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Sample records for membrane-bound trehalase genes

  1. Different functions of the insect soluble and membrane-bound trehalase genes in chitin biosynthesis revealed by RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trehalase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes trehalose to yield two glucose molecules, plays a pivotal role in various physiological processes. In recent years, trehalase proteins have been purified from several insect species and are divided into soluble (Tre-1 and membrane-bound (Tre-2 trehalases. However, no functions of the two trehalases in chitin biosynthesis in insects have yet been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The membrane-bound trehalase of Spodoptera exigua (SeTre-2 was characterized in our laboratory previously. In this study, we cloned the soluble trehalase gene (SeTre-1 and investigated the tissue distribution and developmental expression pattern of the two trehalase genes. SeTre-1 was expressed highly in cuticle and Malpighian tubules, while SeTre-2 was expressed in tracheae and fat body. In the midgut, the two trehalase genes were expressed in different locations. Additionally, the expression profiles of both trehalase mRNAs and their enzyme activities suggest that they may play different roles in chitin biosynthesis. The RNA interference (RNAi of either SeTre-1 or SeTre-2 was gene-specific and effective, with efficiency rates up to 83% at 72 h post injection. After RNAi of SeTre-1 and SeTre-2, significant higher mortality rates were observed during the larva-pupa stage and pupa-adult stage, and the lethal phenotypes were classified and analyzed. Additionally, the change trends of concentration of trehalose and glucose appeared reciprocally in RNAi-mutants. Moreover, knockdown of SeTre-1 gene largely inhibited the expression of chitin synthase gene A (CHSA and reduced the chitin content in the cuticle to two-thirds relative to the control insects. The chitin synthase gene B (CHSB expression, however, was inhibited more by the injection of dsRNA for SeTre-2, and the chitin content in the midgut decreased by about 25%. CONCLUSIONS: SeTre-1 plays a major role in CHSA expression and chitin synthesis in the cuticle, and SeTre-2

  2. Molecular characterization of soluble and membrane-bound trehalases of the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; He, Wen-Bo; Su, Yun-Lin; Bing, Xiao-Li; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    Trehalases (Tres) have been demonstrated to be the key enzymes that are involved in various trehalose-associated physiological processes in insects. However, little attention has been devoted to the Tres in the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. In this study, a soluble Tre (BtTre-1) and a membrane-bound Tre (BtTre-2) were cloned in the invasive cryptic species Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) of the whitefly B. tabaci complex. Alignment of deduced amino acids sequences of both BtTres revealed that they share common consensus regions and residues with Tres of other insect species. Levels of BtTres expression in various stages and tissues of the whitefly suggested that BtTre-2 may play a key role in trehalose catabolism during development of the whitefly, especially for oocyte development, while BtTre-1 may prevent trehalose in salivary gland from leaking and entering into plants along with saliva. Potential roles of trehalose catabolism in response to direct and/or plant-mediated indirect effects of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl China Virus (TYLCCNV) were also detected. Whiteflies feeding on virus-infected tobacco plants showed higher BtTres expressions and accordingly higher BtTres activity but lower trehalose content than those feeding on uninfected plants. The enhanced trehalose catabolism may be beneficial to oocyte development in ovary and attenuate plant defensive responses induced by trehalose in saliva. Viruliferous and nonviruliferous whiteflies feeding on cotton, a nonhost plant for TYLCCNV, differed significantly only in trehalose content. The higher trehalose content in viruliferous whiteflies may be conducive to resisting the stress inflicted by TYLCCNV. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Homozygous deletion of ATC1 and NTC1 genes in Candida parapsilosis abolishes trehalase activity and affects cell growth, sugar metabolism, stress resistance, infectivity and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Guirao-Abad, José P; Martinez-Esparza, María; Maicas, Sergi; Valentín, Eulogio; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2015-12-01

    A double homozygous atc1Δ/atc1Δ/ntc1Δ/ntc1Δ mutant (atc1Δ/ntc1Δ KO) was constructed in the pathogen opportunistic yeast Candida parapsilosis by disruption of the two chromosomal alleles coding for NTC1 gene (encoding a neutral trehalase) in a Cpatc1Δ/atc1Δ background (atc1Δ KO strain, deficient in acid trehalase). The Cpatc1Δ/ntc1Δ KO mutant failed to counteract the inability of Cpatc1Δ cells to metabolize exogenous trehalose and showed a similar growth pattern on several monosaccharides and disaccharides. However, upon prolonged incubation in either rich medium (YPD) or nutrient-starved medium the viability of Cpatc1Δ cells exhibited a sensitive phenotype, which was augmented by further CpNTC1/NTC1 disruption. Furthermore, Cpatc1Δ/ntc1Δ KO cells had difficulty in resuming active growth in fresh YPD. This homozygous mutant also lacked any in vitro measurable trehalase activity, whether acid or neutral, suggesting that a single gene codes for each enzyme. By contrast, in Cpatc1Δ/ntc1Δ KO strain the resistance to oxidative and heat stress displayed by atc1Δ mutant was suppressed. Cpatc1Δ/ntc1Δ KO cells showed a significant decrease in virulence as well as in the capacity to form biofilms. These results point to a major role for acid trehalase (Atc1p) in the pathobiology of C. parapsilosis, whereas the activity of neutral trehalase can only partially counteract Atc1p deficiency. They also support the use of ATC1 and NTC1 genes as interesting antifungal targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cloning, sequencing, and characterization of the gene encoding the smallest subunit of the three-component membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase from Acetobacter pasteurianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Beppu, T; Horinouchi, S

    1995-09-01

    The membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) of Acetobacter pasteurianus NCI1452 consists of three different subunits, a 78-kDa dehydrogenase subunit, a 48-kDa cytochrome c subunit, and a 20-kDa subunit of unknown function. For elucidation of the function of the smallest subunit, this gene was cloned from this strain by the oligonucleotide-probing method, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence and the NH2-terminal sequence determined for the purified protein indicated that the smallest subunit contained a typical signal peptide of 28 amino acids, as did the larger two subunits. This gene complemented the ADH activity of a mutant strain which had lost the smallest subunit. Disruption of this gene on the chromosome resulted in loss of ADH activity in Acetobacter aceti, indicating that the smallest subunit was essential for ADH activity. Immunoblot analyses of cell lysates prepared from various ADH mutants suggested that the smallest subunit was concerned with the stability of the 78-kDa subunit and functioned as a molecular coupler of the 78-kDa subunit to the 48-kDa subunit on the cytoplasmic membrane.

  5. Active site characterization and molecular cloning of Tenebrio molitor midgut trehalase and comments on their insect homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Ana; Cardoso, Christiane; Genta, Fernando A; Terra, Walter R; Ferreira, Clélia

    2013-08-01

    The soluble midgut trehalase from Tenebrio molitor (TmTre1) was purified after several chromatographic steps, resulting in an enzyme with 58 kDa and pH optimum 5.3 (ionizing active groups in the free enzyme: pK(e1) = 3.8 ± 0.2 pK(e2) = 7.4 ± 0.2). The purified enzyme corresponds to the deduced amino acid sequence of a cloned cDNA (TmTre1-cDNA), because a single cDNA coding a soluble trehalase was found in the T. molitor midgut transcriptome. Furthermore, the mass of the protein predicted to be coded by TmTre1-cDNA agrees with that of the purified enzyme. TmTre1 has the essential catalytic groups Asp 315 and Glu 513 and the essential Arg residues R164, R217, R282. Carbodiimide inactivation of the purified enzyme at different pH values reveals an essential carboxyl group with pKa = 3.5 ± 0.3. Phenylglyoxal modified a single Arg residue with pKa = 7.5 ± 0.2, as observed in the soluble trehalase from Spodoptera frugiperda (SfTre1). Diethylpyrocarbonate modified a His residue that resulted in a less active enzyme with pK(e1) changed to 4.8 ± 0.2. In TmTre1 the modified His residue (putatively His 336) is more exposed than the His modified in SfTre1 (putatively His 210) and that affects the ionization of an Arg residue. The architecture of the active site of TmTre1 and SfTre1 is different, as shown by multiple inhibition analysis, the meaning of which demands further research. Trehalase sequences obtained from midgut transcriptomes (pyrosequencing and Illumina data) from 8 insects pertaining to 5 different orders were used in a cladogram, together with other representative sequences. The data suggest that the trehalase gene went duplication and divergence prior to the separation of the paraneopteran and holometabolan orders and that the soluble trehalase derived from the membrane-bound one by losing the C-terminal transmembrane loop. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetically altering the expression of neutral trehalase gene affects conidiospore thermotolerance of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium acridum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Guoxiong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium acridum has been used as an important biocontrol agent instead of insecticides for controlling crop pests throughout the world. However, its virulence varies with environmental factors, especially temperature. Neutral trehalase (Ntl hydrolyzes trehalose, which plays a role in environmental stress response in many organisms, including M. acridum. Demonstration of a relationship between Ntl and thermotolerance or virulence may offer a new strategy for enhancing conidiospore thermotolerance of entomopathogenic fungi through genetic engineering. Results We selected four Ntl over-expression and four Ntl RNA interference (RNAi transformations in which Ntl expression is different. Compared to the wild-type, Ntl mRNA expression was reduced to 35-66% in the RNAi mutants and increased by 2.5-3.5-fold in the over-expression mutants. The RNAi conidiospores exhibited less trehalase activity, accumulated more trehalose, and were much more tolerant of heat stress than the wild-type. The opposite effects were found in conidiospores of over-expression mutants compared to RNAi mutants. Furthermore, virulence was not altered in the two types of mutants compared to the wild type. Conclusions Ntl controlled trehalose accumulation in M. acridum by degrading trehalose, and thus affected conidiospore thermotolerance. These results offer a new strategy for enhancing conidiospore thermotolerance of entomopathogenic fungi without affecting virulence.

  7. Evidence for a modulation of neutral trehalase activity by Ca2+ and cAMP signaling pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae neutral trehalase (encoded by NTH1 is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA and by an endogenous modulator protein. A yeast strain with knockouts of CMK1 and CMK2 genes (cmk1cmk2 and its isogenic control (CMK1CMK2 were used to investigate the role of CaM kinase II in the in vitro activation of neutral trehalase during growth on glucose. In the exponential growth phase, cmk1cmk2 cells exhibited basal trehalase activity and an activation ratio by PKA very similar to that found in CMK1CMK2 cells. At diauxie, even though both cells presented comparable basal trehalase activities, cmk1cmk2 cells showed reduced activation by PKA and lower total trehalase activity when compared to CMK1CMK2 cells. To determine if CaM kinase II regulates NTH1 expression or is involved in post-translational modulation of neutral trehalase activity, NTH1 promoter activity was evaluated using an NTH1-lacZ reporter gene. Similar ß-galactosidase activities were found for CMK1CMK2 and cmk1cmk2 cells, ruling out the role of CaM kinase II in NTH1 expression. Thus, CaM kinase II should act in concert with PKA on the activation of the cryptic form of neutral trehalase. A model for trehalase regulation by CaM kinase II is proposed whereby the target protein for Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase II phosphorylation is not the neutral trehalase itself. The possible identity of this target protein with the recently identified trehalase-associated protein YLR270Wp is discussed.

  8. Structure Biology of Membrane Bound Enzymes

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    Fu, Dax [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). School of Medicine. Dept. of Physiology

    2016-11-30

    The overall goal of the proposed research is to understand the membrane-associated active processes catalyzed by an alkane $\\square$-hydroxylase (AlkB) from eubacterium Pseudomonase oleovorans. AlkB performs oxygenation of unactivated hydrocarbons found in crude oils. The enzymatic reaction involves energy-demanding steps in the membrane with the uses of structurally unknown metal active sites featuring a diiron [FeFe] center. At present, a critical barrier to understanding the membrane-associated reaction mechanism is the lack of structural information. The structural biology efforts have been challenged by technical difficulties commonly encountered in crystallization and structural determination of membrane proteins. The specific aims of the current budget cycle are to crystalize AlkB and initiate X-ray analysis to set the stage for structural determination. The long-term goals of our structural biology efforts are to provide an atomic description of AlkB structure, and to uncover the mechanisms of selective modification of hydrocarbons. The structural information will help elucidating how the unactivated C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons are oxidized to initiate biodegradation and biotransformation processes. The knowledge gained will be fundamental to biotechnological applications to biofuel transformation of non-edible oil feedstock. Renewable biodiesel is a promising energy carry that can be used to reduce fossil fuel dependency. The proposed research capitalizes on prior BES-supported efforts on over-expression and purification of AlkB to explore the inner workings of a bioenergy-relevant membrane-bound enzyme.

  9. Stress Tolerance in Doughs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Trehalase Mutants Derived from Commercial Baker’s Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Shima, Jun; Hino, Akihiro; Yamada-Iyo, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Mori, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is widely believed to be a critical determinant in improving the stress tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used in commercial bread dough. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cells, we constructed, for the first time, diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Δnth1), acid trehalase mutants (Δath1), and double mutants (Δnth1 ath1) by using commercial baker’s yeast strains as the parent strains and the gene disruption me...

  10. Heterologous expression and purification of membrane-bound pyrophosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellosalo, J.; Kajander, T.; Palmgren, Michael Broberg

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatases (M-PPases) are enzymes that couple the hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate to pumping of protons or sodium ions. In plants and bacteria they are important for relieving stress caused by low energy levels during anoxia, drought, nutrient deficiency, cold and low l...

  11. Tunable Tensor Voting Improves Grouping of Membrane-Bound Macromolecules

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    Loss, Leandro A.; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-15

    Membrane-bound macromolecules are responsible for structural support and mediation of cell-cell adhesion in tissues. Quantitative analysis of these macromolecules provides morphological indices for damage or loss of tissue, for example as a result of exogenous stimuli. From an optical point of view, a membrane signal may have nonuniform intensity around the cell boundary, be punctate or diffused, and may even be perceptual at certain locations along the boundary. In this paper, a method for the detection and grouping of punctate, diffuse curvilinear signals is proposed. Our work builds upon the tensor voting and the iterative voting frameworks to propose an efficient method to detect and refine perceptually interesting curvilinear structures in images. The novelty of our method lies on the idea of iteratively tuning the tensor voting fields, which allows the concentration of the votes only over areas of interest. We validate the utility of our system with synthetic and annotated real data. The effectiveness of the tunable tensor voting is demonstrated on complex phenotypic signals that are representative of membrane-bound macromolecular structures.

  12. Mechanism of biological denitrification inhibition: procyanidins induce an allosteric transition of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase through membrane alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Poly, Franck; Piola, Florence; Pancton, Muriel; Comte, Gilles; Meiffren, Guillaume; Haichar, Feth el Zahar

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it has been shown that procyanidins from Fallopia spp. inhibit bacterial denitrification, a phenomenon called biological denitrification inhibition (BDI). However, the mechanisms involved in such a process remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of BDI involving procyanidins, using the model strain Pseudomonas brassicacearum NFM 421. The aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) respiration, cell permeability and cell viability of P. brassicacearum were determined as a function of procyanidin concentration. The effect of procyanidins on the bacterial membrane was observed using transmission electronic microscopy. Bacterial growth, denitrification, NO3- and NO2-reductase activity, and the expression of subunits of NO3- (encoded by the gene narG) and NO2-reductase (encoded by the gene nirS) under NO3 or NO2 were measured with and without procyanidins. Procyanidins inhibited the denitrification process without affecting aerobic respiration at low concentrations. Procyanidins also disturbed cell membranes without affecting cell viability. They specifically inhibited NO3- but not NO2-reductase.Pseudomonas brassicacearum responded to procyanidins by over-expression of the membrane-bound NO3-reductase subunit (encoded by the gene narG). Our results suggest that procyanidins can specifically inhibit membrane-bound NO3-reductase inducing enzymatic conformational changes through membrane disturbance and that P. brassicacearum responds by over-expressing membrane-bound NO3-reductase. Our results lead the way to a better understanding of BDI. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase is essential for glyceric acid production in Acetobacter tropicalis.

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    Habe, Hiroshi; Sato, Shun; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Sakaki, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    Acetobacter tropicalis NBRC16470 can produce highly enantiomerically pure D-glyceric acid (D-GA; >99 % enantiomeric excess) from glycerol. To investigate whether membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (mADH) is involved in GA production in A. tropicalis, we amplified part of the gene encoding mADH subunit I (adhA) using polymerase chain reaction and constructed an adhA-disrupted mutant of A. tropicalis (ΔadhA). Because ΔadhA did not produce GA, we confirmed that mADH is essential for the conversion of glycerol to GA. We also cloned and sequenced the entire region corresponding to adhA and adhB, which encodes mADH subunit II. The sequences showed high identities (84-86 %) with the equivalent mADH subunits from other Acetobacter spp.

  14. NMR spectroscopic studies of membrane-bound biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlweg, W.

    2013-01-01

    In the course of this thesis, biological NMR spectroscopy was employed in studying membrane-bound peptides and proteins, for which structural information is still comparatively hard to obtain. Initial work focused on various model peptides bound to membrane-mimicking micelles, studying the protonation state of arginine in a membrane environment. Strong evidence for a cation-π complex was found in TM7, a peptide which forms the seventh transmembrane helix of subunit a of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). V-ATPase is a physiologically highly relevant proton pump, which is present in intracellular membranes of all eukaryotic organisms, as well as the plasma membrane of several specialized cells. Loss of functional V-ATPase is associated with human diseases such as osteopetrosis, distal renal tubular acidosis or the spreading of cancer. V-ATPase is considered a potential drug target in the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer, or in the development of novel contraceptives. Results from NMR solution structure determination, NMR titration experiments, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy confirm the existence of a buried cation-? complex formed between arginine residue R735, which is essential for proton transport, and neighbouring tryptophan and tyrosine residues. In vivo experiments in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using selective growth tests and fluorescence microscopy showed that formation of the cation-π complex is essential for V-ATPase function. Deletion of both aromatic residues, as well as only the one tryptophan residue leads to growth defects and inability to maintain vacuolar pH homeostasis. These findings shine new light on the still elusive mechanism of proton transport in V-ATPase, and show that arginine R735 may be directly involved in proton transfer across the membrane. (author) [de

  15. Activity and Heat Stability of Trehalase from the Mycelium and Ascospores of Neurospora

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    Hecker, Lanny I.; Sussman, Alfred S.

    1973-01-01

    Trehalases from the ascospores of Neurospora tetrasperma and the mycelium of N. crassa were compared. Enzymes from both sources have identical electrophoretic mobilities, Km's, responses to pH, immunological reactions, and activities in low-molarity buffers. Because both enzymes are so similar, conclusions about the properties of the ascospore enzyme may, be made by studying mycelial trehalase. Mycelial trehalase is most active and stable in low-molarity buffers. The enzyme exists in at least three species; the smallest has a molecular weight between 105,000 and 125,000 and is predominant in low-molarity buffers at 37 C. The stability of trehalase to heating at 65 C can be increased by increasing enzyme concentration and by the addition of polyols. Ascospores contain large amounts of trehalose, which protects trehalase from heat inactivation at 65 C. The importance of this phenomenon in vivo and its relationship to the localization of trehalase in ascospores is discussed. Images PMID:4269376

  16. The morphogenetic MreBCD proteins of Escherichia coli form an essential membrane-bound complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Torben; Bork-Jensen, J.; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    . subtilis and C. crescentus, the mreB gene is essential. However, in E. coli, mreB was inferred not to be essential. Using a tight, conditional gene depletion system, we systematically investigated whether the E. coli mreBCD-encoded components were essential. We found that cells depleted of mreBCD became......D. In contrast, MreB and MreD did not interact in this assay. Thus, we conclude that the E. coli MreBCD form an essential membrane-bound complex. Curiously, MreB did not form cables in cell depleted for MreC, MreD or RodA, indicating a mutual interdependency between MreB filament morphology and cell shape. Based......MreB proteins of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Caulobacter crescentus form actin-like cables lying beneath the cell surface. The cables are required to guide longitudinal cell wall synthesis and their absence leads to merodiploid spherical and inflated cells prone to cell lysis. In B...

  17. Investigating membrane-bound Argonaute functions in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barghetti, Andrea

    by direct cleavage or by inhibition of their translation. Arabidopsis genome encode for 10 different AGO proteins, of which AGO1 is the main effector of post-transcriptional gene silencing mediated by sRNA. Importantly, a fraction of AGO1 population is associated with endomembranes, in particular...

  18. Targeting of a chimeric human histone fusion mRNA to membrane-bound polysomes in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambetti, G.; Stein, J.; Stein, G.

    1987-01-01

    The subcellular location of histone mRNA-containing polysomes may play a key role in the posttranscriptional events that mediate histone mRNA turnover following inhibition of DNA synthesis. Previously, it has been shown that histone mRNA is found primarily on free polysomes that are associated with the cytoskeleton. The authors report here the construction of an Escherichia coli pBR322 β-lactamase signal peptide-human H3 histone fusion gene. The fusion transcript is targeted to membrane-bound polysomes and remains stable following interruption of DNA replication. Relocating mRNA within the cell may provide a procedure for studying the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression

  19. Membrane-bound ATPase contributes to hop resistance of Lactobacillus brevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; van Veen, HW; Saito, H; Kobayashi, H; Konings, WN

    2002-01-01

    The activity of the membrane-bound H+-ATPase of the beer spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus brevis ABBC45 increased upon adaptation to bacteriostatic hop compounds. The ATPase activity was optimal around pH 5.6 and increased up to fourfold when L. brevis was exposed to 666 muM hop compounds. The

  20. Study on the changes in the levels of membrane-bound ATPases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt has been made to determine the deleterious effects of λ cyhalothrin- induced in fresh water tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) with respect to changes in the activities of membrane-bound ATPases (Na+/K+, Mg+ and Ca2+ ATPase) and mineral status ...

  1. Dissociation and purification of the endogenous membrane-bound Vo complex from Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sumei; Hong, Tao; Wang, Kun; Lu, Yinghong; Zhou, Min

    2017-10-01

    Most proteins occur and function in complexes rather than as isolated entities in membranes. In most cases macromolecules with multiple subunits are purified from endogenous sources. In this study, an endogenous membrane-protein complex was obtained from Pichia pastoris, which can be grown at high densities to significantly improve the membrane protein yield. We successfully isolated the membrane-bound Vo complex of V-ATPase from P. pastoris using a fusion FLAG tag attached to the C-terminus of subunit a to generate the vph-tag strain, which was used for dissociation and purification. After FLAG affinity and size exclusion chromatography purification, the production quantity and purity of the membrane-bound Vo complex was 20 μg l -1 and >98%, respectively. The subunits of the endogenous membrane-bound Vo complex observed in P. pastoris were similar to those obtained from S. cerevisiae, as demonstrated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Therefore, successful dissociation and purification of the membrane-bound Vo complex at a high purity and sufficient quantity was achieved via a rapid and simple procedure that can be used to obtain the endogenous membrane-protein complexes from P. pastoris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Steric Pressure among Membrane-Bound Polymers Opposes Lipid Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Zachary I; Kenyon, Laura E; Carrillo, Adelita; Espinoza, Isai; Nagib, Fatema; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-04-19

    Lipid rafts are thought to be key organizers of membrane-protein complexes in cells. Many proteins that interact with rafts have bulky polymeric components such as intrinsically disordered protein domains and polysaccharide chains. Therefore, understanding the interaction between membrane domains and membrane-bound polymers provides insights into the roles rafts play in cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that high concentrations of membrane-bound polymeric domains create significant lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces. Furthermore, our recent work has shown that lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces opposes the assembly of membrane domains. Building on these findings, here we report that membrane-bound polymers are potent suppressors of membrane phase separation, which can destabilize lipid domains with substantially greater efficiency than globular domains such as membrane-bound proteins. Specifically, we created giant vesicles with a ternary lipid composition, which separated into coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases. Lipids with saturated tails and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains conjugated to their head groups were included at increasing molar concentrations. When these lipids were sparse on the membrane surface they partitioned to the liquid ordered phase. However, as they became more concentrated, the fraction of GUVs that were phase-separated decreased dramatically, ultimately yielding a population of homogeneous membrane vesicles. Experiments and physical modeling using compositions of increasing PEG molecular weight and lipid miscibility phase transition temperature demonstrate that longer polymers are the most efficient suppressors of membrane phase separation when the energetic barrier to lipid mixing is low. In contrast, as the miscibility transition temperature increases, longer polymers are more readily driven out of domains by the increased steric pressure. Therefore, the concentration of shorter polymers required

  3. The impact of physiological crowding on the diffusivity of membrane bound proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Justin R; Busch, David J; Bell, David R; Li, Brian; Ren, Pengyu; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-02-21

    Diffusion of transmembrane and peripheral membrane-bound proteins within the crowded cellular membrane environment is essential to diverse biological processes including cellular signaling, endocytosis, and motility. Nonetheless we presently lack a detailed understanding of the influence of physiological levels of crowding on membrane protein diffusion. Utilizing quantitative in vitro measurements, here we demonstrate that the diffusivities of membrane bound proteins follow a single linearly decreasing trend with increasing membrane coverage by proteins. This trend holds for homogenous protein populations across a range of protein sizes and for heterogeneous mixtures of proteins of different sizes, such that protein diffusivity is controlled by the total coverage of the surrounding membrane. These results demonstrate that steric exclusion within the crowded membrane environment can fundamentally limit the diffusive rate of proteins, regardless of their size. In cells this "speed limit" could be modulated by changes in local membrane coverage, providing a mechanism for tuning the rate of molecular interaction and assembly.

  4. Urinary trehalase activity as an indicator of kidney injury due to environmental cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Kohkichi; Katoh, Terutaka; Morikawa, Yuuko; Aoshima, Keiko; Nishijo, Muneko; Teranishi, Hidetoyo; Kasuya, Minoru

    1988-12-01

    One hundred and seventy-eight subjects, patients with Itai-itai disease and their family members, aged 12-87 years living in a cadmium (Cd)-polluted area in the Jinzu River basin (Cd-exposed group) and 176 controls (control group) were examined. In the Cd-exposed group urinary trehalase increased with increasing age, urinary /beta/2-microglobulin (/beta/2-m) and retinol-binding protein. Although urinary cadmium was higher in the Cd-exposed group, no particular correlation was found between urinary trehalase and urinary cadmium. Seventeen men and 11 women showed raised urinary trehalase activities despite normal values of urinary /beta/2-m (<300 /mu/g/g.creatinine), suggesting that urinary trehalase increases earlier than urinary /beta/2-m. In 19 patients with Itai-itai disease included in the Cd-exposed group, urinary trehalase decreased with decreasing reciprocal of serum creatinine, suggesting that urinary trehalase decreases in the most advanced cases of chronic cadmium nephropathy due to reduced tubular cell mass. (orig.).

  5. Synthetic activity enhancement of membrane-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis by pretreatment with isooctane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Xu, Yan; Teng, Yun

    2007-05-01

    The cell-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 with high catalysis ability for ester synthesis was located as a membrane-bound lipase by the treatments of Yatalase firstly. In order to improve its synthetic activity in non-aqueous phase, the pretreatments of this enzyme with various organic solvents were investigated. The pretreatment with isooctane improved evidently the lipase synthetic activity, resulting in about 139% in relative synthetic activity and 115% in activity recovery. The morphological changes of mycelia caused by organic solvent pretreatments could influence the exposure of the membrane-bound enzyme from mycelia and the exhibition of the lipase activity. The pretreatment conditions with isooctane and acetone were further investigated, and the optimum effect was obtained by the isooctane pretreatment at 4 degrees C for 1 h, resulting in 156% in relative synthetic activity and 126% in activity recovery. When the pretreated lipases were employed as catalysts for the esterification production of ethyl hexanoate in heptane, higher initial reaction rate and higher final molar conversion were obtained using the lipase pretreated with isooctane, compared with the untreated lyophilized one. This result suggested that the pretreatment of the membrane-bound lipase with isooctane could be an effective method to substitute the lyophilization for preparing biocatalysts used in non-aqueous phase reactions.

  6. Deoxygenation Affects Composition of Membrane-Bound Proteins in Human Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana G. Luneva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: ATP release from erythrocyte plays a key role in hypoxia-induced elevation of blood flow in systematic circulation. We have previously shown that hemolysis contributes to erythrocyte ATP release triggered by several stimuli, including hypoxia, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-increased membrane fragility remain unknown. Methods: In this study, we compared the action of hypoxia on hemolysis, ATP release and the composition of membrane-bound proteins in human erythrocytes. Results: Twenty minutes incubation of human erythrocytes in the oxygen-free environment increased the content of extracellular hemoglobin by ∼1.5 fold. Paired measurements of hemoglobin and ATP content in the same samples, showed a positive correlation between hemolysis and ATP release. Comparative analysis of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of erythrocyte ghosts obtained under control and deoxygenated conditions revealed a ∼2-fold elevation of the content of membrane-bound protein with Mr of ∼60 kDa. Conclusion: Deoxygenation of human erythrocytes affects composition of membrane-bound proteins. Additional experiments should be performed to identify the molecular origin of 60 kDa protein and its role in the attenuation of erythrocyte integrity and ATP release in hypoxic conditions.

  7. Compartmentalized system with membrane-bound glycerol kinase. Activity and product distribution versus asymmetrical substrate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, A; Merchie, B; Maïsterrena, B

    1991-03-15

    An artificial-membrane-bound glycerokinase chosen as a membrane-bound two-substrate-enzyme model has been used to separate two unequal compartments of a specially designed diffusion cell. An interesting feature is the asymmetry of compartments and the existence of a diffusion layer adjacent to only one face of the enzymic membrane. In such a situation the apparent enzyme activity and the product distribution in the system have been studied versus all the possibilities of combination of ATP and glycerol supply. Our approach has lead us to differentiate two different roles played by a diffusion layer adjacent to a permeable enzymic membrane. Depending on the spatial origin of the enzymic substrates (i.e. from which compartment they derive), the diffusion layer can play either the role of a passive additional resistance to that of the membrane or the role of a third compartment in which the reaction product can partially accumulate before splitting on both parts of the membrane. Our results mainly demonstrate that a membrane-bound enzyme activity and the resulting product distribution occurring in a compartmentalized system may be regulated by the cumulative effect due to the asymmetry in volumes of the compartments, the presence of a diffusion layer and the different possibilities of substrate supply. With the topography studied, which is close to that reported for many 'in vivo' situations, the product may be diffused lead to vectorial metabolism processes.

  8. Hydrogen Production by a Hyperthermophilic Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase in Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S E; Hopkins, R C; Blanchette, C; Walsworth, V; Sumbad, R; Fischer, N; Kuhn, E; Coleman, M; Chromy, B; Letant, S; Hoeprich, P; Adams, M W; Henderson, P T

    2008-10-22

    Hydrogenases constitute a promising class of enzymes for ex vivo hydrogen production. Implementation of such applications is currently hindered by oxygen sensitivity and, in the case of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH), poor water solubility. Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), formed from apolipoproteins and phospholipids, offer a novel means to incorporate MBH into in a well-defined water-soluble matrix that maintains the enzymatic activity and is amenable to incorporation into more complex architectures. We report the synthesis, hydrogen-evolving activity and physical characterization of the first MBH-NLP assembly. This may ultimately lead to the development of biomimetic hydrogen production devices.

  9. Optimisation of the Factor VIII yield in mammalian cell cultures by reducing the membrane bound fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Mille Petersen; Nørby, Peder Lisby; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2011-01-01

    In vivo, clotting Factor VIII (FVIII) circulates in plasma bound to von Willebrand factor (vWF), and the vWF:FVIII complex prevents binding of FVIII to phosphatidylserine (PS). Activation of FVIII by thrombin releases FVIII from vWF, and subsequently FVIII binds to PS exposed on activated platelets...... or ortho-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) demonstrated that annexin V and OPLS were able to reduce the membrane bound fraction of rFVIII by 70% and 30%, respectively. Finally, adding OPLS to CHO cells stably expressing FVIII increased the yield by 50%. Using this new knowledge, the recovery of rFVIII could...

  10. Probing the Influence of Linker Length and Flexibility in the Design and Synthesis of New Trehalase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampiero D’Adamio

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to synthesize new trehalase inhibitors selective towards the insect trehalase versus the porcine trehalase, in view of their application as potentially non-toxic insecticides and fungicides. The synthesis of a new pseudodisaccharide mimetic 8, by means of a stereoselective α-glucosylation of the key pyrrolizidine intermediate 13, was accomplished. The activity of compound 8 as trehalase inhibitor towards C. riparius trehalase was evaluated and the results showed that 8 was active in the μM range and showed a good selectivity towards the insect trehalase. To reduce the overall number of synthetic steps, simpler and more flexible disaccharide mimetics 9–11 bearing a pyrrolidine nucleus instead of the pyrrolizidine core were synthesized. The biological data showed the key role of the linker chain’s length in inducing inhibitory properties, since only compounds 9 (α,β-mixture, bearing a two-carbon atom linker chain, maintained activity as trehalase inhibitors. A proper change in the glucosyl donor-protecting groups allowed the stereoselective synthesis of the β-glucoside 9β, which was active in the low micromolar range (IC50 = 0.78 μM and 12-fold more potent (and more selective than 9α towards the insect trehalase.

  11. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  12. Membrane-bound globin X protects the cell from reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jonas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-08

    Globin X (GbX) is a member of the globin family that emerged early in the evolution of Metazoa. In vertebrates, GbX is restricted to lampreys, fish, amphibians and some reptiles, and is expressed in neurons. Unlike any other metazoan globin, GbX is N-terminally acylated and anchored in the cell membrane via myristoyl and palmitoyl groups, suggesting a unique function. Here, we compared the capacity of GbX to protect a mouse neuronal cell line from hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) with that of myoglobin. To evaluate the contribution of membrane-binding, we generated a mutated version of GbX without acyl groups. All three globins enhanced cell viability under hypoxia, with myoglobin having the most pronounced effect. GbX but not myoglobin protected the cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress. Membrane-bound GbX was significantly more efficient than its mutated, soluble form. Furthermore, myoglobin and mutated GbX increased production of ROS upon H2O2-treatment, while membrane-bound GbX did not. The results indicate that myoglobin enhances O2 supply while GbX protects the cell membrane from ROS-stress. The ancient origin of GbX suggests that ROS-protection reflects the function of the early globins before they acquired a respiratory role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular cloning, mRNA expression and characterization of membrane-bound hemoglobin in oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengming; Xuan, Fujun; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhu, Jian; Ge, Xianping; Wu, Xugan

    2017-05-01

    Most hemoglobins are respiratory proteins and are ubiquitous in animals, bacteria, fungi, protists, and plants. In this study, we describe a membrane-bound hemoglobin in the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (MnHb), which also expresses hemocyanin. MnHb cDNA was cloned using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approach, which afforded a 1201bp gene encoding a 193 amino acid polypeptide. Bioinformatic evaluation suggested MnHb is membrane anchored by N-myristoylation, and immunofluorescence confirmed its location in the membrane of chief cells in the gill. The effect of hypoxia on MnHb expression was investigated, and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting showed that MnHb was expressed almost exclusively in the gill. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed a significant increase in expression after 6h of hypoxia, and levels peaked at 24h due to oxidative stress. Exposure of cultured prawns to the stress inducer H 2 O 2 significantly up-regulated the expression of MnHb in a dose-dependent manner. MnHb may have a role in protecting cell membrane lipids from damage by reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  15. Effect of narcotics on membrane-bound mitochondrial processes in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Michiels, Ellen

    in vivo (zebrafish embryo) and in vitro tests. We applied a passive dosing method to expose zebrafish embryos up to 5 days post fertilization to linear dilution series of a set of non-polar narcotics (phenanthrene and three chlorobenzene structure analogues). In addition to increasing mortality, we...... membrane-bound process and is therefore a potential target. We found that in zebrafish embryos ETC activity was increased at low exposure concentrations, suggesting a compensatory response, while it decreased when exposure concentrations reached levels causing reduced motility, heart rate and eventually...... mortality. The effect of narcotic compounds on ETC activity was confirmed in vitro: we observed inhibition of the ETC after adding the compounds directly to a homogenate of control embryos. To further investigate effects on the energy production system, and to characterize the observed compensatory response...

  16. Free and membrane-bound ribosomes and polysomes in hippocampal neurons during a learning experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, J; David, H; Pohle, W; Marx, I; Matthies, H

    1975-01-24

    The ribosomes of the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells of hipocampus were investigated by morphometric methods after the acquisition of a shock-motivated brightness discrimination in rats. A significant increase in the total number of ribosomes was observed in CA1 cells of trained animals and in CA3 cells of both active controls and trained rats. A significant increase in membrane-bound ribosomes was obtained in CA1 and CA3 cells after training only. The results confirm the suggestion of an increased protein synthesis in hippocampal neurons during and after the acquisition of a brightness discrimination, as we have concluded from out previous investigations on the incorporation of labeled amino acids under identical experimental conditions. The results lead to the assumption that the protein synthesis in some neuronal cells may probably differ not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively in trained and untrained animals.

  17. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Cristina; Besson, Stéphane; Brondino, Carlos D; González, Pablo J; Fauque, Guy; Lampreia, Jorge; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2008-11-01

    Membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617 can be solubilized in either of two ways that will ultimately determine the presence or absence of the small (Iota) subunit. The enzyme complex (NarGHI) is composed of three subunits with molecular masses of 130, 65, and 20 kDa. This enzyme contains approximately 14 Fe, 0.8 Mo, and 1.3 molybdopterin guanine dinucleotides per enzyme molecule. Curiously, one heme b and 0.4 heme c per enzyme molecule have been detected. These hemes were potentiometrically characterized by optical spectroscopy at pH 7.6 and two noninteracting species were identified with respective midpoint potentials at Em=+197 mV (heme c) and -4.5 mV (heme b). Variable-temperature (4-120 K) X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies performed on both as-isolated and dithionite-reduced nitrate reductase showed, respectively, an EPR signal characteristic of a [3Fe-4S]+ cluster and overlapping signals associated with at least three types of [4Fe-4S]+ centers. EPR of the as-isolated enzyme shows two distinct pH-dependent Mo(V) signals with hyperfine coupling to a solvent-exchangeable proton. These signals, called "low-pH" and "high-pH," changed to a pH-independent Mo(V) signal upon nitrate or nitrite addition. Nitrate addition to dithionite-reduced samples at pH 6 and 7.6 yields some of the EPR signals described above and a new rhombic signal that has no hyperfine structure. The relationship between the distinct EPR-active Mo(V) species and their plausible structures is discussed on the basis of the structural information available to date for closely related membrane-bound nitrate reductases.

  18. Differential changes in the activity of cytosolic and vacuolar trehalases along the growth cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel, P F; Argüelles, J C

    1994-07-06

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells contain two intracellular and soluble trehalases with distinct subcellular location (cytosol and vacuoles, respectively). Both enzymes showed an opposite pattern of activity along the growth cycle. Activity of the cytosolic trehalase was high in cells growing exponentially on fermentable sugars (glucose, mannose or galactose) and sharply decayed as the cultures enter stationary phase coinciding with the beginning of trehalose biosynthesis. By contrast, vacuolar trehalase was only detectable in glucose-grown resting cells or in cultures growing on respiratory substrates (glycerol or ethanol). This enzyme was partially derepressed in the mutant hex2, which is deficient in glucose repression. Addition of fresh YPD medium to stationary-phase cultures induced the sudden reactivation of cytosolic trehalase with the concomitant slower inactivation of vacuolar trehalase. However, addition of glucose or various nitrogen sources alone had only a minor effect on both activities. The presence of cycloheximide had no effect on cytosolic trehalase, whereas completely blocked the appearance of vacuolar trehalase suggesting the requirement of protein synthesis 'de novo'.

  19. Characterization of a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase responsible for carminic acid biosynthesis in Dactylopius coccus Costa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannangara, Rubini; Siukstaite, Lina; Borch-Jensen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Carminic acid, a glucosylated anthraquinone found in scale insects like Dactylopius coccus, has since ancient times been used as a red colorant in various applications. Here we show that a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase, isolated from D. coccus and designated DcUGT2, catalyzes the glucosyla......Carminic acid, a glucosylated anthraquinone found in scale insects like Dactylopius coccus, has since ancient times been used as a red colorant in various applications. Here we show that a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase, isolated from D. coccus and designated DcUGT2, catalyzes...

  20. Trealose e trealase em tenebrio molitor L Trehalose and Trehalase in Tenebrio molitor L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Piedras Lopes

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a concentração em trealose e a atividade em trealase do Tenebrio molitor L. durante as tres fases da metamorfose (larva, ninfa, imago. Verificou-se que na larva e no adulto os valores são mais elevados conforme a curva da fig. 3. A trealose foi expressa em mg/g de Tenebrio e a trealose por µg de glicose/mg proteina.Trehalose and trehalase were determined in the Tenebrio molitor L., using larva, pupa and imago. A total number of 895 animals was analyzed. A growth curve up to the end of the larval stage was established (Fig. 1 and compared with the normal one obtained by Fraenkel. It was shown that trehalose and trehalase are more concentrated in the larva and imago presenting a curve with two arms as depicted in the Fig. 3. Trehalase was expressed in mg/g of Tenebrio and trehalase in µg of glucose /mg proteín.

  1. Nitrate reduction associated with respiration in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 is performed by a membrane-bound molybdoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Felix M; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Lucca, María E; Perotti, Nora I; Brondino, Carlos D

    2011-10-01

    The purification and biochemical characterization of the respiratory membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 (Sm NR) is reported together with the optimal conditions for cell growth and enzyme production. The best biomass yield was obtained under aerobic conditions in a fed-batch system using Luria-Bertani medium with glucose as carbon source. The highest level of Sm NR production was achieved using microaerobic conditions with the medium supplemented with both nitrate and nitrite. Sm NR is a mononuclear Mo-protein belonging to the DMSO reductase family isolated as a heterodimeric enzyme containing two subunits of 118 and 45 kDa. Protein characterization by mass spectrometry showed homology with respiratory nitrate reductases. UV-Vis spectra of as-isolated and dithionite reduced Sm NR showed characteristic absorption bands of iron-sulfur and heme centers. Kinetic studies indicate that Sm NR follows a Michaelis-Menten mechanism (K (m) = 97 ± 11 μM, V = 9.4 ± 0.5 μM min(-1), and k (cat) = 12.1 ± 0.6 s(-1)) and is inhibited by azide, chlorate, and cyanide with mixed inhibition patterns. Physiological and kinetic studies indicate that molybdenum is essential for NR activity and that replacement of this metal for tungsten inhibits the enzyme. Although no narGHI gene cluster has been annotated in the genome of rhizobia, the biochemical characterization indicates that Sm NR is a Mo-containing NR enzyme with molecular organization similar to NarGHI.

  2. Membrane-bound organelles versus membrane-less compartments and their control of anabolic pathways in Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; Rabouille, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Classically, we think of cell compartmentalization as being achieved by membrane-bound organelles. It has nevertheless emerged that membrane-less assemblies also largely contribute to this compartmentalization. Here, we compare the characteristics of both types of compartmentalization in term of

  3. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundin, A.; Dijkman, R.; Bergstrom, T.; Kann, N.; Adamiak, B.; Hannoun, C.; Kindler, E.; Jonsdottir, H.R.; Muth, D.; Kint, J.; Forlenza, M.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound

  4. The membrane-bound form of gene 9 minor coat protein of bacteriophage M13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houbiers, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriophage M13 is a virus that infects the bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli ), a single cell organism that resides in our intestines. It consists of the cytoplasm (contents) and a double membrane that keeps the

  5. Activation of the Arabidopsis membrane-bound transcription factor bZIP28 is mediated by site-2 protease, but not site-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yuji; Ashida, Makoto; Hasegawa, Chisa; Tabara, Kazuki; Mishiba, Kei-Ichiro; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2017-08-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a homeostatic cellular response conserved in eukaryotic cells to alleviate the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Arabidopsis bZIP28 is a membrane-bound transcription factor activated by proteolytic cleavage in response to ER stress, thereby releasing its cytosolic portion containing the bZIP domain from the membrane to translocate into the nucleus where it induces the transcription of genes encoding ER-resident molecular chaperones and folding enzymes. It has been widely recognized that the proteolytic activation of bZIP28 is mediated by the sequential cleavage of site-1 protease (S1P) and site-2 protease (S2P). In the present study we provide evidence that bZIP28 protein is cleaved by S2P, but not by S1P. We demonstrated that wild-type and s1p mutant plants produce the active, nuclear form of bZIP28 in response to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin. In contrast, tunicamycin-treated s2p mutants do not accumulate the active, nuclear form of bZIP28. Consistent with these observations, s2p mutants, but not s1p mutants, exhibited a defective transcriptional response of ER stress-responsive genes and significantly higher sensitivity to tunicamycin. Interestingly, s2p mutants accumulate two membrane-bound bZIP28 fragments with a shorter ER lumen-facing C-terminal domain. Importantly, the predicted cleavage sites are located far from the canonical S1P recognition motif previously described. We propose that ER stress-induced proteolytic activation of bZIP28 is mediated by the sequential actions of as-yet-unidentified protease(s) and S2P, and does not require S1P. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Alteration of plasma membrane-bound redox systems of iron deficient pea roots by chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Planchon, Sebastien; Renaut, Jenny; Sergeant, Kjell; Lüthje, Sabine

    2011-08-12

    Iron is essential for all living organisms and plays a crucial role in pathogenicity. This study presents the first proteome analysis of plasma membranes isolated from pea roots. Protein profiles of four different samples (+Fe, +Fe/Chitosan, -Fe, and -Fe/Chitosan) were compared by native IEF-PAGE combined with in-gel activity stains and DIGE. Using DIGE, 89 proteins of interest were detected in plasma membrane fractions. Data revealed a differential abundance of several spots in all samples investigated. In comparison to the control and -FeCh the abundance of six protein spots increased whereas 56 spots decreased in +FeCh. Altered protein spots were analyzed by MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Besides stress-related proteins, transport proteins and redox enzymes were identified. Activity stains after native PAGE and spectrophotometric measurements demonstrated induction of a ferric-chelate reductase (-Fe) and a putative respiratory burst oxidase homolog (-FeCh). However, the activity of the ferric-chelate reductase decreased in -Fe plants after elicitor treatment. The activity of plasma membrane-bound class III peroxidases increased after elicitor treatment and decreased under iron-deficiency, whereas activity of quinone reductases decreased mostly after elicitor treatment. Possible functions of proteins identified and reasons for a weakened pathogen response of iron-deficient plants were discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ligand-modulated conformational switching in a fully synthetic membrane-bound receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Francis G. A.; Le Bailly, Bryden A. F.; Webb, Simon J.; Clayden, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Signal transduction through G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) involves binding to signalling molecules at the cell surface, which leads to global changes in molecular conformation that are communicated through the membrane. Artificial mechanisms for communication involving ligand binding and global conformational switching have been demonstrated so far only in the solution phase. Here, we report a membrane-bound synthetic receptor that responds to binding of a ligand by undergoing a conformational change that is propagated over several nanometres, deep into the phospholipid bilayer. Our design uses a helical foldamer core, with structural features borrowed from a class of membrane-active fungal antibiotics, ligated to a water-compatible, metal-centred binding site and a conformationally responsive fluorophore. Using the fluorophore as a remote reporter of conformational change, we find that binding of specific carboxylate ligands to a Cu(II) cofactor at the binding site perturbs the foldamer's global conformation, mimicking the conformational response of a GPCR to ligand binding.

  8. Electrostatic control by lipids upon the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, M L

    1981-04-06

    In this paper, the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase from bovine brain is shown to be controlled by electrostatic alterations of the charged lipids surrounding the enzyme. The properties under investigation are the enzymatic activity, activation energy and the response of the enzymatic system to temperature. Arrhenius plots of the ATPase activity are biphasic with a break at temperature Ti. The temperature Ti, the activation energies at temperatures above and below Ti, and the enzymatic activity at any constant temperature have been shown to depend upon the concentrations of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions in the solution. These electrolyte dependencies are ascribed to changes of electrostatic conditions at the lipids surrounding the ATPase. If the higher electrostatic screening ability of divalent ions is taken into account, the results in the presence of mono- and divalent ions become virtually the same. As a result of this work, it is concluded that electrostatic alterations are transmitted to the ATPase from the lipids of the membrane in which the enzyme is embedded. Inhibition and activation of the enzyme by mono-and divalent metal ions may thus be explained without any auxiliary hypothesis, particularly without postulating specific binding sites for the different ionic species at the protein. In addition, the specific lipid requirement of the ATPase may be understood better in the light of this interpretation.

  9. Steric pressure between membrane-bound proteins opposes lipid phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheve, Christine S; Gonzales, Paul A; Momin, Noor; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2013-01-30

    Cellular membranes are densely crowded with a diverse population of integral and membrane-associated proteins. In this complex environment, lipid rafts, which are phase-separated membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and saturated lipids, are thought to organize the membrane surface. Specifically, rafts may help to concentrate proteins and lipids locally, enabling cellular processes such as assembly of caveolae, budding of enveloped viruses, and sorting of lipids and proteins in the Golgi. However, the ability of rafts to concentrate protein species has not been quantified experimentally. Here we show that when membrane-bound proteins become densely crowded within liquid-ordered membrane regions, steric pressure arising from collisions between proteins can destabilize lipid phase separations, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of proteins and lipids over the membrane surface. Using a reconstituted system of lipid vesicles and recombinant proteins, we demonstrate that protein-protein steric pressure creates an energetic barrier to the stability of phase-separated membrane domains that increases in significance as the molecular weight of the proteins increases. Comparison with a simple analytical model reveals that domains are destabilized when the steric pressure exceeds the approximate enthalpy of membrane mixing. These results suggest that a subtle balance of free energies governs the stability of phase-separated cellular membranes, providing a new perspective on the role of lipid rafts as concentrators of membrane proteins.

  10. Membrane-bound state of the colicin E1 channel domain as an extended two-dimensional helical array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, S D; Lindeberg, M; Griko, Y; Salamon, Z; Tollin, G; Prendergast, F G; Cramer, W A

    1998-04-14

    Atomic level structures have been determined for the soluble forms of several colicins and toxins, but the structural changes that occur after membrane binding have not been well characterized. Changes occurring in the transition from the soluble to membrane-bound state of the C-terminal 190-residue channel polypeptide of colicin E1 (P190) bound to anionic membranes are described. In the membrane-bound state, the alpha-helical content increases from 60-64% to 80-90%, with a concomitant increase in the average length of the helical segments from 12 to 16 or 17 residues, close to the length required to span the membrane bilayer in the open channel state. The average distance between helical segments is increased and interhelix interactions are weakened, as shown by a major loss of tertiary structure interactions, decreased efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer from an energy donor on helix V of P190 to an acceptor on helix IX, and decreased resonance energy transfer at higher temperatures, not observed in soluble P190, implying freedom of motion of helical segments. Weaker interactions are also shown by a calorimetric thermal transition of low cooperativity, and the extended nature of the helical array is shown by a 3- to 4-fold increase in the average area subtended per molecule to 4,200 A2 on the membrane surface. The latter, with analysis of the heat capacity changes, implies the absence of a developed hydrophobic core in the membrane-bound P190. The membrane interfacial layer thus serves to promote formation of a highly helical extended two-dimensional flexible net. The properties of the membrane-bound state of the colicin channel domain (i.e., hydrophobic anchor, lengthened and loosely coupled alpha-helices, and close association with the membrane interfacial layer) are plausible structural features for the state that is a prerequisite for voltage gating, formation of transmembrane helices, and channel opening.

  11. Influence of kaempferol, a flavonoid compound, on membrane-bound ATPases in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Numair, Khalid S; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Chandramohan, Govindasamy

    2015-01-01

    Kaempferol is a flavonoid found in many edible plants (e.g. tea, cabbage, beans, tomato, strawberries, and grapes) and in plants or botanical products commonly used in traditional medicine. Numerous preclinical studies have shown that kaempferol have a wide range of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and antidiabetic activities. The present study investigates the effect of kaempferol on membrane-bound ATPases in erythrocytes and in liver, kidney, and heart of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced into adult male albino rats of the Wistar strain, by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight (BW)). Kaempferol (100 mg/kg BW) or glibenclamide (600 µg/kg BW) was administered orally once daily for 45 d to normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats. The effects of kaempferol on membrane-bound ATPases (total ATPase, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activity in erythrocytes and in liver, kidney, and heart were determined. In our study, diabetic rats had significantly (p kaempferol (100 mg/kg BW) or glibenclamide (600 µg/kg BW) for a period of 45 d resulted in significant (p kaempferol has the potential to restore deranged activity of membrane-bound ATPases in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Further detailed investigation is necessary to discover kaempferol's action mechanism.

  12. The catalytic function of cytochrome P450 is entwined with its membrane-bound nature [version 1; referees: 4 approved

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    Carlo Barnaba

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450, a family of monooxygenase enzymes, is organized as a catalytic metabolon, which requires enzymatic partners as well as environmental factors that tune its complex dynamic. P450 and its reducing counterparts—cytochrome P450-reductase and cytochrome b5—are membrane-bound proteins located in the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum. They are believed to dynamically associate to form functional complexes. Increasing experimental evidence signifies the role(s played by both protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in P450 catalytic function and efficiency. However, the biophysical challenges posed by their membrane-bound nature have severely limited high-resolution understanding of the molecular interfaces of these interactions. In this article, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on cytochrome P450, highlighting the environmental factors that are entwined with its metabolic function. Recent advances in structural biophysics are also discussed, setting up the bases for a new paradigm in the study of this important class of membrane-bound enzymes.

  13. Evaluation of membrane-bound and soluble forms of HLA-G in Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Murdaca, Giuseppe; Borro, Matteo; Puppo, Francesco

    2018-04-16

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a complex disease characterized by immune dysregulation, extensive vascular damage and wide-spread fibrosis. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classic class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule characterized by complex immuno-modulating properties. HLA-G is expressed on the membrane of different cell lineages in both physiological and pathological conditions. HLA-G is also detectable in soluble form (sHLA-G) deriving from the shedding of surface isoforms (sHLA-G1) or the secretion of soluble isoforms (HLA-G5). Several immunosuppressive functions have been attributed to both membrane-bound and soluble HLA-G molecules. The plasma levels of sHLA-G were higher in SSc patients (444.27 ± 304.84 U/ml) as compared to controls (16.74 ± 20.58 U/ml) (p G (r: 0.65; p G1 (r: 0.60; p = 0.003) and HLA-G5 (r: 0.47; p = 0.02). The percentage of HLA-G-positive monocytes (0.98 ± 1.72), CD4+ (0.37 ± 0.68), CD8+ (2.05 ± 3.74) and CD4+CD8+ double positive cells (14.53 ± 16.88) was higher in SSc patients than in controls (0.11 ± 0.08, 0.01 ± 0.01, 0.01 ± 0.01 and 0.39 ± 0.40, respectively) (p G molecules and the membrane expression of HLA-G by PBMC is clearly elevated suggesting an involvement of HLA-G molecules in the immune dysregulation of SSc. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Structural and dynamical insights into the membrane-bound α-synuclein.

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    Neha Jain

    Full Text Available Membrane-induced disorder-to-helix transition of α-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, has been implicated in a number of important neuronal functions as well as in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. In order to obtain structural insights of membrane-bound α-synuclein at the residue-specific resolution, we took advantage of the fact that the protein is devoid of tryptophan and incorporated single tryptophan at various residue positions along the sequence. These tryptophans were used as site-specific markers to characterize the structural and dynamical aspects of α-synuclein on the negatively charged small unilamellar lipid vesicles. An array of site-specific fluorescence readouts, such as the spectral-shift, quenching efficiency and anisotropy, allowed us to discern various features of the conformational rearrangements occurring at different locations of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane. In order to define the spatial localization of various regions of the protein near the membrane surface, we utilized a unique and sensitive indicator, namely, red-edge excitation shift (REES, which originates when a fluorophore is located in a highly ordered micro-environment. The extent of REES observed at different residue positions allowed us to directly identify the residues that are localized at the membrane-water interface comprising a thin (∼ 15 Å layer of motionally restrained water molecules and enabled us to construct a dynamic hydration map of the protein. The combination of site-specific fluorescence readouts allowed us to unravel the intriguing molecular details of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane in a direct model-free fashion. Additionally, the combination of methodologies described here are capable of distinguishing subtle but important structural alterations of α-synuclein bound to different negatively charged lipids with varied head-group chemistry. We believe that the structural modulations of α-synuclein on the membrane could

  15. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:25258549

  16. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect.

  17. Characterization of a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase responsible for carminic acid biosynthesis in Dactylopius coccus Costa

    OpenAIRE

    Kannangara, Rubini; Siukstaite, Lina; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Madsen, Bjørn; Kongstad, Kenneth T.; Staerk, Dan; Bennedsen, Mads; Okkels, Finn T.; Rasmussen, Silas A.; Larsen, Thomas O.; Frandsen, Rasmus J. N.; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2017-01-01

    Carminic acid, a glucosylated anthraquinone found in scale insects like Dactylopius coccus, has since ancient times been used as a red colorant in various applications. Here we show that a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase, isolated from D. coccus and designated DcUGT2, catalyzes the glucosylation of flavokermesic acid and kermesic acid into their respective C-glucosides dcII and carminic acid. DcUGT2 is predicted to be a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, contain...

  18. Two unrelated putative membrane-bound progestin receptors, progesterone membrane receptor component 1 (PGMRC1 and membrane progestin receptor (mPR beta, are expressed in the rainbow trout oocyte and exhibit similar ovarian expression patterns

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    Fostier Alexis

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In lower vertebrates, steroid-induced oocyte maturation is considered to involve membrane-bound progestin receptors. Two totally distinct classes of putative membrane-bound progestin receptors have been reported in vertebrates. A first class of receptors, now termed progesterone membrane receptor component (PGMRC; subtypes 1 and 2 has been studied since 1996 but never studied in a fish species nor in the oocyte of any animal species. A second class of receptors, termed membrane progestin receptors (mPR; subtypes alpha, beta and gamma, was recently described in vertebrates and implicated in the progestin-initiated induction of oocyte maturation in fish. Methods In the present study, we report the characterization of the full coding sequence of rainbow trout PGMRC1 and mPR beta cDNAs, their tissue distribution, their ovarian expression profiles during oogenesis, their hormonal regulation in the full grown ovary and the in situ localization of PGMRC1 mRNA in the ovary. Results Our results clearly show, for the first time in any animal species, that rainbow trout PGMRC1 mRNA is present in the oocyte and has a strong expression in ovarian tissue. In addition, we show that both mPR beta and PGMRC1, two members of distinct membrane-bound progestin receptor classes, exhibit highly similar ovarian expression profiles during the reproductive cycle with maximum levels during vitellogenesis and a down-expression during late vitellogenesis. In addition, the mRNA abundance of both genes is not increased after in vitro hormonal stimulation of full grown follicles by maturation inducing hormones. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that PGMRC1 is a new possible participant in the progestin-induced oocyte maturation in fish. However, its participation in the process of oocyte maturation, which remains to be confirmed, would occur at post-transcriptional levels.

  19. A genetic screen for anchorage-independent proliferation in mammalian cells identifies a membrane-bound neuregulin.

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    Davide Danovi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Anchorage-independent proliferation is a hallmark of oncogenic transformation and is thought to be conducive to proliferation of cancer cells away from their site of origin. We have previously reported that primary Schwann cells expressing the SV40 Large T antigen (LT are not fully transformed in that they maintain a strict requirement for attachment, requiring a further genetic change, such as oncogenic Ras, to gain anchorage-independence. Using the LT-expressing cells, we performed a genetic screen for anchorage-independent proliferation and identified Sensory and Motor Neuron Derived Factor (SMDF, a transmembrane class III isoform of Neuregulin 1. In contrast to oncogenic Ras, SMDF induced enhanced proliferation in normal primary Schwann cells but did not trigger cellular senescence. In cooperation with LT, SMDF drove anchorage-independent proliferation, loss of contact inhibition and tumourigenicity. This transforming ability was shared with membrane-bound class III but not secreted class I isoforms of Neuregulin, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Importantly, we show that despite being membrane-bound signalling molecules, class III neuregulins transform via a cell intrinsic mechanism, as a result of constitutive, elevated levels of ErbB signalling at high cell density and in anchorage-free conditions. This novel transforming mechanism may provide new targets for cancer therapy.

  20. Construction, assembling and application of a trehalase-GOD enzyme electrode system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, M L; Arduini, F; Laganà, A; Moscone, D; Siliprandi, V

    2009-01-01

    Trehalose is a disaccharide important in foods, serving as a glucose source in many and also as an additive in the food preparation. Because of its peculiar physico-chemical properties it plays an important role as preservative in drying and deep-freezing treatments. A new biosensor for trehalose determination has been realized by means of a flow system, based on a reactor in which the trehalase enzyme catalyses its hydrolysis into two alpha,d-glucose molecules, and a GOD (glucose oxidase) amperometric biosensor is employed for the glucose determination. The optimum operative conditions have been laid out and a particular attention has been paid to the immobilization procedure of the two enzymes. The electrode used is of the SPE (screen-printed electrode) type and has been activated with the Prussian Blue (PB) and then assembled using GOD immobilized with Nafion. The reactor has been prepared with the trehalase enzyme chemically immobilized on an Immunodyne ABC membrane. As demonstration of its utility, the biosensor has been tested on a real sample of Boletus edulis mushroom.

  1. Role of a membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase complex AldFGH in acetic acid fermentation with Acetobacter pasteurianus SKU1108.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Fukunari, Seiya; Kodama, Tomohiro; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Nina, Shun; Kataoka, Naoya; Theeragool, Gunjana; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2018-04-03

    Acetic acid fermentation is widely considered a consequence of ethanol oxidation by two membrane-bound enzymes-alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-of acetic acid bacteria. Here, we used a markerless gene disruption method to construct a mutant of the Acetobacter pasteurianus strain SKU1108 with a deletion in the aldH gene, which encodes the large catalytic subunit of a heterotrimeric ALDH complex (AldFGH), to examine the role of AldFGH in acetic acid fermentation. The ΔaldH strain grew less on ethanol-containing medium, i.e., acetic acid fermentation conditions, than the wild-type strain and significantly accumulated acetaldehyde in the culture medium. Unexpectedly, acetaldehyde oxidase activity levels of the intact ΔaldH cells and the ΔaldH cell membranes were similar to those of the wild-type strain, which might be attributed to an additional ALDH isozyme (AldSLC). The apparent K M values of the wild-type and ΔaldH membranes for acetaldehyde were similar to each other, when the cells were cultured in nonfermentation conditions, where ΔaldH cells grow as well as the wild-type cells. However, the membranes of the wild-type cells grown under fermentation conditions showed a 10-fold lower apparent K M value than those of the cells grown under nonfermentation conditions. Under fermentation conditions, transcriptional levels of a gene for AldSLC were 10-fold lower than those under nonfermentation conditions, whereas aldH transcript levels were not dramatically changed under the two conditions. We suggest that A. pasteurianus SKU1108 has two ALDHs, and the AldFGH complex is indispensable for acetic acid fermentation and is the major enzyme under fermentation conditions.

  2. Characterization and modelling of VanT: a novel, membrane-bound, serine racemase from vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus gallinarum BM4174.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, C A; Martín-Martinez, M; Blundell, T L; Arthur, M; Courvalin, P; Reynolds, P E

    1999-03-01

    Sequence determination of a region downstream from the vanXYc gene in Enterococcus gallinarum BM4174 revealed an open reading frame, designated vanT, that encodes a 698-amino-acid polypeptide with an amino-terminal domain containing 10 predicted transmembrane segments. The protein contained a highly conserved pyridoxal phosphate attachment site in the C-terminal domain, typical of alanine racemases. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and serine racemase activity was detected in the membrane but not in the cytoplasmic fraction after centrifugation of sonicated cells, whereas alanine racemase activity was located almost exclusively in the cytoplasm. When the protein was overexpressed as a polypeptide lacking the predicted transmembrane domain, serine racemase activity was detected in the cytoplasm. The serine racemase activity was partially (64%) inhibited by D-cycloserine, whereas host alanine racemase activity was almost totally inhibited (97%). Serine racemase activity was also detected in membrane preparations of constitutively vancomycin-resistant E. gallinarum BM4174 but not in BM4175, in which insertional inactivation of the vanC-1 D-Ala:D-Ser ligase gene probably had a polar effect on expression of the vanXYc and vanT genes. Comparative modelling of the deduced C-terminal domain was based on the alignment of VanT with the Air alanine racemase from Bacillus stearothermophilus. The model revealed that almost all critical amino acids in the active site of Air were conserved in VanT, indicating that the C-terminal domain of VanT is likely to adopt a three-dimensional structure similar to that of Air and that the protein could exist as a dimer. These results indicate that the source of D-serine for peptidoglycan synthesis in vancomycin-resistant enterococci expressing the VanC phenotype involves racemization of L- to D-serine by a membrane-bound serine racemase.

  3. Protective effect of Lagenaria siceraria (Mol) against membrane-bound enzyme alterations in isoproterenol-induced cardiac damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, M; Selvi, V; Krishnakumari, S

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the preventive role of the ethanolic extract of Lagenaria siceraria (Mol) fruit on membrane-bound enzymes, such as sodium potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase), calcium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Ca(2+) ATPase) and magnesium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Mg(2+) ATPase) on isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with the ethanolic extract of L. siceraria (Mol) fruit (125, 250 and 500 mg kg(-1) body weight) for a period of 30 days. After the treatment period, ISO (85mg kg(-1) body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats at 24-h intervals for 2 days. ISO-induced rats showed a significant (p Mol) fruit for a period of 30 days exhibited a significant (p Mol) fruit has membrane-stabilising role in ISO-induced MI in rats.

  4. Release of membrane-bound vesicles and inhibition of tumor cell adhesion by the peptide Neopetrosiamide A.

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    Pamela Austin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Neopetrosiamide A (NeoA is a 28-amino acid tricyclic peptide originally isolated from a marine sponge as a tumor cell invasion inhibitor whose mechanism of action is unknown.We show that NeoA reversibly inhibits tumor cell adhesion, disassembles focal adhesions in pre-attached cells, and decreases the level of beta1 integrin subunits on the cell surface. NeoA also induces the formation of dynamic, membrane-bound protrusions on the surface of treated cells and the release of membrane-bound vesicles into the culture medium. Proteomic analysis indicates that the vesicles contain EGF and transferrin receptors as well as a number of proteins involved in adhesion and migration including: beta1 integrin and numerous alpha integrin subunits; actin and actin-binding proteins such as cofilin, moesin and myosin 1C; and membrane modulating eps15 homology domain (EHD proteins. Surface labeling, trafficking inhibition, and real-time imaging experiments all suggest that beta1 integrin-containing vesicles are released directly from NeoA-induced cell surface protrusions rather than from vesicles generated intracellularly. The biological activity of NeoA is dependent on its disulfide bond pattern and NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide is globular with a continuous ridge of hydrophobic groups flanked by charged amino acid residues that could facilitate a simultaneous interaction with lipids and proteins in the membrane.NeoA is an anti-adhesive peptide that decreases cell surface integrin levels through a novel, yet to be elucidated, mechanism that involves the release of adhesion molecule-containing vesicles from the cell surface.

  5. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manetta J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Manetta, Holly Bina, Paul Ryan, Niles Fox, Derrick R Witcher, Kristine Kikly Biotechnology Discovery Research, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: B-cell activating factor (BAFF is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. Keywords: autoimmunity, B-cell malignancies, B-cell survival factor, BAFF

  6. Construction of a plasmid for co-expression of mouse membrane-bound form of IL-15 and RAE-1ε and its biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Li; Ji, Ming-Chun; Pan, Xin-Yuan; Gong, Wei-Juan; Tian, Fang; Duan, Qiu-Fang

    2011-05-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) is a pivotal cytokine for the proliferation and activation of a specific group of immune cells such as natural killer (NK), IFN-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDC) and CD8 T cells. RAE-1ε, the ligand for the activating NKG2D receptor, which also play an important role in the proliferation and activation of NK cells and IKDCs. In this study, a membrane-bound form of IL-15 (termed mb15) encoding sequence and RAE-1ε gene were obtained by SOE-PCR or PCR amplification. The amplified mb15 and RAE-1ε gene were then digested and inserted into the multiple cloning site1 (MCS1) and MCS2 of pVITRO2-mcs vector, respectively. A recombinant eukaryotic expression vector for co-expression of mb15 and RAE-1ε was successfully constructed. After it was transfected to BaF3 cells, the expression of IL-15 and RAE-1ε in recombinant BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells were verified by RT-PCR, western blot and FCM analysis. Furthermore, BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells had the ability of promoting NK cells proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. In conclusion, BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells were successfully constructed, which is very useful for further studies, especially for the expansion and activation of certain subsets of immune cells such as NK cells and IKDCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Matriptase-2, a membrane-bound mosaic serine proteinase predominantly expressed in human liver and showing degrading activity against extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Gloria; Cal, Santiago; Quesada, Victor; Sánchez, Luis M; López-Otín, Carlos

    2002-10-04

    We have identified and cloned a fetal liver cDNA encoding a new serine proteinase that has been called matriptase-2. This protein exhibits a domain organization similar to other members of an emerging family of membrane-bound serine proteinases known as type II transmembrane serine proteinases. Matriptase-2 contains a short cytoplasmic domain, a type II transmembrane sequence, a central region with several modular structural domains including two CUB (complement factor C1s/C1r, urchin embryonic growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein) domains and three low density lipoprotein receptor tandem repeats, and finally, a C-terminal catalytic domain with all typical features of serine proteinases. The human matriptase-2 gene maps to 22q12-q13, a location that differs from all type II transmembrane serine proteinase genes mapped to date. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis of COS-7 cells transfected with the isolated cDNA confirmed that matriptase-2 is anchored to the cell surface. Matriptase-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant protein hydrolyzed synthetic substrates used for assaying serine proteinases and endogenous proteins such as type I collagen, fibronectin, and fibrinogen. Matriptase-2 could also activate single-chain urokinase plasminogen activator, albeit with low efficiency. These activities were abolished by inhibitors of serine proteinases but not by inhibitors of other classes of proteolytic enzymes. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that matriptase-2 transcripts are only detected at significant levels in both fetal and adult liver, suggesting that this novel serine proteinase may play a specialized role in matrix remodeling processes taking place in this tissue during development or in adult tissues.

  8. Plant plasma membrane-bound staphylococcal-like DNases as a novel class of eukaryotic nucleases

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    Leśniewicz Krzysztof

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of degradative nucleases responsible for genomic DNA digestion has been observed in all kingdoms of life. It is believed that the main function of DNA degradation occurring during plant programmed cell death is redistribution of nucleic acid derived products such as nitrogen, phosphorus and nucleotide bases. Plant degradative nucleases that have been studied so far belong mainly to the S1-type family and were identified in cellular compartments containing nucleic acids or in the organelles where they are stored before final application. However, the explanation of how degraded DNA components are exported from the dying cells for further reutilization remains open. Results Bioinformatic and experimental data presented in this paper indicate that two Arabidopsis staphylococcal-like nucleases, named CAN1 and CAN2, are anchored to the cell membrane via N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation modifications. Both proteins possess a unique hybrid structure in their catalytic domain consisting of staphylococcal nuclease-like and tRNA synthetase anticodon binding-like motifs. They are neutral, Ca2+-dependent nucleaces showing a different specificity toward the ssDNA, dsDNA and RNA substrates. A study of microarray experiments and endogenous nuclease activity revealed that expression of CAN1 gene correlates with different forms of programmed cell death, while the CAN2 gene is constitutively expressed. Conclusions In this paper we present evidence showing that two plant staphylococcal-like nucleases belong to a new, as yet unidentified class of eukaryotic nucleases, characterized by unique plasma membrane localization. The identification of this class of nucleases indicates that plant cells possess additional, so far uncharacterized, mechanisms responsible for DNA and RNA degradation. The potential functions of these nucleases in relation to their unique intracellular location are discussed.

  9. Identification and characterization of a naturally occurring, efficiently cleaved, membrane-bound, clade A HIV-1 Env, suitable for immunogen design, with properties comparable to membrane-bound BG505.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Supratik; Boliar, Saikat; Samal, Sweety; Ahmed, Shubbir; Shrivastava, Tripti; Shukla, Brihaspati N; Goswami, Sandeep; Bansal, Manish; Chakrabarti, Bimal K

    2017-10-01

    Efficient cleavage of HIV-1 Env gp160 into its constituent subunits correlates with selective binding to neutralizing antibodies and are the closest mimetic of native, functional Envs. This was first demonstrated with the clade B Env, JRFL. The correlation between efficient cleavage and selective binding to neutralizing antibodies is the guiding principle for immunogen design for HIV vaccine. We have recently reported that Envs 4-2.J41 (clade C) and JRCSF (clade B) are also efficiently cleaved and show similar properties. However, an efficiently cleaved, membrane-bound clade A Env suitable for genetic vaccination has not been directly demonstrated. Here we report that BG505 and a new clade A Env, QB726.70M.ENV.C4 (or A5) are efficiently cleaved on cell membrane. A5 shows desirable antigenic properties comparable with BG505 on cell surface. A5SOSIP in supernatant displays majority of bNAb binding epitopes. Thus, both BG505 and A5 Envs can be used in DNA prime-protein boost vaccination studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Provide Insights into Epitopes Coupled to the Soluble and Membrane-Bound MHC-II Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Martiniano; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Epitope recognition by major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) is essential for the activation of immunological responses to infectious diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that this molecular event takes place in the MHC-II peptide-binding groove constituted by the α and β light chains of the heterodimer. This MHC-II peptide-binding groove has several pockets (P1-P11) involved in peptide recognition and complex stabilization that have been probed through crystallographic experiments and in silico calculations. However, most of these theoretical calculations have been performed without taking into consideration the heavy chains, which could generate misleading information about conformational mobility both in water and in the membrane environment. Therefore, in absence of structural information about the difference in the conformational changes between the peptide-free and peptide-bound states (pMHC-II) when the system is soluble in an aqueous environment or non-covalently bound to a cell membrane, as the physiological environment for MHC-II is. In this study, we explored the mechanistic basis of these MHC-II components using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which MHC-II was previously co-crystallized with a small epitope (P7) or coupled by docking procedures to a large (P22) epitope. These MD simulations were performed at 310 K over 100 ns for the water-soluble (MHC-IIw, MHC-II-P7w, and MHC-II-P22w) and 150 ns for the membrane-bound species (MHC-IIm, MHC-II-P7m, and MHC-II-P22m). Our results reveal that despite the different epitope sizes and MD simulation environments, both peptides are stabilized primarily by residues lining P1, P4, and P6-7, and similar noncovalent intermolecular energies were observed for the soluble and membrane-bound complexes. However, there were remarkably differences in the conformational mobility and intramolecular energies upon complex formation, causing some differences with respect to how the two peptides are

  11. Differential expression of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers for imaging in male and female breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen F Vermeulen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5-1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with female breast cancer. METHODS: Tissue microarrays containing 133 male breast cancer and 32 gynecomastia cases were stained by immunohistochemistry for a panel of membrane-bound targets and compared with data on 266 female breast cancers. RESULTS: Growth factor receptors were variably expressed in 4.5% (MET up to 38.5% (IGF1-R of male breast cancers. Compared to female breast cancer, IGF1-R and carbonic anhydrase 12 (CAXII were more frequently and CD44v6, MET and FGFR2 less frequently expressed in male breast cancer. Expression of EGFR, HER2, CAIX, and GLUT1 was not significantly different between male and female breast cancer. Further, 48.1% of male breast cancers expressed at least one and 18.0% expressed multiple growth factor receptors. Since individual membrane receptors are expressed in only half of male breast cancers, a panel of membrane markers will be required for molecular imaging strategies to reach sensitivity. A potential panel of markers for molecular imaging, consisting of EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, CD44v6, CAXII, GLUT1, and CD44v6 was positive in 77% of male breast cancers, comparable to female breast cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Expression patterns of growth factor receptors and hypoxia membrane proteins in male breast cancer are different from female breast cancer. For molecular imaging strategies, a putative panel consisting of markers for EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, GLUT1, CAXII, CD44v6 was positive in 77% of cases and might be considered for development of

  12. Depression of membrane-bound Na+-K+-ATPase activity induced by free radicals and by ischemia of kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kako, K.; Kato, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Mustapha, A.

    1988-01-01

    A partially purified, membrane-bound Na + -K + -ATPase fraction, prepared from the outer medulla of porcine kidney, was incubated in the presence of 0.1-100 mM H 2 O 2 for either 15 or 30 min at 37 degree C. The activity of ouabain-sensitive Na + -K + -ATPase was reduced proportionally to the concentration of H 2 O 2 and the duration of incubation. There were decreases in SH contents and turnover rates of the Na + -K + -ATPase preparation, while malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes were generated from the membrane lipids in the course of the incubation. The concentrations of ethanolamine (E) plasmalogen and of arachidonic acid in the E glycerophospholipid molecules were reduced by the free radical reaction. Similarly, a reduction in Na + K + -ATPase activity and the formation of MDA and conjugated dienes, together with a decrease in E glycerophospholipids, were observed when the membrane fraction was exposed to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) for 30 min at 4 degree C. Microsomal fractions, prepared from the outer medulla of canine kidney after 1 h of unilateral ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion, showed a decreased Na + -K + -ATPase activity, a reduced amount of SH groups, and an increased MDA. These changes were normalized by the infusion of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. These results support the view (1) that free radical generation affects the enzyme protein as well as membrane lipids, and (2) that free radicals may be formed in the ischemic reperfused kidney

  13. Structure and dynamics of the membrane-bound form of the filamentous bacteriophage coat proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusky, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the Pf1 and fd bacteriophage coat proteins in detergent micelles are characterized in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The coat proteins are found to exist within the bacterial inner cell membrane during viral infection and assembly. The coat proteins serve as a model system to investigate integral membrane proteins as well as the viral infection and assembly processes. The coat protein is insoluble in aqueous or organic solvents and can only be effectively solubilized in the presence of detergents that form micelles or phospholipids that form vesicles. The effective molecular weight of the detergent-micelle complex is ca. 30K daltons. Sequential assignment strategies were ineffective due to short T/sub 2s/ and severe resonance degeneracy. The backbone resonance assignments were completed by the combination of several homo- and heteronuclear correlation techniques with biosynthetic 15 N labelling. 2D NOE experiments were used to locate and characterize the secondary structure of the membrane bound form of the proteins showing them to be largely helical with the hydrophobic core existing in a very stable helix

  14. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4 + T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3 + Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3 + Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3 + Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Reduced levels of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase are common to lepidopteran strains resistant to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Jakka, Siva Rama Krishna; Ning, Changming; Liu, Chenxi; Wu, Kongming; Jackson, Jerreme; Gould, Fred; Blanco, Carlos; Portilla, Maribel; Perera, Omaththage; Adang, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Development of insect resistance is one of the main concerns with the use of transgenic crops expressing Cry toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Identification of biomarkers would assist in the development of sensitive DNA-based methods to monitor evolution of resistance to Bt toxins in natural populations. We report on the proteomic and genomic detection of reduced levels of midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (mALP) as a common feature in strains of Cry-resistant Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda when compared to susceptible larvae. Reduced levels of H. virescens mALP protein (HvmALP) were detected by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis in Cry-resistant compared to susceptible larvae, further supported by alkaline phosphatase activity assays and Western blotting. Through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) we demonstrate that the reduction in HvmALP protein levels in resistant larvae are the result of reduced transcript amounts. Similar reductions in ALP activity and mALP transcript levels were also detected for a Cry1Ac-resistant strain of H. armigera and field-derived strains of S. frugiperda resistant to Cry1Fa. Considering the unique resistance and cross-resistance phenotypes of the insect strains used in this work, our data suggest that reduced mALP expression should be targeted for development of effective biomarkers for resistance to Cry toxins in lepidopteran pests.

  16. Membrane-bound catechol-O-methyl transferase in cortical neurons and glial cells is intracellularly oriented

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn H Schott

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT is involved in the inactivation of dopamine in brain regions in which the dopamine transporter (DAT1 is sparsely expressed. The membrane-bound isoform of COMT (MB-COMT is the predominantly expressed form in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. It has been a matter of debate whether in neural cells of the CNS the enzymatic domain of MB-COMT is oriented towards the cytoplasmic or the extracellular compartment. Here we used live immunocytochemistry on cultured neocortical neurons and glial cells to investigate the expression and membrane orientation of native COMT and of transfected MB-COMT fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP. After live staining, COMT immunoreactivity was reliably detected in both neurons and glial cells after permeabilization, but not on unpermeabilized cells. Similarly, autofluorescence of COMT-GFP fusion protein and antibody fluorescence showed overlap only in permeabilized neurons. Our data provide converging evidence for an intracellular membrane orientation of MB-COMT in neurons and glial cells, suggesting the presence of a DAT1-independent postsynaptic uptake mechanism for dopamine, prior to its degradation via COMT.

  17. Characterization of a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase responsible for carminic acid biosynthesis in Dactylopius coccus Costa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannangara, Rubini; Siukstaite, Lina; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Madsen, Bjørn; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Staerk, Dan; Bennedsen, Mads; Okkels, Finn T; Rasmussen, Silas A; Larsen, Thomas O; Frandsen, Rasmus J N; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2017-12-07

    Carminic acid, a glucosylated anthraquinone found in scale insects like Dactylopius coccus, has since ancient times been used as a red colorant in various applications. Here we show that a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase, isolated from D. coccus and designated DcUGT2, catalyzes the glucosylation of flavokermesic acid and kermesic acid into their respective C-glucosides dcII and carminic acid. DcUGT2 is predicted to be a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, containing a cleavable N-terminal signal peptide and a C-terminal transmembrane helix that anchors the protein to the ER, followed by a short cytoplasmic tail. DcUGT2 is found to be heavily glycosylated. Truncated DcUGT2 proteins synthesized in yeast indicate the presence of an internal ER-targeting signal. The cleavable N-terminal signal peptide is shown to be essential for the activity of DcUGT2, whereas the transmembrane helix/cytoplasmic domains, although important, are not crucial for its catalytic function.

  18. Aluminium and Acrylamide Disrupt Cerebellum Redox States, Cholinergic Function and Membrane-Bound ATPase in Adult Rats and Their Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Amara, Ibtissem Ben; Ktari, Naourez; Elwej, Awatef; Boudawara, Ons; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-12-01

    Accumulation of aluminium and acrylamide in food is a major source of human exposure. Their adverse effects are well documented, but there is no information about the health problems arising from their combined exposure. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible neurotoxic effects after co-exposure of pregnant and lactating rats to aluminium and acrylamide in order to evaluate redox state, cholinergic function and membrane-bound ATPases in the cerebellum of adult rats and their progeny. Pregnant female rats have received aluminium (50 mg/kg body weight) via drinking water and acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight) by gavage, either individually or in combination from the 14th day of pregnancy until day 14 after delivery. Exposure to these toxicants provoked an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) levels and a decrease in SOD, CAT, GPx, Na + K + -ATPase, Mg 2+ -ATPase and AChE activities in the cerebellum of mothers and their suckling pups. A reduction in GSH, NPSH and vitamin C levels was also observed. These changes were confirmed by histological results. Interestingly, co-exposure to these toxicants exhibited synergism based on physical and biochemical variables in the cerebellum of mothers and their progeny.

  19. Reduced levels of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase are common to lepidopteran strains resistant to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes

    Full Text Available Development of insect resistance is one of the main concerns with the use of transgenic crops expressing Cry toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Identification of biomarkers would assist in the development of sensitive DNA-based methods to monitor evolution of resistance to Bt toxins in natural populations. We report on the proteomic and genomic detection of reduced levels of midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (mALP as a common feature in strains of Cry-resistant Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda when compared to susceptible larvae. Reduced levels of H. virescens mALP protein (HvmALP were detected by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE analysis in Cry-resistant compared to susceptible larvae, further supported by alkaline phosphatase activity assays and Western blotting. Through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR we demonstrate that the reduction in HvmALP protein levels in resistant larvae are the result of reduced transcript amounts. Similar reductions in ALP activity and mALP transcript levels were also detected for a Cry1Ac-resistant strain of H. armigera and field-derived strains of S. frugiperda resistant to Cry1Fa. Considering the unique resistance and cross-resistance phenotypes of the insect strains used in this work, our data suggest that reduced mALP expression should be targeted for development of effective biomarkers for resistance to Cry toxins in lepidopteran pests.

  20. The potential of lactulose and melibiose, two novel trehalase-indigestible and autophagy-inducing disaccharides, for polyQ-mediated neurodegenerative disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Chiun; Lin, Chih-Hsin; Tao, Yu-Chen; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Huang, Yin-Jung; Huang, Shih-Han; Kung, Pin-Jui; Chen, Wan-Ling; Wang, Chien-Ming; Wu, Yih-Ru; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Lin, Jung-Yaw; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen

    2015-05-01

    The unique property of trehalose encourages its pharmaceutical application in aggregation-mediated neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and many polyglutamine (polyQ)-mediated diseases. However, trehalose is digested into glucose by trehalase and which reduced its efficacy in the disease target tissues. Therefore, searching trehalase-indigestible analogs of trehalose is a potential strategy to enhance therapeutic effect. In this study, two trehalase-indigestible trehalose analogs, lactulose and melibiose, were selected through compound topology and functional group analyses. Hydrogen-bonding network analyses suggest that the elimination of the hydrogen bond between the linker ether and aspartate 321 (D321) of human trehalase is the key for lactulose and melibiose to avoid the hydrolyzation. Using polyQ-mediated spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17) cell and slice cultures, we found the aggregation was significantly prohibited by trehalose, lactulose, and melibiose, which may through up-regulating of autophagy. These findings suggest the therapeutic applications of trehalase-indigestible trehalose analogs in aggregation-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Membrane-bound mucins and mucin terminal glycans expression in idiopathic or Helicobacter pylori, NSAID associated peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Yaron; Boltin, Doron; Halpern, Marisa; Cohen, Miriam; Levi, Zohar; Vilkin, Alex; Morgenstern, Sara; Manugian, Vahig; St Lawrence, Erica; Gagneux, Pascal; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Sharma, Poonam; Batra, Surinder K; Ho, Samuel B

    2014-10-28

    To determine the expression of membrane-bound mucins and glycan side chain sialic acids in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated, non-steroidal inflammatory drug (NSAID)-associated and idiopathic-gastric ulcers. We studied a cohort of randomly selected patients with H. pylori (group 1, n = 30), NSAID (group 2, n = 18), combined H. pylori and NSAID associated gastric ulcers (group 3, n = 24), and patients with idiopathic gastric ulcers (group 4, n = 20). Immunohistochemistry for MUC1, MUC4, MUC17, and staining for Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) lectins was performed on sections from the ulcer margins. Staining intensity of MUC17 was higher in H. pylori ulcers (group 1) than in idiopathic ulcers (group 4), 11.05 ± 3.67 vs 6.93 ± 4.00 for foveola cells, and 10.29 ± 4.67 vs 8.00 ± 3.48 for gland cells, respectively (P < 0.0001). In contrast, MUC1 expression was higher in group 4 compared group 1, 9.89 ± 4.17 vs 2.93 ± 5.13 in foveola cells and 7.63 ± 4.60 vs 2.57± 4.50 for glands, respectively (P < 0.0001). SNA lectin staining was increased in group 4, in parallel to elevated MUC1 expression, indicating more abundant α2-6 sialylation in that group. Cytoplasmic MUC17 staining was significantly decreased in the cases with idiopathic ulcer. The opposite was observed for both MUC1 and SNA lectin. This observation may reflect important pathogenic mechanisms, since different mucins with altered sialylation patterns may differ in their protection efficiency against acid and pepsin.

  2. Identification and characterization of GmPDIL7, a soybean ER membrane-bound protein disulfide isomerase family protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Aya; Matsusaki, Motonori; Masuda, Taro; Urade, Reiko

    2017-02-01

    Most proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) possess intramolecular and intermolecular disulfide bonds, which play an important role in the conformational stability and function of proteins. Hence, eukaryotic cells contain protein disulfide bond formation pathways such as the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-ER oxidoreductin 1 (Ero1) system in the ER lumen. In this study, we identified soybean PDIL7 (GmPDIL7), a novel soybean ER membrane-bound PDI family protein, and determined its enzymatic properties. GmPDIL7 has a putative N-terminal signal sequence, a thioredoxin domain with an active center motif (CGHC), and a putative C-terminal transmembrane region. Likewise, we demonstrated that GmPDIL7 is ubiquitously expressed in soybean tissues and is localized in the ER membrane. Furthermore, GmPDIL7 associated with other soybean PDI family proteins in vivo and GmPDIL7 mRNA was slightly upregulated under ER stress. The redox potential of recombinant GmPDIL7 expressed in Escherichia coli was -187 mV, indicating that GmPDIL7 could oxidize unfolded proteins. GmPDIL7 exhibited a dithiol oxidase activity level that was similar to other soybean PDI family proteins. However, the oxidative refolding activity of GmPDIL7 was lower than other soybean PDI family proteins. GmPDIL7 was well oxidized by GmERO1. Taken together, our results indicated that GmPDIL7 primarily plays a role as a supplier of disulfide bonds in nascent proteins for oxidative folding on the ER membrane. The nucleotide sequence data for the GmPDIL7 cDNA are available in the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) databases under the accession numbers LC158001. Protein disulfide isomerase: EC 5.3.4.1. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Survival, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities of freshwater planarian, Dugesia japonica, exposed to synthetic and natural surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Surfactants are a major class of emerging pollutants widely used in large quantities in everyday life and commonly found in surface waters worldwide. Freshwater planarian was selected to examine the effects of different surfactants by measuring mortality, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities. Among the 10 surfactants tested, the acute toxicities of betaine and polyethylene glycol (PEG-200) to planarians were relatively low, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) greater than 10,000 mg/L. The toxicity to planarians of the other eight surfactants based on 48-h LC50 could be arranged in the descending order of cetylpyridinum chloride (CPC) > 4-tert-octylphenol (4-tert-OP) > ammonium lauryl sulfate > benzalkonium chloride > saponin > sodium lauroylsarcosinate > dioctyl sulfosuccinate > dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). Both CPC and 4-tert-OP were very toxic to planarians, with 48-h LC50 values <1 mg/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of planarian mobility were in the 0.1 to 50 mg/L range and were in the same range as the 24-h LC50 of planarians exposed to different surfactants, except for DTAB. In addition, significant inhibition of cholinesterase activity activities was found in planarians exposed to 4-tert-OP at 2.5 and 5 mg/L and to saponin at 10 mg/L after 2-h treatments. This result suggests that planarian mobility responses can be used as an alternative indicator for acute toxicity of surfactants after a very short exposure period. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  4. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N.

    2011-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded β-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners

  5. Aldopentoses as new substrates for the membrane-bound, pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glycerol (polyol) dehydrogenase of Gluconobacter sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Terada, Yuka; Ozaki, Seishiro; Kataoka, Naoya; Akakabe, Yoshihiko; Adachi, Osao; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2018-04-01

    Membrane-bound, pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH, or polyol dehydrogenase) of Gluconobacter sp. oxidizes various secondary alcohols to produce the corresponding ketones, such as oxidation of D-sorbitol to L-sorbose in vitamin C production. Substrate specificity of GLDH is considered limited to secondary alcohols in the D-erythro configuration at the next to the last carbon. Here, we suggest that L-ribose, D- and L-lyxoses, and L-tagatose are also substrates of GLDH, but these sugars do not meet the substrate specificity rule of GLDH. The oxygen consumption activity of wild-type Gluconobacter frateurii cell membranes depends on several kinds of sugars as compared with that of the membranes of a GLDH-negative variant. Biotransformation of those sugars with the membranes was examined to determine the reaction products. A time course measuring the pH in the reaction mixture and the increase or decrease in substrates and products on TLC suggested that oxidation products of L-lyxose and L-tagatose were ketones with unknown structures, but those of L-ribose and D-lyxose were acids. The oxidation product of L-ribose was purified and revealed to be L-ribonate by HRMS and NMR analysis. Biotransformation of L-ribose with the membranes and also with the whole cells produced L-ribonate in nearly stoichiometric amounts, indicating that the specific oxidation site in L-ribose is recognized by GLDH. Since purified GLDH produced L-ribonate without any intermediate-like compounds, we propose here a reaction model where the first carbon in the pyranose form of L-ribose is oxidized by GLDH to L-ribonolactone, which is further hydrolyzed spontaneously to produce L-ribonate.

  6. Depression of membrane-bound Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase activity induced by free radicals and by ischemia of kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kako, K.; Kato, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Mustapha, A. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1988-02-01

    A partially purified, membrane-bound Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase fraction, prepared from the outer medulla of porcine kidney, was incubated in the presence of 0.1-100 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for either 15 or 30 min at 37{degree}C. The activity of ouabain-sensitive Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase was reduced proportionally to the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the duration of incubation. There were decreases in SH contents and turnover rates of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase preparation, while malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes were generated from the membrane lipids in the course of the incubation. The concentrations of ethanolamine (E) plasmalogen and of arachidonic acid in the E glycerophospholipid molecules were reduced by the free radical reaction. Similarly, a reduction in Na{sup +}K{sup +}-ATPase activity and the formation of MDA and conjugated dienes, together with a decrease in E glycerophospholipids, were observed when the membrane fraction was exposed to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) for 30 min at 4{degree}C. Microsomal fractions, prepared from the outer medulla of canine kidney after 1 h of unilateral ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion, showed a decreased Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity, a reduced amount of SH groups, and an increased MDA. These changes were normalized by the infusion of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. These results support the view (1) that free radical generation affects the enzyme protein as well as membrane lipids, and (2) that free radicals may be formed in the ischemic reperfused kidney.

  7. Membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase: target size and radiation inactivation size of some of its enzymatic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J.; Norby, J.G.

    1988-12-05

    Frozen samples of membrane-bound pig kidney Na,K-ATPase were subjected to target size analysis by radiation inactivation with 10-MeV electrons at -15 degrees C. The various properties investigated decreased monoexponentially with radiation dose, and the decay constants, gamma, were independent of the presence of other proteins and of sucrose concentrations above 0.25 M. The temperature factor was the same as described by others. Irradiation of four proteins of known molecular mass, m, showed that gamma for protein integrity was proportional to m with a proportionality factor about 20% higher than that conventionally used. By this standard curve, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity used as internal standard gave a radiation inactivation size of 110 +/- 5 kDa, very close to m = 104-108 kDa for the dimer, as expected. For Na+/K+-transporting ATPase the following target sizes and radiation inactivation size values were very close to m = 112 kDa for the alpha-peptide: peptide integrity of alpha, 115 kDa; unmodified binding sites for ATP and vanadate, 108 kDa; K+-activated p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity, 106 kDa. There was thus no sign of dimerization of the alpha-peptide or involvement of the beta-peptide. In contrast, optimal Na+/K+-transporting ATPase activity had a radiation inactivation size = 189 +/- 7 kDa, and total nucleotide binding capacity corresponded to 72 +/- 3 kDa. These latter results will be extended and discussed in a forthcoming paper.

  8. Membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase: target size and radiation inactivation size of some of its enzymatic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.; Norby, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Frozen samples of membrane-bound pig kidney Na,K-ATPase were subjected to target size analysis by radiation inactivation with 10-MeV electrons at -15 degrees C. The various properties investigated decreased monoexponentially with radiation dose, and the decay constants, gamma, were independent of the presence of other proteins and of sucrose concentrations above 0.25 M. The temperature factor was the same as described by others. Irradiation of four proteins of known molecular mass, m, showed that gamma for protein integrity was proportional to m with a proportionality factor about 20% higher than that conventionally used. By this standard curve, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity used as internal standard gave a radiation inactivation size of 110 +/- 5 kDa, very close to m = 104-108 kDa for the dimer, as expected. For Na+/K+-transporting ATPase the following target sizes and radiation inactivation size values were very close to m = 112 kDa for the alpha-peptide: peptide integrity of alpha, 115 kDa; unmodified binding sites for ATP and vanadate, 108 kDa; K+-activated p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity, 106 kDa. There was thus no sign of dimerization of the alpha-peptide or involvement of the beta-peptide. In contrast, optimal Na+/K+-transporting ATPase activity had a radiation inactivation size = 189 +/- 7 kDa, and total nucleotide binding capacity corresponded to 72 +/- 3 kDa. These latter results will be extended and discussed in a forthcoming paper

  9. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded β-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners.

  10. Tumor Cell Clone Expressing the Membrane-bound Form of IL-12p35 Subunit Stimulates Antitumor Immune Responses Dominated by CD8(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoyong; Do, Seon Ah; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Young Sang

    2013-04-01

    IL-12 is a secretory heterodimeric cytokine composed of p35 and p40 subunits. IL-12 p35 and p40 subunits are sometimes produced as monomers or homodimers. IL-12 is also produced as a membrane-bound form in some cases. In this study, we hypothesized that the membrane-bound form of IL-12 subunits may function as a costimulatory signal for selective activation of TAA-specific CTL through direct priming without involving antigen presenting cells and helper T cells. MethA fibrosarcoma cells were transfected with expression vectors of membrane-bound form of IL-12p35 (mbIL-12p35) or IL-12p40 subunit (mbIL-12p40) and were selected under G418-containing medium. The tumor cell clones were analyzed for the expression of mbIL-12p35 or p40 subunit and for their stimulatory effects on macrophages. The responsible T-cell subpopulation for antitumor activity of mbIL-12p35 expressing tumor clone was also analyzed in T cell subset-depleted mice. Expression of transfected membrane-bound form of IL-12 subunits was stable during more than 3 months of in vitro culture, and the chimeric molecules were not released into culture supernatants. Neither the mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clones nor mbIL-12p40-expressing tumor clones activated macrophages to secrete TNF-α. Growth of mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clones was more accelerated in the CD8(+) T cell-depleted mice than in CD4(+) T cell-depleted or normal mice. These results suggest that CD8(+) T cells could be responsible for the rejection of mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clone, which may bypass activation of antigen presenting cells and CD4(+) helper T cells.

  11. Suppressing the activity of trehalase with validamycin disrupts the trehalose and chitin biosynthesis pathways in the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Yang, Mengmeng; Shen, Qida; Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Huijuan; Wang, Shigui

    2017-04-01

    Trehalase (TRE) is a key enzyme in trehalose degradation and has important functions in insect growth and chitin synthesis. Though validamycin has the potential for pest control by suppressing TRE activities, it is not known whether validamycin acts on both trehalose and chitin metabolism. TRE1 and TRE2 activities and glucose and glycogen contents decreased significantly after the injection of different doses of validamycin solution compared with the control group, while the trehalose content increased significantly. Overall, it showed that about 13 to 38% insects was appeared abnormal phenotypes, and 10 to 57% of insects died 48h after injection of solutions with different concentrations of validamycin; the chitin content also decreased significantly. Validamycin altered the relative expression levels of trehalose, glycogen and chitin metabolism-related genes by suppressing the activities of two TREs. We showed that the expression levels of three TRE and two trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) genes increased, while the expression levels of GP; CHS1 and its two transcripts, CHS1a, CHS1b; six chitinases, including Cht3, Cht4, Cht5, Cht6, Cht7, Cht9; and the HK, G6PI2, GFAT, GNPNA, PAGM1, UAP, VVL, CI and AP genes decreased significantly 48h after the injection of any validamycin concentration compared with the control group. These results demonstrate that by inhibiting the activities of two TREs, validamycin alters N. lugens chitin synthesis and degradation and affects trehalose and chitin metabolism-related gene expression. The development of TRE inhibitors may provide effective pest control in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An artificial neural network for membrane-bound catechol-O-methyltransferase biosynthesis with Pichia pastoris methanol-induced cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Augusto Q; Martins, Luís M; Dias, João M L; Bonifácio, Maria J; Queiroz, João A; Passarinha, Luís A

    2015-08-07

    Membrane proteins are important drug targets in many human diseases and gathering structural information regarding these proteins encourages the pharmaceutical industry to develop new molecules using structure-based drug design studies. Specifically, membrane-bound catechol-O-methyltransferase (MBCOMT) is an integral membrane protein that catalyzes the methylation of catechol substrates and has been linked to several diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Schizophrenia. Thereby, improvements in the clinical outcome of the therapy to these diseases may come from structure-based drug design where reaching MBCOMT samples in milligram quantities are crucial for acquiring structural information regarding this target protein. Therefore, the main aim of this work was to optimize the temperature, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) concentration and the methanol flow-rate for the biosynthesis of recombinant MBCOMT by Pichia pastoris bioreactor methanol-induced cultures using artificial neural networks (ANN). The optimization trials intended to evaluate MBCOMT expression by P. pastoris bioreactor cultures led to the development of a first standard strategy for MBCOMT bioreactor biosynthesis with a batch growth on glycerol until the dissolved oxygen spike, 3 h of glycerol feeding and 12 h of methanol induction. The ANN modeling of the aforementioned fermentation parameters predicted a maximum MBCOMT specific activity of 384.8 nmol/h/mg of protein at 30°C, 2.9 mL/L/H methanol constant flow-rate and with the addition of 6% (v/v) DMSO with almost 90% of healthy cells at the end of the induction phase. These results allowed an improvement of MBCOMT specific activity of 6.4-fold in comparison to that from the small-scale biosynthesis in baffled shake-flasks. The ANN model was able to describe the effects of temperature, DMSO concentration and methanol flow-rate on MBCOMT specific activity, as shown by the good fitness between predicted and observed values. This experimental procedure

  13. Molecular basis of the 14-3-3 protein-dependent activation of yeast neutral trehalase Nth1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alblová, Miroslava; Šmídová, Aneta; Dočekal, V.; Veselý, J.; Herman, P.; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 46 (2017), E9811-E9820 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02739S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-00726S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : 14-3-3 protein * trehalase * crystal structure * enzyme * allostery Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemical research methods Impact factor: 9.661, year: 2016

  14. Molecular basis of the 14-3-3 protein-dependent activation of yeast neutral trehalase Nth1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alblova, Miroslava; Smidova, Aneta; Docekal, Vojtech; Vesely, Jan; Herman, Petr; Obsilova, Veronika; Obsil, Tomas

    2017-11-14

    The 14-3-3 proteins, a family of highly conserved scaffolding proteins ubiquitously expressed in all eukaryotic cells, interact with and regulate the function of several hundreds of partner proteins. Yeast neutral trehalases (Nth), enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of trehalose to glucose, compared with trehalases from other organisms, possess distinct structure and regulation involving phosphorylation at multiple sites followed by binding to the 14-3-3 protein. Here we report the crystal structures of yeast Nth1 and its complex with Bmh1 (yeast 14-3-3 isoform), which, together with mutational and fluorescence studies, indicate that the binding of Nth1 by 14-3-3 triggers Nth1's activity by enabling the proper 3D configuration of Nth1's catalytic and calcium-binding domains relative to each other, thus stabilizing the flexible part of the active site required for catalysis. The presented structure of the Bmh1:Nth1 complex highlights the ability of 14-3-3 to modulate the structure of a multidomain binding partner and to function as an allosteric effector. Furthermore, comparison of the Bmh1:Nth1 complex structure with those of 14-3-3:serotonin N -acetyltransferase and 14-3-3:heat shock protein beta-6 complexes revealed similarities in the 3D structures of bound partner proteins, suggesting the highly conserved nature of 14-3-3 affects the structures of many client proteins.

  15. Two specific membrane-bound aminopeptidase N isoforms from Aedes aegypti larvae serve as functional receptors for the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin implicating counterpart specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroonkesorn, Aratee; Pootanakit, Kusol; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-05-29

    The interaction between Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins and their receptors on midgut cells of susceptible insect larvae is the critical determinant in toxin specificity. Besides GPI-linked alkaline phosphatase in Aedes aegypti mosquito-larval midguts, membrane-bound aminopeptidase N (AaeAPN) is widely thought to serve as a Cry4Ba receptor. Here, two full-length AaeAPN isoforms, AaeAPN2778 and AaeAPN2783, predicted to be GPI-linked were cloned and successfully expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells as 112- and 107-kDa membrane-bound proteins, respectively. In the cytotoxicity assay, Sf9 cells expressing each of the two AaeAPN isoforms showed increased sensitivity to the Cry4Ba mosquito-active toxin. Double immunolocalization revealed specific binding of Cry4Ba to each individual AaeAPN expressed on the cell membrane surface. Sequence analysis and homology-based modeling placed these two AaeAPNs to the M1 aminopeptidase family as they showed similar four-domain structures, with the most conserved domain II being the catalytic component. Additionally, the most variable domain IV containing negatively charged surface patches observed only in dipteran APNs could be involved in insect specificity. Overall results demonstrated that these two membrane-bound APN isoforms were responsible for mediating Cry4Ba toxicity against AaeAPN-expressed Sf9 cells, suggesting their important role as functional receptors for the toxin counterpart in A. aegypti mosquito larvae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Membrane-bound steel factor maintains a high local concentration for mouse primordial germ cell motility, and defines the region of their migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gu

    Full Text Available Steel factor, the protein product of the Steel locus in the mouse, is a multifunctional signal for the primordial germ cell population. We have shown previously that its expression accompanies the germ cells during migration to the gonads, forming a "travelling niche" that controls their survival, motility, and proliferation. Here we show that these functions are distributed between the alternatively spliced membrane-bound and soluble forms of Steel factor. The germ cells normally migrate as individuals from E7.5 to E11.5, when they aggregate together in the embryonic gonads. Movie analysis of Steel-dickie mutant embryos, which make only the soluble form, at E7.5, showed that the germ cells fail to migrate normally, and undergo "premature aggregation" in the base of the allantois. Survival and directionality of movement is not affected. Addition of excess soluble Steel factor to Steel-dickie embryos rescued germ cell motility, and addition of Steel factor to germ cells in vitro showed that a fourfold higher dose was required to increase motility, compared to survival. These data show that soluble Steel factor is sufficient for germ cell survival, and suggest that the membrane-bound form provides a higher local concentration of Steel factor that controls the balance between germ cell motility and aggregation. This hypothesis was tested by addition of excess soluble Steel factor to slice cultures of E11.5 embryos, when migration usually ceases, and the germ cells aggregate. This reversed the aggregation process, and caused increased motility of the germ cells. We conclude that the two forms of Steel factor control different aspects of germ cell behavior, and that membrane-bound Steel factor controls germ cell motility within a "motility niche" that moves through the embryo with the germ cells. Escape from this niche causes cessation of motility and death by apoptosis of the ectopic germ cells.

  17. Role of Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC1325 in membrane-bound transport ATPases system in Alzheimer’s disease-induced rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimgampalle Mallikarjuna

    2016-12-01

    Results: Chronic injection of D-Galactose caused lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction leading to the damage of neurons in the brain, finally bringing a significant decrease (-20% in the brain total membrane bound ATPases over the controls. Contrary to this, treatment of AD-induced rats with L. plantarum MTCC1325 reverted all the constituents of ATPase enzymes to near normal levels within 30 days. Conclusion: Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC1325 exerted a beneficial action on the entire ATPases system in AD-induced rat brain by delaying neurodegeneration.

  18. An organelle-free assay for pea chloroplast Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane bound fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. (Clemson Univ, SC (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Mg-chelatase, which catalyzes the insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin, lies at the branchpoint of heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis in chloroplasts. Since magnesium chelation is the first step unique to chlorophyll synthesis, one would expect this step to be highly regulated. However, to date little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase due mostly to an inability to assay it's activity outside of the intact plastid. Here the authors report the first truly in vitro i.e. organelle-free, assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts which is 3 to 4 fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts, survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated, by centrifugation, into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity and both were inactivated by boiling; indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane bound protein(s). The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol Mg-Deuteroporphyrin/h/mg protein and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity. The soluble component could be fractionated with ammonium sulfate. The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. Crude separation of chloroplast membranes into thylakoids and envelopes, suggested that the membrane-bound component of Mg-chelatase is probably located in the envelope.

  19. Occlusion of 22Na+ and 86Rb+ in membrane-bound and soluble protomeric alpha beta-units of Na,K-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilsen, B.; Andersen, J.P.; Petersen, J.; Jorgensen, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    In this work, we examined occlusion of 22 Na+ and 86 Rb+ in membranous and detergent-solubilized Na,K-ATPase from outer renal medulla. Optimum conditions for occlusion of 22 Na+ were provided by formation of the phosphorylated complex from the beta,gamma-bidentate complex of chromium (III) with ATP (CrATP). Release of occluded cations occurred at equally slow rates in soluble and membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase. Values of 22 Na+ occlusion as high as 11 nmol/mg of protein were measured, corresponding to 1.8-2.7 mol of Na+/mol of phosphorylated Na,K-ATPase as determined by 32 P incorporation from [gamma- 32 P]CrATP. Maximum capacity for phosphorylation from [gamma- 32 P]CrATP was 6 nmol/mg of protein and equal to capacities for binding of [48V]vanadate and [ 3 H]ouabain. The stoichiometry for occlusion of Rb+ was close to 2 Rb+ ions/phosphorylation site. In an analytical ultracentrifuge, the soluble Na+- or Rb+-occluded complexes showed sedimentation velocities (S20,w = 6.8-7.4) consistent with monomeric alpha beta-units. The data show that soluble monomeric alpha beta-units of Na,K-ATPase can occlude Rb+ or Na+ with the same stoichiometry as the membrane-bound enzyme. The structural basis for occlusion of cations in Na,K-ATPase is suggested to be the formation of a cavity inside a monomeric alpha beta-unit constituting the minimum protein unit required for active Na,K-transport

  20. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Paul C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1, demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC. Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4 fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective.

  1. Occlusion of /sup 22/Na+ and /sup 86/Rb+ in membrane-bound and soluble protomeric alpha beta-units of Na,K-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilsen, B.; Andersen, J.P.; Petersen, J.; Jorgensen, P.L.

    1987-08-05

    In this work, we examined occlusion of /sup 22/Na+ and /sup 86/Rb+ in membranous and detergent-solubilized Na,K-ATPase from outer renal medulla. Optimum conditions for occlusion of /sup 22/Na+ were provided by formation of the phosphorylated complex from the beta,gamma-bidentate complex of chromium (III) with ATP (CrATP). Release of occluded cations occurred at equally slow rates in soluble and membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase. Values of /sup 22/Na+ occlusion as high as 11 nmol/mg of protein were measured, corresponding to 1.8-2.7 mol of Na+/mol of phosphorylated Na,K-ATPase as determined by /sup 32/P incorporation from (gamma-/sup 32/P)CrATP. Maximum capacity for phosphorylation from (gamma-/sup 32/P)CrATP was 6 nmol/mg of protein and equal to capacities for binding of (48V)vanadate and (/sup 3/H)ouabain. The stoichiometry for occlusion of Rb+ was close to 2 Rb+ ions/phosphorylation site. In an analytical ultracentrifuge, the soluble Na+- or Rb+-occluded complexes showed sedimentation velocities (S20,w = 6.8-7.4) consistent with monomeric alpha beta-units. The data show that soluble monomeric alpha beta-units of Na,K-ATPase can occlude Rb+ or Na+ with the same stoichiometry as the membrane-bound enzyme. The structural basis for occlusion of cations in Na,K-ATPase is suggested to be the formation of a cavity inside a monomeric alpha beta-unit constituting the minimum protein unit required for active Na,K-transport.

  2. ATPaseTb2, a unique membrane-bound FoF1-ATPase component, is essential in bloodstream and dyskinetoplastic trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolína Šubrtová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the infectious stage of Trypanosoma brucei, an important parasite of humans and livestock, the mitochondrial (mt membrane potential (Δψm is uniquely maintained by the ATP hydrolytic activity and subsequent proton pumping of the essential FoF1-ATPase. Intriguingly, this multiprotein complex contains several trypanosome-specific subunits of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate that one of the largest novel subunits, ATPaseTb2, is membrane-bound and localizes with monomeric and multimeric assemblies of the FoF1-ATPase. Moreover, RNAi silencing of ATPaseTb2 quickly leads to a significant decrease of the Δψm that manifests as a decreased growth phenotype, indicating that the FoF1-ATPase is impaired. To further explore the function of this protein, we employed a trypanosoma strain that lacks mtDNA (dyskinetoplastic, Dk and thus subunit a, an essential component of the proton pore in the membrane Fo-moiety. These Dk cells generate the Δψm by combining the hydrolytic activity of the matrix-facing F1-ATPase and the electrogenic exchange of ATP4- for ADP3- by the ATP/ADP carrier (AAC. Surprisingly, in addition to the expected presence of F1-ATPase, the monomeric and multimeric FoF1-ATPase complexes were identified. In fact, the immunoprecipitation of a F1-ATPase subunit demonstrated that ATPaseTb2 was a component of these complexes. Furthermore, RNAi studies established that the membrane-bound ATPaseTb2 subunit is essential for maintaining normal growth and the Δψm of Dk cells. Thus, even in the absence of subunit a, a portion of the FoF1-ATPase is assembled in Dk cells.

  3. Aggressive re-warming at 38.5 degrees C following deep hypothermia at 21 degrees C increases neutrophil membrane bound elastase activity and pro-inflammatory factor release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Min; Zhao, Xiao-gang; He, Yi; Gu, Yan; Mei, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is often performed under hypothermic condition. The effects of hypothermia and re-warming on neutrophil activity are unclear. This study aimed to compare the effects of different hypothermia and re-warming regimens on neutrophil membrane bound elastase (MBE)

  4. Pathogen-expanded CD11b+ invariant NKT cells feedback inhibit T cell proliferation via membrane-bound TGF-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanmei; Jiang, Zhengping; Chen, Zhubo; Gu, Yan; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xiang; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-04-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) are effector cells, but also regulator of immune response, which either promote or suppress immune response through production of different cytokines. However, the subsets of NKT cells with definite phenotype and regulatory function need to be further identified. Furthermore, the mechanisms for NKT cells to regulate immune response remain to be fully elucidated. Here we identified CD11b(+) invariant NKT (CD11b(+) iNKT) cells as a new subset of regulatory NKT cells in mouse models with infection. αGalCer:CD1d complex(+)TCRβ(+)NK1.1(+) NKT cells could be categorized to CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) subsets. NKT cells are enriched in liver. During Listeria monocytogenes infection, hepatic CD11b(+) iNKT cells were significantly induced and expanded, with peak expansion on day 8. CD11b(+) iNKT cells were also expanded significantly in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. As compared to CD11b(-) iNKT cells, CD11b(+) iNKT cells expressed higher levels of CD27, FasL, B7H1, CD69, and particularly higher level of membrane-bound TGF-β1 (mTGF-β1), but produced less IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Hepatic CD11b(+) iNKT cells suppressed antigen-nonspecific and OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation through mTGF-β1 both in vitro and in vivo, meanwhile, they did not interfere with activation of CD4 T cells and cytotoxicity of the activated CD8 T cells. Thus, we have identified a new subset of pathogen-expanded CD11b(+) invariant NKT cells which can feedback inhibit T cell response through cell-to-cell contact via cell surface (membrane-bound) TGF-β1, especially at the late stage of immune response against infection. CD11b(+) regulatory iNKT cells may contribute to protect host from pathological injure by preventing immune overactivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response in relation to the H+-permeability of the membrane bound ATPase in spinach chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R.L.; van Kooten, O.; Vredenberg, W.J.

    1985-08-01

    The effect of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) on the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response and on the activity of the ATPase was investigated in isolated spinach chloroplasts. It was found that after the addition of 5 X 10(-8)mol DCCD the rate of ATP hydrolysis induced by a period of 60 sec illumination was decreased to less than 5% of its original value. At this concentration, hardly any effect, if at all, could be detected on the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response, neither in dark-adapted nor in light-activated chloroplasts. It was concluded that the presence of concentrations of DCCD, sufficiently high to affect the ATPase activity, does not affect the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response. Since DCCD decreases the H+ permeability of the membrane-bound ATPase, it was concluded that this permeability coefficient for protons is not an important factor in the regulation of the flash-induced membrane potential and, therefore, does not affect the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response.

  6. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2006-01-01

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K d values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k on ) and dissociation (k off ) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein

  7. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moaddel, Ruin [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States); Wainer, Irving W. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States)]. E-mail: Wainerir@grc.nia.nih.gov

    2006-03-30

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K {sub d} values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k {sub on}) and dissociation (k {sub off}) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein.

  8. The extracellular membrane-proximal domain of membrane-bound IgE restricts B cell activation by limiting B cell antigen receptor surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanshylla, Kanika; Opazo, Felipe; Gronke, Konrad; Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2018-03-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are key mediators of allergic reactions. Due to their potentially harmful anaphylactic properties, their production is tightly regulated. The membrane-bound isoform of IgE (mIgE), which is an integral component of the B cell antigen receptor, has been shown to be critical for the regulation of IgE responses in mice. In primate species including humans, mIgE can be expressed in two isoforms that are produced by alternative splicing of the primary ε Ig heavy chain transcript, and differ in the absence or presence of an extracellular membrane-proximal domain (EMPD) consisting of 52 amino acids. However, the function of the EMPD remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the EMPD restricts surface expression of mIgE-containing BCRs in human and murine B cells. The EMPD does not interfere with BCR assembly but acts as an autonomous endoplasmic reticulum retention domain. Limited surface expression of EMPD-containing mIgE-BCRs caused impaired activation of intracellular signaling cascades and hence represents a regulatory mechanism that may control the production of potentially anaphylactic IgE antibodies in primate species. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  10. In Situ Proteolysis for Crystallization of Membrane Bound Cytochrome P450 17A1 and 17A2 Proteins from Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Li; Egli, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Fish and human cytochrome P450 (P450) 17A1 catalyze both steroid 17α-hydroxylation and 17α,20-lyase reactions. Fish P450 17A2 catalyzes only 17α-hydroxylation. Both enzymes are microsomal-type P450s, integral membrane proteins that bind to the membrane through their N-terminal hydrophobic segment, the signal anchor sequence. The presence of this N-terminal region renders expression of full-length proteins challenging or impossible. For some proteins, variable truncation of the signal anchor sequence precludes expression or results in poor expression levels. To crystallize P450 17A1 and 17A2 in order to gain insight into their different activities, we used an alternative N-terminal sequence to boost expression together with in situ proteolysis. Key features of our approach to identify crystallizable P450 fragments were the use of an N-terminal leader sequence, a screen composed of 12 proteases to establish optimal cleavage, variations of protease concentration in combination with an SDS-PAGE assay, and analysis of the resulting fragments using Edman sequencing. Described in this unit are protocols for vector preparation, expression, purification, and in situ proteolytic crystallization of two membrane-bound P450 proteins. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Role of individual phosphorylation sites for the 14-3-3-protein-dependent activation of yeast neutral trehalase Nth1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veisová, Dana; Macáková, Eva; Řežábková, Lenka; Šulc, Miroslav; Vácha, Petr; Sychrová, Hana; Obšil, T.; Obšilová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 443, č. 3 (2012), s. 663-670 ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0455; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110801 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 350111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : 14-3-3 protein * Bmh * neutral trehalase (Nth1) * enzymatic activity * phosphorylation * Saccharomyces cerevisiae Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.654, year: 2012

  12. Roles of Agrobacterium tumefaciens membrane-bound ferritin (MbfA) in iron transport and resistance to iron under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhubhanil, Sakkarin; Chamsing, Jareeya; Sittipo, Panida; Chaoprasid, Paweena; Sukchawalit, Rojana; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2014-05-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens membrane-bound ferritin (MbfA) is a member of the erythrin (Er)-vacuolar iron transport family. The MbfA protein has an Er or ferritin-like domain at its N terminus and has been predicted to have five transmembrane segments in its C-terminal region. Analysis of protein localization using PhoA and LacZ reporter proteins supported the view that the N-terminal di-iron site is located in the cytoplasm whilst the C-terminal end faces the periplasm. An A. tumefaciens mbfA mutant strain had 1.5-fold higher total iron content than the WT strain. Furthermore, multi-copy expression of mbfA reduced total iron content two- and threefold in WT and mbfA mutant backgrounds, respectively. These results suggest that MbfA may function as an iron exporter rather than an iron storage protein. The mbfA mutant showed 10-fold increased sensitivity to the iron-activated antibiotic streptonigrin, implying that the mutant had increased accumulation of intracellular free iron. Growth of the mbfA mutant was reduced in the presence of high iron under acidic conditions. The expression of mbfA was induced highly in cells grown in iron-replete medium at pH 5.5, further supporting the view that mbfA is involved in the response to iron under acidic conditions. A. tumefaciens MbfA may play a protective role against increased free iron in the cytoplasm through iron binding and export, thus preventing iron-induced toxicity via the Fenton reaction.

  13. Unexpected Potency Differences between B-Cell-Activating Factor (BAFF) Antagonist Antibodies against Various Forms of BAFF: Trimer, 60-Mer, and Membrane-Bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Amy M; Kenny, Cynthia Hess; Khalil, Ashraf M; Pan, Qi; Ralph, Kerry L M; Ritchie, Julie; Venkataramani, Sathyadevi; Presky, David H; DeWire, Scott M; Brodeur, Scott R

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic agents antagonizing B-cell-activating factor/B-lymphocyte stimulator (BAFF/BLyS) are currently in clinical development for autoimmune diseases; belimumab is the first Food and Drug Administration-approved drug in more than 50 years for the treatment of lupus. As a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, BAFF promotes B-cell survival and homeostasis and is overexpressed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases. BAFF exists in three recognized forms: membrane-bound and two secreted, soluble forms of either trimeric or 60-mer oligomeric states. To date, most in vitro pharmacology studies of BAFF neglect one or more of these forms. Here, we report a comprehensive in vitro cell-based analysis of BAFF in assay systems that measure all forms of BAFF-mediated activation. We demonstrate the effects of these BAFF forms in both a primary human B-cell proliferation assay and in nuclear factor κB reporter assay systems in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing BAFF receptors and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI). In contrast to the mouse system, we find that BAFF trimer activates the human TACI receptor. Further, we profiled the activities of two clinically advanced BAFF antagonist antibodies, belimumab and tabalumab. Unexpectedly, we revealed differences in inhibitory potencies against the various BAFF forms, in particular that belimumab does not potently inhibit BAFF 60-mer. Through this increased understanding of the activity of BAFF antagonists against different forms of BAFF, we hope to influence the discovery of BAFF antagonist antibodies with distinct therapeutic mechanisms for improvement in the treatment of lupus or other related autoimmune pathologies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. In vitro assay of the chlorophyll biosynthetic enzyme Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane-bound fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. (Clemson Univ., SC (United States))

    1991-07-01

    The first committed step in chlorophyll synthesis is the Mg-chelatase-catalyzed insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX. Since iron insertion into protoporphyrin leads to heme formation, Mg-chelatase lies at the branch point of heme and chlorophyll synthesis in chloroplasts. Little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase, as it has been assayed only in intact cucumber chloroplasts. In this report we describe an in vitro assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts was 3- to 4-fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts. This activity survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated by centrifugation into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity, and both were inactivated by boiling indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane-bound protein(s). The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol of Mg-deuteroporphyrin per h per mg of protein, and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity and the enzymen was sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (I{sub 50}, 20 {mu}M). Broken and reconstituted cucumber chloroplasts were unable to maintain Mg-chelatase activity. However, the cucumber supernatant fraction was active when combined with the pellet fraction of peas; the converse was not true, which suggested that the cucumber pellet was the component that lost activity during lysis.

  15. Generation of a novel regulatory NK cell subset from peripheral blood CD34+ progenitors promoted by membrane-bound IL-15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giuliani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NK cells have been long time considered as cytotoxic lymphocytes competent in killing virus-infected cells and tumors. However, NK cells may also play essential immuno-regulatory functions. In this context, the real existence of a defined NK subset with negative regulatory properties has been hypothesized but never clearly demonstrated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we show the in vitro generation from human peripheral blood haematopoietic progenitors (PB-HP, of a novel subset of non-cytolytic NK cells displaying a mature phenotype and remarkable immuno-regulatory functions (NK-ireg. The main functional hallmark of these NK-ireg cells is represented by the surface expression/release of HLA-G, a major immunosuppressive molecule. In addition, NK-ireg cells secrete two powerful immuno-regulatory factors: IL-10 and IL-21. Through these factors, NK-ireg cells act as effectors of the down-regulation of the immune response: reconverting mature myeloid DC (mDC into immature/tolerogenic DC, blocking cytolytic functions on conventional NK cells and inducing HLA-G membrane expression on PB-derived monocytes. The generation of "NK-ireg" cells is obtained, by default, in culture conditions favouring cell-to-cell contacts, and it is strictly dependent on reciprocal trans-presentation of membrane-bound IL-15 forms constitutively and selectively expressed by human CD34(+ PB-HP. Finally, a small subset of NKp46(+ HLA-G(+ IL-10(+ is detected within freshly isolated decidual NK cells, suggesting that these cells could represent an in vivo counterpart of the NK-ireg cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, NK-ireg cells represent a novel truly differentiated non-cytolytic NK subset with a self-sustainable phenotype (CD56(+ CD16(+ NKp30(+ NKp44(+ NKp46(+ CD94(+ CD69(+ CCR7(+ generated from specific pSTAT6(+ GATA3(+ precursors. NK-ireg cells could be employed to develop new immuno-suppressive strategies in autoimmune diseases, transplant

  16. Site-specific incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan as a probe of the structure and function of the membrane-bound D-lactate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli: A 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peersen, O.B.; Pratt, E.A.; Truong, H.T. N.; Ho, C.; Rule, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the membrane-bound D-lactate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli have been investigated by fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 5-fluorotryptophan-labeled enzyme in conjunction with oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis. 5-Fluorotryptophan has been substituted for nine phenylalanine, tyrosine, and leucine residues in the enzyme molecule without loss of activity. The 19 F signals from these additional tryptophan residues have been used as markers for sensitivity to substrate, exposure to aqueous solvent, and proximity to a lipid-bound spin-label. The nuclear magnetic resonance data show that two mutational sites, at amino acid residues 340 and 361, are near the lipid environment used to stabilize the enzyme. There are a number of amino acid residues on the carboxyl side of this region that are strongly sensitive to the aqueous solvent. The environment of the wide-type tryptophan residue at position 469 changes as a result of two of the substitution mutations, suggesting some amino acid residue-residue interactions. Secondary structure prediction methods indicate a possible binding site for the flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor in the carboxyl end of the enzyme molecule. These results suggest that the membrane-bound D-lactate dehydrogenase may have the two-domain structure of many cytoplasmic dehydrogenases but with the addition of a membrane-binding domain between the catalytic and cofactor-binding domains. This type of three-domain structure may be of general significance for understanding the structure of membrane-bound proteins which do not traverse the lipid bilayer of membranes

  17. Modulatory Effect of Taurine on 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)Anthracene-Induced Alterations in Detoxification Enzyme System, Membrane Bound Enzymes, Glycoprotein Profile and Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen in Rat Breast Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Baskaran, Kuppusamy; Periyasamy, Kuppusamy; Selvaraj, Sundaramoorthy; Ilakkia, Aruldoss; Saravanan, Dhiravidamani; Venkateswari, Ramachandran; Revathi Mani, Balasundaram; Anandakumar, Pandi; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2016-08-01

    The modulatory effect of taurine on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats was studied. DMBA (25 mg/kg body weight) was administered to induce breast cancer in rats. Protein carbonyl levels, activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase), phase I drug metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH cytochrome c reductase), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase), glycoprotein levels, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied. DMBA-induced breast tumor bearing rats showed abnormal alterations in the levels of protein carbonyls, activities of membrane bound enzymes, drug metabolizing enzymes, glycoprotein levels, and PCNA protein expression levels. Taurine treatment (100 mg/kg body weight) appreciably counteracted all the above changes induced by DMBA. Histological examination of breast tissue further supported our biochemical findings. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated the chemotherapeutic effect of taurine in DMBA-induced breast cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Gene clusters involved in isethionate degradation by terrestrial and marine bacteria.

    KAUST Repository

    Weinitschke, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous isethionate (2-hydroxyethanesulfonate) is dissimilated by diverse bacteria. Growth of Cupriavidus necator H16 with isethionate was observed, as was inducible membrane-bound isethionate dehydrogenase (IseJ) and inducible transcription of the genes predicted to encode IseJ and a transporter (IseU). Biodiversity in isethionate transport genes was observed and investigated by transcription experiments.

  19. Assessment of different fixation protocols on the presence of membrane-bound vesicles in Caco-2 cells: a multidimensional view by means of correlative light and 3-D transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shami, Gerald; Cheng, Delfine; Henriquez, Jeffrey; Braet, Filip

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we present a comparative analysis of a variety of chemical and physical fixation protocols for the specific visualisation of the membrane-bound vesicles (MBVs) in the Caco-2 colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line. In so doing, we validated the applicability of specific specimen preparation protocols for the preservation and contrasting of membrane-associated vesicles. Next, by employing the best respective chemical (GOT) and physical (SHPF) fixation methods for the application of transmission electron tomography and modelling we were able to characterise MBVs in three-dimensions and at the nanometer scale. In the second part of this study, we employ a correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) approach in order to determine which vesicular compartments are implicated in the uptake of FITC-BSA as a model protein drug. In so doing, we provide a solid foundation for future studies investigating chemotherapeutic drug uptake, transport and fate in cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A microassay for the determination of soluble and membrane-bound glutamate decarboxylase activity--influences of cations, lipid composition, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate on the glutamate decarboxylase binding to liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagel, C.; Fleissner, A.; Seifert, R.

    1989-01-01

    A radiochemical microassay for soluble and membrane-bound glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is described. Up to 180 samples can be determined per day with a variation coefficient of 2%. The method detects newly synthesized gamma-amino-n-butyric acid in the picomole range and can easily be applied to other enzymes whose substrate and product differ by charge. In an aqueous homogenate of brain (1 + 10; w/v) about 15% of the total GAD activity are spun down by centrifugation (1 h, 100,000g) increasing to 35% of the total GAD activity in solutions with 8 mM calcium chloride or 100 mM potassium acetate. There is similar dependence on the cation concentration when GAD binds to phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as well as dependence on lipid concentration and lipid composition. The coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate has no influence on GAD binding to liposomes

  1. Membrane-bound SIV envelope trimers are immunogenic in ferrets after intranasal vaccination with a replication-competent canine distemper virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia; Wright, Kevin J; Backer, Martin; Coleman, John W; Koehnke, Rebecca; Frenk, Esther; Domi, Arban; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; DeStefano, Joanne; Narpala, Sandeep; Powell, Rebecca; Morrow, Gavin; Boggiano, Cesar; Zamb, Timothy J; Richter King, C; Parks, Christopher L

    2013-11-01

    We are investigating canine distemper virus (CDV) as a vaccine vector for the delivery of HIV envelope (Env) that closely resembles the native trimeric spike. We selected CDV because it will promote vaccine delivery to lymphoid tissues, and because human exposure is infrequent, reducing potential effects of pre-existing immunity. Using SIV Env as a model, we tested a number of vector and gene insert designs. Vectors containing a gene inserted between the CDV H and L genes, which encoded Env lacking most of its cytoplasmic tail, propagated efficiently in Vero cells, expressed the immunogen on the cell surface, and incorporated the SIV glycoprotein into progeny virus particles. When ferrets were vaccinated intranasally, there were no signs of distress, vector replication was observed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, and the animals produced anti-SIV Env antibodies. These data show that live CDV-SIV Env vectors can safely induce anti-Env immune responses following intranasal vaccination. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The expression and functional activity of membrane-bound human leukocyte antigen-G1 are influenced by the 3'-untranslated region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Signe Goul; Hantash, Basil M; Zhao, Longmei

    2013-01-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an immunosuppressive molecule acting on both the innate and adaptive immune system. A 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs66554220) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-G gene has been associated with a number of diseases, pregnancy complications...... insertion were the most efficient in inhibiting NK cytotoxicity but showed a lower soluble HLA-G1 per mHLA-G1 ratio than the HLA-G1 K562 cells lacking the 14 bp insertion. Our data suggest 3'UTR polymorphism may play an important role in HLA-G regulation with implications on a range of diseases....

  3. Survival of the fittest: positive selection of CD4+ T cells expressing a membrane-bound fusion inhibitor following HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpel, Janine; Braun, Stephen E; Qiu, Gang; Wong, Fay Eng; Conolle, Michelle; Schmitz, Jörn E; Brendel, Christian; Humeau, Laurent M; Dropulic, Boro; Rossi, John J; Berger, Annemarie; von Laer, Dorothee; Johnson, R Paul

    2010-08-23

    Although a variety of genetic strategies have been developed to inhibit HIV replication, few direct comparisons of the efficacy of these inhibitors have been carried out. Moreover, most studies have not examined whether genetic inhibitors are able to induce a survival advantage that results in an expansion of genetically-modified cells following HIV infection. We evaluated the efficacy of three leading genetic strategies to inhibit HIV replication: 1) an HIV-1 tat/rev-specific small hairpin (sh) RNA; 2) an RNA antisense gene specific for the HIV-1 envelope; and 3) a viral entry inhibitor, maC46. In stably transduced cell lines selected such that >95% of cells expressed the genetic inhibitor, the RNA antisense envelope and viral entry inhibitor maC46 provided the strongest inhibition of HIV-1 replication. However, when mixed populations of transduced and untransduced cells were challenged with HIV-1, the maC46 fusion inhibitor resulted in highly efficient positive selection of transduced cells, an effect that was evident even in mixed populations containing as few as 1% maC46-expressing cells. The selective advantage of the maC46 fusion inhibitor was also observed in HIV-1-infected cultures of primary T lymphocytes as well as in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. These results demonstrate robust inhibition of HIV replication with the fusion inhibitor maC46 and the antisense Env inhibitor, and importantly, a survival advantage of cells expressing the maC46 fusion inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. Evaluation of the ability of genetic inhibitors of HIV-1 replication to confer a survival advantage on genetically-modified cells provides unique information not provided by standard techniques that may be important in the in vivo efficacy of these genes.

  4. Humanised IgG1 antibody variants targeting membrane-bound carcinoembryonic antigen by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S Q; Umana, P; Mössner, E; Ntouroupi, T; Brünker, P; Schmidt, C; Wilding, J L; Mortensen, N J; Bodmer, W F

    2009-11-17

    The effect of glycoengineering a membrane specific anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (this paper uses the original term CEA for the formally designated CEACAM5) antibody (PR1A3) on its ability to enhance killing of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines by human immune effector cells was assessed. In vivo efficacy of the antibody was also tested. The antibody was modified using EBNA cells cotransfected with beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III and the humanised hPR1A3 antibody genes. The resulting alteration of the Fc segment glycosylation pattern enhances the antibody's binding affinity to the FcgammaRIIIa receptor on human immune effector cells but does not alter the antibody's binding capacity. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is inhibited in the presence of anti-FcgammaRIII blocking antibodies. This glycovariant of hPR1A3 enhances ADCC 10-fold relative to the parent unmodified antibody using either unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear or natural killer (NK) cells and CEA-positive CRC cells as targets. NK cells are far more potent in eliciting ADCC than either freshly isolated monocytes or granulocytes. Flow cytometry and automated fluorescent microscopy have been used to show that both versions of hPR1A3 can induce antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by monocyte-derived macrophages. However, the glycovariant antibody did not mediate enhanced ADCP. This may be explained by the relatively low expression of FcgammaRIIIa on cultured macrophages. In vivo studies show the efficacy of glycoengineered humanised IgG1 PR1A3 in significantly improving survival in a CRC metastatic murine model. The greatly enhanced in vitro ADCC activity of the glycoengineered version of hPR1A3 is likely to be clinically beneficial.

  5. Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2012-01-01

    In summary, our data show that development of the expression of genes encoding secreted (Muc2/Tff3) and membrane-bound (Muc1/Muc3/Muc4) mucus regulatory proteins, respectively, is distinct and that the onset of this development may be accelerated by specific groups of bacteria present or absent a...

  6. Characterization of plasma membrane bound inorganic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... N-ethylmaliemide (NEM), phenylarsineoxide, ABC superfamily transport modulator verapamil and was also by F1Fo-ATPase inhibitor quercetin. Conclusion: We conclude that there are significant differences within promastigote, amastigote and mammalian host in cytosolic pH homeostasis to merit the inclusion of PPase ...

  7. A membrane-bound vertebrate globin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Blank

    Full Text Available The family of vertebrate globins includes hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other O(2-binding proteins of yet unclear functions. Among these, globin X is restricted to fish and amphibians. Zebrafish (Danio rerio globin X is expressed at low levels in neurons of the central nervous system and appears to be associated with the sensory system. The protein harbors a unique N-terminal extension with putative N-myristoylation and S-palmitoylation sites, suggesting membrane-association. Intracellular localization and transport of globin X was studied in 3T3 cells employing green fluorescence protein fusion constructs. Both myristoylation and palmitoylation sites are required for correct targeting and membrane localization of globin X. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a vertebrate globin has been identified as component of the cell membrane. Globin X has a hexacoordinate binding scheme and displays cooperative O(2 binding with a variable affinity (P(50∼1.3-12.5 torr, depending on buffer conditions. A respiratory function of globin X is unlikely, but analogous to some prokaryotic membrane-globins it may either protect the lipids in cell membrane from oxidation or may act as a redox-sensing or signaling protein.

  8. Direct association of a promoter polymorphism in the CD36/FAT fatty acid transporter gene with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corpeleijn, E.; Kallen, van der C.J.H.; Kruijshoop, M.; Magagnin, M.G.P.; Bruin, de T.W.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Saris, W.H.M.; Blaak, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: The membrane-bound fatty acid transporter CD36/FAT may play a role in disturbed fatty acid handling as observed in the metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Genetic variation in the CD36 gene may contribute to the aetiology of diabetes. METHODS: A population-based cohort in

  9. Frequent loss and alteration of the MOXD2 gene in catarrhines and whales: a possible connection with the evolution of olfaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Seon Kim

    Full Text Available The MOXD2 gene encodes a membrane-bound monooxygenase similar to dopamine-β-hydroxylase, and has been proposed to be associated with olfaction. In this study, we analyzed MOXD2 genes from 64 mammalian species, and identified loss-of-function mutations in apes (humans, Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, and five gibbon species from the four major gibbon genera, toothed whales (killer whales, bottlenose dolphins, finless porpoises, baijis, and sperm whales, and baleen whales (minke whales and fin whales. We also identified a shared 13-nt deletion in the last exon of Old World cercopithecine monkeys that results in conversion of a membrane-bound protein to a soluble form. We hypothesize that the frequent inactivation and alteration of MOXD2 genes in catarrhines and whales may be associated with the evolution of olfaction in these clades.

  10. Expression of Membrane-Bound Human AminopeptidaseP as a Soluble Enzyme and an Investigation into Its Efficacy Towards Offering Protection Against the Toxicity of Chemical Warfare Nerve Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    provided food and water ad libitum. Mice (n=6) were injected with 2 × 1011 viral particles of Ad-shmAPP or Ad-null per mouse via the tail vein. Prior...Interact, 2010. 187(1-3): p. 349-54. 10. Hsu, Y.T., et al., Evaluation of organophosphorus chemicals- degrading enzymes: a comparison of Escherichia coli...against the toxicity of the organophosphorus pesticide toxicant diazoxon. Gene Ther, 2011. 18(3): p. 250-7. 22. Broomfield, C.A., et al., Protection

  11. Mapping of HNF4alpha target genes in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Bressendorff, Simon; Moller, Jette

    2009-01-01

    not previously been described as being regulated by HNF4alpha. The 1,541 genes contributed significantly to gene ontology (GO) pathways categorized by lipid and amino acid transport and metabolism. An analysis of the homeodomain transcription factor Cdx-2 (CDX2), the disaccharidase trehalase (TREH......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of HNF4alpha has been extensively studied in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, and HNF4alpha is also regarded as key regulator of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation as well. The aim of the present work is to identify novel HNF4alpha target genes...... in the human intestinal epithelial cells in order to elucidate the role of HNF4alpha in the intestinal differentiation progress. METHODS: We have performed a ChIP-chip analysis of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2 in order to make a genome-wide identification of HNF4alpha binding to promoter regions...

  12. Single-molecule tracking in live Vibrio cholerae reveals that ToxR recruits the membrane-bound virulence regulator TcpP to the toxT promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Beth L; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J; Biteen, Julie S

    2015-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes the human disease cholera by producing a potent toxin. The V. cholerae virulence pathway involves an unusual transcription step: the bitopic inner-membrane proteins TcpP and ToxR activate toxT transcription. As ToxT is the primary direct transcription activator in V. cholerae pathogenicity, its regulation by membrane-localized activators is key in the disease process. However, the molecular mechanisms by which membrane-localized activators engage the transcription process have yet to be uncovered in live cells. Here we report the use of super-resolution microscopy, single-molecule tracking, and gene knockouts to examine the dynamics of individual TcpP proteins in live V. cholerae cells with < 40 nm spatial resolution on a 50 ms timescale. Single-molecule trajectory analysis reveals that TcpP diffusion is heterogeneous and can be described by three populations of TcpP motion: one fast, one slow, and one immobile. By comparing TcpP diffusion in wild-type V. cholerae to that in mutant strains lacking either toxR or the toxT promoter, we determine that TcpP mobility is greater in the presence of its interaction partners than in their absence. Our findings support a mechanism in which ToxR recruits TcpP to the toxT promoter for transcription activation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Isolation and purification of membrane-bound cytochrome c from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    ferrochrome and redox spectra showed the presence of heme-c. Key words: Cytochrome c, respiratory chain and Proteus mirabilis. INTRODUCTION. Proteus mirabilis is facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped, gram negative bacterium.

  14. Biogenesis of membrane bound respiratory complexes in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Claire E.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia colt is one of the preferred bacteria for studies on the energetics and regulation of respiration Respiratory chains consist of primary dehydrogenases and terminal reductases or oxidases linked by quinones. In order to assemble this complex arrangement of protein complexes, synthesis of the subunits occurs in the cytoplasm followed by assembly in the cytoplasm and/or membrane, the incorporation of metal or organic cofactors and the anchoring of the complex to the membrane In the c...

  15. Biogenesis of membrane bound respiratory complexes in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, Claire E.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    Escherichia colt is one of the preferred bacteria for studies on the energetics and regulation of respiration Respiratory chains consist of primary dehydrogenases and terminal reductases or oxidases linked by quinones. In order to assemble this complex arrangement of protein complexes, synthesis of

  16. Isolation and purification of membrane-bound cytochrome c from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present studies, respiratory chain pathogenic bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, was investigated. In the first phase, growth profile study was performed to optimize the P. mirabilis growth. Maximum bacterial growth could be obtained between 10 – 12 h of culturing time. Down-stream processing was performed by using ...

  17. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  18. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  19. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB Gene Encodes a Diheme Ferric Reductase ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra K.; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Iron utilization by bacteria in aerobic environments involves uptake as a ferric chelate from the environment, followed by reduction to the ferrous form. Ferric iron reduction is poorly understood in most bacterial species. Here, we identified Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB (bll3557) as a gene adjacent to, and coregulated with, the pyoR gene (blr3555) encoding the outer membrane receptor for transport of a ferric pyoverdine. FrcB is a membrane-bound, diheme protein, characteristic of eukaryotic ferric reductases. Heme was essential for FrcB stability, as were conserved histidine residues in the protein that likely coordinate the heme moieties. Expression of the frcB gene in Escherichia coli conferred ferric reductase activity on those cells. Furthermore, reduced heme in purified FrcB was oxidized by ferric iron in vitro. B. japonicum cells showed inducible ferric reductase activity in iron-limited cells that was diminished in an frcB mutant. Steady-state levels of frcB mRNA were strongly induced under iron-limiting conditions, but transcript levels were low and unresponsive to iron in an irr mutant lacking the global iron response transcriptional regulator Irr. Thus, Irr positively controls the frcB gene. FrcB belongs to a family of previously uncharacterized proteins found in many proteobacteria and some cyanobacteria. This suggests that membrane-bound, heme-containing ferric reductase proteins are not confined to eukaryotes but may be common in bacteria. PMID:21705608

  20. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB gene encodes a diheme ferric reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Sandra K; O'Brian, Mark R

    2011-08-01

    Iron utilization by bacteria in aerobic environments involves uptake as a ferric chelate from the environment, followed by reduction to the ferrous form. Ferric iron reduction is poorly understood in most bacterial species. Here, we identified Bradyrhizobium japonicum frcB (bll3557) as a gene adjacent to, and coregulated with, the pyoR gene (blr3555) encoding the outer membrane receptor for transport of a ferric pyoverdine. FrcB is a membrane-bound, diheme protein, characteristic of eukaryotic ferric reductases. Heme was essential for FrcB stability, as were conserved histidine residues in the protein that likely coordinate the heme moieties. Expression of the frcB gene in Escherichia coli conferred ferric reductase activity on those cells. Furthermore, reduced heme in purified FrcB was oxidized by ferric iron in vitro. B. japonicum cells showed inducible ferric reductase activity in iron-limited cells that was diminished in an frcB mutant. Steady-state levels of frcB mRNA were strongly induced under iron-limiting conditions, but transcript levels were low and unresponsive to iron in an irr mutant lacking the global iron response transcriptional regulator Irr. Thus, Irr positively controls the frcB gene. FrcB belongs to a family of previously uncharacterized proteins found in many proteobacteria and some cyanobacteria. This suggests that membrane-bound, heme-containing ferric reductase proteins are not confined to eukaryotes but may be common in bacteria.

  1. Purification of a membrane-bound trypsin-like enzyme from the gut of the velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner =Purificação de uma enzima “tipo tripsina” não-solúvel do intestino da lagarta da soja (Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Matos Santoro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of protein digestion in insects by specific endoprotease inhibitors is being regarded as an alternative to conventional insecticides for pest control. To optimize the effectiveness of this strategy, the understanding of the endoprotease diversity of the target insect is crucial. In this sense, a membrane-bound trypsin-like enzyme from the gut of Anticarsia gemmatalis fifth-instar larvae was purified. Non-soluble fraction of the gut extract was solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyldimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS and subjected to a p-aminobenzamidine affinity chromatography followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The yield of the purified enzyme was 11% with a purification factor of 143 and a final specific activity of 18.6 µM min.-1 mg-1 protein using N-α-benzoyl-L- Arg-p-nitroanilide (L-BApNA as substrate. The purified sample showed a single band with proteolytic activity active and apparent molecular mass of 25 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Molecular mass determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was 28,632 ± 26 Da. Although the low recovery and the difficulties in purifying large enzyme amounts limited its further characterization, the results contribute for the understanding of the proteases present on A. gemmatalis gut, which are potential targets for natural or specifically designed protease inhibitors.Comprometer a digestão de proteínas dos insetos pelo uso de inibidores específicos de endoproteases tem sido amplamente estudado como um método de controle de pragas alternativo ao uso dos inseticidas convencionais. No processo de otimização desta estratégia, o conhecimento da diversidade das endoproteases do inseto alvo torna-se crucial. Neste sentido, uma enzima “tipo-tripsina” ligada à membrana obtida do intestino de larvas do 5° instar de A. gemmatalis foi purificada. A fração insolúvel do extrato do intestino foi solubilizada com 3-[(3-cholamidopropyldimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS e submetida

  2. Reference genes to quantify gene expression during oogenesis in a teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloffre, Laurence A M; Andrade, André; Filipe, Alexandra I; Canario, Adelino V M

    2012-09-10

    Understanding the molecular events involved in the acquisition of competence during oogenesis is a key step to determine the secret of 'high quality' eggs for aquaculture. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is the technique of election to determine changes in transcript abundance in such studies, but choosing reference genes for normalization, in particular during oogenesis, remains a challenge. In the present study, transcription of 6 functionally distinct genes, β actin (ACTB), cathepsin D (CTSD), cathepsin Z (CTSZ), elongation factor 1 α (EEF1A), TATA binding protein (TBP) and tubulin A (TUBA1A) was assessed as normalizers of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI) gene expression in mRNA from Mozambique tilapia oocytes during oogenesis. Reverse transcription was equally efficient and varies little in all samples. Most of the genes considered for reference were stable during early stages of oogenesis but variations were observed during vitellogenesis. A single gene and up to 3 genes were shown to be insufficient for reliable normalization throughout the whole oogenesis. The combination of the genes ACTB, CTSD, EEF1A and CTSZ as reference was found to minimize variation and has the most stable expression pattern between maturation stages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Knock down of Whitefly Gut Gene Expression and Mortality by Orally Delivered Gut Gene-Specific dsRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Meenal; Raza, Amir; Ali, Muhammad Yousaf; Ashraf, Muhammad Aleem; Mansoor, Shahid; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Brown, Judith K

    2017-01-01

    Control of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) agricultural pest and plant virus vector relies on the use of chemical insecticides. RNA-interference (RNAi) is a homology-dependent innate immune response in eukaryotes, including insects, which results in degradation of the corresponding transcript following its recognition by a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that shares 100% sequence homology. In this study, six whitefly 'gut' genes were selected from an in silico-annotated transcriptome library constructed from the whitefly alimentary canal or 'gut' of the B biotype of B. tabaci, and tested for knock down efficacy, post-ingestion of dsRNAs that share 100% sequence homology to each respective gene target. Candidate genes were: Acetylcholine receptor subunit α, Alpha glucosidase 1, Aquaporin 1, Heat shock protein 70, Trehalase1, and Trehalose transporter1. The efficacy of RNAi knock down was further tested in a gene-specific functional bioassay, and mortality was recorded in 24 hr intervals, six days, post-treatment. Based on qPCR analysis, all six genes tested showed significantly reduced gene expression. Moderate-to-high whitefly mortality was associated with the down-regulation of osmoregulation, sugar metabolism and sugar transport-associated genes, demonstrating that whitefly survivability was linked with RNAi results. Silenced Acetylcholine receptor subunit α and Heat shock protein 70 genes showed an initial low whitefly mortality, however, following insecticide or high temperature treatments, respectively, significantly increased knockdown efficacy and death was observed, indicating enhanced post-knockdown sensitivity perhaps related to systemic silencing. The oral delivery of gut-specific dsRNAs, when combined with qPCR analysis of gene expression and a corresponding gene-specific bioassay that relates knockdown and mortality, offers a viable approach for functional genomics analysis and the discovery of prospective dsRNA biopesticide targets. The approach can

  4. Demonstration of expression of a neuropeptide-encoding gene in crustacean hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Su-Hua; Chen, Yan-Jhou; Huang, Shao-Yen; Tsai, Wei-Shiun; Wu, Hsin-Ju; Hsu, Tsan-Ting; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2012-04-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) was originally identified in a neuroendocrine system-the X-organ/sinus gland complex. In this study, a cDNA (Prc-CHH) encoding CHH precursor was cloned from the hemocyte of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Analysis of tissues by a CHH-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the presence of CHH in hemocytes, the levels of which were much lower than those in the sinus gland, but 2 to 10 times higher than those in the thoracic and cerebral ganglia. Total hemocytes were separated by density gradient centrifugation into layers of hyaline cell (HC), semi-granular cell (SGC), and granular cell (GC). Analysis of extracts of each layer using ELISA revealed that CHH is present in GCs (202.8±86.7 fmol/mg protein) and SGCs (497.8±49.4 fmol/mg protein), but not in HCs. Finally, CHH stimulated the membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity of hemocytes in a dose-dependent manner. These data for the first time confirm that a crustacean neuropeptide-encoding gene is expressed in cells essential for immunity and its expression in hemocytes is cell type-specific. Effect of CHH on the membrane-bound GC activity of hemocyte suggests that hemocyte is a target site of CHH. Possible functions of the hemocyte-derived CHH are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene expression profile analysis of human intervertebral disc degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used microarray analysis to investigate the biogenesis and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. The gene expression profiles of 37 disc tissue samples obtained from patients with herniated discs and degenerative disc disease collected by the National Cancer Institute Cooperative Tissue Network were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes between more and less degenerated discs were identified by significant analysis of microarray. A total of 555 genes were significantly overexpressed in more degenerated discs with a false discovery rate of < 3%. Functional annotation showed that these genes were significantly associated with membrane-bound vesicles, calcium ion binding and extracellular matrix. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that these genes, including previously reported genes such as fibronectin, COL2A1 and f-catenin, may play key roles in disc degeneration. Unsupervised clustering indicated that the widely used morphology-based Thompson grading system was only marginally associated with the molecular classification of intervertebral disc degeneration. These findings indicate that detailed, systematic gene analysis may be a useful way of studying the biology of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  6. Fatty acid represses insulin receptor gene expression by impairing HMGA1 through protein kinase Cε

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Debleena; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Roy, SibSankar; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2007-01-01

    It is known that free fatty acid (FFA) contributes to the development of insulin resistance and type2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism in FFA-induced insulin resistance is still unclear. In the present investigation we have demonstrated that palmitate significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PDK1, the key insulin signaling molecule. Consequently, PDK1 phosphorylation of plasma membrane bound PKCε was also inhibited. Surprisingly, phosphorylation of cytosolic PKCε was greatly stimulated by palmitate; this was then translocated to the nuclear region and associated with the inhibition of insulin receptor (IR) gene transcription. A PKCε translocation inhibitor peptide, εV1, suppressed this inhibitory effect of palmitate, suggesting requirement of phospho-PKCε migration to implement palmitate effect. Experimental evidences indicate that phospho-PKCε adversely affected HMGA1. Since HMGA1 regulates IR promoter activity, expression of IR gene was impaired causing reduction of IR on cell surface and that compromises with insulin sensitivity

  7. Carbohydrate-related genes and cell wall biosynthesis in vascular tissues of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, Campbell J; Lennon, Denise M; Wood-Jones, Alicia; Nairn, Alison V; Dean, Jeffrey F D

    2008-07-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), the most widely planted tree species in the United States, is an important source of wood and wood fibers for a multitude of consumer products. Wood fibers are primarily composed of secondary cell walls, and cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin are major components of wood. Fiber morphology and cell wall composition are important determinants of wood properties. We used comparative genomics to identify putative genes for cellulose and hemicellulose synthesis in loblolly pine that are homologous to genes implicated in cell wall synthesis in angiosperms. Sequences encoding putative secondary cell wall cellulose synthase genes, cellulose synthase-like genes, a membrane-bound endoglucanase gene, a sucrose synthase gene, a UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene and GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase genes were identified in expressed sequence tag (EST) collections from loblolly pine. Full-length coding sequences were obtained from cDNA clones isolated from a library constructed from developing xylem. Phylogenetic relationships between the genes from loblolly pine and angiosperm taxa were examined and transcriptional profiling in vascular tissues was conducted by real-time quantitative, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The putative cell wall synthesis genes were expressed at high levels in vascular tissues and a subset was differentially regulated in xylem and phloem tissues. Inferred phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns for the genes from loblolly pine were consistent with roles in synthesis of complex carbohydrates of the cell wall. These studies suggest functional conservation of homologous wood formation genes in gymnosperm and angiosperm taxa.

  8. An in vivo transfection system for inducible gene expression and gene silencing in murine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Eric K; Lechler, Christian; Kohnke-Ertel, Birgit; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Sage, Julien; Schmid, Roland M; Ehmer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Hydrodynamic tail vein injection (HTVI) of transposon-based integration vectors is an established system for stably transfecting mouse hepatocytes in vivo that has been successfully employed to study key questions in liver biology and cancer. Refining the vectors for transposon-mediated hepatocyte transfection will further expand the range of applications of this technique in liver research. In the present study, we report an advanced transposon-based system for manipulating gene expression in hepatocytes in vivo. Transposon-based vector constructs were generated to enable the constitutive expression of inducible Cre recombinase (CreER) together with tetracycline-inducible transgene or miR-small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression (Tet-ON system). Transposon and transposase expression vectors were co-injected into R26R-mTmG reporter mice by HTVI. Cre-mediated gene recombination was induced by tamoxifen, followed by the administration of doxycycline to drive tetracycline-inducible gene or shRNA expression. Expression was visualized by immunofluorescence staining in livers of injected mice. After HTVI, Cre recombination by tamoxifen led to the expression of membrane-bound green fluorescent protein in transfected hepatocytes. Activation of inducible gene or shRNA expression was detected by immunostaining in up to one-third of transfected hepatocytes, with an efficiency dependent on the promoter driving the Tet-ON system. Our vector system combines Cre-lox mediated gene mutation with inducible gene expression or gene knockdown, respectively. It provides the opportunity for rapid and specific modification of hepatocyte gene expression and can be a useful tool for genetic screening approaches and analysis of target genes specifically in genetically engineered mouse models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Structure and location of the murine adrenoleukodystrophy gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, M.A. [Christchurch School of Medicine (New Zealand); Rowland, S.A.; Dodd, A. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a degenerative neurological disease characterized by the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids in various tissues and demyelination of the central nervous system. The human gene responsible for the disease encodes a membrane-bound ATP-binding transporter protein that is located in peroxisomes. We isolated the mouse adrenoleukodystrophy gene, determined its structure, and mapped it both cytogentically and genetically. The mouse gene is very similar in structure to the human gene, consisting of 10 exons arranged over a 22-kb genomic region. We localized it in band B of the mouse X chromosome by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and, using a new microsatellite repeat polymorphism, determined the map location as 47 cM from the X centromere. We found evidence for other sequences in the mouse genome related to the 3{prime} end of Aldgh. This study paves the way for the construction of gene-targeting plasmids that may be used to develop an animal model of ALD. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Sequence analysis of flanking regions of the pfoA gene of Clostridium perfringens: beta-galactosidase gene (pbg) is located in the 3'-flanking region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Kobayashi, T; Ba-Thein, W; Ohtani, K; Hayashi, H

    1995-01-01

    The 3'-flanking region of the perfringolysin O (theta-toxin) gene (pfoA) of Clostridium perfringens was analyzed by chromosome walking. A total of 5,363 bp of the downstream region of the pfoA gene was sequenced and four open reading frames were found. ORF54 and ORF80 were found to be homologous to genes coding for membrane-bound transporter proteins of other bacteria and the beta-galactosidase gene (bgaB) of Bacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. ORF80 was named the pbg gene. Clones which showed beta-galactosidase activities were selected from a lambda FIXII genomic library of C. perfringens by blue plaque screening using X-Gal as a substrate. Four clones whose plaques showed blue appearances were obtained. Two of the four clones hybridized with the pbg probe but the others did not, indicating that there are two distinct beta-galactosidase genes in C. perfringens. The pbg gene was subcloned into pBR322 and was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, suggesting that the pbg gene codes for a beta-galactosidase of C. perfringens.

  11. Estradiol-induced gene expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C.J.; Kroll, K.J.; Gross, T.G.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) and estrogen receptor (ER) gene expression levels were measured in largemouth bass to evaluate the activation of the ER-mediated pathway by estradiol (E2). Single injections of E2 ranging from 0.0005 to 5 mg/kg up-regulated plasma Vtg in a dose-dependent manner. Vtg and ER mRNAs were measured using partial cDNA sequences corresponding to the C-terminal domain for Vtg and the ligand-binding domain of ER?? sequences. After acute E2-exposures (2 mg/kg), Vtg and ER mRNAs and plasma Vtg levels peaked after 2 days. The rate of ER mRNA accumulation peaked 36-42 h earlier than Vtg mRNA. The expression window for ER defines the primary response to E2 in largemouth bass and that for Vtg a delayed primary response. The specific effect of E2 on other estrogen-regulated genes was tested during these same time windows using differential display RT-PCR. Specific up-regulated genes that are expressed in the same time window as Vtg were ERp72 (a membrane-bound disulfide isomerase) and a gene with homology to an expressed gene identified in zebrafish. Genes that were expressed in a pattern that mimics the ER include the gene for zona radiata protein ZP2, and a gene with homology to an expressed gene found in winter flounder. One gene for fibrinogen ?? was down-regulated and an unidentified gene was transiently up-regulated after 12 h of exposure and returned to basal levels by 48 h. Taken together these studies indicate that the acute molecular response to E2 involves a complex network of responses over time. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. VAMP2-NRG1 Fusion Gene is a Novel Oncogenic Driver of Non-Small-Cell Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yeonjoo; Yong, Seunghui; Kim, Pora; Lee, Hee-Young; Jung, Yeonhwa; Keum, Juhee; Lee, Sanghyuk; Kim, Jhingook; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-07-01

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) has been discovered as the tail moiety of fusion genes with several distinct partner head genes in lung cancers. These fusion genes activate ERBB2/ERBB3 receptor-mediated cell signaling and thereby function as oncogenic drivers. We have carried out whole-transcriptome sequencing of 100 non-small-cell lung carcinoma tumors and isolated a novel fusion gene consisting of vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) and NRG1. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and genomic DNA analysis were used to demonstrate interchromosomal translocation. Immunoblotting and soft agar assays were used to examine stimulating activity of the fusion gene through ERBB2/ERBB3 signaling pathway. The most highly expressed splice variant of VAMP2-NRG1 fusion gene was shown to be membrane bound and display EGF-like domain of NRG1 extracellularly. VAMP2-NRG1 promotes anchorage-independent colony formation of H1568 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Ectopic expression of the fusion gene stimulates phosphorylation of ERBB2 and ERBB3 as well as downstream targets, AKT and ERK, confirming activation of the signaling pathway. VAMP2-NRG1 is a novel oncogenic fusion gene representing a new addition to the list of NRG1 fusion genes, which together may form an important diagnostic and clinical category of lung adenocarcinoma cases.

  13. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  14. Trans and surface membrane bound zervamicin IIB: 13C-MAOSS-NMR at high spinning speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raap, J.; Hollander, J.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.; Swischeva, N. V.; Skladnev, D.; Kiihne, S.

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between 15 N-labelled peptides or proteins and lipids can be investigated using membranes aligned on a thin polymer film, which is rolled into a cylinder and inserted into the MAS-NMR rotor. This can be spun at high speed, which is often useful at high field strengths. Unfortunately, substrate films like commercially available polycarbonate or PEEK produce severe overlap with peptide and protein signals in 13 C-MAOSS NMR spectra. We show that a simple house hold foil support allows clear observation of the carbonyl, aromatic and C α signals of peptides and proteins as well as the ester carbonyl and choline signals of phosphocholine lipids. The utility of the new substrate is validated in applications to the membrane active peptide zervamicin IIB. The stability and macroscopic ordering of thin PC10 bilayers was compared with that of thicker POPC bilayers, both supported on the household foil. Sidebands in the 31 P-spectra showed a high degree of alignment of both the supported POPC and PC10 lipid molecules. Compared with POPC, the PC10 lipids are slightly more disordered, most likely due to the increased mobilities of the shorter lipid molecules. This mobility prevents PC10 from forming stable vesicles for MAS studies. The 13 C-peptide peaks were selectively detected in a 13 C-detected 1 H-spin diffusion experiment. Qualitative analysis of build-up curves obtained for different mixing times allowed the transmembrane peptide in PC10 to be distinguished from the surface bound topology in POPC. The 13 C-MAOSS results thus independently confirms previous findings from 15 N spectroscopy [Bechinger, B., Skladnev, D.A., Ogrel, A., Li, X., Rogozhkina, E.V., Ovchinnikova, T.V., O'Neil, J.D.J. and Raap, J. (2001) Biochemistry, 40, 9428-9437]. In summary, application of house hold foil opens the possibility of measuring high resolution 13 C-NMR spectra of peptides and proteins in well ordered membranes, which are required to determine the secondary and supramolecular structures of membrane active peptides, proteins and aggregates

  15. Inositol phosphates influence the membrane bound Ca2+/Mg2+ stimulated ATPase from human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, M.; Ekholm, J.; Kumar, R.; Hanahan, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The modulation by exogenous inositol phosphates of the membrane Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ ATPase from saponin/EGTA lysed human erythrocytes was determined in a buffer (pH 7.6) containing histidine, 80 mM, MgCl 2 , 3.3 mM, NaCl, 74 mM, KCl, 30 mM, Na 2 ATP, 2.3 mM, ouabain, 0.83 mM, with variable amounts of CaCl 2 and EGTA. The ATPase assay was linear with time at 44 0 C. The inositol phosphates were commercially obtained and were also prepared from 32 P labeled rabbit platelet inositol phospholipids. Inositol triphosphate (IP 3 ) elevated the Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ ATPase activity over basal levels in a dose, time, and calcium dependent manner and were increased up to 85% of control values. Activities for the Na + /K + -ATPase and a Mg 2+ ATPase were not effected by IP 3 . Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ APTase activity with IP 2 or IP 3 could be synergistically elevated with calmodulin addition. The activation of the ATPase with IP 3 was calcium dependent in a range from .001 to .02 mM. The apparent Km and Vmax values were determined for IP 3 stimulated Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ ATPase

  16. Detection of membrane-bound and soluble antigens by magnetic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Schou; Howard, Emily; Lu, Shulin

    2017-01-01

    blood cell-bound Epstein-Barr viral particles, and soluble IL-6, and validate the results by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy performed in parallel. Additionally, employing an inexpensive, single lens, manual focus, wifi-enabled camera, we extend the portability of our method for its...

  17. Effect of zinc and calcium ions on the rat kidney membrane-bound ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-07-11

    Jul 11, 2013 ... 2009, Yilmaz et al. 2009). Strategies for inhibition of DPP-IV activity have been developed for the treatment of various diseases, in particular type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer (Matteucci and. Giampietro 2009; Peters 2010; Stulc and Sedo 2010). In several of these pathologies, a deficiency of cations (e.g..

  18. An amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on epoxy resin membrane bound cholesterol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, C S; Narang, Jagriti; Chauhan, Nidhi; Sharma, Preety; Sharma, Renu

    2012-10-01

    The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of enzyme has resulted into improved sensitivity and stability of biosensors for uric acid, ascorbic acid and polyphenols. The present work was aimed to prepare an improved amperometric biosensor for determination of serum cholesterol required in the diagnostics and management of certain pathological conditions. Epoxy resin membrane with immobilized cholesterol oxidase was mounted on the cleaned platinum (Pt) electrode with a parafilm to construct a working electrode. This working electrode along with Ag/AgCl as reference and Ag wire as an auxiliary electrode were connected through a three terminal electrometer to construct a cholesterol biosensor. The sensor showed optimum response within 25 sec at pH 7.0 and 45°C. The linear working range of biosensor was 1.0 to 8.0 mM cholesterol. K m and I max for cholesterol were 5.0 mM and 9.09 μA, respectively. The biosensor measured serum cholesterol. The minimum detection limit of the sensor was 1.0 mM. The mean analytical recoveries of added cholesterol in serum (2.84 and 4.13 mM) were 91.4 ± 2.8 and 92.3 ± 3.1 per cent (n=6), respectively. Within and between assay coefficient of variation (CV) were epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of cholesterol oxidase has resulted into an improved amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The present biosensor had an advantage over the existing biosensors as it worked at comparatively lower potential.

  19. Ficolins and FIBCD1: Soluble and membrane bound pattern recognition molecules with acetyl group selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Theresa; Schlosser, Anders; Holmskov, Uffe

    2011-01-01

    as pattern recognition molecules. Ficolins are soluble oligomeric proteins composed of trimeric collagen-like regions linked to fibrinogen-related domains (FReDs) that have the ability to sense molecular patterns on both pathogens and apoptotic cell surfaces and activate the complement system. The ficolins......D-containing molecules, and discusses structural resemblance but also diversity in recognition of acetylated ligands....

  20. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  1. Evidence for a plasma-membrane-bound nitrate reductase involved in nitrate uptake of Chlorella sorokiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischner, R.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-nitrate-reductase (NR) immunoglobulin-G (IgG) fragments inhibited nitrate uptake into Chlorella cells but had no affect on nitrate uptake. Intact anti-NR serum and preimmune IgG fragments had no affect on nitrate uptake. Membrane-associated NR was detected in plasma-membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The PM-associated NR was not removed by sonicating PM vesicles in 500 mM NaCl and 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and represented up to 0.8% of the total Chlorella NR activity. The PM NR was solubilized by Triton X-100 and inactivated by Chlorella NR antiserum. Plasma-membrane NR was present in ammonium-grown Chlorella cells that completely lacked soluble NR activity. The subunit sizes of the PM and soluble NRs were 60 and 95 kDa, respectively, as determined by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis and western blotting.

  2. Revealing the membrane-bound structure of neurokinin A using neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkes, Malcolm J. M.; Hauss, Thomas; Dante, Silvia; Bradshaw, Jeremy P.

    2000-03-01

    Neurokinin A (or substance K) belongs to the tachykinin family, a group of small amphipathic peptides that bind to specific membrane-embedded, G-protein coupled receptors. The agonist/receptor complex is quaternary in nature because the receptor binding sites are thought to be located within the lipid bilayer and because the role of water cannot be ignored. The cell membrane acts as a solvent to accumulate peptide and an inducer of peptide secondary structure. The three-dimensional shape that the peptide assumes when associated to the cell membrane will be an important parameter with regards to the receptor selectivity and affinity. Neutron diffraction measurements were carried out in order to define the location of the N-terminus of the peptide in synthetic phospholipid multi-bilayer stacks.

  3. Novel Fabrication of CA Membrane Bound Carbon Electrode for Bi-enzymatic Determination of Lactate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIKAS

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactate oxidase from Pediococcus species has been immobilized onto cellulose acetate (CA membrane to form an enzymatic membrane. HRP has been incorporated into carbon paste electrode. Enzymatic membrane was mounted over the HRP-carbon paste electrode with the help of dialyses membrane, which acts as working electrode. Lactate biosensor was constructed by connecting this fabricated working electrode to Ag/AgCl reference electrode along with platinum wire auxiliary electrode through potentiostate. The biosensor showed an excellent performance with a linear response range between 5µM to 1mML-1 of lactate with a correlation coefficient (r of .94 for n=30, when compared to standard colorimetric methods. The optimum pH of the biosensor is 6.5 and incubation temperature is 25°C. This bi-enzyme electrode can be used for 150 determinants; over 45 days with out any considerable lose of activity, when stored at 4°C in 0.5M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 6.5. The response time was 1 second and no major metabolic interference was observed.

  4. Clathrin-dependent endocytosis of membrane-bound RANKL in differentiated osteoclasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Narducci

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone is continuously repaired and remodelled through well-coordinated activity of osteoblasts that form new bone and osteoclasts, which resorb it. Osteoblasts synthesize and secrete two key molecules that are important for osteoclast differentiation, namely the ligand for the receptor of activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG. Active membrane transport is a typical feature of the resorbing osteoclast during bone resorption. Normally, one resorption cycle takes several hours as observed by monitoring actin ring formation and consequent disappearance in vitro. During these cyclic changes, the cytoskeleton undergoes remarkable dynamic rearrangement. Active cells show a continuous process of exocytosis that plays an essential role in transport of membrane components, soluble molecules and receptor-mediated ligands thus allowing them to communicate with the environment. The processes that govern intracellular transport and trafficking in mature osteoclasts are poorly known. The principal methodological problem that have made these studies difficult is a physiological culture of osteoclasts that permit observing the vesicle apparatus in conditions similar to the in vivo conditions. In the present study we have used a number of morphological approaches to characterize the composition, formation and the endocytic and biosynthetic pathways that play roles in dynamics of differentiation of mature bone resorbing cells using a tri-dimensional system of physiologic coculture.

  5. Raman Spectroscopy of Conformational Changes in Membrane-Bound Sodium Potassium ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus; Abdali, Salim; Lundbæk, Jens August

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation we assess the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for probing conformational changes in membrane-spanning proteins — in this case, the sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+,K+-ATPase). Spectral analysis of protein-lipid complexes is complicated by the presence...

  6. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF A POLYURETHANE-BASED SUPPORT FOR IMMOBILIZING MEMBRANE-BOUND LIPASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Soares

    Full Text Available Abstract This study conducted an assessment of polyurethane foams that were synthesized by one-shot process and used as a low-cost support to immobilize Mucor circinelloides URM 4182 whole-cells presenting high lipolytic activity. Polyols with different molecular weights (1100 to 6000 g mol-1 were applied to synthesize the polymer matrix, and the agitation speed effect was used for controlling the average pore size of the investigated polyurethane foams. The physical and mechanical properties of the polymers were evaluated by standard test methods, and their morphology was identified by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The immobilization procedure efficiency was assessed by quantifying the capability of the matrices to attach the cells and the catalytic activity of the biocatalysts in both aqueous (olive oil hydrolysis and non-aqueous media (ethanolysis of babassu oil under single and consecutive batch runs. Although all synthesized matrices were suitable to immobilize the whole cells with high catalytic performance, a better set of parameters was attained when the polyol ether with molecular weight of 6000 g mol-1 and 1100 g mol-1 was used. Both matrices yielded immobilized biocatalysts with high hydrolysis and transesterification activities, and exhibited a satisfactory operational stability with 96% and 81% retention of their initial hydrolytic and transesterification activities after three consecutive batch runs.

  7. An expression tag toolbox for microbial production of membrane bound plant cytochromes P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez Albacete, Dario; Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Christensen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    tag chimeras of the model plant P450 CYP79A1 in different Escherichia coli strains. Using a high-throughput screening platform based on C-terminal GFP fusions, we identify several highly expressing and robustly performing chimeric designs. Analysis of long-term cultures by flow cytometry showed...

  8. Model of fission yeast cell shape driven by membrane-bound growth factors and the cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Drake

    Full Text Available Fission yeast serves as a model for how cellular polarization machinery consisting of signaling molecules and the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton regulates cell shape. In this work, we develop mathematical models to investigate how these cells maintain a tubular shape of approximately constant diameter. Many studies identify active Cdc42, found in a cap at the inner membrane of growing cell tips, as an important regulator of local cell wall remodeling, likely through control of exocyst tethering and the targeting of other polarity-enhancing structures. First, we show that a computational model with Cdc42-dependent local cell wall remodeling under turgor pressure predicts a relationship between spatial extent of growth signal and cell diameter that is in agreement with prior experiments. Second, we model the consequences of feedback between cell shape and distribution of Cdc42 growth signal at cell tips. We show that stability of cell diameter over successive cell divisions places restrictions on their mutual dependence. We argue that simple models where the spatial extent of the tip growth signal relies solely on geometrical alignment of confined microtubules might lead to unstable width regulation. Third, we study a computational model that combines a growth signal distributed over a characteristic length scale (as, for example, by a reaction-diffusion mechanism with an axis-sensing microtubules system that places landmarks at positions where microtubule tips touch the cortex. A two-dimensional implementation of this model leads to stable cell diameter for a wide range of parameters. Changes to the parameters of this model reproduce straight, bent, and bulged cell shapes, and we discuss how this model is consistent with other observed cell shapes in mutants. Our work provides an initial quantitative framework for understanding the regulation of cell shape in fission yeast, and a scaffold for understanding this process on a more molecular level in the future.

  9. Study on the changes in the levels of membrane-bound ATPases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    in the level of lipid peroxidation in liver was also observed. The results of the present investigation have .... membrane phospholipids not only altered the lipid milieu and structural as well as functional integrity of cell .... uncoupling of the human erythrocyte Ca2+ pump. Eur. J. Biochem.,. 221: 1103-1110. FAO (1999).

  10. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca 2+ -mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1

  11. Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic techniques for investigating membrane-bound ion channel activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Székács

    Full Text Available Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic (OWLS techniques were probed for monitoring ion permeation through channels incorporated into artificial lipid environment. A novel sensor set-up was developed by depositing liposomes or cell-derived membrane fragments onto hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membrane. The fibrous material of PTFE membrane could entrap lipoid vesicles and the water-filled pores provided environment for the hydrophilic domains of lipid-embedded proteins. The sensor surface was kept clean from the lipid holder PTFE membrane by a water- and ion-permeable polyethylene terephthalate (PET mesh. The sensor set-up was tested with egg yolk lecithin liposomes containing gramicidin ion channels and with cell-derived membrane fragments enriched in GABA-gated anion channels. The method allowed monitoring the move of Na(+ and organic cations through gramicidin channels and detecting the Cl(--channel functions of the (α5β2γ2 GABAA receptor in the presence or absence of GABA and the competitive GABA-blocker bicuculline.

  12. Effect of zinc and calcium ions on the rat kidney membrane-bound ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-07-11

    Jul 11, 2013 ... which a mixed inhibition mechanism was observed (Ki values of the competitive component: 0.15±0.01 mM and. 50.0±1.05 mM ... porcine DPP-IV with a Ki value near circulating concentra- tions in mammals while the effect ..... peptidase-IV: Is there a risk of oncological and immunological adverse effects?

  13. Membrane-bound ATPase of intact vacuoles and tonoplasts isolated from mature plant tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Wagner, G.J.; Siegelman, H.W.; Hind, G.

    1977-01-01

    Intact vacuoles were isolated from petals of Hippeastrum and Tulipa (Wagner, G. J. and Siegelman, H. W. (1975) Science 190, 1298 to 1299). The ATPase activity of fresh vacuole suspensions was found to be 2 to 3 times that of protoplasts from the same tissue. 70 to 80% of the ATPase activity of intact vacuoles was recovered in tonoplast preparations. The antibiotic Dio-9 at 6 ..mu..g/10/sup 6/ vacuoles or protoplasts causes 40% inhibition. However, only the protoplast ATPase is sensitive to oligomycin. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbondiimide (DCCD) slightly stimulates ATPase activity in both vacuole and protoplast suspensions, whereas ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide) (EDAC) strongly inhibits. Spectrophotometric studies show that in the petal the vacuolar contents have a pH of 4.0 for Tulipa and 4.3 for Hippeastrum, whereas the intact isolated vacuole has an internal pH of 7.0 (in pH 8.0 buffer) for Tulipa and about 7.3 for Hippeastrum. Internal ion concentrations of 150, 46, 30, 30 and 6 mM were found for K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Cl/sup -/, and Ca/sup 2 +/ respectively, which are about the same as those in protoplasts.

  14. Interactions between membrane-bound cellulose synthases involved in the synthesis of the secondary cell wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.F.P.; Vernhettes, S.; Desprez, T.; Vincken, J.P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    It has not yet been reported how the secondary CESA (cellulose synthase) proteins are organized in the rosette structure. A membrane-based yeast two-hybrid (MbYTH) approach was used to analyze the interactions between the CESA proteins involved in secondary cell wall synthesis of Arabidopsis and the

  15. Effect of zinc and calcium ions on the rat kidney membrane-bound ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Structural Biology and Biocomputing Programme, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), C/Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, Madrid E-28029, Spain; Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Cuernavaca, ...

  16. Mucin 1 Gene (MUC1 and Gastric-Cancer Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Saeki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC is one of the major malignant diseases worldwide, especially in Asia. It is classified into intestinal and diffuse types. While the intestinal-type GC (IGC is almost certainly caused by Helicobacter pylori (HP infection, its role in the diffuse-type GC (DGC appears limited. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS on Japanese and Chinese populations identified chromosome 1q22 as a GC susceptibility locus which harbors mucin 1 gene (MUC1 encoding a cell membrane-bound mucin protein. MUC1 has been known as an oncogene with an anti-apoptotic function in cancer cells; however, in normal gastric mucosa, it is anticipated that the mucin 1 protein has a role in protecting gastric epithelial cells from a variety of external insults which cause inflammation and carcinogenesis. HP infection is the most definite insult leading to GC, and a protective function of mucin 1 protein has been suggested by studies on Muc1 knocked-out mice.

  17. Comparative Genetic Diversity of the narG, nosZ, and 16S rRNA Genes in Fluorescent Pseudomonads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Sandrine; Philippot, Laurent; Edel-Hermann, Veronique; Deulvot, Chrystel; Mougel, Christophe; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    The diversity of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase (narG) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) genes in fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from soil and rhizosphere environments was characterized together with that of the 16S rRNA gene by a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Fragments of 1,008 bp and 1,433 bp were amplified via PCR with primers specific for the narG and nosZ genes, respectively. The presence of the narG and nosZ genes in the bacterial strains was confirmed by hybridization of the genomic DNA and the PCR products with the corresponding probes. The ability of the strains to either reduce nitrate or totally dissimilate nitrogen was assessed. Overall, there was a good correspondence between the reductase activities and the presence of the corresponding genes. Distribution in the different ribotypes of strains harboring both the narG and nosZ genes and of strains missing both genes suggests that these two groups of strains had different evolutionary histories. Both dissimilatory genes showed high polymorphism, with similarity indexes (Jaccard) of between 0.04 and 0.8, whereas those of the 16S rRNA gene only varied from 0.77 to 0.99. No correlation between the similarity indexes of 16S rRNA and dissimilatory genes was seen, suggesting that the evolution rates of ribosomal and functional genes differ. Pairwise comparison of similarity indexes of the narG and nosZ genes led to the delineation of two types of strains. Within the first type, the similarity indexes of both genes varied in the same range, suggesting that these two genes have followed a similar evolution. Within the second type of strain, the range of variations was higher for the nosZ than for the narG gene, suggesting that these genes have had a different evolutionary rate. PMID:12571023

  18. Changes in the gene expression profile of Acetobacter aceti during growth on ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kenta; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2012-03-01

    Acetobacter aceti NBRC 14818 shows a diauxic growth profile and temporarily accumulates acetate when grown in medium containing ethanol. However, the mechanisms underlying the metabolic switching between the incomplete oxidation of ethanol and overoxidation of acetate, and the control of stress resistance systems in A. aceti cells grown on ethanol are not fully understood. In this study, time-dependent transcriptome changes in cells during growth on ethanol were analyzed by DNA microarray. In A. aceti, ethanol is oxidized to acetate via acetaldehyde by sequential reactions of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We found that the genes encoding pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent ADH, membrane-bound ALDH, and two NAD(+)-ADHs were expressed constitutively in cells throughout the culture period. In contrast, the expression levels of genes encoding tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes were low during acetate accumulation until ethanol was consumed, but were significantly upregulated after the accumulated acetate was started to be consumed. This result suggests that changes in the carbon metabolic flow through the TCA cycle are important for the metabolic switching from acetate accumulation to the overoxidation of acetate. In addition, the genes for glyoxylate pathway enzymes were significantly upregulated soon after the cells began oxidizing ethanol, indicating that this pathway is important for the utilization of ethanol as a carbon source. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure models of G72, the product of a susceptibility gene to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yusuke; Fukui, Kiyoshi

    2017-02-01

    The G72 gene is one of the most susceptible genes to schizophrenia and is contained exclusively in the genomes of primates. The product of the G72 gene modulates the activity of D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) and is a small protein prone to aggregate, which hampers its structural studies. In addition, lack of a known structure of a homologue makes it difficult to use the homology modelling method for the prediction of the structure. Thus, we first developed a hybrid ab initio approach for small proteins prior to the prediction of the structure of G72. The approach uses three known ab initio algorithms. To evaluate the hybrid approach, we tested our prediction of the structure of the amino acid sequences whose structures were already solved and compared the predicted structures with the experimentally solved structures. Based on these comparisons, the average accuracy of our approach was calculated to be ∼5 Å. We then applied the approach to the sequence of G72 and successfully predicted the structures of the N- and C-terminal domains (ND and CD, respectively) of G72. The predicted structures of ND and CD were similar to membrane-bound proteins and adaptor proteins, respectively. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Study on the Effect of Wing Bud Chitin Metabolism and Its Developmental Network Genes in the Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, by Knockdown of TRE Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens is one of the most serious pests of rice, and there is so far no effective way to manage this pest. However, RNA interference not only can be used to study gene function, but also provide potential opportunities for novel pest management. The development of wing plays a key role in insect physiological activities and mainly involves chitin. Hence, the regulating role of trehalase (TRE genes on wing bud formation has been studied by RNAi. In this paper, the activity levels of TRE and the contents of the two sugars trehalose and glucose were negatively correlated indicating the potential role of TRE in the molting process. In addition, NlTRE1-1 and NlTRE2 were expressed at higher levels in wing bud tissue than in other tissues, and abnormal molting and wing deformity or curling were noted 48 h after the insect was injected with any double-stranded TRE (dsTRE, even though different TREs have compensatory functions. The expression levels of NlCHS1b, NlCht1, NlCht2, NlCht6, NlCht7, NlCht8, NlCht10, NlIDGF, and NlENGase decreased significantly 48 h after the insect was injected with a mixture of three kinds of dsTREs. Similarly, the TRE inhibitor validamycin can inhibit NlCHS1 and NlCht gene expression. However, the wing deformity was the result of the NlIDGF, NlENGase, NlAP, and NlTSH genes being inhibited when a single dsTRE was injected. These results demonstrate that silencing of TRE gene expression can lead to wing deformities due to the down-regulation of the AP and TSH genes involved in wing development and that the TRE inhibitor validamycin can co-regulate chitin metabolism and the expression of wing development-related genes in wing bud tissue. The results provide a new approach for the prevention and management of N. lugens.

  1. Study on the Effect of Wing Bud Chitin Metabolism and Its Developmental Network Genes in the Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, by Knockdown of TRE Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Qiu, Ling-Yu; Yang, Hui-Li; Wang, Hui-Juan; Zhou, Min; Wang, Shi-Gui; Tang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens is one of the most serious pests of rice, and there is so far no effective way to manage this pest. However, RNA interference not only can be used to study gene function, but also provide potential opportunities for novel pest management. The development of wing plays a key role in insect physiological activities and mainly involves chitin. Hence, the regulating role of trehalase (TRE) genes on wing bud formation has been studied by RNAi. In this paper, the activity levels of TRE and the contents of the two sugars trehalose and glucose were negatively correlated indicating the potential role of TRE in the molting process. In addition, NlTRE1-1 and NlTRE2 were expressed at higher levels in wing bud tissue than in other tissues, and abnormal molting and wing deformity or curling were noted 48 h after the insect was injected with any double-stranded TRE ( dsTRE ), even though different TREs have compensatory functions. The expression levels of NlCHS1b, NlCht1, NlCht2, NlCht6, NlCht7, NlCht8, NlCht10, NlIDGF , and NlENGase decreased significantly 48 h after the insect was injected with a mixture of three kinds of dsTREs . Similarly, the TRE inhibitor validamycin can inhibit NlCHS1 and NlCht gene expression. However, the wing deformity was the result of the NlIDGF, NlENGase, NlAP , and NlTSH genes being inhibited when a single dsTRE was injected. These results demonstrate that silencing of TRE gene expression can lead to wing deformities due to the down-regulation of the AP and TSH genes involved in wing development and that the TRE inhibitor validamycin can co-regulate chitin metabolism and the expression of wing development-related genes in wing bud tissue. The results provide a new approach for the prevention and management of N. lugens .

  2. Virulence control in group A Streptococcus by a two-component gene regulatory system: global expression profiling and in vivo infection modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Morag R; Smoot, Laura M; Migliaccio, Cristi A Lux; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Federle, Michael J; Adams, Gerald J; Scott, June R; Musser, James M

    2002-10-15

    Two-component gene regulatory systems composed of a membrane-bound sensor and cytoplasmic response regulator are important mechanisms used by bacteria to sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Group A Streptococcus, the causative agent of mild infections and life-threatening invasive diseases, produces many virulence factors that promote survival in humans. A two-component regulatory system, designated covRS (cov, control of virulence; csrRS), negatively controls expression of five proven or putative virulence factors (capsule, cysteine protease, streptokinase, streptolysin S, and streptodornase). Inactivation of covRS results in enhanced virulence in mouse models of invasive disease. Using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR, we found that CovR influences transcription of 15% (n = 271) of all chromosomal genes, including many that encode surface and secreted proteins mediating host-pathogen interactions. CovR also plays a central role in gene regulatory networks by influencing expression of genes encoding transcriptional regulators, including other two-component systems. Differential transcription of genes influenced by covR also was identified in mouse soft-tissue infection. This analysis provides a genome-scale overview of a virulence gene network in an important human pathogen and adds insight into the molecular mechanisms used by group A Streptococcus to interact with the host, promote survival, and cause disease.

  3. A Candida albicans gene expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, A; Sentandreu, R; Gozalbo, D

    1996-09-01

    Two plasmids (derived from YCplac22 and YEplac112) carrying a Candida albicans gene (including the 5' non-coding promoter sequences) coding for a 30 kDa membrane-bound protein, were used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. A 30 kDa protein was immunodetected by Western blot in the membrane fraction of transformants. Northern analysis showed the presence of three mRNA species (of about 1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 kb) hybridizing with the C. albicans gene as a probe. The same result was obtained using the 5' and 3' regions of the gene as probes, whereas only a 1.1 kb mRNA was found in C. albicans and none was detected in S. cerevisiae control transformants. Thus, heterologous expression of this gene in S. cerevisiae results in a distinct pattern of mRNA processing, either due to the location on plasmid vectors and/or to differences in the mRNA processing systems in the two microorganisms.

  4. Expression of the E.coli pntA and pntB genes encoding nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its effect on product formation during anaerobic glucose fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlund, M.; Nissen, Torben Lauesgaard; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1999-01-01

    We studied the physiological effect of the interconversion between the NAD(H) and NADP(H) coenzyme systems in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the membrane-bound transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli. Our objective was to determine if the membrane-bound transhydrogenase could work...

  5. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a Δ6-fatty acid desaturase gene from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Bi-Bo

    2013-09-01

    The objective was to screen for and isolate a novel enzyme with the specific activity of a Δ6-fatty acid desaturase from Rhizopus oryzae. In this study, R. oryzae was identified as a novel fungal species that produces large amounts of γ-linolenic acid. A full-length cDNA, designated here as RoD6D, with high homology to fungal Δ6-fatty acid desaturase genes was isolated from R. oryzae by using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends method. It had an open reading frame of 1176 bp encoding a deduced polypeptide of 391 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis characterized the putative RoD6D protein as a typical membrane-bound desaturase, including three conserved histidine-rich motifs, a hydropathy profile, and a cytochrome b5 -like domain in the N terminus. When the coding sequence was expressed in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain INVScl, the encoded product of RoD6D exhibited Δ6-fatty acid desaturase activity that led to the accumulation of γ-linolenic acid. The corresponding genomic sequence of RoD6D was 1565 bp in length, with five introns. This is the first report on the characterization and gene cloning of a Δ6-fatty acid desaturase of R. oryzae from Douchi. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Co-ordinate transcriptional regulation of dopamine synthesis genes by alpha-synuclein in human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Melisa J; O'Farrell, Casey; Daya, Sneha; Ahmad, Rili; Miller, David W; Hardy, John; Farrer, Matthew J; Cookson, Mark R

    2003-05-01

    Abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein in Lewy bodies is a neuropathological hallmark of both sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Although mutations in alpha-synuclein have been identified in autosomal dominant PD, the mechanism by which dopaminergic cell death occurs remains unknown. We investigated transcriptional changes in neuroblastoma cell lines transfected with either normal or mutant (A30P or A53T) alpha-synuclein using microarrays, with confirmation of selected genes by quantitative RT-PCR. Gene products whose expression was found to be significantly altered included members of diverse functional groups such as stress response, transcription regulators, apoptosis-inducing molecules, transcription factors and membrane-bound proteins. We also found evidence of altered expression of dihydropteridine reductase, which indirectly regulates the synthesis of dopamine. Because of the importance of dopamine in PD, we investigated the expression of all the known genes in dopamine synthesis. We found co-ordinated downregulation of mRNA for GTP cyclohydrolase, sepiapterin reductase (SR), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic acid decarboxylase by wild-type but not mutant alpha-synuclein. These were confirmed at the protein level for SR and TH. Reduced expression of the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 was also noted, suggesting that the co-ordinate regulation of dopamine synthesis is regulated through this transcription factor.

  7. A new gene (rmSTG) specific for taste buds is found by laser capture microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, M; Danilova, V; Hellekant, G; Azen, E A

    2001-01-01

    Getting pure populations of taste buds suitable for molecular analysis has hampered the characterization of genes specifically expressed in taste cells. To solve this problem, we prepared specific cDNA libraries from small numbers of taste cells and surrounding epithelium isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) and report the discovery of a rhesus monkey novel gene (rmSTG) expressed specifically in taste cells, as found by differential screening of the cDNA libraries and RNA in situ hybridization. RNA in situ hybridization shows the preferential expression of this gene in taste buds from circumvallate, foliate, and fungiform papillae of the tongue. RT-PCR and Northern analysis of RNA from different non-taste organs showed no expression, pointing to a very specialized function of the protein in taste cells. Analysis of extended cDNAs and genomic DNA showed two exons and one intron. Northern analysis of circumvallate papillae showed a transcript of 1.3 kb as established in the gene model. BLAST search analysis showed that the human homolog is localized in the recently completely sequenced HLA class I region of Chromosome 6p21 and is sublocalized to the main susceptibility region for psoriasis vulgaris. The predicted gene encodes a protein of 314 amino acids with an N-terminal signal peptide and cleavage site, suggesting a membrane-bound or secreted protein with an extracellular role in taste cell physiology. The monkey, human, and mouse STG proteins contain potential O-glycosylation sites and tandem repeats inside a region showing approximately 50% similarity with prion proteins.

  8. 5 Year Expression and Neutrophil Defect Repair after Gene Therapy in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Gernoux, Gwladys; Gruntman, Alisha M; Borel, Florie; Reeves, Emer P; Calcedo, Roberto; Rouhani, Farshid N; Yachnis, Anthony; Humphries, Margaret; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Messina, Louis; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Trapnell, Bruce; Wilson, James M; McElvaney, Noel G; Flotte, Terence R

    2017-06-07

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is a monogenic disorder resulting in emphysema due principally to the unopposed effects of neutrophil elastase. We previously reported achieving plasma wild-type alpha-1 antitrypsin concentrations at 2.5%-3.8% of the purported therapeutic level at 1 year after a single intramuscular administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 alpha-1 antitrypsin vector in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient patients. We analyzed blood and muscle for alpha-1 antitrypsin expression and immune cell response. We also assayed previously reported markers of neutrophil function known to be altered in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient patients. Here, we report sustained expression at 2.0%-2.5% of the target level from years 1-5 in these same patients without any additional recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-1 alpha-1 antitrypsin vector administration. In addition, we observed partial correction of disease-associated neutrophil defects, including neutrophil elastase inhibition, markers of degranulation, and membrane-bound anti-neutrophil antibodies. There was also evidence of an active T regulatory cell response (similar to the 1 year data) and an exhausted cytotoxic T cell response to adeno-associated virus serotype-1 capsid. These findings suggest that muscle-based alpha-1 antitrypsin gene replacement is tolerogenic and that stable levels of M-AAT may exert beneficial neutrophil effects at lower concentrations than previously anticipated. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation of the gene for murine glucose-6-phosphatase, the enzyme deficient in glycogen storage disease type 1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, L L; Lei, K J; Pan, C J; Sakata, S F; Ruppert, S; Schutz, G; Chou, J Y

    1993-10-15

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase, the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis catalyzing the terminal step in gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. Despite its clinical importance, this membrane-bound enzyme has eluded molecular characterization. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a murine glucose-6-phosphatase cDNA by screening a mouse liver cDNA library differentially with mRNA populations representing the normal and the albino deletion mouse known to express markedly reduced glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Additionally, we identified the gene that consists of 5 exons. Biochemical analyses indicate that the in vitro expressed enzyme is indistinguishable from mouse liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase exhibiting essentially identical kinetic constants, latency, thermal lability, and vanadate sensitivity. The characterization of the murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene opens the way for studying the molecular basis of GSD type 1a in humans and its etiology in an animal model.

  10. Studying Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Studying Genes Studying Genes Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area PDF Version (382 KB) Other Fact Sheets What are genes? Genes are segments of DNA that contain instructions ...

  11. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  12. A gene encoding a sphingolipid biosynthesis enzyme determines the sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to an antifungal plant defensin from dahlia (Dahlia merckii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, K; Cammue, B P; Lemaire, K; Winderickx, J; Dickson, R C; Lester, R L; Ferket, K K; Van Even, F; Parret, A H; Broekaert, W F

    2000-08-15

    We have previously identified a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant that is markedly more resistant than wild-type to Dahlia merckii antimicrobial peptide 1 (DmAMP1), an antifungal plant defensin isolated from seeds of dahlia (Dahlia merckii). A complementation approach was followed that consisted of the introduction of a genomic library of DmAMP1-sensitive wild-type yeast into the DmAMP1-resistant yeast mutant and screening for restored sensitivity to DmAMP1. The gene determining sensitivity of S. cerevisiae to DmAMP1 was identified as IPT1, a gene encoding an enzyme involved in the last step of the synthesis of the sphingolipid mannose-(inositol-phosphate)(2)-ceramide. Strains with a nonfunctional IPT1 allele lacked mannose-(inositol-phosphate)(2)-ceramide in their plasma membranes, bound significantly less DmAMP1 compared with wild-type strains, and were highly resistant to DmAMP1-mediated membrane permeabilization. All of these phenotypic deviations could be restored by reintroduction of a functional IPT1 gene. Our data support a model in which membrane patches containing sphingolipids act as binding sites for DmAMP1 or, alternatively, are required to anchor membrane or cell wall-associated proteins, which themselves interact with DmAMP1.

  13. Association of codon 108/158 catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphism with the psychiatric manifestations of velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachman, H.M.; Papolos, D.F.; Veit, S. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-20

    Velo-cardio-facial-syndrome (VCFS) is a common congenital disorder associated with typical facial appearance, cleft palate, cardiac defects, and learning disabilities. The majority of patients have an interstitial deletion on chromosome 22q11. In addition to physical abnormalities, a variety of psychiatric illnesses have been reported in patients with VCFS, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The psychiatric manifestations of VCFS could be due to haploinsufficiency of a gene(s) within 22q11. One candidate that has been mapped to this region is catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). We recently identified a polymorphism in the COMT gene that leads to a valine{r_arrow}methionine substitution at amino acid 158 of the membrane-bound form of the enzyme. Homozygosity for COMT158{sup met} leads to a 3- to 4-fold reduction in enzymatic activity, compared with homozygotes for COMT158{sup met}. We now report that in a population of patients with VCFS, there is an apparent association between the low-activity allele, COMT158{sup met}, and the development of bipolar spectrum disorder, and in particular, a rapid-cycling form. 33 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite: differential evolution by positive selection and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devault, Alain; Bañuls, Anne-Laure

    2008-10-24

    PSA (promastigote surface antigen) is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. From the newly available complete genome sequences of L. major, L. infantum and L. braziliensis, we have established the complete list of PSA genes, based on the conservation of specific domain architecture. The latter includes an array of leucine rich repeats of unique signature flanked by conserved cysteine-rich domains. All PSA genes code either for secreted or membrane-anchored surface proteins. Besides the few previously identified PSA genes, which are shown here to be part of a relatively large subclass of PSA genes located on chromosome 12, this study identifies seven other PSA subtypes. The latter, whose genes lie on chromosomes 5, 9, 21 and 31 in all three species, form single gene (two genes in one instance) subfamilies, which phylogenetically cluster as highly related orthologs. On the other hand, genes found on chromosome 12 generally show high diversification, as reflected in greater sequence divergence between species, and in an extended set of divergent paralogs. Moreover, we show that the latter genes are submitted to strong positive selection. We also provide evidence that evolution of these genes is driven by intra- and intergenic recombination, thereby modulating the number of LRRs in protein and generating chimeric genes. PSA is a Leishmania family of membrane-bound or secreted proteins, whose main signature consists in a specific LRR sequence. All PSA genes found in the genomes of three sequenced Leishmania species unambiguously distribute into eight subfamilies of orthologs. Seven of these are evolving relatively slowly and could

  15. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite: differential evolution by positive selection and recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bañuls Anne-Laure

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSA (promastigote surface antigen is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. Results From the newly available complete genome sequences of L. major, L. infantum and L. braziliensis, we have established the complete list of PSA genes, based on the conservation of specific domain architecture. The latter includes an array of leucine rich repeats of unique signature flanked by conserved cysteine-rich domains. All PSA genes code either for secreted or membrane-anchored surface proteins. Besides the few previously identified PSA genes, which are shown here to be part of a relatively large subclass of PSA genes located on chromosome 12, this study identifies seven other PSA subtypes. The latter, whose genes lie on chromosomes 5, 9, 21 and 31 in all three species, form single gene (two genes in one instance subfamilies, which phylogenetically cluster as highly related orthologs. On the other hand, genes found on chromosome 12 generally show high diversification, as reflected in greater sequence divergence between species, and in an extended set of divergent paralogs. Moreover, we show that the latter genes are submitted to strong positive selection. We also provide evidence that evolution of these genes is driven by intra- and intergenic recombination, thereby modulating the number of LRRs in protein and generating chimeric genes. Conclusion PSA is a Leishmania family of membrane-bound or secreted proteins, whose main signature consists in a specific LRR sequence. All PSA genes found in the genomes of three sequenced Leishmania species unambiguously distribute into eight subfamilies of orthologs

  16. Co-overexpressing a plasma membrane and a vacuolar membrane sodium/proton antiporter significantly improves salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Arabidopsis gene AtNHX1 encodes a vacuolar membrane bound sodium/proton (Sodium/Hydrogen) antiporter that transports sodium into the vacuole and exports hydrogen into the cytoplasm. The Arabidopsis gene SOS1 encodes a plasma membrane bound sodium/hydrogen antiporter that exports sodium to the ex...

  17. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase cobA gene of Propionibacterium freudenreichii (shermanii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, I; Roessner, C A; Stolowich, N J; Hardin, S H; Harris-Haller, L W; Yokubaitis, N T; Murooka, Y; Hashimoto, Y; Scott, A I

    1995-03-01

    We cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed cobA, the gene encoding uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase in Propionibacterium freudenreichii, and examined the catalytic properties of the enzyme. The methyltransferase is similar in mass (27 kDa) and homologous to the one isolated from Pseudomonas denitrificans. In contrast to the much larger isoenzyme encoded by the cysG gene of Escherichia coli (52 kDa), the P. freudenreichii enzyme does not contain the additional 22-kDa peptide moiety at its N-terminal end bearing the oxidase-ferrochelatase activity responsible for the conversion of dihydrosirohydrochlorin (precorrin-2) to siroheme. Since it does not contain this moiety, it is not a likely candidate for synthesis of a cobalt-containing early intermediate that has been proposed for the vitamin B12 biosynthetic pathway in P. freudenreichii. Uroporphyrinogen III methyltransferase of P. freudenreichii not only catalyzes the addition of two methyl groups to uroporphyrinogen III to afford the early vitamin B12 intermediate, precorrin-2, but also has an overmethylation property that catalyzes the synthesis of several tri- and tetra-methylated compounds that are not part of the vitamin B12 pathway. The enzyme catalyzes the addition of three methyl groups to uroporphyrinogen I to form trimethylpyrrocorphin, the intermediate necessary for biosynthesis of the natural products, factors S1 and S3, previously isolated from this organism. A second gene found upstream from the cobA gene encodes a protein homologous to CbiO of Salmonella typhimurium, a membrane-bound, ATP-dependent transport protein thought to be part of the cobalt transport system involved in vitamin B12 synthesis. These two genes do not appear to constitute part of an extensive cobalamin operon.

  18. gene structure, gene expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and seedling leaves were sampled at 6 h after the treatment. For cold stress, the seedlings were transferred to 4◦C growth chamber for 30 min. Control seedlings were exposed to none of these treatments. To examine the expression patterns of these predicted genes in Poplar and to further confirm their stress responsive-.

  19. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  20. Virus-induced Gene Silencing-based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g. salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4 or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  1. Conserved and Diversified Gene Families of Monovalent Cation/H+ Antiporters from Algae to Flowering Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil eChanroj

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available All organisms have evolved strategies to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental and environmental cues. One strategy is mediated by cation-proton antiporters (CPA. CPA1 genes found in bacteria, fungi, metazoa and plants have been functionally-characterized; though roles of plant CPA2 genes in KEA (K+-efflux antiporter and CHX (cation/H+ exchanger families are largely unknown. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three clades of the Na+-H+ exchanger (NHX family have been conserved from single-celled alga to Arabidopsis. These are i plasma membrane-bound SOS1/AtNHX7 that share ancestry with prokaryote NhaP, ii endosomal AtNHX5/6 that is part of the eukaryote Intracellular-NHE clade, and iii a vacuolar NHX clade (AtNHX1-4 specific to plants. Early diversification of KEA genes possibly from ancestral genes of a cyanobacterium is suggested for three K+-efflux antiporter clades (KEA/Kef seen in all plants. Intriguingly, the CHX gene family blossomed from a few members in early land plants to >40 genes in legumes. Homologs from spirogyra or moss share high similarity with guard cell-specific AtCHX20, suggesting that AtCHX20 and its relatives (AtCHX16-19 are founders of the family. Evolutionary analysis suggests pollen-expressed CHX genes appeared later in monocots and early eudicots. AtCHX proteins have been localized to intracellular and plasma membrane of plants, and shown to mediate K+ transport and pH homeostasis. Thus KEA genes are conserved from green algae to angiosperms, and their presence in red algae and secondary endosymbionts suggest a role in plastids. In contrast, AtNHX1-4 subtype evolved in ancestral plants to handle ion homeostasis of vacuoles in all cell types. The strong presence of CHX genes in land plants, but not in metazoa or fungi, would infer a role of ion and pH homeostasis at dynamic endomembranes to support vegetative and reproductive success of flowering plants.

  2. Transcription factor Nrf1 is topologically repartitioned across membranes to enable target gene transactivation through its acidic glucose-responsive domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Ren, Yonggang; Li, Shaojun; Hayes, John D

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound Nrf1 transcription factor regulates critical homeostatic and developmental genes. The conserved N-terminal homology box 1 (NHB1) sequence in Nrf1 targets the cap'n'collar (CNC) basic basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP) factor to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but it is unknown how its activity is controlled topologically within membranes. Herein, we report a hitherto unknown mechanism by which the transactivation activity of Nrf1 is controlled through its membrane-topology. Thus after Nrf1 is anchored within ER membranes, its acidic transactivation domains (TADs), including the Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) glycodomain situated between acidic domain 1 (AD1) and AD2, are transiently translocated into the lumen of the ER, where NST is glycosylated in the presence of glucose to yield an inactive 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein. Subsequently, portions of the TADs partially repartition across membranes into the cyto/nucleoplasmic compartments, whereupon an active 95-kDa form of Nrf1 accumulates, a process that is more obvious in glucose-deprived cells and may involve deglycosylation. The repartitioning of Nrf1 out of membranes is monitored within this protein by its acidic-hydrophobic amphipathic glucose-responsive domains, particularly the Neh5L subdomain within AD1. Therefore, the membrane-topological organization of Nrf1 dictates its post-translational modifications (i.e. glycosylation, the putative deglycosylation and selective proteolysis), which together control its ability to transactivate target genes.

  3. Ultrastructural Characterization of Turnip Mosaic Virus-Induced Cellular Rearrangements Reveals Membrane-Bound Viral Particles Accumulating in Vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Juan; Basu, Kaustuv; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    Positive-strand RNA [(+) RNA] viruses remodel cellular membranes to facilitate virus replication and assembly. In the case of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the viral membrane protein 6K2 plays an essential role in endomembrane alterations. Although 6K2-induced membrane dynamics have been widely studied by confocal microscopy, the ultrastructure of this remodeling has not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the formation of TuMV-induced membrane changes by chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF/FS) for transmission electron microscopy at different times of infection. We observed the formation of convoluted membranes connected to rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) early in the infection process, followed by the production of single-membrane vesicle-like (SMVL) structures at the midstage of infection. Both SMVL and double-membrane vesicle-like structures with electron-dense cores, as well as electron-dense bodies, were found late in the infection process. Immunogold labeling results showed that the vesicle-like structures were 6K2 tagged and suggested that only the SMVL structures were viral RNA replication sites. Electron tomography (ET) was used to regenerate a three-dimensional model of these vesicle-like structures, which showed that they were, in fact, tubules. Late in infection, we observed filamentous particle bundles associated with electron-dense bodies, which suggests that these are sites for viral particle assembly. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. Our work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. Positive-strand RNA viruses remodel cellular membranes for different stages of the infection process, such as protein translation and processing, viral RNA synthesis, particle assembly, and virus transmission. The ultrastructure of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV)-induced membrane remodeling was investigated over several days of infection. The first change that was observed involved endoplasmic reticulum-connected convoluted membrane accumulation. This was followed by the formation of single-membrane tubules, which were shown to be viral RNA replication sites. Later in the infection process, double-membrane tubular structures were observed and were associated with viral particle bundles. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. This work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. The membrane-bound aspartyl protease BACE1:Molecular and functional properties in Alzheimer’s disease and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian eDislich

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 is a transmembrane aspartyl protease involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis and in myelination. BACE1 initiates the generation of the pathogenic amyloid β-peptide, which makes BACE1 a major drug target for AD. BACE1 also cleaves and activates neuregulin 1, thereby contributing to postnatal myelination, in particular in the peripheral nervous system. Additional proteins are also cleaved by BACE1, but less is known about the physiological consequences of their cleavage. Recently, new phenotypes were described in BACE1-deficient mice. Although it remains unclear through which BACE1 substrates they are mediated, the phenotypes suggest a versatile role of this protease for diverse physiological processes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and cellular properties of BACE1 as well as its regulation by lipids, by transcriptional and by translational mechanisms. The main focus will be on the recent progress in understanding BACE1 function and its implication for potential mechanism-based side effects upon therapeutic inhibition.

  5. Construction of membrane-bound artificial cells using microfluidics: a new frontier in bottom-up synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elani, Yuval

    2016-06-15

    The quest to construct artificial cells from the bottom-up using simple building blocks has received much attention over recent decades and is one of the grand challenges in synthetic biology. Cell mimics that are encapsulated by lipid membranes are a particularly powerful class of artificial cells due to their biocompatibility and the ability to reconstitute biological machinery within them. One of the key obstacles in the field centres on the following: how can membrane-based artificial cells be generated in a controlled way and in high-throughput? In particular, how can they be constructed to have precisely defined parameters including size, biomolecular composition and spatial organization? Microfluidic generation strategies have proved instrumental in addressing these questions. This article will outline some of the major principles underpinning membrane-based artificial cells and their construction using microfluidics, and will detail some recent landmarks that have been achieved. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Arf and RhoA regulate both the cytosolic and the membrane-bound phospholipase D from human placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.; Provost, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that human placenta contains a cytosolic phospholipase D (PLD) activity. This activity had a pH optimum of 7.0 and was stimulated by PIP and inhibited by oleate. Furthermore, cytosolic PLD was stimulated by 30 µM GTP¿S (6-14-fold) and by the small G...... placenta, which is stimulated by PIP, but not by oleate. Here we show that oleic acid and a-linolenic acid both dose-dependently inhibited solubilized membrane PLD (65% inhibition at 4 mM), whereas stearic acid (4 mM) had no effect. Thus, the presence of double bonds in the fatty acid is important...... was devoid of endogenous RhoA and Arf and could not be stimulated by GTP¿S. However, mArf3 (1 µM) still activated this partially purified membrane PLD, whereas RhoA (0.37 nM) was not able to activate this PLD fraction. In concludion, our results suggest that the human placenta contains a PLD that is located...

  7. IRON UPTAKE BY LEAF MESOPHYLL-CELLS - THE ROLE OF THE PLASMA MEMBRANE-BOUND FERRIC-CHELATE REDUCTASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUGGEMANN, W; MAASKANTEL, K; MOOG, PR

    The uptake of Fe-59 from FeCl3, ferric (Fe3+) citrate (FeCitr) and Fe3+-EDTA (FeEDTA) was studied in leaf mesophyll of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Uptake rates decreased in the order FeCl3>FeCitr much greater than FeEDTA, and uptake depended on an obligatory reduction step of Fe3+ to Fe2+, after

  8. Multi-membrane-bound structures of Apicomplexa: II. the ovoid mitochondrial cytoplasmic (OMC) complex of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Apicomplexa including the causative agents of toxoplasmosis and malaria reportedly possess one or few tubular-shaped mitochondria that permeate, more or less branched, throughout these unicellular parasites. Electron micrographs generated herein from serial-sectioned Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites demonstrated, however, a greater diversity regarding both the shape of the cultured parasite's single mitochondrion and its sub-structural organization. Moreover, a unique subcellular construction was detected that basically comprised a pouch-shaped subdivision of the tachyzoite mitochondrion plus a fraction of parasitic cytoplasm enclosed therein. This composite assembling, termed ovoid mitochondrial cytoplasmic (OMC) complex, characteristically displayed a highly reduced matrix lumen of its mitochondrial border construction, which furthermore often failed to possess any cristae or contained tightly pleated cristae, thus creating a pouch-shaped multi-laminar wall of four or more membranous layers, respectively. Given this architecture, cross-sectioned OMC complexes of T. gondii tachyzoites frequently mimicked in size and shape the parasites' plastid-like organelle (apicoplast). Moreover, like the apicoplast, the OMC complex was often found adjacent to the tachyzoite's single Golgi complex and constantly located in close proximity to the outer membrane of the parasite's nuclear envelope. The T. gondii OMC complex differed, however, from the apicoplast in its exact fine structural organization and a stage-restricted presence that was apparently linked to mitochondrial growth and/or division. Any special function(s) possibly performed by the T. gondii OMC complex remains, nevertheless, to be elucidated.

  9. Membrane-bound conformation of M13 major coat protein : a structure validation through FRET-derived constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, W.L.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    M13 major coat protein, a 50-amino-acid-long protein, was incorporated into DOPC/DOPG (80/20 molar ratio) unilamellar vesicles. Over 60% of all amino acid residues was replaced with cysteine residues, and the single cysteine mutants were labeled with the fluorescent label I-AEDANS. The coat protein

  10. Substrate specificity of membrane-bound alcohol oxidase from the tobacco hornworm moth (Manduca sexta) female pheromone glands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luxová, Anna; Svatoš, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2006), s. 37-42 ISSN 1381-1177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : alcohol oxidase * insects * aldehydes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.149, year: 2006

  11. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the highest IQ, including the current leader Wolinella succinogenes, are found among the poorly studied beta-, delta- and epsilon-proteobacteria. Among all bacterial phyla, only cyanobacteria appear to be true introverts, probably due to their capacity to conduct oxygenic photosynthesis, using a complex system of intracellular membranes. The census data, available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Complete_Genomes/SignalCensus.html, can be used to get an insight into metabolic and behavioral propensities of each given organism and improve prediction of the organism's properties based solely on its genome sequence.

  12. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y

    2005-06-14

    Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins--histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases--encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set) can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the highest IQ, including the current leader Wolinella succinogenes, are found among the poorly studied beta-, delta- and epsilon-proteobacteria. Among all bacterial phyla, only cyanobacteria appear to be true introverts, probably due to their capacity to conduct oxygenic photosynthesis, using a complex system of intracellular membranes. The census data, available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Complete_Genomes/SignalCensus.html, can be used to get an insight into metabolic and behavioral propensities of each given organism and improve prediction of the organism's properties based solely on its genome sequence.

  13. Aminophospholipid glycation causes lipid bilayer structure alterations and inhibition of membrane-bound Na+, K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obšil, Tomáš; Amler, Evžen; Pavlíček, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 63, - (1998), s. 1060-1073 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/95/0624; GA AV ČR IAA5011503 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 182/97/B Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.546, year: 1998

  14. Cigarette smokers develop altered erythrocyte membrane composition: an investigation unmasking the role of membrane bound integral protein GLUT 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Jyotirmoy; Seal, Paromita; Roy, Amartya; Haldar, Rajen

    2017-04-01

    Erythrocytes in cigarette smokers are prone to oxidative damage. Here, we sought to elucidate the facts behind modifications and possible defense system developed in erythrocyte of cigarette smokers. We observed significant increase in stomatocytes and spherocytes, and osmotic fragility of erythrocyte, along with reduced level of protein thiol and increased fluorescence anisotropy in isolated membrane. Denaturing gel electrophoresis indicated alterations in band 3, band 4.2 and band 4.5. Among those, Glut 1 (i.e. band 4.5), which transports glucose (insulin independent) and dehydroascorbate (DHA), was selectively chosen for its long history in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased Glut 1 level in smokers was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, smokers showed significantly higher glucose uptake in whole blood. The intracellular (Ic) ROS (as indicated by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin) was significantly higher in smokers as evidenced by flow cytometric assay. Glucose and DHA alone or together significantly reduced IcROS at higher rate in smokers. However, in presence of Glut 1 specific blocker, phloretin, neither glucose nor DHA could reduce IcROS in both non-smokers and smokers. This confirms that Glut 1 by transporting glucose or DHA attenuates IcROS. Therefore, we conclude that erythrocytes, although altered morphologically, also develop a defense system by upregulating Glut 1 to combat with enhanced Ic oxidative insult in cigarette smokers.

  15. Properties of the cyanobacterial coupling factor ATPase from Spirulina platensis. II. Activity of the purified and membrane-bound enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D B; Yocum, C F

    1986-02-15

    Cyanobacterial (Spirulina platensis) photosynthetic membranes and isolated F1 ATPase were characterized with respect to ATP activity. The following results indicate that the regulation of expression of ATPase activity in Spirulina platensis is similar to that found in chloroplasts: the ATPase activity of Spirulina membranes and isolated F1 ATPase is mostly latent, a characteristic of chloroplast ATPase activity; treatments that elicit ATPase activity in higher plant chloroplast thylakoids and isolated chloroplast coupling factor (CF1) greatly stimulate the activity of Spirulina membranes and F1, and the cation specificity of chloroplast ATPase activity, e. g., light-induced membrane activity that is magnesium dependent and trypsin-activated CF1 activity that is calcium dependent, is also observed in Spirulina. Thus, an 8- to 15-fold increase in specific activity (to 13-15 mumol Pi min-1 mg chl-1) is obtained when Spirulina membranes are treated with trypsin (CaATPase) or with methanol (MgATPase): a light-induced, dithiothreitol-dependent MgATPase activity is also found in the membranes. Purified Spirulina F1 is a CaATPase when activated with trypsin (endogenous activity increases from 4 to 27-37 mumol Pi min-1 mg protein-1) or with dithiothreitol (5.6 mumol Pi min-1 mg-1), but a MgATPase when assayed with methanol (18-20 mumol Pi min-1 mg-1). The effects of varying calcium and ATP concentrations on the kinetics of trypsin-induced CaATPase activity of Spirulina F1 were examined. When the calcium concentration is varied at constant ATP concentration, the velocity plot shows a marked sigmoidicity. By varying Ca-ATP metal-nucleotide complex concentration at constant concentrations of free calcium or ATP, it is shown that the sigmoidicity is due to the effect of free ATP, which changes the Hill constant to 1.6 from 1.0 observed when the free calcium concentration is kept constant at 5 mM. Therefore not only is ATP an inhibitor but it is also an allosteric effector of Spirulina F1 ATPase activity. At 5 mM free calcium, the Km for teh Ca-ATP metal-nucleotide complex is 0.42 mM.

  16. Transformations of membrane-bound organelles in sec 14 mutants of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambourg, A; Clermont, Y; Nicaud, J M; Gaillardin, C; Kepes, F

    1996-07-01

    In early descriptions of ultrastructural alterations of secretory (sec) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mutants, sec7 and sec14, were shown to produce cell structures, the so-called Berkeley bodies thought at first to correspond to Golgi structures. In sec7 mutants grown at restrictive temperature, secretion granules soon dis-appeared, whereas networks of Golgi tubules increased in size and transformed into stacks of seven to eight flattened elements. At these time intervals, structures resembling Berkeley bodies appeared to be extensions of the endoplasmic reticulum (Rambourg et al., 1993). It is the purpose of the present study to examine by electron microscopy S. cerevisiae sec14 mutants and to compare the modifications along their secretory pathway with those occurring in a homologous mutant of Yarrowia lipolytica. S. cerevisiae sec 14 mutant cells coming from exponentially growing cultures were examined either at 24 degrees C or after shifting at 37 degrees C for 0, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. Y. lipolytica mutant cells were first cultured in YNB in 5000 medium and then transferred for 0, 6, 8, 12, 20, and 24 hr, in a phosphate-buffered YPD medium, which allows wild cells to differentiate from yeast to mycelian form. In both cases, cells were fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde, treated for 15 min in 1% sodium metaperiodate, post-fixed in reduced osmium, and embedded in Epon. To visualize the three-dimensional configuration of cell organelles, stereopairs were prepared from section stained with lead citrate and tilted at +/- 15 degrees from the 0 degree position of the goniometric stage of the electron microscope. In S. cerevisiae mutant cells shifted for 2 min at the restrictive temperature, faintly stained networks of thin anastomosed tubules were located at close proximity and often continuous with faintly stained ER cisternae. More intensely stained tubular networks with nodular dilations having the size of secretion granules were dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Later on, the faintly stained ER elements and related tubular networks decreased in number, whereas the intensely stained nodular tubular networks increased in frequency. The incidence of secretion granules also increased and were distributed at random throughout the cytoplasm. Widemeshed, intensely stained fenestrated spheres were often encountered and increased in number, in parallel to the increase in the number of nodular tubular networks. At late time intervals, the fenestrated spheres decreased in number as they seemingly transformed into spherical bodies identical to vacuoles. In contrast to what occurred in S. cerevisiae sec14 mutant, the main ultrastructural modification observed in Y. lipolytica transferred to the YPD medium was the formation of deep plasma membrane invaginations. It appears that two functionally homologous PI/PC transfer proteins (Sec14psc and Sec14pyl) control distinct physiological processes in the two sec14 mutants examined. Such differences are perhaps related to the regulatory role of these proteins in different target organelles, i.e., the Golgi apparatus in S. cerevisiae or the plasma membrane in Y. lipolytica.

  17. Cloning and bioinformatics analyses of the coding DNA sequence (CDS of Delta 6 Desaturase gene from Mortierella alpina (CBS 754.68

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmat Ashaar ghadim

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Membrane-bound desaturases and related enzymes play a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids. Delta6 desaturase is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of the unsaturated fatty acids. Mortierella alpina is an oleaginous fungus with active Delta 6 desaturase which hasbeengreatly considered recently. Materials and methods: In order to isolate and clone Δ6D gene from Mortierella alpina, after extraction of total RNA and synthesis cDNA, PCR amplification has been done using gene specific primers. The amplified fragment was cloned into the pBlueScriptSK+ containing seed specific promoter napin. Then the recombinant plasmid was transformed into E.coli DH5a by freezing and thawing method. The confirmed gene construct was cloned into the binary vector pBI121 and transformed into Agrobacterium LBA4404 in order to transform canola plants. Bioinformatics characterization of target gene was investigated by servers TMHMM, ProtParam and Psipred. Results: Correctness of cloning was confirmed by PCR with specific primers, enzymatic digestion and sequencing. The proliferation of a fragment with 830 bp using internal primer of napin promoter and Delta6 desaturase primer confirmed insertion of the gene along with napin promoter. Nucleotide sequencing results showed that cloned CDS includes 1374 nucleotides that will translate to a protein with 448 amino acids. Using bioinformatics analysis, presence of cytochrome b5 domain, three His-box, secondary and spatial structures, transmembrane and conserved domains were confirmed. Discussion and conclusion: Based on the results of BLAST analysis using nucleotide and protein sequences, and also presence of functional domains in the protein, it can be predicted that cloned CDS will show proper enzyme activity after transformation into plants. Confirming these results requires expression analysis of the gene in appropriate plant system and studying its function in the enzyme level.

  18. MAPK signaling pathway alters expression of midgut ALP and ABCC genes and causes resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in diamondback moth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojiang Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Insecticidal crystal toxins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are widely used as biopesticide sprays or expressed in transgenic crops to control insect pests. However, large-scale use of Bt has led to field-evolved resistance in several lepidopteran pests. Resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L., was previously mapped to a multigenic resistance locus (BtR-1. Here, we assembled the 3.15 Mb BtR-1 locus and found high-level resistance to Cry1Ac and Bt biopesticide in four independent P. xylostella strains were all associated with differential expression of a midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP outside this locus and a suite of ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C (ABCC genes inside this locus. The interplay between these resistance genes is controlled by a previously uncharacterized trans-regulatory mechanism via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. Molecular, biochemical, and functional analyses have established ALP as a functional Cry1Ac receptor. Phenotypic association experiments revealed that the recessive Cry1Ac resistance was tightly linked to down-regulation of ALP, ABCC2 and ABCC3, whereas it was not linked to up-regulation of ABCC1. Silencing of ABCC2 and ABCC3 in susceptible larvae reduced their susceptibility to Cry1Ac but did not affect the expression of ALP, whereas suppression of MAP4K4, a constitutively transcriptionally-activated MAPK upstream gene within the BtR-1 locus, led to a transient recovery of gene expression thereby restoring the susceptibility in resistant larvae. These results highlight a crucial role for ALP and ABCC genes in field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac and reveal a novel trans-regulatory signaling mechanism responsible for modulating the expression of these pivotal genes in P. xylostella.

  19. Interspecies and Intraspecies Analysis of Trehalose Contents and the Biosynthesis Pathway Gene Family Reveals Crucial Roles of Trehalose in Osmotic-Stress Tolerance in Cassava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bingying; Fu, Lili; Zhang, Dan; He, Xiuquan; Chen, Qiang; Peng, Ming; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose is a nonreducing α,α-1,1-disaccharide in a wide range of organisms, and has diverse biological functions that range from serving as an energy source to acting as a protective/signal sugar. However, significant amounts of trehalose have rarely been detected in higher plants, and the function of trehalose in the drought-tolerant crop cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is unclear. We measured soluble sugar concentrations of nine plant species with differing levels of drought tolerance and 41 cassava varieties using high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD). Significantly high amounts of trehalose were identified in drought-tolerant crops cassava, Jatropha curcas, and castor bean (Ricinus communis). All cassava varieties tested contained high amounts of trehalose, although their concentrations varied from 0.23 to 1.29 mg·g−1 fresh weight (FW), and the trehalose level was highly correlated with dehydration stress tolerance of detached leaves of the varieties. Moreover, the trehalose concentrations in cassava leaves increased 2.3–5.5 folds in response to osmotic stress simulated by 20% PEG 6000. Through database mining, 24 trehalose pathway genes, including 12 trehalose-6-phosphate synthases (TPS), 10 trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatases (TPP), and two trehalases were identified in cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there were four cassava TPS genes (MeTPS1–4) that were orthologous to the solely active TPS gene (AtTPS1 and OsTPS1) in Arabidopsis and rice, and a new TPP subfamily was identified in cassava, suggesting that the trehalose biosynthesis activities in cassava had potentially been enhanced in evolutionary history. RNA-seq analysis indicated that MeTPS1 was expressed at constitutionally high level before and after osmotic stress, while other trehalose pathway genes were either up-regulated or down-regulated, which may explain why cassava accumulated high level of trehalose under

  20. Interspecies and Intraspecies Analysis of Trehalose Contents and the Biosynthesis Pathway Gene Family Reveals Crucial Roles of Trehalose in Osmotic-Stress Tolerance in Cassava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingying Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a nonreducing α,α-1,1-disaccharide in a wide range of organisms, and has diverse biological functions that range from serving as an energy source to acting as a protective/signal sugar. However, significant amounts of trehalose have rarely been detected in higher plants, and the function of trehalose in the drought-tolerant crop cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz is unclear. We measured soluble sugar concentrations of nine plant species with differing levels of drought tolerance and 41 cassava varieties using high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD. Significantly high amounts of trehalose were identified in drought-tolerant crops cassava, Jatropha curcas, and castor bean (Ricinus communis. All cassava varieties tested contained high amounts of trehalose, although their concentrations varied from 0.23 to 1.29 mg·g−1 fresh weight (FW, and the trehalose level was highly correlated with dehydration stress tolerance of detached leaves of the varieties. Moreover, the trehalose concentrations in cassava leaves increased 2.3–5.5 folds in response to osmotic stress simulated by 20% PEG 6000. Through database mining, 24 trehalose pathway genes, including 12 trehalose-6-phosphate synthases (TPS, 10 trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatases (TPP, and two trehalases were identified in cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there were four cassava TPS genes (MeTPS1–4 that were orthologous to the solely active TPS gene (AtTPS1 and OsTPS1 in Arabidopsis and rice, and a new TPP subfamily was identified in cassava, suggesting that the trehalose biosynthesis activities in cassava had potentially been enhanced in evolutionary history. RNA-seq analysis indicated that MeTPS1 was expressed at constitutionally high level before and after osmotic stress, while other trehalose pathway genes were either up-regulated or down-regulated, which may explain why cassava accumulated high level of trehalose

  1. Determining Roles of Accessory Genes in Denitrification by Mutant Fitness Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Brian J; Thorgersen, Michael P; Lancaster, W Andrew; Price, Morgan N; Wetmore, Kelly M; Poole, Farris L; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam P; Adams, Michael W W

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes of the denitrification pathway play an important role in the global nitrogen cycle, including release of nitrous oxide, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. In addition, nitric oxide reductase, maturation factors, and proteins associated with nitric oxide detoxification are used by pathogens to combat nitric oxide release by host immune systems. While the core reductases that catalyze the conversion of nitrate to dinitrogen are well understood at a mechanistic level, there are many peripheral proteins required for denitrification whose basic function is unclear. A bar-coded transposon DNA library from Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2 was grown under denitrifying conditions, using nitrate or nitrite as an electron acceptor, and also under molybdenum limitation conditions, with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Analysis of sequencing results from these growths yielded gene fitness data for 3,307 of the 4,265 protein-encoding genes present in strain RCH2. The insights presented here contribute to our understanding of how peripheral proteins contribute to a fully functioning denitrification pathway. We propose a new low-affinity molybdate transporter, OatABC, and show that differential regulation is observed for two MoaA homologs involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. We also propose that NnrS may function as a membrane-bound NO sensor. The dominant HemN paralog involved in heme biosynthesis is identified, and a CheR homolog is proposed to function in nitrate chemotaxis. In addition, new insights are provided into nitrite reductase redundancy, nitric oxide reductase maturation, nitrous oxide reductase maturation, and regulation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Oxygen control of nif gene expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae depends on NifL reduction at the cytoplasmic membrane by electrons derived from the reduced quinone pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Roman; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2003-04-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae, the flavoprotein, NifL regulates NifA mediated transcriptional activation of the N2-fixation (nif) genes in response to molecular O2 and ammonium. We investigated the influence of membrane-bound oxidoreductases on nif-regulation by biochemical analysis of purified NifL and by monitoring NifA-mediated expression of nifH'-'lacZ reporter fusions in different mutant backgrounds. NifL-bound FAD-cofactor was reduced by NADH only in the presence of a redox-mediator or inside-out vesicles derived from anaerobically grown K. pneumoniae cells, indicating that in vivo NifL is reduced by electrons derived from membrane-bound oxidoreductases of the anaerobic respiratory chain. This mechanism is further supported by three lines of evidence: First, K. pneumoniae strains carrying null mutations of fdnG or nuoCD showed significantly reduced nif-induction under derepressing conditions, indicating that NifL inhibition of NifA was not relieved in the absence of formate dehydrogenase-N or NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. The same effect was observed in a heterologous Escherichia coli system carrying a ndh null allele (coding for NADH dehydrogenaseII). Second, studying nif-induction in K. pneumoniae revealed that during anaerobic growth in glycerol, under nitrogen-limitation, the presence of the terminal electron acceptor nitrate resulted in a significant decrease of nif-induction. The final line of evidence is that reduced quinone derivatives, dimethylnaphthoquinol and menadiol, are able to transfer electrons to the FAD-moiety of purified NifL. On the basis of these data, we postulate that under anaerobic and nitrogen-limited conditions, NifL inhibition of NifA activity is relieved by reduction of the FAD-cofactor by electrons derived from the reduced quinone pool, generated by anaerobic respiration, that favours membrane association of NifL. We further hypothesize that the quinol/quinone ratio is important for providing the signal to NifL.

  3. Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergström Anders

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal regulation of the small intestinal mucus layer is potentially important in the development of adult gut functionality. We hypothesized that the nature of bacterial colonization affects mucus gene regulation in early life. We thus analyzed the influence of the presence of a conventional microbiota as well as two selected monocolonizing bacterial strains on the transcription of murine genes involved in mucus layer development during the first week of life. Mouse pups (N = 8/group from differently colonized dams: Germ-free (GF, conventional specific pathogen free (SPF, monocolonized with either Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (Lb or Escherichia coli Nissle (Ec were analyzed by qPCR on isolated ileal tissue sections from postnatal days 1 and 6 (PND1, PND6 after birth with respect to: (i transcription of specific genes involved in mucus production (Muc1-4, Tff3 and (ii amounts of 16S rRNA of Lactobacillus and E. coli. Quantification of 16S rRNA genes was performed to obtain a measure for amounts of colonized bacteria. Results We found a microbiota-independent transcriptional increase of all five mucus genes from PND1 to PND6. Furthermore, the relative level of transcription of certain mucus genes on PND1 was increased by the presence of bacteria. This was observed for Tff3 in the SPF, Ec, and Lb groups; for Muc2 in SPF; and for Muc3 and Muc4 in Ec and Lb, respectively. Detection of bacterial 16S rRNA genes levels above the qPCR detection level occurred only on PND6 and only for some of the colonized animals. On PND6, we found significantly lower levels of Muc1, Muc2 and Muc4 gene transcription for Lb animals with detectable Lactobacillus levels as compared to animals with Lactobacillus levels below the detection limit. Conclusions In summary, our data show that development of the expression of genes encoding secreted (Muc2/Tff3 and membrane-bound (Muc1/Muc3/Muc4 mucus regulatory proteins, respectively, is distinct and

  4. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.; Walters, R.A.; Enger, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn 2+ or Cd 2+ . We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  5. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  6. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  7. Immunoglobulin genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honjo, T; Alt, F. W; Rabbitts, T. H

    1989-01-01

    ... Cataloguing in Publication Data Immunoglobulin genes 1. Vertebrates. Immunoglobulins 1. Honjo, T. II. Alt, F.W. III. Rabbitts, T.H. 612'. 118223 ISBN 0-12-354865-9 This book is printed on acid-free paper ( T...

  8. Ageing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2018-01-01

    The idea of gerontogenes is in line with the evolutionary explanation of ageing as being an emergent phenomenon as a result of the imperfect maintenance and repair systems. Although evolutionary processes did not select for any specific ageing genes that restrict and determine the lifespan...... of an individual, the term ‘gerontogenes’ primarily refers to any genes that may seem to influence ageing and longevity, without being specifically selected for that role. Such genes can also be called ‘virtual gerontogenes’ by virtue of their indirect influence on the rate and process of ageing. More than 1000...... virtual gerontogenes have been associated with ageing and longevity in model organisms and humans. The ‘real’ genes, which do influence the essential lifespan of a species, and have been selected for in accordance with the evolutionary life history of the species, are known as the longevity assurance...

  9. Assessment of polymorphic variants in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene with cutaneous pigmentation using an evolutionary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanetsky, Peter A; Ge, Fan; Najarian, Derek; Swoyer, Jennifer; Panossian, Saarene; Schuchter, Lynn; Holmes, Robin; Guerry, DuPont; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2004-05-01

    The melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) encodes a membrane-bound receptor protein that is central to melanin synthesis. The coding region of MC1R is highly polymorphic and associations of variants with pigmentation phenotypes and risk for cutaneous neoplasms have been reported. We sought to determine the distribution and frequency of MC1R variants and their relationship to pigmentation characteristics in 179 Caucasian controls from the United States. One hundred thirty-five (75.4%) subjects carried one or more variants, and we determined that carriage of the previously designated "red hair color" (RHC) alleles, R151C, R160W, and D294H was strongly associated with fair pigmentation phenotypes including light hair and eye color, tendency to burn, decreased tendency to tan, and freckling. We used SIFT software to define MC1R protein positions that were predicted intolerant to amino acid substitutions; detected variants that corresponded to intolerant substitutions were D84E, R142H, R151C, I155T, R160W, and D294H. Carriage of one or more of these putative functionally important variants or the frameshift variant ins86A was significantly associated with fair pigmentation phenotypes. Analyses limited to carriage of ins86A and the three non-RHC alleles identified by SIFT were attenuated and no longer reached statistical significance. This is the first study to describe MC1R variants among control subjects from the U.S. Our results indicate that the frequency of variants is similar to that previously observed among non-U.S. Caucasians. Risk variants defined by either the published literature or by evolutionary criteria are strongly and significantly associated with all fair pigmentation phenotypes that were measured.

  10. Controlling instability in gacS-gacA regulatory genes during inoculant production of Pseudomonas fluorescens biocontrol strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, B K; Défago, G

    2000-08-01

    Secondary metabolism in fluorescent pseudomonads is globally regulated by gacS, which encodes a membrane-bound sensor kinase, and gacA, which encodes a transcriptional response regulator. Spontaneous mutation in either gene blocked biosynthesis of the antimicrobial compounds hydrogen cyanide, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyoluteorin, and pyrrolnitrin by the model biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0. Spontaneous mutants also had altered abilities to utilize several carbon sources and to increase medium pH compared with the wild type, suggesting that gacS and gacA influence primary as well as secondary bacterial metabolism. Inoculant efficacy for biocontrol was significantly reduced by contamination with regulatory mutants which accumulated during inoculum production. Spontaneous mutants accumulated in all 192 separate liquid cultures examined, typically at a frequency of 1% or higher after 12 days. During scale-up in a simulated industrial fermentation process, mutants increased exponentially and accounted for 7, 23, and 61% of the total viable cells after transfer to 20-, 100-, and 500-ml preparations, respectively. GacS(-) and GacA(-) mutants had identical phenotypes and occurred at the same frequency, indicating that the selective pressures for the two mutants were similar. We developed a simple screening method for monitoring inoculant quality based on the distinctive appearance of mutant colonies (i.e., orange color, enlarged diameter, hyperfluorescence). Mutant competitiveness was favored in a nutrient-rich medium with a high electrolyte concentration (nutrient broth containing yeast extract). We were able to control mutant accumulation and to clean up contaminated cultures by using certain mineral amendments (i.e., zinc, copper, cobalt, manganese, and ammonium molybdate) or by diluting media 1/10. Spontaneous mutants and genetic constructs had the same response to culture conditions. Zinc and medium dilution were also effective for improving the

  11. Rab11-dependent Recycling of the Human Ether-a-go-go-related Gene (hERG) Channel*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeffery; Guo, Jun; Yang, Tonghua; Li, Wentao; Lamothe, Shawn M.; Kang, Yudi; Szendrey, John A.; Zhang, Shetuan

    2015-01-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) encodes the pore-forming subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel (IKr). A reduction in the hERG current causes long QT syndrome, which predisposes affected individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. We reported previously that hERG channels in the plasma membrane undergo vigorous internalization under low K+ conditions. In the present study, we addressed whether hERG internalization occurs under normal K+ conditions and whether/how internalized channels are recycled back to the plasma membrane. Using patch clamp, Western blot, and confocal imaging analyses, we demonstrated that internalized hERG channels can effectively recycle back to the plasma membrane. Low K+-enhanced hERG internalization is accompanied by an increased rate of hERG recovery in the plasma membrane upon reculture following proteinase K-mediated clearance of cell-surface proteins. The increased recovery rate is not due to enhanced protein synthesis, as hERG mRNA expression was not altered by low K+ exposure, and the increased recovery was observed in the presence of the protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. GTPase Rab11, but not Rab4, is involved in the recycling of hERG channels. Interfering with Rab11 function not only delayed hERG recovery in cells after exposure to low K+ medium but also decreased hERG expression and function in cells under normal culture conditions. We concluded that the recycling pathway plays an important role in the homeostasis of plasma membrane-bound hERG channels. PMID:26152716

  12. Genomic organization, splice variants and expression of CGM1, a CD66-related member of the carcinoembryonic antigen gene family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, G.; Grunert, F.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Watt, S. M.; Thompson, J.; Zimmermann, W.

    1993-01-01

    The tumor marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) belongs to a family of proteins which are composed of one immunoglobulin variable domain and a varying number of immunoglobulin constant-like domains. Most of the membrane-bound members, which are anchored either by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol

  13. Transcriptome analysis of the Cryptocaryon irritans tomont stage identifies potential genes for the detection and control of cryptocaryonosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Kiew-Lian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptocaryon irritans is a parasitic ciliate that causes cryptocaryonosis (white spot disease in marine fish. Diagnosis of cryptocaryonosis often depends on the appearance of white spots on the surface of the fish, which are usually visible only during later stages of the disease. Identifying suitable biomarkers of this parasite would aid the development of diagnostic tools and control strategies for C. irritans. The C. irritans genome is virtually unexplored; therefore, we generated and analyzed expressed sequence tags (ESTs of the parasite to identify genes that encode for surface proteins, excretory/secretory proteins and repeat-containing proteins. Results ESTs were generated from a cDNA library of C. irritans tomonts isolated from infected Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer. Clustering of the 5356 ESTs produced 2659 unique transcripts (UTs containing 1989 singletons and 670 consensi. BLAST analysis showed that 74% of the UTs had significant similarity (E-value -5 to sequences that are currently available in the GenBank database, with more than 15% of the significant hits showing unknown function. Forty percent of the UTs had significant similarity to ciliates from the genera Tetrahymena and Paramecium. Comparative gene family analysis with related taxa showed that many protein families are conserved among the protozoans. Based on gene ontology annotation, functional groups were successfully assigned to 790 UTs. Genes encoding excretory/secretory proteins and membrane and membrane-associated proteins were identified because these proteins often function as antigens and are good antibody targets. A total of 481 UTs were classified as encoding membrane proteins, 54 were classified as encoding for membrane-bound proteins, and 155 were found to contain excretory/secretory protein-coding sequences. Amino acid repeat-containing proteins and GPI-anchored proteins were also identified as potential candidates for the development of

  14. Gene Locater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Sehar, Anoosha; Rehman, Inayat-Ur

    2012-01-01

    software's for calculating recombination frequency is mostly limited to the range and flexibility of this type of analysis. GENE LOCATER is a fully customizable program for calculating recombination frequency, written in JAVA. Through an easy-to-use interface, GENE LOCATOR allows users a high degree...... of flexibility in calculating genetic linkage and displaying linkage group. Among other features, this software enables user to identify linkage groups with output visualized graphically. The program calculates interference and coefficient of coincidence with elevated accuracy in sample datasets. AVAILABILITY......: The database is available for free at http://www.moperandib.com....

  15. Progesterone stimulates adipocyte determination and differentiation 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c gene expression. potential mechanism for the lipogenic effect of progesterone in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, D; Le Liepvre, X; Ferre, P; Dugail, I

    2001-04-13

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS), a nutritionally regulated lipogenic enzyme, is transcriptionally controlled by ADD1/SREBP1c (adipocyte determination and differentiation 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c), through insulin-mediated stimulation of ADD1/SREBP1c expression. Progesterone exerts lipogenic effects on adipocytes, and FAS is highly induced in breast tumor cell lines upon progesterone treatment. We show here that progesterone up-regulates ADD1/SREBP1c expression in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and the primary cultured preadipocyte from rat parametrial adipose tissue. In MCF7, progesterone induced ADD1/SREBP1c and Metallothionein II (a well known progesterone-regulated gene) mRNAs, with comparable potency. In preadipocytes, progesterone increased ADD1/SREBP1c mRNA dose-dependently, but not SREBP1a or SREBP2. Run-on experiments demonstrated that progesterone action on ADD1/SREBP1c was primarily at the transcriptional level. The membrane-bound and mature nuclear forms of ADD1/SREBP1 protein accumulated in preadipocytes cultured with progesterone, and FAS induction could be abolished by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant negative form of ADD1/SREBP1 in these cells. Finally, in the presence of insulin, progesterone was unable to up-regulate ADD1/SREBP1c mRNA in preadipocytes, whereas its effect was restored after 24 h of insulin deprivation. Together these results demonstrate that ADD1/SREBP1c is controlled by progesterone, which, like insulin, acts by increasing ADD1/SREBP1c gene transcription. This provides a potential mechanism for the lipogenic actions of progesterone on adipose tissue.

  16. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  17. Improvement of H2 yield of Fermentative Bacteria by Gene Manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makiko Harada; Takashi Kaneko; Shigeharu Tanisho

    2006-01-01

    Two method were proposed in this paper. One is to destroy the NADH dehydrogenase complex in the electron transport chain of a facultative anaerobic bacterium Enterobacter aerogenes and the other is to disrupt the butyrate producing pathway of a strict anaerobic bacterium Clostridium butyricum. In case of E. aerogenes, one of the 14 membrane-bound NADH dehydrogenases, nuoG, is targeted to destroy. In case of C. butyricum, function of thiolase is targeted to disrupt. (authors)

  18. Differential Transcriptional Activation of Genes Encoding Soluble Methane Monooxygenase in a Facultative Versus an Obligate Methanotroph

    OpenAIRE

    Angela V. Smirnova; Peter F. Dunfield

    2018-01-01

    Methanotrophs are a specialized group of bacteria that can utilize methane (CH4) as a sole energy source. A key enzyme responsible for methane oxidation is methane monooxygenase (MMO), of either a soluble, cytoplasmic type (sMMO), or a particulate, membrane-bound type (pMMO). Methylocella silvestris BL2 and Methyloferula stellata AR4 are closely related methanotroph species that oxidize methane via sMMO only. However, Methyloferula stellata is an obligate methanotroph, while Methylocella silv...

  19. Gene expression of 17beta-estradiol-metabolizing isozymes: comparison of normal human mammary gland to normal human liver and to cultured human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Leane; Wagner, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic activation of 17beta-estradiol (E2) to catechols and quinones together with lack of deactivation constitute risk factors in human breast carcinogenesis. E2-catchols are generated by cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (CYPs). Deactivation of E2, E2-catechols, and E2-quinones is mediated by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), sulfotransferase (SULT), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and NADPH-quinone-oxidoreductase (QR) isozymes, respectively. The aim of the present study was to quantify mRNA levels of E2-metabolizing isozymes expressed in MCF-7 cells cultured in the presence/absence of steroids by reverse transcription/competitive PCR in relation to the housekeeping gene hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and compare them with expression levels in normal human mammary gland (MG) and liver tissue. CYP1A1, 1B1, SULT1A1, 1A2, membrane-bound and soluble COMT, GSTT1, QR1, and UGT2B7 were detected in both tissues and MCF-7 cells; however, most enzymes were expressed at least tenfold higher in liver. Yet, CYP1B1 was expressed as high in breast as in liver and UGTs were not detected in MCF-7 cells cultured with steroids. MCF-7 cells cultured steroid-free additionally expressed CYP1A2 as well as UGT1A4, 1A8, and 1A9. Normal human liver but not MG expressed CYP1A2, 3A4, UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A9, and SULT2A1. UGT1A8 was only detected in MCF7 cells but was not found in human liver. Thus, our study provides a comprehensive overview of expression levels of E2-metabolizing enzymes in a popular in vitro model and in human tissues, which will contribute to the interpretation of in vitro studies concerning the activation/deactivation of E2.

  20. Expression of the gltP gene of Escherichia coli in a glutamate transport-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides restores chemotaxis to glutamate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H J; van der Heide, T.; Tolner, B; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1995-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides is chemotactic to glutamate and most other amino acids. In Escherichia coli, chemotaxis involves a membrane-bound sensor that either binds the amino acid directly or interacts with the binding protein loaded with the amino acid. In R. sphaeroides, chemotaxis is thought to

  1. Gene expression and gene therapy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, Claire; Couillaud, Franck; Moonen, Chrit T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The fast growing field of molecular imaging has achieved major advances in imaging gene expression, an important element of gene therapy. Gene expression imaging is based on specific probes or contrast agents that allow either direct or indirect spatio-temporal evaluation of gene expression. Direct evaluation is possible with, for example, contrast agents that bind directly to a specific target (e.g., receptor). Indirect evaluation may be achieved by using specific substrate probes for a target enzyme. The use of marker genes, also called reporter genes, is an essential element of MI approaches for gene expression in gene therapy. The marker gene may not have a therapeutic role itself, but by coupling the marker gene to a therapeutic gene, expression of the marker gene reports on the expression of the therapeutic gene. Nuclear medicine and optical approaches are highly sensitive (detection of probes in the picomolar range), whereas MRI and ultrasound imaging are less sensitive and require amplification techniques and/or accumulation of contrast agents in enlarged contrast particles. Recently developed MI techniques are particularly relevant for gene therapy. Amongst these are the possibility to track gene therapy vectors such as stem cells, and the techniques that allow spatiotemporal control of gene expression by non-invasive heating (with MRI guided focused ultrasound) and the use of temperature sensitive promoters. (orig.)

  2. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L.; Tamgac, G.

    2002-01-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  3. MicroRNA as Crucial Regulators of Gene Expression in Estradiol-Treated Human Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Vidal-Gómez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Estrogen signalling plays an important role in vascular biology as it modulates vasoactive and metabolic pathways in endothelial cells. Growing evidence has also established microRNA (miRNA as key regulators of endothelial function. Nonetheless, the role of estrogen regulation on miRNA profile in endothelial cells is poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to determine how estrogen modulates miRNA profile in human endothelial cells and to explore the role of the different estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ and GPER in the regulation of miRNA expression by estrogen. Methods: We used miRNA microarrays to determine global miRNA expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC exposed to a physiological concentration of estradiol (E2; 1 nmol/L for 24 hours. miRNA-gene interactions were computationally predicted using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and changes in miRNA levels were validated by qRT-PCR. Role of ER in the E2-induced miRNA was additionally confirmed by using specific ER agonists and antagonists. Results: miRNA array revealed that expression of 114 miRNA were significantly modified after E2 exposition. Further biological pathway analysis revealed cell death and survival, lipid metabolism, reproductive system function, as the top functions regulated by E2. We validated changes in the most significantly increased (miR-30b-5p, miR-487a-5p, miR-4710, miR-501-3p and decreased (miR-378h and miR-1244 miRNA and the role of ER in these E2-induced miRNA was determined. Results showed that both classical, ERα and ERβ, and membrane-bound ER, GPER, differentially regulated specific miRNA. In silico analysis of validated miRNA promoters identified specific ER binding sites. Conclusion: Our findings identify differentially expressed miRNA pathways linked to E2 in human endothelial cells through ER, and provide new insights by which estrogen can modulate endothelial function.

  4. Regulation of trehalose metabolism in Saccharomyces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, A.D.; Costa-Carvalho, V.L.A.; Ortiz, C.H.D.; Dellamora-Ortiz, G.M.; Paschoalin, V.M.F.; Panek, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The regulation of trehalose metabolism in Saccharomyces is studied by construction of mutants with specific lesions, cloning of genes involved in the regulation of trehalose synthase and of trehalase, as well as, isolation and purification of enzymes from the various mutants constructed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. ATPaseTb2, a Unique Membrane-bound FoF1-ATPase Component, Is Essential in Bloodstream and Dyskinetoplastic Trypanosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šubrtová, Karolína; Panicucci, Brian; Zíková, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2015), e1004660 E-ISSN 1553-7374 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1205; GA ČR GAP302/12/2513 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mitochondrial ATP synthase * inducible expression system * sequence analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 7.003, year: 2015

  6. Isolation, purification, and partial characterization of a membrane-bound Cl-/HCO3--activated ATPase complex from rat brain with sensitivity to GABAAergic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzikov, Sergey A

    2017-02-07

    This study describes the isolation and purification of a protein complex with [Formula: see text]-ATPase activity and sensitivity to GABA A ergic ligands from rat brain plasma membranes. The ATPase complex was enriched using size-exclusion, affinity, and ion-exchange chromatography. The fractions obtained at each purification step were subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), which revealed four subunits with molecular mass ∼48, 52, 56, and 59 kDa; these were retained at all stages of the purification process. Autoradiography revealed that the ∼52 and 56 kDa subunits could bind [ 3 H]muscimol. The [Formula: see text]-ATPase activity of this enriched protein complex was regulated by GABA A ergic ligands but was not sensitive to blockers of the NKCC or KCC cotransporters.

  7. Membrane-bound human orphan cytochrome P450 2U1: Sequence singularities, construction of a full 3D model, and substrate docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducassou, Lionel; Dhers, Laura; Jonasson, Gabriella; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; André, François

    2017-09-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2U1 (CYP2U1) is an orphan CYP that exhibits several distinctive characteristics among the 57 human CYPs with a highly conserved sequence in almost all living organisms. We compared its protein sequence with those of the 57 human CYPs and constructed a 3D structure of a full-length CYP2U1 model bound to a POPC membrane. We also performed docking experiments of arachidonic acid (AA) and N-arachidonoylserotonin (AS) in this model. The protein sequence of CYP2U1 displayed two unique characteristics when compared to those of the human CYPs, the presence of a longer N-terminal region upstream of the putative trans-membrane helix (TMH) containing 8 proline residues, and of an insert of about 20 amino acids containing 5 arginine residues between helices A' and A. Its N-terminal part upstream of TMH involved an additional short terminal helix, in a manner similar to what was reported in the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CYP51. Our model also showed a specific interaction between the charged residues of insert AA' and phosphate groups of lipid polar heads, suggesting a possible role of this insert in substrate recruitment. Docking of AA and AS in this model showed these substrates in channel 2ac, with the terminal alkyl chain of AA or the indole ring of AS close to the heme, in agreement with the reported CYP2U1-catalyzed AA and AS hydroxylation regioselectivities. This model should be useful to find new endogenous or exogenous CYP2U1 substrates and to interpret the regioselectivity of their hydroxylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  8. Membrane-bound MinDE complex acts as a toggle switch that drives Min oscillation coupled to cytoplasmic depletion of MinD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Li, Min; Mizuuchi, Michiyo; Hwang, Ling Chin; Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Min system self-organizes into a cell-pole to cell-pole oscillator on the membrane to prevent divisions at the cell poles. Reconstituting the Min system on a lipid bilayer has contributed to elucidating the oscillatory mechanism. However, previous in vitro patterns were attained with protein densities on the bilayer far in excess of those in vivo and failed to recapitulate the standing wave oscillations observed in vivo. Here we studied Min protein patterning at limiting MinD concentrations reflecting the in vivo conditions. We identified “burst” patterns—radially expanding and imploding binding zones of MinD, accompanied by a peripheral ring of MinE. Bursts share several features with the in vivo dynamics of the Min system including standing wave oscillations. Our data support a patterning mechanism whereby the MinD-to-MinE ratio on the membrane acts as a toggle switch: recruiting and stabilizing MinD on the membrane when the ratio is high and releasing MinD from the membrane when the ratio is low. Coupling this toggle switch behavior with MinD depletion from the cytoplasm drives a self-organized standing wave oscillator. PMID:26884160

  9. Adhesion force sensing and activation of a membrane-bound sensor to activate nisin efflux pumps in Staphylococcus aureus under mechanical and chemical stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carniello, Vera; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2018-01-01

    Nisin-associated-sensitivity-response-regulator (NsaRS) in Staphylococcus aureus is important for its adhesion to surfaces and resistance against antibiotics, like nisin. NsaRS consists of an intra-membrane-located sensor NsaS and a cytoplasmatically-located response-regulator NsaR, which becomes

  10. 2-Keto-D-Gluconate-Yielding Membrane-Bound D-Glucose Dehydrogenase from Arthrobacter globiformis C224: Purification and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose dehydrogenase (GlcDH is the rate-limiting catalyst for microbial conversion of glucose to the important organic acid 2-ketogluconic acid (2KGlcA. In this study, a D-glucose dehydrogenase was purified from the industrial 2KGlcA producer Arthrobacter globiformis C224. After four purification steps, the GlcDH was successfully purified over 180 folds and specific activity of 88.1 U/mg. A single protein band of 87 kDa was detected by SDS-PAGE. The purified GlcDH had the broad substrate specificity with the Km values for D-glucose, D-xylose, D-galactose and maltose of 0.21 mM, 0.34 mM, 0.46 mM and 0.59 mM, respectively. The kinetic studies proved that A. globiformis GlcDH followed the ping-pong kinetic mechanism. The GlcDH showed an optimum catalytic activity at pH 5.0 and 45 °C with the stable activity at temperature of 20–40 °C and pH of 6.0–7.0. Organic solvents, metal ions or EDTA could significantly influence the GlcDH activity to different degrees.

  11. The cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase CKX1 is a membrane-bound protein requiring homooligomerization in the endoplasmic reticulum for its cellular activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, M.C.E.; Weber, H.; Hluska, T.; Leonte, G.; Anderson, S. P.; Novák, Ondřej; Senes, A.; Werner, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 3 (2018), s. 2024-2039 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA15-22322S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : HELIX-HELIX ASSOCIATION * VIRUS MOVEMENT PROTEIN * RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEINS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  12. The presence of a membrane-bound progesterone receptor sensitizes the estradiol-induced effect on the proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Hans; Yang, Yang; Seeger, Harald; Fehm, Tanja; Cahill, Michael A; Tong, Xiaowen; Ruan, Xiangyan; Mueck, Alfred O

    2011-08-01

    Breast cancer risk is still an important topic regarding hormone therapy as well as oral contraception. Evidence that progestogens may play a crucial role is accumulating. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) expressed in breast cancer may be important in tumorigenesis and thus may increase breast cancer risk. The aim of this project was to investigate the influence of different estradiol (E2) concentrations and the addition of two progestogens on MCF-7 breast cancer cells overexpressing PGRMC1. MCF-7 cells were stably transfected with PGRMC1 expression plasmid (MCF-7/PGRMC1-3HA [WT-12]). To test the effects of E2 and progestogens on cell proliferation, MCF-7 and WT-12 cells were stimulated with different concentrations of E2 (10 and 10 M) alone and in combination with progesterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate (each 10 M). E2 elicited a concentration-dependent proliferative effect on both cell lines, which was much more pronounced in WT-12 cells (50% vs 200%). This effect could be completely abrogated by the addition of the E2 antagonist fulvestrant. Addition of progesterone had no influence on the E2-induced effect, whereas medroxy-progesterone acetate enhanced the E2-induced effect at a low E2 concentration, which was, again, more pronounced in the WT-12 cells. The figures were between 20% and 40% in MCF-7 and between 60% and 250% in WT-12 cells. Overexpression of PGRMC1 sensitizes the proliferative response of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line to estradiol. The effect of progestogens on breast cancer tumorigenesis may depend on the specific progestogen used for hormone therapy or oral contraception.

  13. Membrane-bound and cytosolic forms of heterotrimeric G proteins in young and adult rat myocardium: influence of neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Jiří; Bouřová, Lenka; Kolář, František; Svoboda, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2001), s. 215-224 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1660; GA MŠk VS97099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : development * G proteins * young and adult rat myocardium Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2001

  14. Membrane-Bound and Exosomal Metastasis-Associated C4.4A Promotes Migration by Associating with the α6β4 Integrin and MT1-MMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honoré Ngora

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis-associated C4.4A, which becomes upregulated during wound healing and, in some tumors, during tumor progression, is known to be frequently associated with hypoxia. With the function of C4.4A still unknown, we explored the impact of hypoxia on C4.4A expression and functional activity. Metastatic rat and human tumor lines upregulate C4.4A expression when cultured in the presence of CoCl2. Although hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α becomes upregulated concomitantly, HIF-1α did not induce C4.4A transcription. Instead, hypoxia-induced C4.4A up-regulation promoted in vivo and in vitro wound healing, where increased migration on the C4.4A ligands laminin-111 and -332 was observed after a transient period of pronounced binding. Increased migration was accompanied by C4.4A associating with α6β4, MT1-MMP1, and TACE and by laminin fragmentation. Hypoxia also promoted the release of C4.4A in exosomes and TACE-mediated C4.4A shedding. The association of C4.4A with α6β4 and MT1-MMP1 was maintained in exosomes and exosomal α6β4- and MT1-MMP1-associated C4.4A but not shed C4.4A sufficient for laminin degradation. Hypoxia-induced recruitment of α6β4 toward raft-located C4.4A, MT1-MMP, and TACE allows for a shift from adhesion to motility, which is supported by laminin degradation. These findings provide the first explanation for the C4.4A contribution to wound healing and metastasis.

  15. Specific Binding of Protoporphyrin IX to a Membrane-Bound 63 Kilodalton Polypeptide in Cucumber Cotyledons Treated with Diphenyl Ether-Type Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ryo; Oshio, Hiromichi; Koike, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Yorinao; Yoshida, Shigeo; Takahashi, Nobutaka

    1991-01-01

    Porphyrin accumulation in excised cucumber cotyledons (Cucumis sativus L.) treated with a N-phenylimide S-23142 (N-[4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-propargyloxyphenyl]-3,4,5,6- tetrahydrophthalimide) and a diphenylether acifluorfen-ethyl (ethyl-5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitro benzoic acid) was studied. Most of the accumulated porphyrins were found in the membrane fractions of 6,000g and 30,000g pellets, forming a complex with a membrane polypeptide. The complex was solubilized with 1% n-dodecyl β-d-maltoside and its molecular mass was estimated to be 63,000 and 66,000 daltons by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel permeation high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The polypeptide also existed in untreated cotyledons but had little protoporphyrin IX. The complex was also formed in vitro by mixing the 30,000g pellets from untreated cotyledons and authentic protoporphyrin IX. However, protoporphyrin IX formed the complex specifically with the 63,000 dalton polypeptide and not with the other proteins both in vivo and in vitro. At least four fluorescent porphyrins, including protoporphyrin IX, were found in the acetone extract of the cotyledons by HPLC using a reversed phase column. Protoporphyrin IX was one of the two porphyrins that formed the complex. These results suggest that S-23142 and acifluorfenethyl enhance the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX, which forms the complex with the membrane protein. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3 PMID:16668204

  16. Effects of electric fields on membrane-bound Na, K-ATPase. Progress report, 1 July 1989-30 June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsong, T.Y.

    1990-06-30

    We continued to work on effects of oscillating electric fields on membrane functions, in particular the electric activation of Na, K-ATPase, and to develop theory of electro-conformational coupling. We believe transmembrane electric fields are involved in the regulation of the internal activity of a cell and also in the cell-to-cell communications. An in depth study of Na, K-ATPase will provide useful information concerning the molecular design of a cell to sense and to transmit signals.

  17. Electrostatic control by lipids upon the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase. II. The influence of surface potential upon the activating ion equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, M L

    1983-07-13

    Electrostatic influences upon the enzymatic activity of the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase from ox brain (EC 3.6.1.3) have been studied. (1) The characteristics of the temperature dependence of the activity - the slopes and inflection temperature, Ti, of the Arrhenius plots - have been shown to depend on the total concentration, but not on the specific properties of added monovalent ions. (2) The enzymatic activity has been shown to be subject simultaneously to unspecific and specific influences of alkali-metal ions or NH+4. Ion-specific effects result from different binding constants of complexation between activating ions and enzyme. These stability constants are affected by the formation of an electrical double layer at the membrane surface. With increasing electrostatic screening, the complex formation is destabilized and, as a consequence, the enzymatic activity decreases. (3) This interaction between ion binding and surface electrostatics enables the enzyme to adapt its activity to the actual ionic conditions. This gives rise to a complex net dependence of the enzymatic activity upon the concentrations of activating ions. Such dependencies are analyzed, and an 'activity surface' has been constructed which represents the enzymatic activity as a function of simultaneously varying concentrations of sodium and potassium. The shape of this activity surface is determined by the relations between ion concentrations, surface potential and the resulting stability of the complexation between the activating ions and the enzyme. By means of three-dimensional representation it is demonstrated that the adaptability of the stability constants is of great importance with respect to the maintenance of the optimal ionic concentrations within the living cell. Therefore, by means of the surrounding membrane, the ATPase is provided with a quality, in addition to its substrate specificity and catalytic ability, which is necessary for its function as a transport enzyme.

  18. [Study of the receptor for black widow spider neurotoxin. I. Characteristics of membrane-bound and solubilized receptors from the bovine brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, A G; Shamotienko, O G; Surkova, I N; Kovalenko, V A; Grishin, E V

    1990-02-01

    Iodine-125 labelled alpha-latrotoxin from the venom of Central Asia black widow spider Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus binds specifically to the bovine brain membrane receptor producing a stable slowly dissociating complex with Kd = 1.6 x 10(-10) M and Bmax = 0.5 pmol/mg protein. Treatment of the complex with alkaline high-salt buffer induces reversible dissociation of the bound toxin. The antitoxin polyclonal antibody does not increase the dissociation rate of the bound toxin. Wheat germ lectin as well as concanavalin A inhibit the toxin binding to the membrane receptor. The receptor is solubilized with ionic and non-ionic detergents, and methods of latrotoxin binding assay are developed. The solubilized receptor is shown to retain high affinity to toxin, its binding activity being stable but critically dependent on the presence of calcium ions. Chromatographic properties of the receptor suggest its glycoprotein nature.

  19. Brain-specific interaction of a 91-kDa membrane-bound protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Issinger, O G; Braulke, T

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the 300 kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300-CT) is thought to play an important role in sorting and targeting of lysosomal enzymes and the insulin-like growth factor II along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway. In this study a brain specific 91 kDa protein and a 35...... kDa protein salt-washed from membranes (referred as TIP 91-M and TIP 35-M) were found to interact with the cytoplasmic receptor tail as assayed by cross-linkage with recombinant [32P] labeled MPR 300-CT. Subcellular fractionation revealed a distinct pattern of distribution of TIP 35-M and TIP 91-M...

  20. Regulation of microtubule nucleation from membranes by complexes of membrane-bound gamma-tubulin with Fyn kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macůrek, Libor; Dráberová, Eduarda; Richterová, Věra; Sulimenko, Vadym; Sulimenko, Tetyana; Dráberová, Lubica; Marková, Vladimíra; Dráber, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 416, č. 3 (2008), s. 421-430 ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GA204/05/2375; GA ČR GA304/04/1273; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : detergent -resistant membrane * Fyn * PI3K gamma-tubulin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.371, year: 2008

  1. How Genes Evolve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which they are found e.g. the evolution of the gene coding for the protein cytochrome-C which is part ofthe respiratory apparatus. On the contrary, paralogous genes are descendants of a duplicated gene. Paralogous genes therefore evolve within the same species as well as in different species e.g. genes coding for alpha ...

  2. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  3. Genome-wide exploration of metal tolerance protein (MTP) genes in common wheat (Triticum aestivum): insights into metal homeostasis and biofortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Recep; Filiz, Ertugrul; Eroglu, Seckin

    2017-04-01

    Metal transport process in plants is a determinant of quality and quantity of the harvest. Although it is among the most important of staple crops, knowledge about genes that encode for membrane-bound metal transporters is scarce in wheat. Metal tolerance proteins (MTPs) are involved in trace metal homeostasis at the sub-cellular level, usually by providing metal efflux out of the cytosol. Here, by using various bioinformatics approaches, genes that encode for MTPs in the hexaploid wheat genome (Triticum aestivum, abbreviated as Ta) were identified and characterized. Based on the comparison with known rice MTPs, the wheat genome contained 20 MTP sequences; named as TaMTP1-8A, B and D. All TaMTPs contained a cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family domain and most members harbored a zinc transporter dimerization domain. Based on motif, phylogeny and alignment analysis, A, B and D genomes of TaMTP3-7 sequences demonstrated higher homology compared to TaMTP1, 2 and 8. With reference to their rice orthologs, TaMTP1s and TaMTP8s belonged to Zn-CDFs, TaMTP2s to Fe/Zn-CDFs and TaMTP3-7s to Mn-CDFs. Upstream regions of TaMTP genes included diverse cis-regulatory motifs, indicating regulation by developmental stage, tissue type and stresses. A scan of the coding sequences of 20 TaMTPs against published miRNAs predicted a total of 14 potential miRNAs, mainly targeting the members of most diverged groups. Expression analysis showed that several TaMTPs were temporally and spatially regulated during the developmental time-course. In grains, MTPs were preferentially expressed in the aleurone layer, which is known as a reservoir for high concentrations of iron and zinc. The work identified and characterized metal tolerance proteins in common wheat and revealed a potential involvement of MTPs in providing a sink for trace element storage in wheat grains.

  4. Gene cluster statistics with gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Narayanan; Durand, Dannie

    2009-05-01

    Identifying genomic regions that descended from a common ancestor is important for understanding the function and evolution of genomes. In distantly related genomes, clusters of homologous gene pairs are evidence of candidate homologous regions. Demonstrating the statistical significance of such "gene clusters" is an essential component of comparative genomic analyses. However, currently there are no practical statistical tests for gene clusters that model the influence of the number of homologs in each gene family on cluster significance. In this work, we demonstrate empirically that failure to incorporate gene family size in gene cluster statistics results in overestimation of significance, leading to incorrect conclusions. We further present novel analytical methods for estimating gene cluster significance that take gene family size into account. Our methods do not require complete genome data and are suitable for testing individual clusters found in local regions, such as contigs in an unfinished assembly. We consider pairs of regions drawn from the same genome (paralogous clusters), as well as regions drawn from two different genomes (orthologous clusters). Determining cluster significance under general models of gene family size is computationally intractable. By assuming that all gene families are of equal size, we obtain analytical expressions that allow fast approximation of cluster probabilities. We evaluate the accuracy of this approximation by comparing the resulting gene cluster probabilities with cluster probabilities obtained by simulating a realistic, power-law distributed model of gene family size, with parameters inferred from genomic data. Surprisingly, despite the simplicity of the underlying assumption, our method accurately approximates the true cluster probabilities. It slightly overestimates these probabilities, yielding a conservative test. We present additional simulation results indicating the best choice of parameter values for data

  5. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.; Amati, G.; Andersen, K.K.; Arnaud, M.; Asai, K.; Ashikaga, S.; Aymerich, S.; Bessieres, P.; Boland, F.; Brignell, S.C.; Bron, S; Bunai, K.; Chapuis, J; Christiansen, L.C.; Danchin, A.; Debarbouille, M.; Dervyn, E.; Deuerling, E.; Devine, K.; Devine, S.K.; Dreesen, O.; Errington, J.; Fillinger, S.; Foster, S.J.; Fujita, Y.; Galizzi, A.; Gardan, R.; Eschevins, C.; Fukushima, T.; Haga, K.; Harwood, C.R; Hecker, M.; Hosoya, D.; Hullo, M.F.; Kakeshita, H.; Karamata, D.; Kasahara, Y.; Kawamura, F.; Koga, K.; Koski, P.; Kuwana, R.; Imamura, D.; Ishimaru, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Ishio, I.; Le Coq, D.; Masson, A.; Mauel, C.; Meima, Roelf; Mellado, R.P.; Moir, A.; Moriya, S.; Nagakawa, E.; Nanamiya, H.; Nakai, S.; Nygaard, P.; Ogura, M.; Ohanan, T.; O'Reilly, M.; O'Rourke, M.; Pragai, Z.; Pooley, H.M.; Rapoport, G.; Rawlins, J.P.; Rivas, L.A.; Rivolta, C.; Sadaie, A.; Sadaie, Y.; Sarvas, M; Sato, T.; Saxild, H.H.; Scanlan, E.; Schumann, W; Seegers, J.F. M. L.; Sekiguchi, J.; Sekowska, A.; Seror, S.J.; Simon, M.; Stragier, P.; Studer, R.; Takamatsu, H.; Tanaka, T.; Takeuchi, M.; Thomaides, H.B.; Vagner, V.; van Dijl, J.M.; Watabe, K.; Wipat, A; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamane, K.; Yata, K.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Zuber, U.; Ogasawara, N.; Ishio, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were

  6. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    The human genome codes for ~35,000 genes and all these genes are not expressed in every cell. The time and site of gene expression is very precisely regulated. In any cell, only. Silence of the Genes. 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Utpal Nath and Saumitra Das. Keywords. RNA interference, siRNA,.

  7. A mutant of Paracoccus denitrificans with disrupted genes coding for cytochrome c550 and pseudoazurin establishes these two proteins as the in vivo electron donors to cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, Isobel V; Page, M Dudley; van Spanning, Rob J M; Ferguson, Stuart J

    2003-01-01

    In Paracoccus denitrificans, electrons pass from the membrane-bound cytochrome bc(1) complex to the periplasmic nitrite reductase, cytochrome cd(1). The periplasmic protein cytochrome c(550) has often been implicated in this electron transfer, but its absence, as a consequence of mutation, has

  8. Carbohydrate digestion in Lutzomyia longipalpis' larvae (Diptera - Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Vladimir F; Moreira, Bruno H; Moraes, Caroline S; Pereira, Marcos H; Genta, Fernando A; Gontijo, Nelder F

    2012-10-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis is the principal species of phlebotomine incriminated as vector of Leishmania infantum, the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis in the Americas. Despite its importance as vector, almost nothing related to the larval biology, especially about its digestive system has been published. The objective of the present study was to obtain an overview of carbohydrate digestion by the larvae. Taking in account that phlebotomine larvae live in the soil rich in decaying materials and microorganisms we searched principally for enzymes capable to hydrolyze carbohydrates present in this kind of substrate. The principal carbohydrases encountered in the midgut were partially characterized. One of them is a α-amylase present in the anterior midgut. It is probably involved with the digestion of glycogen, the reserve carbohydrate of fungi. Two other especially active enzymes were present in the posterior midgut, a membrane bound α-glucosidase and a membrane bound trehalase. The first, complete the digestion of glycogen and the other probably acts in the digestion of trehalose, a carbohydrate usually encountered in microorganisms undergoing hydric stress. In a screening done with the use of p-nitrophenyl-derived substrates other less active enzymes were also observed in the midgut. A general view of carbohydrate digestion in L. longipalpis was presented. Our results indicate that soil microorganisms appear to be the main source of nutrients for the larvae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  10. Tomato UDP-Glucose Sterol Glycosyltransferases: A Family of Developmental and Stress Regulated Genes that Encode Cytosolic and Membrane-Associated Forms of the Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Ramirez-Estrada

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sterol glycosyltransferases (SGTs catalyze the glycosylation of the free hydroxyl group at C-3 position of sterols to produce sterol glycosides. Glycosylated sterols and free sterols are primarily located in cell membranes where in combination with other membrane-bound lipids play a key role in modulating their properties and functioning. In contrast to most plant species, those of the genus Solanum contain very high levels of glycosylated sterols, which in the case of tomato may account for more than 85% of the total sterol content. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of the four members of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom SGT gene family. Expression of recombinant SlSGT proteins in E. coli cells and N. benthamiana leaves demonstrated the ability of the four enzymes to glycosylate different sterol species including cholesterol, brassicasterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol, which is consistent with the occurrence in their primary structure of the putative steroid-binding domain found in steroid UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and the UDP-sugar binding domain characteristic for a superfamily of nucleoside diphosphosugar glycosyltransferases. Subcellular localization studies based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and cell fractionation analyses revealed that the four tomato SGTs, like the Arabidopsis SGTs UGT80A2 and UGT80B1, localize into the cytosol and the PM, although there are clear differences in their relative distribution between these two cell fractions. The SlSGT genes have specialized but still largely overlapping expression patterns in different organs of tomato plants and throughout the different stages of fruit development and ripening. Moreover, they are differentially regulated in response to biotic and abiotic stress conditions. SlSGT4 expression increases markedly in response to osmotic, salt, and cold stress, as well as upon treatment with abscisic

  11. Rapid induction of the growth hormone gene transcription by glucocorticoids in vitro: possible involvement of membrane glucocorticoid receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, H; Yamamoto, N; Hiraoka, Y; Aiso, S; Sugimoto, K; Yoshida, S; Shutoh, F; Hisano, S

    2014-03-01

    The regulation of transcription of the growth hormone (GH) gene by glucocorticoids was studied in MtT/S cells, a cell line derived from an oestrogen-induced mammotrophic tumour in the rat, and in the primary culture of the anterior pituitary gland of adult mice. The levels of the GH heteronuclear RNA (GH hnRNA), which are mainly determined by the transcription rate, increased by 25-fold during 24 h in response to dexamethasone (DEX; 1 μM) in MtT/S cells that were cultured in the medium containing charcoal-stripped serum for 7 days. The stimulatory effect of DEX on the GH hnRNA levels was detectable as early as 30 min. This rapid effect of DEX did not require on-going protein synthesis, whereas it was considered that DEX requires the presence of unknown cellular proteins produced independently of DEX stimulation. By contrast, on-going protein synthesis was required for DEX action when incubated for 6 h, as has been observed in the previous studies. The specific inhibitor of glucocorticoid receptor, RU486, inhibited both rapid (30 min) and delayed (6 h) the effects of glucocorticoids on GH hnRNA levels. Membrane impermeable glucocorticoid, corticosterone-bovine serum albumin conjugate (CSBSA), was found to have effects similar to those of DEX and free corticosterone (CS), suggesting that glucocorticoids regulate GH gene transcription at least in part through the membrane bound receptors. From pharmacological studies, it was suggested that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation is involved in the rapid effects but not in the delayed effects of glucocorticoids. This also suggests that the delayed effects of glucocorticoids depend on mechanisms other than the activation of PI3-kinase. Finally, both rapid and delayed effects of CS and CSBSA were observed not only in MtT/S cells, but also in the mouse pituitary cells in primary culture. Therefore, it is possible that the membrane initiated action of glucocorticoids is involved in the regulation of GH

  12. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  13. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...... predicted to be essential. The vast majority of essential genes were categorized in relatively few domains of cell metabolism, with about half involved in information processing, one-fifth involved in the synthesis of cell envelope and the determination of cell shape and division, and one-tenth related...... to cell energetics. Only 4% of essential genes encode unknown functions. Most essential genes are present throughout a wide range of Bacteria, and almost 70% can also be found in Archaea and Eucarya. However, essential genes related to cell envelope, shape, division, and respiration tend to be lost from...

  14. Epigenetics: beyond genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fossey, A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory processes lead to differential gene expression and are referred to as epigenetic phenomena; these are ubiquitous processes in the biological world. These reversible heritable changes concern DNA and RNA, their interactions...

  15. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-04-24

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. MR REPORTER GENES

    OpenAIRE

    Gilad, Assaf A.; Ziv, Keren; McMahon, Michael T.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Neeman, Michal; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging of dynamic processes has benefited tremendously from the use of reporter genes. These genes encode for proteins that emit light, bind radiolabeled probes or, as covered in this review, modulate magnetic resonance (MR) contrast. Reporter genes play a pivotal role in monitoring cell trafficking, gene replacement therapy, protein-protein interactions, neuronal plasticity and embryonic development. Several strategies exist for generating MR contrast: enzyme-catalyze...

  17. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  18. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    tary to the endogenous sense mRNA produced by the normal gene. The antisense strand binds to the sense strand and blocks protein synthesis. This method of gene inhibition was termed antisense technology. The antisense technology soon became a. RNA interference. (RNAi) is a novel mechanism for controlling gene.

  19. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  20. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanavichit, Apichart

    2002-01-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  1. Carboxylesterase 1 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Madsen, Majbritt Busk

    2018-01-01

    The carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) encodes a hydrolase that metabolizes commonly used drugs. The CES1-related pseudogene, carboxylesterase 1 pseudogene 1 (CES1P1), has been implicated in gene exchange with CES1 and in the formation of hybrid genes including the carboxylesterase 1A2 gene (CES1A2...... region was revealed. In conclusion, many procedures for CES1, CES1A2 and CES1P1 genotyping appear to lack specificity. Knowledge about the segmental duplications may improve the typing of these genes....

  2. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  3. Human gene essentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartha, István; di Iulio, Julia; Venter, J Craig; Telenti, Amalio

    2018-01-01

    A gene can be defined as essential when loss of its function compromises viability of the individual (for example, embryonic lethality) or results in profound loss of fitness. At the population level, identification of essential genes is accomplished by observing intolerance to loss-of-function variants. Several computational methods are available to score gene essentiality, and recent progress has been made in defining essentiality in the non-coding genome. Haploinsufficiency is emerging as a critical aspect of gene essentiality: approximately 3,000 human genes cannot tolerate loss of one of the two alleles. Genes identified as essential in human cell lines or knockout mice may be distinct from those in living humans. Reconciling these discrepancies in how we evaluate gene essentiality has applications in clinical genetics and may offer insights for drug development.

  4. Do Housekeeping Genes Exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  5. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene ( BDNF ), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  6. Genes and Social Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Gene E.; Fernald, Russell D.; Clayton, David F.

    2008-01-01

    What specific genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of brain circuits that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate these brain circuits? Here we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key “vectors of influence” that link genes, brain, and social behavior: 1) social information alters gene readout in the brain to influence beh...

  7. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Human housekeeping genes, revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Eli; Levanon, Erez Y

    2013-10-01

    Housekeeping genes are involved in basic cell maintenance and, therefore, are expected to maintain constant expression levels in all cells and conditions. Identification of these genes facilitates exposure of the underlying cellular infrastructure and increases understanding of various structural genomic features. In addition, housekeeping genes are instrumental for calibration in many biotechnological applications and genomic studies. Advances in our ability to measure RNA expression have resulted in a gradual increase in the number of identified housekeeping genes. Here, we describe housekeeping gene detection in the era of massive parallel sequencing and RNA-seq. We emphasize the importance of expression at a constant level and provide a list of 3804 human genes that are expressed uniformly across a panel of tissues. Several exceptionally uniform genes are singled out for future experimental use, such as RT-PCR control genes. Finally, we discuss both ways in which current technology can meet some of past obstacles encountered, and several as yet unmet challenges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Recombinant gene expression protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tuan, Rocky S

    1997-01-01

    .... A fundamental requirement for successful recombinant gene expression is the design of the cloning vector and the choice of the host organism for expression. Recombinant Gene Expression Protocols grows out of the need for a laboratory manual that provides the reader the background and rationale, as well as the practical protocols for the preparation of...

  10. One gene's shattering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kenneth M

    2012-05-29

    A new study shows that three independent mutations in the Sh1 gene, which encodes a YABBY transcription factor, gave rise to the non-shattering seed phenotype in domesticated sorghum. This same gene may have also had a role in the domestication of other cereals, including maize and rice.

  11. Your Genes, Your Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table of Contents Your Genes, Your Choices describes the Human Genome Project, the science behind it, and the ethical, legal, and social issues that are ... Nothing could be further from the truth. Your Genes, Your Choices points out how the progress of ...

  12. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases

  13. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Premzl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomenclature of eutherian lysozyme genes.

  14. Gene amplification in carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimari Bizari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene amplification increases the number of genes in a genome and can give rise to karyotype abnormalities called double minutes (DM and homogeneously staining regions (HSR, both of which have been widely observed in human tumors but are also known to play a major role during embryonic development due to the fact that they are responsible for the programmed increase of gene expression. The etiology of gene amplification during carcinogenesis is not yet completely understood but can be considered a result of genetic instability. Gene amplification leads to an increase in protein expression and provides a selective advantage during cell growth. Oncogenes such as CCND1, c-MET, c-MYC, ERBB2, EGFR and MDM2 are amplified in human tumors and can be associated with increased expression of their respective proteins or not. In general, gene amplification is associated with more aggressive tumors, metastases, resistance to chemotherapy and a decrease in the period during which the patient stays free of the disease. This review discusses the major role of gene amplification in the progression of carcinomas, formation of genetic markers and as possible therapeutic targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of some types of tumors.

  15. Genes and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E A; Newhouse, S; Caulfield, M J; Munroe, P B

    2003-01-01

    The combination of investigation of rare Mendelian forms of hypertension, candidate gene studies, comparative mapping and genome-wide screening in both animal models and man has led to significant progress in determining new mechanisms of blood pressure control. In this review, the newly discovered blood pressure/cardiovascular genes, WNK kinases and angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and the development of a new anti-hypertensive agent PST2238 are discussed. Major genes causing essential hypertension have yet to be discovered, however, there are now over 20 published genome-wide screens for blood pressure controlling genes. Several regions demonstrate suggestive linkage to the trait and there is some overlap of regions between the different studies. It is hoped that new blood pressure genes will ultimately be discovered using this method. Pharmacogenetic studies in hypertension have only been initiated recently, some are described in this paper. Small studies upon single candidate genes, suggest that the contribution of genetics to the inter-individual variation in blood pressure response to anti-hypertensive therapy, is small, approximately 3-5%. Recently micro-arrays with multiple polymorphisms in multiple genes have been used. After accounting for the additive affects of multiple blood pressure loci, an individual's genetic profile appeared to explain up to 50% of the variation in blood pressure response to therapy. Knowledge of the genetic variants that cause hypertension and influence response to anti-hypertensive therapy will ultimately provide a greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying blood pressure control.

  16. Antisense gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied...... to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how...

  17. Rice Genomics: Gene discovery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There is a need for discovering candidate genes( a lot of them all over the genome indeed ) and the unlimited allelic variation that can productively take over rice metabolism when cellular water content falls below threshold levels.

  18. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  19. Radiosensitivity and genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qiyue; Lun Mingyue

    1995-07-01

    Reported effects of some oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and DNA repair genes on sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation are reviewed. The role of oncogenes in cellular response to irradiation is discussed, especially the extensively studied oncogenes such as the ras gene family. For tumour suppressor genes, mainly the p53, which is increasingly implicated as a gene affecting radiosensitivity, is reviewed. It is considered that there is a cell cycle checkpoint determinant which is postulated to be able to arrest the irradiated cells in G 1 phase to allow them to repair damage before they undergo DNA synthesis. So far there are six DNA repair genes which have been cloned in mammalian cells, but only one, XRCC1, appears to be involved in repair of human X-ray damage. XRCC1 can correct high sisterchromatid exchange levels when transferred into EM 9 cells, but its expression seems to have no correlation with radiosensitivity of human neck and head tumour cells. Radiosensitivity is an intricate issue which may involve many factors. A scheme of cellular reactions after exposure to irradiation is proposed to indicate a possible sequence of events initiated by ionizing radiation

  20. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  1. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adegoke, Olufemi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this CDA is to evaluate the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer in two ongoing case-control studies, the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS...

  2. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  3. Third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes

    OpenAIRE

    Premzl, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol annotated most comprehensive eutherian lysozyme gene data set. Among 209 potential coding sequences, the third party annotation gene data set of eutherian lysozyme genes included 116 complete coding sequences that first described seven major gene clusters. As one new framework of future experiments, the present integrated gene annotations, phylogenetic analysis and protein molecular evolution analysis proposed new classification and nomencla...

  4. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  5. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2007-01-01

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  6. [Gene therapy in cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, David

    2002-01-01

    The modification of genetic material of living cells for therapeutic purposes have been regarded by many as an unrealized promise. However, recent successful achievements in the field have contributed to vanish this perception and have reopened the possibility to use gene therapy as a medical intervention in humans. In the case of cardiovascular diseases, and despite its high prevalence, the number of approved human gene therapy protocols has remained low. This may be due, at least in part, to the availability of effective alternative therapies for some of the most common vasculopathies. However, recent advances in the understanding of the genetic and molecular bases of the cardiovascular system have opened the possibility to introduce gene therapy in the management of a great variety of cardiovascular disorders. The purpose of this communication is to briefly summarize the progress in this area.

  7. Gene decay in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. J. van Passel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene-dense chromosomes of archaea and bacteria were long thought to be devoid of pseudogenes, but with the massive increase in available genome sequences, whole genome comparisons between closely related species have identified mutations that have rendered numerous genes inactive. Comparative analyses of sequenced archaeal genomes revealed numerous pseudogenes, which can constitute up to 8.6% of the annotated coding sequences in some genomes. The largest proportion of pseudogenes is created by gene truncations, followed by frameshift mutations. Within archaeal genomes, large numbers of pseudogenes contain more than one inactivating mutation, suggesting that pseudogenes are deleted from the genome more slowly in archaea than in bacteria. Although archaea seem to retain pseudogenes longer than do bacteria, most archaeal genomes have unique repertoires of pseudogenes.

  8. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  9. Inferring horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Ravenhall

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric" methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic" approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events.

  10. Genes in mammalian reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwatkin, R.B.L. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    This is an informative book which deals mainly with genomic imprinting, the role of steroid hormones in development, the expression of a variety of genes during development and the link to hereditary diseases. It is an up-to-date review in a field that is quickly changing and provides valuable basic information and current research trends.

  11. Are there anxious genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    Anxiety comprises many clinical descriptions and phenotypes. A genetic predisposition to anxiety is undoubted; however, the nature and extent of that contribution is still unclear. Methods for the genetic analysis of such complex disorders is briefly reviewed, followed by a discussion of the comorbidity of anxiety with other psychiatric disorders and their possible common genetic etiology. Extensive genetic studies of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) gene have revealed how variation in gene expression can be correlated with anxiety phenotypes. Complete genome-wide linkage scans for panic disorder (PD) susceptibility genes have suggested a locus on chromosome arm 7p, and association studies have highlighted many candidate genes. A highly significant association between phobias, panic disorder, and a duplication at chromosomal region 15q24-26 is one of the most exciting findings to date. Emerging molecular genetic technologies and the use of increasingly sophisticated animal models of anxiety provide great promise for the future of the field. PMID:22033820

  12. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 4. Silence of the Genes - 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Utpal Nath Saumitra Das. General Article Volume 12 Issue 4 April 2007 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Searching for speciation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Benjamin George; Côté, Isabelle M; Emerson, Brent C

    2011-01-01

    Closely related species that show clear phenotypic divergence, but without obvious geographic barriers, can provide opportunities to study how diversification can occur when opportunities for allopatric speciation are limited. We examined genetic divergence in the coral reef fish genus Hypoplectr...... evidence for genes that may be associated with colour morphotype in the genus Hypoplectrus....

  14. How Genes Evolve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haemoglobin is a well known respiratory pigment which transports oxygen to various tissues of the body. Tetrameric haemoglo bin (Hb) molecules consist of two .... production of a tetramer that was more effective in oxygen transport and release as compared to the ancestral monomeric form of haemoglobin. Further, gene ...

  15. pyrophosphatase gene in rye

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    photoperiod. Leaves, stems and roots were collected sepa- rately at 6-h intervals from the start (0 h) to the end (72 h) of each experiment. Each treatment was conducted in triplicate. All samples were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen and were stored at −80. ◦. C until being used for analysis. Isolation of the ScHP1 gene.

  16. Hidden genes in birds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hron, Tomáš; Pajer, Petr; Pačes, Jan; Bartůněk, Petr; Elleder, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, August 18 (2015) ISSN 1465-6906 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11215; GA MŠk LO1419 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : REPETITIVE SEQUENCES * G/C stretches * avian genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.313, year: 2015

  17. What is a Gene?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 4. What is a Gene? A Question With Variable Answers. S C Lakhotia. General Article Volume 2 Issue 4 April 1997 pp 38-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/04/0038-0047 ...

  18. What is a Gene?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    certain supra-genic aspects of biological information that we inherit through the generations and has a profound role in gene activity. Our understanding of the structure and organization of the genetic material has greatly increased in recent years: we have deciphered the total DNA base sequence of genomes of some.

  19. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  20. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs), researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our finding that disease genes in

  1. Industrial scale gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notka, Frank; Liss, Michael; Wagner, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The most recent developments in the area of deep DNA sequencing and downstream quantitative and functional analysis are rapidly adding a new dimension to understanding biochemical pathways and metabolic interdependencies. These increasing insights pave the way to designing new strategies that address public needs, including environmental applications and therapeutic inventions, or novel cell factories for sustainable and reconcilable energy or chemicals sources. Adding yet another level is building upon nonnaturally occurring networks and pathways. Recent developments in synthetic biology have created economic and reliable options for designing and synthesizing genes, operons, and eventually complete genomes. Meanwhile, high-throughput design and synthesis of extremely comprehensive DNA sequences have evolved into an enabling technology already indispensable in various life science sectors today. Here, we describe the industrial perspective of modern gene synthesis and its relationship with synthetic biology. Gene synthesis contributed significantly to the emergence of synthetic biology by not only providing the genetic material in high quality and quantity but also enabling its assembly, according to engineering design principles, in a standardized format. Synthetic biology on the other hand, added the need for assembling complex circuits and large complexes, thus fostering the development of appropriate methods and expanding the scope of applications. Synthetic biology has also stimulated interdisciplinary collaboration as well as integration of the broader public by addressing socioeconomic, philosophical, ethical, political, and legal opportunities and concerns. The demand-driven technological achievements of gene synthesis and the implemented processes are exemplified by an industrial setting of large-scale gene synthesis, describing production from order to delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  3. Patenting human genes: Chinese academic articles' portrayal of gene patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li

    2018-04-24

    The patenting of human genes has been the subject of debate for decades. While China has gradually come to play an important role in the global genomics-based testing and treatment market, little is known about Chinese scholars' perspectives on patent protection for human genes. A content analysis of academic literature was conducted to identify Chinese scholars' concerns regarding gene patents, including benefits and risks of patenting human genes, attitudes that researchers hold towards gene patenting, and any legal and policy recommendations offered for the gene patent regime in China. 57.2% of articles were written by law professors, but scholars from health sciences, liberal arts, and ethics also participated in discussions on gene patent issues. While discussions of benefits and risks were relatively balanced in the articles, 63.5% of the articles favored gene patenting in general and, of the articles (n = 41) that explored gene patents in the Chinese context, 90.2% supported patent protections for human genes in China. The patentability of human genes was discussed in 33 articles, and 75.8% of these articles reached the conclusion that human genes are patentable. Chinese scholars view the patent regime as an important legal tool to protect the interests of inventors and inventions as well as the genetic resources of China. As such, many scholars support a gene patent system in China. These attitudes towards gene patents remain unchanged following the court ruling in the Myriad case in 2013, but arguments have been raised about the scope of gene patents, in particular that the increasing numbers of gene patents may negatively impact public health in China.

  4. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  5. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  6. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odelta dos Santos

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  7. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgol Farjadnia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable.

  8. Graphene based gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-03-01

    Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy.Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI

  9. Gene Expression in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrogio, A.

    Skeletal system has two main functions, to provide mechanical integrity for both locomotion and protection and to play an important role in mineral homeostasis. There is extensive evidence showing loss of bone mass during long-term Space-Flights. The loss is due to a break in the equilibrium between the activity of osteoblasts (the cells that forms bone) and the activity of osteoclasts (the cells that resorbs bone). Surprisingly, there is scanty information about the possible altered gene expression occurring in cells that form bone in microgravity.(Just 69 articles result from a "gene expression in microgravity" MedLine query.) Gene-chip or microarray technology allows to screen thousands of genes at the same time: the use of this technology on samples coming from cells exposed to microgravity could provide us with many important informations. For example, the identification of the molecules or structures which are the first sensors of the mechanical stress derived from lack of gravity, could help in understanding which is the first event leading to bone loss due to long-term exposure to microgravity. Consequently, this structure could become a target for a custom-designed drug. It is evident that bone mass loss, observed during long-time stay in Space, represents an accelerated model of what happens in aging osteoporosis. Therefore, the discovery and design of drugs able to interfere with the bone-loss process, could help also in preventing negative physiological processes normally observed on Earth. Considering the aims stated above, my research is designed to:

  10. Gene Porter Bridwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  11. Mutant genes in pea breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiecicki, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutations of genes Dpo (dehiscing pods) and A (anthocyanin synthesis) played a role in pea domestication. A number of other genes were important in cultivar development for 3 types of usage (dry seeds, green vegetable types, fodder), e.g. fn, fna, le, p, v, fas and af. New genes (induced and spontaneous), are important for present ideotypes and are registered by the Pisum Genetics Association (PGA). Comparison of a pea variety ideotype with the variation available in gene banks shows that breeders need 'new' features. In mutation induction experiments, genotype, mutagen and method of treatment (e.g. combined or fractionated doses) are varied for broadening the mutation spectrum and selecting more genes of agronomic value. New genes are genetically analysed. In Poland, some mutant varieties with the gene afila were registered, controlling lodging by a shorter stem and a higher number of internodes. Really non-lodging pea varieties could strongly increase seed yield. But the probability of detecting a major gene for lodging resistance is low. Therefore, mutant genes with smaller influence on plant architecture are sought, to combine their effect by crossing. Promising seem to be the genes rogue, reductus and arthritic as well as a number of mutant genes not yet genetically identified. The gene det for terminal inflorescence - similarly to Vicia faba - changes plant development. Utilisation of assimilates and ripening should be better. Improvement of harvest index should give higher seed yield. A number of genes controlling disease resistance are well known (eg. Fw, Fnw, En, mo and sbm). Important in mass screening of resistance are closely linked gene markers. Pea gene banks collect respective lines, but mutants induced in highly productive cultivars would be better. Inducing gene markers sometimes seems to be easier than transfer by crossing. Mutation induction in pea breeding is probably more important because a high number of monogenic features are

  12. Regulation of eucaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, R.; Ptashne, M.S

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a method of regulating the expression of a gene in a eucaryotic cell. The method consists of: providing in the eucaryotic cell, a peptide, derived from or substantially similar to a peptide of a procaryotic cell able to bind to DNA upstream from or within the gene, the amount of the peptide being sufficient to bind to the gene and thereby control expression of the gene.

  13. Genealogy and gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, Marianne

    2008-02-01

    Heredity can be followed in persons or in genes. Persons can be identified only a few generations back, but simplified models indicate that universal ancestors to all now living persons have occurred in the past. Genetic variability can be characterized as variants of DNA sequences. Data are available only from living persons, but from the pattern of variation gene trees can be inferred by means of coalescence models. The merging of lines backwards in time leads to a MRCA (most recent common ancestor). The time and place of living for this inferred person can give insights in human evolutionary history. Demographic processes are incorporated in the model, but since culture and customs are known to influence demography the models used ought to be tested against available genealogy. The Icelandic data base offers a possibility to do so and points to some discrepancies. Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome patterns give a rather consistent view of human evolutionary history during the latest 100 000 years but the earlier epochs of human evolution demand gene trees with longer branches. The results of such studies reveal as yet unsolved problems about the sources of our genome.

  14. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  15. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  16. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  17. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aquino de Muro, Marilena; Rapley, Ralph

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  18. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  19. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  20. Shedding of klotho by ADAMs in the kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Ellen P. M.; Pulskens, Wilco P.; van der Hagen, Eline A. E.; Lavrijsen, Marla; Vervloet, Marc G.; van Goor, Harry; Bindels, Rene J. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-aging gene klotho plays an important role in Ca2+ and phosphate homeostasis. Membrane-bound klotho is an essential coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 and can be cleaved by proteases, including a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 10 and ADAM17. Cleavage of klotho occurs at a

  1. MUREIN-METABOLIZING ENZYMES FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI - EXISTENCE OF A 2ND LYTIC TRANSGLYCOSYLASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ENGEL, H; SMINK, AJ; VANWIJNGAARDEN, L; KECK, W

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the soluble lytic transglycosylase, a murein-metabolizing enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa (Slt70), Escherichia coli possesses a second lytic transglycosylase, which has been described as a membrane-bound lytic transglycosylase (Mlt; 35 kDa; EC 3.2.1.-). The mlt gene, which

  2. Gene electrotransfer in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapte...... describes how gene therapy may be performed using electric pulses to enhance uptake and expression.......Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapter...

  3. The ethics of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sarah; Harris, John

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments have progressed in areas of science that pertain to gene therapy and its ethical implications. This review discusses the current state of therapeutic gene technologies, including stem cell therapies and genetic modification, and identifies ethical issues of concern in relation to the science of gene therapy and its application, including the ethics of embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning, the risks associated with gene therapy, and the ethics of clinical research in developing new therapeutic technologies. Additionally, ethical issues relating to genetic modification itself are considered: the significance of the human genome, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, and concerns regarding gene therapy as a eugenic practice.

  4. Exploring new gene integration sites for gene knock-in by gene-trapping strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanchi, Isamu; Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Masago, Yusaku; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya; Okuda, Tomohiko

    2015-06-01

    The knock-in mouse is a powerful tool for biological research, but the stability of expression of an integrated gene strongly depends on where it is integrated in the mouse genome. At present, there are an insufficient number of loci suitable for gene knock-in, such as the Rosa26 locus. Therefore, in this study, we developed an efficient strategy for identifying genome loci suitable for gene knock-in and characterized the properties of such loci for gene integration. For efficient discovery and characterization, we constructed a new gene-trapping vector that enables monitoring of the expression of both trapped and integrated genes using fluorescence. We successfully obtained fluorescent-positive mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) clones with the vector. Thorough analysis of the expression of fluorescent proteins in chimera embryos generated with the obtained mESC clones, some of the gene-trapped chimera embryos showed stable and ubiquitous expression of the integrated gene. Furthermore, adult mice derived from one of the gene-trapped mESC clones showed ubiquitous expression of the integrated gene in various tissues without any unusual phenotype. This indicated that the identified locus possesses high potential for foreign gene integration. Our strategy allows for efficient discovery and characterization of mouse genome loci for gene integration.

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.; Morin, K. W.; Knaus, E. E.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering and molecular biology have opened the door to disease treatment by transferring genes to cells that are responsible for the pathological condition being addressed. These genes can serve to supplement or introduce the function of indigenous genes that are either inadequately expressed or that are congenitally absent in the patient. They can introduce new functions such as drug sensitization to provide a unique therapeutic target. Gene transfer is readily monitored in vitro using a range of histochemical and biochemical tests that are ''built in'' to the therapeutic gene cassette. In vivo, in situ monitoring of the gene transfer and gene expression processes can be achieved with these tests only if biopsy is possible. Scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the extent and location of gene expression, provided that an appropriate reporter gene is included in the therapeutic cassette. This overview includes a brief orientation to gene transfer therapy and is followed by a review of current approaches to gene therapy imaging. The concluding section deals with imaging based on radiolabelled nucleoside substrates for herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase, with emphasis on IVFRU, a stable potent and selective HSV-1 TK substrate developed in their laboratories

  6. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  7. Gene circuit analysis of the terminal gap gene huckebein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksat Ashyraliyev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The early embryo of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to study the role of genes in pattern formation. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in the hierarchy of the segmentation genes involved in specifying the position of body segments. Here, we use an integrative, systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of the terminal gap gene huckebein (hkb on gap gene expression. We present quantitative expression data for the Hkb protein, which enable us to include hkb in gap gene circuit models. Gap gene circuits are mathematical models of gene networks used as computational tools to extract regulatory information from spatial expression data. This is achieved by fitting the model to gap gene expression patterns, in order to obtain estimates for regulatory parameters which predict a specific network topology. We show how considering variability in the data combined with analysis of parameter determinability significantly improves the biological relevance and consistency of the approach. Our models are in agreement with earlier results, which they extend in two important respects: First, we show that Hkb is involved in the regulation of the posterior hunchback (hb domain, but does not have any other essential function. Specifically, Hkb is required for the anterior shift in the posterior border of this domain, which is now reproduced correctly in our models. Second, gap gene circuits presented here are able to reproduce mutants of terminal gap genes, while previously published models were unable to reproduce any null mutants correctly. As a consequence, our models now capture the expression dynamics of all posterior gap genes and some variational properties of the system correctly. This is an important step towards a better, quantitative understanding of the developmental and evolutionary dynamics of the gap gene network.

  8. Maximum Gene-Support Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Shan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomes and genes diversify during evolution; however, it is unclear to what extent genes still retain the relationship among species. Model species for molecular phylogenetic studies include yeasts and viruses whose genomes were sequenced as well as plants that have the fossil-supported true phylogenetic trees available. In this study, we generated single gene trees of seven yeast species as well as single gene trees of nine baculovirus species using all the orthologous genes among the species compared. Homologous genes among seven known plants were used for validation of the finding. Four algorithms—maximum parsimony (MP, minimum evolution (ME, maximum likelihood (ML, and neighbor-joining (NJ—were used. Trees were reconstructed before and after weighting the DNA and protein sequence lengths among genes. Rarely a gene can always generate the “true tree” by all the four algorithms. However, the most frequent gene tree, termed “maximum gene-support tree” (MGS tree, or WMGS tree for the weighted one, in yeasts, baculoviruses, or plants was consistently found to be the “true tree” among the species. The results provide insights into the overall degree of divergence of orthologous genes of the genomes analyzed and suggest the following: 1 The true tree relationship among the species studied is still maintained by the largest group of orthologous genes; 2 There are usually more orthologous genes with higher similarities between genetically closer species than between genetically more distant ones; and 3 The maximum gene-support tree reflects the phylogenetic relationship among species in comparison.

  9. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  10. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... 45K) PDF version of this title (3.8M) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  11. Horse serum reduces expression of membrane-bound and soluble isoforms of the preadipocyte marker Delta-like 1 homolog (Dlk1), but is inefficient for adipogenic differentiation of mouse preadipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Nielsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte H

    2013-01-01

    horse serum, this did not correlate with a high degree of adipogenic differentiation. In conclusion, our novel results thus reveal that horse serum clearly is insufficient for adipogenic differentiation of mouse preadipocytes and that low levels of Dlk1 alone are a poor marker of mouse in vitro...

  12. The Mouse-Specific Splice Variant mRAGE_v4 Encodes a Membrane-Bound RAGE That Is Resistant to Shedding and Does Not Contribute to the Production of Soluble RAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jaron; Bertolotti, Matteo; Fritz, Günter; Bianchi, Marco E.; Raucci, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is involved in the onset and progression of several inflammatory diseases. The RAGE primary transcript undergoes numerous alternative splicing (AS) events, some of which are species-specific. Here, we characterize the mouse-specific mRAGE_v4 splice variant, which is conserved in rodents and absent in primates. mRAGE_v4 derives from exon 9 skipping and encodes a receptor (M-RAGE) that lacks 9 amino acids between the transmembrane and the immunoglobulin (Ig) domains. RNA-Seq data confirm that in mouse lung mRAGE_v4 is the most abundant RAGE mRNA isoform after mRAGE, which codes for full-length RAGE (FL-RAGE), while in heart all RAGE variants are almost undetectable. The proteins M-RAGE and FL-RAGE are roughly equally abundant in mouse lung. Contrary to FL-RAGE, M-RAGE is extremely resistant to shedding because it lacks the peptide motif recognized by both ADAM10 and MMP9, and does not contribute significantly to soluble cRAGE formation. Thus, a cassette exon in RAGE corresponds to a specific function of the RAGE protein–the ability to be shed. Given the differences in RAGE AS variants between rodents and humans, caution is due in the interpretation of results obtained in mouse models of RAGE-dependent human pathologies. PMID:27655137

  13. Generation of H9 T-cells stably expressing a membrane-bound form of the cytoplasmic tail of the Env-glycoprotein: lack of transcomplementation of defective HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Valerie

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract H9-T-cells do not support the replication of mutant HIV-1 encoding Env protein lacking its long cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (Env-CT. Here we describe the generation of a H9-T-cell population constitutively expressing the HIV-1 Env-CT protein domain anchored in the cellular membrane by it homologous membrane-spanning domain (TMD. We confirmed that the Env-TMD-CT protein was associated with cellular membranes, that its expression did not have any obvious cytotoxic effects on the cells and that it did not affect wild-type HIV-1 replication. However, as measured in both a single-round assay as well as in spreading infections, replication competence of mutant pNL-Tr712, lacking the Env-CT, was not restored in this H9 T-cell population. This means that the Env-CT per se cannot transcomplement the replication block of HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env proteins and suggests that the Env-CT likely exerts its function only in the context of the complete Env protein.

  14. Membrane-bound versus soluble major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A and major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain B differential expression: Mechanisms of tumor eradication versus evasion and current drug development strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A/chain B (MICA/MICB is stress-inducible, highly polymorphic ligands whose expression at the transcript level has been detected in all tissues except the central nervous system. However, their restricted protein expression is due to their regulation at the posttranslational level. Its levels are elevated in virally infected and neoplastically transformed cells. Membrane expression of this NKG2DL marks the aberrant cells for elimination by those immune effector cells that express the cognate NKG2D receptor. Among the evasion strategies developed by tumors, the metalloprotease-dependent shedding of MICA/MICB from tumors (either the free or the exosome form can contribute to the inhibition of cytolysis by the immune effector cells (all NK cells, most NKT cells; γδ CD8+ T cells and αβ CD8+ T cells, as well as some αβ CD4+ T cells. There are micro-RNA clusters that regulate surface expression and shedding. Polymorphic variants can be used as susceptibility/associative markers and can also possibly be used to correlate with tumor survival as well as staging/grading of tumors. Variations in the expression level require quantification of this marker for diagnostic/prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Mechanism-based studies would provide a better tumor-specific understanding of their relative roles in the processes of tumor cell elimination versus growth and progression. Last but not least, conventional, interlaboratory validated assays (for, e.g., antibody-based methods should be replaced by robust, reproducible, feasible biophysics-based methods using tumor biopsies. Further, correlative DNA polymorphism-based studies can be done using biological fluids (for, e.g., human saliva that can be sampled by minimally invasive means.

  15. Membrane-bound versus soluble major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A and major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain B differential expression: Mechanisms of tumor eradication versus evasion and current drug development strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, P K

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A/chain B (MICA/MICB) is stress-inducible, highly polymorphic ligands whose expression at the transcript level has been detected in all tissues except the central nervous system. However, their restricted protein expression is due to their regulation at the posttranslational level. Its levels are elevated in virally infected and neoplastically transformed cells. Membrane expression of this NKG2DL marks the aberrant cells for elimination by those immune effector cells that express the cognate NKG2D receptor. Among the evasion strategies developed by tumors, the metalloprotease-dependent shedding of MICA/MICB from tumors (either the free or the exosome form) can contribute to the inhibition of cytolysis by the immune effector cells (all NK cells, most NKT cells; γδ CD8+ T cells and αβ CD8+ T cells, as well as some αβ CD4+ T cells). There are micro-RNA clusters that regulate surface expression and shedding. Polymorphic variants can be used as susceptibility/associative markers and can also possibly be used to correlate with tumor survival as well as staging/grading of tumors. Variations in the expression level require quantification of this marker for diagnostic/prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Mechanism-based studies would provide a better tumor-specific understanding of their relative roles in the processes of tumor cell elimination versus growth and progression. Last but not least, conventional, interlaboratory validated assays (for, e.g., antibody-based methods) should be replaced by robust, reproducible, feasible biophysics-based methods using tumor biopsies. Further, correlative DNA polymorphism-based studies can be done using biological fluids (for, e.g., human saliva) that can be sampled by minimally invasive means.

  16. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... analyzed in this study. GAD65 has a shorter half-life than the GAD64 forms, remains hydrophilic and soluble, and does not resolve into isomers. Comparative analysis of the brain and beta-cell forms of GAD show that GAD65 and GAD64 in pancreatic beta-cells correspond to the larger and smaller forms of GAD...... in brain, respectively. The expression of different forms and the flexibility in subcellular localization of the GAD autoantigen in beta-cells may have implications for both its function and autoantigenicity....

  17. Generation of H9 T-cells stably expressing a membrane-bound form of the cytoplasmic tail of the Env-glycoprotein: lack of transcomplementation of defective HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch Valerie; Pfeiffer Tanya; Holtkotte Denise

    2006-01-01

    Abstract H9-T-cells do not support the replication of mutant HIV-1 encoding Env protein lacking its long cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (Env-CT). Here we describe the generation of a H9-T-cell population constitutively expressing the HIV-1 Env-CT protein domain anchored in the cellular membrane by it homologous membrane-spanning domain (TMD). We confirmed that the Env-TMD-CT protein was associated with cellular membranes, that its expression did not have any obvious cytotoxic effects on the ce...

  18. Membrane-bound dd-carboxypeptidases from Bacillus megaterium KM. General properties, substrate specificity and sensitivity to penicillins, cephalosporins and peptide inhibitors of the activity at pH5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Mauriño, Teresa; Nieto, Manuel; Perkins, Harold R.

    1974-01-01

    1. The membrane from Bacillus megaterium KM contained a dd-carboxypeptidase with optimum activity under the following conditions: pH5.2, bivalent cation, 3mm; ionic strength, 40mm; temperature, 35°C. It was inactivated by treatment with p-chloromercuribenzoate but was fairly insensitive to 2-mercaptoethanol. 2. The enzyme was inhibited by penicillins and cephalosporins. The inhibition of this enzyme was partially reversed on dialysis but 0.2m-2-mercaptoethanol could neither prevent nor reverse the inhibition. 3. The enzyme was extremely sensitive to changes in the configuration and size of the side chain of the C-terminal dipeptide of the substrate. An aliphatic side chain of a well-defined length and polarity was required in the residue that precedes the C-terminal dipeptide. 4. The enzyme was inhibited by a wide range of analogues of the peptidic portion of the natural substrate. PMID:4218954

  19. Trehalose is a chemical attractant in the establishment of coral symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Mary; Carter, Virginia; Zuchowicz, Nikolas; Phillips, Micaiah; Penfield, Chelsea; Shamenek, Brittany; Vallen, Elizabeth A; Kleinhans, Frederick W; Peterson, Kelly; White, Meghan; Yancey, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs have evolved with a crucial symbiosis between photosynthetic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) and their cnidarian hosts (Scleractinians). Most coral larvae take up Symbiodinium from their environment; however, the earliest steps in this process have been elusive. Here we demonstrate that the disaccharide trehalose may be an important signal from the symbiont to potential larval hosts. Symbiodinium freshly isolated from Fungia scutaria corals constantly released trehalose (but not sucrose, maltose or glucose) into seawater, and released glycerol only in the presence of coral tissue. Spawning Fungia adults increased symbiont number in their immediate area by excreting pellets of Symbiodinium, and when these naturally discharged Symbiodinium were cultured, they also released trehalose. In Y-maze experiments, coral larvae demonstrated chemoattractant and feeding behaviors only towards a chamber with trehalose or glycerol. Concomitantly, coral larvae and adult tissue, but not symbionts, had significant trehalase enzymatic activities, suggesting the capacity to utilize trehalose. Trehalase activity was developmentally regulated in F. scutaria larvae, rising as the time for symbiont uptake occurs. Consistent with the enzymatic assays, gene finding demonstrated the presence of a trehalase enzyme in the genome of a related coral, Acropora digitifera, and a likely trehalase in the transcriptome of F. scutaria. Taken together, these data suggest that adult F. scutaria seed the reef with Symbiodinium during spawning and the exuded Symbiodinium release trehalose into the environment, which acts as a chemoattractant for F. scutaria larvae and as an initiator of feeding behavior- the first stages toward establishing the coral-Symbiodinium relationship. Because trehalose is a fixed carbon compound, this cue would accurately demonstrate to the cnidarian larvae the photosynthetic ability of the potential symbiont in the ambient environment. To our knowledge, this is

  20. Trehalose is a chemical attractant in the establishment of coral symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hagedorn

    Full Text Available Coral reefs have evolved with a crucial symbiosis between photosynthetic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium and their cnidarian hosts (Scleractinians. Most coral larvae take up Symbiodinium from their environment; however, the earliest steps in this process have been elusive. Here we demonstrate that the disaccharide trehalose may be an important signal from the symbiont to potential larval hosts. Symbiodinium freshly isolated from Fungia scutaria corals constantly released trehalose (but not sucrose, maltose or glucose into seawater, and released glycerol only in the presence of coral tissue. Spawning Fungia adults increased symbiont number in their immediate area by excreting pellets of Symbiodinium, and when these naturally discharged Symbiodinium were cultured, they also released trehalose. In Y-maze experiments, coral larvae demonstrated chemoattractant and feeding behaviors only towards a chamber with trehalose or glycerol. Concomitantly, coral larvae and adult tissue, but not symbionts, had significant trehalase enzymatic activities, suggesting the capacity to utilize trehalose. Trehalase activity was developmentally regulated in F. scutaria larvae, rising as the time for symbiont uptake occurs. Consistent with the enzymatic assays, gene finding demonstrated the presence of a trehalase enzyme in the genome of a related coral, Acropora digitifera, and a likely trehalase in the transcriptome of F. scutaria. Taken together, these data suggest that adult F. scutaria seed the reef with Symbiodinium during spawning and the exuded Symbiodinium release trehalose into the environment, which acts as a chemoattractant for F. scutaria larvae and as an initiator of feeding behavior- the first stages toward establishing the coral-Symbiodinium relationship. Because trehalose is a fixed carbon compound, this cue would accurately demonstrate to the cnidarian larvae the photosynthetic ability of the potential symbiont in the ambient environment. To our

  1. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  2. One gene, many phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasun P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available "Phenotype" is the visible or quantifiable effect of the expression of a gene, whereas the specific genetic constitution responsible for a phenotype is called "genotype". It was hoped that phenotype could be accurately predicted if the genotype could be characterized. But, the relationship between the genotype and phenotype is not straightforward. Similar genetic lesions can have entirely different phenotypes. In recent years, there has been tremendous progress in the understanding of the genetic basis of diseases. The extent to which it will be possible to relate findings at the DNA level to the clinical phenotype is difficult to delineate on many occasions. The elucidation of mechanisms underlying genotype-phenotype discrepancies is important as it will influence the use of DNA-based tests in the diagnosis, therapy and counseling of individuals affected with genetic disorders. This issue is pertinent to almost every aspect of medical practice and research in this post-genome era. In this article, we have tried to summarize those factors which are responsible for varied manifestations of lesion(s in a single gene.

  3. Reverse engineering transcriptional gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is a step-by-step guide on how to infer gene networks from gene expression profiles. The definition of a gene network is given in Subheading 1, where the different types of networks are discussed. The chapter then guides the readers through a data-gathering process in order to build a compendium of gene expression profiles from a public repository. Gene expression profiles are then discretized and a statistical relationship between genes, called mutual information (MI), is computed. Gene pairs with insignificant MI scores are then discarded by applying one of the described pruning steps. The retained relationships are then used to build up a Boolean adjacency matrix used as input for a clustering algorithm to divide the network into modules (or communities). The gene network can then be used as a hypothesis generator for discovering gene function and analyzing gene signatures. Some case studies are presented, and an online web-tool called Netview is described.

  4. Bayesian assignment of gene ontology terms to gene expression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykacek, P

    2012-09-15

    Gene expression assays allow for genome scale analyses of molecular biological mechanisms. State-of-the-art data analysis provides lists of involved genes, either by calculating significance levels of mRNA abundance or by Bayesian assessments of gene activity. A common problem of such approaches is the difficulty of interpreting the biological implication of the resulting gene lists. This lead to an increased interest in methods for inferring high-level biological information. A common approach for representing high level information is by inferring gene ontology (GO) terms which may be attributed to the expression data experiment. This article proposes a probabilistic model for GO term inference. Modelling assumes that gene annotations to GO terms are available and gene involvement in an experiment is represented by a posterior probabilities over gene-specific indicator variables. Such probability measures result from many Bayesian approaches for expression data analysis. The proposed model combines these indicator probabilities in a probabilistic fashion and provides a probabilistic GO term assignment as a result. Experiments on synthetic and microarray data suggest that advantages of the proposed probabilistic GO term inference over statistical test-based approaches are in particular evident for sparsely annotated GO terms and in situations of large uncertainty about gene activity. Provided that appropriate annotations exist, the proposed approach is easily applied to inferring other high level assignments like pathways. Source code under GPL license is available from the author. peter.sykacek@boku.ac.at.

  5. Bayesian assignment of gene ontology terms to gene expression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykacek, P.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Gene expression assays allow for genome scale analyses of molecular biological mechanisms. State-of-the-art data analysis provides lists of involved genes, either by calculating significance levels of mRNA abundance or by Bayesian assessments of gene activity. A common problem of such approaches is the difficulty of interpreting the biological implication of the resulting gene lists. This lead to an increased interest in methods for inferring high-level biological information. A common approach for representing high level information is by inferring gene ontology (GO) terms which may be attributed to the expression data experiment. Results: This article proposes a probabilistic model for GO term inference. Modelling assumes that gene annotations to GO terms are available and gene involvement in an experiment is represented by a posterior probabilities over gene-specific indicator variables. Such probability measures result from many Bayesian approaches for expression data analysis. The proposed model combines these indicator probabilities in a probabilistic fashion and provides a probabilistic GO term assignment as a result. Experiments on synthetic and microarray data suggest that advantages of the proposed probabilistic GO term inference over statistical test-based approaches are in particular evident for sparsely annotated GO terms and in situations of large uncertainty about gene activity. Provided that appropriate annotations exist, the proposed approach is easily applied to inferring other high level assignments like pathways. Availability: Source code under GPL license is available from the author. Contact: peter.sykacek@boku.ac.at PMID:22962488

  6. Generalist genes and learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2005-07-01

    The authors reviewed recent quantitative genetic research on learning disabilities that led to the conclusion that genetic diagnoses differ from traditional diagnoses in that the effects of relevant genes are largely general rather than specific. This research suggests that most genes associated with common learning disabilities--language impairment, reading disability, and mathematics disability--are generalists in 3 ways. First, genes that affect common learning disabilities are largely the same genes responsible for normal variation in learning abilities. Second, genes that affect any aspect of a learning disability affect other aspects of the disability. Third, genes that affect one learning disability are also likely to affect other learning disabilities. These quantitative genetic findings have far-reaching implications for molecular genetics and neuroscience as well as psychology. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Differential Gene Expression and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Seroude

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that an intricate program of gene expression controls progression through the different stages in development. The equally complex biological phenomenon known as aging is genetically determined and environmentally modulated. This review focuses on the genetic component of aging, with a special emphasis on differential gene expression. At least two genetic pathways regulating organism longevity act by modifying gene expression. Many genes are also subjected to age-dependent transcriptional regulation. Some age-related gene expression changes are prevented by caloric restriction, the most robust intervention that slows down the aging process. Manipulating the expression of some age-regulated genes can extend an organism's life span. Remarkably, the activity of many transcription regulatory elements is linked to physiological age as opposed to chronological age, indicating that orderly and tightly controlled regulatory pathways are active during aging.

  8. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  9. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    the periosteal tissues of healing fractures in small animals , and allow more accurate evaluation of the effects of the fracture therapy (Rundle et...X-ray fluoroscopy (Figure 7). Individual animals receiving the MLV-BMP-2/4 gene therapy by either the percutaneous injection or the intramedullary... animal subjects to understand gene expression in the healing response to bone injury and identify novel genes that might accelerate or delay the

  10. A genetic ensemble approach for gene-gene interaction identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joshua WK

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has now become clear that gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions are ubiquitous and fundamental mechanisms for the development of complex diseases. Though a considerable effort has been put into developing statistical models and algorithmic strategies for identifying such interactions, the accurate identification of those genetic interactions has been proven to be very challenging. Methods In this paper, we propose a new approach for identifying such gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying complex diseases. This is a hybrid algorithm and it combines genetic algorithm (GA and an ensemble of classifiers (called genetic ensemble. Using this approach, the original problem of SNP interaction identification is converted into a data mining problem of combinatorial feature selection. By collecting various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP subsets as well as environmental factors generated in multiple GA runs, patterns of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions can be extracted using a simple combinatorial ranking method. Also considered in this study is the idea of combining identification results obtained from multiple algorithms. A novel formula based on pairwise double fault is designed to quantify the degree of complementarity. Conclusions Our simulation study demonstrates that the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm has comparable identification power to Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and is slightly better than Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA, which are the two most popular methods for gene-gene interaction identification. More importantly, the identification results generated by using our genetic ensemble algorithm are highly complementary to those obtained by PIA and MDR. Experimental results from our simulation studies and real world data application also confirm the effectiveness of the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm, as well as the potential benefits of

  11. Genes, evolution and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    I argue that the g factor meets the fundamental criteria of a scientific construct more fully than any other conception of intelligence. I briefly discuss the evidence regarding the relationship of brain size to intelligence. A review of a large body of evidence demonstrates that there is a g factor in a wide range of species and that, in the species studied, it relates to brain size and is heritable. These findings suggest that many species have evolved a general-purpose mechanism (a general biological intelligence) for dealing with the environments in which they evolved. In spite of numerous studies with considerable statistical power, we know of very few genes that influence g and the effects are very small. Nevertheless, g appears to be highly polygenic. Given the complexity of the human brain, it is not surprising that that one of its primary faculties-intelligence-is best explained by the near infinitesimal model of quantitative genetics.

  12. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  13. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  14. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each......' C, and clustered Dukes' D separately. Real-time PCR of 10 known genes and 5 ESTs demonstrated excellent reproducibility of the array-based findings. The most frequently altered genes belonged to functional categories of metabolism (22%), transcription and translation (11%), and cellular processes (9...

  15. Synthetic sustained gene delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy today is hampered by the need of a safe and efficient gene delivery system that can provide a sustained therapeutic effect without cytotoxicity or unwanted immune responses. Bolus gene delivery in solution results in the loss of delivered factors via lymphatic system and may cause undesired effects by the escape of bioactive molecules to distant sites. Controlled gene delivery systems, acting as localized depot of genes, provide an extended sustained release of genes, giving prolonged maintenance of the therapeutic level of encoded proteins. They also limit the DNA degradation in the nuclease rich extra-cellular environment. While attempts have been made to adapt existing controlled drug delivery technologies, more novel approaches are being investigated for controlled gene delivery. DNA encapsulated in nano/micro spheres of polymers have been administered systemically/orally to be taken up by the targeted tissues and provide sustained release once internalized. Alternatively, DNA entrapped in hydrogels or scaffolds have been injected/implanted in tissues/cavities as platforms for gene delivery. The present review examines these different modalities for sustained delivery of viral and non-viral gene-delivery vectors. Design parameters and release mechanisms of different systems made with synthetic or natural polymers are presented along with their prospective applications and opportunities for continuous development.

  16. Gene therapy and reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribley, John M; Rehman, Khurram S; Niu, Hairong; Christman, Gregory M

    2002-04-01

    To review the literature on the principles of gene therapy and its potential application in reproductive medicine. Literature review. Gene therapy involves transfer of genetic material to target cells using a delivery system, or vector. Attention has primarily focused on viral vectors. Significant problems remain to be overcome including low efficacy of gene transfer, the transient expression of some vectors, safety issues with modified adenoviruses and retroviruses, and ethical concerns. If these issues can be resolved, gene therapy will be applicable to an increasing spectrum of single and multiple gene disorders, as the Human Genome Project data are analyzed, and the genetic component of human disease becomes better understood. Gynecologic gene therapy has advanced to human clinical trials for ovarian carcinoma, and shows potential for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata. Obstetric applications of gene therapy, including fetal gene therapy, remain more distant goals. Concerns about the safety of human gene therapy research are being actively addressed, and remarkable progress in improving DNA transfer has been made. The first treatment success for a genetic disease (severe combined immunodeficiency disease) has been achieved, and ongoing research efforts will eventually yield clinical applications in many spheres of reproductive medicine.

  17. Gene- and evidence-based candidate gene selection for schizophrenia and gene feature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingchun; Han, Leng; Zhao, Zhongming

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric disorder that affects about 1% of the population globally. A tremendous amount of effort has been expended in the past decade, including more than 2400 association studies, to identify genes influencing susceptibility to the disorder. However, few genes or markers have been reliably replicated. The wealth of this information calls for an integration of gene association data, evidence-based gene ranking, and follow-up replication in large sample. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate evidence-based gene ranking methods and to examine the features of top-ranking candidate genes for schizophrenia. We proposed a gene-based approach for selecting and prioritizing candidate genes by combining odds ratios (ORs) of multiple markers in each association study and then combining ORs in multiple studies of a gene. We named it combination-combination OR method (CCOR). CCOR is similar to our recently published method, which first selects the largest OR of the markers in each study and then combines these ORs in multiple studies (i.e., selection-combination OR method, SCOR), but differs in selecting representative OR in each study. Features of top-ranking genes were examined by Gene Ontology terms and gene expression in tissues. Our evaluation suggested that the SCOR method overall outperforms the CCOR method. Using the SCOR, a list of 75 top-ranking genes was selected for schizophrenia candidate genes (SZGenes). We found that SZGenes had strong correlation with neuro-related functional terms and were highly expressed in brain-related tissues. The scientific landscape for schizophrenia genetics and other complex disease studies is expected to change dramatically in the next a few years, thus, the gene-based combined OR method is useful in candidate gene selection for follow-up association studies and in further artificial intelligence in medicine. This method for prioritization of candidate genes can be applied to other

  18. Gene therapy for meningioma: improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L. M.; van der Valk, Paul; Leonhart, Angelique M.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Pinedo, Herbert M.; Curiel, David T.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Gerritsen, Winald R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECT: Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  19. Gene therapy for meningioma : improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, CMF; Grill, J; Lamfers, MLM; Van der Valk, P; Leonhart, AM; Van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Curiel, DT; Vandertop, WP; Gerritsen, WR

    Object. Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  20. Evaluation of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... MADS family of TFs control floral organ identity within each whorl of the flower by activating downstream genes. Measuring gene expression in different tissue types and developmental stages is of fundamental importance in TFs functional research. In last few years, quantitative real-time. PCR (qRT-PCR) ...

  1. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NO, Gregersen; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  2. Classifying genes to the correct Gene Ontology Slim term in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using neighbouring genes with classification learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatsoulis Costas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that gene location and surrounding genes influence the functionality of genes in the eukaryotic genome. Knowing the Gene Ontology Slim terms associated with a gene gives us insight into a gene's functionality by informing us how its gene product behaves in a cellular context using three different ontologies: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. In this study, we analyzed if we could classify a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to its correct Gene Ontology Slim term using information about its location in the genome and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes using classification learning. Results We performed experiments to establish that the MultiBoostAB algorithm using the J48 classifier could correctly classify Gene Ontology Slim terms of a gene given information regarding the gene's location and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes for training. Different neighbourhood sizes were examined to determine how many nearest neighbours should be included around each gene to provide better classification rules. Our results show that by just incorporating neighbour information from each gene's two-nearest neighbours, the percentage of correctly classified genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term for each ontology reaches over 80% with high accuracy (reflected in F-measures over 0.80 of the classification rules produced. Conclusions We confirmed that in classifying genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term, the inclusion of neighbour information from those genes is beneficial. Knowing the location of a gene and the Gene Ontology Slim information from neighbouring genes gives us insight into that gene's functionality. This benefit is seen by just including information from a gene's two-nearest neighbouring genes.

  3. Gene Synthesis with HG Khorana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 12. Gene Synthesis with H G Khorana. Marvin H Caruthers. General Article Volume 17 Issue 12 December 2012 pp ... Keywords. Chemical synthesis of genes for yeast alanine tRNA and E. coli supressor tRNA; Khorana's philosophy on science.

  4. Clock genes, ADHD and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogavero, Floriana; Jager, Amanda; Glennon, Jeffrey C

    2016-11-09

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is frequently associated with comorbid aggression and sleep disturbances. The sleep/wake cycle is under the control of the circadian system which is moderated by clock genes. Clock genes can regulate the transcription of monoamine oxidase A, which is involved in the degradation of monoamines. Disturbances in monoamine interaction with clock genes in those with monoamine gene polymorphisms may regulate susceptibility of ADHD and comorbid aggression/sleep disturbances. While monoamines influence circadian rhythm and clock gene expression, circadian rhythm components modulate aggressive behavior, and altered clock genes expression have been associated with ADHD. We propose a mechanism by which circadian rhythm and clock gene expression may influence ADHD and comorbid aggression through the modulation of neurotransmitters. The role of clock genes in ADHD patients with comorbid aggression awaits further research; therefore we also indicate directions for future studies to help increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms in ADHD with comorbid aggression and sleep disturbances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. (vitamin B1) biosynthesis genes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the gene transcripts of first two enzymes in thiamine biosynthesis pathway, THIC and THI1/THI4 were identified and amplified from oil palm tissues. Primers were designed based on sequence comparison of the genes from Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Oryza sativa and Alnus glutinosa. Oil palm's responses ...

  6. superoxide dismutase gene in sugarcane

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-10

    Jan 10, 2012 ... Superoxide dismutases (SODs) play an important role in stress-tolerance in plants. In this study, for the first time, a full-length cDNA sequence of MnSOD gene, termed as Sc-MnSOD (GenBank accession number: GQ246460), was obtained in sugarcane. Sequence analysis revealed that Sc-MnSOD gene ...

  7. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  8. Imaging after vascular gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Yang, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    Targets for cardiovascular gene therapy currently include limiting restenosis after balloon angioplasty and stent placement, inhibiting vein bypass graft intimal hyperplasia/stenosis, therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiac and lower-limb ischemia, and prevention of thrombus formation. While catheter angiography is still standard method to follow-up vascular gene transfer, other modern imaging techniques, especially intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging provide complementary information about the therapeutic effect of vascular gene transfer in humans. Although molecular imaging of therapeutic gene expression in the vasculatures is still in its technical development phase, it has already offered basic medical science an extremely useful in vivo evaluation tool for non- or minimally invasive imaging of vascular gene therapy

  9. Gene recognition by combination of several gene-finding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, K; Takagi, T

    1998-01-01

    A number of programs have been developed to predict the eukaryotic gene structures in DNA sequences. However, gene finding is still a challenging problem. We have explored the effectiveness when the results of several gene-finding programs were re-analyzed and combined. We studied several methods with four programs (FEXH, GeneParser3, GEN-SCAN and GRAIL2). By HIGHEST-policy combination method or BOUNDARY method, approximate correlation (AC) improved by 3-5% in comparison with the best single gene-finding program. From another viewpoint, OR-based combination of the four programs is the most reliable to know whether a candidate exon overlaps with the real exon or not, although it is less sensitive than GENSCAN for exon-intron boundaries. Our methods can easily be extended to combine other programs. We have developed a server program (Shirokane System) and a client program (GeneScope) to use the methods. GeneScope is available through a WWW site (http://gf.genome.ad.jp/). (katsu,takagi)@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

  10. Targeting Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Ali Y; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Brown, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Chemical detoxification and physical destruction of aflatoxins in foods and feed commodities are mostly unattainable in a way that preserves the edibility of the food. Therefore, preventing mycotoxins in general and aflatoxins in particular from entering the food chain is a better approach. This requires early detection of the aflatoxin-causing organisms. Detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing fungi has always been a challenge, especially within species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. Culture-based methods require a high level of expertise and a list of sophisticated equipment. Furthermore, even for a trained taxonomist, species that are identical in morphology, physiology, and nutritional aspects can be challenging to classify. Fungal taxonomy has changed over the past few decades; more species are being reclassified, and new species are being described due to advances in sequencing and genome assembly. These developments make the use of PCR-based approaches practical, rapid, and more reliable for the identification of fungi to the species level. This chapter presents a variety of protocols to detect and quantify aflatoxin-producing fungi using mycotoxin biosynthesis pathway genes.

  11. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  12. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Hendrik J. M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Gerbens, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; ter Elst, Arja

    2007-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes) is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e. g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M) vary considerably under different experimental

  13. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth / For Parents / Gene Therapy and ... caused by a "bad" gene. Two Types of Gene Therapy The two forms of gene therapy are: Somatic ...

  14. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  15. Remote control of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiaochun; Miano, Joseph M

    2007-06-01

    The elucidation of a growing number of species' genomes heralds an unprecedented opportunity to ascertain functional attributes of non-coding sequences. In particular, cis regulatory modules (CRMs) controlling gene expression constitute a rich treasure trove of data to be defined and experimentally validated. Such information will provide insight into cell lineage determination and differentiation and the genetic basis of heritable diseases as well as the development of novel tools for restricting the inactivation of genes to specific cell types or conditions. Historically, the study of CRMs and their individual transcription factor binding sites has been limited to proximal regions around gene loci. Two important by-products of the genomics revolution, artificial chromosome vectors and comparative genomics, have fueled efforts to define an increasing number of CRMs acting remotely to control gene expression. Such regulation from a distance has challenged our perspectives of gene expression control and perhaps the very definition of a gene. This review summarizes current approaches to characterize remote control of gene expression in transgenic mice and inherent limitations for accurately interpreting the essential nature of CRM activity.

  16. Delimiting Coalescence Genes (C-Genes) in Phylogenomic Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Gatesy, John

    2018-02-26

    coalescence methods have emerged as a popular alternative for inferring species trees with large genomic datasets, because these methods explicitly account for incomplete lineage sorting. However, statistical consistency of summary coalescence methods is not guaranteed unless several model assumptions are true, including the critical assumption that recombination occurs freely among but not within coalescence genes (c-genes), which are the fundamental units of analysis for these methods. Each c-gene has a single branching history, and large sets of these independent gene histories should be the input for genome-scale coalescence estimates of phylogeny. By contrast, numerous studies have reported the results of coalescence analyses in which complete protein-coding sequences are treated as c-genes even though exons for these loci can span more than a megabase of DNA. Empirical estimates of recombination breakpoints suggest that c-genes may be much shorter, especially when large clades with many species are the focus of analysis. Although this idea has been challenged recently in the literature, the inverse relationship between c-gene size and increased taxon sampling in a dataset-the 'recombination ratchet'-is a fundamental property of c-genes. For taxonomic groups characterized by genes with long intron sequences, complete protein-coding sequences are likely not valid c-genes and are inappropriate units of analysis for summary coalescence methods unless they occur in recombination deserts that are devoid of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS). Finally, it has been argued that coalescence methods are robust when the no-recombination within loci assumption is violated, but recombination must matter at some scale because ILS, a by-product of recombination, is the raison d'etre for coalescence methods. That is, extensive recombination is required to yield the large number of independently segregating c-genes used to infer a species tree. If coalescent methods are powerful

  17. Identification of key player genes in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarieh, Maryam; Wiese, Andreas; Will, Thorsten; Hamed, Mohamed; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-09-06

    Identifying the gene regulatory networks governing the workings and identity of cells is one of the main challenges in understanding processes such as cellular differentiation, reprogramming or cancerogenesis. One particular challenge is to identify the main drivers and master regulatory genes that control such cell fate transitions. In this work, we reformulate this problem as the optimization problems of computing a Minimum Dominating Set and a Minimum Connected Dominating Set for directed graphs. Both MDS and MCDS are applied to the well-studied gene regulatory networks of the model organisms E. coli and S. cerevisiae and to a pluripotency network for mouse embryonic stem cells. The results show that MCDS can capture most of the known key player genes identified so far in the model organisms. Moreover, this method suggests an additional small set of transcription factors as novel key players for governing the cell-specific gene regulatory network which can also be investigated with regard to diseases. To this aim, we investigated the ability of MCDS to define key drivers in breast cancer. The method identified many known drug targets as members of the MDS and MCDS. This paper proposes a new method to identify key player genes in gene regulatory networks. The Java implementation of the heuristic algorithm explained in this paper is available as a Cytoscape plugin at http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/mcds . The SageMath programs for solving integer linear programming formulations used in the paper are available at https://github.com/maryamNazarieh/KeyRegulatoryGenes and as supplementary material.

  18. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73 ISSN 0015-5500 Grant - others:EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  19. Cloning and selection of reference genes for gene expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Full length mRNA sequences of Ac-β-actin and Ac-gapdh, and partial mRNA sequences of Ac-18SrRNA and Ac-ubiquitin were cloned from pineapple in this study. The four genes were tested as housekeeping genes in three experimental sets. GeNorm and NormFinder analysis revealed that β-actin was the most ...

  20. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  1. Gene Therapy Approaches to Hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Giuliana; Cavazzana, Marina; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2017-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies is currently based on transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells genetically modified with a lentiviral vector expressing a globin gene under the control of globin transcriptional regulatory elements. Preclinical and early clinical studies showed the safety and potential efficacy of this therapeutic approach as well as the hurdles still limiting its general application. In addition, for both beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease, an altered bone marrow microenvironment reduces the efficiency of stem cell harvesting as well as engraftment. These hurdles need be addressed for gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies to become a clinical reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The hunt for gene dopers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mai M H; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2009-07-01

    Gene doping, the abuse of gene therapy for illicit athletic enhancement, is perceived as a coming threat and is a prime concern to the anti-doping community. This doping technique represents a significant ethical challenge and there are concerns regarding its safety for athletes. This article presents the basics of gene doping, potential strategies for its detection and the role of promising new technologies in aiding detection efforts. These include the use of lab-on-a-chip techniques as well as nanoparticles to enhance the performance of current analytical methods and to develop new doping detection strategies.

  3. Comparing the evolutionary conservation between human essential genes, human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenhua; Zheng, Jiajia; Luan, Meiwei; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-01

    Human housekeeping genes are often confused with essential human genes, and several studies regard both types of genes as having the same level of evolutionary conservation. However, this is not necessarily the case. To clarify this, we compared the differences between human housekeeping genes and essential human genes with respect to four aspects: the evolutionary rate (dN/dS), protein sequence identity, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density and level of linkage disequilibrium (LD). The results showed that housekeeping genes had lower evolutionary rates, higher sequence identities, lower SNP densities and higher levels of LD compared with essential genes. Together, these findings indicate that housekeeping and essential genes are two distinct types of genes, and that housekeeping genes have a higher level of evolutionary conservation. Therefore, we suggest that researchers should pay careful attention to the distinctions between housekeeping genes and essential genes. Moreover, it is still controversial whether we should substitute human orthologs of mouse essential genes for human essential genes. Therefore, we compared the evolutionary features between human orthologs of mouse essential genes and human housekeeping genes and we got inconsistent results in long-term and short-term evolutionary characteristics implying the irrationality of simply replacing human essential genes with human orthologs of mouse essential genes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chicago Learn More Close The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy ASGCT is the primary membership organization for scientists, ... Therapeutics Official Journal of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy is the leading journal for gene ...

  5. Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español The Basics on Genes and Genetic Disorders KidsHealth / For Teens / The Basics ... such as treating health problems. What Is a Gene? To understand how genes work, let's review some ...

  6. Information-processing genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir Shah, K.

    1995-01-01

    There are an estimated 100,000 genes in the human genome of which 97% is non-coding. On the other hand, bacteria have little or no non-coding DNA. Non-coding region includes introns, ALU sequences, satellite DNA, and other segments not expressed as proteins. Why it exists? Why nature has kept non-coding during the long evolutionary period if it has no role in the development of complex life forms? Does complexity of a species somehow correlated to the existence of apparently useless sequences? What kind of capability is encoded within such nucleotide sequences that is a necessary, but not a sufficient condition for the evolution of complex life forms, keeping in mind the C-value paradox and the omnipresence of non-coding segments in higher eurkaryotes and also in many archea and prokaryotes. The physico-chemical description of biological processes is hardware oriented and does not highlight algorithmic or information processing aspect. However, an algorithm without its hardware implementation is useless as much as hardware without its capability to run an algorithm. The nature and type of computation an information-processing hardware can perform depends only on its algorithm and the architecture that reflects the algorithm. Given that enormously difficult tasks such as high fidelity replication, transcription, editing and regulation are all achieved within a long linear sequence, it is natural to think that some parts of a genome are involved is these tasks. If some complex algorithms are encoded with these parts, then it is natural to think that non-coding regions contain processing-information algorithms. A comparison between well-known automatic sequences and sequences constructed out of motifs is found in all species proves the point: noncoding regions are a sort of ''hardwired'' programs, i.e., they are linear representations of information-processing machines. Thus in our model, a noncoding region, e.g., an intron contains a program (or equivalently, it is

  7. Gene discovery in Triatoma infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Burgos Nelia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triatoma infestans is the most relevant vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone of South America. Since its genome has not yet been studied, sequencing of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs is one of the most powerful tools for efficiently identifying large numbers of expressed genes in this insect vector. Results In this work, we generated 826 ESTs, resulting in an increase of 47% in the number of ESTs available for T. infestans. These ESTs were assembled in 471 unique sequences, 151 of which represent 136 new genes for the Reduviidae family. Conclusions Among the putative new genes for the Reduviidae family, we identified and described an interesting subset of genes involved in development and reproduction, which constitute potential targets for insecticide development.

  8. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  9. MHC Genes and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pillai, Shiv

    2000-01-01

    Tumors are believed to emerge only when immune surveillance fails. We wished to ascertain whether the failure to inherit putative protective alleles of HLA class II genes is linked to the development of breast cancer...

  10. Genes That Influence Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters September 26, 2011 Genes that Influence Blood Pressure In one of the largest genomic studies ever, ... consortium identified 29 genetic variations that influence blood pressure. More than half of these variants were previously ...

  11. Gene therapy of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wei; Tan Jian

    2007-01-01

    Normally, differentiated thyroid carcinoma(DTC) is a disease of good prognosis, but about 30% of the tumors are dedifferentiate, which are inaccessible to standard therapeutic procedures such as 'operation, 131 I therapy and thyroid hormone'. Both internal and abroad experts are researching a new therapy of dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma--gene therapy. Many of them utilize methods of it, but follow different strategies: (1) transduction of the thyroid sodium/iodide transporter gene to make tissues that do not accumulate iodide treatable by 131 I therapy; (2) strengthening of the anti-tumor immune response; (3) suicide gene therapy; (4) depression the generation of tumor cells; (5) gene therapy of anti- vascularization. (authors)

  12. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-exome sequencing of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and 'exome chip' studies pointing to novel genes in LDL metabolism. RECENT FINDINGS: The genetic loci for ATP-binding cassette......-exome sequencing and 'exome chip' studies have additionally suggested several novel genes in LDL metabolism including insulin-induced gene 2, signal transducing adaptor family member 1, lysosomal acid lipase A, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 5 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2. Most...... of these findings still require independent replications and/or functional studies to confirm the exact role in LDL metabolism and the clinical implications for human health. SUMMARY: GWAS, exome sequencing studies, and recently 'exome chip' studies have suggested several novel genes with effects on LDL cholesterol...

  13. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  14. Endocrine aspects of cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Boscaro, Marco; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-02-01

    The field of cancer gene therapy is in continuous expansion, and technology is quickly moving ahead as far as gene targeting and regulation of gene expression are concerned. This review focuses on the endocrine aspects of gene therapy, including the possibility to exploit hormone and hormone receptor functions for regulating therapeutic gene expression, the use of endocrine-specific genes as new therapeutic tools, the effects of viral vector delivery and transgene expression on the endocrine system, and the endocrine response to viral vector delivery. Present ethical concerns of gene therapy and the risk of germ cell transduction are also discussed, along with potential lines of innovation to improve cell and gene targeting.

  15. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  16. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  17. Rice Multi-Gene Analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gdyang

    Maps of all the intronic MIR genes analyzed using MPSS database in rice. Click here for a legend that explains the icons and colors in the image below. Click here to jump in the page below to the specific gene. osa-MIR159f osa-MIR399i osa-MIR418 osa-MIR437 osa-MIR439b osa-MIR439j osa-MIR440 osa-MIR442.

  18. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  19. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen, S.V; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV...

  20. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  1. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  2. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  3. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  4. Advances in study of reporter gene imaging for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Chuanjie; Zhou Jiwen

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of gene therapy, it is requisite to monitor localization and expression of the therapeutic gene in vivo. Monitoring expression of reporter gene using radionuclide reporter gene technique is the best method. Adenoviral vectors expressing reporter gene are constructed using gene fusion, bicistronic, double promoter or bidirectional transcriptional recombination techniques, and transferred into target cells and tissues, then injected radiolabeled reporter probes which couple to the reporter genes. The reporter genes can be imaged invasively, repeatedly, quantitatively with γ-camera, PET and SPECT. Recently, several reporter gene and reporter probe systems have been used in studies of gene therapy. The part of them has been used for clinic trials

  5. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  6. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudeh, Nour; Kweider, Mahmoud; Abbady, Abdul-Qader; Soukkarieh, Chadi

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK) antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica. The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique. The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed. Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  7. Reduced rates of gene loss, gene silencing, and gene mutation in Dnmt1-deficient embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, M.F.; van Amerongen, R.; Nijjar, T.; Cuppen, E.; Jones, P.A.; Laird, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene inactivation is a crucial event in oncogenesis. Gene inactivation mechanisms include events resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH), gene mutation, and transcriptional silencing. The contribution of each of these different pathways varies among tumor suppressor genes and by

  8. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    ) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...... with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern......BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...

  9. Polymorphism of xenobiotic metabolizm genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidin, M. B.; Ten, I. A.; Sevostiyanova, N. v.; Kokorina, Y. I.; Slominskaya, F. M.; Tereshchenko, I. V.; Kolomiets, S. A.; Takhanov, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    The genes of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes genes, also called biotransformation genes or environmental genes seems to be an important factor of individual susceptibility of common diseases of different genesis including cancer. At the present time, a systematic accumulation of information on the role of these genes polymorphism in predisposition to different disorders is carried out worldwide. To investigate a significance of biotransformation genes for cancer disorders in West Siberia region, we studies a polymorphism of genes CYP2C19 (Small-RFLP, 1 and 2 alleles in exone 5), GSTTI, GSTMI (null and normal alleles in both genes) in 47 lung cancer (LC) patients, 269 women with breast cancer (BC), and 130 controls from Tomsk, Russia. All participants were Russians. The frequency of GSTM1 null genotype in LC patients was significantly higher than that in controls (0.608?0.071 vs. 0.162?0-032; p<1x10-7 by Fisher exact test), whereas the frequency of null genotype in BC women was significantly lower in comparison with control women (0.545?0.039 vs. 0.747?0.053: p=0.005 by Fisher exact test). The latter circumstance seems to be unexpected because a priori one suggest that just null genotype of GSTM1 is of a pathological nature. Frequencies of null genotypes of GSTN1 in LC patients and GSTT1 in BC women corresponded to those in controls. In LC patients frequencies of CYP2C19 alleles did not differ significantly from values control sample, whereas in BC women the frequency of CYP2C19 2 allele was higher than that in control (0.340?0.20 vs. 0.182?0.034, p=4,9x10-4 by Fisher exact test). This allele encodes a truncated non-functional protein being a major cause of poor metabolism of some drugs. Thus, the data obtained allow us to conclude that polymorphisms of GSTTi, GSTM1, and CYP2C19 genes are associated with cancer disorders in Russians from West Siberia Even so, their pathogenetic meaning is specific with respect the type of malignant pathology. (Author)

  10. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene expression in which RNA synthesis occurs from the DNA (gene) template in a series of.

  11. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  12. Gene Synthesis with H G Khorana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Why synthesize genes? Because of the naiveté of biologists and molecular biologists in 1965 when Gobind Khorana initiated synthesis of the yeast alanine tRNA gene, this was a valid question. At that time, we could deduce the sequence of only one gene – the yeast alanine tRNA gene as the corresponding tRNA.

  13. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, we discuss the dynamic organization of eukaryotic genes into chromatin. Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene ...

  14. Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Flotte, Terence R

    2008-12-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that lead to defective ion transport in the conducting pulmonary airways and exocrine glands. Through a process that is not fully understood, CFTR defects predispose affected patients to chronic endobronchial infections with organisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Following the discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, CF became one of the primary targets for gene therapy research. Early enthusiasm surrounded the new field of gene therapy during most of the 1990s and it led academics and clinicians on a big effort to apply gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Clinical studies have been pursued using recombinant adenovirus, recombinant adeno-associated virus, cationic liposomes, and cationic polymer vectors. Although to this date no dramatic therapeutic benefits have been observed, a lot of information has been gained from the pre-clinical and clinical studies that were performed. This learning curve has led to the optimization of vector technology and an appreciation of immune and mechanical barriers that have to be overcome for successful delivery.

  15. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  16. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Gene therapy for inherited immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzot, Fabien; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana, Marina

    2014-06-01

    During the last decade, gene therapy has emerged as a convincing therapy for primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Ex vivo gene transfer into autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) via viral vectors permits sustained correction of T cell immunodeficiency in two forms of severe combined immunodeficiency: X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) (γ chain [γc] deficiency) and adenosine deaminase deficiency. However, this success has been balanced by the occurrence of genotoxicity generated by the integration of first-generation retroviral vectors. Recently, the development of safer self-inactivating vectors has led to the initiation of new studies with the hope of equivalent efficacy and a better safety profile. This review article focuses on the updated results of gene therapy trials for PIDs - from early studies to ongoing clinical trials. We detail the major advances made in gene transfer and repair technologies, and discuss the many ways to extend our present experience. With optimization in terms of safety and efficacy, gene therapy by lentiviral transduction could become a compelling alternative to allogeneic HSC transplantation, and thus may take center stage in the management of PIDs in coming years.

  18. Molecular Studies on Preproinsulin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin plays an important role in maintaining the blood glucose level of the body. The β-cells of pancreas produce insulin in the form of precursor that is preproinsulin. The gene of preproinsulin provides an interesting system for addressing question related to molecular evolution. Recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to isolate and sequence the chromosomal genes coding for unique protein products. Although preproinsulin of various organism has been isolated and cloned, but there is no report from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis that is our major livestock. The genomic DNA of buffalo was isolated using Laura-Lee-Boodram method. The part of preproinsulin gene (596bp and 520bp using BPPI-UPS and bpiful_F as forward and BC1-C as reverse primer was amplified. Cloning of amplified fragments of gene were performed in pCR 2.1 vector. Positive clones were screened on the basis of blue white selection. The band obtained on 596bp and 520bp after colony PCR confirmed the successful cloning of preproinsulin gene in pCR 2.1 vector.

  19. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A hybrid approach of gene sets and single genes for the prediction of survival risks with gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated biological knowledge is often encoded as gene sets, collections of genes associated with similar biological functions or pathways. The use of gene sets in the analyses of high-throughput gene expression data has been intensively studied and applied in clinical research. However, the main interest remains in finding modules of biological knowledge, or corresponding gene sets, significantly associated with disease conditions. Risk prediction from censored survival times using gene sets hasn't been well studied. In this work, we propose a hybrid method that uses both single gene and gene set information together to predict patient survival risks from gene expression profiles. In the proposed method, gene sets provide context-level information that is poorly reflected by single genes. Complementarily, single genes help to supplement incomplete information of gene sets due to our imperfect biomedical knowledge. Through the tests over multiple data sets of cancer and trauma injury, the proposed method showed robust and improved performance compared with the conventional approaches with only single genes or gene sets solely. Additionally, we examined the prediction result in the trauma injury data, and showed that the modules of biological knowledge used in the prediction by the proposed method were highly interpretable in biology. A wide range of survival prediction problems in clinical genomics is expected to benefit from the use of biological knowledge.

  1. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  2. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    an analytical approach to examine the suitability of correction methods by considering the inter-treatment bias as well as the inter-replicate variance, which allows use of the best correction method with minimum residual bias. Analyses of RNA sequencing and microarray data showed that the efficiencies......This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies....... For maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce...

  3. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen S.V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV node mimicking beta blockade can be therapeutic in the management of atrial fibrillation. G protein overexpression to modify the AV node also is experimental. Modification and expression of potassium channel genes altering the delayed rectifier potassium currents may permit better management of congenital long QT syndromes. Arrhythmias in a failing heart are due to abnormal calcium cycling. Potential targets for genetic modulation include the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, calsequestrin and sodium calcium exchanger.Lastly the ethical concerns need to be addressed.

  4. Nonlinear dimensionality reduction of gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Using microarray measurements techniques, it is possible to measure the activity of genes simultaneously across the whole genome. Since genes influence each others activity levels through complex regulatory networks, such gene expression measurements are state samples of a dynamical system. Gene expression data has proven useful for diagnosis and definition of disease subgroups, for inference of the functional role of a given gene or for the deciphering of complex disease mechanisms. However,...

  5. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...

  6. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gen...

  7. Candidate Gene Identification of Flowering Time Genes in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrinne E. Grover

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flowering time control is critically important to all sexually reproducing angiosperms in both natural ecological and agronomic settings. Accordingly, there is much interest in defining the genes involved in the complex flowering-time network and how these respond to natural and artificial selection, the latter often entailing transitions in day-length responses. Here we describe a candidate gene analysis in the cotton genus , which uses homologs from the well-described flowering network to bioinformatically and phylogenetically identify orthologs in the published genome sequence from Ulbr., one of the two model diploid progenitors of the commercially important allopolyploid cottons, L. and L. Presence and patterns of expression were evaluated from 13 aboveground tissues related to flowering for each of the candidate genes using allopolyploid as a model. Furthermore, we use a comparative context to determine copy number variability of each key gene family across 10 published angiosperm genomes. Data suggest a pattern of repeated loss of duplicates following ancient whole-genome doubling events in diverse lineages. The data presented here provide a foundation for understanding both the parallel evolution of day-length neutrality in domesticated cottons and the flowering-time network, in general, in this important crop plant.

  8. Effect Alpha Globlin Gene Deletion And Gamma Globin Gene -158 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... have been unable to find a molecular basis for the benign clinical course in all our patients. Other genetic or acquired factors must be hypothesized which ameliorate the clinical condition. Keywords: β- thalassemia, Xmn1 polymorphism, α-globin gene deletion. Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Vol.

  9. FunGeneClusterS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    and industrial biotechnology applications. We have previously published a method for accurate prediction of clusters from genome and transcriptome data, which could also suggest cross-chemistry, however, this method was limited both in the number of parameters which could be adjusted as well as in user......Secondary metabolites of fungi are receiving an increasing amount of interest due to their prolific bioactivities and the fact that fungal biosynthesis of secondary metabolites often occurs from co-regulated and co-located gene clusters. This makes the gene clusters attractive for synthetic biology...

  10. Mutated genes as research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Green plants are the ultimate source of all resources required for man's life, his food, his clothes, and almost all his energy requirements. Primitive prehistoric man could live from the abundance of nature surrounding him. Man today, dominating nature in terms of numbers and exploiting its limited resources, cannot exist without employing his intelligence to direct natural evolution. Plant sciences, therefore, are not a matter of curiosity but an essential requirement. From such considerations, the IAEA and FAO jointly organized a symposium to assess the value of mutation research for various kinds of plant science, which directly or indirectly might contribute to sustaining and improving crop production. The benefit through developing better cultivars that plant breeders can derive from using the additional genetic resources resulting from mutation induction has been assessed before at other FAO/IAEA meetings (Rome 1964, Pullman 1969, Ban 1974, Ibadan 1978) and is also monitored in the Mutation Breeding Newsletter, published by IAEA twice a year. Several hundred plant cultivars which carry economically important characters because their genes have been altered by ionizing radiation or other mutagens, are grown by farmers and horticulturists in many parts of the world. But the benefit derived from such mutant varieties is without any doubt surpassed by the contribution which mutation research has made towards the advancement of genetics. For this reason, a major part of the papers and discussions at the symposium dealt with the role induced-mutation research played in providing insight into gene action and gene interaction, the organization of genes in plant chromosomes in view of homology and homoeology, the evolutionary role of gene duplication and polyploidy, the relevance of gene blocks, the possibilities for chromosome engineering, the functioning of cytroplasmic inheritance and the genetic dynamics of populations. In discussing the evolutionary role of

  11. Gene regulation by growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, R.; Gorham, J.; Siegfried, Z.; Leonard, D.; Gizang-Ginsberg, E.; Thompson, M.A.; Lawe, D.; Kouzarides, T.; Vosatka, R.; MacGregor, D.; Jamal, S.; Greenberg, M.E.; Ziff, E.B.

    1988-01-01

    To coordinate the proliferation and differentiation of diverse cell types, cells of higher eukaryotes communicate through the release of growth factors. These peptides interact with specific transmembrane receptors of other cells and thereby generate intracellular messengers. The many changes in cellular physiology and activity that can be induced by growth factors imply that growth factor-induced signals can reach the nucleus and control gene activity. Moreover, current evidence also suggests that unregulated signaling along such pathways can induce aberrant proliferation and the formation of tumors. This paper reviews investigations of growth factor regulation of gene expression conducted by the authors' laboratory

  12. Gene therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, T R; Laube, B L

    2001-09-01

    Theoretically, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene replacement during the neonatal period can decrease morbidity and mortality from cystic fibrosis (CF). In vivo gene transfers have been accomplished in CF patients. Choice of vector, mode of delivery to airways, translocation of genetic information, and sufficient expression level of the normalized CFTR gene are issues that currently are being addressed in the field. The advantages and limitations of viral vectors are a function of the parent virus. Viral vectors used in this setting include adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV). Initial studies with Ad vectors resulted in a vector that was efficient for gene transfer with dose-limiting inflammatory effects due to the large amount of viral protein delivered. The next generation of Ad vectors, with more viral coding sequence deletions, has a longer duration of activity and elicits a lesser degree of cell-mediated immunity in mice. A more recent generation of Ad vectors has no viral genes remaining. Despite these changes, the problem of humoral immunity remains with Ad vectors. A variety of strategies such as vector systems requiring single, or widely spaced, administrations, pharmacologic immunosuppression at administration, creation of a stealth vector, modification of immunogenic epitopes, or tolerance induction are being considered to circumvent humoral immunity. AAV vectors have been studied in animal and human models. They do not appear to induce inflammatory changes over a wide range of doses. The level of CFTR messenger RNA expression is difficult to ascertain with AAV vectors since the small size of the vector relative to the CFTR gene leaves no space for vector-specific sequences on which to base assays to distinguish endogenous from vector-expressed messenger RNA. In general, AAV vectors appear to be safe and have superior duration profiles. Cationic liposomes are lipid-DNA complexes. These vectors generally have been

  13. Lipid Synthetic Transcription Factor SREBP-1a Activates p21WAF1/CIP1, a Universal Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Noriyuki; Shimano, Hitoshi; Nakakuki, Masanori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sato, Ryuichiro; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Sone, Hirohito; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toyoshima, Hideo; Yamada, Nobuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are membrane-bound transcription factors that regulate lipid synthetic genes. In contrast to SREBP-2, which regulates cellular cholesterol level in normal cells, SREBP-1a is highly expressed in actively growing cells and activates entire programs of genes involved in lipid synthesis such as cholesterol, fatty acids, triglycerides, and phospholipids. Previously, the physiological relevance of this potent activity of SREBP-1a has been thought ...

  14. Multifactor dimensionality reduction for detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in pharmacogenomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Marylyn D; Motsinger, Alison A

    2005-12-01

    In the quest for discovering disease susceptibility genes, the reality of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions creates difficult challenges for many current statistical approaches. In an attempt to overcome limitations with current disease gene detection methods, the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach was previously developed. In brief, MDR is a method that reduces the dimensionality of multilocus information to identify polymorphisms associated with an increased risk of disease. This approach takes multilocus genotypes and develops a model for defining disease risk by pooling high-risk genotype combinations into one group and low-risk combinations into another. Cross-validation and permutation testing are used to identify optimal models. While this approach was initially developed for studies of complex disease, it is also directly applicable to pharmacogenomic studies where the outcome variable is drug treatment response/nonresponse or toxicity/no toxicity. MDR is a nonparametric and model-free approach that has been shown to have reasonable power to detect epistasis in both theoretical and empirical studies. This computational technology is described in detail in this review, and its application in pharmacogenomic studies is demonstrated.

  15. Gene and enhancer trap tagging of vascular-expressed genes in poplar trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Gayle Dupper; Caiping Ma; Robert Martienssen; Steven Strauss; Richard Meilan

    2004-01-01

    We report a gene discovery system for poplar trees based on gene and enhancer traps. Gene and enhancer trap vectors carrying the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were inserted into the poplar genome via Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation, where they reveal the expression pattern of genes at or near the insertion sites. Because GUS...

  16. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this case, the ...

  17. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this.

  18. Interactive visualization of gene regulatory networks with associated gene expression time series data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, Michel A.; Hijum, Sacha A.F.T. van; Lulko, Andrzej T.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Linsen, L; Hagen, H; Hamann, B

    2008-01-01

    We present GENeVis, an application to visualize gene expression time series data in a gene regulatory network context. This is a network of regulator proteins that regulate the expression of their respective target genes. The networks are represented as graphs, in which the nodes represent genes,

  19. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. Not...

  20. Embryos, genes, and birth defects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferretti, Patrizia

    2006-01-01

    ... Structural anomalies The genesis of chromosome abnormalities Embryo survival The cause of high levels of chromosome abnormality in human embryos Relative parental risks - age, translocations, inversions, gonadal and germinal mosaics 33 33 34 35 36 44 44 45 4 Identification and Analysis of Genes Involved in Congenital Malformation Syndromes Peter J. Scambler Ge...

  1. Meta-morpho-gene deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Forming of meta-morpho-gene deposits make integral processes part of metamorphism and forming of proper rocks. The metamorphism of rocks and ores is essential modification of their mineral composition, structure and texture under the influence of rising of thermodynamical parameters

  2. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  3. Genome position and gene amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirsová, Pavla; Snijders, A.M.; Kwek, S.; Roydasgupta, R.; Fridlyand, J.; Tokuyasu, T.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2007), r120 ISSN 1474-760X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene amplification * array comparative genomic hybridization * oncogene Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.589, year: 2007

  4. Total Synthesis of a Gene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 12. Total Synthesis of a Gene. H G Khorana. Classics Volume 17 Issue 12 December 2012 pp 1174-1197 ... Author Affiliations. H G Khorana1. Professor of Biology and Chemestry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139.

  5. Genes, Environment, and Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Mark V.; Cutter, Mary Ann; Davidson, Ronald; Dougherty, Michael J.; Drexler, Edward; Gelernter, Joel; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Vogler, George P.; Zola, John

    This curriculum module explores genes, environment, and human behavior. This book provides materials to teach about the nature and methods of studying human behavior, raise some of the ethical and public policy dilemmas emerging from the Human Genome Project, and provide professional development for teachers. An extensive Teacher Background…

  6. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  7. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... Polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are associated with abortion, early embryo loss and recurrent spontaneous abortion in human. However, information on the association between MTHFR polymorphism and cow abortion is scarce. In the present study, the effects.

  8. Gene therapy of inherited immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Giorgia; Thornhill, Susannah I; Kinnon, Christine; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2008-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a group of inherited diseases that affect the development or activity of the immune system. In severe cases allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has proved to be a successful curative modality but it is limited by toxicity and reduced efficacy in mismatched donor settings. Gene therapy for PID has been developed as an alternative strategy and has entered the clinical arena. In this review we discuss the outcomes of recent gene therapy trials and some of the problems that remain to be tackled. Results from clinical trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), adenosine deaminase deficient SCID (ADA-SCID), and X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) are discussed. In addition, other conditions are highlighted such as the Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) for which gene therapy has shown considerable promise in preclinical studies, and are currently being translated into novel clinical approaches. Whilst these encouraging results demonstrate that gene therapy can be used successfully to treat monogenic PID, the occurrence of vector-related side effects has highlighted the need for accurate assessment of the associated risks and a requirement for improvements in vector design.

  9. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  10. (TNNC1) gene in goat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-23

    Feb 23, 2012 ... the protein conformation, which was viewed in the Swiss Pdb. Viewer (Schwede et al., 2003). Tissue expression analysis. Tissue expression pattern of TNNC1 was performed by fluorescence quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) using goat β-actin gene as an internal expression control. The primers of β-actin (Table ...

  11. Ancient genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Crespo, P; Poza, M; Prieto-Alcedo, M; Villa, T G

    2004-07-01

    Amber is a plant resin mainly produced by coniferous trees that, after entrapping a variety of living beings, was subjected to a process of fossilization until it turned into yellowish, translucent stones. It is also one of the best sources of ancient DNA on which to perform studies on evolution. Here a method for the sterilization of amber that allows reliable ancient DNA extraction with no actual DNA contamination is described. Working with insects taken from amber, it was possible to amplify the ATP9, PGU1 and rRNA18S ancient genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae corresponding to samples from the Miocene and Oligocene. After comparison of the current genes with their ancient (up to 35-40 million years) counterparts it was concluded that essential genes such as rRNA18S are highly conserved and that even normal 'house-keeping' genes, such as PGU1, are strikingly conserved along the millions of years that S. cerevisiae has evolved.

  12. (TNNC1) gene in goat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-23

    Feb 23, 2012 ... nucleotide sequence was high and was similar in various animals ranging from 97.94 (cow) to 83.33%. (African clawed frog), and ... Key words: TroponinC1 gene, molecular cloning, structural analysis, expression, goat. INTRODUCTION ... influence on meat tenderness, in which the types of myofiber can be ...

  13. Candidate genes in panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howe, A. S.; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Bani-Fatemi, A.

    2016-01-01

    association studies and ancestry-specific effects. In the present study, we performed a succinct review of case-control association studies published prior to April 2015. Meta-analyses were performed for candidate gene variants examined in at least three studies using the Cochrane Mantel-Haenszel fixed...

  14. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  15. Using Genes to Guide Prescriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain medicines. In general, each gene is the body's instructions for building a specific protein. These instructions are in a ... or different medications—to prevent the drug from building up to toxic levels before it's processed by the body. Rheumatoid Arthritis New insight into drugs that treat ...

  16. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based indu......Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a c......AMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX......) transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating c...

  17. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  18. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene are associated with abortion, early embryo loss and recurrent spontaneous abortion in human. However, information on the association between MTHFR polymorphism and cow abortion is scarce. In the present study, the effects of MTHFR ...

  19. Gene editing. Time to reflection.

    OpenAIRE

    Santaló Pedro, Josep

    2017-01-01

    The development of new gene editing technologies and their special characteristics have led to a passionate debate on the suitability and reliability of their use both in plant and animal species and in the human species itself. A brief analysis of the arguments used in this debate as well as a summary of some of the most relevant statements in this regard is made.

  20. Gene therapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, Eric M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-09-01

    Lung cancer patients suffer a 15% overall survival despite advances in chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. This unacceptably low survival rate is due to the usual finding of advanced disease at diagnosis. However, multimodality strategies using conventional therapies only minimally improve survival rates even in early stages of lung cancer. Attempts to improve survival in advanced disease using various combinations of platinum-based chemotherapy have demonstrated that no regimen is superior, suggesting a therapeutic plateau and the need for novel, more specific, and less toxic therapeutic strategies. Over the past three decades, the genetic etiology of cancer has been gradually delineated, albeit not yet completely. Understanding the molecular events that occur during the multistep process of bronchogenic carcinogenesis may make these tasks more surmountable. During these same three decades, techniques have been developed which allow transfer of functional genes into mammalian cells. For example, blockade of activated tumor-promoting oncogenes or replacement of inactivated tumor-suppressing or apoptosis-promoting genes can be achieved by gene therapy. This article will discuss the therapeutic implications of these molecular changes associated with bronchogenic carcinomas and will then review the status of gene therapies for treatment of lung cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    cells are capable of regulating their gene expression, so that each cell can only express a particular set of genes yielding limited numbers of proteins with specialized functions. Therefore a rigid control of differential gene expression is necessary for cellular diversity. On the other hand, aberrant...... gene regulation will disrupt the cell’s fundamental processes, which in turn can cause disease. Hence, understanding gene regulation is essential for deciphering the code of life. Along with the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technology and the subsequent large-scale data analysis......, genome-wide assays have increased our understanding of gene regulation significantly. This thesis describes the integration and analysis of HTS data across different important aspects of gene regulation. Gene expression can be regulated at different stages when the genetic information is passed from gene...

  2. Gene conversion in the rice genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuqing; Clark, Terry; Zheng, Hongkun

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene conversion causes a non-reciprocal transfer of genetic information between similar sequences. Gene conversion can both homogenize genes and recruit point mutations thereby shaping the evolution of multigene families. In the rice genome, the large number of duplicated genes...... increases opportunities for gene conversion. RESULTS: To characterize gene conversion in rice, we have defined 626 multigene families in which 377 gene conversions were detected using the GENECONV program. Over 60% of the conversions we detected were between chromosomes. We found that the inter......-chromosomal conversions distributed between chromosome 1 and 5, 2 and 6, and 3 and 5 are more frequent than genome average (Z-test, P conversion on the same chromosome decreased with the physical distance between gene conversion partners. Ka/Ks analysis indicates that gene conversion...

  3. QTLminer: identifying genes regulating quantitative traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schughart Klaus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping identifies genomic regions that likely contain genes regulating a quantitative trait. However, QTL regions may encompass tens to hundreds of genes. To find the most promising candidate genes that regulate the trait, the biologist typically collects information from multiple resources about the genes in the QTL interval. This process is very laborious and time consuming. Results QTLminer is a bioinformatics tool that automatically performs QTL region analysis. It is available in GeneNetwork and it integrates information such as gene annotation, gene expression and sequence polymorphisms for all the genes within a given genomic interval. Conclusions QTLminer substantially speeds up discovery of the most promising candidate genes within a QTL region.

  4. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksen Jens

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have therefore investigated transcriptional changes through gene expression profile analyses, morphological changes by histological analysis, and physiological changes by force generation measurements. DNA electrotransfer was obtained using a combination of a short high voltage pulse (HV, 1000 V/cm, 100 μs followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms; a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. Results Differentially expressed genes were investigated by microarray analysis, and descriptive statistics were performed to evaluate the effects of 1 electroporation, 2 DNA injection, and 3 time after treatment. The biological significance of the results was assessed by gene annotation and supervised cluster analysis. Generally, electroporation caused down-regulation of structural proteins e.g. sarcospan and catalytic enzymes. Injection of DNA induced down-regulation of intracellular transport proteins e.g. sentrin. The effects on muscle fibres were transient as the expression profiles 3 weeks after treatment were closely related with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern in some fibres after DNA+HV+LV treatment, while HV+LV pulses alone showed preservation of cell integrity. No difference in the force generation capacity was observed in

  5. MGC: a metagenomic gene caller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Allali, Achraf; Rose, John R

    2013-01-01

    Computational gene finding algorithms have proven their robustness in identifying genes in complete genomes. However, metagenomic sequencing has presented new challenges due to the incomplete and fragmented nature of the data. During the last few years, attempts have been made to extract complete and incomplete open reading frames (ORFs) directly from short reads and identify the coding ORFs, bypassing other challenging tasks such as the assembly of the metagenome. In this paper we introduce a metagenomics gene caller (MGC) which is an improvement over the state-of-the-art prediction algorithm Orphelia. Orphelia uses a two-stage machine learning approach and computes a model that classifies extracted ORFs from fragmented sequences. We hypothesise and demonstrate evidence that sequences need separate models based on their local GC-content in order to avoid the noise introduced to a single model computed with sequences from the entire GC spectrum. We have also added two amino-acid features based on the benefit of amino-acid usage shown in our previous research. Our algorithm is able to predict genes and translation initiation sites (TIS) more accurately than Orphelia which uses a single model. Learning separate models for several pre-defined GC-content regions as opposed to a single model approach improves the performance of the neural network as demonstrated by the experimental results presented in this paper. The inclusion of amino-acid usage features also helps improve the overall accuracy of our algorithm. MGC's improvement sets the ground for further investigation into the use of GC-content to separate data for training models in machine learning based gene finders.

  6. Transferring alien genes to wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    In broad terms an alien gene can be considered to be any gene transferred to wheat from a related species. As described above by Maan (section 7D) the genus Triticum contains a broad range of species, some of which cross readily with the cultivated tetraploid (T. Turgidum L.) or hexaploid (T. aestivum L.) wheats, and others only with great difficulty. In addition, wheat will also cross with species in a number of other genera including Agropyron, Elymus, Elytrigia (=Agropyron), Haynaldia, Hordeum, and Secale (Riley and Kimber, 1966; Knobloch, 1968; Feldman and Sears, 1981). In discussing the Triticum and Aegilops spp., the classification by Kimber and Sears, section SA-I, above, will be followed. For the Agropyron and related species the classification described by Dewey (1983) will be used. To avoid confusion, in referring to the literature the designations used by the authors will be given, followed by the new designation. The wild relatives of wheat are adapted to a broad range of environments and carry a large reservoir of useful genes (Zohary et al., 1969; Kerber and Dyck, 1973; Brezhnev, 1977; Feldman and Sears, 1981; Limin and Fowler, 1981; Sharma et aI., 1981; McGuire and Dvorak, 1981). Initially they were considered to be primarily sources of disease resistance, but more recently they have been recognized as potential sources of genes for high protein, cold tolerance, salt tolerance, drought tolerance, lodging resistance, early maturity, and even yield. Extensive screening of the wild relatives of wheat needs to be done before their useful genes can be fully utilized

  7. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  8. Gene losses during human origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Wang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudogenization is a widespread phenomenon in genome evolution, and it has been proposed to serve as an engine of evolutionary change, especially during human origins (the "less-is-more" hypothesis. However, there has been no comprehensive analysis of human-specific pseudogenes. Furthermore, it is unclear whether pseudogenization itself can be selectively favored and thus play an active role in human evolution. Here we conduct a comparative genomic analysis and a literature survey to identify 80 nonprocessed pseudogenes that were inactivated in the human lineage after its separation from the chimpanzee lineage. Many functions are involved among these genes, with chemoreception and immune response being outstandingly overrepresented, suggesting potential species-specific features in these aspects of human physiology. To explore the possibility of adaptive pseudogenization, we focus on CASPASE12, a cysteinyl aspartate proteinase participating in inflammatory and innate immune response to endotoxins. We provide population genetic evidence that the nearly complete fixation of a null allele at CASPASE12 has been driven by positive selection, probably because the null allele confers protection from severe sepsis. We estimate that the selective advantage of the null allele is about 0.9% and the pseudogenization started shortly before the out-of-Africa migration of modern humans. Interestingly, two other genes related to sepsis were also pseudogenized in humans, possibly by selection. These adaptive gene losses might have occurred because of changes in our environment or genetic background that altered the threat from or response to sepsis. The identification and analysis of human-specific pseudogenes open the door for understanding the roles of gene losses in human origins, and the demonstration that gene loss itself can be adaptive supports and extends the "less-is-more" hypothesis.

  9. Empirical study of supervised gene screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Shuangge

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray studies provide a way of linking variations of phenotypes with their genetic causations. Constructing predictive models using high dimensional microarray measurements usually consists of three steps: (1 unsupervised gene screening; (2 supervised gene screening; and (3 statistical model building. Supervised gene screening based on marginal gene ranking is commonly used to reduce the number of genes in the model building. Various simple statistics, such as t-statistic or signal to noise ratio, have been used to rank genes in the supervised screening. Despite of its extensive usage, statistical study of supervised gene screening remains scarce. Our study is partly motivated by the differences in gene discovery results caused by using different supervised gene screening methods. Results We investigate concordance and reproducibility of supervised gene screening based on eight commonly used marginal statistics. Concordance is assessed by the relative fractions of overlaps between top ranked genes screened using different marginal statistics. We propose a Bootstrap Reproducibility Index, which measures reproducibility of individual genes under the supervised screening. Empirical studies are based on four public microarray data. We consider the cases where the top 20%, 40% and 60% genes are screened. Conclusion From a gene discovery point of view, the effect of supervised gene screening based on different marginal statistics cannot be ignored. Empirical studies show that (1 genes passed different supervised screenings may be considerably different; (2 concordance may vary, depending on the underlying data structure and percentage of selected genes; (3 evaluated with the Bootstrap Reproducibility Index, genes passed supervised screenings are only moderately reproducible; and (4 concordance cannot be improved by supervised screening based on reproducibility.

  10. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  11. Gene transfer: anything goes in plant mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parasitic plants and their hosts have proven remarkably adept at exchanging fragments of mitochondrial DNA. Two recent studies provide important mechanistic insights into the pattern, process and consequences of horizontal gene transfer, demonstrating that genes can be transferred in large chunks and that gene conversion between foreign and native genes leads to intragenic mosaicism. A model involving duplicative horizontal gene transfer and differential gene conversion is proposed as a hitherto unrecognized source of genetic diversity. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/150

  12. Gene transfer: anything goes in plant mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic plants and their hosts have proven remarkably adept at exchanging fragments of mitochondrial DNA. Two recent studies provide important mechanistic insights into the pattern, process and consequences of horizontal gene transfer, demonstrating that genes can be transferred in large chunks and that gene conversion between foreign and native genes leads to intragenic mosaicism. A model involving duplicative horizontal gene transfer and differential gene conversion is proposed as a hitherto unrecognized source of genetic diversity. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/150 PMID:21176244

  13. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... that the method can be applied to modulating the expression of native genes on the chromosome. We constructed a series of strains in which the expression of the las operon, containing the genes pfk, pyk, and ldh, was modulated by integrating a truncated copy of the pfk gene. Importantly, the modulation affected...

  14. Investigation progress of PET reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yumei; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imaging for gene therapy and gene expression has been more and more attractive, while the use of gene therapy has been widely investigated and intense research have allowed it to the clinical setting in the last two-decade years. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide qualitative and quantitative information for gene therapy. PET imaging could also obtain some valuable parameters not available by other techniques. This technology is useful to understand the process and development of gene therapy and how to apply it into clinical practice in the future. (authors)

  15. Cerebrovascular gene expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Anne-Sofie; Frederiksen, Simona Denise; Edvinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in the middle cerebral arteries from hypertensive compared to normotensive rats. The gene expression of 72 genes was decreased and the gene expression of 97 genes was increased. The following genes with a fold difference ≥1.40 were verified by quantitative PCR; Postn, Olr1, Fas, Vldlr, Mmp2, Timp1, Serpine1......, Mmp11, Cd34, Ptgs1 and Ptgs2. The gene expression of Postn, Olr1, Fas, Vldlr, Mmp2, Timp1 and Serpine1 and the protein expression of LOX1 (also known as OLR1) were significantly increased in the middle cerebral arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats compared to Wistar-Kyoto rats. In conclusion...

  16. Effects of starvation on the carbohydrate metabolism in Harmonia axyridis (Pallas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo-Kun Shi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose plays an important role in energy storage, metabolism, and protection from extreme environmental conditions in insects. Trehalose is the main blood sugar in insects, and it can be rapidly used as an energy source in times of need. To elucidate the mechanisms of the starvation response, we observed the effects of starvation on trehalose and glycogen, trehalase activity, and the relative gene expression of genes in the trehalose and glycogen metabolic pathways in the invasive beetle Harmonia axyridis. Our results show that trehalose levels and the activities of two types of trehalases decreased significantly in the first 8 h of starvation, while the relative expression of HaTreh1-1 increased. While trehalose remained nearly constant at a relatively high level from 8 to 24 h, glycogen levels decreased significantly from 8 h to 24 h of starvation. Likewise, glycogen phosphorylase (HaGP expression was significantly higher at 12 to 24 h starvation than the first 8 h, while the expression of glycogen synthase (HaGS was relatively stable. Furthermore, trehalose decreased significantly from 24 h starvation to 72 h starvation, while trehalase activities and the relative expression of some HaTreh genes generally increased toward the end of the starvation period. The expression of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (HaTPS increased significantly, supporting the increase in trehalose synthesis. These results show that trehalose plays a key role in the energy provided during the starvation process through the molecular and biochemical regulation of trehalose and glycogen metabolism.

  17. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  18. GenePRIMP: A GENE PRediction IMprovement Pipeline for Prokaryotic genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-04-01

    We present 'gene prediction improvement pipeline' (GenePRIMP; http://geneprimp.jgi-psf.org/), a computational process that performs evidence-based evaluation of gene models in prokaryotic genomes and reports anomalies including inconsistent start sites, missed genes and split genes. We found that manual curation of gene models using the anomaly reports generated by GenePRIMP improved their quality, and demonstrate the applicability of GenePRIMP in improving finishing quality and comparing different genome-sequencing and annotation technologies.

  19. Multifactor dimensionality reduction software for detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Lance W; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Moore, Jason H

    2003-02-12

    Polymorphisms in human genes are being described in remarkable numbers. Determining which polymorphisms and which environmental factors are associated with common, complex diseases has become a daunting task. This is partly because the effect of any single genetic variation will likely be dependent on other genetic variations (gene-gene interaction or epistasis) and environmental factors (gene-environment interaction). Detecting and characterizing interactions among multiple factors is both a statistical and a computational challenge. To address this problem, we have developed a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method for collapsing high-dimensional genetic data into a single dimension thus permitting interactions to be detected in relatively small sample sizes. In this paper, we describe the MDR approach and an MDR software package. We developed a program that integrates MDR with a cross-validation strategy for estimating the classification and prediction error of multifactor models. The software can be used to analyze interactions among 2-15 genetic and/or environmental factors. The dataset may contain up to 500 total variables and a maximum of 4000 study subjects. Information on obtaining the executable code, example data, example analysis, and documentation is available upon request. All supplementary information can be found at http://phg.mc.vanderbilt.edu/Software/MDR.

  20. Gene family matters: expanding the HGNC resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daugherty Louise C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC assigns approved gene symbols to human loci. There are currently over 33,000 approved gene symbols, the majority of which represent protein-coding genes, but we also name other locus types such as non-coding RNAs, pseudogenes and phenotypic loci. Where relevant, the HGNC organise these genes into gene families and groups. The HGNC website http://www.genenames.org/ is an online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources for human genes, and includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information. In addition to this, we also have dedicated gene family web pages and are currently expanding and generating more of these pages using data curated by the HGNC and from information derived from external resources that focus on particular gene families. Here, we review our current online resources with a particular focus on our gene family data, using it to highlight our new Gene Symbol Report and gene family data downloads.