mcveigh, Elliot R; Halperin, Henry R

    Single-image super resolution is a process of obtaining a high-resolution image from a set of low-resolution observations by signal processing. While super resolution has been demonstrated to improve image quality in scaled down images in the image domain, its effects on the Fourier-based image acquisition technique, such as MRI, remains unknown.We performed high-resolution ex vivo late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.4 mm 3 ) in postinfarction swine hearts ( n = 24). The swine hearts were divided into the training set ( n = 14) and the test set ( n = 10), and in all hearts, low-resolution images were simulated from the high-resolution images. In the training set, super-resolution dictionaries with pairs of small matching patches of the high- and low-resolution images were created. In the test set, super resolution recovered high-resolution images from low-resolution images using the dictionaries. The same algorithm was also applied to patient LGE ( n = 4) to assess its effects. Compared with interpolated images, super resolution significantly improved basic image quality indices ( P Super resolution using Fourier-based zero padding achieved the best image quality. However, the magnitude of improvement was small in images with zero padding. Super resolution substantially improved the spatial resolution of the patient LGE images by sharpening the edges of the heart and the scar. In conclusion, single-image super resolution significantly improves image errors. However, the magnitude of improvement was relatively small in images with Fourier-based zero padding. These findings provide evidence to support its potential use in myocardial scar imaging.

  16. Analysis of vaginal microbicide film hydration kinetics by quantitative imaging refractometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Rinehart

    Full Text Available We have developed a quantitative imaging refractometry technique, based on holographic phase microscopy, as a tool for investigating microscopic structural changes in water-soluble polymeric materials. Here we apply the approach to analyze the structural degradation of vaginal topical microbicide films due to water uptake. We implemented transmission imaging of 1-mm diameter film samples loaded into a flow chamber with a 1.5×2 mm field of view. After water was flooded into the chamber, interference images were captured and analyzed to obtain high resolution maps of the local refractive index and subsequently the volume fraction and mass density of film material at each spatial location. Here, we compare the hydration dynamics of a panel of films with varying thicknesses and polymer compositions, demonstrating that quantitative imaging refractometry can be an effective tool for evaluating and characterizing the performance of candidate microbicide film designs for anti-HIV drug delivery.

  17. Analysis of vaginal microbicide film hydration kinetics by quantitative imaging refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Matthew; Grab, Sheila; Rohan, Lisa; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a quantitative imaging refractometry technique, based on holographic phase microscopy, as a tool for investigating microscopic structural changes in water-soluble polymeric materials. Here we apply the approach to analyze the structural degradation of vaginal topical microbicide films due to water uptake. We implemented transmission imaging of 1-mm diameter film samples loaded into a flow chamber with a 1.5×2 mm field of view. After water was flooded into the chamber, interference images were captured and analyzed to obtain high resolution maps of the local refractive index and subsequently the volume fraction and mass density of film material at each spatial location. Here, we compare the hydration dynamics of a panel of films with varying thicknesses and polymer compositions, demonstrating that quantitative imaging refractometry can be an effective tool for evaluating and characterizing the performance of candidate microbicide film designs for anti-HIV drug delivery.

  18. [Quantitative determination of vitamin A levels in frozen preserved human amniotic membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Mayumi; Kawahara, Junichi; Muramatsu, Ryuji; Usui, Masahiko

    2005-11-01

    Retinoids are associated with cell proliferation and differentiation. The levels of retinoids (vitamin A and its derivatives) in human amniotic membrane (AM) were measured to investigate whether endogenous retinoids in AM might contribute to the process of wound healing of the keratoconjunctival epithelium in AM transplantation. Retinoids were extracted from AM obtained from three patients following cesarean section. Retinoids including retinol (ROL), retinylaldehyde (RAL), retinoic acid(RA), and retinyl palmitate(RP) were analyzed using a reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a multi-wavelength detector or fluorescence detector. ROL was identified and detected in AM at a concentration of 9.42 2.75(mean +/- standard deviation) ng/g wet tissue. No other retinoids, were detected. Among the retinoids tested, only retinol was detected at low levels in human AM tissues. Based on these results, endogenous retinoids in AM probably have little effect on wound healing of the keratoconjunctival epithelium in AM transplantation.

  19. Active auxin uptake by zucchini membrane vesicles: quantitation using ESR volume and delta pH determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, T.L.; Mehlhorn, R.J.; Briggs, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Closed and pH-tight membrane vesicles prepared from hypocotyls of 5-day-old dark-grown seedlings of Cucurbita pepo accumulate the plant growth hormone indole-3-acetic acid along an imposed proton gradient (pH low outside, high inside). The use of electron paramagnetic spin probes permitted quantitation both of apparent vesicle volume and magnitude of the pH gradient. Under the experimental conditions used, hormone accumulation was at minimum 20-fold, a value 4 times larger than what one would predict if accumulation reflected only diffusional equilibrium at the measured pH gradient. It is concluded that hormone uptake is an active process, with each protonated molecule of hormone accompanied by an additional proton. Experiments with ionophores confirm that it is the pH gradient itself which drives the uptake

  20. Quantitative topographic imaging using a near-field scanning microwave microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahacos, C. P.; Steinhauer, D. E.; Dutta, S. K.; Feenstra, B. J.; Anlage, Steven M.; Wellstood, F. C.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a technique for extracting topographic information using a scanning near-field microwave microscope. By monitoring the shift of the system's resonant frequency, we obtain quantitative topographic images of uniformly conducting metal surfaces. At a frequency of 9.572 GHz, our technique allows a height discrimination of about 55 nm at a separation of 30 μm. We present topographic images of uneven, conducting samples and compare the height response and sensitivity of the system with theoretical expectations.

  1. Morphological image processing for quantitative shape analysis of biomedical structures: effective contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimori, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    A contrast enhancement approach utilizing a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing is introduced. The method is quantitatively evaluated and then applied to some medical images. Image processing methods significantly contribute to visualization of images captured by biomedical modalities (such as mammography, X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and light and electron microscopy). Quantitative interpretation of the deluge of complicated biomedical images, however, poses many research challenges, one of which is to enhance structural features that are scarcely perceptible to the human eye. This study introduces a contrast enhancement approach based on a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing. The proposed method is applied to medical images for the enhancement of structural features. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated quantitatively by the contrast improvement ratio (CIR). The CIR of the proposed method is 12.1, versus 4.7 and 0.1 for two conventional contrast enhancement methods, clearly indicating the high contrasting capability of the method

  2. Morphological image processing for quantitative shape analysis of biomedical structures: effective contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimori, Yoshitaka, E-mail: kimori@orion.ac.jp [National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 5-1 Higashiyama, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    A contrast enhancement approach utilizing a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing is introduced. The method is quantitatively evaluated and then applied to some medical images. Image processing methods significantly contribute to visualization of images captured by biomedical modalities (such as mammography, X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and light and electron microscopy). Quantitative interpretation of the deluge of complicated biomedical images, however, poses many research challenges, one of which is to enhance structural features that are scarcely perceptible to the human eye. This study introduces a contrast enhancement approach based on a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing. The proposed method is applied to medical images for the enhancement of structural features. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated quantitatively by the contrast improvement ratio (CIR). The CIR of the proposed method is 12.1, versus 4.7 and 0.1 for two conventional contrast enhancement methods, clearly indicating the high contrasting capability of the method.

  3. Multi-institutional Quantitative Evaluation and Clinical Validation of Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) Autosegmentation of Target Structures and Normal Tissues on Computer Tomography Images in the Head and Neck, Thorax, Liver, and Male Pelvis Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bzdusek, Karl; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Clinical validation and quantitative evaluation of computed tomography (CT) image autosegmentation using Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE).......Clinical validation and quantitative evaluation of computed tomography (CT) image autosegmentation using Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE)....

  4. Quantitative study of undersampled recoverability for sparse images in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Sidky, Emil Y.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2012-01-01

    Image reconstruction methods based on exploiting image sparsity, motivated by compressed sensing (CS), allow reconstruction from a significantly reduced number of projections in X-ray computed tomography (CT). However, CS provides neither theoretical guarantees of accurate CT reconstruction, nor...... any relation between sparsity and a sufficient number of measurements for recovery. In this paper, we demonstrate empirically through computer simulations that minimization of the image 1-norm allows for recovery of sparse images from fewer measurements than unknown pixels, without relying...... on artificial random sampling patterns. We establish quantitatively an average-case relation between image sparsity and sufficient number of measurements for recovery, and we show that the transition from non-recovery to recovery is sharp within well-defined classes of simple and semi-realistic test images...

  5. Enzymatic studies on planar supported membranes using a widefield fluorescence LAURDAN Generalized Polarization imaging approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Jonathan R.; Thoke, Henrik Seir; Stock, Robeto

    2017-01-01

    the temporal resolution previously achieved using laser scanning based microscopes. A dedicated protocol to calibrate LAURDAN GP data obtained with charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras as detectors is also presented, enabling reliable assignment of GP values in the field of view. Using this methodology we...... to a single solid ordered phase at longer time scales. Additionally, we comparatively studied this system using the membrane fluorophore DiIC18. The advantages and limitations of both fluorescent dyes are discussed, emphasizing the adequacy of LAURDAN GP imaging to explore this type of membrane phenomena....

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging quantitation of changes in muscle volume during 7 days of strict bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A A; Stuart, C A; Brunder, D G; Hillman, G R

    1995-10-01

    Prolonged bed rest results in a loss of leg lean body mass. Previous studies using bed rest as a model for microgravity have shown decreases in leg mass after 12 and 14 d, 5 and 17 wk. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide a precise and non-invasive means of determining muscle volume, we sought to determine if changes in leg muscle volume could be detected in bed rest periods as short as 7 d. Five young, healthy, male volunteers were subjected to 7 d of absolute bed rest. Each subject underwent MRI quantitation of segmental muscle volumes of the calves and thighs before and after bed rest. Eleven (calf) and nine (thigh) contiguous 1-cm thick transaxial images were generated over prescribed regions using a Technicare MRI imager with a 0.6T superconducting magnet and body coil. Image processing was performed using a generalized 8-bit medical image analysis package developed at University of Texas Medical Branch. Images were analyzed for muscle and non-muscle volumes (including fat, blood vessel, and bone marrow volumes). The MRI quantitation demonstrated bed rest-induced significant decreases in segmental thigh muscle (approximately 3.0%, p image analysis of MRI images provides a sensitive tool capable of detecting leg volume changes of as little as 3.0% over a 7-d period of strict bed rest.

  7. Quantitative imaging of tissue sections using infrared scanning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Samantha L; Cumyn, Elizabeth; King, Declan; Kline, Rachel A; Carpanini, Sarah M; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Barron, Rona; Wishart, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of immunohistochemically (IHC) labelled tissue sections typically yields semi-quantitative results. Visualising infrared (IR) 'tags', with an appropriate scanner, provides an alternative system where the linear nature of the IR fluorophore emittance enables realistic quantitative fluorescence IHC (QFIHC). Importantly, this new technology enables entire tissue sections to be scanned, allowing accurate area and protein abundance measurements to be calculated from rapidly acquired images. Here, some of the potential benefits of using IR-based tissue imaging are examined, and the following are demonstrated. Firstly, image capture and analysis using IR-based scanning technology yields comparable area-based quantification to those obtained from a modern high-resolution digital slide scanner. Secondly, IR-based dual target visualisation and expression-based quantification is rapid and simple. Thirdly, IR-based relative protein abundance QIHC measurements are an accurate reflection of tissue sample protein abundance, as demonstrated by comparison with quantitative fluorescent Western blotting data. In summary, it is proposed that IR-based QFIHC provides an alternative method of rapid whole-tissue section low-resolution imaging for the production of reliable and accurate quantitative data. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Anatomical Society.

  8. Assessment of quantitative hypertrophy scores in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : Magnetic resonance imaging versus echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posma, JL; Blanksma, PK; vanderWall, EE; Hamer, HPM; Mooyaart, EL; Lie, KI

    1996-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and transthoracic echocardiography in quantitative assessment of the extent of hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), we examined 52 consecutive patients with HCM. The Spirito-Maron and Wigle

  9. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging for stroke research in the pharmaceutical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eis, M.; Neumaier, M.; Pschorn, U.

    1998-01-01

    In conclusion, quantitative NMR imaging is a valuable method for monitoring the volume and degree of severity of cerebral lesions and therapeutic effects over time. Thus, it is an important tool for evaluating the efficacy of cerebroprotective drugs in vivo. (orig.)

  10. Efficient Isolation and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Cancer Cell Plasma Membrane Proteins for Identification of Metastasis-Associated Cell Surface Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Jensen, Ole N

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface membrane proteins are involved in central processes such as cell signaling, cell-cell interactions, ion and solute transport, and they seem to play a pivotal role in several steps of the metastatic process of cancer cells. The low abundance and hydrophobic nature of cell surface...... membrane proteins complicate their purification and identification by MS. We used two isogenic cell lines with opposite metastatic capabilities in nude mice to optimize cell surface membrane protein purification and to identify potential novel markers of metastatic cancer. The cell surface membrane...... peptides of which 622 (300 at SL80) were membrane proteins. The quantitative proteomic analysis identified 16 cell surface proteins as potential markers of the ability of breast cancer cells to form distant metastases....

  11. Spectro-refractometry of individual microscopic objects using swept-source quantitative phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Hwang; Jang, Jaeduck; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-11-05

    We present a novel spectroscopic quantitative phase imaging technique with a wavelength swept-source, referred to as swept-source diffraction phase microscopy (ssDPM), for quantifying the optical dispersion of microscopic individual samples. Employing the swept-source and the principle of common-path interferometry, ssDPM measures the multispectral full-field quantitative phase imaging and spectroscopic microrefractometry of transparent microscopic samples in the visible spectrum with a wavelength range of 450-750 nm and a spectral resolution of less than 8 nm. With unprecedented precision and sensitivity, we demonstrate the quantitative spectroscopic microrefractometry of individual polystyrene beads, 30% bovine serum albumin solution, and healthy human red blood cells.

  12. Automated recognition of cell phenotypes in histology images based on membrane- and nuclei-targeting biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaçalı, Bilge; Vamvakidou, Alexandra P; Tözeren, Aydın

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro culture of cancer cells are used to predict the effects of prospective anti-cancer drugs in vivo. In this study, we present an automated image analysis protocol for detailed morphological protein marker profiling of tumoroid cross section images. Histologic cross sections of breast tumoroids developed in co-culture suspensions of breast cancer cell lines, stained for E-cadherin and progesterone receptor, were digitized and pixels in these images were classified into five categories using k-means clustering. Automated segmentation was used to identify image regions composed of cells expressing a given biomarker. Synthesized images were created to check the accuracy of the image processing system. Accuracy of automated segmentation was over 95% in identifying regions of interest in synthesized images. Image analysis of adjacent histology slides stained, respectively, for Ecad and PR, accurately predicted regions of different cell phenotypes. Image analysis of tumoroid cross sections from different tumoroids obtained under the same co-culture conditions indicated the variation of cellular composition from one tumoroid to another. Variations in the compositions of cross sections obtained from the same tumoroid were established by parallel analysis of Ecad and PR-stained cross section images. Proposed image analysis methods offer standardized high throughput profiling of molecular anatomy of tumoroids based on both membrane and nuclei markers that is suitable to rapid large scale investigations of anti-cancer compounds for drug development

  13. Quantitative metrics for assessment of chemical image quality and spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Cahill, John F; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2016-04-15

    Currently objective/quantitative descriptions of the quality and spatial resolution of mass spectrometry derived chemical images are not standardized. Development of these standardized metrics is required to objectively describe the chemical imaging capabilities of existing and/or new mass spectrometry imaging technologies. Such metrics would allow unbiased judgment of intra-laboratory advancement and/or inter-laboratory comparison for these technologies if used together with standardized surfaces. Two image metrics, viz., "chemical image contrast" (ChemIC) based on signal-to-noise related statistical measures on chemical image pixels and "corrected resolving power factor" (cRPF) constructed from statistical analysis of mass-to-charge chronograms across features of interest in an image, were developed. These metrics, quantifying chemical image quality and spatial resolution, respectively, were used to evaluate chemical images of a model photoresist patterned surface collected using a laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system under different instrument operational parameters. The calculated ChemIC and cRPF metrics determined in an unbiased fashion the relative ranking of chemical image quality obtained with the laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system. These rankings were used to show that both chemical image contrast and spatial resolution deteriorated with increasing surface scan speed, increased lane spacing and decreasing size of surface features. ChemIC and cRPF, respectively, were developed and successfully applied for the objective description of chemical image quality and spatial resolution of chemical images collected from model surfaces using a laser ablation/liquid vortex capture mass spectrometry imaging system. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published in 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in

  14. Preoperative Prediction of Microvascular Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Quantitative Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jian; Chakraborty, Jayasree; Chapman, William C; Gerst, Scott; Gonen, Mithat; Pak, Linda M; Jarnagin, William R; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Do, Richard K G; Simpson, Amber L

    2017-12-01

    Microvascular invasion (MVI) is a significant risk factor for early recurrence after resection or transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Knowledge of MVI status would help guide treatment recommendations, but is generally identified after operation. This study aims to predict MVI preoperatively using quantitative image analysis. One hundred and twenty patients from 2 institutions underwent resection of HCC from 2003 to 2015 were included. The largest tumor from preoperative CT was subjected to quantitative image analysis, which uses an automated computer algorithm to capture regional variation in CT enhancement patterns. Quantitative imaging features by automatic analysis, qualitative radiographic descriptors by 2 radiologists, and preoperative clinical variables were included in multivariate analysis to predict histologic MVI. Histologic MVI was identified in 19 (37%) patients with tumors ≤5 cm and 34 (49%) patients with tumors >5 cm. Among patients with tumors ≤5 cm, none of the clinical findings or radiographic descriptors were associated with MVI; however, quantitative features based on angle co-occurrence matrix predicted MVI with an area under curve of 0.80, positive predictive value of 63%, and negative predictive value of 85%. In patients with tumors >5 cm, higher α-fetoprotein level, larger tumor size, and viral hepatitis history were associated with MVI, and radiographic descriptors were not. However, a multivariate model combining α-fetoprotein, tumor size, hepatitis status, and quantitative feature based on local binary pattern predicted MVI with area under curve of 0.88, positive predictive value of 72%, and negative predictive value of 96%. This study reveals the potential importance of quantitative image analysis as a predictor of MVI. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear medicine and imaging research: instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation. Comprehensive progress report, January 1, 1980-January 14, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.C.

    1982-07-01

    Progress is reported for the period January 1980 through January 1983 in the following project areas: (1) imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation; and (2) methodology for quantitative evaluation of diagnostic performance

  16. Quantitative amplitude and phase contrast imaging in a scanning transmission X-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornberger, Benjamin; Feser, Michael; Jacobsen, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Phase contrast in X-ray imaging provides lower radiation dose, and dramatically higher contrast at multi-keV photon energies when compared with absorption contrast. We describe here the use of a segmented detector in a scanning transmission X-ray microscope to collect partially coherent bright field images. We have adapted a Fourier filter reconstruction technique developed by McCallum, Landauer and Rodenburg to retrieve separate, quantitative maps of specimen phase shift and absorption. This is demonstrated in the imaging of a germanium test pattern using 525eV soft X-rays

  17. Quantitative analysis of fringe visibility in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianheng; Lei, Yaohu; Du, Yang; Liu, Xin; Guo, Jinchuan; Li, Ji; Niu, Hanben

    2016-01-01

    The newly developed x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging technique has attracted increasing research interest. In this study, we quantitatively analyze the fringe visibility obtained in differential phase-contrast imaging. Numerical results of the visibility for polychromatic x rays with different structure heights of absorption gratings are shown and discussed. Furthermore, the fringe visibility of the nonabsorption grating approach is calculated, and based on the results, we conclude that this approach can potentially be applied for higher x-ray photon energies. These analytic results will be useful for designing a differential phase-contrast imaging system for different applications.

  18. Quantitative phase imaging of living cells with a swept laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shichao; Zhu, Yizheng

    2016-03-01

    Digital holographic phase microscopy is a well-established quantitative phase imaging technique. However, interference artifacts from inside the system, typically induced by elements whose optical thickness are within the source coherence length, limit the imaging quality as well as sensitivity. In this paper, a swept laser source based technique is presented. Spectra acquired at a number of wavelengths, after Fourier Transform, can be used to identify the sources of the interference artifacts. With proper tuning of the optical pathlength difference between sample and reference arms, it is possible to avoid these artifacts and achieve sensitivity below 0.3nm. Performance of the proposed technique is examined in live cell imaging.

  19. STUDY ON HIGH RESOLUTION MEMBRANE-BASED DIFFRACTIVE OPTICAL IMAGING ON GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jiao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffractive optical imaging technology provides a new way to realize high resolution earth observation on geostationary orbit. There are a lot of benefits to use the membrane-based diffractive optical element in ultra-large aperture optical imaging system, including loose tolerance, light weight, easy folding and unfolding, which make it easy to realize high resolution earth observation on geostationary orbit. The implementation of this technology also faces some challenges, including the configuration of the diffractive primary lens, the development of high diffraction efficiency membrane-based diffractive optical elements, and the correction of the chromatic aberration of the diffractive optical elements. Aiming at the configuration of the diffractive primary lens, the “6+1” petal-type unfold scheme is proposed, which consider the compression ratio, the blocking rate and the development complexity. For high diffraction efficiency membrane-based diffractive optical element, a self-collimating method is proposed. The diffraction efficiency is more than 90 % of the theoretical value. For the chromatic aberration correction problem, an optimization method based on schupmann is proposed to make the imaging spectral bandwidth in visible light band reach 100 nm. The above conclusions have reference significance for the development of ultra-large aperture diffractive optical imaging system.

  20. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipola, Petri; Vanninen, Ritva; Manninen, Hannu; Leinonen, Ville; Niemelaeinen, Riikka; Aalto, Timo; Airaksinen, Olavi; Battie, Michele C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  1. A method for improved clustering and classification of microscopy images using quantitative co-localization coefficients

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundThe localization of proteins to specific subcellular structures in eukaryotic cells provides important information with respect to their function. Fluorescence microscopy approaches to determine localization distribution have proved to be an essential tool in the characterization of unknown proteins, and are now particularly pertinent as a result of the wide availability of fluorescently-tagged constructs and antibodies. However, there are currently very few image analysis options able to effectively discriminate proteins with apparently similar distributions in cells, despite this information being important for protein characterization.FindingsWe have developed a novel method for combining two existing image analysis approaches, which results in highly efficient and accurate discrimination of proteins with seemingly similar distributions. We have combined image texture-based analysis with quantitative co-localization coefficients, a method that has traditionally only been used to study the spatial overlap between two populations of molecules. Here we describe and present a novel application for quantitative co-localization, as applied to the study of Rab family small GTP binding proteins localizing to the endomembrane system of cultured cells.ConclusionsWe show how quantitative co-localization can be used alongside texture feature analysis, resulting in improved clustering of microscopy images. The use of co-localization as an additional clustering parameter is non-biased and highly applicable to high-throughput image data sets.

  2. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Ting, Gann; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/ tk-luc). A good correlation ( R2=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm 3 ( R2=0.907). γ Scintigraphy combined with [ 131I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  3. Quantitative imaging biomarkers for the evaluation of cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Li, Debiao; Carr, James C

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent condition in aged populations. Cardiovascular diseases are leading causes of death and disability in patients with T2DM. Traditional strategies for controlling the cardiovascular complications of diabetes primarily target a cluster of well-defined risk factors, such as hyperglycemia, lipid disorders and hypertension. However, there is controversy over some recent clinical trials aimed at evaluating efficacy of intensive treatments for T2DM. As a powerful tool for quantitative cardiovascular risk estimation, multi-disciplinary cardiovascular imaging have been applied to detect and quantify morphological and functional abnormalities in the cardiovascular system. Quantitative imaging biomarkers acquired with advanced imaging procedures are expected to provide new insights to stratify absolute cardiovascular risks and reduce the overall costs of health care for people with T2DM by facilitating the selection of optimal therapies. This review discusses principles of state-of-the-art cardiovascular imaging techniques and compares applications of those techniques in various clinical circumstances. Individuals measurements of cardiovascular disease burdens from multiple aspects, which are closely related to existing biomarkers and clinical outcomes, are recommended as promising candidates for quantitative imaging biomarkers to assess the responses of the cardiovascular system during diabetic regimens. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes: linking basic nanotechniques to cell biology, immunology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Yang, Fen; Chen, Zheng W.; Cai, Jiye

    2014-10-01

    The cell membrane, which consists of a viscous phospholipid bilayer, different kinds of proteins and various nano/micrometer-sized domains, plays a very important role in ensuring the stability of the intracellular environment and the order of cellular signal transductions. Exploring the precise cell membrane structure and detailed functions of the biomolecules in a cell membrane would be helpful to understand the underlying mechanisms involved in cell membrane signal transductions, which could further benefit research into cell biology, immunology and medicine. The detection of membrane biomolecules at the single molecule level can provide some subtle information about the molecular structure and the functions of the cell membrane. In particular, information obtained about the molecular mechanisms and other information at the single molecule level are significantly different from that detected from a large amount of biomolecules at the large-scale through traditional techniques, and can thus provide a novel perspective for the study of cell membrane structures and functions. However, the precise investigations of membrane biomolecules prompts researchers to explore cell membranes at the single molecule level by the use of in situ imaging methods, as the exact conformation and functions of biomolecules are highly controlled by the native cellular environment. Recently, the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes has attracted increasing attention from cell biologists and immunologists. The size of biomolecules and their clusters on the cell surface are set at the nanoscale, which makes it mandatory to use high- and super-resolution imaging techniques to realize the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In the past few decades, some amazing imaging techniques and instruments with super resolution have been widely developed for molecule imaging, which can also be further employed for the in situ single molecule imaging of cell membranes. In

  5. Simultaneous AFM topography and recognition imaging at the plasma membrane of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtcheglova, Lilia A; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Elucidation the nano-organization of membrane proteins at/within the plasma membrane is probably the most demanding and still challenging task in cell biology since requires experimental approaches with nanoscale resolution. During last decade, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) has become a powerful tool to quickly obtain local receptor nano-maps on complex heterogeneous biosurfaces such as cells and membranes. Here we emphasize the TREC technique and explain how to unravel the nano-landscape of mammalian cells. We describe the procedures for all steps of the experiment including tip functionalization with ligand molecules, sample preparation, and localization of key molecules on the cell surface. We also discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this technique. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman imaging of cell membrane by a highly homogeneous and isotropic silver nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Pesce, Giuseppe; Dochshanov, Alden; Sasso, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Label-free chemical imaging of live cell membranes can shed light on the molecular basis of cell membrane functionalities and their alterations under membrane-related diseases. In principle, this can be done by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in confocal microscopy, but requires engineering plasmonic architectures with a spatially invariant SERS enhancement factor G(x, y) = G. To this end, we exploit a self-assembled isotropic nanostructure with characteristics of homogeneity typical of the so-called near-hyperuniform disorder. The resulting highly dense, homogeneous and isotropic random pattern consists of clusters of silver nanoparticles with limited size dispersion. This nanostructure brings together several advantages: very large hot spot density (~104 μm-2), superior spatial reproducibility (SD nanotoxicity issues. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01341k

  7. Cell membrane conformation at vertical nanowire array interface revealed by fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthing, Trine; Bonde, Sara; Rostgaard, Katrine R; Martinez, Karen L; Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Sørensen, Claus B; Nygård, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The perspectives offered by vertical arrays of nanowires for biosensing applications in living cells depend on the access of individual nanowires to the cell interior. Recent results on electrical access and molecular delivery suggest that direct access is not always obtained. Here, we present a generic approach to directly visualize the membrane conformation of living cells interfaced with nanowire arrays, with single nanowire resolution. The method combines confocal z-stack imaging with an optimized cell membrane labelling strategy which was applied to HEK293 cells interfaced with 2–11 μm long and 3–7 μm spaced nanowires with various surface coatings (bare, aminosilane-coated or polyethyleneimine-coated indium arsenide). We demonstrate that, for all commonly used nanowire lengths, spacings and surface coatings, nanowires generally remain enclosed in a membrane compartment, and are thereby not in direct contact with the cell interior. (paper)

  8. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging. PMID:25270052

  9. Susceptibility-weighted imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A; Yeom, Kristen W; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Quantitative neutron imaging of water distribution, venation network and sap flow in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraeye, Thijs; Derome, Dominique; Aregawi, Wondwosen; Cantré, Dennis; Hartmann, Stefan; Lehmann, Eberhard; Carmeliet, Jan; Voisard, Frédéric; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolai, Bart

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative neutron imaging is a promising technique to investigate leaf water flow and transpiration in real time and has perspectives towards studies of plant response to environmental conditions and plant water stress. The leaf hydraulic architecture is a key determinant of plant sap transport and plant-atmosphere exchange processes. Non-destructive imaging with neutrons shows large potential for unveiling the complex internal features of the venation network and the transport therein. However, it was only used for two-dimensional imaging without addressing flow dynamics and was still unsuccessful in accurate quantification of the amount of water. Quantitative neutron imaging was used to investigate, for the first time, the water distribution in veins and lamina, the three-dimensional venation architecture and sap flow dynamics in leaves. The latter was visualised using D2O as a contrast liquid. A high dynamic resolution was obtained by using cold neutrons and imaging relied on radiography (2D) as well as tomography (3D). The principle of the technique was shown for detached leaves, but can be applied to in vivo leaves as well. The venation network architecture and the water distribution in the veins and lamina unveiled clear differences between plant species. The leaf water content could be successfully quantified, though still included the contribution of the leaf dry matter. The flow measurements exposed the hierarchical structure of the water transport pathways, and an accurate quantification of the absolute amount of water uptake in the leaf was possible. Particular advantages of neutron imaging, as compared to X-ray imaging, were identified. Quantitative neutron imaging is a promising technique to investigate leaf water flow and transpiration in real time and has perspectives towards studies of plant response to environmental conditions and plant water stress.

  11. Retinal status analysis method based on feature extraction and quantitative grading in OCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dongmei; Tong, Hejun; Zheng, Shuang; Luo, Ling; Gao, Fulin; Minar, Jiri

    2016-07-22

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is widely used in ophthalmology for viewing the morphology of the retina, which is important for disease detection and assessing therapeutic effect. The diagnosis of retinal diseases is based primarily on the subjective analysis of OCT images by trained ophthalmologists. This paper describes an OCT images automatic analysis method for computer-aided disease diagnosis and it is a critical part of the eye fundus diagnosis. This study analyzed 300 OCT images acquired by Optovue Avanti RTVue XR (Optovue Corp., Fremont, CA). Firstly, the normal retinal reference model based on retinal boundaries was presented. Subsequently, two kinds of quantitative methods based on geometric features and morphological features were proposed. This paper put forward a retinal abnormal grading decision-making method which was used in actual analysis and evaluation of multiple OCT images. This paper showed detailed analysis process by four retinal OCT images with different abnormal degrees. The final grading results verified that the analysis method can distinguish abnormal severity and lesion regions. This paper presented the simulation of the 150 test images, where the results of analysis of retinal status showed that the sensitivity was 0.94 and specificity was 0.92.The proposed method can speed up diagnostic process and objectively evaluate the retinal status. This paper aims on studies of retinal status automatic analysis method based on feature extraction and quantitative grading in OCT images. The proposed method can obtain the parameters and the features that are associated with retinal morphology. Quantitative analysis and evaluation of these features are combined with reference model which can realize the target image abnormal judgment and provide a reference for disease diagnosis.

  12. A custom-built PET phantom design for quantitative imaging of printed distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, P J; Angelis, G I; Kotasidis, F; Green, M; Matthews, J C [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lionheart, W R [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Reader, A J, E-mail: p.markiewicz@manchester.ac.uk [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2011-11-07

    This note presents a practical approach to a custom-made design of PET phantoms enabling the use of digital radioactive distributions with high quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution. The phantom design allows planar sources of any radioactivity distribution to be imaged in transaxial and axial (sagittal or coronal) planes. Although the design presented here is specially adapted to the high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the presented methods can be adapted to almost any PET scanner. Although the presented phantom design has many advantages, a number of practical issues had to be overcome such as positioning of the printed source, calibration, uniformity and reproducibility of printing. A well counter (WC) was used in the calibration procedure to find the nonlinear relationship between digital voxel intensities and the actual measured radioactive concentrations. Repeated printing together with WC measurements and computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plates (IP) were used to evaluate the reproducibility and uniformity of such printing. Results show satisfactory printing uniformity and reproducibility; however, calibration is dependent on the printing mode and the physical state of the cartridge. As a demonstration of the utility of using printed phantoms, the image resolution and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed HRRT images are assessed. There is very good quantitative agreement in the calibration procedure between HRRT, CR and WC measurements. However, the high resolution of CR and its quantitative accuracy supported by WC measurements made it possible to show the degraded resolution of HRRT brain images caused by the partial-volume effect and the limits of iterative image reconstruction. (note)

  13. A custom-built PET phantom design for quantitative imaging of printed distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, P J; Angelis, G I; Kotasidis, F; Green, M; Matthews, J C; Lionheart, W R; Reader, A J

    2011-01-01

    This note presents a practical approach to a custom-made design of PET phantoms enabling the use of digital radioactive distributions with high quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution. The phantom design allows planar sources of any radioactivity distribution to be imaged in transaxial and axial (sagittal or coronal) planes. Although the design presented here is specially adapted to the high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT), the presented methods can be adapted to almost any PET scanner. Although the presented phantom design has many advantages, a number of practical issues had to be overcome such as positioning of the printed source, calibration, uniformity and reproducibility of printing. A well counter (WC) was used in the calibration procedure to find the nonlinear relationship between digital voxel intensities and the actual measured radioactive concentrations. Repeated printing together with WC measurements and computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plates (IP) were used to evaluate the reproducibility and uniformity of such printing. Results show satisfactory printing uniformity and reproducibility; however, calibration is dependent on the printing mode and the physical state of the cartridge. As a demonstration of the utility of using printed phantoms, the image resolution and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed HRRT images are assessed. There is very good quantitative agreement in the calibration procedure between HRRT, CR and WC measurements. However, the high resolution of CR and its quantitative accuracy supported by WC measurements made it possible to show the degraded resolution of HRRT brain images caused by the partial-volume effect and the limits of iterative image reconstruction. (note)

  14. Review of imaging solutions for integrated quantitative immunohistochemistry in the Pathology daily practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcial GarcĂ­a Rojo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC plays an essential role in Pathology. In order to improve reproducibility and standardization of the results interpretation, IHC quantification methods have been developed. IHC interpretation based in whole slide imaging or virtual microscopy is of special interest. The objective of this work is to review the different computer-based programs for automatic immunohistochemistry and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH evaluation. Scanning solutions and image analysis software in immunohistochemistry were studied, focusing especially on systems based in virtual slides. Integrated scanning and image analysis systems are available (Bacus TMAScore, Dako ACIS III, Genetix Ariol, Aperio Image Analysis, 3DHistech Mirax HistoQuant, Bioimagene Pathiam. Other image analysis software systems (Definiens TissueMap, SlidePath Tissue Image Analysis can be applied to several virtual slide formats. Fluorescence is the preferred approach in HistoRx AQUA, since it allows for a better compartmentalization of signals. Multispectral imaging using CRi Nuance allows multiple antibodies immunohistochemistry, and different stain unmixing. Most current popular automated image analysis solutions are aimed to brightfield immunohistochemistry, but fluorescence and FISH solutions may become more important in the near future. Automated quantitative tissue microarrays (TMA analysis is essential to provide high-throughput analysis. Medical informatics standards in images (DICOM and workflow (IHE under development will foster the use of image analysis in Pathology Departments.

  15. Aspects of Quantitation in Mass Spectrometry Imaging Investigated on Cryo-Sections of Spiked Tissue Homogenates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heidi Toft; Janfelt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    for differences in tissue types in, for example, whole-body imaging, a set of tissue homogenates of different tissue types (lung, liver, kidney, heart, and brain) from rabbit was spiked to the same concentration with the drug amitriptyline and imaged in the same experiment using isotope labeled amitriptyline......Internal standards have been introduced in quantitative mass spectrometry imaging in order to compensate for differences in intensities throughout an image caused by, for example, difference in ion suppression or analyte extraction efficiency. To test how well the internal standards compensate...... for these results range approximately within a factor of 3 (but for other compounds in other tissues could be higher), underscore the importance of preparing the standard curve in the same matrix as the unknown sample whenever possible. In, for example, whole-body imaging where a diversity of tissue types...

  16. Image evaluation of HIV encephalopathy: a multimodal approach using quantitative MR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Paulo T.C.; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara [University of Sao Paulo, Radiology Section, Internal Medicine Department, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cervi, Maria C. [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatrics, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Antonio Carlos [University of Sao Paulo, Radiology Section, Internal Medicine Department, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hospital das Clinicas da FMRP-USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    A multimodal approach of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy using quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) techniques can demonstrate brain changes not detectable only with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare conventional MRI and MR quantitative techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and relaxometry and to determine whether quantitative techniques are more sensitive than conventional imaging for brain changes caused by HIV infection. We studied prospectively nine HIV positive children (mean age 6 years, from 5 to 8 years old) and nine controls (mean age 7.3 years; from 3 to 10 years), using MRS and relaxometry. Examinations were carried on 1.5-T equipment. HIV-positive patients presented with only minor findings and all control patients had normal conventional MR findings. MRS findings showed an increase in choline to creatine (CHO/CRE) ratios bilaterally in both frontal gray and white matter, in the left parietal white matter, and in total CHO/CRE ratio. In contrast, N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/CRE) ratios did not present with any significant difference between both groups. Relaxometry showed significant bilateral abnormalities, with lengthening of the relaxation time in HIV positive in many regions. Conventional MRI is not sensitive for early brain changes caused by HIV infection. Quantitative techniques such as MRS and relaxometry appear as valuable tools in the diagnosis of these early changes. Therefore, a multimodal quantitative study can be useful in demonstrating and understanding the physiopathology of the disease. (orig.)

  17. A New Insight into Morphology of Solvent Resistant Nano filtration Membranes: Image Processing Assisted Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouresmaeel-Selakjani, P.; Jahanshahi, M.; Peyravi, M.; Fauzi Ismail, A.; Nabipoor, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate the morphological properties of polyimide based Solvent Resistant Nano filtration membranes by mean of image processing. Effect of phase inversion parameters like polymer concentration, volatile co-solvent, pre-evaporation time, additives in coagulation bath, polymers weight ratio in composite membranes, addition of nano particles and cross-linking agents have been reviewed. The voids of membrane were targeted to survey in the aspect of void area concentration in the scanning electron microscopy micrograph, mean of voids area, voids orientation and circle equivalent diameters of voids. This method by mean of the developed software could make the morphological studies of membranes easy. The population of different measured parameters of the voids could also measure. In conclusion for polyimide based membranes there are specific trends for change in voids properties by changing of phase inversion parameters. It was predictable, but investigated qualitatively up to now and this review can confirm the qualitative observations and also open new discussions about, for example void orientations that are not investigated in any study up to now

  18. A method for normalizing pathology images to improve feature extraction for quantitative pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Allison; Barker, Jocelyn; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of digital slide scanning technologies and the potential proliferation of large repositories of digital pathology images, many research studies can leverage these data for biomedical discovery and to develop clinical applications. However, quantitative analysis of digital pathology images is impeded by batch effects generated by varied staining protocols and staining conditions of pathological slides. To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel, fully automated stain normalization method to reduce batch effects and thus aid research in digital pathology applications. Their method, intensity centering and histogram equalization (ICHE), normalizes a diverse set of pathology images by first scaling the centroids of the intensity histograms to a common point and then applying a modified version of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization. Normalization was performed on two datasets of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of different tissue slices from the same lung tumor, and one immunohistochemistry dataset of digitized slides created by restaining one of the H&E datasets. The ICHE method was evaluated based on image intensity values, quantitative features, and the effect on downstream applications, such as a computer aided diagnosis. For comparison, three methods from the literature were reimplemented and evaluated using the same criteria. The authors found that ICHE not only improved performance compared with un-normalized images, but in most cases showed improvement compared with previous methods for correcting batch effects in the literature. ICHE may be a useful preprocessing step a digital pathology image processing pipeline.

  19. Quantitative histological image analyses of reticulin fibers in a myelofibrotic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Hector A; Patterson, Shenia; Matsuura, Shinobu; Ravid, Katya

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) reticulin fibrosis (RF), revealed by silver staining of tissue sections, is associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms, while tools for quantitative assessment of reticulin deposition throughout a femur BM are still in need. Here, we present such a method, allowing via analysis of hundreds of composite images to identify a patchy nature of RF throughout the BM during disease progression in a mouse model of myelofibrosis. To this end, initial conversion of silver stained BM color images into binary images identified two limitations: variable color, owing to polychromatic staining of reticulin fibers, and variable background in different sections of the same batch, limiting application of the color deconvolution method, and use of constant threshold, respectively. By blind coding image identities, to allow for threshold input (still within a narrow range), and using shape filtering to further eliminate background we were able to quantitate RF in myelofibrotic Gata-1low (experimental) and wild type (control) mice as a function of animal age. Color images spanning the whole femur BM were batch-analyzed using ImageJ software, aided by our two newly added macros. The results show heterogeneous RF density in different areas of the marrow of Gata-1low mice, with degrees of heterogeneity reduced upon aging. This method can be applied uniformly across laboratories in studies assessing RF remodeling induced by aging or other conditions in animal models.

  20. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O.; Laningham, Fred H.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2007-01-01

    Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment. In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. (orig.)

  1. Activated sludge characterization through microscopy: A review on quantitative image analysis and chemometric techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Daniela P. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Amaral, A. Luís [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Instituto Politécnico de Coimbra, ISEC, DEQB, Rua Pedro Nunes, Quinta da Nora, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira, Eugénio C., E-mail: ecferreira@deb.uminho.pt [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2013-11-13

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Quantitative image analysis shows potential to monitor activated sludge systems. •Staining techniques increase the potential for detection of operational problems. •Chemometrics combined with quantitative image analysis is valuable for process monitoring. -- Abstract: In wastewater treatment processes, and particularly in activated sludge systems, efficiency is quite dependent on the operating conditions, and a number of problems may arise due to sludge structure and proliferation of specific microorganisms. In fact, bacterial communities and protozoa identification by microscopy inspection is already routinely employed in a considerable number of cases. Furthermore, quantitative image analysis techniques have been increasingly used throughout the years for the assessment of aggregates and filamentous bacteria properties. These procedures are able to provide an ever growing amount of data for wastewater treatment processes in which chemometric techniques can be a valuable tool. However, the determination of microbial communities’ properties remains a current challenge in spite of the great diversity of microscopy techniques applied. In this review, activated sludge characterization is discussed highlighting the aggregates structure and filamentous bacteria determination by image analysis on bright-field, phase-contrast, and fluorescence microscopy. An in-depth analysis is performed to summarize the many new findings that have been obtained, and future developments for these biological processes are further discussed.

  2. Quantitative 3D imaging of whole, unstained cells by using X-ray diffraction microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huaidong; Song, Changyong; Chen, Chien-Chun; Xu, Rui; Raines, Kevin S; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Lu, Chien-Hung; Lee, Ting-Kuo; Nakashima, Akio; Urano, Jun; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Miao, Jianwei

    2010-06-22

    Microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of biology. Although significant progress has recently been made in optical microscopy to break the diffraction-limit barrier, reliance of such techniques on fluorescent labeling technologies prohibits quantitative 3D imaging of the entire contents of cells. Cryoelectron microscopy can image pleomorphic structures at a resolution of 3-5 nm, but is only applicable to thin or sectioned specimens. Here, we report quantitative 3D imaging of a whole, unstained cell at a resolution of 50-60 nm by X-ray diffraction microscopy. We identified the 3D morphology and structure of cellular organelles including cell wall, vacuole, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, granules, nucleus, and nucleolus inside a yeast spore cell. Furthermore, we observed a 3D structure protruding from the reconstructed yeast spore, suggesting the spore germination process. Using cryogenic technologies, a 3D resolution of 5-10 nm should be achievable by X-ray diffraction microscopy. This work hence paves a way for quantitative 3D imaging of a wide range of biological specimens at nanometer-scale resolutions that are too thick for electron microscopy.

  3. Survival Prediction in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma by Quantitative Computed Tomography Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attiyeh, Marc A; Chakraborty, Jayasree; Doussot, Alexandre; Langdon-Embry, Liana; Mainarich, Shiana; Gönen, Mithat; Balachandran, Vinod P; D'Angelica, Michael I; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Jarnagin, William R; Kingham, T Peter; Allen, Peter J; Simpson, Amber L; Do, Richard K

    2018-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal cancer with no established a priori markers of survival. Existing nomograms rely mainly on post-resection data and are of limited utility in directing surgical management. This study investigated the use of quantitative computed tomography (CT) features to preoperatively assess survival for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. A prospectively maintained database identified consecutive chemotherapy-naive patients with CT angiography and resected PDAC between 2009 and 2012. Variation in CT enhancement patterns was extracted from the tumor region using texture analysis, a quantitative image analysis tool previously described in the literature. Two continuous survival models were constructed, with 70% of the data (training set) using Cox regression, first based only on preoperative serum cancer antigen (CA) 19-9 levels and image features (model A), and then on CA19-9, image features, and the Brennan score (composite pathology score; model B). The remaining 30% of the data (test set) were reserved for independent validation. A total of 161 patients were included in the analysis. Training and test sets contained 113 and 48 patients, respectively. Quantitative image features combined with CA19-9 achieved a c-index of 0.69 [integrated Brier score (IBS) 0.224] on the test data, while combining CA19-9, imaging, and the Brennan score achieved a c-index of 0.74 (IBS 0.200) on the test data. We present two continuous survival prediction models for resected PDAC patients. Quantitative analysis of CT texture features is associated with overall survival. Further work includes applying the model to an external dataset to increase the sample size for training and to determine its applicability.

  4. WE-G-207-05: Relationship Between CT Image Quality, Segmentation Performance, and Quantitative Image Feature Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J; Nishikawa, R [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Reiser, I [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Boone, J [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Segmentation quality can affect quantitative image feature analysis. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between computed tomography (CT) image quality, segmentation performance, and quantitative image feature analysis. Methods: A total of 90 pathology proven breast lesions in 87 dedicated breast CT images were considered. An iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithm was used to obtain CT images with different quality. With different combinations of 4 variables in the algorithm, this study obtained a total of 28 different qualities of CT images. Two imaging tasks/objectives were considered: 1) segmentation and 2) classification of the lesion as benign or malignant. Twenty-three image features were extracted after segmentation using a semi-automated algorithm and 5 of them were selected via a feature selection technique. Logistic regression was trained and tested using leave-one-out-cross-validation and its area under the ROC curve (AUC) was recorded. The standard deviation of a homogeneous portion and the gradient of a parenchymal portion of an example breast were used as an estimate of image noise and sharpness. The DICE coefficient was computed using a radiologist’s drawing on the lesion. Mean DICE and AUC were used as performance metrics for each of the 28 reconstructions. The relationship between segmentation and classification performance under different reconstructions were compared. Distributions (median, 95% confidence interval) of DICE and AUC for each reconstruction were also compared. Results: Moderate correlation (Pearson’s rho = 0.43, p-value = 0.02) between DICE and AUC values was found. However, the variation between DICE and AUC values for each reconstruction increased as the image sharpness increased. There was a combination of IIR parameters that resulted in the best segmentation with the worst classification performance. Conclusion: There are certain images that yield better segmentation or classification

  5. Determining the platinum loading and distribution of industrial scale polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell electrodes using low energy X-ray imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, T.; Vassiliev, Anton; Kerr, R.

    2014-01-01

    Low energy X-ray imaging (E <25 keV) is herein demonstrated to be a rapid, effective and non-destructive tool for the quantitative determination of the platinum loading and distribution over the entire geometric area of gas diffusion electrodes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. A linea...... of electrodes fabricated using an industrial spraying process. This technique proves to be an attractive option for the electrode performance study, the process optimization and quality control of electrode fabrication on an industrial scale....

  6. Free-cholesterol loading does not trigger phase separation of the fluorescent sterol dehydroergosterol in the plasma membrane of macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    membrane distribution of the fluorescent cholesterol-mimicking sterol dehydroergosterol (DHE) was investigated in FC-loaded J774 macrophages. Wide field fluorescence and deconvolution microscopy were combined with quantitative assessment of sterol distribution in straightened plasma membrane image segments...

  7. Quantitative Wavelength Analysis and Image Classification for Intraoperative Cancer Diagnosis with Hyperspectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-02-21

    Complete surgical removal of tumor tissue is essential for postoperative prognosis after surgery. Intraoperative tumor imaging and visualization are an important step in aiding surgeons to evaluate and resect tumor tissue in real time, thus enabling more complete resection of diseased tissue and better conservation of healthy tissue. As an emerging modality, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) holds great potential for comprehensive and objective intraoperative cancer assessment. In this paper, we explored the possibility of intraoperative tumor detection and visualization during surgery using HSI in the wavelength range of 450 nm - 900 nm in an animal experiment. We proposed a new algorithm for glare removal and cancer detection on surgical hyperspectral images, and detected the tumor margins in five mice with an average sensitivity and specificity of 94.4% and 98.3%, respectively. The hyperspectral imaging and quantification method have the potential to provide an innovative tool for image-guided surgery.

  8. Versatile quantitative phase imaging system applied to high-speed, low noise and multimodal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Antoine; Aknoun, Sherazade; Savatier, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2017-02-01

    Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) is a well-established quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique based on the analysis of interference patterns of four diffraction orders by an optical grating set in front of an array detector [1]. As a QPI modality, this is a non-invasive imaging technique which allow to measure the optical path difference (OPD) of semi-transparent samples. We present a system enabling QWLSI with high-performance sCMOS cameras [2] and apply it to perform high-speed imaging, low noise as well as multimodal imaging. This modified QWLSI system contains a versatile optomechanical device which images the optical grating near the detector plane. Such a device is coupled with any kind of camera by varying its magnification. In this paper, we study the use of a sCMOS Zyla5.5 camera from Andor along with our modified QWLSI system. We will present high-speed live cell imaging, up to 200Hz frame rate, in order to follow intracellular fast motions while measuring the quantitative phase information. The structural and density information extracted from the OPD signal is complementary to the specific and localized fluorescence signal [2]. In addition, QPI detects cells even when the fluorophore is not expressed. This is very useful to follow a protein expression with time. The 10 µm spatial pixel resolution of our modified QWLSI associated to the high sensitivity of the Zyla5.5 enabling to perform high quality fluorescence imaging, we have carried out multimodal imaging revealing fine structures cells, like actin filaments, merged with the morphological information of the phase. References [1]. P. Bon, G. Maucort, B. Wattellier, and S. Monneret, "Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry for quantitative phase microscopy of living cells," Opt. Express, vol. 17, pp. 13080-13094, 2009. [2] P. Bon, S. Lécart, E. Fort and S. Lévêque-Fort, "Fast label-free cytoskeletal network imaging in living mammalian cells," Biophysical journal, 106

  9. MO-C-BRB-06: Translating NIH / NIBIB funding to clinical reality in quantitative diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, E. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  10. MO-C-BRB-06: Translating NIH / NIBIB funding to clinical reality in quantitative diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, E.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  11. Quantitative proteomic profiling of membrane proteins from the mouse brain cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum using the HysTag reagent: mapping of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Nielsen, Peter Aa; Andersen, Jens R

    2007-01-01

    of recently developed methods for isolation of membrane proteins from 10-20 mg brain tissue [Nielsen, P.Aa., Olsen, J.V., Podtelejnokov, A.V., Andersen, J.R., Mann, M., Wisniewski, J.R., 2005. Proteomic mapping of brain plasma membrane proteins. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 4, 402--408] and the Hys...... proteins mapped in distinct brain compartments and offer a technology that allows in depth study of brain membrane proteomes, such as mouse models of neurological diseases.......Analysis of the brain proteome and studying brain diseases through clinical biopsies and animal disease models require methods of quantitative proteomics that are sensitive and allow identification and quantification of low abundant membrane proteins from minute amount of tissue. Taking advantage...

  12. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET parametric imaging at the voxel-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) PET has the potential to enhance detection of early stages of atherosclerosis or microvascular dysfunction, characterization of flow-limiting effects of coronary artery disease (CAD), and identification of balanced reduction of flow due to multivessel stenosis. We aim to enable quantitative MP-PET at the individual voxel level, which has the potential to allow enhanced visualization and quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) as computed from uptake parametric images. This framework is especially challenging for the 82Rb radiotracer. The short half-life enables fast serial imaging and high patient throughput; yet, the acquired dynamic PET images suffer from high noise-levels introducing large variability in uptake parametric images and, therefore, in the estimates of MBF and MFR. Robust estimation requires substantial post-smoothing of noisy data, degrading valuable functional information of physiological and pathological importance. We present a feasible and robust approach to generate parametric images at the voxel-level that substantially reduces noise without significant loss of spatial resolution. The proposed methodology, denoted physiological clustering, makes use of the functional similarity of voxels to penalize deviation of voxel kinetics from physiological partners. The results were validated using extensive simulations (with transmural and non-transmural perfusion defects) and clinical studies. Compared to post-smoothing, physiological clustering depicted enhanced quantitative noise versus bias performance as well as superior recovery of perfusion defects (as quantified by CNR) with minimal increase in bias. Overall, parametric images obtained from the proposed methodology were robust in the presence of high-noise levels as manifested in the voxel time-activity-curves.

  13. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  14. Quantitative imaging of collective cell migration during Drosophila gastrulation: multiphoton microscopy and computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supatto, Willy; McMahon, Amy; Fraser, Scott E; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes imaging and computational tools to collect and analyze live imaging data of embryonic cell migration. Our five-step protocol requires a few weeks to move through embryo preparation and four-dimensional (4D) live imaging using multi-photon microscopy, to 3D cell tracking using image processing, registration of tracking data and their quantitative analysis using computational tools. It uses commercially available equipment and requires expertise in microscopy and programming that is appropriate for a biology laboratory. Custom-made scripts are provided, as well as sample datasets to permit readers without experimental data to carry out the analysis. The protocol has offered new insights into the genetic control of cell migration during Drosophila gastrulation. With simple modifications, this systematic analysis could be applied to any developing system to define cell positions in accordance with the body plan, to decompose complex 3D movements and to quantify the collective nature of cell migration.

  15. Quantitative 3-D imaging of eukaryotic cells using soft X-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Dilworth Y; McDermott, Gerry; Etkin, Laurence D; Le Gros, Mark A; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2008-06-01

    Imaging has long been one of the principal techniques used in biological and biomedical research. Indeed, the field of cell biology grew out of the first electron microscopy images of organelles in a cell. Since this landmark event, much work has been carried out to image and classify the organelles in eukaryotic cells using electron microscopy. Fluorescently labeled organelles can now be tracked in live cells, and recently, powerful light microscope techniques have pushed the limit of optical resolution to image single molecules. In this paper, we describe the use of soft X-ray tomography, a new tool for quantitative imaging of organelle structure and distribution in whole, fully hydrated eukaryotic Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. In addition to imaging intact cells, soft X-ray tomography has the advantage of not requiring the use of any staining or fixation protocols--cells are simply transferred from their growth environment to a sample holder and immediately cryofixed. In this way the cells can be imaged in a near native state. Soft X-ray tomography is also capable of imaging relatively large numbers of cells in a short period of time, and is therefore a technique that has the potential to produce information on organelle morphology from statistically significant numbers of cells.

  16. Videodensitometric quantitative angiography after coronary balloon angioplasty, compared to edge-detection quantitative angiography and intracoronary ultrasound imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R. J.; Kok, W. E.; Pasterkamp, G.; von Birgelen, C.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Serruys, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the value of videodensitometric quantification of the coronary lumen after angioplasty by comparison to two other techniques of coronary artery lumen quantification. METHODS AND RESULTS: Videodensitometric quantitative angiography, edge detection quantitative angiography and 30 MHz

  17. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2016-04-07

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  18. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Abhinav K; Frey, Eric C; Caffo, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  19. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging

  20. Measuring iron in the brain using quantitative susceptibility mapping and X-ray fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weili; Nichol, Helen; Liu, Saifeng; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Haacke, E Mark

    2013-09-01

    Measuring iron content in the brain has important implications for a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), derived from magnetic resonance images, has been used to measure total iron content in vivo and in post mortem brain. In this paper, we show how magnetic susceptibility from QSM correlates with total iron content measured by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The relationship between susceptibility and ferritin iron was estimated at 1.10±0.08 ppb susceptibility per μg iron/g wet tissue, similar to that of iron in fixed (frozen/thawed) cadaveric brain and previously published data from unfixed brains. We conclude that magnetic susceptibility can provide a direct and reliable quantitative measurement of iron content and that it can be used clinically at least in regions with high iron content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Checklist for Successful Quantitative Live Cell Imaging in Systems Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Myong-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of signaling and gene regulatory networks has provided unique insights about systems behaviors for many cell biological problems of medical importance. Quantitative single cell monitoring has a crucial role in advancing systems modeling of molecular networks. However, due to the multidisciplinary techniques that are necessary for adaptation of such systems biology approaches, dissemination to a wide research community has been relatively slow. In this essay, I focus on some technical aspects that are often under-appreciated, yet critical in harnessing live cell imaging methods to achieve single-cell-level understanding and quantitative modeling of molecular networks. The importance of these technical considerations will be elaborated with examples of successes and shortcomings. Future efforts will benefit by avoiding some pitfalls and by utilizing the lessons collectively learned from recent applications of imaging in systems biology. PMID:24709701

  2. Porosity determination on pyrocarbon by means of automatic quantitative image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizlik, K.; Uhlenbruck, U.; Delle, W.; Hoven, H.; Nickel, H.

    1976-05-01

    For a long time, the quantitative image analysis is well known as a method for quantifying the results of material investigation basing on ceramography. The development of the automatic image analyzers has made it a fast and elegant procedure for evaluation. Since 1975, it is used in IRW to determine easily and routinely the macroporosity and by this the density of the pyrocarbon coatings of nuclear fuel particles. This report describes the definition of measuring parameters, the measuring procedure, the mathematical calculations, and first experimental and mathematical results.

  3. Direct quantitative13C-filtered1H magnetic resonance imaging of PEGylated biomacromolecules in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvares, Rohan D A; Lau, Justin Y C; Macdonald, Peter M; Cunningham, Charles H; Prosser, R Scott

    2017-04-01

    1 H MRI is an established diagnostic method that generally relies on detection of water. Imaging specific macromolecules is normally accomplished only indirectly through the use of paramagnetic tags, which alter the water signal in their vicinity. We demonstrate a new approach in which macromolecular constituents, such as proteins and drug delivery systems, are observed directly and quantitatively in vivo using 1 H MRI of 13 C-labeled poly(ethylene glycol) ( 13 C-PEG) tags. Molecular imaging of 13 C-PEG-labeled species was accomplished by incorporating a modified heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence filter into a gradient echo imaging sequence. We demonstrate the approach by monitoring the real-time distribution of 13 C-PEG and 13 C-PEGylated albumin injected into the hind leg of a mouse. Filtering the 1 H PEG signal through the directly coupled 13 C nuclei largely eliminates background water and fat signals, thus enabling the imaging of molecules using 1 H MRI. PEGylation is widely employed to enhance the performance of a multitude of macromolecular therapeutics and drug delivery systems, and 13 C-filtered 1 H MRI of 13 C-PEG thus offers the possibility of imaging and quantitating their distribution in living systems in real time. Magn Reson Med 77:1553-1561, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Hyperspectral and differential CARS microscopy for quantitative chemical imaging in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Pope, Iestyn; Masia, Francesco; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy for quantitative chemical imaging of saturated and unsaturated lipids in human stem-cell derived adipocytes. We compare dual-frequency/differential CARS (D-CARS), which enables rapid imaging and simple data analysis, with broadband hyperspectral CARS microscopy analyzed using an unsupervised phase-retrieval and factorization method recently developed by us for quantitative chemical image analysis. Measurements were taken in the vibrational fingerprint region (1200-2000/cm) and in the CH stretch region (2600-3300/cm) using a home-built CARS set-up which enables hyperspectral imaging with 10/cm resolution via spectral focussing from a single broadband 5 fs Ti:Sa laser source. Through a ratiometric analysis, both D-CARS and phase-retrieved hyperspectral CARS determine the concentration of unsaturated lipids with comparable accuracy in the fingerprint region, while in the CH stretch region D-CARS provides only a qualitative contrast owing to its non-linear behavior. When analyzing hyperspectral CARS images using the blind factorization into susceptibilities and concentrations of chemical components recently demonstrated by us, we are able to determine vol:vol concentrations of different lipid components and spatially resolve inhomogeneities in lipid composition with superior accuracy compared to state-of-the art ratiometric methods.

  5. Using Non-Invasive Multi-Spectral Imaging to Quantitatively Assess Tissue Vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, A; Chernomordik, V; Riley, J; Hassan, M; Amyot, F; Dasgeb, B; Demos, S G; Pursley, R; Little, R; Yarchoan, R; Tao, Y; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2007-10-04

    This research describes a non-invasive, non-contact method used to quantitatively analyze the functional characteristics of tissue. Multi-spectral images collected at several near-infrared wavelengths are input into a mathematical optical skin model that considers the contributions from different analytes in the epidermis and dermis skin layers. Through a reconstruction algorithm, we can quantify the percent of blood in a given area of tissue and the fraction of that blood that is oxygenated. Imaging normal tissue confirms previously reported values for the percent of blood in tissue and the percent of blood that is oxygenated in tissue and surrounding vasculature, for the normal state and when ischemia is induced. This methodology has been applied to assess vascular Kaposi's sarcoma lesions and the surrounding tissue before and during experimental therapies. The multi-spectral imaging technique has been combined with laser Doppler imaging to gain additional information. Results indicate that these techniques are able to provide quantitative and functional information about tissue changes during experimental drug therapy and investigate progression of disease before changes are visibly apparent, suggesting a potential for them to be used as complementary imaging techniques to clinical assessment.

  6. Hyperspectral and differential CARS microscopy for quantitative chemical imaging in human adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Claudia; Pope, Iestyn; Masia, Francesco; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy for quantitative chemical imaging of saturated and unsaturated lipids in human stem-cell derived adipocytes. We compare dual-frequency/differential CARS (D-CARS), which enables rapid imaging and simple data analysis, with broadband hyperspectral CARS microscopy analyzed using an unsupervised phase-retrieval and factorization method recently developed by us for quantitative chemical image analysis. Measurements were taken in the vibrational fingerprint region (1200–2000/cm) and in the CH stretch region (2600–3300/cm) using a home-built CARS set-up which enables hyperspectral imaging with 10/cm resolution via spectral focussing from a single broadband 5 fs Ti:Sa laser source. Through a ratiometric analysis, both D-CARS and phase-retrieved hyperspectral CARS determine the concentration of unsaturated lipids with comparable accuracy in the fingerprint region, while in the CH stretch region D-CARS provides only a qualitative contrast owing to its non-linear behavior. When analyzing hyperspectral CARS images using the blind factorization into susceptibilities and concentrations of chemical components recently demonstrated by us, we are able to determine vol:vol concentrations of different lipid components and spatially resolve inhomogeneities in lipid composition with superior accuracy compared to state-of-the art ratiometric methods. PMID:24877002

  7. Anatomy-Correlated Breast Imaging and Visual Grading Analysis Using Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Klock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study presents correlations between cross-sectional anatomy of human female breasts and Quantitative Transmission (QT Ultrasound, does discriminate classifier analysis to validate the speed of sound correlations, and does a visual grading analysis comparing QT Ultrasound with mammography. Materials and Methods. Human cadaver breasts were imaged using QT Ultrasound, sectioned, and photographed. Biopsies confirmed microanatomy and areas were correlated with QT Ultrasound images. Measurements were taken in live subjects from QT Ultrasound images and values of speed of sound for each identified anatomical structure were plotted. Finally, a visual grading analysis was performed on images to determine whether radiologists’ confidence in identifying breast structures with mammography (XRM is comparable to QT Ultrasound. Results. QT Ultrasound identified all major anatomical features of the breast, and speed of sound calculations showed specific values for different breast tissues. Using linear discriminant analysis overall accuracy is 91.4%. Using visual grading analysis readers scored the image quality on QT Ultrasound as better than on XRM in 69%–90% of breasts for specific tissues. Conclusions. QT Ultrasound provides accurate anatomic information and high tissue specificity using speed of sound information. Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound can distinguish different types of breast tissue with high resolution and accuracy.

  8. Quantitative imaging of the human upper airway: instrument design and clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, M. S.; Armstrong, J. J.; Paduch, A.; Sampson, D. D.; Walsh, J. H.; Hillman, D. R.; Eastwood, P. R.

    2006-08-01

    Imaging of the human upper airway is widely used in medicine, in both clinical practice and research. Common imaging modalities include video endoscopy, X-ray CT, and MRI. However, no current modality is both quantitative and safe to use for extended periods of time. Such a capability would be particularly valuable for sleep research, which is inherently reliant on long observation sessions. We have developed an instrument capable of quantitative imaging of the human upper airway, based on endoscopic optical coherence tomography. There are no dose limits for optical techniques, and the minimally invasive imaging probe is safe for use in overnight studies. We report on the design of the instrument and its use in preliminary clinical studies, and we present results from a range of initial experiments. The experiments show that the instrument is capable of imaging during sleep, and that it can record dynamic changes in airway size and shape. This information is useful for research into sleep disorders, and potentially for clinical diagnosis and therapies.

  9. Easy measurement of diffusion coefficients of EGFP-tagged plasma membrane proteins using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup; Marlar, Saw

    2014-01-01

    Lateral diffusion and compartmentalization of plasma membrane proteins are tightly regulated in cells and thus, studying these processes will reveal new insights to plasma membrane protein function and regulation. Recently, k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS)1 was developed to enable...... routine measurements of diffusion coefficients directly from images of fluorescently tagged plasma membrane proteins, that avoided systematic biases introduced by probe photophysics. Although the theoretical basis for the analysis is complex, the method can be implemented by nonexperts using a freely...... to the correlation function yields the diffusion coefficient. This paper provides a step-by-step guide to the image analysis and measurement of diffusion coefficients via kICS. First, a high frame rate image sequence of a fluorescently labeled plasma membrane protein is acquired using a fluorescence microscope Then...

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of Scintillation Camera Imaging Characteristics of Isotopes Used in Liver Radioembolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Nijsen, Johannes Franciscus Wilhelmus; Dam, Alida Johanna; de Jong, Hugo Wilhelmus Antonius Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Scintillation camera imaging is used for treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry in liver radioembolization (RE). In yttrium-90 (90Y) RE, scintigraphic images of technetium-99m (99mTc) are used for treatment planning, while 90Y Bremsstrahlung images are used for post-treatment dosimetry. In holmium-166 (166Ho) RE, scintigraphic images of 166Ho can be used for both treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry. The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate and compare the imaging characteristics of these three isotopes, in order that imaging protocols can be optimized and RE studies with varying isotopes can be compared. Methodology/Principal Findings Phantom experiments were performed in line with NEMA guidelines to assess the spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate linearity, and contrast recovery of 99mTc, 90Y and 166Ho. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain detailed information about the history of detected photons. The results showed that the use of a broad energy window and the high-energy collimator gave optimal combination of sensitivity, spatial resolution, and primary photon fraction for 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging, although differences with the medium-energy collimator were small. For 166Ho, the high-energy collimator also slightly outperformed the medium-energy collimator. In comparison with 99mTc, the image quality of both 90Y and 166Ho is degraded by a lower spatial resolution, a lower sensitivity, and larger scatter and collimator penetration fractions. Conclusions/Significance The quantitative evaluation of the scintillation camera characteristics presented in this study helps to optimize acquisition parameters and supports future analysis of clinical comparisons between RE studies. PMID:22073149

  11. Quantitative evaluation of scintillation camera imaging characteristics of isotopes used in liver radioembolization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattijs Elschot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scintillation camera imaging is used for treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry in liver radioembolization (RE. In yttrium-90 (90Y RE, scintigraphic images of technetium-99m (99mTc are used for treatment planning, while 90Y Bremsstrahlung images are used for post-treatment dosimetry. In holmium-166 (166Ho RE, scintigraphic images of 166Ho can be used for both treatment planning and post-treatment dosimetry. The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate and compare the imaging characteristics of these three isotopes, in order that imaging protocols can be optimized and RE studies with varying isotopes can be compared. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phantom experiments were performed in line with NEMA guidelines to assess the spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate linearity, and contrast recovery of 99mTc, 90Y and 166Ho. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain detailed information about the history of detected photons. The results showed that the use of a broad energy window and the high-energy collimator gave optimal combination of sensitivity, spatial resolution, and primary photon fraction for 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging, although differences with the medium-energy collimator were small. For 166Ho, the high-energy collimator also slightly outperformed the medium-energy collimator. In comparison with 99mTc, the image quality of both 90Y and 166Ho is degraded by a lower spatial resolution, a lower sensitivity, and larger scatter and collimator penetration fractions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The quantitative evaluation of the scintillation camera characteristics presented in this study helps to optimize acquisition parameters and supports future analysis of clinical comparisons between RE studies.

  12. Quantitative Phase Imaging Techniques for the Study of Cell Pathophysiology: From Principles to Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjoo Park

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A cellular-level study of the pathophysiology is crucial for understanding the mechanisms behind human diseases. Recent advances in quantitative phase imaging (QPI techniques show promises for the cellular-level understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases. To provide important insight on how the QPI techniques potentially improve the study of cell pathophysiology, here we present the principles of QPI and highlight some of the recent applications of QPI ranging from cell homeostasis to infectious diseases and cancer.

  13. Quantitative beam-deflection optical tomographic imaging of fluid flows and flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, G.W.; Byer, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously described the application of beam-deflection optical tomography to density measurements in a supersonic jet. They showed that the technique can give very accurate quantitative 2-D images of density. In this work they describe extension of this technique to 3-D measurements in a flame, supersonic jet, and subsonic jet. Near-diffraction-limited measurements also are reported. The experiment apparatus is discussed

  14. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  15. High-Resolution, Quantitative, and Three-Dimensional Coherent Diffractive Imaging with a Tabletop EUV Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth Rose

    Imaging is a critical tool used across a broad range of applications in science, technology, medicine, and manufacturing. Microscopy, the type of imaging which allows us to access the elusive yet rich world of what is smaller than we can naturally see--makes it possible to observe and design the nano-world of biological, material, and nanofabricated systems. In this thesis, I describe the development of a new type of microscopy that combines two powerful tools: coherent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources produced by high harmonic generation, and ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging. This microscope produces high-resolution, chemically-specific, phase- and amplitude-contrast images with large fields of view on the order of hundreds of microns, while preserving a high spatial resolution on the scale of tens of nanometers. Recently, we extended this new tabletop microscopy technique to image reflective samples, periodic samples, and to image dynamic nano-scale elastic and thermal processes. I will discuss these advances and in particular demonstrate two new capabilities: first, a new imaging technique with high compositionally- and morphologically-sensitive quantitative information, capable of imaging reactions and diffusion at a buried interface. This capability will open up a new, exquisitely sensitive layer-by-layer imaging that has many applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology, including surface and materials science and metrology. Secondly, I will demonstrate imaging of a thick sample in three dimensions. By accounting for diffraction within a thick sample, it is possible to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional images of biological and meta-material samples non-invasively, and without the use of staining or labeling.

  16. Automatic Gleason grading of prostate cancer using quantitative phase imaging and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tan H.; Sridharan, Shamira; Macias, Virgilia; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Melamed, Jonathan; Do, Minh N.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    We present an approach for automatic diagnosis of tissue biopsies. Our methodology consists of a quantitative phase imaging tissue scanner and machine learning algorithms to process these data. We illustrate the performance by automatic Gleason grading of prostate specimens. The imaging system operates on the principle of interferometry and, as a result, reports on the nanoscale architecture of the unlabeled specimen. We use these data to train a random forest classifier to learn textural behaviors of prostate samples and classify each pixel in the image into different classes. Automatic diagnosis results were computed from the segmented regions. By combining morphological features with quantitative information from the glands and stroma, logistic regression was used to discriminate regions with Gleason grade 3 versus grade 4 cancer in prostatectomy tissue. The overall accuracy of this classification derived from a receiver operating curve was 82%, which is in the range of human error when interobserver variability is considered. We anticipate that our approach will provide a clinically objective and quantitative metric for Gleason grading, allowing us to corroborate results across instruments and laboratories and feed the computer algorithms for improved accuracy.

  17. Automatic Gleason grading of prostate cancer using quantitative phase imaging and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tan H; Sridharan, Shamira; Macias, Virgilia; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Melamed, Jonathan; Do, Minh N; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    We present an approach for automatic diagnosis of tissue biopsies. Our methodology consists of a quantitative phase imaging tissue scanner and machine learning algorithms to process these data. We illustrate the performance by automatic Gleason grading of prostate specimens. The imaging system operates on the principle of interferometry and, as a result, reports on the nanoscale architecture of the unlabeled specimen. We use these data to train a random forest classifier to learn textural behaviors of prostate samples and classify each pixel in the image into different classes. Automatic diagnosis results were computed from the segmented regions. By combining morphological features with quantitative information from the glands and stroma, logistic regression was used to discriminate regions with Gleason grade 3 versus grade 4 cancer in prostatectomy tissue. The overall accuracy of this classification derived from a receiver operating curve was 82%, which is in the range of human error when interobserver variability is considered. We anticipate that our approach will provide a clinically objective and quantitative metric for Gleason grading, allowing us to corroborate results across instruments and laboratories and feed the computer algorithms for improved accuracy.

  18. Quantitative imaging of cells with multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS)-Nanoautography with stable isotope tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Greg; Glassner, Brian J.; Lechene, Claude P.

    2006-01-01

    We describe some technical aspects of the application of multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry (MIMS) to biological research, particularly the use of isotopic tags to localize and measure their incorporation into intracellular compartments. We touch on sample preparation, on image formation, on drift correction and on extraction of quantitative data from isotope ratio imaging. We insist on the wide variety of sample types that can be used, ranging from whole cells prepared directly on Si supports, to thin sections of cells and tissues on Si supports, to ultrathin TEM sections on carbon-coated grid. We attempt to dispel the myth of difficulties in sample preparation, which we view as a needless deterrent to the application of MIMS to the general biological community. We present protocols for the extraction of isotope ratio data from mass images. We illustrate the benefits of using sequential image plane acquisition followed by the application of an autocorrelation algorithm (nanotracking) to remove the effects of specimen drift. We insist on the advantages to display the isotope ratios as hue saturation intensity images

  19. Selecting Targets for Tumor Imaging: An Overview of Cancer-Associated Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C. Boonstra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor targeting is a booming business: The global therapeutic monoclonal antibody market accounted for more than $78 billion in 2012 and is expanding exponentially. Tumors can be targeted with an extensive arsenal of monoclonal antibodies, ligand proteins, peptides, RNAs, and small molecules. In addition to therapeutic targeting, some of these compounds can also be applied for tumor visualization before or during surgery, after conjugation with radionuclides and/or near-infrared fluorescent dyes. The majority of these tumor-targeting compounds are directed against cell membrane-bound proteins. Various categories of targetable membrane-bound proteins, such as anchoring proteins, receptors, enzymes, and transporter proteins, exist. The functions and biological characteristics of these proteins determine their location and distribution on the cell membrane, making them more, or less, accessible, and therefore, it is important to understand these features. In this review, we evaluate the characteristics of cancer-associated membrane proteins and discuss their overall usability for cancer targeting, especially focusing on imaging applications.

  20. Comparison of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging CT to fluorescent microsphere-based flow from high-resolution cryo-images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Li, Yuemeng; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) has the potential to provide quantitative measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) which can aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of MPI-CT in a porcine model of balloon-induced LAD coronary artery ischemia guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR). We quantified MBF at baseline (FFR=1.0) and under moderate ischemia (FFR=0.7) using MPI-CT and compared to fluorescent microsphere-based MBF from high-resolution cryo-images. Dynamic, contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained using a spectral detector CT (Philips Healthcare). Projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed and processed to obtain MBF. Three MBF quantification approaches were evaluated: singular value decomposition (SVD) with fixed Tikhonov regularization (ThSVD), SVD with regularization determined by the L-Curve criterion (LSVD), and Johnson-Wilson parameter estimation (JW). The three approaches over-estimated MBF compared to cryo-images. JW produced the most accurate MBF, with average error 33.3+/-19.2mL/min/100g, whereas LSVD and ThSVD had greater over-estimation, 59.5+/-28.3mL/min/100g and 78.3+/-25.6 mL/min/100g, respectively. Relative blood flow as assessed by a flow ratio of LAD-to-remote myocardium was strongly correlated between JW and cryo-imaging, with R2=0.97, compared to R2=0.88 and 0.78 for LSVD and ThSVD, respectively. We assessed tissue impulse response functions (IRFs) from each approach for sources of error. While JW was constrained to physiologic solutions, both LSVD and ThSVD produced IRFs with non-physiologic properties due to noise. The L-curve provided noise-adaptive regularization but did not eliminate non-physiologic IRF properties or optimize for MBF accuracy. These findings suggest that model-based MPI-CT approaches may be more appropriate for quantitative MBF estimation and that cryo-imaging can support the development of MPI-CT by providing spatial distributions of MBF.

  1. Quantitative volumetric imaging of normal, neoplastic and hyperplastic mouse prostate using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shalini; Pan, Chunliu; Wood, Ronald; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Yeh, Shuyuan; Sha, Kai; Krolewski, John J; Nastiuk, Kent L

    2015-09-21

    Genetically engineered mouse models are essential to the investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying human prostate pathology and the effects of therapy on the diseased prostate. Serial in vivo volumetric imaging expands the scope and accuracy of experimental investigations of models of normal prostate physiology, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer, which are otherwise limited by the anatomy of the mouse prostate. Moreover, accurate imaging of hyperplastic and tumorigenic prostates is now recognized as essential to rigorous pre-clinical trials of new therapies. Bioluminescent imaging has been widely used to determine prostate tumor size, but is semi-quantitative at best. Magnetic resonance imaging can determine prostate volume very accurately, but is expensive and has low throughput. We therefore sought to develop and implement a high throughput, low cost, and accurate serial imaging protocol for the mouse prostate. We developed a high frequency ultrasound imaging technique employing 3D reconstruction that allows rapid and precise assessment of mouse prostate volume. Wild-type mouse prostates were examined (n = 4) for reproducible baseline imaging, and treatment effects on volume were compared, and blinded data analyzed for intra- and inter-operator assessments of reproducibility by correlation and for Bland-Altman analysis. Examples of benign prostatic hyperplasia mouse model prostate (n = 2) and mouse prostate implantation of orthotopic human prostate cancer tumor and its growth (n =  ) are also demonstrated. Serial measurement volume of the mouse prostate revealed that high frequency ultrasound was very precise. Following endocrine manipulation, regression and regrowth of the prostate could be monitored with very low intra- and interobserver variability. This technique was also valuable to monitor the development of prostate growth in a model of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we demonstrate accurate ultrasound image

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang, E-mail: njmu_wangdehang@126.com

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica.

  4. Deriving Quantitative Crystallographic Information from the Wavelength-Resolved Neutron Transmission Analysis Performed in Imaging Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Current status of Bragg-edge/dip neutron transmission analysis/imaging methods is presented. The method can visualize real-space distributions of bulk crystallographic information in a crystalline material over a large area (~10 cm with high spatial resolution (~100 μm. Furthermore, by using suitable spectrum analysis methods for wavelength-dependent neutron transmission data, quantitative visualization of the crystallographic information can be achieved. For example, crystallographic texture imaging, crystallite size imaging and crystalline phase imaging with texture/extinction corrections are carried out by the Rietveld-type (wide wavelength bandwidth profile fitting analysis code, RITS (Rietveld Imaging of Transmission Spectra. By using the single Bragg-edge analysis mode of RITS, evaluations of crystal lattice plane spacing (d-spacing relating to macro-strain and d-spacing distribution’s FWHM (full width at half maximum relating to micro-strain can be achieved. Macro-strain tomography is performed by a new conceptual CT (computed tomography image reconstruction algorithm, the tensor CT method. Crystalline grains and their orientations are visualized by a fast determination method of grain orientation for Bragg-dip neutron transmission spectrum. In this paper, these imaging examples with the spectrum analysis methods and the reliabilities evaluated by optical/electron microscope and X-ray/neutron diffraction, are presented. In addition, the status at compact accelerator driven pulsed neutron sources is also presented.

  5. Deep Learning Automates the Quantitative Analysis of Individual Cells in Live-Cell Imaging Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Valen, David A; Kudo, Takamasa; Lane, Keara M; Macklin, Derek N; Quach, Nicolas T; DeFelice, Mialy M; Maayan, Inbal; Tanouchi, Yu; Ashley, Euan A; Covert, Markus W

    2016-11-01

    Live-cell imaging has opened an exciting window into the role cellular heterogeneity plays in dynamic, living systems. A major critical challenge for this class of experiments is the problem of image segmentation, or determining which parts of a microscope image correspond to which individual cells. Current approaches require many hours of manual curation and depend on approaches that are difficult to share between labs. They are also unable to robustly segment the cytoplasms of mammalian cells. Here, we show that deep convolutional neural networks, a supervised machine learning method, can solve this challenge for multiple cell types across the domains of life. We demonstrate that this approach can robustly segment fluorescent images of cell nuclei as well as phase images of the cytoplasms of individual bacterial and mammalian cells from phase contrast images without the need for a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker. These networks also enable the simultaneous segmentation and identification of different mammalian cell types grown in co-culture. A quantitative comparison with prior methods demonstrates that convolutional neural networks have improved accuracy and lead to a significant reduction in curation time. We relay our experience in designing and optimizing deep convolutional neural networks for this task and outline several design rules that we found led to robust performance. We conclude that deep convolutional neural networks are an accurate method that require less curation time, are generalizable to a multiplicity of cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, and expand live-cell imaging capabilities to include multi-cell type systems.

  6. Quantitative comparison of PZT and CMUT probes for photoacoustic imaging: Experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maëva Vallet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA signals are short ultrasound (US pulses typically characterized by a single-cycle shape, often referred to as N-shape. The spectral content of such wideband signals ranges from a few hundred kilohertz to several tens of megahertz. Typical reception frequency responses of classical piezoelectric US imaging transducers, based on PZT technology, are not sufficiently broadband to fully preserve the entire information contained in PA signals, which are then filtered, thus limiting PA imaging performance. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT are rapidly emerging as a valid alternative to conventional PZT transducers in several medical ultrasound imaging applications. As compared to PZT transducers, CMUTs exhibit both higher sensitivity and significantly broader frequency response in reception, making their use attractive in PA imaging applications. This paper explores the advantages of the CMUT larger bandwidth in PA imaging by carrying out an experimental comparative study using various CMUT and PZT probes from different research laboratories and manufacturers. PA acquisitions are performed on a suture wire and on several home-made bimodal phantoms with both PZT and CMUT probes. Three criteria, based on the evaluation of pure receive impulse response, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR respectively, have been used for a quantitative comparison of imaging results. The measured fractional bandwidths of the CMUT arrays are larger compared to PZT probes. Moreover, both SNR and CNR are enhanced by at least 6 dB with CMUT technology. This work highlights the potential of CMUT technology for PA imaging through qualitative and quantitative parameters.

  7. Quantitative comparison of PZT and CMUT probes for photoacoustic imaging: Experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Maëva; Varray, François; Boutet, Jérôme; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Caliano, Giosuè; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Vray, Didier

    2017-12-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) signals are short ultrasound (US) pulses typically characterized by a single-cycle shape, often referred to as N-shape. The spectral content of such wideband signals ranges from a few hundred kilohertz to several tens of megahertz. Typical reception frequency responses of classical piezoelectric US imaging transducers, based on PZT technology, are not sufficiently broadband to fully preserve the entire information contained in PA signals, which are then filtered, thus limiting PA imaging performance. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT) are rapidly emerging as a valid alternative to conventional PZT transducers in several medical ultrasound imaging applications. As compared to PZT transducers, CMUTs exhibit both higher sensitivity and significantly broader frequency response in reception, making their use attractive in PA imaging applications. This paper explores the advantages of the CMUT larger bandwidth in PA imaging by carrying out an experimental comparative study using various CMUT and PZT probes from different research laboratories and manufacturers. PA acquisitions are performed on a suture wire and on several home-made bimodal phantoms with both PZT and CMUT probes. Three criteria, based on the evaluation of pure receive impulse response, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) respectively, have been used for a quantitative comparison of imaging results. The measured fractional bandwidths of the CMUT arrays are larger compared to PZT probes. Moreover, both SNR and CNR are enhanced by at least 6 dB with CMUT technology. This work highlights the potential of CMUT technology for PA imaging through qualitative and quantitative parameters.

  8. Quantitative analysis of morphological change in the articular disc of temporomandibular joint on MR image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Chinami; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Imanaka, Masahiro; Yuasa, Masao; Yamamoto, Akira; Otonari, Takamichi

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated morphological changes of the articular disc by measurement of the volume of disc on MR images. This retrospective study investigated 16 joints; 8 showed an unchanged disc configuration and 8 showed a changed configuration during the follow-up period. MR imaging was performed with a 0.3 Tesla MR imager (HITACHI MEDICAL, Tokyo, Japan) using a surface coil measuring 9 cm in diameter. The images were obtained on a corrected sagittal plane in a closed mouth position. Volume measurements of the articular disc were as follows: Two regions of interest were placed over the articular disc. Measurements of the signal intensity were made directly on the MR imager. Maximal and minimal values of signal intensity were calculated from the mean value ±2SD. The maximal value of signal intensity was determined to be higher than the mean value +2SD. Minimal value of signal intensity was determined to be below the value -2SD. The area of the disc was measured directly using level detection software by inputting maximal and minimal signal intensities. Volume was calculated using the area identified on each slice multiplied by 4 mm (slice thickness). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test was used for statistical analysis. Unchanged group showed similar disc volumes on both the initial MR image and follow up MR image. However, the changed group showed some difference in volume between initial MR image and follow-up MR image. This measurement technique has been shown to be a useful technique for quantitative analysis of morphological changes in the articular disc in the temporomandibular joint on MR image. (author)

  9. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the forearm interosseous membrane. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Martin, Juan [Infanta Leonor University Hospital, Trauma and Orthopaedics, Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Madrid (Spain); Pretell-Mazzini, Juan [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pediatric Orthopaedic Fellow, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The interosseous membrane of the forearm is an important structure to consider in cases of elbow and forearm trauma; it can be injured after elbow or forearm fractures, leading to longitudinal forearm instability. Diagnosis of interosseous membrane injuries is challenging, and failure in diagnosis may result in poor clinical outcomes and complications. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have shown to be valuable methods for the evaluation of this important structure. Both techniques have advantages and limitations, and its use should be adapted to each specific clinical scenario. This article presents an up-to-date literature review regarding the use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the forearm interosseous membrane evaluation. (orig.)

  10. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the forearm interosseous membrane. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Martin, Juan; Pretell-Mazzini, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The interosseous membrane of the forearm is an important structure to consider in cases of elbow and forearm trauma; it can be injured after elbow or forearm fractures, leading to longitudinal forearm instability. Diagnosis of interosseous membrane injuries is challenging, and failure in diagnosis may result in poor clinical outcomes and complications. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have shown to be valuable methods for the evaluation of this important structure. Both techniques have advantages and limitations, and its use should be adapted to each specific clinical scenario. This article presents an up-to-date literature review regarding the use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the forearm interosseous membrane evaluation. (orig.)

  11. Live cell linear dichroism imaging reveals extensive membrane ruffling within the docking structure of natural killer cell immune synapses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benninger, Richard K P; Vanherberghen, Bruno; Young, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We have applied fluorescence imaging of two-photon linear dichroism to measure the subresolution organization of the cell membrane during formation of the activating (cytolytic) natural killer (NK) cell immune synapse (IS). This approach revealed that the NK cell plasma membrane is convoluted...... into ruffles at the periphery, but not in the center of a mature cytolytic NK cell IS. Time-lapse imaging showed that the membrane ruffles formed at the initial point of contact between NK cells and target cells and then spread radialy across the intercellular contact as the size of the IS increased, becoming...

  12. Wide-field spectrally resolved quantitative fluorescence imaging system: toward neurosurgical guidance in glioma resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijing; Thom, Maria; Ebner, Michael; Wykes, Victoria; Desjardins, Adrien; Miserocchi, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Vercauteren, Tom

    2017-11-01

    In high-grade glioma surgery, tumor resection is often guided by intraoperative fluorescence imaging. 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) provides fluorescent contrast between normal brain tissue and glioma tissue, thus achieving improved tumor delineation and prolonged patient survival compared with conventional white-light-guided resection. However, commercially available fluorescence imaging systems rely solely on visual assessment of fluorescence patterns by the surgeon, which makes the resection more subjective than necessary. We developed a wide-field spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging system utilizing a Generation II scientific CMOS camera and an improved computational model for the precise reconstruction of the PpIX concentration map. In our model, the tissue's optical properties and illumination geometry, which distort the fluorescent emission spectra, are considered. We demonstrate that the CMOS-based system can detect low PpIX concentration at short camera exposure times, while providing high-pixel resolution wide-field images. We show that total variation regularization improves the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed quantitative concentration map by approximately twofold. Quantitative comparison between the estimated PpIX concentration and tumor histopathology was also investigated to further evaluate the system.

  13. 3D quantitative imaging of the microvasculature with the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Botvinick, Elliott L.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Gough, David A.

    2001-11-01

    There is a growing need for developing 3D quantitative imaging tools that can operate at high speed enabling real-time visualization for the field of biology, material science, and the semiconductor industry. We will present our 3D quantitative imaging system based on a confocal microscope built with a Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD). By using the DMD as a spatial light modulator, confocal transverse surface (x, y) scanning can be performed in parallel at speeds faster than video rate without physical movement of the sample. The DMD allows us to programmably configure the source and the detection pinhole array in the lateral direction to achieve the best signal and to reduce the crosstalk noise. Investigations of the microcirculation were performed on 40 g to 45 g golden Syrian hamsters fit with dorsal skin fold window chambers. FITC-Dextran or Red blood cells from donor hamsters, stained with Celltracker CM-DiI, were injected into the circulation and imaged with the confocal microscope. We will present the measured results for the axial resolution, in vivo, as well as experimental results from imaging the window chamber.

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5-S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3-S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MRI and image quantitation for drug assessment - growth effects of anabolic steroids and precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haiying; Wu, Ed; Vasselli, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    MRI and image quantitation play an expanding role in modern drug research, because MRI offers high resolution and non-invasive ability, and provides excellent soft tissue contrast. Moreover, with development of effective image segmentation and analysis methods, in-vivo and serial tissue growth measurements could be assessed. In the study, MR image acquisition and analysis protocol were established and validated for investigating the effects of anabolic steroids and precursors on muscle growth and body composition in a guinea pig model. Semi-automatic and interactive segmentation methods were developed to accurately label the tissue of interest for tissue volume estimation. In addition, a longitudinal tissue area outlining procedure was proposed for study of tissue geometric features in relation to tissue growth. Finally, a fully automatic data retrieval and analysis scheme was implemented to facilitate the overall huge amount of image quantitation, statistical analysis, as well as study group comparisons. As a result, highly significant differences in muscle and organ growth were detected between intact and castrated guinea pigs using the selected anabolic steroids, indicating the viability of employing such protocol to assess other anabolic steroids. Furthermore, the anabolic potential of selected steroid precursors and their effects on muscle growth, in comparison with that in respective positive control groups of castrated guinea pigs, were evaluated with the proposed protocol.

  16. Membrane lipid domains and rafts: current applications of fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Loura, Luís M S; Prieto, Manuel

    2009-02-01

    Membrane microdomains and their involvement in cellular processes are part of the current paradigm of biomembranes. However, a better characterization of domains, namely lipid rafts, is needed. In this review, it is shown how the use of time-resolved fluorescence, with the adequate parameters and probes, helps elucidating the type, number, fraction, composition and size of lipid phases and domains in multicomponent model systems. The determination of phase diagrams for lipid mixtures containing sphingolipids and/or cholesterol is exemplified. The use of fluorescence quenching and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are also illustrated. Strategies for studying protein-induced domains are presented. The advantages of using single point microscopic decays and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in systems with three-phase coexistence are explained. Finally, the introduction of FLIM allows studies in live cell membranes, and the nature of the microdomains observed is readily elucidated due to the information retrieved from fluorescence lifetimes.

  17. High spatial resolution quantitative MR images: an experimental study of dedicated surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensanne, D; Josse, G; Lagarde, J M; Vincensini, D

    2006-01-01

    Measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T 2 ) by quantitative MR imaging represents a potentially efficient tool to evaluate the physicochemical properties of various media. However, noise in MR images is responsible for uncertainties in the determination of T 2 relaxation times, which limits the accuracy of parametric tissue analysis. The required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the T 2 relaxation behaviour specific to each tissue. Thus, we have previously shown that keeping the uncertainty in T 2 measurements within a limit of 10% implies that SNR values be greater than 100 and 300 for mono- and biexponential T 2 relaxation behaviours, respectively. Noise reduction can be obtained either by increasing the voxel size (i.e., at the expense of spatial resolution) or by using high sensitivity dedicated surface coils (which allows us to increase SNR without deteriorating spatial resolution in an excessive manner). However, surface coil sensitivity is heterogeneous, i.e., it- and hence SNR-decreases with increasing depth, and the more so as the coil radius is smaller. The use of surface coils is therefore limited to the analysis of superficial structure such as the hypodermic tissue analysed here. The aim of this work was to determine the maximum limits of spatial resolution and depth compatible with reliable in vivo T 2 quantitative MR images using dedicated surface coils available on various clinical MR scanners. The average thickness of adipose tissue is around 15 mm, and the results obtained have shown that obtaining reliable biexponential relaxation analysis requires a minimum achievable voxel size of 13 mm 3 for a conventional volume birdcage coil and only of 1.7 mm 3 for the smallest available surface coil (23 mm in diameter). Further improvement in spatial resolution allowing us to detect low details in MR images without deteriorating parametric T 2 images can be obtained by image filtering. By using the non-linear selective blurring filter described in a

  18. In vivo quantitative NMR imaging of fruit tissues during growth using Spoiled Gradient Echo sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenouche, S.; Perrier, M.; Bertin, N.

    2014-01-01

    the intrinsic parameters maps M 0 and T 1 of the fruit tissues. Water transport and paths flow were monitored using Gd 3+/[Fe(CN)6]3-/D - mannitol nanoparticles as a tracer. This dynamic study was carried out using a compartmental modeling. The CA was preferentially accumulated in the surrounding tissues...... of this study was to design a robust and accurate quantitative measurement method based on NMR imaging combined with contrast agent (CA) for mapping and quantifying water transport in growing cherry tomato fruits. A multiple flip-angle Spoiled Gradient Echo (SGE) imaging sequence was used to evaluate...... of columella and in the seed envelopes. The total quantities and the average volume flow of water estimated are: 198 mg, 1.76 mm 3/h for the columella and 326 mg, 2.91 mm 3/h for the seed envelopes. We demonstrate in this paper that the NMR imaging technique coupled with efficient and biocompatible CA...

  19. Real-time and quantitative isotropic spatial resolution susceptibility imaging for magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Shiqiang; Liu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic transparency of biological tissue allows the magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) to be a promising functional sensor and contrast agent. The complex susceptibility of MNPs, strongly influenced by particle concentration, excitation magnetic field and their surrounding microenvironment, provides significant implications for biomedical applications. Therefore, magnetic susceptibility imaging of high spatial resolution will give more detailed information during the process of MNP-aided diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we present a novel spatial magnetic susceptibility extraction method for MNPs under a gradient magnetic field, a low-frequency drive magnetic field, and a weak strength high-frequency magnetic field. Based on this novel method, a magnetic particle susceptibility imaging (MPSI) of millimeter-level spatial resolution (<3 mm) was achieved using our homemade imaging system. Corroborated by the experimental results, the MPSI shows real-time (1 s per frame acquisition) and quantitative abilities, and isotropic high resolution.

  20. A combined post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histological study of multiple sclerosis pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasinski, James; Chance, Steven A.; DeLuca, Gabriele C.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Chang, Eun-Hyuk; Palace, Jacqueline A.; McNab, Jennifer A.; Jenkinson, Mark; Miller, Karla L.; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory neurological condition characterized by focal and diffuse neurodegeneration and demyelination throughout the central nervous system. Factors influencing the progression of pathology are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that anatomical connectivity influences the spread of neurodegeneration. This predicts that measures of neurodegeneration will correlate most strongly between interconnected structures. However, such patterns have been difficult to quantify through post-mortem neuropathology or in vivo scanning alone. In this study, we used the complementary approaches of whole brain post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histology to assess patterns of multiple sclerosis pathology. Two thalamo-cortical projection systems were considered based on their distinct neuroanatomy and their documented involvement in multiple sclerosis: lateral geniculate nucleus to primary visual cortex and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to prefrontal cortex. Within the anatomically distinct thalamo-cortical projection systems, magnetic resonance imaging derived cortical thickness was correlated significantly with both a measure of myelination in the connected tract and a measure of connected thalamic nucleus cell density. Such correlations did not exist between these markers of neurodegeneration across different thalamo-cortical systems. Magnetic resonance imaging lesion analysis depicted clearly demarcated subcortical lesions impinging on the white matter tracts of interest; however, quantitation of the extent of lesion-tract overlap failed to demonstrate any appreciable association with the severity of markers of diffuse pathology within each thalamo-cortical projection system. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging metrics in both white matter tracts were correlated significantly with a histologically derived measure of tract myelination. These data demonstrate for the first time the relevance of functional

  1. Bright-field quantitative phase microscopy (BFQPM) for accurate phase imaging using conventional microscopy hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Micah; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    2015-03-01

    Most quantitative phase microscopy methods require the use of custom-built or modified microscopic configurations which are not typically available to most bio/pathologists. There are, however, phase retrieval algorithms which utilize defocused bright-field images as input data and are therefore implementable in existing laboratory environments. Among these, deterministic methods such as those based on inverting the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) or a phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) are particularly attractive due to their compatibility with Köhler illuminated systems and numerical simplicity. Recently, a new method has been proposed, called multi-filter phase imaging with partially coherent light (MFPI-PC), which alleviates the inherent noise/resolution trade-off in solving the TIE by utilizing a large number of defocused bright-field images spaced equally about the focal plane. Despite greatly improving the state-ofthe- art, the method has many shortcomings including the impracticality of high-speed acquisition, inefficient sampling, and attenuated response at high frequencies due to aperture effects. In this report, we present a new method, called bright-field quantitative phase microscopy (BFQPM), which efficiently utilizes a small number of defocused bright-field images and recovers frequencies out to the partially coherent diffraction limit. The method is based on a noiseminimized inversion of a PCTF derived for each finite defocus distance. We present simulation results which indicate nanoscale optical path length sensitivity and improved performance over MFPI-PC. We also provide experimental results imaging live bovine mesenchymal stem cells at sub-second temporal resolution. In all, BFQPM enables fast and accurate phase imaging with unprecedented spatial resolution using widely available bright-field microscopy hardware.

  2. Otitis Media Diagnosis for Developing Countries Using Tympanic Membrane Image-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Hermanus C; van Zijl, Willemien H; Swanepoel, DeWet; Hellström, Sten; Laurent, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Otitis media is one of the most common childhood diseases worldwide, but because of lack of doctors and health personnel in developing countries it is often misdiagnosed or not diagnosed at all. This may lead to serious, and life-threatening complications. There is, thus a need for an automated computer based image-analyzing system that could assist in making accurate otitis media diagnoses anywhere. A method for automated diagnosis of otitis media is proposed. The method uses image-processing techniques to classify otitis media. The system is trained using high quality pre-assessed images of tympanic membranes, captured by digital video-otoscopes, and classifies undiagnosed images into five otitis media categories based on predefined signs. Several verification tests analyzed the classification capability of the method. An accuracy of 80.6% was achieved for images taken with commercial video-otoscopes, while an accuracy of 78.7% was achieved for images captured on-site with a low cost custom-made video-otoscope. The high accuracy of the proposed otitis media classification system compares well with the classification accuracy of general practitioners and pediatricians (~64% to 80%) using traditional otoscopes, and therefore holds promise for the future in making automated diagnosis of otitis media in medically underserved populations.

  3. Quantitative depth resolved microcirculation imaging with optical coherence tomography angiography (Part ΙΙ): Microvascular network imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wanrong

    2017-04-17

    In this work, we review the main phenomena that have been explored in OCT angiography to image the vessels of the microcirculation within living tissues with the emphasis on how the different processing algorithms were derived to circumvent specific limitations. Parameters are then discussed that can quantitatively describe the depth-resolved microvascular network for possible clinic diagnosis applications. Finally,future directions in continuing OCT development are discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR  perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR ≈ 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29  ±  0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42  ±  0.01 (p  CT.

  5. Target-to-background enhancement in multispectral endoscopy with background autofluorescence mitigation for quantitative molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian W.; Girard, Emily J.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence molecular imaging with exogenous probes improves specificity for the detection of diseased tissues by targeting unambiguous molecular signatures. Additionally, increased diagnostic sensitivity is expected with the application of multiple molecular probes. We developed a real-time multispectral fluorescence-reflectance scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) for wide-field molecular imaging of fluorescent dye-labeled molecular probes at nanomolar detection levels. Concurrent multichannel imaging with the wide-field SFE also allows for real-time mitigation of the background autofluorescence (AF) signal, especially when fluorescein, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved dye, is used as the target fluorophore. Quantitative tissue AF was measured for the ex vivo porcine esophagus and murine brain tissues across the visible and near-infrared spectra. AF signals were then transferred to the unit of targeted fluorophore concentration to evaluate the SFE detection sensitivity for sodium fluorescein and cyanine. Next, we demonstrated a real-time AF mitigation algorithm on a tissue phantom, which featured molecular probe targeted cells of high-grade dysplasia on a substrate containing AF species. The target-to-background ratio was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when applying the real-time AF mitigation algorithm. Furthermore, a quantitative estimate of the fluorescein photodegradation (photobleaching) rate was evaluated and shown to be insignificant under the illumination conditions of SFE. In summary, the multichannel laser-based flexible SFE has demonstrated the capability to provide sufficient detection sensitivity, image contrast, and quantitative target intensity information for detecting small precancerous lesions in vivo. PMID:25027002

  6. Quantitative assessment of murine articular cartilage and bone using X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Murine models for rheumatoid arthritis (RA research can provide important insights for understanding RA pathogenesis and evaluating the efficacy of novel treatments. However, simultaneously imaging both murine articular cartilage and subchondral bone using conventional techniques is challenging because of low spatial resolution and poor soft tissue contrast. X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI is a new technique that offers high spatial resolution for the visualisation of cartilage and skeletal tissues. The purpose of this study was to utilise XPCI to observe articular cartilage and subchondral bone in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA murine model and quantitatively assess changes in the joint microstructure. XPCI was performed on the two treatment groups (the control group and CIA group, n = 9 per group to monitor the progression of damage to the femur from the knee joint in a longitudinal study (at 0, 4 and 8 weeks after primary injection. For quantitative assessment, morphologic parameters were measured in three-dimensional (3D images using appropriate image analysis software. Our results showed that the average femoral cartilage volume, surface area and thickness were significantly decreased (P<0.05 in the CIA group compared to the control group. Meanwhile, these decreases were accompanied by obvious destruction of the surface of subchondral bone and a loss of trabecular bone in the CIA group. This study confirms that XPCI technology has the ability to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate microstructural changes in mouse joints. This technique has the potential to become a routine analysis method for accurately monitoring joint damage and comprehensively assessing treatment efficacy.

  7. Quantitative imaging of glutathione in live cells using a reversible reaction-based ratiometric fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiqian; Yu, Yong; Chen, Jianwei; Zhao, Mingkun; Chen, Hui; Song, Xianzhou; Matzuk, Alexander J; Carroll, Shaina L; Tan, Xiao; Sizovs, Antons; Cheng, Ninghui; Wang, Meng C; Wang, Jin

    2015-03-20

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining redox homeostasis inside cells. Currently, there are no methods available to quantitatively assess the GSH concentration in live cells. Live cell fluorescence imaging revolutionized the field of cell biology and has become an indispensable tool in current biological studies. In order to minimize the disturbance to the biological system in live cell imaging, the probe concentration needs to be significantly lower than the analyte concentration. Because of this, any irreversible reaction-based GSH probe can only provide qualitative results within a short reaction time and will exhibit maximum response regardless of the GSH concentration if the reaction is completed. A reversible reaction-based probe with an appropriate equilibrium constant allows measurement of an analyte at much higher concentrations and, thus, is a prerequisite for GSH quantification inside cells. In this contribution, we report the first fluorescent probe-ThiolQuant Green (TQ Green)-for quantitative imaging of GSH in live cells. Due to the reversible nature of the reaction between the probe and GSH, we are able to quantify mM concentrations of GSH with TQ Green concentrations as low as 20 nM. Furthermore, the GSH concentrations measured using TQ Green in 3T3-L1, HeLa, HepG2, PANC-1, and PANC-28 cells are reproducible and well correlated with the values obtained from cell lysates. TQ Green imaging can also resolve the changes in GSH concentration in PANC-1 cells upon diethylmaleate (DEM) treatment. In addition, TQ Green can be conveniently applied in fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to measure GSH level changes. Through this study, we not only demonstrate the importance of reaction reversibility in designing quantitative reaction-based fluorescent probes but also provide a practical tool to facilitate redox biology studies.

  8. Quantitative Image Feature Engine (QIFE): an Open-Source, Modular Engine for 3D Quantitative Feature Extraction from Volumetric Medical Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegaray, Sebastian; Bakr, Shaimaa; Rubin, Daniel L; Napel, Sandy

    2017-10-06

    The aim of this study was to develop an open-source, modular, locally run or server-based system for 3D radiomics feature computation that can be used on any computer system and included in existing workflows for understanding associations and building predictive models between image features and clinical data, such as survival. The QIFE exploits various levels of parallelization for use on multiprocessor systems. It consists of a managing framework and four stages: input, pre-processing, feature computation, and output. Each stage contains one or more swappable components, allowing run-time customization. We benchmarked the engine using various levels of parallelization on a cohort of CT scans presenting 108 lung tumors. Two versions of the QIFE have been released: (1) the open-source MATLAB code posted to Github, (2) a compiled version loaded in a Docker container, posted to DockerHub, which can be easily deployed on any computer. The QIFE processed 108 objects (tumors) in 2:12 (h/mm) using 1 core, and 1:04 (h/mm) hours using four cores with object-level parallelization. We developed the Quantitative Image Feature Engine (QIFE), an open-source feature-extraction framework that focuses on modularity, standards, parallelism, provenance, and integration. Researchers can easily integrate it with their existing segmentation and imaging workflows by creating input and output components that implement their existing interfaces. Computational efficiency can be improved by parallelizing execution at the cost of memory usage. Different parallelization levels provide different trade-offs, and the optimal setting will depend on the size and composition of the dataset to be processed.

  9. Quantitative diagnosis of bladder cancer by morphometric analysis of HE images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Nebylitsa, Samantha V.; Mukherjee, Sushmita; Jain, Manu

    2015-02-01

    In clinical practice, histopathological analysis of biopsied tissue is the main method for bladder cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The diagnosis is performed by a pathologist based on the morphological features in the image of a hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained tissue sample. This manuscript proposes algorithms to perform morphometric analysis on the HE images, quantify the features in the images, and discriminate bladder cancers with different grades, i.e. high grade and low grade. The nuclei are separated from the background and other types of cells such as red blood cells (RBCs) and immune cells using manual outlining, color deconvolution and image segmentation. A mask of nuclei is generated for each image for quantitative morphometric analysis. The features of the nuclei in the mask image including size, shape, orientation, and their spatial distributions are measured. To quantify local clustering and alignment of nuclei, we propose a 1-nearest-neighbor (1-NN) algorithm which measures nearest neighbor distance and nearest neighbor parallelism. The global distributions of the features are measured using statistics of the proposed parameters. A linear support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is used to classify the high grade and low grade bladder cancers. The results show using a particular group of nuclei such as large ones, and combining multiple parameters can achieve better discrimination. This study shows the proposed approach can potentially help expedite pathological diagnosis by triaging potentially suspicious biopsies.

  10. Quantitation of PET signal as an adjunct to visual interpretation of florbetapir imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontecorvo, Michael J.; Arora, Anupa K.; Devine, Marybeth; Lu, Ming; Galante, Nick; Siderowf, Andrew; Devadanam, Catherine; Joshi, Abhinay D.; Heun, Stephen L.; Teske, Brian F.; Truocchio, Stephen P.; Krautkramer, Michael; Devous, Michael D.; Mintun, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using quantitation to augment interpretation of florbetapir PET amyloid imaging. A total of 80 physician readers were trained on quantitation of florbetapir PET images and the principles for using quantitation to augment a visual read. On day 1, the readers completed a visual read of 96 scans (46 autopsy-verified and 50 from patients seeking a diagnosis). On day 2, 69 of the readers reinterpreted the 96 scans augmenting their interpretation with quantitation (VisQ method) using one of three commercial software packages. A subset of 11 readers reinterpreted all scans on day 2 based on a visual read only (VisVis control). For the autopsy-verified scans, the neuropathologist's modified CERAD plaque score was used as the truth standard for interpretation accuracy. Because an autopsy truth standard was not available for scans from patients seeking a diagnosis, the majority VisQ interpretation of the three readers with the best accuracy in interpreting autopsy-verified scans was used as the reference standard. Day 1 visual read accuracy was high for both the autopsy-verified scans (90%) and the scans from patients seeking a diagnosis (87.3%). Accuracy improved from the visual read to the VisQ read (from 90.1% to 93.1%, p < 0.0001). Importantly, access to quantitative information did not decrease interpretation accuracy of the above-average readers (>90% on day 1). Accuracy in interpreting the autopsy-verified scans also increased from the first to the second visual read (VisVis group). However, agreement with the reference standard (best readers) for scans from patients seeking a diagnosis did not improve with a second visual read, and in this cohort the VisQ group was significantly improved relative to the VisVis group (change 5.4% vs. -1.1%, p < 0.0001). These results indicate that augmentation of visual interpretation of florbetapir PET amyloid images with quantitative information obtained using commercially available

  11. Quantitation of PET signal as an adjunct to visual interpretation of florbetapir imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontecorvo, Michael J.; Arora, Anupa K.; Devine, Marybeth; Lu, Ming; Galante, Nick; Siderowf, Andrew; Devadanam, Catherine; Joshi, Abhinay D.; Heun, Stephen L.; Teske, Brian F.; Truocchio, Stephen P.; Krautkramer, Michael; Devous, Michael D.; Mintun, Mark A. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals (a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly and Company), Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    This study examined the feasibility of using quantitation to augment interpretation of florbetapir PET amyloid imaging. A total of 80 physician readers were trained on quantitation of florbetapir PET images and the principles for using quantitation to augment a visual read. On day 1, the readers completed a visual read of 96 scans (46 autopsy-verified and 50 from patients seeking a diagnosis). On day 2, 69 of the readers reinterpreted the 96 scans augmenting their interpretation with quantitation (VisQ method) using one of three commercial software packages. A subset of 11 readers reinterpreted all scans on day 2 based on a visual read only (VisVis control). For the autopsy-verified scans, the neuropathologist's modified CERAD plaque score was used as the truth standard for interpretation accuracy. Because an autopsy truth standard was not available for scans from patients seeking a diagnosis, the majority VisQ interpretation of the three readers with the best accuracy in interpreting autopsy-verified scans was used as the reference standard. Day 1 visual read accuracy was high for both the autopsy-verified scans (90%) and the scans from patients seeking a diagnosis (87.3%). Accuracy improved from the visual read to the VisQ read (from 90.1% to 93.1%, p < 0.0001). Importantly, access to quantitative information did not decrease interpretation accuracy of the above-average readers (>90% on day 1). Accuracy in interpreting the autopsy-verified scans also increased from the first to the second visual read (VisVis group). However, agreement with the reference standard (best readers) for scans from patients seeking a diagnosis did not improve with a second visual read, and in this cohort the VisQ group was significantly improved relative to the VisVis group (change 5.4% vs. -1.1%, p < 0.0001). These results indicate that augmentation of visual interpretation of florbetapir PET amyloid images with quantitative information obtained using commercially available

  12. Evaluating the Microcirculation of Normal Extraocular Muscles Using Quantitative Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Huo, Lei; Wang, Penghui; Huang, Lixiang; Chai, Chao; Sun, Fengyuan; Xia, Shuang; Shen, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the microcirculation of normal extraocular muscles using quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (DCE-MRI). The institutional review board approved the study. Forty-eight eyes were examined using quantitative DCE-MRI on a 3-T MRI system. Quantitative parameters, including the volume transfer constant (Ktrans), the fractional volume of extravascular extracellular space (Ve), and the rate constant (Kep) of each extraocular muscles, were analyzed. The type of DEC time-intensity curve (TIC) was evaluated. The parameters of bilateral extraocular muscles were compared using the Wilcoxon test. The difference in quantitative values of different extraocular muscles was compared using independent-samples Kruskal-Wallis test. No statistical differences of parameters were found between the left and right extraocular muscles (P > 0.05). Volume transfer constant values in medial rectus (MR) muscles and inferior rectus (IR) muscles were significantly higher than those in the lateral rectus (LR) muscles and superior rectus (SR) muscles (P difference was not significant (P > 0.05). In the 4 extraocular muscles, the Ve values of MR are the largest, followed by the IR, LR, and SR values. The DCE time-intensity curves of extraocular muscles are type II or type III. Medial rectus and IR are mainly type III, and LR and SR are mainly type II. The quantitative DCE-MRI can be used as an important and noninvasive technique to evaluate the microcirculation of extraocular muscles. Further investigations for other extraocular muscles diseases by using quantitative DCE-MRI are warranted.

  13. Quantitative imaging of green fluorescent protein in cultured cells: comparison of microscopic techniques, use in fusion proteins and detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niswender, K D; Blackman, S M; Rohde, L; Magnuson, M A; Piston, D W

    1995-11-01

    To determine the application limits of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene or protein tag, we expressed GFP by itself and with fusion protein partners, and used three different imaging methods to identify GFP fluorescence. In conventional epifluorescence photomicroscopy, GFP expressed in cells could be distinguished as a bright green signal over a yellow-green autofluorescence background. In quantitative fluorescence microscopy, however, the GFP signal is contaminated by cellular autofluorescence. Improved separation of GFP signal from HeLa cell autofluorescence was achieved by the combination of confocal scanning laser microscopy using 488-nm excitation, a rapid cut-on dichroic mirror and a narrow-bandpass emission filter. Two-photon excitation of GFP fluorescence at the equivalent of approximately 390 nm provided better absorption than did 488-nm excitation. This resulted in increased signal/background but also generated a different autofluorescence pattern and appeared to increase GFP photobleaching. Fluorescence spectra similar to those of GFP alone were observed when GFP was expressed as a fusion protein either with glutathione-S-transferase (GST) or with glucokinase. Furthermore, purified GST.GFP fusion protein displayed an extinction coefficient and quantum yield consistent with values previously reported for GFP alone. In HeLa cells, the cytoplasmic GFP concentration must be greater than approximately 1 microM to allow quantifiable discrimination over autofluorescence. However, lower expression levels may be detectable if GFP is targeted to discrete subcellular compartments, such as the plasma membrane, organelles or nucleus.

  14. Image Quality on Dual-energy CTPA Virtual Monoenergetic Images: Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Bari; Patel, Hersh; O'Donnell, Thomas; Girvin, Francis; Brusca-Augello, Geraldine; Alpert, Jeffrey B; Niu, Bowen; Attia, Mariam; Babb, James; Ko, Jane P

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to determine the optimal photon energy for image quality of the pulmonary arteries (PAs) on dual-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiography (CTPA) utilizing low volumes of iodinated contrast. The study received institutional review board exemption and was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant. Adults (n = 56) who underwent dual-energy CTPA with 50-60 cc of iodinated contrast on a third-generation dual-source multidetector CT were retrospectively and consecutively identified. Twelve virtual monoenergetic kiloelectron volt (keV) image data sets (40-150 keV, 10-keV increments) were generated with a second-generation noise-reducing algorithm. Standard regions of interest were placed on main, right, left, and right interlobar pulmonary arteries; pectoralis muscle; and extrathoracic air. Attenuation [mean CT number (Hounsfield unit, HU)], noise [standard deviation (HU)], signal to noise (SNR), and contrast to noise ratio were evaluated. Three blinded chest radiologists rated (from 1 to 5, with 5 being the best) randomized monoenergetic and weighted-average images for attenuation and noise. P <.05 was considered significant. Region of interest mean CT number increased as keV decreased, with 40 keV having the highest value (P < .001). Mean SNR was highest for 40-60 keV (P <.05) (14.5-14.7) and was higher (P <.05) than all remaining energies (90-150 keV) for all vessel regions combined. Contrast to noise ratio was highest for 40 keV (P <.001) and decreased as keV increased. SNR was highest at 60 and 70 keV, only slightly higher than 40-50 keV (P <.05). Reader scores for 40-50 keV were greater than other energies and weighted-average images (P <.05). Kiloelectron volt images of 40-50 keV from the second-generation algorithm optimize attenuation on dual-energy CTPA and can potentially aid in interpretation and avoiding nondiagnostic examinations. Copyright © 2017 The Association of

  15. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rafay Ahmed,1 Matthew J Oborski,2 Misun Hwang,1 Frank S Lieberman,3 James M Mountz11Department of Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology and Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies

  16. Assessing agreement between preclinical magnetic resonance imaging and histology: An evaluation of their image qualities and quantitative results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Elschner

    Full Text Available One consequence of demographic change is the increasing demand for biocompatible materials for use in implants and prostheses. This is accompanied by a growing number of experimental animals because the interactions between new biomaterials and its host tissue have to be investigated. To evaluate novel materials and engineered tissues the use of non-destructive imaging modalities have been identified as a strategic priority. This provides the opportunity for studying interactions repeatedly with individual animals, along with the advantages of reduced biological variability and decreased number of laboratory animals. However, histological techniques are still the golden standard in preclinical biomaterial research. The present article demonstrates a detailed method comparison between histology and magnetic resonance imaging. This includes the presentation of their image qualities as well as the detailed statistical analysis for assessing agreement between quantitative measures. Exemplarily, the bony ingrowth of tissue engineered bone substitutes for treatment of a cleft-like maxillary bone defect has been evaluated. By using a graphical concordance analysis the mean difference between MRI results and histomorphometrical measures has been examined. The analysis revealed a slightly but significant bias in the case of the bone volume [Formula: see text] and a clearly significant deviation for the remaining defect width [Formula: see text] But the study although showed a considerable effect of the analyzed section position to the quantitative result. It could be proven, that the bias of the data sets was less originated due to the imaging modalities, but mainly on the evaluation of different slice positions. The article demonstrated that method comparisons not always need the use of an independent animal study, additionally.

  17. Assessing agreement between preclinical magnetic resonance imaging and histology: An evaluation of their image qualities and quantitative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschner, Cindy; Korn, Paula; Hauptstock, Maria; Schulz, Matthias C; Range, Ursula; Jünger, Diana; Scheler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    One consequence of demographic change is the increasing demand for biocompatible materials for use in implants and prostheses. This is accompanied by a growing number of experimental animals because the interactions between new biomaterials and its host tissue have to be investigated. To evaluate novel materials and engineered tissues the use of non-destructive imaging modalities have been identified as a strategic priority. This provides the opportunity for studying interactions repeatedly with individual animals, along with the advantages of reduced biological variability and decreased number of laboratory animals. However, histological techniques are still the golden standard in preclinical biomaterial research. The present article demonstrates a detailed method comparison between histology and magnetic resonance imaging. This includes the presentation of their image qualities as well as the detailed statistical analysis for assessing agreement between quantitative measures. Exemplarily, the bony ingrowth of tissue engineered bone substitutes for treatment of a cleft-like maxillary bone defect has been evaluated. By using a graphical concordance analysis the mean difference between MRI results and histomorphometrical measures has been examined. The analysis revealed a slightly but significant bias in the case of the bone volume [Formula: see text] and a clearly significant deviation for the remaining defect width [Formula: see text] But the study although showed a considerable effect of the analyzed section position to the quantitative result. It could be proven, that the bias of the data sets was less originated due to the imaging modalities, but mainly on the evaluation of different slice positions. The article demonstrated that method comparisons not always need the use of an independent animal study, additionally.

  18. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannequin, Pascal Paul

    2015-06-07

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images.Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable.The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  19. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  20. Quantitative functional lung imaging with synchrotron radiation using inhaled xenon as contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, S; Le Duc, G; Porra, L; Berruyer, G; Nemoz, C; Monfraix, S; Fiedler, S; Thomlinson, W; Suortti, P; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, C G; Sovijärvi, A R

    2001-12-01

    Small airways play a key role in the distribution of ventilation and in the matching of ventilation to perfusion. The purpose of this study was to introduce an imaging method that allows measurement of regional lung ventilation and evaluation of the function of airways with a small diameter. The experiments were performed at the Medical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation beams were used to obtain quantitative respiration-gated images of lungs and airways in two anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated rabbits using inhaled stable xenon (Xe) gas as a contrast agent. Two simultaneous images were acquired at two different energies, above and below the K-edge of Xe. Logarithmic subtraction of the two images yields absolute Xe concentrations. This technique is known as K-edge subtraction (KES) radiography. Two-dimensional planar and CT images were obtained showing spatial distribution of Xe concentrations within the airspaces, as well as the dynamics of filling with Xe. Bronchi down to 1 mm in diameter were visible both in the subtraction radiographs and in tomographic images. Absolute concentrations of Xe gas were calculated within the tube carrying the inhaled gas mixture, small and large bronchi, and lung tissue. Local time constants of ventilation with Xe were obtained by following the evolution of gas concentration in sequential computed tomography images. The results of this first animal study indicate that KES imaging of lungs with Xe gas as a contrast agent has great potential in studies of the distribution of ventilation within the lungs and of airway function, including airways with a small diameter.

  1. Experimental study on quantitative evaluation of film-based digital imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Heang Hee; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Denkook University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    A digital imaging system using Machintosh II ci computer, high resolution Sony XC-77 CCD camera, Quick capture Frame Grabber Board was evaluated for quantitative analysis of standardized periapical film with aluminum step wedge. The results were as follows: 1. Correlation between Al thickness and gray level was high-positively associated (r{sup 2}=0.99, p<0.001). 2. Correlation between measured weight of experimental lesion and estimated relative lesion volume by digital subtracted radiography was also high-positively associated(r{sup 2}=0.98<0.001). 3. As exposure time was increased, mean gray level was decreased (p<0.01). and when the exposure time was shorter than 0.2 second, the value of r{sup 2} was relatively low. On the basis of the above results, it is considered that this digital imaging system using a Macintosh II ci computer and a high resolution CCD monochrome camera will be useful evaluating digitalized image from standardized periapical film quantitatively.

  2. Studying the relationship between redox and cell growth using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Leslie, Matthew T.; Bapst, Natalya; Smith, John; Gaskins, H. Rex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging has been used in the past to study the dry mass of cells and study cell growth under various treatment conditions. However, the relationship between cellular redox and growth rates has not yet been studied in this context. This study employed the recombinant Glrx-roGFP2 redox biosensor targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or cytosolic compartments of A549 lung epithelial carcinoma cells. The Glrx-roGFP2s biosensor consists of a modified GFP protein containing internal cysteine residues sensitive to the local redox environment. The formation/dissolution of sulfide bridges contorts the internal chromophore, dictating corresponding changes in florescence emission that provide direct measures of the local redox potential. Combining 2-channel florescent imaging of the redox sensor with quantitative phase imaging allowed observation of redox homeostasis alongside measurements of cellular mass during full cycles of cellular division. The results indicate that mitochondrial redox showed a stronger inverse correlation with cell growth than cytoplasmic redox states; although redox changes are restricted to a 5% range. We are now studying the relationship between mitochondrial redox and cell growth in an isogenic series of breast cell lines built upon the MCF-10A genetic background that vary both in malignancy and metastatic potential.

  3. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  4. Contribute to quantitative identification of casting defects based on computer analysis of X-ray images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ignaszak

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The forecast of structure and properties of casting is based on results of computer simulation of physical processes which are carried out during the casting processes. For the effective using of simulation system it is necessary to validate mathematica-physical models describing process of casting formation and the creation of local discontinues, witch determinate the casting properties.In the paper the proposition for quantitative validation of VP system using solidification casting defects by information sources of II group (methods of NDT was introduced. It was named the VP/RT validation (virtual prototyping/radiographic testing validation. Nowadays identification of casting defects noticeable on X-ray images bases on comparison of X-ray image of casting with relates to the ASTM. The results of this comparison are often not conclusive because based on operator’s subjective assessment. In the paper the system of quantitative identification of iron casting defects on X-ray images and classification this defects to ASTM class is presented. The methods of pattern recognition and machine learning were applied.

  5. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers: A Review of Statistical Methods for Computer Algorithm Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative biomarkers from medical images are becoming important tools for clinical diagnosis, staging, monitoring, treatment planning, and development of new therapies. While there is a rich history of the development of quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) techniques, little attention has been paid to the validation and comparison of the computer algorithms that implement the QIB measurements. In this paper we provide a framework for QIB algorithm comparisons. We first review and compare various study designs, including designs with the true value (e.g. phantoms, digital reference images, and zero-change studies), designs with a reference standard (e.g. studies testing equivalence with a reference standard), and designs without a reference standard (e.g. agreement studies and studies of algorithm precision). The statistical methods for comparing QIB algorithms are then presented for various study types using both aggregate and disaggregate approaches. We propose a series of steps for establishing the performance of a QIB algorithm, identify limitations in the current statistical literature, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:24919829

  6. PET phantom design for assessment of quantitative imaging of arbitrary planar distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, P.J.; Angelis, G.I.; Kotasidis, F.; Matthews, J.C. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences; Lionheart, W.R. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Mathematics; Reader, A.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada). Brain Imaging Centre

    2011-07-01

    A specially designed phantom enabling development and evaluation of reconstruction methods and system models for the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) is here presented. The design of the phantom permits for planar sources of any spatial radioactivity distribution to be imaged in transaxial and axial (sagittal/coronal) planes. The planar sources are created by feeding A4 paper sheets into an ink-jet printer with a modified cartridge containing ink mixed with a given radioisotope (usually 18F). Phosphor imaging plates (IP) are used with computed radiography (CR) to assess the quality of the printing and also to provide a gold standard with which the reconstructed HRRT data can be compared. For further quantitative testing and analysis a number of equally-sized samples are cut out from the planar sources and measured in a well counter. Using such a custombuild phantom not only avoids the scatter correction problem (scatter is then negligible) but may also enable development of more complex models, methods or reconstruction techniques which are of critical importance in high resolution iterative image reconstruction. Presented results demonstrate good quantitative agreement between the HRRT, CR and well counter. (orig.)

  7. Quantitative images of metals in plant tissues measured by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.S.; Dietrich, R.C.; Matusch, A.; Pozebon, D.; Dressler, V.L.

    2008-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for quantitative imaging of toxic and essential elements in thin sections (thickness of 30 or 40 μm) of tobacco plant tissues. Two-dimensional images of Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Rh, Pt and Pb in leaves, shoots and roots of tobacco were produced. Sections of the plant tissues (fixed onto glass slides) were scanned by a focused beam of a Nd:YAG laser in a laser ablation chamber. The ablated material was transported with argon as carrier gas to the ICP ion source at a quadrupole ICP-MS instrument. Ion intensities of the investigated elements were measured together with 13 C + , 33 S + and 34 S + within the entire plant tissue section. Matrix matching standards (prepared using powder of dried tobacco leaves) were used to constitute calibration curves, whereas the regression coefficient of the attained calibration curves was typically 0.99. The variability of LA-ICP-MS process, sample heterogeneity and water content in the sample were corrected by using 13 C + as internal standard. Quantitative imaging of the selected elements revealed their inhomogeneous distribution in leaves, shoots and roots

  8. Quantitative determination of sibutramine in adulterated herbal slimming formulations by TLC-image analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phattanawasin, Panadda; Sotanaphun, Uthai; Sukwattanasinit, Tasamaporn; Akkarawaranthorn, Jariya; Kitchaiya, Sarunyaporn

    2012-06-10

    A simple thin layer chromatographic (TLC)-image analysis method was developed for rapid determination and quantitation of sibutramine hydrochloride (SH) adulterated in herbal slimming products. Chromatographic separation of SH was achieved on a silica gel 60 F(254) TLC plate, using toluene-n-hexane-diethylamine (9:1:0.3, v/v/v) as the mobile phase and Dragendorff reagent as spot detection. Image analysis of the scanned TLC plate was performed to quantify the amount of SH. The polynomial regression data for the calibration plots showed good linear relationship in the concentration range of 1-6 μg/spot. The limits of detection and quantitation were 190 and 634 ng/spot, respectively. The method gave satisfactory specificity, precision, accuracy, robustness and was applied for determination of SH in herbal formulations. The contents of SH in adulterated samples determined by the TLC-image analysis and TLC-densitometry were also compared. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optical properties of acute kidney injury measured by quantitative phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Sungbea; Min, Eunjung; Baek, Songyee; Kwon, Hyug Moo; Popescu, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute kidney disease (AKI) has been examined mainly by histology, immunohistochemistry and western blot. Though these approaches are widely accepted in the field, it has an inherent limitation due to the lack of high-throughput and quantitative information. For a better understanding of prognosis in AKI, we present a new approach using quantitative phase imaging combined with a wide-field scanning platform. Through the phase-delay information from the tissue, we were able to predict a stage of AKI based on various optical properties such as light scattering coefficient and anisotropy. These optical parameters quantify the deterioration process of the AKI model of tissue. Our device would be a very useful tool when it is required to deliver fast feedback of tissue pathology or when diseases are related to mechanical properties such as fibrosis. PMID:29541494

  10. The relationship of the round window membrane to the cochlear aqueduct shown in three-dimensional imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R; Segenhout, JM; Albers, FWJ; Wit, HP

    2005-01-01

    The round window membrane and cochlear aqueduct complex in the guinea pig are reconstructed with 3D-imaging, using orthogonal plane fluorescence optical sectioning (OPFOS). The 3D-images show that the periotic duct and the aqueduct are connected to a pouch-like extension of the round window. The

  11. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer's Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Su

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network (DIAN, an autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted.

  12. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging in Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the DIAN Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wang, Qing; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Cash, Lisa A.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Klunk, William E.; Galasko, Douglas; Brickman, Adam M.; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M.; Thompson, Paul M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Schofield, Peter R.; Masters, Colin L.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Fox, Nick C.; Förster, Stefan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Marcus, Daniel S.; Weiner, Michael W.; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid imaging plays an important role in the research and diagnosis of dementing disorders. Substantial variation in quantitative methods to measure brain amyloid burden exists in the field. The aim of this work is to investigate the impact of methodological variations to the quantification of amyloid burden using data from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN), an autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population. Cross-sectional and longitudinal [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) PET imaging data from the DIAN study were analyzed. Four candidate reference regions were investigated for estimation of brain amyloid burden. A regional spread function based technique was also investigated for the correction of partial volume effects. Cerebellar cortex, brain-stem, and white matter regions all had stable tracer retention during the course of disease. Partial volume correction consistently improves sensitivity to group differences and longitudinal changes over time. White matter referencing improved statistical power in the detecting longitudinal changes in relative tracer retention; however, the reason for this improvement is unclear and requires further investigation. Full dynamic acquisition and kinetic modeling improved statistical power although it may add cost and time. Several technical variations to amyloid burden quantification were examined in this study. Partial volume correction emerged as the strategy that most consistently improved statistical power for the detection of both longitudinal changes and across-group differences. For the autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease population with PiB imaging, utilizing brainstem as a reference region with partial volume correction may be optimal for current interventional trials. Further investigation of technical issues in quantitative amyloid imaging in different study populations using different amyloid imaging tracers is warranted. PMID:27010959

  13. Improved localization of cellular membrane receptors using combined fluorescence microscopy and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, M; Pfleger, M; Chtcheglova, L A; Neundlinger, I; Bozna, B L; Ebner, A; Schuetz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zhu, R; Mayer, B [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rankl, C; Moertelmaier, M; Kada, G; Kienberger, F [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Salio, M; Shepherd, D; Polzella, P; Cerundolo, V [Cancer Research UK Tumor Immunology Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dieudonne, M, E-mail: ferry_kienberger@agilent.com [Agilent Technologies Belgium, Wingepark 51, Rotselaar, AN B-3110 (Belgium)

    2010-03-19

    The combination of fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy has a great potential in single-molecule-detection applications, overcoming many of the limitations coming from each individual technique. Here we present a new platform of combined fluorescence and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) for improved localization of cellular receptors. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled human sodium-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) expressed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and endothelial cells (MyEnd) from mouse myocardium stained with phalloidin-rhodamine were used as cell systems to study AFM topography and fluorescence microscopy on the same surface area. Topographical AFM images revealed membrane features such as lamellipodia, cytoskeleton fibers, F-actin filaments and small globular structures with heights ranging from 20 to 30 nm. Combined fluorescence and TREC imaging was applied to detect density, distribution and localization of YFP-labeled CD1d molecules on {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}GalCer)-loaded THP1 cells. While the expression level, distribution and localization of CD1d molecules on THP1 cells were detected with fluorescence microscopy, the nanoscale distribution of binding sites was investigated with molecular recognition imaging by using a chemically modified AFM tip. Using TREC on the inverted light microscope, the recognition sites of cell receptors were detected in recognition images with domain sizes ranging from {approx} 25 to {approx} 160 nm, with the smaller domains corresponding to a single CD1d molecule.

  14. A compact structured light based otoscope for three dimensional imaging of the tympanic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anshuman J.; Estrada, Julio C.; Ge, Zhifei; Dolcetti, Sara; Chen, Deborah; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-02-01

    Three dimensional (3D) imaging of the tympanic membrane (TM) has been carried out using a traditional otoscope equipped with a high-definition webcam, a portable projector and a telecentric optical system. The device allows us to project fringe patterns on the TM and the magnified image is processed using phase shifting algorithms to arrive at a 3D description of the TM. Obtaining a 3D image of the TM can aid in the diagnosis of ear infections such as otitis media with effusion, which is essentially fluid build-up in the middle ear. The high resolution of this device makes it possible examine a computer generated 3D profile for abnormalities in the shape of the eardrum. This adds an additional dimension to the image that can be obtained from a traditional otoscope by allowing visualization of the TM from different perspectives. In this paper, we present the design and construction of this device and details of the imaging processing for recovering the 3D profile of the subject under test. The design of the otoscope is similar to that of the traditional device making it ergonomically compatible and easy to adopt in clinical practice.

  15. Quantitative myocardial blood flow imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kero, Tanja; Nordström, Jonny; Harms, Hendrik J; Sörensen, Jens; Ahlström, Håkan; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-12-01

    The use of integrated PET-MR offers new opportunities for comprehensive assessment of cardiac morphology and function. However, little is known on the quantitative accuracy of cardiac PET imaging with integrated time-of-flight PET-MR. The aim of the present work was to validate the GE Signa PET-MR scanner for quantitative cardiac PET perfusion imaging. Eleven patients (nine male; mean age 59 years; range 46-74 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent 15 O-water PET scans at rest and during adenosine-induced hyperaemia on a GE Discovery ST PET-CT and a GE Signa PET-MR scanner. PET-MR images were reconstructed using settings recommended by the manufacturer, including time-of-flight (TOF). Data were analysed semi-automatically using Cardiac VUer software, resulting in both parametric myocardial blood flow (MBF) images and segment-based MBF values. Correlation and agreement between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based MBF values for all three coronary artery territories were assessed using regression analysis and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to the cardiac PET-MR reconstruction protocol as recommended by the manufacturer, comparisons were made using a PET-CT resolution-matched reconstruction protocol both without and with TOF to assess the effect of time-of-flight and reconstruction parameters on quantitative MBF values. Stress MBF data from one patient was excluded due to movement during the PET-CT scanning. Mean MBF values at rest and stress were (0.92 ± 0.12) and (2.74 ± 1.37) mL/g/min for PET-CT and (0.90 ± 0.23) and (2.65 ± 1.15) mL/g/min for PET-MR (p = 0.33 and p = 0.74). ICC between PET-CT-based and PET-MR-based regional MBF was 0.98. Image quality was improved with PET-MR as compared to PET-CT. ICC between PET-MR-based regional MBF with and without TOF and using different filter and reconstruction settings was 1.00. PET-MR-based MBF values correlated well with PET-CT-based MBF values and

  16. Development of a calibration protocol for quantitative imaging for molecular radiotherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wevrett, J.; Fenwick, A.; Scuffham, J.; Nisbet, A.

    2017-11-01

    Within the field of molecular radiotherapy, there is a significant need for standardisation in dosimetry, in both quantitative imaging and dosimetry calculations. Currently, there are a wide range of techniques used by different clinical centres and as a result there is no means to compare patient doses between centres. To help address this need, a 3 year project was funded by the European Metrology Research Programme, and a number of clinical centres were involved in the project. One of the required outcomes of the project was to develop a calibration protocol for three dimensional quantitative imaging of volumes of interest. Two radionuclides were selected as being of particular interest: iodine-131 (131I, used to treat thyroid disorders) and lutetium-177 (177Lu, used to treat neuroendocrine tumours). A small volume of activity within a scatter medium (water), representing a lesion within a patient body, was chosen as the calibration method. To ensure ease of use in clinical centres, an "off-the-shelf" solution was proposed - to avoid the need for in-house manufacturing. The BIODEX elliptical Jaszczak phantom and 16 ml fillable sphere were selected. The protocol was developed for use on SPECT/CT gamma cameras only, where the CT dataset would be used to correct the imaging data for attenuation of the emitted photons within the phantom. The protocol corrects for scatter of emitted photons using the triple energy window correction technique utilised by most clinical systems. A number of clinical systems were tested in the development of this protocol, covering the major manufacturers of gamma camera generally used in Europe. Initial imaging was performed with 131I and 177Lu at a number of clinical centres, but due to time constraints in the project, some acquisitions were performed with 177Lu only. The protocol is relatively simplistic, and does not account for the effects of dead-time in high activity patients, the presence of background activity surrounding

  17. Molecular spectral imaging system for quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of early diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingli; Zhang, Jingfa; Wang, Yiting; Xu, Guoteng

    2009-12-01

    A molecular spectral imaging system has been developed based on microscopy and spectral imaging technology. The system is capable of acquiring molecular spectral images from 400 nm to 800 nm with 2 nm wavelength increments. The basic principles, instrumental systems, and system calibration method as well as its applications for the calculation of the stain-uptake by tissues are introduced. As a case study, the system is used for determining the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and evaluating the therapeutic effects of erythropoietin. Some molecular spectral images of retinal sections of normal, diabetic, and treated rats were collected and analyzed. The typical transmittance curves of positive spots stained for albumin and advanced glycation end products are retrieved from molecular spectral data with the spectral response calibration algorithm. To explore and evaluate the protective effect of erythropoietin (EPO) on retinal albumin leakage of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, an algorithm based on Beer-Lambert's law is presented. The algorithm can assess the uptake by histologic retinal sections of stains used in quantitative pathology to label albumin leakage and advanced glycation end products formation. Experimental results show that the system is helpful for the ophthalmologist to reveal the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and explore the protective effect of erythropoietin on retinal cells of diabetic rats. It also highlights the potential of molecular spectral imaging technology to provide more effective and reliable diagnostic criteria in pathology.

  18. Quantitative 3D Analysis of Plant Roots Growing in Soil Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochs, Johannes; Pflugfelder, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of root system architecture traits are an important requirement for plant phenotyping. Most of the current methods for analyzing root growth require either artificial growing conditions (e.g. hydroponics), are severely restricted in the fraction of roots detectable (e.g. rhizotrons), or are destructive (e.g. soil coring). On the other hand, modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are noninvasive and allow high-quality three-dimensional imaging of roots in soil. Here, we present a plant root imaging and analysis pipeline using MRI together with an advanced image visualization and analysis software toolbox named NMRooting. Pots up to 117 mm in diameter and 800 mm in height can be measured with the 4.7 T MRI instrument used here. For 1.5 l pots (81 mm diameter, 300 mm high), a fully automated system was developed enabling measurement of up to 18 pots per day. The most important root traits that can be nondestructively monitored over time are root mass, length, diameter, tip number, and growth angles (in two-dimensional polar coordinates) and spatial distribution. Various validation measurements for these traits were performed, showing that roots down to a diameter range between 200 μm and 300 μm can be quantitatively measured. Root fresh weight correlates linearly with root mass determined by MRI. We demonstrate the capabilities of MRI and the dedicated imaging pipeline in experimental series performed on soil-grown maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants. PMID:26729797

  19. Quantitative analysis of geomorphic processes using satellite image data at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. S., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    When aerial and satellite photographs and images are used in the quantitative analysis of geomorphic processes, either through direct observation of active processes or by analysis of landforms resulting from inferred active or dormant processes, a number of limitations in the use of such data must be considered. Active geomorphic processes work at different scales and rates. Therefore, the capability of imaging an active or dormant process depends primarily on the scale of the process and the spatial-resolution characteristic of the imaging system. Scale is an important factor in recording continuous and discontinuous active geomorphic processes, because what is not recorded will not be considered or even suspected in the analysis of orbital images. If the geomorphic process of landform change caused by the process is less than 200 m in x to y dimension, then it will not be recorded. Although the scale factor is critical, in the recording of discontinuous active geomorphic processes, the repeat interval of orbital-image acquisition of a planetary surface also is a consideration in order to capture a recurring short-lived geomorphic process or to record changes caused by either a continuous or a discontinuous geomorphic process.

  20. Quantitative phase imaging using quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometry. Application to X-ray domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzi, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Since Roentgen discovered X-rays, X-ray imaging systems are based on absorption contrast. This technique is inefficient for weakly absorbing objects. As a result, X-ray standard radiography can detect bones lesions, but cannot detect ligament lesions. However, phase contrast imaging can overcome this limitation. Since the years 2000, relying on former works of opticians, X-ray scientists are developing phase sensitive devices compatible with industrial applications such as medical imaging or non destructive control. Standard architectures for interferometry are challenging to implement in the X-ray domain. This is the reason why grating based interferometers became the most promising devices to envision industrial applications. They provided the first x-ray phase contrast images of living human samples. Nevertheless, actual grating based architectures require the use of at least two gratings, and are challenging to adapt on an industrial product. So, the aim of my thesis was to develop a single phase grating interferometer. I demonstrated that such a device can provide achromatic and propagation invariant interference patterns. I used this interferometer to perform quantitative phase contrast imaging of a biological fossil sample and x-ray at mirror metrology. (author)

  1. An optimized framework for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Grussu, Francesco; Ianus, Andrada; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Fairney, James; Ourselin, Sebastien; Alexander, Daniel C; Cercignani, Mara; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2018-05-01

    To develop a framework to fully characterize quantitative magnetization transfer indices in the human cervical cord in vivo within a clinically feasible time. A dedicated spinal cord imaging protocol for quantitative magnetization transfer was developed using a reduced field-of-view approach with echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. Sequence parameters were optimized based in the Cramer-Rao-lower bound. Quantitative model parameters (i.e., bound pool fraction, free and bound pool transverse relaxation times [ T2F, T2B], and forward exchange rate [k FB ]) were estimated implementing a numerical model capable of dealing with the novelties of the sequence adopted. The framework was tested on five healthy subjects. Cramer-Rao-lower bound minimization produces optimal sampling schemes without requiring the establishment of a steady-state MT effect. The proposed framework allows quantitative voxel-wise estimation of model parameters at the resolution typically used for spinal cord imaging (i.e. 0.75 × 0.75 × 5 mm 3 ), with a protocol duration of ∼35 min. Quantitative magnetization transfer parametric maps agree with literature values. Whole-cord mean values are: bound pool fraction = 0.11(±0.01), T2F = 46.5(±1.6) ms, T2B = 11.0(±0.2) µs, and k FB  = 1.95(±0.06) Hz. Protocol optimization has a beneficial effect on reproducibility, especially for T2B and k FB . The framework developed enables robust characterization of spinal cord microstructure in vivo using qMT. Magn Reson Med 79:2576-2588, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  2. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico eSilvestri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent Purkinje cells. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of Purkinje cells, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of Purkinje cells with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments.

  3. LDRD final report on imaging self-organization of proteins in membranes by photocatalytic nano-tagging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Shelnutt, John Allen; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Song, Yujiang; Medforth, Craig J.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a new nanotagging technology for detecting and imaging the self-organization of proteins and other components of membranes at nanometer resolution for the purpose of investigating cell signaling and other membrane-mediated biological processes. We used protein-, lipid-, or drug-bound porphyrin photocatalysts to grow in-situ nanometer-sized metal particles, which reveal the location of the porphyrin-labeled molecules by electron microscopy. We initially used photocatalytic nanotagging to image assembled multi-component proteins and to monitor the distribution of lipids and porphyrin labels in liposomes. For example, by exchanging the heme molecules in hemoproteins with a photocatalytic tin porphyrin, a nanoparticle was grown at each heme site of the protein. The result obtained from electron microscopy for a tagged multi-subunit protein such as hemoglobin is a symmetric constellation of a specific number of nanoparticle tags, four in the case of the hemoglobin tetramer. Methods for covalently linking photocatalytic porphyrin labels to lipids and proteins were also developed to detect and image the self-organization of lipids, protein-protein supercomplexes, and membrane-protein complexes. Procedures for making photocatalytic porphyrin-drug, porphyrin-lipid, and porphyrin-protein hybrids for non-porphyrin-binding proteins and membrane components were pursued and the first porphyrin-labeled lipids was investigated in liposomal membrane models. Our photocatalytic nanotagging technique may ultimately allow membrane self-organization and cell signaling processes to be imaged in living cells. Fluorescence and plasmonic spectra of the tagged proteins might also provide additional information about protein association and membrane organization. In addition, a porphyrin-aspirin or other NSAID hybrid may be used to grow metal nanotags for the pharmacologically important COX enzymes in membranes so that the distribution of the protein can be imaged at the

  4. Image registration of BANG[reg] gel dose maps for quantitative dosimetry verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Maryanski, Marek J.; Kendrick, Lance A.; Ranade, Manisha K.; Buatti, John M.; Friedman, William A.

    1999-01-01

    Background: The BANG[reg] (product symbol SGEL, MGS Research Inc., Guilford, CT) polymer gel has been shown to be a valuable dosimeter for determining three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions. Because the proton relaxation rate (R2) of the gel changes as a function of absorbed dose, MR scans of the irradiated gel can be used to generate 3D dose maps. Previous work with the gel, however, has not relied on precise localization of the measured dose distribution. This has limited its quantitative use, as no precise correlation exists with the planned distribution. This paper reports on a technique for providing this correlation, thus providing a quality assurance tool that includes all of the steps of imaging, treatment planning, dose calculation, and treatment localization. Methods and Materials: The BANG[reg] gel formulation was prepared and poured into spherical flasks (15.3-cm inner diameter). A stereotactic head ring was attached to each flask. Three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) compatible fiducial markers were placed on the flask, thus defining the central axial plane. A high-resolution CT scan was obtained of each flask. These images were transferred to a radiosurgery treatment-planning program, where treatment plans were developed. The gels were irradiated using our systems for stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The gels were MR imaged, and a relative 3D dose map was created from an R2 map of these images. The dose maps were transferred to an image-correlation program, and then fused to the treatment-planning CT scan through a rigid body match of the MRI/CT-compatible fiducial markers. The fused dose maps were imported into the treatment-planning system for quantitative comparison with the calculated treatment plans. Results: Calculated and measured isodose surfaces agreed to within 2 mm at the worst points within the in-plane dose distributions. This agreement is excellent, considering that

  5. Application of quantitative image analysis to the investigation of macroporosity of graphitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delle, W.; Koizlik, K.; Hoven, H.; Wallura, E.

    1978-01-01

    The essence of quantitative image analysis is that the classification of graphitic materials to be inspected is possible on the basis of the grey value contrast between pores (dark) and carbon (bright). Macroporosity is defined as total of all pores with diameters larger than 0.2 μm. The pore size distributions and pore shapes of graphites based on petroleum, pitch, gilsonite and fluid coke as well as graphitic fuel matrices and pyrolytic carbons were investigated. The relationships between maximum grain size, macroporosity and total porosity as well as the anisotropies of macroporosity and electrical resistivity of graphite were established. (orig./GSC) [de

  6. Time-resolved imaging refractometry of microbicidal films using quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Matthew T; Drake, Tyler K; Robles, Francisco E; Rohan, Lisa C; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy is applied to image temporal changes in the refractive index (RI) distributions of solutions created by microbicidal films undergoing hydration. We present a novel method of using an engineered polydimethylsiloxane structure as a static phase reference to facilitate calibration of the absolute RI across the entire field. We present a study of dynamic structural changes in microbicidal films during hydration and subsequent dissolution. With assumptions about the smoothness of the phase changes induced by these films, we calculate absolute changes in the percentage of film in regions across the field of view.

  7. Multi-spectral quantitative phase imaging based on filtration of light via ultrasonic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machikhin, A. S.; Polschikova, O. V.; Ramazanova, A. G.; Pozhar, V. E.

    2017-07-01

    A new digital holographic microscopy scheme for multi-spectral quantitative phase imaging is proposed and implemented. It is based on acousto-optic filtration of wide-band low-coherence light at the entrance of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, recording and digital processing of interferograms. The key requirements for the acousto-optic filter are discussed. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated by calculating the phase maps of human red blood cells at multiple wavelengths in the range 770-810 nm. The scheme can be used for the measurement of dispersion of thin films and biological samples.

  8. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Integral Membrane Proteins from Ocular Lens and Retinal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Angus C.; Chaurand, Pierre; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    A tissue preparation protocol for MALDI (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization) imaging mass spectrometry of an integral membrane protein was developed using ocular lens and retina tissues as model samples. Frozen bovine and human lenses were cryosectioned equatorially or axially at −20 °C into 20 μm-thick tissue sections. Lens sections were mounted onto gold-coated MALDI targets by methanol soft-landing to maintain tissue integrity. Tissue sections underwent extensive water washing to deplete the samples of highly abundant water-soluble proteins. Automated matrix deposition was achieved using an acoustic reagent multispotter, with sinapinic acid as matrix and high percentage acetonitrile as solvent, with a center-to-center spot spacing of 200–300 μm. Molecular images of full-length Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and its most abundant truncation products were obtained from mass spectral data acquired across whole bovine and human lens sections. In equatorial and axial sections of bovine lenses, full-length AQP0 was detected throughout the lens. A truncation product corresponding to AQP0 (1–260) was detected in the bovine lens core at low abundance. In axial lens sections, no antero-posterior variation was detected. In 11 year-old human lens sections, full-length AQP0 was most abundant in the lens periphery, but was detected throughout the lens. The major truncation product, consisting of AQP0 residues 1–246, was absent from the lens periphery and increased in abundance in the lens core. This tissue preparation protocol was then applied to image the distribution of the G-protein coupled receptor, opsin, in the rabbit retina. This protocol has expanded the variety of target analytes which can be detected by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to include integral membrane proteins. PMID:19326924

  9. Single particle 3D reconstruction for 2D crystal images of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Sebastian; Arheit, Marcel; Kowal, Julia; Zeng, Xiangyan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-01

    In cases where ultra-flat cryo-preparations of well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) crystals are available, electron crystallography is a powerful method for the determination of the high-resolution structures of membrane and soluble proteins. However, crystal unbending and Fourier-filtering methods in electron crystallography three-dimensional (3D) image processing are generally limited in their performance for 2D crystals that are badly ordered or non-flat. Here we present a single particle image processing approach, which is implemented as an extension of the 2D crystallographic pipeline realized in the 2dx software package, for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of membrane proteins. The algorithm presented, addresses the low single-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 2D crystal images by exploiting neighborhood correlation between adjacent proteins in the 2D crystal. Compared with conventional single particle processing for randomly oriented particles, the computational costs are greatly reduced due to the crystal-induced limited search space, which allows a much finer search space compared to classical single particle processing. To reduce the considerable computational costs, our software features a hybrid parallelization scheme for multi-CPU clusters and computer with high-end graphic processing units (GPUs). We successfully apply the new refinement method to the structure of the potassium channel MloK1. The calculated 3D reconstruction shows more structural details and contains less noise than the map obtained by conventional Fourier-filtering based processing of the same 2D crystal images. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Deep Learning Automates the Quantitative Analysis of Individual Cells in Live-Cell Imaging Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Valen, David A.; Lane, Keara M.; Quach, Nicolas T.; Maayan, Inbal

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell imaging has opened an exciting window into the role cellular heterogeneity plays in dynamic, living systems. A major critical challenge for this class of experiments is the problem of image segmentation, or determining which parts of a microscope image correspond to which individual cells. Current approaches require many hours of manual curation and depend on approaches that are difficult to share between labs. They are also unable to robustly segment the cytoplasms of mammalian cells. Here, we show that deep convolutional neural networks, a supervised machine learning method, can solve this challenge for multiple cell types across the domains of life. We demonstrate that this approach can robustly segment fluorescent images of cell nuclei as well as phase images of the cytoplasms of individual bacterial and mammalian cells from phase contrast images without the need for a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker. These networks also enable the simultaneous segmentation and identification of different mammalian cell types grown in co-culture. A quantitative comparison with prior methods demonstrates that convolutional neural networks have improved accuracy and lead to a significant reduction in curation time. We relay our experience in designing and optimizing deep convolutional neural networks for this task and outline several design rules that we found led to robust performance. We conclude that deep convolutional neural networks are an accurate method that require less curation time, are generalizable to a multiplicity of cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, and expand live-cell imaging capabilities to include multi-cell type systems. PMID:27814364

  11. Quantitative determination of total pigments in red meats using hyperspectral imaging and multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhenjie; Sun, Da-Wen; Xie, Anguo; Pu, Hongbin; Han, Zhong; Luo, Man

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the potential of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) for quantitative determination of total pigments in red meats, including beef, goose, and duck. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied to correlate the spectral data with the reference values of total pigments measured by a traditional method. In order to simplify the PLSR model based on the full spectra, eleven optimal wavelengths were selected using successive projections algorithm (SPA). The new SPA-PLSR model yielded good results with the coefficient of determination (R(2)p) of 0.953, root mean square error (RMSEP) of 9.896, and ratio of prediction to deviation (RPD) of 4.628. Finally, distribution maps of total pigments in red meats were developed using an image processing algorithm. The overall results from this study indicated HSI had the capability for predicting total pigments in red meats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 3D-CT imaging processing for qualitative and quantitative analysis of maxillofacial cysts and tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia; Antunes, Jose Leopoldo Ferreira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odotologia. Dept. de Odontologia Social

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate spiral-computed tomography (3D-CT) images of 20 patients presenting with cysts and tumors in the maxillofacial complex, in order to compare the surface and volume techniques of image rendering. The qualitative and quantitative appraisal indicated that the volume technique allowed a more precise and accurate observation than the surface method. On the average, the measurements obtained by means of the 3D volume-rendering technique were 6.28% higher than those obtained by means of the surface method. The sensitivity of the 3D surface technique was lower than that of the 3D volume technique for all conditions stipulated in the diagnosis and evaluation of lesions. We concluded that the 3D-CT volume rendering technique was more reproducible and sensitive than the 3D-CT surface method, in the diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation of maxillofacial lesions, especially those with intra-osseous involvement. (author)

  13. Quantitation of right and left ventricular volume with MR imaging in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boxt, L.M.; Katz, J.; Kolb, T.; Czegledy, F.P.; Barst, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper tests the utility of MR imaging in quantitating changes in ventricular volume and function in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). Right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) volumes were determined in six patients with PPH and in eight controls. Short-axis images were obtained from the cardiac apex to the base at ED and ES, and the ventricular cavities were planimetered. Volumes were computed by summing the areas of the cavities times the thickness of the sections (12-14 mm). The intersection gap (1-3 mm) was averaged between adjacent sections. Results were indexed to the subject's body surface area. This technique was verified by comparison of results obtained by this method with the water displacement volumes of ventricular casts of eight excised bovine hearts and six water-filled balloons. Linear regression and the unpaired Students t test were used to test significance

  14. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition.

  15. Radiation damages to cell membranes of dogs and rats quantitatively estimated by changes in sedimentation behaviour of erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, V.F.; Potemkin, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    It was shown that injury to plasma membranes leads to a change in the sedimentation behaviour of erythrocytes: the maximum effect is produced when a protein component of the membrane is affected. The same dose dependent character of the change in erythrocyte sedimentation in urografine are observed during the first 24 h after γ-irradiation of rats and dogs

  16. Dual channel rank-based intensity weighting for quantitative co-localization of microscopy images

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Singan, Vasanth R

    2011-10-21

    Abstract Background Accurate quantitative co-localization is a key parameter in the context of understanding the spatial co-ordination of molecules and therefore their function in cells. Existing co-localization algorithms consider either the presence of co-occurring pixels or correlations of intensity in regions of interest. Depending on the image source, and the algorithm selected, the co-localization coefficients determined can be highly variable, and often inaccurate. Furthermore, this choice of whether co-occurrence or correlation is the best approach for quantifying co-localization remains controversial. Results We have developed a novel algorithm to quantify co-localization that improves on and addresses the major shortcomings of existing co-localization measures. This algorithm uses a non-parametric ranking of pixel intensities in each channel, and the difference in ranks of co-localizing pixel positions in the two channels is used to weight the coefficient. This weighting is applied to co-occurring pixels thereby efficiently combining both co-occurrence and correlation. Tests with synthetic data sets show that the algorithm is sensitive to both co-occurrence and correlation at varying levels of intensity. Analysis of biological data sets demonstrate that this new algorithm offers high sensitivity, and that it is capable of detecting subtle changes in co-localization, exemplified by studies on a well characterized cargo protein that moves through the secretory pathway of cells. Conclusions This algorithm provides a novel way to efficiently combine co-occurrence and correlation components in biological images, thereby generating an accurate measure of co-localization. This approach of rank weighting of intensities also eliminates the need for manual thresholding of the image, which is often a cause of error in co-localization quantification. We envisage that this tool will facilitate the quantitative analysis of a wide range of biological data sets

  17. Segmentation and Quantitative Analysis of Apoptosis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells from Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuncheng; Budman, Hector M; Duever, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Accurate and fast quantitative analysis of living cells from fluorescence microscopy images is useful for evaluating experimental outcomes and cell culture protocols. An algorithm is developed in this work to automatically segment and distinguish apoptotic cells from normal cells. The algorithm involves three steps consisting of two segmentation steps and a classification step. The segmentation steps are: (i) a coarse segmentation, combining a range filter with a marching square method, is used as a prefiltering step to provide the approximate positions of cells within a two-dimensional matrix used to store cells' images and the count of the number of cells for a given image; and (ii) a fine segmentation step using the Active Contours Without Edges method is applied to the boundaries of cells identified in the coarse segmentation step. Although this basic two-step approach provides accurate edges when the cells in a given image are sparsely distributed, the occurrence of clusters of cells in high cell density samples requires further processing. Hence, a novel algorithm for clusters is developed to identify the edges of cells within clusters and to approximate their morphological features. Based on the segmentation results, a support vector machine classifier that uses three morphological features: the mean value of pixel intensities in the cellular regions, the variance of pixel intensities in the vicinity of cell boundaries, and the lengths of the boundaries, is developed for distinguishing apoptotic cells from normal cells. The algorithm is shown to be efficient in terms of computational time, quantitative analysis, and differentiation accuracy, as compared with the use of the active contours method without the proposed preliminary coarse segmentation step.

  18. Serial thallium-201 imaging after dipyridamole for coronary disease detection: quantitative analysis using myocardial clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, R.D.; Dai, Y.H.; Boucher, C.A.; Pohost, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    After dipyridamole, canine studies have demonstrated a slower rate of myocardial thallium-201 clearance from zones distal to a coronary artery stenosis compared to normal zones. To determine if criteria based on canine myocardial thallium-201 clearance rates could be applied clinically, 40 patients with and 26 patients without coronary artery disease (CAD) had serial thallium-201 images obtained for 2 to 5 hours after dipyridamole. Regions of interest were manually placed over six left ventricular segments in two projections for each of three imaging times. The myocardial thallium-201 clearance rate was calculated for each of the six segments and, using the clearance rate criterion found in canine studies, was considered abnormal if less than 6.5%/hr. Using this criterion alone, 22 of 26 patients (85%) without CAD had normal and 30 of 40 patients (75%) with CAD had abnormal myocardial thallium-201 clearance rates. A quantitative analysis of regional inhomogeneity in tracer distribution (normal was greater than or equal to 25% difference between segments) was negative in 24 of 26 patients (92%) without CAD and positive in 20 of 40 patients (50%) with CAD. When both clearance rate and regional inhomogeneity were considered, 21 of 26 patients (81%) without CAD had negative and 36 of 40 patients (90%) with CAD had positive results. Thus, post-dipyridamole myocardial clearance rate criteria derived from canine studies can be applied to clinical thallium imaging. Quantitative analysis of serial thallium-201 images after dipyridamole is optimized by using myocardial thallium-201 clearance rates. Such an approach is independent of regional inhomogeneities in tracer distribution

  19. Imaging membrane potential changes from dendritic spines using computer-generated holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanese, Dimitrii; Weng, Ju-Yun; Zampini, Valeria; De Sars, Vincent; Canepari, Marco; Rozsa, Balazs; Emiliani, Valentina; Zecevic, Dejan

    2017-07-01

    Electrical properties of neuronal processes are extraordinarily complex, dynamic, and, in the general case, impossible to predict in the absence of detailed measurements. To obtain such a measurement one would, ideally, like to be able to monitor electrical subthreshold events as they travel from synapses on distal dendrites and summate at particular locations to initiate action potentials. It is now possible to carry out these measurements at the scale of individual dendritic spines using voltage imaging. In these measurements, the voltage-sensitive probes can be thought of as transmembrane voltmeters with a linear scale, which directly monitor electrical signals. Grinvald et al. were important early contributors to the methodology of voltage imaging, and they pioneered some of its significant results. We combined voltage imaging and glutamate uncaging using computer-generated holography. The results demonstrated that patterned illumination, by reducing the surface area of illuminated membrane, reduces photodynamic damage. Additionally, region-specific illumination practically eliminated the contamination of optical signals from individual spines by the scattered light from the parent dendrite. Finally, patterned illumination allowed one-photon uncaging of glutamate on multiple spines to be carried out in parallel with voltage imaging from the parent dendrite and neighboring spines.

  20. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging traits as endophenotypes for genetic mapping in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saud Alhusaini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the field of imaging genomics has combined high-throughput genotype data with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (QMRI measures to identify genes associated with brain structure, cognition, and several brain-related disorders. Despite its successful application in different psychiatric and neurological disorders, the field has yet to be advanced in epilepsy. In this article we examine the relevance of imaging genomics for future genetic studies in epilepsy from three perspectives. First, we discuss prior genome-wide genetic mapping efforts in epilepsy, considering the possibility that some studies may have been constrained by inherent theoretical and methodological limitations of the genome-wide association study (GWAS method. Second, we offer a brief overview of the imaging genomics paradigm, from its original inception, to its role in the discovery of important risk genes in a number of brain-related disorders, and its successful application in large-scale multinational research networks. Third, we provide a comprehensive review of past studies that have explored the eligibility of brain QMRI traits as endophenotypes for epilepsy. While the breadth of studies exploring QMRI-derived endophenotypes in epilepsy remains narrow, robust syndrome-specific neuroanatomical QMRI traits have the potential to serve as accessible and relevant intermediate phenotypes for future genetic mapping efforts in epilepsy.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Diffusion Weighted MR Images of Brain Tumor Using Signal Intensity Gradient Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Shanbhag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion weighted-magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI in the examination and classification of brain tumors, namely, glioma and meningioma. Our hypothesis was that as signal intensity variations on diffusion weighted (DW images depend on histology and cellularity of the tumor, analysing the signal intensity characteristics on DW images may allow differentiating between the tumor types. Towards this end the signal intensity variations on DW images of the entire tumor volume data of 20 subjects with glioma and 12 subjects with meningioma were investigated and quantified using signal intensity gradient (SIG parameter. The relative increase in the SIG values (RSIG for the subjects with glioma and meningioma was in the range of 10.08–28.36 times and 5.60–9.86 times, respectively, compared to their corresponding SIG values on the contralateral hemisphere. The RSIG values were significantly different between the subjects with glioma and meningioma (P<0.01, with no overlap between RSIG values across the two tumors. The results indicate that the quantitative changes in the RSIG values could be applied in the differential diagnosis of glioma and meningioma, and their adoption in clinical diagnosis and treatment could be helpful and informative.

  2. Micro/nano-computed tomography technology for quantitative dynamic, multi-scale imaging of morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Chelsea L; Recknagel, Andrew K; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2015-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis and embryonic development are dynamic events challenging to quantify, especially considering the intricate events that happen simultaneously in different locations and time. Micro- and more recently nano-computed tomography (micro/nanoCT) has been used for the past 15 years to characterize large 3D fields of tortuous geometries at high spatial resolution. We and others have advanced micro/nanoCT imaging strategies for quantifying tissue- and organ-level fate changes throughout morphogenesis. Exogenous soft tissue contrast media enables visualization of vascular lumens and tissues via extravasation. Furthermore, the emergence of antigen-specific tissue contrast enables direct quantitative visualization of protein and mRNA expression. Micro-CT X-ray doses appear to be non-embryotoxic, enabling longitudinal imaging studies in live embryos. In this chapter we present established soft tissue contrast protocols for obtaining high-quality micro/nanoCT images and the image processing techniques useful for quantifying anatomical and physiological information from the data sets.

  3. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  4. Digital Image Quantitative Evaluations for Low Cost Film Digitizers Height Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Arshad Yassin; Ahmad Nasir Yusof; Noorhazleena Azaman

    2016-01-01

    Non Destructive Testing (NDT) technology contributes significant improvement to the quality of industrial products, and the integrity of equipment and plants. Introduction of powerful computers and reliable imaging technology has had significant impact on the traditional nuclear based NDT technology. Demand for faster, reliable, low cost, and flexible technology is rapidly increased. With the growing demand for more efficient digital archiving, digital image analysis, and reporting results with a low cost technology, one cannot deny the importance of having another cheaper solution. This project will apply fundamental principle of image digitization to be used in building up a low cost film digitization solution. The height of the film digitization was carefully determined by examining each digital images produced. Three (3) repetitive quantitative evaluations (Modulation Transfer Function [MTF], Characteristic Transfer Curve [CTC], and Contrast to Noise Ratio [CNR]) were performed at different condition to assist with the determination of the low cost film digitizers height. All 3 evaluations were successfully applied and the most appropriate height was successfully determined. (author)

  5. Quantitative proton imaging from multiple physics processes: a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, C; Rescigno, R; Rousseau, M; Brasse, D

    2015-07-07

    Proton imaging is developed in order to improve the accuracy of charged particle therapy treatment planning. It makes it possible to directly map the relative stopping powers of the materials using the information on the energy loss of the protons. In order to reach a satisfactory spatial resolution in the reconstructed images, the position and direction of each particle is recorded upstream and downstream from the patient. As a consequence of individual proton detection, information on the transmission rate and scattering of the protons is available. Image reconstruction processes are proposed to make use of this information. A proton tomographic acquisition of an anthropomorphic head phantom was simulated. The transmission rate of the particles was used to reconstruct a map of the macroscopic cross section for nuclear interactions of the materials. A two-step iterative reconstruction process was implemented to reconstruct a map of the inverse scattering length of the materials using the scattering of the protons. Results indicate that, while the reconstruction processes should be optimized, it is possible to extract quantitative information from the transmission rate and scattering of the protons. This suggests that proton imaging could provide additional knowledge on the materials that may be of use to further improve treatment planning.

  6. Quantitative imaging of lipids in live mouse oocytes and early embryos using CARS microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Josephine; Pope, Iestyn; Masia, Francesco; Sanusi, Randa; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes contain lipid droplets that are a store of fatty acids, whose metabolism plays a substantial role in pre-implantation development. Fluorescent staining has previously been used to image lipid droplets in mammalian oocytes and embryos, but this method is not quantitative and often incompatible with live cell imaging and subsequent development. Here we have applied chemically specific, label-free coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to mouse oocytes and pre-implantation embryos. We show that CARS imaging can quantify the size, number and spatial distribution of lipid droplets in living mouse oocytes and embryos up to the blastocyst stage. Notably, it can be used in a way that does not compromise oocyte maturation or embryo development. We have also correlated CARS with two-photon fluorescence microscopy simultaneously acquired using fluorescent lipid probes on fixed samples, and found only a partial degree of correlation, depending on the lipid probe, clearly exemplifying the limitation of lipid labelling. In addition, we show that differences in the chemical composition of lipid droplets in living oocytes matured in media supplemented with different saturated and unsaturated fatty acids can be detected using CARS hyperspectral imaging. These results demonstrate that CARS microscopy provides a novel non-invasive method of quantifying lipid content, type and spatial distribution with sub-micron resolution in living mammalian oocytes and embryos. PMID:27151947

  7. Quantitative optical imaging of paracetamol-induced metabolism changes in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Liu, Xin; Roberts, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Paracetamol is the most readily available and widely used painkiller. However, its toxicity remains the most common cause of liver injury. The toxicity of paracetamol has been attributing to its toxic metabolite, which depletes cellular glutathione (GSH) stores and reacts within cells to increase oxidative stress, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell necrosis. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can provide quantitative imaging of biological tissues and organs in vivo and allow direct visualization of cellular events, which were used to monitor cellular metabolism in paracetamol-induced toxicity in this study. To better understand mechanisms of paracetamol induced liver injury, the redox ratio of NADH/FAD in liver cells were detected and quantified by MPM imaging to represent the relative rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation within cells. Compared to normal liver, average fluorescence lifetime of NADH and redox ratio of NADH/FAD in hepatocytes was significantly decreased after paracetamol overdose for 12 and 24 hrs, reflecting impaired metabolic activity. GSH levels of treatment groups were significantly lower than those of normal livers, with gradually decreasing from periportal to centrilobular zonation. This imaging technique has significant implications for investigating metabolic mechanisms of paracetamol toxicity.

  8. Inverse methods for 3D quantitative optical coherence elasticity imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Wijesinghe, Philip; Hugenberg, Nicholas; Sampson, David D.; Munro, Peter R. T.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Oberai, Assad A.

    2017-02-01

    In elastography, quantitative elastograms are desirable as they are system and operator independent. Such quantification also facilitates more accurate diagnosis, longitudinal studies and studies performed across multiple sites. In optical elastography (compression, surface-wave or shear-wave), quantitative elastograms are typically obtained by assuming some form of homogeneity. This simplifies data processing at the expense of smearing sharp transitions in elastic properties, and/or introducing artifacts in these regions. Recently, we proposed an inverse problem-based approach to compression OCE that does not assume homogeneity, and overcomes the drawbacks described above. In this approach, the difference between the measured and predicted displacement field is minimized by seeking the optimal distribution of elastic parameters. The predicted displacements and recovered elastic parameters together satisfy the constraint of the equations of equilibrium. This approach, which has been applied in two spatial dimensions assuming plane strain, has yielded accurate material property distributions. Here, we describe the extension of the inverse problem approach to three dimensions. In addition to the advantage of visualizing elastic properties in three dimensions, this extension eliminates the plane strain assumption and is therefore closer to the true physical state. It does, however, incur greater computational costs. We address this challenge through a modified adjoint problem, spatially adaptive grid resolution, and three-dimensional decomposition techniques. Through these techniques the inverse problem is solved on a typical desktop machine within a wall clock time of 20 hours. We present the details of the method and quantitative elasticity images of phantoms and tissue samples.

  9. Quantitative plaque features from coronary computed tomography angiography to identify regional ischemia by myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Zamudio, Mariana; Fuchs, Tobias A; Slomka, Piotr; Otaki, Yuka; Arsanjani, Reza; Gransar, Heidi; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Dey, Damini

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to investigate whether quantitative plaque features measured from coronary CT angiography (CCTA) predict ischemia by myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging (MPI). Hundred and eighty-four consecutive patients (63% males) with suspected-coronary artery disease, undergoing hybrid CCTA, and attenuation corrected solid state 99mTc stress/rest MPI and single vessel ischemia were considered. Quantitative analysis of CCTA derived non-calcified plaque (NCP), low-density NCP [difference (CD, maximum difference in HU/lumen area within lesion). Normal thresholds for plaque features were defined as 95th percentile thresholds, from 40% of vessels with non-ischemic MPI regions. These vessels were excluded from further analysis. Regional ischemia (≥ 2%) was quantified from MPI. All plaque features were higher in arteries corresponding to ischemia (P Quantitative plaque features obtained from CCTA, LDNCP, and CD, are associated with ischemia by MPI independent of stenosis. LDNCP burden and CD are associated with ischemia in stenosis 30-69% and ≥ 70%, respectively. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Alzheimer disease: Quantitative analysis of I-123-iodoamphetamine SPECT brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, R.S.; Tikofsky, R.S.; Collier, B.D.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Palmer, D.W.; Glatt, S.L.; Antuono, P.G.; Isitman, A.T.; Papke, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    To enable a more quantitative diagnosis of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT), the authors developed and tested a semiautomated method to define regions of interest (ROIs) to be used in quantitating results from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of regional cerebral blood flow performed with N-isopropyl iodine-123-iodoamphetamine. SPECT/IMP imaging was performed in ten patients with probable SDAT and seven healthy subjects. Multiple ROIs were manually and semiautomatically generated, and uptake was quantitated for each ROI. Mean cortical activity was estimated as the average of the mean activity in 24 semiautomatically generated ROIs; mean cerebellar activity was determined from the mean activity in separate ROIs. A ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity less than 0.60 and a ratio of parietal to mean cortical activity less than 0.90 allowed correct categorization of nine of ten and eight of ten patients, respectively, with SDAT and all control subjects. The degree of diminished mental status observed in patients with SDAT correlated with both global and regional changes in IMP uptake

  11. Digital Holographic Microscopy: Quantitative Phase Imaging and Applications in Live Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Kosmeier, Sebastian; Schlichthaber, Frank; Remmersmann, Christian; von Bally, Gert; Rommel, Christina; Dierker, Christian; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    The analysis of complex processes in living cells creates a high demand for fast and label-free methods for online monitoring. Widely used fluorescence methods require specific labeling and are often restricted to chemically fixated samples. Thus, methods that offer label-free and minimally invasive detection of live cell processes and cell state alterations are of particular interest. In combination with light microscopy, digital holography provides label-free, multi-focus quantitative phase imaging of living cells. In overview, several methods for digital holographic microscopy (DHM) are presented. First, different experimental setups for the recording of digital holograms and the modular integration of DHM into common microscopes are described. Then the numerical processing of digitally captured holograms is explained. This includes the description of spatial and temporal phase shifting techniques, spatial filtering based reconstruction, holographic autofocusing, and the evaluation of self-interference holograms. Furthermore, the usage of partial coherent light and multi-wavelength approaches is discussed. Finally, potentials of digital holographic microscopy for quantitative cell imaging are illustrated by results from selected applications. It is shown that DHM can be used for automated tracking of migrating cells and cell thickness monitoring as well as for refractive index determination of cells and particles. Moreover, the use of DHM for label-free analysis in fluidics and micro-injection monitoring is demonstrated. The results show that DHM is a highly relevant method that allows novel insights in dynamic cell biology, with applications in cancer research and for drugs and toxicity testing.

  12. Segmental quantitative MR imaging analysis of diurnal variation of water content in the lumbar intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tingting; Ai, Tao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Tao; Li, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the changes in water content in the lumbar intervertebral discs by quantitative T2 MR imaging in the morning after bed rest and evening after a diurnal load. Twenty healthy volunteers were separately examined in the morning after bed rest and in the evening after finishing daily work. T2-mapping images were obtained and analyzed. An equally-sized rectangular region of interest (ROI) was manually placed in both, the anterior and the posterior annulus fibrosus (AF), in the outermost 20% of the disc. Three ROIs were placed in the space defined as the nucleus pulposus (NP). Repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired 2-tailed t tests were used for statistical analysis, with p NP (anterior NP = -13.9 ms; central NP = -17.0 ms; posterior NP = -13.3 ms; all p p = 0.025) and the posterior AF (+5.9 ms; p p = 0.414). Discs with initially low T2 values in the center NP showed a smaller degree of variation in the anterior NP and in the central NP, than in discs with initially high T2 values in the center NP (10.0% vs. 16.1%, p = 0.037; 6.4% vs. 16.1%, p = 0.006, respectively). Segmental quantitative T2 MRI provides valuable insights into physiological aspects of normal discs.

  13. Quantitative Phase Fraction Detection in Organic Photovoltaic Materials through EELS Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Dyck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic photovoltaic materials have recently seen intense interest from the research community. Improvements in device performance are occurring at an impressive rate; however, visualization of the active layer phase separation still remains a challenge. This paper outlines the application of two electron energy-loss spectroscopic (EELS imaging techniques that can complement and enhance current phase detection techniques. Specifically, the bulk plasmon peak position, often used to produce contrast between phases in energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM, is quantitatively mapped across a sample cross section. A complementary spectrum image capturing the carbon and sulfur core loss edges is compared with the plasmon peak map and found to agree quite well, indicating that carbon and sulfur density differences between the two phases also allows phase discrimination. Additionally, an analytical technique for determining absolute atomic areal density is used to produce an absolute carbon and sulfur areal density map. We show how these maps may be re-interpreted as a phase ratio map, giving quantitative information about the purity of the phases within the junction.

  14. Micro-PIXE for the quantitative imaging of chemical elements in single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, R.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of biological relevant metals is important to understand their mechanisms of action in cells, either for physiological, toxicological or pathological processes. However, the direct detection of trace metals in single cells is a challenging task that requires sophisticated analytical developments. The aim of this seminar will be to present the recent achievements in this field using micro-PIXE analysis. The combination of micro-PIXE with RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry) and STIM (Scanning Transmission lon Microscopy) allows the quantitative determination of trace metal content within sub-cellular compartments. The application of STlM analysis will be more specifically highlighted as it provides high spatial resolution imaging (<200 nm) and excellent mass sensitivity (<0.1 ng). Application of the STIM-PIXE-RBS methodology is absolutely needed when organic mass loss appears during PIXE-RBS irradiation. This combination of STIM-PIXE-RBS provides fully quantitative determination of trace element content, expressed in μg/g, which is a quite unique capability for micro-PIXE compared to other micro-analytical methods such as the electron and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence or the techniques based on mass spectrometry. Examples of micro-PIXE studies for subcellular imaging of trace elements in the various fields of interest will be presented such as metal-based toxicology, pharmacology, and neuro degeneration [1] R. Ortega, G. Devés, A. Carmona. J. R. Soc. Interface, 6, (2009) S649-S658. (author)

  15. Quantitative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for brain disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kwak, Byung-Joon

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively analyze data from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in patients with brain disorders and to assess its potential utility for analyzing brain function. DTI was obtained by performing 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD), and the data were analyzed using Matlab-based SPM software. The two-sample t-test was used for error analysis of the location of the activated pixels. We compared regions of white matter where the fractional anisotropy (FA) values were low and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were increased. In the AD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right sub-lobar insula, and right occipital lingual gyrus whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus. In the VD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right limbic cingulate gyrus, and right sub-lobar caudate tail whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the left lateral globus pallidus and left medial globus pallidus. In conclusion by using DTI and SPM analysis, we were able to not only determine the structural state of the regions affected by brain disorders but also quantitatively analyze and assess brain function.

  16. Quantitative isolation and in vivo imaging of malaria parasite liver stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Alice S; Baer, Kerstin; Dumpit, Ronald F; Gray, Sean; Lejarcegui, Nicholas; Frevert, Ute; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2006-10-01

    The liver stages of Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, are the least explored forms in the parasite's life cycle despite their recognition as key vaccine and drug targets. In vivo experimental access to liver stages of human malaria parasites is practically prohibited and therefore rodent model malaria parasites have been used for in vivo studies. However, even in rodent models progress in the analysis of liver stages has been limited, mainly due to their low abundance and associated difficulties in visualisation and isolation. Here, we present green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria parasite liver infections in BALB/c mice as an excellent quantitative model for the live visualisation and isolation of the so far elusive liver stages. We believe P. yoelii GFP-tagged liver stages allow, for the first time, the efficient quantitative isolation of intact early and late liver stage-infected hepatocyte units by fluorescence activated cell sorting. GFP-tagged liver stages are also well suited for intravital imaging, allowing us for the first time to visualise them in real time. We identify previously unrecognised features of liver stages including vigorous parasite movement and expulsion of 'extrusomes'. Intravital imaging thus reveals new, important information on the malaria parasite's transition from tissue to blood stage.

  17. Image registration and analysis for quantitative myocardial perfusion: application to dynamic circular cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isola, A. A.; Schmitt, H.; van Stevendaal, U.; Begemann, P. G.; Coulon, P.; Boussel, L.; Grass, M.

    2011-09-01

    Large area detector computed tomography systems with fast rotating gantries enable volumetric dynamic cardiac perfusion studies. Prospectively, ECG-triggered acquisitions limit the data acquisition to a predefined cardiac phase and thereby reduce x-ray dose and limit motion artefacts. Even in the case of highly accurate prospective triggering and stable heart rate, spatial misalignment of the cardiac volumes acquired and reconstructed per cardiac cycle may occur due to small motion pattern variations from cycle to cycle. These misalignments reduce the accuracy of the quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion parameters on a per voxel basis. An image-based solution to this problem is elastic 3D image registration of dynamic volume sequences with variable contrast, as it is introduced in this contribution. After circular cone-beam CT reconstruction of cardiac volumes covering large areas of the myocardial tissue, the complete series is aligned with respect to a chosen reference volume. The results of the registration process and the perfusion analysis with and without registration are evaluated quantitatively in this paper. The spatial alignment leads to improved quantification of myocardial perfusion for three different pig data sets.

  18. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction improves image quality without affecting perfusion CT quantitation in primary colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Prezzi

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the effect of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR on perfusion CT (pCT parameter quantitation and image quality in primary colorectal cancer. Methods: Prospective observational study. Following institutional review board approval and informed consent, 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma underwent pCT (100 kV, 150 mA, 120 s acquisition, axial mode. Tumour regional blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, mean transit time (MTT and permeability surface area product (PS were determined using identical regions-of-interests for ASIR percentages of 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%. Image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR and pCT parameters were assessed across ASIR percentages. Coefficients of variation (CV, repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA and Spearman’ rank order correlation were performed with statistical significance at 5%. Results: With increasing ASIR percentages, image noise decreased by 33% while CNR increased by 61%; peak tumour CNR was greater than 1.5 with 60% ASIR and above. Mean BF, BV, MTT and PS differed by less than 1.8%, 2.9%, 2.5% and 2.6% across ASIR percentages. CV were 4.9%, 4.2%, 3.3% and 7.9%; rANOVA P values: 0.85, 0.62, 0.02 and 0.81 respectively. Conclusions: ASIR improves image noise and CNR without altering pCT parameters substantially. Keywords: Perfusion imaging, Multidetector computed tomography, Colorectal neoplasms, Computer-assisted image processing, Radiation dosage

  19. Anniversary Paper: History and status of CAD and quantitative image analysis: The role of Medical Physics and AAPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giger, Maryellen L.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Boone, John

    2008-01-01

    algorithms using appropriate cases to measure performance and robustness; conducting observer studies with which to evaluate radiologists in the diagnostic task without and with the use of the computer aid; and ultimately assessing performance with a clinical trial. Medical physicists also have an important role in quantitative imaging, by validating the quantitative integrity of scanners and developing imaging techniques, and image analysis tools that extract quantitative data in a more accurate and automated fashion. As imaging systems become more complex and the need for better quantitative information from images grows, the future includes the combined research efforts from physicists working in CAD with those working on quantitative imaging systems to readily yield information on morphology, function, molecular structure, and more--from animal imaging research to clinical patient care. A historical review of CAD and a discussion of challenges for the future are presented here, along with the extension to quantitative image analysis.

  20. UK quantitative WB-DWI technical workgroup: consensus meeting recommendations on optimisation, quality control, processing and analysis of quantitative whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Anna; Alonzi, Roberto; Blackledge, Matthew; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Collins, David J; Cook, Gary; Coutts, Glynn; Goh, Vicky; Graves, Martin; Kelly, Charles; Koh, Dow-Mu; McCallum, Hazel; Miquel, Marc E; O'Connor, James; Padhani, Anwar; Pearson, Rachel; Priest, Andrew; Rockall, Andrea; Stirling, James; Taylor, Stuart; Tunariu, Nina; van der Meulen, Jan; Walls, Darren; Winfield, Jessica; Punwani, Shonit

    2018-01-01

    Application of whole body diffusion-weighted MRI (WB-DWI) for oncology are rapidly increasing within both research and routine clinical domains. However, WB-DWI as a quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) has significantly slower adoption. To date, challenges relating to accuracy and reproducibility, essential criteria for a good QIB, have limited widespread clinical translation. In recognition, a UK workgroup was established in 2016 to provide technical consensus guidelines (to maximise accuracy and reproducibility of WB-MRI QIBs) and accelerate the clinical translation of quantitative WB-DWI applications for oncology. A panel of experts convened from cancer centres around the UK with subspecialty expertise in quantitative imaging and/or the use of WB-MRI with DWI. A formal consensus method was used to obtain consensus agreement regarding best practice. Questions were asked about the appropriateness or otherwise on scanner hardware and software, sequence optimisation, acquisition protocols, reporting, and ongoing quality control programs to monitor precision and accuracy and agreement on quality control. The consensus panel was able to reach consensus on 73% (255/351) items and based on consensus areas made recommendations to maximise accuracy and reproducibly of quantitative WB-DWI studies performed at 1.5T. The panel were unable to reach consensus on the majority of items related to quantitative WB-DWI performed at 3T. This UK Quantitative WB-DWI Technical Workgroup consensus provides guidance on maximising accuracy and reproducibly of quantitative WB-DWI for oncology. The consensus guidance can be used by researchers and clinicians to harmonise WB-DWI protocols which will accelerate clinical translation of WB-DWI-derived QIBs.

  1. Fuzzy logic algorithm for quantitative tissue characterization of diffuse liver diseases from ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, A M; Derbala, A S; Youssef, A M

    1999-08-01

    Computerized ultrasound tissue characterization has become an objective means for diagnosis of liver diseases. It is difficult to differentiate diffuse liver diseases, namely cirrhotic and fatty liver by visual inspection from the ultrasound images. The visual criteria for differentiating diffused diseases are rather confusing and highly dependent upon the sonographer's experience. This often causes a bias effects in the diagnostic procedure and limits its objectivity and reproducibility. Computerized tissue characterization to assist quantitatively the sonographer for the accurate differentiation and to minimize the degree of risk is thus justified. Fuzzy logic has emerged as one of the most active area in classification. In this paper, we present an approach that employs Fuzzy reasoning techniques to automatically differentiate diffuse liver diseases using numerical quantitative features measured from the ultrasound images. Fuzzy rules were generated from over 140 cases consisting of normal, fatty, and cirrhotic livers. The input to the fuzzy system is an eight dimensional vector of feature values: the mean gray level (MGL), the percentile 10%, the contrast (CON), the angular second moment (ASM), the entropy (ENT), the correlation (COR), the attenuation (ATTEN) and the speckle separation. The output of the fuzzy system is one of the three categories: cirrhosis, fatty or normal. The steps done for differentiating the pathologies are data acquisition and feature extraction, dividing the input spaces of the measured quantitative data into fuzzy sets. Based on the expert knowledge, the fuzzy rules are generated and applied using the fuzzy inference procedures to determine the pathology. Different membership functions are developed for the input spaces. This approach has resulted in very good sensitivities and specificity for classifying diffused liver pathologies. This classification technique can be used in the diagnostic process, together with the history

  2. Imaging approaches for analysis of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Modzel, Maciej; Lund, Frederik W; Lomholt, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid component of the plasma membrane (PM) of mammalian cells, where it is involved in control of many physiological processes, such as endocytosis, cell migration, cell signalling and surface ruffling. In an attempt to explain these functions of cholesterol, several models have been put forward about cholesterol's lateral and transbilayer organization in the PM. In this article, we review imaging techniques developed over the last two decades for assessing the distribution and dynamics of cholesterol in the PM of mammalian cells. Particular focus is on fluorescence techniques to study the lateral and inter-leaflet distribution of suitable cholesterol analogues in the PM of living cells. We describe also several methods for determining lateral cholesterol dynamics in the PM including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), single particle tracking (SPT) and spot variation FCS coupled to stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. For proper interpretation of such measurements, we provide some background in probe photophysics and diffusion phenomena occurring in cell membranes. In particular, we show the equivalence of the reaction-diffusion approach, as used in FRAP and FCS, and continuous time random walk (CTRW) models, as often invoked in SPT studies. We also discuss mass spectrometry (MS) based imaging of cholesterol in the PM of fixed cells and compare this method with fluorescence imaging of sterols. We conclude that evidence from many experimental techniques converges towards a model of a homogeneous distribution of cholesterol with largely free and unhindered diffusion in both leaflets of the PM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spectropathology-corroborated multimodal quantitative imaging biomarkers for neuroretinal degeneration in diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guha Mazumder A

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Arpan Guha Mazumder,1,2 Swarnadip Chatterjee,3 Saunak Chatterjee,1 Juan Jose Gonzalez,4 Swarnendu Bag,5 Sambuddha Ghosh,6 Anirban Mukherjee,7 Jyotirmoy Chatterjee1 1Multimodal Imaging and Computing for Theranostics Laboratory, School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India; 2Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India; 4Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA; 5Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Technology Sikkim, Ravangla Sub-Division, South Sikkim, 6Department of Ophthalmology, Calcutta National Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, 7Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India Introduction: Image-based early detection for diabetic retinopathy (DR needs value addition due to lack of well-defined disease-specific quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIBs for neuroretinal degeneration and spectropathological information at the systemic level. Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR. Therefore, development of an integrated assessment method for detecting neuroretinal degeneration using spectropathology and QIBs is necessary for the early diagnosis of DR. Methods: The present work explored the efficacy of intensity and textural features extracted from optical coherence tomography (OCT images after selecting a specific subset of features for the precise classification of retinal layers using variants of support vector machine (SVM. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy were also performed to confirm the spectropathological attributes of serum for further value addition to the OCT, fundoscopy, and fluorescein angiography (FA findings

  4. Low-frequency quantitative ultrasound imaging of cell death in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Papanicolau, Naum; Tadayyon, Hadi; Lee, Justin; Zubovits, Judit; Sadeghian, Alireza; Karshafian, Raffi; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Giles, Anoja; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, no clinical imaging modality is used routinely to assess tumor response to cancer therapies within hours to days of the delivery of treatment. Here, the authors demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound at a clinically relevant frequency to quantitatively detect changes in tumors in response to cancer therapies using preclinical mouse models.Methods: Conventional low-frequency and corresponding high-frequency ultrasound (ranging from 4 to 28 MHz) were used along with quantitative spectroscopic and signal envelope statistical analyses on data obtained from xenograft tumors treated with chemotherapy, x-ray radiation, as well as a novel vascular targeting microbubble therapy.Results: Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers indicated significant changes in cell-death associated parameters in responsive tumors. Specifically changes in the midband fit, spectral slope, and 0-MHz intercept biomarkers were investigated for different types of treatment and demonstrated cell-death related changes. The midband fit and 0-MHz intercept biomarker derived from low-frequency data demonstrated increases ranging approximately from 0 to 6 dBr and 0 to 8 dBr, respectively, depending on treatments administrated. These data paralleled results observed for high-frequency ultrasound data. Statistical analysis of ultrasound signal envelope was performed as an alternative method to obtain histogram-based biomarkers and provided confirmatory results. Histological analysis of tumor specimens indicated up to 61% cell death present in the tumors depending on treatments administered, consistent with quantitative ultrasound findings indicating cell death. Ultrasound-based spectroscopic biomarkers demonstrated a good correlation with histological morphological findings indicative of cell death (r 2 = 0.71, 0.82; p < 0.001).Conclusions: In summary, the results provide preclinical evidence, for the first time, that quantitative ultrasound used at a clinically relevant frequency, in

  5. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  6. Quantitative analysis of optical coherence tomography and histopathology images of normal and dysplastic oral mucosal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegun, Oluyori Kutulola; Tomlins, Pete H; Hagi-Pavli, Eleni; McKenzie, Gordon; Piper, Kim; Bader, Dan L; Fortune, Farida

    2012-07-01

    Selecting the most representative site for biopsy is crucial in establishing a definitive diagnosis of oral epithelial dysplasia. The current process involves clinical examination that can be subjective and prone to sampling errors. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for differentiation of normal and dysplastic oral epithelial samples, with a view to developing an objective and reproducible approach for biopsy site selection. Biopsy samples from patients with fibro-epithelial polyps (n = 13), mild dysplasia (n = 2), and moderate/severe dysplasia (n = 4) were scanned at 5-μm intervals using an OCT microscope and subsequently processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Epithelial differentiation was measured from the rate of change (gradient) of the backscattered light intensity in the OCT signal as a function of depth. This parameter is directly related to the density of optical scattering from the cell nuclei. OCT images of normal oral epithelium showed a clear delineation of the mucosal layers observed in the matching histology. However, OCT images of oral dysplasia did not clearly identify the individual mucosal layers because of the increased density of abnormal cell nuclei, which impeded light penetration. Quantitative analysis on 2D-OCT and histology images differentiated dysplasia from normal control samples. Similar analysis on 3D-OCT datasets resulted in the reclassification of biopsy samples into the normal/mild and moderate/severe groups. Quantitative differentiation of normal and dysplastic lesions using OCT offers a non-invasive objective approach for localizing the most representative site to biopsy, particularly in oral lesions with similar clinical features.

  7. Ranking quantitative resistance to Septoria tritici blotch in elite wheat cultivars using automated image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karisto, Petteri; Hund, Andreas; Yu, Kang; Anderegg, Jonas; Walter, Achim; Mascher, Fabio; McDonald, Bruce A; Mikaberidze, Alexey

    2017-12-06

    Quantitative resistance is likely to be more durable than major gene resistance for controlling Septoria tritici blotch (STB) on wheat. Earlier studies hypothesized that resistance affecting the degree of host damage, as measured by the percentage of leaf area covered by STB lesions, is distinct from resistance that affects pathogen reproduction, as measured by the density of pycnidia produced within lesions. We tested this hypothesis using a collection of 335 elite European winter wheat cultivars that was naturally infected by a diverse population of Zymoseptoria tritici in a replicated field experiment. We used automated image analysis (AIA) of 21420 scanned wheat leaves to obtain quantitative measures of conditional STB intesity that were precise, objective, and reproducible. These measures allowed us to explicitly separate resistance affecting host damage from resistance affecting pathogen reproduction, enabling us to confirm that these resistance traits are largely independent. The cultivar rankings based on host damage were different from the rankings based on pathogen reproduction, indicating that the two forms of resistance should be considered separately in breeding programs aiming to increase STB resistance. We hypothesize that these different forms of resistance are under separate genetic control, enabling them to be recombined to form new cultivars that are highly resistant to STB. We found a significant correlation between rankings based on automated image analysis and rankings based on traditional visual scoring, suggesting that image analysis can complement conventional measurements of STB resistance, based largely on host damage, while enabling a much more precise measure of pathogen reproduction. We showed that measures of pathogen reproduction early in the growing season were the best predictors of host damage late in the growing season, illustrating the importance of breeding for resistance that reduces pathogen reproduction in order to minimize

  8. Fully automated quantitative analysis of breast cancer risk in DCE-MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luan; Hu, Xiaoxin; Gu, Yajia; Li, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) and background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) images are two important indices for breast cancer risk assessment in the clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for quantitative analysis of FGT and BPE in DCE-MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three steps, i.e., segmentation of whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues. Based on the volume of interest extracted automatically, dynamic programming method was applied in each 2-D slice of a 3-D MR scan to delineate the chest wall and breast skin line for segmenting the whole breast. This step took advantages of the continuity of chest wall and breast skin line across adjacent slices. We then further used fuzzy c-means clustering method with automatic selection of cluster number for segmenting the fibroglandular tissues within the segmented whole breast area. Finally, a statistical method was used to set a threshold based on the estimated noise level for segmenting the enhanced fibroglandular tissues in the subtraction images of pre- and post-contrast MR scans. Based on the segmented whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues, FGT and BPE were automatically computed. Preliminary results of technical evaluation and clinical validation showed that our fully automated scheme could obtain good segmentation of the whole breast, fibroglandular tissues, and enhanced fibroglandular tissues to achieve accurate assessment of FGT and BPE for quantitative analysis of breast cancer risk.

  9. Quantitative 3D Analysis of Plant Roots Growing in Soil Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Metzner, Ralf; Kochs, Johannes; Postma, Johannes A; Pflugfelder, Daniel; Bühler, Jonas; Schurr, Ulrich; Jahnke, Siegfried

    2016-03-01

    Precise measurements of root system architecture traits are an important requirement for plant phenotyping. Most of the current methods for analyzing root growth require either artificial growing conditions (e.g. hydroponics), are severely restricted in the fraction of roots detectable (e.g. rhizotrons), or are destructive (e.g. soil coring). On the other hand, modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are noninvasive and allow high-quality three-dimensional imaging of roots in soil. Here, we present a plant root imaging and analysis pipeline using MRI together with an advanced image visualization and analysis software toolbox named NMRooting. Pots up to 117 mm in diameter and 800 mm in height can be measured with the 4.7 T MRI instrument used here. For 1.5 l pots (81 mm diameter, 300 mm high), a fully automated system was developed enabling measurement of up to 18 pots per day. The most important root traits that can be nondestructively monitored over time are root mass, length, diameter, tip number, and growth angles (in two-dimensional polar coordinates) and spatial distribution. Various validation measurements for these traits were performed, showing that roots down to a diameter range between 200 μm and 300 μm can be quantitatively measured. Root fresh weight correlates linearly with root mass determined by MRI. We demonstrate the capabilities of MRI and the dedicated imaging pipeline in experimental series performed on soil-grown maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Triple-color super-resolution imaging of live cells: resolving submicroscopic receptor organization in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmes, Stephan; Staufenbiel, Markus; Lisse, Domenik; Richter, Christian P; Beutel, Oliver; Busch, Karin B; Hess, Samuel T; Piehler, Jacob

    2012-05-14

    In living color: efficient intracellular covalent labeling of proteins with a photoswitchable dye using the HaloTag for dSTORM super-resolution imaging in live cells is described. The dynamics of cellular nanostructures at the plasma membrane were monitored with a time resolution of a few seconds. In combination with dual-color FPALM imaging, submicroscopic receptor organization within the context of the membrane skeleton was resolved. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Imaging choroidal neovascular membrane using en face swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Magdy Moussa,1,2 Mahmoud Leila,3 Hagar Khalid1,2 1Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; 2MEDIC Eye Center, Tanta, Egypt; 3Retina Department, Research Institute of Ophthalmology, Giza, Egypt Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA in delineating the morphology of choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective observational case series reviewing clinical data and fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA, swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT, and SS-OCTA images of patients with CNV and comparing the findings. The swept-source technology enables deeper penetration and superior axial resolution. The incorporated blood flow detection algorithm, optical coherence tomography angiography ratio analysis (OCTARA, enables visualization of CNV in vivo without the need for dye injection. Results: The study included 136 eyes of 105 patients. Active lesions on SS-OCTA images showed increased capillary density, extensive arborization, vascular anastomosis and looping, and peri-lesional hollow. Inactive lesions showed decreased capillary density, presence of large linear vessels, and presence of feeder vessels supplying the CNV. We detected positive correlation between SS-OCTA, FFA, and SS-OCT images in 97% of eyes. In the remaining 3%, SS-OCTA confirmed the absence of CNV, whereas FFA and SS-OCT either were inconclusive in the diagnosis of CNV or yielded false-positive results. Conclusion: SS-OCT and SS-OCTA represent a reproducible risk-free analog for FFA in imaging CNV. SS-OCTA is particularly versatile in cases where FFA and SS-OCT are inconclusive. Keywords: swept-source OCT, OCT angiography, imaging of CNV, OCTARA algorithm

  12. High PRF ultrafast sliding compound doppler imaging: fully qualitative and quantitative analysis of blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinbum; Jang, Won Seuk; Yoo, Yangmo

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast compound Doppler imaging based on plane-wave excitation (UCDI) can be used to evaluate cardiovascular diseases using high frame rates. In particular, it provides a fully quantifiable flow analysis over a large region of interest with high spatio-temporal resolution. However, the pulse-repetition frequency (PRF) in the UCDI method is limited for high-velocity flow imaging since it has a tradeoff between the number of plane-wave angles (N) and acquisition time. In this paper, we present high PRF ultrafast sliding compound Doppler imaging method (HUSDI) to improve quantitative flow analysis. With the HUSDI method, full scanline images (i.e. each tilted plane wave data) in a Doppler frame buffer are consecutively summed using a sliding window to create high-quality ensemble data so that there is no reduction in frame rate and flow sensitivity. In addition, by updating a new compounding set with a certain time difference (i.e. sliding window step size or L), the HUSDI method allows various Doppler PRFs with the same acquisition data to enable a fully qualitative, retrospective flow assessment. To evaluate the performance of the proposed HUSDI method, simulation, in vitro and in vivo studies were conducted under diverse flow circumstances. In the simulation and in vitro studies, the HUSDI method showed improved hemodynamic representations without reducing either temporal resolution or sensitivity compared to the UCDI method. For the quantitative analysis, the root mean squared velocity error (RMSVE) was measured using 9 angles (-12° to 12°) with L of 1-9, and the results were found to be comparable to those of the UCDI method (L  =  N  =  9), i.e.  ⩽0.24 cm s-1, for all L values. For the in vivo study, the flow data acquired from a full cardiac cycle of the femoral vessels of a healthy volunteer were analyzed using a PW spectrogram, and arterial and venous flows were successfully assessed with high Doppler PRF (e.g. 5 kHz at L

  13. Parametric imaging and quantitative analysis of the PET amyloid ligand [(18)F]flutemetamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heurling, Kerstin; Buckley, Chris; Van Laere, Koen; Vandenberghe, Rik; Lubberink, Mark

    2015-11-01

    imaging allows for quantification without introducing bias due to selection of anatomical regions, and thus enables objective statistical voxel-based comparisons of tracer binding. Several parametric modeling approaches perform well, especially after Gaussian pre-filtering of the dynamic data. However, the semi-