WorldWideScience

Sample records for membrane-bound photoredox systems

  1. NMR spectroscopic studies of membrane-bound biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlweg, W.

    2013-01-01

    In the course of this thesis, biological NMR spectroscopy was employed in studying membrane-bound peptides and proteins, for which structural information is still comparatively hard to obtain. Initial work focused on various model peptides bound to membrane-mimicking micelles, studying the protonation state of arginine in a membrane environment. Strong evidence for a cation-π complex was found in TM7, a peptide which forms the seventh transmembrane helix of subunit a of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). V-ATPase is a physiologically highly relevant proton pump, which is present in intracellular membranes of all eukaryotic organisms, as well as the plasma membrane of several specialized cells. Loss of functional V-ATPase is associated with human diseases such as osteopetrosis, distal renal tubular acidosis or the spreading of cancer. V-ATPase is considered a potential drug target in the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer, or in the development of novel contraceptives. Results from NMR solution structure determination, NMR titration experiments, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy confirm the existence of a buried cation-? complex formed between arginine residue R735, which is essential for proton transport, and neighbouring tryptophan and tyrosine residues. In vivo experiments in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using selective growth tests and fluorescence microscopy showed that formation of the cation-π complex is essential for V-ATPase function. Deletion of both aromatic residues, as well as only the one tryptophan residue leads to growth defects and inability to maintain vacuolar pH homeostasis. These findings shine new light on the still elusive mechanism of proton transport in V-ATPase, and show that arginine R735 may be directly involved in proton transfer across the membrane. (author) [de

  2. Membrane-organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, R. David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The key photoredox process in photosynthesis is the accumulation of oxidizing equivalents on a tetranuclear manganese cluster that then liberates electrons and protons from water and forms oxygen gas. Our primary goal in this project is to characterize inorganic systems that can perform this same water-splitting chemistry. One such species is the dinuclear ruthenium complex known as the blue dimer. Starting at the Ru(III,III) oxidation state, the blue dimer is oxidized up to a putative Ru(V,V) level prior to O-O bond formation. We employ electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize each step in this reaction cycle to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of water oxidation.

  3. Compartmentalized system with membrane-bound glycerol kinase. Activity and product distribution versus asymmetrical substrate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, A; Merchie, B; Maïsterrena, B

    1991-03-15

    An artificial-membrane-bound glycerokinase chosen as a membrane-bound two-substrate-enzyme model has been used to separate two unequal compartments of a specially designed diffusion cell. An interesting feature is the asymmetry of compartments and the existence of a diffusion layer adjacent to only one face of the enzymic membrane. In such a situation the apparent enzyme activity and the product distribution in the system have been studied versus all the possibilities of combination of ATP and glycerol supply. Our approach has lead us to differentiate two different roles played by a diffusion layer adjacent to a permeable enzymic membrane. Depending on the spatial origin of the enzymic substrates (i.e. from which compartment they derive), the diffusion layer can play either the role of a passive additional resistance to that of the membrane or the role of a third compartment in which the reaction product can partially accumulate before splitting on both parts of the membrane. Our results mainly demonstrate that a membrane-bound enzyme activity and the resulting product distribution occurring in a compartmentalized system may be regulated by the cumulative effect due to the asymmetry in volumes of the compartments, the presence of a diffusion layer and the different possibilities of substrate supply. With the topography studied, which is close to that reported for many 'in vivo' situations, the product may be diffused lead to vectorial metabolism processes.

  4. Evaluation of membrane-bound and soluble forms of HLA-G in Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, Paola; Negrini, Simone; Murdaca, Giuseppe; Borro, Matteo; Puppo, Francesco

    2018-04-16

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a complex disease characterized by immune dysregulation, extensive vascular damage and wide-spread fibrosis. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classic class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule characterized by complex immuno-modulating properties. HLA-G is expressed on the membrane of different cell lineages in both physiological and pathological conditions. HLA-G is also detectable in soluble form (sHLA-G) deriving from the shedding of surface isoforms (sHLA-G1) or the secretion of soluble isoforms (HLA-G5). Several immunosuppressive functions have been attributed to both membrane-bound and soluble HLA-G molecules. The plasma levels of sHLA-G were higher in SSc patients (444.27 ± 304.84 U/ml) as compared to controls (16.74 ± 20.58 U/ml) (p G (r: 0.65; p G1 (r: 0.60; p = 0.003) and HLA-G5 (r: 0.47; p = 0.02). The percentage of HLA-G-positive monocytes (0.98 ± 1.72), CD4+ (0.37 ± 0.68), CD8+ (2.05 ± 3.74) and CD4+CD8+ double positive cells (14.53 ± 16.88) was higher in SSc patients than in controls (0.11 ± 0.08, 0.01 ± 0.01, 0.01 ± 0.01 and 0.39 ± 0.40, respectively) (p G molecules and the membrane expression of HLA-G by PBMC is clearly elevated suggesting an involvement of HLA-G molecules in the immune dysregulation of SSc. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Alteration of plasma membrane-bound redox systems of iron deficient pea roots by chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Planchon, Sebastien; Renaut, Jenny; Sergeant, Kjell; Lüthje, Sabine

    2011-08-12

    Iron is essential for all living organisms and plays a crucial role in pathogenicity. This study presents the first proteome analysis of plasma membranes isolated from pea roots. Protein profiles of four different samples (+Fe, +Fe/Chitosan, -Fe, and -Fe/Chitosan) were compared by native IEF-PAGE combined with in-gel activity stains and DIGE. Using DIGE, 89 proteins of interest were detected in plasma membrane fractions. Data revealed a differential abundance of several spots in all samples investigated. In comparison to the control and -FeCh the abundance of six protein spots increased whereas 56 spots decreased in +FeCh. Altered protein spots were analyzed by MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Besides stress-related proteins, transport proteins and redox enzymes were identified. Activity stains after native PAGE and spectrophotometric measurements demonstrated induction of a ferric-chelate reductase (-Fe) and a putative respiratory burst oxidase homolog (-FeCh). However, the activity of the ferric-chelate reductase decreased in -Fe plants after elicitor treatment. The activity of plasma membrane-bound class III peroxidases increased after elicitor treatment and decreased under iron-deficiency, whereas activity of quinone reductases decreased mostly after elicitor treatment. Possible functions of proteins identified and reasons for a weakened pathogen response of iron-deficient plants were discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Membrane-Organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, James K.

    2014-09-18

    This project has three interrelated goals relevant to solar water photolysis, which are to develop: (1) vesicle-organized assemblies for H2 photoproduction that utilize pyrylium and structurally related compounds as combined photosensitizers and cyclic electroneutral transmembrane electron carriers; (2) transmembrane redox systems whose reaction rates can be modulated by light; and (3) homogeneous catalysts for water oxidation. . In area (1), initial efforts to photogenerate H2 from vectorially-organized vesicles containing occluded colloidal Pt and commonly available pyrylium ions as transmembrane redox mediators were unsuccessful. New pyrylium compounds with significantly lower reduction potentials have been synthesized to address this problem, their apparent redox potentials in functioning systems have been now evaluated by using a series of occluded viologens, and H2 photoproduction has been demonstrated in continuous illumination experiments. In area (2), spirooxazine-quinone dyads have been synthesized and their capacity to function as redox mediators across bilayer membranes has been evaluated through continuous photolysis and transient spectrophotometric measurements. Photoisomerization of the spiro moiety to the ring-open mero form caused net quantum yields to decrease significantly, providing a basis for photoregulation of transmembrane redox. Research on water oxidation (area 3) has been directed at understanding mechanisms of catalysis by cis,cis-[(bpy)2Ru(OH2)]2O4+ and related polyimine complexes. Using a variety of physical techniques, we have: (i) identified the redox state of the complex ion that is catalytically active; (ii) shown using 18O isotopic labeling that there are two reaction pathways, both of which involve participation of solvent H2O; and (iii) detected and characterized by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopies new species which may be key intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  7. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N.

    2011-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded β-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners

  8. The structure of Serratia marcescens Lip, a membrane-bound component of the type VI secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Vincenzo A.; Shepherd, Sharon M.; English, Grant; Coulthurst, Sarah J.; Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of S. marcescens Lip reveals a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Lip, a core component of the type VI secretion apparatus, is localized to the outer membrane and is positioned to interact with other proteins forming this complex system. Lip is a membrane-bound lipoprotein and a core component of the type VI secretion system found in Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of a Lip construct (residues 29–176) from Serratia marcescens (SmLip) has been determined at 1.92 Å resolution. Experimental phases were derived using a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion approach on a sample cocrystallized with iodide. The membrane localization of the native protein was confirmed. The structure is that of the globular domain lacking only the lipoprotein signal peptide and the lipidated N-terminus of the mature protein. The protein fold is dominated by an eight-stranded β-sandwich and identifies SmLip as a new member of the transthyretin family of proteins. Transthyretin and the only other member of the family fold, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, form homotetramers important for their function. The asymmetric unit of SmLip is a tetramer with 222 symmetry, but the assembly is distinct from that previously noted for the transthyretin protein family. However, structural comparisons and bacterial two-hybrid data suggest that the SmLip tetramer is not relevant to its role as a core component of the type VI secretion system, but rather reflects a propensity for SmLip to participate in protein–protein interactions. A relatively low level of sequence conservation amongst Lip homologues is noted and is restricted to parts of the structure that might be involved in interactions with physiological partners.

  9. Role of Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC1325 in membrane-bound transport ATPases system in Alzheimer’s disease-induced rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimgampalle Mallikarjuna

    2016-12-01

    Results: Chronic injection of D-Galactose caused lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction leading to the damage of neurons in the brain, finally bringing a significant decrease (-20% in the brain total membrane bound ATPases over the controls. Contrary to this, treatment of AD-induced rats with L. plantarum MTCC1325 reverted all the constituents of ATPase enzymes to near normal levels within 30 days. Conclusion: Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC1325 exerted a beneficial action on the entire ATPases system in AD-induced rat brain by delaying neurodegeneration.

  10. Photo-redox activated drug delivery systems operating under two photon excitation in the near-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardado-Alvarez, Tania M; Devi, Lekshmi Sudha; Vabre, Jean-Marie; Pecorelli, Travis A; Schwartz, Benjamin J; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2014-05-07

    We report the design and synthesis of a nano-container consisting of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with the pore openings covered by "snap-top" caps that are opened by near-IR light. A photo transducer molecule that is a reducing agent in an excited electronic state is covalently attached to the system. Near IR two-photon excitation causes inter-molecular electron transfer that reduces a disulfide bond holding the cap in place, thus allowing the cargo molecules to escape. We describe the operation of the "snap-top" release mechanism by both one- and two-photon activation. This system presents a proof of concept of a near-IR photoredox-induced nanoparticle delivery system that may lead to a new type of photodynamic drug release therapy.

  11. Tunable Tensor Voting Improves Grouping of Membrane-Bound Macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, Leandro A.; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-15

    Membrane-bound macromolecules are responsible for structural support and mediation of cell-cell adhesion in tissues. Quantitative analysis of these macromolecules provides morphological indices for damage or loss of tissue, for example as a result of exogenous stimuli. From an optical point of view, a membrane signal may have nonuniform intensity around the cell boundary, be punctate or diffused, and may even be perceptual at certain locations along the boundary. In this paper, a method for the detection and grouping of punctate, diffuse curvilinear signals is proposed. Our work builds upon the tensor voting and the iterative voting frameworks to propose an efficient method to detect and refine perceptually interesting curvilinear structures in images. The novelty of our method lies on the idea of iteratively tuning the tensor voting fields, which allows the concentration of the votes only over areas of interest. We validate the utility of our system with synthetic and annotated real data. The effectiveness of the tunable tensor voting is demonstrated on complex phenotypic signals that are representative of membrane-bound macromolecular structures.

  12. Structure Biology of Membrane Bound Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Dax [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). School of Medicine. Dept. of Physiology

    2016-11-30

    The overall goal of the proposed research is to understand the membrane-associated active processes catalyzed by an alkane $\\square$-hydroxylase (AlkB) from eubacterium Pseudomonase oleovorans. AlkB performs oxygenation of unactivated hydrocarbons found in crude oils. The enzymatic reaction involves energy-demanding steps in the membrane with the uses of structurally unknown metal active sites featuring a diiron [FeFe] center. At present, a critical barrier to understanding the membrane-associated reaction mechanism is the lack of structural information. The structural biology efforts have been challenged by technical difficulties commonly encountered in crystallization and structural determination of membrane proteins. The specific aims of the current budget cycle are to crystalize AlkB and initiate X-ray analysis to set the stage for structural determination. The long-term goals of our structural biology efforts are to provide an atomic description of AlkB structure, and to uncover the mechanisms of selective modification of hydrocarbons. The structural information will help elucidating how the unactivated C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons are oxidized to initiate biodegradation and biotransformation processes. The knowledge gained will be fundamental to biotechnological applications to biofuel transformation of non-edible oil feedstock. Renewable biodiesel is a promising energy carry that can be used to reduce fossil fuel dependency. The proposed research capitalizes on prior BES-supported efforts on over-expression and purification of AlkB to explore the inner workings of a bioenergy-relevant membrane-bound enzyme.

  13. Asymmetric Organocatalysis and Photoredox Catalysis for the α-Functionalization of Tetrahydroisoquinolines

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Hong

    2018-03-14

    The asymmetric α‐alkylation of tetrahydroisoquinolines with cyclic ketones has been accomplished in the presence of a combined catalytic system consisting of a visible‐light photoredox catalyst and a chiral primary amine organocatalyst. The desired products were obtained in good yields, high enantioselectivity, and good to excellent diastereoselectivity. (PC: photoredox cycle, EN: enamine cycle).

  14. Modulatory Effect of Taurine on 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)Anthracene-Induced Alterations in Detoxification Enzyme System, Membrane Bound Enzymes, Glycoprotein Profile and Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen in Rat Breast Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Baskaran, Kuppusamy; Periyasamy, Kuppusamy; Selvaraj, Sundaramoorthy; Ilakkia, Aruldoss; Saravanan, Dhiravidamani; Venkateswari, Ramachandran; Revathi Mani, Balasundaram; Anandakumar, Pandi; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2016-08-01

    The modulatory effect of taurine on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats was studied. DMBA (25 mg/kg body weight) was administered to induce breast cancer in rats. Protein carbonyl levels, activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase), phase I drug metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH cytochrome c reductase), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase), glycoprotein levels, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied. DMBA-induced breast tumor bearing rats showed abnormal alterations in the levels of protein carbonyls, activities of membrane bound enzymes, drug metabolizing enzymes, glycoprotein levels, and PCNA protein expression levels. Taurine treatment (100 mg/kg body weight) appreciably counteracted all the above changes induced by DMBA. Histological examination of breast tissue further supported our biochemical findings. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated the chemotherapeutic effect of taurine in DMBA-induced breast cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Heterologous expression and purification of membrane-bound pyrophosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellosalo, J.; Kajander, T.; Palmgren, Michael Broberg

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatases (M-PPases) are enzymes that couple the hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate to pumping of protons or sodium ions. In plants and bacteria they are important for relieving stress caused by low energy levels during anoxia, drought, nutrient deficiency, cold and low l...

  16. A membrane-bound vertebrate globin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Blank

    Full Text Available The family of vertebrate globins includes hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other O(2-binding proteins of yet unclear functions. Among these, globin X is restricted to fish and amphibians. Zebrafish (Danio rerio globin X is expressed at low levels in neurons of the central nervous system and appears to be associated with the sensory system. The protein harbors a unique N-terminal extension with putative N-myristoylation and S-palmitoylation sites, suggesting membrane-association. Intracellular localization and transport of globin X was studied in 3T3 cells employing green fluorescence protein fusion constructs. Both myristoylation and palmitoylation sites are required for correct targeting and membrane localization of globin X. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a vertebrate globin has been identified as component of the cell membrane. Globin X has a hexacoordinate binding scheme and displays cooperative O(2 binding with a variable affinity (P(50∼1.3-12.5 torr, depending on buffer conditions. A respiratory function of globin X is unlikely, but analogous to some prokaryotic membrane-globins it may either protect the lipids in cell membrane from oxidation or may act as a redox-sensing or signaling protein.

  17. Aromatic Chlorosulfonylation by Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májek, Michal; Neumeier, Michael; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2017-01-10

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis enables the efficient synthesis of arenesulfonyl chlorides from anilines. The new protocol involves the convenient in situ preparation of arenediazonium salts (from anilines) and the reactive gases SO 2 and HCl (from aqueous SOCl 2 ). The photocatalytic chlorosulfonylation operates at mild conditions (room temperature, acetonitrile/water) with low catalyst loading. Various functional groups are tolerated (e.g., halides, azides, nitro groups, CF 3 , SF 5 , esters, heteroarenes). Theoretical and experimental studies support a photoredox-catalysis mechanism. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  19. Asymmetric photoredox transition-metal catalysis activated by visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Haohua; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhang, Lilu; Röse, Philipp; Chen, Liang-An; Harms, Klaus; Marsch, Michael; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is seen as one of the most economical strategies to satisfy the growing demand for enantiomerically pure small molecules in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. And visible light has been recognized as an environmentally friendly and sustainable form of energy for triggering chemical transformations and catalytic chemical processes. For these reasons, visible-light-driven catalytic asymmetric chemistry is a subject of enormous current interest. Photoredox catalysis provides the opportunity to generate highly reactive radical ion intermediates with often unusual or unconventional reactivities under surprisingly mild reaction conditions. In such systems, photoactivated sensitizers initiate a single electron transfer from (or to) a closed-shell organic molecule to produce radical cations or radical anions whose reactivities are then exploited for interesting or unusual chemical transformations. However, the high reactivity of photoexcited substrates, intermediate radical ions or radicals, and the low activation barriers for follow-up reactions provide significant hurdles for the development of efficient catalytic photochemical processes that work under stereochemical control and provide chiral molecules in an asymmetric fashion. Here we report a highly efficient asymmetric catalyst that uses visible light for the necessary molecular activation, thereby combining asymmetric catalysis and photocatalysis. We show that a chiral iridium complex can serve as a sensitizer for photoredox catalysis and at the same time provide very effective asymmetric induction for the enantioselective alkylation of 2-acyl imidazoles. This new asymmetric photoredox catalyst, in which the metal centre simultaneously serves as the exclusive source of chirality, the catalytically active Lewis acid centre, and the photoredox centre, offers new opportunities for the `green' synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules.

  20. Effect of narcotics on membrane-bound mitochondrial processes in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Michiels, Ellen

    in vivo (zebrafish embryo) and in vitro tests. We applied a passive dosing method to expose zebrafish embryos up to 5 days post fertilization to linear dilution series of a set of non-polar narcotics (phenanthrene and three chlorobenzene structure analogues). In addition to increasing mortality, we...... membrane-bound process and is therefore a potential target. We found that in zebrafish embryos ETC activity was increased at low exposure concentrations, suggesting a compensatory response, while it decreased when exposure concentrations reached levels causing reduced motility, heart rate and eventually...... mortality. The effect of narcotic compounds on ETC activity was confirmed in vitro: we observed inhibition of the ETC after adding the compounds directly to a homogenate of control embryos. To further investigate effects on the energy production system, and to characterize the observed compensatory response...

  1. The morphogenetic MreBCD proteins of Escherichia coli form an essential membrane-bound complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Torben; Bork-Jensen, J.; Gerdes, Kenn

    2005-01-01

    . subtilis and C. crescentus, the mreB gene is essential. However, in E. coli, mreB was inferred not to be essential. Using a tight, conditional gene depletion system, we systematically investigated whether the E. coli mreBCD-encoded components were essential. We found that cells depleted of mreBCD became......D. In contrast, MreB and MreD did not interact in this assay. Thus, we conclude that the E. coli MreBCD form an essential membrane-bound complex. Curiously, MreB did not form cables in cell depleted for MreC, MreD or RodA, indicating a mutual interdependency between MreB filament morphology and cell shape. Based......MreB proteins of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Caulobacter crescentus form actin-like cables lying beneath the cell surface. The cables are required to guide longitudinal cell wall synthesis and their absence leads to merodiploid spherical and inflated cells prone to cell lysis. In B...

  2. Electrostatic control by lipids upon the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, M L

    1981-04-06

    In this paper, the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase from bovine brain is shown to be controlled by electrostatic alterations of the charged lipids surrounding the enzyme. The properties under investigation are the enzymatic activity, activation energy and the response of the enzymatic system to temperature. Arrhenius plots of the ATPase activity are biphasic with a break at temperature Ti. The temperature Ti, the activation energies at temperatures above and below Ti, and the enzymatic activity at any constant temperature have been shown to depend upon the concentrations of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions in the solution. These electrolyte dependencies are ascribed to changes of electrostatic conditions at the lipids surrounding the ATPase. If the higher electrostatic screening ability of divalent ions is taken into account, the results in the presence of mono- and divalent ions become virtually the same. As a result of this work, it is concluded that electrostatic alterations are transmitted to the ATPase from the lipids of the membrane in which the enzyme is embedded. Inhibition and activation of the enzyme by mono-and divalent metal ions may thus be explained without any auxiliary hypothesis, particularly without postulating specific binding sites for the different ionic species at the protein. In addition, the specific lipid requirement of the ATPase may be understood better in the light of this interpretation.

  3. Steric pressure between membrane-bound proteins opposes lipid phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheve, Christine S; Gonzales, Paul A; Momin, Noor; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2013-01-30

    Cellular membranes are densely crowded with a diverse population of integral and membrane-associated proteins. In this complex environment, lipid rafts, which are phase-separated membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and saturated lipids, are thought to organize the membrane surface. Specifically, rafts may help to concentrate proteins and lipids locally, enabling cellular processes such as assembly of caveolae, budding of enveloped viruses, and sorting of lipids and proteins in the Golgi. However, the ability of rafts to concentrate protein species has not been quantified experimentally. Here we show that when membrane-bound proteins become densely crowded within liquid-ordered membrane regions, steric pressure arising from collisions between proteins can destabilize lipid phase separations, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of proteins and lipids over the membrane surface. Using a reconstituted system of lipid vesicles and recombinant proteins, we demonstrate that protein-protein steric pressure creates an energetic barrier to the stability of phase-separated membrane domains that increases in significance as the molecular weight of the proteins increases. Comparison with a simple analytical model reveals that domains are destabilized when the steric pressure exceeds the approximate enthalpy of membrane mixing. These results suggest that a subtle balance of free energies governs the stability of phase-separated cellular membranes, providing a new perspective on the role of lipid rafts as concentrators of membrane proteins.

  4. Membrane-bound ATPase contributes to hop resistance of Lactobacillus brevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; van Veen, HW; Saito, H; Kobayashi, H; Konings, WN

    2002-01-01

    The activity of the membrane-bound H+-ATPase of the beer spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus brevis ABBC45 increased upon adaptation to bacteriostatic hop compounds. The ATPase activity was optimal around pH 5.6 and increased up to fourfold when L. brevis was exposed to 666 muM hop compounds. The

  5. Study on the changes in the levels of membrane-bound ATPases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt has been made to determine the deleterious effects of λ cyhalothrin- induced in fresh water tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) with respect to changes in the activities of membrane-bound ATPases (Na+/K+, Mg+ and Ca2+ ATPase) and mineral status ...

  6. Dissociation and purification of the endogenous membrane-bound Vo complex from Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sumei; Hong, Tao; Wang, Kun; Lu, Yinghong; Zhou, Min

    2017-10-01

    Most proteins occur and function in complexes rather than as isolated entities in membranes. In most cases macromolecules with multiple subunits are purified from endogenous sources. In this study, an endogenous membrane-protein complex was obtained from Pichia pastoris, which can be grown at high densities to significantly improve the membrane protein yield. We successfully isolated the membrane-bound Vo complex of V-ATPase from P. pastoris using a fusion FLAG tag attached to the C-terminus of subunit a to generate the vph-tag strain, which was used for dissociation and purification. After FLAG affinity and size exclusion chromatography purification, the production quantity and purity of the membrane-bound Vo complex was 20 μg l -1 and >98%, respectively. The subunits of the endogenous membrane-bound Vo complex observed in P. pastoris were similar to those obtained from S. cerevisiae, as demonstrated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Therefore, successful dissociation and purification of the membrane-bound Vo complex at a high purity and sufficient quantity was achieved via a rapid and simple procedure that can be used to obtain the endogenous membrane-protein complexes from P. pastoris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding the Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Photoredox Catalysis and Transition-Metal-Free Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitre, Spencer P; McTiernan, Christopher D; Scaiano, Juan C

    2016-06-21

    Over the past decade, the field of photoredox catalysis has gained increasing attention in synthetic organic chemistry because of its wide applicability in sustainable free-radical-mediated processes. Numerous examples have shown that under carefully optimized conditions, efficient and highly selective processes can be developed through excitation of a photosensitizer using inexpensive, readily available light sources. However, despite all of these recent advancements, some generalizations and/or misconceptions have become part of the photoredox culture, and often many of these discoveries lack in-depth investigations into the excited-state kinetics and underlying mechanisms. In this Account, we begin with a tutorial for understanding both the redox properties of excited states and how to measure the kinetics of excited-state processes. We discuss the generalization of direct excitation of closed-shell species to generate more potent reductive or oxidative excited states, using the helium atom as a quantitative example. We also outline how to apply redox potentials to calculate whether the proposed electron transfer events are thermodynamically feasible. In the second half of our tutorial, we discuss how to measure the kinetics of excited-state processes using techniques such as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and transient spectroscopy and how to apply the data using Stern-Volmer and kinetic analysis. Then we shift gears to discuss our recent contributions to the field of photoredox catalysis. Our lab focuses on developing transition-metal-free alternatives to ruthenium and iridium bipyridyl complexes for these transformations, with the goal of developing systems in which the reaction kinetics is more favorable. We have found that methylene blue, a member of the thiazine dye family, can be employed in photoredox processes such as oxidative hydroxylations of arylboronic acids to phenols. Interestingly, we were able to demonstrate that methylene blue is

  8. Steric Pressure among Membrane-Bound Polymers Opposes Lipid Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Zachary I; Kenyon, Laura E; Carrillo, Adelita; Espinoza, Isai; Nagib, Fatema; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-04-19

    Lipid rafts are thought to be key organizers of membrane-protein complexes in cells. Many proteins that interact with rafts have bulky polymeric components such as intrinsically disordered protein domains and polysaccharide chains. Therefore, understanding the interaction between membrane domains and membrane-bound polymers provides insights into the roles rafts play in cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that high concentrations of membrane-bound polymeric domains create significant lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces. Furthermore, our recent work has shown that lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces opposes the assembly of membrane domains. Building on these findings, here we report that membrane-bound polymers are potent suppressors of membrane phase separation, which can destabilize lipid domains with substantially greater efficiency than globular domains such as membrane-bound proteins. Specifically, we created giant vesicles with a ternary lipid composition, which separated into coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases. Lipids with saturated tails and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains conjugated to their head groups were included at increasing molar concentrations. When these lipids were sparse on the membrane surface they partitioned to the liquid ordered phase. However, as they became more concentrated, the fraction of GUVs that were phase-separated decreased dramatically, ultimately yielding a population of homogeneous membrane vesicles. Experiments and physical modeling using compositions of increasing PEG molecular weight and lipid miscibility phase transition temperature demonstrate that longer polymers are the most efficient suppressors of membrane phase separation when the energetic barrier to lipid mixing is low. In contrast, as the miscibility transition temperature increases, longer polymers are more readily driven out of domains by the increased steric pressure. Therefore, the concentration of shorter polymers required

  9. The impact of physiological crowding on the diffusivity of membrane bound proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Justin R; Busch, David J; Bell, David R; Li, Brian; Ren, Pengyu; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-02-21

    Diffusion of transmembrane and peripheral membrane-bound proteins within the crowded cellular membrane environment is essential to diverse biological processes including cellular signaling, endocytosis, and motility. Nonetheless we presently lack a detailed understanding of the influence of physiological levels of crowding on membrane protein diffusion. Utilizing quantitative in vitro measurements, here we demonstrate that the diffusivities of membrane bound proteins follow a single linearly decreasing trend with increasing membrane coverage by proteins. This trend holds for homogenous protein populations across a range of protein sizes and for heterogeneous mixtures of proteins of different sizes, such that protein diffusivity is controlled by the total coverage of the surrounding membrane. These results demonstrate that steric exclusion within the crowded membrane environment can fundamentally limit the diffusive rate of proteins, regardless of their size. In cells this "speed limit" could be modulated by changes in local membrane coverage, providing a mechanism for tuning the rate of molecular interaction and assembly.

  10. Synthetic activity enhancement of membrane-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis by pretreatment with isooctane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Xu, Yan; Teng, Yun

    2007-05-01

    The cell-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 with high catalysis ability for ester synthesis was located as a membrane-bound lipase by the treatments of Yatalase firstly. In order to improve its synthetic activity in non-aqueous phase, the pretreatments of this enzyme with various organic solvents were investigated. The pretreatment with isooctane improved evidently the lipase synthetic activity, resulting in about 139% in relative synthetic activity and 115% in activity recovery. The morphological changes of mycelia caused by organic solvent pretreatments could influence the exposure of the membrane-bound enzyme from mycelia and the exhibition of the lipase activity. The pretreatment conditions with isooctane and acetone were further investigated, and the optimum effect was obtained by the isooctane pretreatment at 4 degrees C for 1 h, resulting in 156% in relative synthetic activity and 126% in activity recovery. When the pretreated lipases were employed as catalysts for the esterification production of ethyl hexanoate in heptane, higher initial reaction rate and higher final molar conversion were obtained using the lipase pretreated with isooctane, compared with the untreated lyophilized one. This result suggested that the pretreatment of the membrane-bound lipase with isooctane could be an effective method to substitute the lyophilization for preparing biocatalysts used in non-aqueous phase reactions.

  11. Deoxygenation Affects Composition of Membrane-Bound Proteins in Human Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana G. Luneva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: ATP release from erythrocyte plays a key role in hypoxia-induced elevation of blood flow in systematic circulation. We have previously shown that hemolysis contributes to erythrocyte ATP release triggered by several stimuli, including hypoxia, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-increased membrane fragility remain unknown. Methods: In this study, we compared the action of hypoxia on hemolysis, ATP release and the composition of membrane-bound proteins in human erythrocytes. Results: Twenty minutes incubation of human erythrocytes in the oxygen-free environment increased the content of extracellular hemoglobin by ∼1.5 fold. Paired measurements of hemoglobin and ATP content in the same samples, showed a positive correlation between hemolysis and ATP release. Comparative analysis of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of erythrocyte ghosts obtained under control and deoxygenated conditions revealed a ∼2-fold elevation of the content of membrane-bound protein with Mr of ∼60 kDa. Conclusion: Deoxygenation of human erythrocytes affects composition of membrane-bound proteins. Additional experiments should be performed to identify the molecular origin of 60 kDa protein and its role in the attenuation of erythrocyte integrity and ATP release in hypoxic conditions.

  12. Hydrogen Production by a Hyperthermophilic Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase in Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S E; Hopkins, R C; Blanchette, C; Walsworth, V; Sumbad, R; Fischer, N; Kuhn, E; Coleman, M; Chromy, B; Letant, S; Hoeprich, P; Adams, M W; Henderson, P T

    2008-10-22

    Hydrogenases constitute a promising class of enzymes for ex vivo hydrogen production. Implementation of such applications is currently hindered by oxygen sensitivity and, in the case of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH), poor water solubility. Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), formed from apolipoproteins and phospholipids, offer a novel means to incorporate MBH into in a well-defined water-soluble matrix that maintains the enzymatic activity and is amenable to incorporation into more complex architectures. We report the synthesis, hydrogen-evolving activity and physical characterization of the first MBH-NLP assembly. This may ultimately lead to the development of biomimetic hydrogen production devices.

  13. Optimisation of the Factor VIII yield in mammalian cell cultures by reducing the membrane bound fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Mille Petersen; Nørby, Peder Lisby; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2011-01-01

    In vivo, clotting Factor VIII (FVIII) circulates in plasma bound to von Willebrand factor (vWF), and the vWF:FVIII complex prevents binding of FVIII to phosphatidylserine (PS). Activation of FVIII by thrombin releases FVIII from vWF, and subsequently FVIII binds to PS exposed on activated platelets...... or ortho-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) demonstrated that annexin V and OPLS were able to reduce the membrane bound fraction of rFVIII by 70% and 30%, respectively. Finally, adding OPLS to CHO cells stably expressing FVIII increased the yield by 50%. Using this new knowledge, the recovery of rFVIII could...

  14. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  15. Membrane-bound globin X protects the cell from reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jonas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-08

    Globin X (GbX) is a member of the globin family that emerged early in the evolution of Metazoa. In vertebrates, GbX is restricted to lampreys, fish, amphibians and some reptiles, and is expressed in neurons. Unlike any other metazoan globin, GbX is N-terminally acylated and anchored in the cell membrane via myristoyl and palmitoyl groups, suggesting a unique function. Here, we compared the capacity of GbX to protect a mouse neuronal cell line from hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) with that of myoglobin. To evaluate the contribution of membrane-binding, we generated a mutated version of GbX without acyl groups. All three globins enhanced cell viability under hypoxia, with myoglobin having the most pronounced effect. GbX but not myoglobin protected the cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced stress. Membrane-bound GbX was significantly more efficient than its mutated, soluble form. Furthermore, myoglobin and mutated GbX increased production of ROS upon H2O2-treatment, while membrane-bound GbX did not. The results indicate that myoglobin enhances O2 supply while GbX protects the cell membrane from ROS-stress. The ancient origin of GbX suggests that ROS-protection reflects the function of the early globins before they acquired a respiratory role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Provide Insights into Epitopes Coupled to the Soluble and Membrane-Bound MHC-II Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Martiniano; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Epitope recognition by major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II) is essential for the activation of immunological responses to infectious diseases. Several studies have demonstrated that this molecular event takes place in the MHC-II peptide-binding groove constituted by the α and β light chains of the heterodimer. This MHC-II peptide-binding groove has several pockets (P1-P11) involved in peptide recognition and complex stabilization that have been probed through crystallographic experiments and in silico calculations. However, most of these theoretical calculations have been performed without taking into consideration the heavy chains, which could generate misleading information about conformational mobility both in water and in the membrane environment. Therefore, in absence of structural information about the difference in the conformational changes between the peptide-free and peptide-bound states (pMHC-II) when the system is soluble in an aqueous environment or non-covalently bound to a cell membrane, as the physiological environment for MHC-II is. In this study, we explored the mechanistic basis of these MHC-II components using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which MHC-II was previously co-crystallized with a small epitope (P7) or coupled by docking procedures to a large (P22) epitope. These MD simulations were performed at 310 K over 100 ns for the water-soluble (MHC-IIw, MHC-II-P7w, and MHC-II-P22w) and 150 ns for the membrane-bound species (MHC-IIm, MHC-II-P7m, and MHC-II-P22m). Our results reveal that despite the different epitope sizes and MD simulation environments, both peptides are stabilized primarily by residues lining P1, P4, and P6-7, and similar noncovalent intermolecular energies were observed for the soluble and membrane-bound complexes. However, there were remarkably differences in the conformational mobility and intramolecular energies upon complex formation, causing some differences with respect to how the two peptides are

  17. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  18. Membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase is essential for glyceric acid production in Acetobacter tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habe, Hiroshi; Sato, Shun; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Sakaki, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    Acetobacter tropicalis NBRC16470 can produce highly enantiomerically pure D-glyceric acid (D-GA; >99 % enantiomeric excess) from glycerol. To investigate whether membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (mADH) is involved in GA production in A. tropicalis, we amplified part of the gene encoding mADH subunit I (adhA) using polymerase chain reaction and constructed an adhA-disrupted mutant of A. tropicalis (ΔadhA). Because ΔadhA did not produce GA, we confirmed that mADH is essential for the conversion of glycerol to GA. We also cloned and sequenced the entire region corresponding to adhA and adhB, which encodes mADH subunit II. The sequences showed high identities (84-86 %) with the equivalent mADH subunits from other Acetobacter spp.

  19. Free and membrane-bound ribosomes and polysomes in hippocampal neurons during a learning experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, J; David, H; Pohle, W; Marx, I; Matthies, H

    1975-01-24

    The ribosomes of the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells of hipocampus were investigated by morphometric methods after the acquisition of a shock-motivated brightness discrimination in rats. A significant increase in the total number of ribosomes was observed in CA1 cells of trained animals and in CA3 cells of both active controls and trained rats. A significant increase in membrane-bound ribosomes was obtained in CA1 and CA3 cells after training only. The results confirm the suggestion of an increased protein synthesis in hippocampal neurons during and after the acquisition of a brightness discrimination, as we have concluded from out previous investigations on the incorporation of labeled amino acids under identical experimental conditions. The results lead to the assumption that the protein synthesis in some neuronal cells may probably differ not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively in trained and untrained animals.

  20. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Cristina; Besson, Stéphane; Brondino, Carlos D; González, Pablo J; Fauque, Guy; Lampreia, Jorge; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2008-11-01

    Membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617 can be solubilized in either of two ways that will ultimately determine the presence or absence of the small (Iota) subunit. The enzyme complex (NarGHI) is composed of three subunits with molecular masses of 130, 65, and 20 kDa. This enzyme contains approximately 14 Fe, 0.8 Mo, and 1.3 molybdopterin guanine dinucleotides per enzyme molecule. Curiously, one heme b and 0.4 heme c per enzyme molecule have been detected. These hemes were potentiometrically characterized by optical spectroscopy at pH 7.6 and two noninteracting species were identified with respective midpoint potentials at Em=+197 mV (heme c) and -4.5 mV (heme b). Variable-temperature (4-120 K) X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies performed on both as-isolated and dithionite-reduced nitrate reductase showed, respectively, an EPR signal characteristic of a [3Fe-4S]+ cluster and overlapping signals associated with at least three types of [4Fe-4S]+ centers. EPR of the as-isolated enzyme shows two distinct pH-dependent Mo(V) signals with hyperfine coupling to a solvent-exchangeable proton. These signals, called "low-pH" and "high-pH," changed to a pH-independent Mo(V) signal upon nitrate or nitrite addition. Nitrate addition to dithionite-reduced samples at pH 6 and 7.6 yields some of the EPR signals described above and a new rhombic signal that has no hyperfine structure. The relationship between the distinct EPR-active Mo(V) species and their plausible structures is discussed on the basis of the structural information available to date for closely related membrane-bound nitrate reductases.

  1. Structure and dynamics of the membrane-bound form of the filamentous bacteriophage coat proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusky, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the Pf1 and fd bacteriophage coat proteins in detergent micelles are characterized in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The coat proteins are found to exist within the bacterial inner cell membrane during viral infection and assembly. The coat proteins serve as a model system to investigate integral membrane proteins as well as the viral infection and assembly processes. The coat protein is insoluble in aqueous or organic solvents and can only be effectively solubilized in the presence of detergents that form micelles or phospholipids that form vesicles. The effective molecular weight of the detergent-micelle complex is ca. 30K daltons. Sequential assignment strategies were ineffective due to short T/sub 2s/ and severe resonance degeneracy. The backbone resonance assignments were completed by the combination of several homo- and heteronuclear correlation techniques with biosynthetic 15 N labelling. 2D NOE experiments were used to locate and characterize the secondary structure of the membrane bound form of the proteins showing them to be largely helical with the hydrophobic core existing in a very stable helix

  2. Membrane-bound catechol-O-methyl transferase in cortical neurons and glial cells is intracellularly oriented

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn H Schott

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT is involved in the inactivation of dopamine in brain regions in which the dopamine transporter (DAT1 is sparsely expressed. The membrane-bound isoform of COMT (MB-COMT is the predominantly expressed form in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. It has been a matter of debate whether in neural cells of the CNS the enzymatic domain of MB-COMT is oriented towards the cytoplasmic or the extracellular compartment. Here we used live immunocytochemistry on cultured neocortical neurons and glial cells to investigate the expression and membrane orientation of native COMT and of transfected MB-COMT fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP. After live staining, COMT immunoreactivity was reliably detected in both neurons and glial cells after permeabilization, but not on unpermeabilized cells. Similarly, autofluorescence of COMT-GFP fusion protein and antibody fluorescence showed overlap only in permeabilized neurons. Our data provide converging evidence for an intracellular membrane orientation of MB-COMT in neurons and glial cells, suggesting the presence of a DAT1-independent postsynaptic uptake mechanism for dopamine, prior to its degradation via COMT.

  3. Characterization of a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase responsible for carminic acid biosynthesis in Dactylopius coccus Costa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannangara, Rubini; Siukstaite, Lina; Borch-Jensen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Carminic acid, a glucosylated anthraquinone found in scale insects like Dactylopius coccus, has since ancient times been used as a red colorant in various applications. Here we show that a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase, isolated from D. coccus and designated DcUGT2, catalyzes the glucosyla......Carminic acid, a glucosylated anthraquinone found in scale insects like Dactylopius coccus, has since ancient times been used as a red colorant in various applications. Here we show that a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase, isolated from D. coccus and designated DcUGT2, catalyzes...

  4. An organelle-free assay for pea chloroplast Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane bound fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. (Clemson Univ, SC (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Mg-chelatase, which catalyzes the insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin, lies at the branchpoint of heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis in chloroplasts. Since magnesium chelation is the first step unique to chlorophyll synthesis, one would expect this step to be highly regulated. However, to date little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase due mostly to an inability to assay it's activity outside of the intact plastid. Here the authors report the first truly in vitro i.e. organelle-free, assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts which is 3 to 4 fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts, survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated, by centrifugation, into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity and both were inactivated by boiling; indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane bound protein(s). The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol Mg-Deuteroporphyrin/h/mg protein and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity. The soluble component could be fractionated with ammonium sulfate. The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. Crude separation of chloroplast membranes into thylakoids and envelopes, suggested that the membrane-bound component of Mg-chelatase is probably located in the envelope.

  5. Synergy between experimental and computational approaches to homogeneous photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Taye B; Hansen, Jørn H

    2016-07-05

    In this Frontiers article, we highlight how state-of-the-art density functional theory calculations can contribute to the field of homogeneous photoredox catalysis. We discuss challenges in the fields and potential solutions to be found at the interface between theory and experiment. The exciting opportunities and insights that can arise through such an interdisciplinary approach are highlighted.

  6. Generating carbyne equivalents with photoredox catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaofeng; Herraiz, Ana G.; Del Hoyo, Ana M.; Suero, Marcos G.

    2018-02-01

    Carbon has the unique ability to bind four atoms and form stable tetravalent structures that are prevalent in nature. The lack of one or two valences leads to a set of species—carbocations, carbanions, radicals and carbenes—that is fundamental to our understanding of chemical reactivity. In contrast, the carbyne—a monovalent carbon with three non-bonded electrons—is a relatively unexplored reactive intermediate; the design of reactions involving a carbyne is limited by challenges associated with controlling its extreme reactivity and the lack of efficient sources. Given the innate ability of carbynes to form three new covalent bonds sequentially, we anticipated that a catalytic method of generating carbynes or related stabilized species would allow what we term an ‘assembly point’ disconnection approach for the construction of chiral centres. Here we describe a catalytic strategy that generates diazomethyl radicals as direct equivalents of carbyne species using visible-light photoredox catalysis. The ability of these carbyne equivalents to induce site-selective carbon–hydrogen bond cleavage in aromatic rings enables a useful diazomethylation reaction, which underpins sequencing control for the late-stage assembly-point functionalization of medically relevant agents. Our strategy provides an efficient route to libraries of potentially bioactive molecules through the installation of tailored chiral centres at carbon–hydrogen bonds, while complementing current translational late-stage functionalization processes. Furthermore, we exploit the dual radical and carbene character of the generated carbyne equivalent in the direct transformation of abundant chemical feedstocks into valuable chiral molecules.

  7. Membrane-bound organelles versus membrane-less compartments and their control of anabolic pathways in Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; Rabouille, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Classically, we think of cell compartmentalization as being achieved by membrane-bound organelles. It has nevertheless emerged that membrane-less assemblies also largely contribute to this compartmentalization. Here, we compare the characteristics of both types of compartmentalization in term of

  8. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundin, A.; Dijkman, R.; Bergstrom, T.; Kann, N.; Adamiak, B.; Hannoun, C.; Kindler, E.; Jonsdottir, H.R.; Muth, D.; Kint, J.; Forlenza, M.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound

  9. Ligand-modulated conformational switching in a fully synthetic membrane-bound receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Francis G. A.; Le Bailly, Bryden A. F.; Webb, Simon J.; Clayden, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Signal transduction through G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) involves binding to signalling molecules at the cell surface, which leads to global changes in molecular conformation that are communicated through the membrane. Artificial mechanisms for communication involving ligand binding and global conformational switching have been demonstrated so far only in the solution phase. Here, we report a membrane-bound synthetic receptor that responds to binding of a ligand by undergoing a conformational change that is propagated over several nanometres, deep into the phospholipid bilayer. Our design uses a helical foldamer core, with structural features borrowed from a class of membrane-active fungal antibiotics, ligated to a water-compatible, metal-centred binding site and a conformationally responsive fluorophore. Using the fluorophore as a remote reporter of conformational change, we find that binding of specific carboxylate ligands to a Cu(II) cofactor at the binding site perturbs the foldamer's global conformation, mimicking the conformational response of a GPCR to ligand binding.

  10. Nitrate reduction associated with respiration in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 is performed by a membrane-bound molybdoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Felix M; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Lucca, María E; Perotti, Nora I; Brondino, Carlos D

    2011-10-01

    The purification and biochemical characterization of the respiratory membrane-bound nitrate reductase from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 (Sm NR) is reported together with the optimal conditions for cell growth and enzyme production. The best biomass yield was obtained under aerobic conditions in a fed-batch system using Luria-Bertani medium with glucose as carbon source. The highest level of Sm NR production was achieved using microaerobic conditions with the medium supplemented with both nitrate and nitrite. Sm NR is a mononuclear Mo-protein belonging to the DMSO reductase family isolated as a heterodimeric enzyme containing two subunits of 118 and 45 kDa. Protein characterization by mass spectrometry showed homology with respiratory nitrate reductases. UV-Vis spectra of as-isolated and dithionite reduced Sm NR showed characteristic absorption bands of iron-sulfur and heme centers. Kinetic studies indicate that Sm NR follows a Michaelis-Menten mechanism (K (m) = 97 ± 11 μM, V = 9.4 ± 0.5 μM min(-1), and k (cat) = 12.1 ± 0.6 s(-1)) and is inhibited by azide, chlorate, and cyanide with mixed inhibition patterns. Physiological and kinetic studies indicate that molybdenum is essential for NR activity and that replacement of this metal for tungsten inhibits the enzyme. Although no narGHI gene cluster has been annotated in the genome of rhizobia, the biochemical characterization indicates that Sm NR is a Mo-containing NR enzyme with molecular organization similar to NarGHI.

  11. Identification and characterization of GmPDIL7, a soybean ER membrane-bound protein disulfide isomerase family protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Aya; Matsusaki, Motonori; Masuda, Taro; Urade, Reiko

    2017-02-01

    Most proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) possess intramolecular and intermolecular disulfide bonds, which play an important role in the conformational stability and function of proteins. Hence, eukaryotic cells contain protein disulfide bond formation pathways such as the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-ER oxidoreductin 1 (Ero1) system in the ER lumen. In this study, we identified soybean PDIL7 (GmPDIL7), a novel soybean ER membrane-bound PDI family protein, and determined its enzymatic properties. GmPDIL7 has a putative N-terminal signal sequence, a thioredoxin domain with an active center motif (CGHC), and a putative C-terminal transmembrane region. Likewise, we demonstrated that GmPDIL7 is ubiquitously expressed in soybean tissues and is localized in the ER membrane. Furthermore, GmPDIL7 associated with other soybean PDI family proteins in vivo and GmPDIL7 mRNA was slightly upregulated under ER stress. The redox potential of recombinant GmPDIL7 expressed in Escherichia coli was -187 mV, indicating that GmPDIL7 could oxidize unfolded proteins. GmPDIL7 exhibited a dithiol oxidase activity level that was similar to other soybean PDI family proteins. However, the oxidative refolding activity of GmPDIL7 was lower than other soybean PDI family proteins. GmPDIL7 was well oxidized by GmERO1. Taken together, our results indicated that GmPDIL7 primarily plays a role as a supplier of disulfide bonds in nascent proteins for oxidative folding on the ER membrane. The nucleotide sequence data for the GmPDIL7 cDNA are available in the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) databases under the accession numbers LC158001. Protein disulfide isomerase: EC 5.3.4.1. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Direct C–H trifluoromethylation of di- and trisubstituted alkenes by photoredox catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Tomita

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trifluoromethylated alkene scaffolds are known as useful structural motifs in pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals as well as functional organic materials. But reported synthetic methods usually require multiple synthetic steps and/or exhibit limitation with respect to access to tri- and tetrasubstituted CF3-alkenes. Thus development of new methodologies for facile construction of Calkenyl–CF3 bonds is highly demanded.Results: The photoredox reaction of alkenes with 5-(trifluoromethyldibenzo[b,d]thiophenium tetrafluoroborate, Umemoto’s reagent, as a CF3 source in the presence of [Ru(bpy3]2+ catalyst (bpy = 2,2’-bipyridine under visible light irradiation without any additive afforded CF3-substituted alkenes via direct Calkenyl–H trifluoromethylation. 1,1-Di- and trisubstituted alkenes were applicable to this photocatalytic system, providing the corresponding multisubstituted CF3-alkenes. In addition, use of an excess amount of the CF3 source induced double C–H trifluoromethylation to afford geminal bis(trifluoromethylalkenes.Conclusion: A range of multisubstituted CF3-alkenes are easily accessible by photoredox-catalyzed direct C–H trifluoromethylation of alkenes under mild reaction conditions. In particular, trifluoromethylation of triphenylethene derivatives, from which synthetically valuable tetrasubstituted CF3-alkenes are obtained, have never been reported so far. Remarkably, the present facile and straightforward protocol is extended to double trifluoromethylation of alkenes.

  13. Uncondensed Graphitic Carbon Nitride on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Oxygen Sensing via a Photoredox Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, James E; Sorescu, Dan C; Burkert, Seth C; White, David L; Star, Alexander

    2017-08-16

    Melon, a polymeric, uncondensed graphitic carbon nitride with a two-dimensional structure, has been coupled with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to create an oxygen chemiresistor sensor that is active under UV photoactivation. Oxygen gas is an important sensor target in a variety of areas including industrial safety, combustion process monitoring, as well as environmental and biomedical fields. Because of the intimate electrical interface formed between melon and rGO, charge transfer of photoexcited electrons occurs between the two materials when under UV (λ = 365 nm) irradiation. A photoredox mechanism wherein oxygen is reduced on the rGO surface provides the basis for sensing oxygen gas in the concentration range 300-100 000 ppm. The sensor response was found to be logarithmically proportional to oxygen gas concentration. DFT calculations of a melon-oxidized graphene composite found that slight protonation of melon leads to charge accumulation on the rGO layer and a corresponding charge depletion on the melon layer. This work provides an example of a metal-free system for solid-gas interface sensing via a photoredox mechanism.

  14. Molecular characterization of soluble and membrane-bound trehalases of the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; He, Wen-Bo; Su, Yun-Lin; Bing, Xiao-Li; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    Trehalases (Tres) have been demonstrated to be the key enzymes that are involved in various trehalose-associated physiological processes in insects. However, little attention has been devoted to the Tres in the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. In this study, a soluble Tre (BtTre-1) and a membrane-bound Tre (BtTre-2) were cloned in the invasive cryptic species Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) of the whitefly B. tabaci complex. Alignment of deduced amino acids sequences of both BtTres revealed that they share common consensus regions and residues with Tres of other insect species. Levels of BtTres expression in various stages and tissues of the whitefly suggested that BtTre-2 may play a key role in trehalose catabolism during development of the whitefly, especially for oocyte development, while BtTre-1 may prevent trehalose in salivary gland from leaking and entering into plants along with saliva. Potential roles of trehalose catabolism in response to direct and/or plant-mediated indirect effects of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl China Virus (TYLCCNV) were also detected. Whiteflies feeding on virus-infected tobacco plants showed higher BtTres expressions and accordingly higher BtTres activity but lower trehalose content than those feeding on uninfected plants. The enhanced trehalose catabolism may be beneficial to oocyte development in ovary and attenuate plant defensive responses induced by trehalose in saliva. Viruliferous and nonviruliferous whiteflies feeding on cotton, a nonhost plant for TYLCCNV, differed significantly only in trehalose content. The higher trehalose content in viruliferous whiteflies may be conducive to resisting the stress inflicted by TYLCCNV. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Membrane-bound state of the colicin E1 channel domain as an extended two-dimensional helical array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, S D; Lindeberg, M; Griko, Y; Salamon, Z; Tollin, G; Prendergast, F G; Cramer, W A

    1998-04-14

    Atomic level structures have been determined for the soluble forms of several colicins and toxins, but the structural changes that occur after membrane binding have not been well characterized. Changes occurring in the transition from the soluble to membrane-bound state of the C-terminal 190-residue channel polypeptide of colicin E1 (P190) bound to anionic membranes are described. In the membrane-bound state, the alpha-helical content increases from 60-64% to 80-90%, with a concomitant increase in the average length of the helical segments from 12 to 16 or 17 residues, close to the length required to span the membrane bilayer in the open channel state. The average distance between helical segments is increased and interhelix interactions are weakened, as shown by a major loss of tertiary structure interactions, decreased efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer from an energy donor on helix V of P190 to an acceptor on helix IX, and decreased resonance energy transfer at higher temperatures, not observed in soluble P190, implying freedom of motion of helical segments. Weaker interactions are also shown by a calorimetric thermal transition of low cooperativity, and the extended nature of the helical array is shown by a 3- to 4-fold increase in the average area subtended per molecule to 4,200 A2 on the membrane surface. The latter, with analysis of the heat capacity changes, implies the absence of a developed hydrophobic core in the membrane-bound P190. The membrane interfacial layer thus serves to promote formation of a highly helical extended two-dimensional flexible net. The properties of the membrane-bound state of the colicin channel domain (i.e., hydrophobic anchor, lengthened and loosely coupled alpha-helices, and close association with the membrane interfacial layer) are plausible structural features for the state that is a prerequisite for voltage gating, formation of transmembrane helices, and channel opening.

  16. Mechanism of biological denitrification inhibition: procyanidins induce an allosteric transition of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase through membrane alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Poly, Franck; Piola, Florence; Pancton, Muriel; Comte, Gilles; Meiffren, Guillaume; Haichar, Feth el Zahar

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it has been shown that procyanidins from Fallopia spp. inhibit bacterial denitrification, a phenomenon called biological denitrification inhibition (BDI). However, the mechanisms involved in such a process remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of BDI involving procyanidins, using the model strain Pseudomonas brassicacearum NFM 421. The aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) respiration, cell permeability and cell viability of P. brassicacearum were determined as a function of procyanidin concentration. The effect of procyanidins on the bacterial membrane was observed using transmission electronic microscopy. Bacterial growth, denitrification, NO3- and NO2-reductase activity, and the expression of subunits of NO3- (encoded by the gene narG) and NO2-reductase (encoded by the gene nirS) under NO3 or NO2 were measured with and without procyanidins. Procyanidins inhibited the denitrification process without affecting aerobic respiration at low concentrations. Procyanidins also disturbed cell membranes without affecting cell viability. They specifically inhibited NO3- but not NO2-reductase.Pseudomonas brassicacearum responded to procyanidins by over-expression of the membrane-bound NO3-reductase subunit (encoded by the gene narG). Our results suggest that procyanidins can specifically inhibit membrane-bound NO3-reductase inducing enzymatic conformational changes through membrane disturbance and that P. brassicacearum responds by over-expressing membrane-bound NO3-reductase. Our results lead the way to a better understanding of BDI. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Influence of kaempferol, a flavonoid compound, on membrane-bound ATPases in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Numair, Khalid S; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Chandramohan, Govindasamy

    2015-01-01

    Kaempferol is a flavonoid found in many edible plants (e.g. tea, cabbage, beans, tomato, strawberries, and grapes) and in plants or botanical products commonly used in traditional medicine. Numerous preclinical studies have shown that kaempferol have a wide range of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and antidiabetic activities. The present study investigates the effect of kaempferol on membrane-bound ATPases in erythrocytes and in liver, kidney, and heart of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced into adult male albino rats of the Wistar strain, by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight (BW)). Kaempferol (100 mg/kg BW) or glibenclamide (600 µg/kg BW) was administered orally once daily for 45 d to normal and STZ-induced diabetic rats. The effects of kaempferol on membrane-bound ATPases (total ATPase, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activity in erythrocytes and in liver, kidney, and heart were determined. In our study, diabetic rats had significantly (p kaempferol (100 mg/kg BW) or glibenclamide (600 µg/kg BW) for a period of 45 d resulted in significant (p kaempferol has the potential to restore deranged activity of membrane-bound ATPases in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Further detailed investigation is necessary to discover kaempferol's action mechanism.

  18. The catalytic function of cytochrome P450 is entwined with its membrane-bound nature [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Barnaba

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450, a family of monooxygenase enzymes, is organized as a catalytic metabolon, which requires enzymatic partners as well as environmental factors that tune its complex dynamic. P450 and its reducing counterparts—cytochrome P450-reductase and cytochrome b5—are membrane-bound proteins located in the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum. They are believed to dynamically associate to form functional complexes. Increasing experimental evidence signifies the role(s played by both protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in P450 catalytic function and efficiency. However, the biophysical challenges posed by their membrane-bound nature have severely limited high-resolution understanding of the molecular interfaces of these interactions. In this article, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on cytochrome P450, highlighting the environmental factors that are entwined with its metabolic function. Recent advances in structural biophysics are also discussed, setting up the bases for a new paradigm in the study of this important class of membrane-bound enzymes.

  19. Incorporation of membrane-bound, mammalian-derived immunomodulatory proteins into influenza whole virus vaccines boosts immunogenicity and protection against lethal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Paul C

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza epidemics continue to cause morbidity and mortality within the human population despite widespread vaccination efforts. This, along with the ominous threat of an avian influenza pandemic (H5N1, demonstrates the need for a much improved, more sophisticated influenza vaccine. We have developed an in vitro model system for producing a membrane-bound Cytokine-bearing Influenza Vaccine (CYT-IVAC. Numerous cytokines are involved in directing both innate and adaptive immunity and it is our goal to utilize the properties of individual cytokines and other immunomodulatory proteins to create a more immunogenic vaccine. Results We have evaluated the immunogenicity of inactivated cytokine-bearing influenza vaccines using a mouse model of lethal influenza virus challenge. CYT-IVACs were produced by stably transfecting MDCK cell lines with mouse-derived cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2 and IL-4 fused to the membrane-anchoring domain of the viral hemagglutinin. Influenza virus replication in these cell lines resulted in the uptake of the bioactive membrane-bound cytokines during virus budding and release. In vivo efficacy studies revealed that a single low dose of IL-2 or IL-4-bearing CYT-IVAC is superior at providing protection against lethal influenza challenge in a mouse model and provides a more balanced Th1/Th2 humoral immune response, similar to live virus infections. Conclusion We have validated the protective efficacy of CYT-IVACs in a mammalian model of influenza virus infection. This technology has broad applications in current influenza virus vaccine development and may prove particularly useful in boosting immune responses in the elderly, where current vaccines are minimally effective.

  20. Structural and dynamical insights into the membrane-bound α-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Jain

    Full Text Available Membrane-induced disorder-to-helix transition of α-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, has been implicated in a number of important neuronal functions as well as in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. In order to obtain structural insights of membrane-bound α-synuclein at the residue-specific resolution, we took advantage of the fact that the protein is devoid of tryptophan and incorporated single tryptophan at various residue positions along the sequence. These tryptophans were used as site-specific markers to characterize the structural and dynamical aspects of α-synuclein on the negatively charged small unilamellar lipid vesicles. An array of site-specific fluorescence readouts, such as the spectral-shift, quenching efficiency and anisotropy, allowed us to discern various features of the conformational rearrangements occurring at different locations of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane. In order to define the spatial localization of various regions of the protein near the membrane surface, we utilized a unique and sensitive indicator, namely, red-edge excitation shift (REES, which originates when a fluorophore is located in a highly ordered micro-environment. The extent of REES observed at different residue positions allowed us to directly identify the residues that are localized at the membrane-water interface comprising a thin (∼ 15 Å layer of motionally restrained water molecules and enabled us to construct a dynamic hydration map of the protein. The combination of site-specific fluorescence readouts allowed us to unravel the intriguing molecular details of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane in a direct model-free fashion. Additionally, the combination of methodologies described here are capable of distinguishing subtle but important structural alterations of α-synuclein bound to different negatively charged lipids with varied head-group chemistry. We believe that the structural modulations of α-synuclein on the membrane could

  1. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:25258549

  2. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect.

  3. Merging Visible Light Photoredox Catalysis with Metal Catalyzed C–H Activations: On the Role of Oxygen and Superoxide Ions as Oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus The development of efficient catalytic systems for direct aromatic C–H bond functionalization is a long-desired goal of chemists, because these protocols provide environmental friendly and waste-reducing alternatives to classical methodologies for C–C and C–heteroatom bond formation. A key challenge for these transformations is the reoxidation of the in situ generated metal hydride or low-valent metal complexes of the primary catalytic bond forming cycle. To complete the catalytic cycle and to regenerate the C–H activation catalyst, (super)stoichiometric amounts of Cu(II) or Ag(I) salts have often been applied. Recently, “greener” approaches have been developed by applying molecular oxygen in combination with Cu(II) salts, internal oxidants that are cleaved during the reaction, or solvents or additives enabling the metal hydride reoxidation. All these approaches improved the environmental friendliness but have not overcome the obstacles associated with the overall limited functional group and substrate tolerance. Hence, catalytic processes that do not feature the unfavorable aspects described above and provide products in a streamlined as well as economically and ecologically advantageous manner would be desirable. In this context, we decided to examine visible light photoredox catalysis as a new alternative to conventionally applied regeneration/oxidation procedures. This Account summarizes our recent advances in this expanding area and will highlight the new concept of merging distinct redox catalytic processes for C–H functionalizations through the application of visible light photoredox catalysis. Photoredox catalysis can be considered as catalytic electron-donating or -accepting processes, making use of visible-light absorbing homogeneous and heterogeneous metal-based catalysts, as well as organic dye sensitizers or polymers. As a consequence, photoredox catalysis is, in principle, an ideal tool for the recycling of any given metal

  4. Characterization of a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase responsible for carminic acid biosynthesis in Dactylopius coccus Costa

    OpenAIRE

    Kannangara, Rubini; Siukstaite, Lina; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Madsen, Bjørn; Kongstad, Kenneth T.; Staerk, Dan; Bennedsen, Mads; Okkels, Finn T.; Rasmussen, Silas A.; Larsen, Thomas O.; Frandsen, Rasmus J. N.; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2017-01-01

    Carminic acid, a glucosylated anthraquinone found in scale insects like Dactylopius coccus, has since ancient times been used as a red colorant in various applications. Here we show that a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase, isolated from D. coccus and designated DcUGT2, catalyzes the glucosylation of flavokermesic acid and kermesic acid into their respective C-glucosides dcII and carminic acid. DcUGT2 is predicted to be a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, contain...

  5. Decarboxylative Fluorination of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids via Photoredox Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventre, Sandrine; Petronijevic, Filip R.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2016-01-01

    The direct conversion of aliphatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alkyl fluorides has been achieved via visible light-promoted photoredox catalysis. This operationally simple, redox-neutral fluorination method is amenable to a wide variety of carboxylic acids. Photon-induced oxidation of carboxylates leads to the formation of carboxyl radicals, which upon rapid CO2-extrusion and F• transfer from a fluorinating reagent yield the desired fluoroalkanes with high efficiency. Experimental evidence indicates that an oxidative quenching pathway is operable in this broadly applicable fluorination protocol. PMID:25881929

  6. A genetic screen for anchorage-independent proliferation in mammalian cells identifies a membrane-bound neuregulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Danovi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Anchorage-independent proliferation is a hallmark of oncogenic transformation and is thought to be conducive to proliferation of cancer cells away from their site of origin. We have previously reported that primary Schwann cells expressing the SV40 Large T antigen (LT are not fully transformed in that they maintain a strict requirement for attachment, requiring a further genetic change, such as oncogenic Ras, to gain anchorage-independence. Using the LT-expressing cells, we performed a genetic screen for anchorage-independent proliferation and identified Sensory and Motor Neuron Derived Factor (SMDF, a transmembrane class III isoform of Neuregulin 1. In contrast to oncogenic Ras, SMDF induced enhanced proliferation in normal primary Schwann cells but did not trigger cellular senescence. In cooperation with LT, SMDF drove anchorage-independent proliferation, loss of contact inhibition and tumourigenicity. This transforming ability was shared with membrane-bound class III but not secreted class I isoforms of Neuregulin, indicating a distinct mechanism of action. Importantly, we show that despite being membrane-bound signalling molecules, class III neuregulins transform via a cell intrinsic mechanism, as a result of constitutive, elevated levels of ErbB signalling at high cell density and in anchorage-free conditions. This novel transforming mechanism may provide new targets for cancer therapy.

  7. Switching on elusive organometallic mechanisms with photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrett, Jack A; Cuthbertson, James D; Shurtleff, Valerie W; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-08-20

    Transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions have become one of the most used carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions in chemical synthesis. Recently, nickel catalysis has been shown to participate in a wide variety of C-C bond-forming reactions, most notably Negishi, Suzuki-Miyaura, Stille, Kumada and Hiyama couplings. Despite the tremendous advances in C-C fragment couplings, the ability to forge C-O bonds in a general fashion via nickel catalysis has been largely unsuccessful. The challenge for nickel-mediated alcohol couplings has been the mechanistic requirement for the critical C-O bond-forming step (formally known as the reductive elimination step) to occur via a Ni(III) alkoxide intermediate. Here we demonstrate that visible-light-excited photoredox catalysts can modulate the preferred oxidation states of nickel alkoxides in an operative catalytic cycle, thereby providing transient access to Ni(III) species that readily participate in reductive elimination. Using this synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis, we have developed a highly efficient and general carbon-oxygen coupling reaction using abundant alcohols and aryl bromides. More notably, we have developed a general strategy to 'switch on' important yet elusive organometallic mechanisms via oxidation state modulations using only weak light and single-electron-transfer catalysts.

  8. Synthesis of quaternary aryl phosphonium salts: photoredox-mediated phosphine arylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, A F; An, J; Jackson, M; Lindovska, P; Denton, R M

    2016-04-11

    We report a synthesis method for the construction of quaternary aryl phoshonium salts at ambient temperature. The regiospecific reaction involves the coupling of phosphines with aryl radicals derived from diaryliodonium salts under photoredox conditions.

  9. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2006-01-01

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K d values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k on ) and dissociation (k off ) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein

  10. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moaddel, Ruin [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States); Wainer, Irving W. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States)]. E-mail: Wainerir@grc.nia.nih.gov

    2006-03-30

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K {sub d} values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k {sub on}) and dissociation (k {sub off}) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein.

  11. Protective effect of Lagenaria siceraria (Mol) against membrane-bound enzyme alterations in isoproterenol-induced cardiac damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, M; Selvi, V; Krishnakumari, S

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the preventive role of the ethanolic extract of Lagenaria siceraria (Mol) fruit on membrane-bound enzymes, such as sodium potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase), calcium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Ca(2+) ATPase) and magnesium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Mg(2+) ATPase) on isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with the ethanolic extract of L. siceraria (Mol) fruit (125, 250 and 500 mg kg(-1) body weight) for a period of 30 days. After the treatment period, ISO (85mg kg(-1) body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats at 24-h intervals for 2 days. ISO-induced rats showed a significant (p Mol) fruit for a period of 30 days exhibited a significant (p Mol) fruit has membrane-stabilising role in ISO-induced MI in rats.

  12. Targeting of a chimeric human histone fusion mRNA to membrane-bound polysomes in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambetti, G.; Stein, J.; Stein, G.

    1987-01-01

    The subcellular location of histone mRNA-containing polysomes may play a key role in the posttranscriptional events that mediate histone mRNA turnover following inhibition of DNA synthesis. Previously, it has been shown that histone mRNA is found primarily on free polysomes that are associated with the cytoskeleton. The authors report here the construction of an Escherichia coli pBR322 β-lactamase signal peptide-human H3 histone fusion gene. The fusion transcript is targeted to membrane-bound polysomes and remains stable following interruption of DNA replication. Relocating mRNA within the cell may provide a procedure for studying the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression

  13. Release of membrane-bound vesicles and inhibition of tumor cell adhesion by the peptide Neopetrosiamide A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Austin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Neopetrosiamide A (NeoA is a 28-amino acid tricyclic peptide originally isolated from a marine sponge as a tumor cell invasion inhibitor whose mechanism of action is unknown.We show that NeoA reversibly inhibits tumor cell adhesion, disassembles focal adhesions in pre-attached cells, and decreases the level of beta1 integrin subunits on the cell surface. NeoA also induces the formation of dynamic, membrane-bound protrusions on the surface of treated cells and the release of membrane-bound vesicles into the culture medium. Proteomic analysis indicates that the vesicles contain EGF and transferrin receptors as well as a number of proteins involved in adhesion and migration including: beta1 integrin and numerous alpha integrin subunits; actin and actin-binding proteins such as cofilin, moesin and myosin 1C; and membrane modulating eps15 homology domain (EHD proteins. Surface labeling, trafficking inhibition, and real-time imaging experiments all suggest that beta1 integrin-containing vesicles are released directly from NeoA-induced cell surface protrusions rather than from vesicles generated intracellularly. The biological activity of NeoA is dependent on its disulfide bond pattern and NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide is globular with a continuous ridge of hydrophobic groups flanked by charged amino acid residues that could facilitate a simultaneous interaction with lipids and proteins in the membrane.NeoA is an anti-adhesive peptide that decreases cell surface integrin levels through a novel, yet to be elucidated, mechanism that involves the release of adhesion molecule-containing vesicles from the cell surface.

  14. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manetta J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Manetta, Holly Bina, Paul Ryan, Niles Fox, Derrick R Witcher, Kristine Kikly Biotechnology Discovery Research, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: B-cell activating factor (BAFF is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. Keywords: autoimmunity, B-cell malignancies, B-cell survival factor, BAFF

  15. Consecutive visible-light photoredox decarboxylative couplings of adipic acid active esters with alkynyl sulfones leading to cyclic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Tian, Hua; Jiang, Min; Yang, Haijun; Zhao, Yufen; Fu, Hua

    2016-07-07

    Novel and efficient consecutive photoredox decarboxylative couplings of adipic acid active esters (bis(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)-substituted hexanedioates) with substituted 1-(2-arylethynylsulfonyl)benzenes have been developed under visible-light photocatalysis. The successive photoredox decarboxylative C-C bond formation at room temperature afforded the corresponding cyclic compounds in good yields with tolerance of some functional groups.

  16. Unexpected Potency Differences between B-Cell-Activating Factor (BAFF) Antagonist Antibodies against Various Forms of BAFF: Trimer, 60-Mer, and Membrane-Bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Amy M; Kenny, Cynthia Hess; Khalil, Ashraf M; Pan, Qi; Ralph, Kerry L M; Ritchie, Julie; Venkataramani, Sathyadevi; Presky, David H; DeWire, Scott M; Brodeur, Scott R

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic agents antagonizing B-cell-activating factor/B-lymphocyte stimulator (BAFF/BLyS) are currently in clinical development for autoimmune diseases; belimumab is the first Food and Drug Administration-approved drug in more than 50 years for the treatment of lupus. As a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, BAFF promotes B-cell survival and homeostasis and is overexpressed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases. BAFF exists in three recognized forms: membrane-bound and two secreted, soluble forms of either trimeric or 60-mer oligomeric states. To date, most in vitro pharmacology studies of BAFF neglect one or more of these forms. Here, we report a comprehensive in vitro cell-based analysis of BAFF in assay systems that measure all forms of BAFF-mediated activation. We demonstrate the effects of these BAFF forms in both a primary human B-cell proliferation assay and in nuclear factor κB reporter assay systems in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing BAFF receptors and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI). In contrast to the mouse system, we find that BAFF trimer activates the human TACI receptor. Further, we profiled the activities of two clinically advanced BAFF antagonist antibodies, belimumab and tabalumab. Unexpectedly, we revealed differences in inhibitory potencies against the various BAFF forms, in particular that belimumab does not potently inhibit BAFF 60-mer. Through this increased understanding of the activity of BAFF antagonists against different forms of BAFF, we hope to influence the discovery of BAFF antagonist antibodies with distinct therapeutic mechanisms for improvement in the treatment of lupus or other related autoimmune pathologies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Identification and characterization of a naturally occurring, efficiently cleaved, membrane-bound, clade A HIV-1 Env, suitable for immunogen design, with properties comparable to membrane-bound BG505.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Supratik; Boliar, Saikat; Samal, Sweety; Ahmed, Shubbir; Shrivastava, Tripti; Shukla, Brihaspati N; Goswami, Sandeep; Bansal, Manish; Chakrabarti, Bimal K

    2017-10-01

    Efficient cleavage of HIV-1 Env gp160 into its constituent subunits correlates with selective binding to neutralizing antibodies and are the closest mimetic of native, functional Envs. This was first demonstrated with the clade B Env, JRFL. The correlation between efficient cleavage and selective binding to neutralizing antibodies is the guiding principle for immunogen design for HIV vaccine. We have recently reported that Envs 4-2.J41 (clade C) and JRCSF (clade B) are also efficiently cleaved and show similar properties. However, an efficiently cleaved, membrane-bound clade A Env suitable for genetic vaccination has not been directly demonstrated. Here we report that BG505 and a new clade A Env, QB726.70M.ENV.C4 (or A5) are efficiently cleaved on cell membrane. A5 shows desirable antigenic properties comparable with BG505 on cell surface. A5SOSIP in supernatant displays majority of bNAb binding epitopes. Thus, both BG505 and A5 Envs can be used in DNA prime-protein boost vaccination studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential expression of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers for imaging in male and female breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen F Vermeulen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Male breast cancer accounts for 0.5-1% of all breast cancers and is generally diagnosed at higher stage than female breast cancers and therefore might benefit from earlier detection and targeted therapy. Except for HER2 and EGFR, little is known about expression of growth factor receptors in male breast cancer. We therefore investigated expression profiles of growth factor receptors and membrane-bound tumor markers in male breast cancer and gynecomastia, in comparison with female breast cancer. METHODS: Tissue microarrays containing 133 male breast cancer and 32 gynecomastia cases were stained by immunohistochemistry for a panel of membrane-bound targets and compared with data on 266 female breast cancers. RESULTS: Growth factor receptors were variably expressed in 4.5% (MET up to 38.5% (IGF1-R of male breast cancers. Compared to female breast cancer, IGF1-R and carbonic anhydrase 12 (CAXII were more frequently and CD44v6, MET and FGFR2 less frequently expressed in male breast cancer. Expression of EGFR, HER2, CAIX, and GLUT1 was not significantly different between male and female breast cancer. Further, 48.1% of male breast cancers expressed at least one and 18.0% expressed multiple growth factor receptors. Since individual membrane receptors are expressed in only half of male breast cancers, a panel of membrane markers will be required for molecular imaging strategies to reach sensitivity. A potential panel of markers for molecular imaging, consisting of EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, CD44v6, CAXII, GLUT1, and CD44v6 was positive in 77% of male breast cancers, comparable to female breast cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Expression patterns of growth factor receptors and hypoxia membrane proteins in male breast cancer are different from female breast cancer. For molecular imaging strategies, a putative panel consisting of markers for EGFR, IGF1-R, FGFR2, GLUT1, CAXII, CD44v6 was positive in 77% of cases and might be considered for development of

  19. Different functions of the insect soluble and membrane-bound trehalase genes in chitin biosynthesis revealed by RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trehalase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes trehalose to yield two glucose molecules, plays a pivotal role in various physiological processes. In recent years, trehalase proteins have been purified from several insect species and are divided into soluble (Tre-1 and membrane-bound (Tre-2 trehalases. However, no functions of the two trehalases in chitin biosynthesis in insects have yet been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The membrane-bound trehalase of Spodoptera exigua (SeTre-2 was characterized in our laboratory previously. In this study, we cloned the soluble trehalase gene (SeTre-1 and investigated the tissue distribution and developmental expression pattern of the two trehalase genes. SeTre-1 was expressed highly in cuticle and Malpighian tubules, while SeTre-2 was expressed in tracheae and fat body. In the midgut, the two trehalase genes were expressed in different locations. Additionally, the expression profiles of both trehalase mRNAs and their enzyme activities suggest that they may play different roles in chitin biosynthesis. The RNA interference (RNAi of either SeTre-1 or SeTre-2 was gene-specific and effective, with efficiency rates up to 83% at 72 h post injection. After RNAi of SeTre-1 and SeTre-2, significant higher mortality rates were observed during the larva-pupa stage and pupa-adult stage, and the lethal phenotypes were classified and analyzed. Additionally, the change trends of concentration of trehalose and glucose appeared reciprocally in RNAi-mutants. Moreover, knockdown of SeTre-1 gene largely inhibited the expression of chitin synthase gene A (CHSA and reduced the chitin content in the cuticle to two-thirds relative to the control insects. The chitin synthase gene B (CHSB expression, however, was inhibited more by the injection of dsRNA for SeTre-2, and the chitin content in the midgut decreased by about 25%. CONCLUSIONS: SeTre-1 plays a major role in CHSA expression and chitin synthesis in the cuticle, and SeTre-2

  20. Ficolins and FIBCD1: Soluble and membrane bound pattern recognition molecules with acetyl group selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Theresa; Schlosser, Anders; Holmskov, Uffe

    2011-01-01

    as pattern recognition molecules. Ficolins are soluble oligomeric proteins composed of trimeric collagen-like regions linked to fibrinogen-related domains (FReDs) that have the ability to sense molecular patterns on both pathogens and apoptotic cell surfaces and activate the complement system. The ficolins......D-containing molecules, and discusses structural resemblance but also diversity in recognition of acetylated ligands....

  1. Depression of membrane-bound Na+-K+-ATPase activity induced by free radicals and by ischemia of kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kako, K.; Kato, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Mustapha, A.

    1988-01-01

    A partially purified, membrane-bound Na + -K + -ATPase fraction, prepared from the outer medulla of porcine kidney, was incubated in the presence of 0.1-100 mM H 2 O 2 for either 15 or 30 min at 37 degree C. The activity of ouabain-sensitive Na + -K + -ATPase was reduced proportionally to the concentration of H 2 O 2 and the duration of incubation. There were decreases in SH contents and turnover rates of the Na + -K + -ATPase preparation, while malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes were generated from the membrane lipids in the course of the incubation. The concentrations of ethanolamine (E) plasmalogen and of arachidonic acid in the E glycerophospholipid molecules were reduced by the free radical reaction. Similarly, a reduction in Na + K + -ATPase activity and the formation of MDA and conjugated dienes, together with a decrease in E glycerophospholipids, were observed when the membrane fraction was exposed to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) for 30 min at 4 degree C. Microsomal fractions, prepared from the outer medulla of canine kidney after 1 h of unilateral ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion, showed a decreased Na + -K + -ATPase activity, a reduced amount of SH groups, and an increased MDA. These changes were normalized by the infusion of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. These results support the view (1) that free radical generation affects the enzyme protein as well as membrane lipids, and (2) that free radicals may be formed in the ischemic reperfused kidney

  2. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4 + T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3 + Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3 + Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3 + Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Reduced levels of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase are common to lepidopteran strains resistant to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Jakka, Siva Rama Krishna; Ning, Changming; Liu, Chenxi; Wu, Kongming; Jackson, Jerreme; Gould, Fred; Blanco, Carlos; Portilla, Maribel; Perera, Omaththage; Adang, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Development of insect resistance is one of the main concerns with the use of transgenic crops expressing Cry toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Identification of biomarkers would assist in the development of sensitive DNA-based methods to monitor evolution of resistance to Bt toxins in natural populations. We report on the proteomic and genomic detection of reduced levels of midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (mALP) as a common feature in strains of Cry-resistant Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda when compared to susceptible larvae. Reduced levels of H. virescens mALP protein (HvmALP) were detected by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis in Cry-resistant compared to susceptible larvae, further supported by alkaline phosphatase activity assays and Western blotting. Through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) we demonstrate that the reduction in HvmALP protein levels in resistant larvae are the result of reduced transcript amounts. Similar reductions in ALP activity and mALP transcript levels were also detected for a Cry1Ac-resistant strain of H. armigera and field-derived strains of S. frugiperda resistant to Cry1Fa. Considering the unique resistance and cross-resistance phenotypes of the insect strains used in this work, our data suggest that reduced mALP expression should be targeted for development of effective biomarkers for resistance to Cry toxins in lepidopteran pests.

  4. Molecular cloning, mRNA expression and characterization of membrane-bound hemoglobin in oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengming; Xuan, Fujun; Fu, Hongtuo; Zhu, Jian; Ge, Xianping; Wu, Xugan

    2017-05-01

    Most hemoglobins are respiratory proteins and are ubiquitous in animals, bacteria, fungi, protists, and plants. In this study, we describe a membrane-bound hemoglobin in the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (MnHb), which also expresses hemocyanin. MnHb cDNA was cloned using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approach, which afforded a 1201bp gene encoding a 193 amino acid polypeptide. Bioinformatic evaluation suggested MnHb is membrane anchored by N-myristoylation, and immunofluorescence confirmed its location in the membrane of chief cells in the gill. The effect of hypoxia on MnHb expression was investigated, and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting showed that MnHb was expressed almost exclusively in the gill. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed a significant increase in expression after 6h of hypoxia, and levels peaked at 24h due to oxidative stress. Exposure of cultured prawns to the stress inducer H 2 O 2 significantly up-regulated the expression of MnHb in a dose-dependent manner. MnHb may have a role in protecting cell membrane lipids from damage by reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase responsible for carminic acid biosynthesis in Dactylopius coccus Costa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannangara, Rubini; Siukstaite, Lina; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Madsen, Bjørn; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Staerk, Dan; Bennedsen, Mads; Okkels, Finn T; Rasmussen, Silas A; Larsen, Thomas O; Frandsen, Rasmus J N; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2017-12-07

    Carminic acid, a glucosylated anthraquinone found in scale insects like Dactylopius coccus, has since ancient times been used as a red colorant in various applications. Here we show that a membrane-bound C-glucosyltransferase, isolated from D. coccus and designated DcUGT2, catalyzes the glucosylation of flavokermesic acid and kermesic acid into their respective C-glucosides dcII and carminic acid. DcUGT2 is predicted to be a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, containing a cleavable N-terminal signal peptide and a C-terminal transmembrane helix that anchors the protein to the ER, followed by a short cytoplasmic tail. DcUGT2 is found to be heavily glycosylated. Truncated DcUGT2 proteins synthesized in yeast indicate the presence of an internal ER-targeting signal. The cleavable N-terminal signal peptide is shown to be essential for the activity of DcUGT2, whereas the transmembrane helix/cytoplasmic domains, although important, are not crucial for its catalytic function.

  6. Aluminium and Acrylamide Disrupt Cerebellum Redox States, Cholinergic Function and Membrane-Bound ATPase in Adult Rats and Their Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Amara, Ibtissem Ben; Ktari, Naourez; Elwej, Awatef; Boudawara, Ons; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-12-01

    Accumulation of aluminium and acrylamide in food is a major source of human exposure. Their adverse effects are well documented, but there is no information about the health problems arising from their combined exposure. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible neurotoxic effects after co-exposure of pregnant and lactating rats to aluminium and acrylamide in order to evaluate redox state, cholinergic function and membrane-bound ATPases in the cerebellum of adult rats and their progeny. Pregnant female rats have received aluminium (50 mg/kg body weight) via drinking water and acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight) by gavage, either individually or in combination from the 14th day of pregnancy until day 14 after delivery. Exposure to these toxicants provoked an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) levels and a decrease in SOD, CAT, GPx, Na + K + -ATPase, Mg 2+ -ATPase and AChE activities in the cerebellum of mothers and their suckling pups. A reduction in GSH, NPSH and vitamin C levels was also observed. These changes were confirmed by histological results. Interestingly, co-exposure to these toxicants exhibited synergism based on physical and biochemical variables in the cerebellum of mothers and their progeny.

  7. Reduced levels of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase are common to lepidopteran strains resistant to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes

    Full Text Available Development of insect resistance is one of the main concerns with the use of transgenic crops expressing Cry toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Identification of biomarkers would assist in the development of sensitive DNA-based methods to monitor evolution of resistance to Bt toxins in natural populations. We report on the proteomic and genomic detection of reduced levels of midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (mALP as a common feature in strains of Cry-resistant Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda when compared to susceptible larvae. Reduced levels of H. virescens mALP protein (HvmALP were detected by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE analysis in Cry-resistant compared to susceptible larvae, further supported by alkaline phosphatase activity assays and Western blotting. Through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR we demonstrate that the reduction in HvmALP protein levels in resistant larvae are the result of reduced transcript amounts. Similar reductions in ALP activity and mALP transcript levels were also detected for a Cry1Ac-resistant strain of H. armigera and field-derived strains of S. frugiperda resistant to Cry1Fa. Considering the unique resistance and cross-resistance phenotypes of the insect strains used in this work, our data suggest that reduced mALP expression should be targeted for development of effective biomarkers for resistance to Cry toxins in lepidopteran pests.

  8. Clathrin-dependent endocytosis of membrane-bound RANKL in differentiated osteoclasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Narducci

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone is continuously repaired and remodelled through well-coordinated activity of osteoblasts that form new bone and osteoclasts, which resorb it. Osteoblasts synthesize and secrete two key molecules that are important for osteoclast differentiation, namely the ligand for the receptor of activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG. Active membrane transport is a typical feature of the resorbing osteoclast during bone resorption. Normally, one resorption cycle takes several hours as observed by monitoring actin ring formation and consequent disappearance in vitro. During these cyclic changes, the cytoskeleton undergoes remarkable dynamic rearrangement. Active cells show a continuous process of exocytosis that plays an essential role in transport of membrane components, soluble molecules and receptor-mediated ligands thus allowing them to communicate with the environment. The processes that govern intracellular transport and trafficking in mature osteoclasts are poorly known. The principal methodological problem that have made these studies difficult is a physiological culture of osteoclasts that permit observing the vesicle apparatus in conditions similar to the in vivo conditions. In the present study we have used a number of morphological approaches to characterize the composition, formation and the endocytic and biosynthetic pathways that play roles in dynamics of differentiation of mature bone resorbing cells using a tri-dimensional system of physiologic coculture.

  9. Model of fission yeast cell shape driven by membrane-bound growth factors and the cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Drake

    Full Text Available Fission yeast serves as a model for how cellular polarization machinery consisting of signaling molecules and the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton regulates cell shape. In this work, we develop mathematical models to investigate how these cells maintain a tubular shape of approximately constant diameter. Many studies identify active Cdc42, found in a cap at the inner membrane of growing cell tips, as an important regulator of local cell wall remodeling, likely through control of exocyst tethering and the targeting of other polarity-enhancing structures. First, we show that a computational model with Cdc42-dependent local cell wall remodeling under turgor pressure predicts a relationship between spatial extent of growth signal and cell diameter that is in agreement with prior experiments. Second, we model the consequences of feedback between cell shape and distribution of Cdc42 growth signal at cell tips. We show that stability of cell diameter over successive cell divisions places restrictions on their mutual dependence. We argue that simple models where the spatial extent of the tip growth signal relies solely on geometrical alignment of confined microtubules might lead to unstable width regulation. Third, we study a computational model that combines a growth signal distributed over a characteristic length scale (as, for example, by a reaction-diffusion mechanism with an axis-sensing microtubules system that places landmarks at positions where microtubule tips touch the cortex. A two-dimensional implementation of this model leads to stable cell diameter for a wide range of parameters. Changes to the parameters of this model reproduce straight, bent, and bulged cell shapes, and we discuss how this model is consistent with other observed cell shapes in mutants. Our work provides an initial quantitative framework for understanding the regulation of cell shape in fission yeast, and a scaffold for understanding this process on a more molecular

  10. In vitro assay of the chlorophyll biosynthetic enzyme Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane-bound fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. (Clemson Univ., SC (United States))

    1991-07-01

    The first committed step in chlorophyll synthesis is the Mg-chelatase-catalyzed insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX. Since iron insertion into protoporphyrin leads to heme formation, Mg-chelatase lies at the branch point of heme and chlorophyll synthesis in chloroplasts. Little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase, as it has been assayed only in intact cucumber chloroplasts. In this report we describe an in vitro assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts was 3- to 4-fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts. This activity survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated by centrifugation into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity, and both were inactivated by boiling indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane-bound protein(s). The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol of Mg-deuteroporphyrin per h per mg of protein, and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity and the enzymen was sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (I{sub 50}, 20 {mu}M). Broken and reconstituted cucumber chloroplasts were unable to maintain Mg-chelatase activity. However, the cucumber supernatant fraction was active when combined with the pellet fraction of peas; the converse was not true, which suggested that the cucumber pellet was the component that lost activity during lysis.

  11. Merging Photoredox Catalysis with Organocatalysis: The Direct Asymmetric Alkylation of Aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicewicz, David A.; MacMilla, David W. C.

    2009-01-01

    Photoredox catalysis and organocatalysis represent two powerful fields of molecule activation that have found widespread application in the areas of inorganic and organic chemistry, respectively. We merged these two catalysis fields to solve problems in asymmetric chemical synthesis. Specifically, the enantioselective intermolecular α-alkylation of aldehydes has been accomplished using an interwoven activation pathway that combines both the photoredox catalyst Ru(bpy)3Cl2 (where bpy is 2,2′-bipyridine) and an imidazolidinone organocatalyst. This broadly applicable, yet previously elusive, alkylation reaction is now highly enantioselective and operationally trivial. PMID:18772399

  12. Merging photoredox catalysis with organocatalysis: the direct asymmetric alkylation of aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicewicz, David A; MacMillan, David W C

    2008-10-03

    Photoredox catalysis and organocatalysis represent two powerful fields of molecule activation that have found widespread application in the areas of inorganic and organic chemistry, respectively. We merged these two catalysis fields to solve problems in asymmetric chemical synthesis. Specifically, the enantioselective intermolecular alpha-alkylation of aldehydes has been accomplished using an interwoven activation pathway that combines both the photoredox catalyst Ru(bpy)3Cl2 (where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine) and an imidazolidinone organocatalyst. This broadly applicable, yet previously elusive, alkylation reaction is now highly enantioselective and operationally trivial.

  13. Porphyrin-Metalation-Mediated Tuning of Photoredox Catalytic Properties in Metal–Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jacob A.; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Morton, Martha D.; Echeverría, Elena; Torres, Fernand E.; Zhang, Jian

    2015-09-04

    Photoredox catalytic activation of organic molecules via single-electron transfer processes has proven to be a mild and efficient synthetic methodology. However, the heavy reliance on expensive ruthenium and iridium complexes limits their applications for scale-up synthesis. To this end, photoactive metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) exhibit unique advantages as novel heterogeneous photocatalytic systems, yet their utilization toward organic transformations has been limited. Here we describe the preparation and synthetic applications of four isostructural porphyrinic MOFs, namely, UNLPF-10a, -10b, -11, and -12, which are composed of free base, InIII-, SnIVCl2-, and SnIV-porphyrin building blocks, respectively. We demonstrate that the metalation with high valent metal cations (InIII and SnIV) significantly modifies the electronic structure of porphyrin macrocycle and provides a highly oxidative photoexcited state that can undergo efficient reductive quenching processes to facilitate organic reactions. In particular, UNLPF-12 exhibits both outstanding photostability and efficient photocatalytic activities toward a range of important organic transformations including aerobic hydroxylation of arylboronic acids, amine coupling, and the Mannich reaction.

  14. Preparative semiconductor photoredox catalysis: An emerging theme in organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, David W; Walton, John C

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous semiconductor photoredox catalysis (SCPC), particularly with TiO2, is evolving to provide radically new synthetic applications. In this review we describe how photoactivated SCPCs can either (i) interact with a precursor that donates an electron to the semiconductor thus generating a radical cation; or (ii) interact with an acceptor precursor that picks up an electron with production of a radical anion. The radical cations of appropriate donors convert to neutral radicals usually by loss of a proton. The most efficient donors for synthetic purposes contain adjacent functional groups such that the neutral radicals are resonance stabilized. Thus, ET from allylic alkenes and enol ethers generated allyl type radicals that reacted with 1,2-diazine or imine co-reactants to yield functionalized hydrazones or benzylanilines. SCPC with tertiary amines enabled electron-deficient alkenes to be alkylated and furoquinolinones to be accessed. Primary amines on their own led to self-reactions involving C-N coupling and, with terminal diamines, cyclic amines were produced. Carboxylic acids were particularly fruitful affording C-centered radicals that alkylated alkenes and took part in tandem addition cyclizations producing chromenopyrroles; decarboxylative homo-dimerizations were also observed. Acceptors initially yielding radical anions included nitroaromatics and aromatic iodides. The latter led to hydrodehalogenations and cyclizations with suitable precursors. Reductive SCPC also enabled electron-deficient alkenes and aromatic aldehydes to be hydrogenated without the need for hydrogen gas.

  15. Preparative semiconductor photoredox catalysis: An emerging theme in organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Manley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous semiconductor photoredox catalysis (SCPC, particularly with TiO2, is evolving to provide radically new synthetic applications. In this review we describe how photoactivated SCPCs can either (i interact with a precursor that donates an electron to the semiconductor thus generating a radical cation; or (ii interact with an acceptor precursor that picks up an electron with production of a radical anion. The radical cations of appropriate donors convert to neutral radicals usually by loss of a proton. The most efficient donors for synthetic purposes contain adjacent functional groups such that the neutral radicals are resonance stabilized. Thus, ET from allylic alkenes and enol ethers generated allyl type radicals that reacted with 1,2-diazine or imine co-reactants to yield functionalized hydrazones or benzylanilines. SCPC with tertiary amines enabled electron-deficient alkenes to be alkylated and furoquinolinones to be accessed. Primary amines on their own led to self-reactions involving C–N coupling and, with terminal diamines, cyclic amines were produced. Carboxylic acids were particularly fruitful affording C-centered radicals that alkylated alkenes and took part in tandem addition cyclizations producing chromenopyrroles; decarboxylative homo-dimerizations were also observed. Acceptors initially yielding radical anions included nitroaromatics and aromatic iodides. The latter led to hydrodehalogenations and cyclizations with suitable precursors. Reductive SCPC also enabled electron-deficient alkenes and aromatic aldehydes to be hydrogenated without the need for hydrogen gas.

  16. Membrane-bound mucins and mucin terminal glycans expression in idiopathic or Helicobacter pylori, NSAID associated peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Yaron; Boltin, Doron; Halpern, Marisa; Cohen, Miriam; Levi, Zohar; Vilkin, Alex; Morgenstern, Sara; Manugian, Vahig; St Lawrence, Erica; Gagneux, Pascal; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Sharma, Poonam; Batra, Surinder K; Ho, Samuel B

    2014-10-28

    To determine the expression of membrane-bound mucins and glycan side chain sialic acids in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated, non-steroidal inflammatory drug (NSAID)-associated and idiopathic-gastric ulcers. We studied a cohort of randomly selected patients with H. pylori (group 1, n = 30), NSAID (group 2, n = 18), combined H. pylori and NSAID associated gastric ulcers (group 3, n = 24), and patients with idiopathic gastric ulcers (group 4, n = 20). Immunohistochemistry for MUC1, MUC4, MUC17, and staining for Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) lectins was performed on sections from the ulcer margins. Staining intensity of MUC17 was higher in H. pylori ulcers (group 1) than in idiopathic ulcers (group 4), 11.05 ± 3.67 vs 6.93 ± 4.00 for foveola cells, and 10.29 ± 4.67 vs 8.00 ± 3.48 for gland cells, respectively (P < 0.0001). In contrast, MUC1 expression was higher in group 4 compared group 1, 9.89 ± 4.17 vs 2.93 ± 5.13 in foveola cells and 7.63 ± 4.60 vs 2.57± 4.50 for glands, respectively (P < 0.0001). SNA lectin staining was increased in group 4, in parallel to elevated MUC1 expression, indicating more abundant α2-6 sialylation in that group. Cytoplasmic MUC17 staining was significantly decreased in the cases with idiopathic ulcer. The opposite was observed for both MUC1 and SNA lectin. This observation may reflect important pathogenic mechanisms, since different mucins with altered sialylation patterns may differ in their protection efficiency against acid and pepsin.

  17. Survival, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities of freshwater planarian, Dugesia japonica, exposed to synthetic and natural surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Surfactants are a major class of emerging pollutants widely used in large quantities in everyday life and commonly found in surface waters worldwide. Freshwater planarian was selected to examine the effects of different surfactants by measuring mortality, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities. Among the 10 surfactants tested, the acute toxicities of betaine and polyethylene glycol (PEG-200) to planarians were relatively low, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) greater than 10,000 mg/L. The toxicity to planarians of the other eight surfactants based on 48-h LC50 could be arranged in the descending order of cetylpyridinum chloride (CPC) > 4-tert-octylphenol (4-tert-OP) > ammonium lauryl sulfate > benzalkonium chloride > saponin > sodium lauroylsarcosinate > dioctyl sulfosuccinate > dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). Both CPC and 4-tert-OP were very toxic to planarians, with 48-h LC50 values <1 mg/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of planarian mobility were in the 0.1 to 50 mg/L range and were in the same range as the 24-h LC50 of planarians exposed to different surfactants, except for DTAB. In addition, significant inhibition of cholinesterase activity activities was found in planarians exposed to 4-tert-OP at 2.5 and 5 mg/L and to saponin at 10 mg/L after 2-h treatments. This result suggests that planarian mobility responses can be used as an alternative indicator for acute toxicity of surfactants after a very short exposure period. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  18. Aldopentoses as new substrates for the membrane-bound, pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glycerol (polyol) dehydrogenase of Gluconobacter sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Terada, Yuka; Ozaki, Seishiro; Kataoka, Naoya; Akakabe, Yoshihiko; Adachi, Osao; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2018-04-01

    Membrane-bound, pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH, or polyol dehydrogenase) of Gluconobacter sp. oxidizes various secondary alcohols to produce the corresponding ketones, such as oxidation of D-sorbitol to L-sorbose in vitamin C production. Substrate specificity of GLDH is considered limited to secondary alcohols in the D-erythro configuration at the next to the last carbon. Here, we suggest that L-ribose, D- and L-lyxoses, and L-tagatose are also substrates of GLDH, but these sugars do not meet the substrate specificity rule of GLDH. The oxygen consumption activity of wild-type Gluconobacter frateurii cell membranes depends on several kinds of sugars as compared with that of the membranes of a GLDH-negative variant. Biotransformation of those sugars with the membranes was examined to determine the reaction products. A time course measuring the pH in the reaction mixture and the increase or decrease in substrates and products on TLC suggested that oxidation products of L-lyxose and L-tagatose were ketones with unknown structures, but those of L-ribose and D-lyxose were acids. The oxidation product of L-ribose was purified and revealed to be L-ribonate by HRMS and NMR analysis. Biotransformation of L-ribose with the membranes and also with the whole cells produced L-ribonate in nearly stoichiometric amounts, indicating that the specific oxidation site in L-ribose is recognized by GLDH. Since purified GLDH produced L-ribonate without any intermediate-like compounds, we propose here a reaction model where the first carbon in the pyranose form of L-ribose is oxidized by GLDH to L-ribonolactone, which is further hydrolyzed spontaneously to produce L-ribonate.

  19. Depression of membrane-bound Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase activity induced by free radicals and by ischemia of kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kako, K.; Kato, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Mustapha, A. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1988-02-01

    A partially purified, membrane-bound Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase fraction, prepared from the outer medulla of porcine kidney, was incubated in the presence of 0.1-100 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for either 15 or 30 min at 37{degree}C. The activity of ouabain-sensitive Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase was reduced proportionally to the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the duration of incubation. There were decreases in SH contents and turnover rates of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase preparation, while malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes were generated from the membrane lipids in the course of the incubation. The concentrations of ethanolamine (E) plasmalogen and of arachidonic acid in the E glycerophospholipid molecules were reduced by the free radical reaction. Similarly, a reduction in Na{sup +}K{sup +}-ATPase activity and the formation of MDA and conjugated dienes, together with a decrease in E glycerophospholipids, were observed when the membrane fraction was exposed to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) for 30 min at 4{degree}C. Microsomal fractions, prepared from the outer medulla of canine kidney after 1 h of unilateral ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion, showed a decreased Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity, a reduced amount of SH groups, and an increased MDA. These changes were normalized by the infusion of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. These results support the view (1) that free radical generation affects the enzyme protein as well as membrane lipids, and (2) that free radicals may be formed in the ischemic reperfused kidney.

  20. Membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase: target size and radiation inactivation size of some of its enzymatic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J.; Norby, J.G.

    1988-12-05

    Frozen samples of membrane-bound pig kidney Na,K-ATPase were subjected to target size analysis by radiation inactivation with 10-MeV electrons at -15 degrees C. The various properties investigated decreased monoexponentially with radiation dose, and the decay constants, gamma, were independent of the presence of other proteins and of sucrose concentrations above 0.25 M. The temperature factor was the same as described by others. Irradiation of four proteins of known molecular mass, m, showed that gamma for protein integrity was proportional to m with a proportionality factor about 20% higher than that conventionally used. By this standard curve, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity used as internal standard gave a radiation inactivation size of 110 +/- 5 kDa, very close to m = 104-108 kDa for the dimer, as expected. For Na+/K+-transporting ATPase the following target sizes and radiation inactivation size values were very close to m = 112 kDa for the alpha-peptide: peptide integrity of alpha, 115 kDa; unmodified binding sites for ATP and vanadate, 108 kDa; K+-activated p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity, 106 kDa. There was thus no sign of dimerization of the alpha-peptide or involvement of the beta-peptide. In contrast, optimal Na+/K+-transporting ATPase activity had a radiation inactivation size = 189 +/- 7 kDa, and total nucleotide binding capacity corresponded to 72 +/- 3 kDa. These latter results will be extended and discussed in a forthcoming paper.

  1. Membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase: target size and radiation inactivation size of some of its enzymatic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.; Norby, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Frozen samples of membrane-bound pig kidney Na,K-ATPase were subjected to target size analysis by radiation inactivation with 10-MeV electrons at -15 degrees C. The various properties investigated decreased monoexponentially with radiation dose, and the decay constants, gamma, were independent of the presence of other proteins and of sucrose concentrations above 0.25 M. The temperature factor was the same as described by others. Irradiation of four proteins of known molecular mass, m, showed that gamma for protein integrity was proportional to m with a proportionality factor about 20% higher than that conventionally used. By this standard curve, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity used as internal standard gave a radiation inactivation size of 110 +/- 5 kDa, very close to m = 104-108 kDa for the dimer, as expected. For Na+/K+-transporting ATPase the following target sizes and radiation inactivation size values were very close to m = 112 kDa for the alpha-peptide: peptide integrity of alpha, 115 kDa; unmodified binding sites for ATP and vanadate, 108 kDa; K+-activated p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity, 106 kDa. There was thus no sign of dimerization of the alpha-peptide or involvement of the beta-peptide. In contrast, optimal Na+/K+-transporting ATPase activity had a radiation inactivation size = 189 +/- 7 kDa, and total nucleotide binding capacity corresponded to 72 +/- 3 kDa. These latter results will be extended and discussed in a forthcoming paper

  2. Tumor Cell Clone Expressing the Membrane-bound Form of IL-12p35 Subunit Stimulates Antitumor Immune Responses Dominated by CD8(+) T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoyong; Do, Seon Ah; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Young Sang

    2013-04-01

    IL-12 is a secretory heterodimeric cytokine composed of p35 and p40 subunits. IL-12 p35 and p40 subunits are sometimes produced as monomers or homodimers. IL-12 is also produced as a membrane-bound form in some cases. In this study, we hypothesized that the membrane-bound form of IL-12 subunits may function as a costimulatory signal for selective activation of TAA-specific CTL through direct priming without involving antigen presenting cells and helper T cells. MethA fibrosarcoma cells were transfected with expression vectors of membrane-bound form of IL-12p35 (mbIL-12p35) or IL-12p40 subunit (mbIL-12p40) and were selected under G418-containing medium. The tumor cell clones were analyzed for the expression of mbIL-12p35 or p40 subunit and for their stimulatory effects on macrophages. The responsible T-cell subpopulation for antitumor activity of mbIL-12p35 expressing tumor clone was also analyzed in T cell subset-depleted mice. Expression of transfected membrane-bound form of IL-12 subunits was stable during more than 3 months of in vitro culture, and the chimeric molecules were not released into culture supernatants. Neither the mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clones nor mbIL-12p40-expressing tumor clones activated macrophages to secrete TNF-α. Growth of mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clones was more accelerated in the CD8(+) T cell-depleted mice than in CD4(+) T cell-depleted or normal mice. These results suggest that CD8(+) T cells could be responsible for the rejection of mbIL-12p35-expressing tumor clone, which may bypass activation of antigen presenting cells and CD4(+) helper T cells.

  3. Enantioselective Decarboxylative Arylation of α-Amino Acids via the Merger of Photoredox and Nickel Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Zhiwei; Cong, Huan; Li, Wei; Choi, Junwon; Fu, Gregory C.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2016-01-01

    An asymmetric decarboxylative Csp3–Csp2 cross-coupling has been achieved via the synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis. This mild, operationally simple protocol transforms a wide variety of naturally abundant α-amino acids and readily available aryl halides into valuable chiral benzylic amines in high enantiomeric excess, thereby producing motifs found in pharmacologically active agents. PMID:26849354

  4. Decarboxylative Aminomethylation of Aryl- and Vinylsulfonates through Combined Nickel- and Photoredox-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Lulu

    2016-09-23

    A mild approach for the decarboxylative aminomethylation of aryl sulfonates by the combination of photoredox and nickel catalysis through C−O bond cleavage is described for the first time. A wide range of aryl triflates as well as aryl mesylates, tosylates and alkenyl triflates afford the corresponding products in good to excellent yields.

  5. An artificial neural network for membrane-bound catechol-O-methyltransferase biosynthesis with Pichia pastoris methanol-induced cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Augusto Q; Martins, Luís M; Dias, João M L; Bonifácio, Maria J; Queiroz, João A; Passarinha, Luís A

    2015-08-07

    Membrane proteins are important drug targets in many human diseases and gathering structural information regarding these proteins encourages the pharmaceutical industry to develop new molecules using structure-based drug design studies. Specifically, membrane-bound catechol-O-methyltransferase (MBCOMT) is an integral membrane protein that catalyzes the methylation of catechol substrates and has been linked to several diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Schizophrenia. Thereby, improvements in the clinical outcome of the therapy to these diseases may come from structure-based drug design where reaching MBCOMT samples in milligram quantities are crucial for acquiring structural information regarding this target protein. Therefore, the main aim of this work was to optimize the temperature, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) concentration and the methanol flow-rate for the biosynthesis of recombinant MBCOMT by Pichia pastoris bioreactor methanol-induced cultures using artificial neural networks (ANN). The optimization trials intended to evaluate MBCOMT expression by P. pastoris bioreactor cultures led to the development of a first standard strategy for MBCOMT bioreactor biosynthesis with a batch growth on glycerol until the dissolved oxygen spike, 3 h of glycerol feeding and 12 h of methanol induction. The ANN modeling of the aforementioned fermentation parameters predicted a maximum MBCOMT specific activity of 384.8 nmol/h/mg of protein at 30°C, 2.9 mL/L/H methanol constant flow-rate and with the addition of 6% (v/v) DMSO with almost 90% of healthy cells at the end of the induction phase. These results allowed an improvement of MBCOMT specific activity of 6.4-fold in comparison to that from the small-scale biosynthesis in baffled shake-flasks. The ANN model was able to describe the effects of temperature, DMSO concentration and methanol flow-rate on MBCOMT specific activity, as shown by the good fitness between predicted and observed values. This experimental procedure

  6. Two specific membrane-bound aminopeptidase N isoforms from Aedes aegypti larvae serve as functional receptors for the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin implicating counterpart specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroonkesorn, Aratee; Pootanakit, Kusol; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-05-29

    The interaction between Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins and their receptors on midgut cells of susceptible insect larvae is the critical determinant in toxin specificity. Besides GPI-linked alkaline phosphatase in Aedes aegypti mosquito-larval midguts, membrane-bound aminopeptidase N (AaeAPN) is widely thought to serve as a Cry4Ba receptor. Here, two full-length AaeAPN isoforms, AaeAPN2778 and AaeAPN2783, predicted to be GPI-linked were cloned and successfully expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells as 112- and 107-kDa membrane-bound proteins, respectively. In the cytotoxicity assay, Sf9 cells expressing each of the two AaeAPN isoforms showed increased sensitivity to the Cry4Ba mosquito-active toxin. Double immunolocalization revealed specific binding of Cry4Ba to each individual AaeAPN expressed on the cell membrane surface. Sequence analysis and homology-based modeling placed these two AaeAPNs to the M1 aminopeptidase family as they showed similar four-domain structures, with the most conserved domain II being the catalytic component. Additionally, the most variable domain IV containing negatively charged surface patches observed only in dipteran APNs could be involved in insect specificity. Overall results demonstrated that these two membrane-bound APN isoforms were responsible for mediating Cry4Ba toxicity against AaeAPN-expressed Sf9 cells, suggesting their important role as functional receptors for the toxin counterpart in A. aegypti mosquito larvae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Membrane-bound steel factor maintains a high local concentration for mouse primordial germ cell motility, and defines the region of their migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gu

    Full Text Available Steel factor, the protein product of the Steel locus in the mouse, is a multifunctional signal for the primordial germ cell population. We have shown previously that its expression accompanies the germ cells during migration to the gonads, forming a "travelling niche" that controls their survival, motility, and proliferation. Here we show that these functions are distributed between the alternatively spliced membrane-bound and soluble forms of Steel factor. The germ cells normally migrate as individuals from E7.5 to E11.5, when they aggregate together in the embryonic gonads. Movie analysis of Steel-dickie mutant embryos, which make only the soluble form, at E7.5, showed that the germ cells fail to migrate normally, and undergo "premature aggregation" in the base of the allantois. Survival and directionality of movement is not affected. Addition of excess soluble Steel factor to Steel-dickie embryos rescued germ cell motility, and addition of Steel factor to germ cells in vitro showed that a fourfold higher dose was required to increase motility, compared to survival. These data show that soluble Steel factor is sufficient for germ cell survival, and suggest that the membrane-bound form provides a higher local concentration of Steel factor that controls the balance between germ cell motility and aggregation. This hypothesis was tested by addition of excess soluble Steel factor to slice cultures of E11.5 embryos, when migration usually ceases, and the germ cells aggregate. This reversed the aggregation process, and caused increased motility of the germ cells. We conclude that the two forms of Steel factor control different aspects of germ cell behavior, and that membrane-bound Steel factor controls germ cell motility within a "motility niche" that moves through the embryo with the germ cells. Escape from this niche causes cessation of motility and death by apoptosis of the ectopic germ cells.

  8. Dual Hypervalent Iodine(III) Reagents and Photoredox Catalysis Enable Decarboxylative Ynonylation under Mild Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hanchu; Zhang, Guojin; Chen, Yiyun

    2015-06-26

    A combination of hypervalent iodine(III) reagents (HIR) and photoredox catalysis with visible light has enabled chemoselective decarboxylative ynonylation to construct ynones, ynamides, and ynoates. This ynonylation occurs effectively under mild reaction conditions at room temperature and on substrates with various sensitive and reactive functional groups. The reaction represents the first HIR/photoredox dual catalysis to form acyl radicals from α-ketoacids, followed by an unprecedented acyl radical addition to HIR-bound alkynes. Its efficient construction of an mGlu5 receptor inhibitor under neutral aqueous conditions suggests future visible-light-induced biological applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Merging Photoredox and Nickel Catalysis: Decarboxylative Cross-Coupling of Carboxylic Acids with Vinyl Halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Decarboxylative cross-coupling of alkyl carboxylic acids with vinyl halides has been accomplished through the synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis. This new methodology has been successfully applied to a variety of α-oxy and α-amino acids, as well as simple hydrocarbon-substituted acids. Diverse vinyl iodides and bromides give rise to vinylation products in high efficiency under mild, operationally simple reaction conditions. PMID:25521443

  10. Photoredox-Catalyzed Ketyl–Olefin Coupling for the Synthesis of Substituted Chromanols

    KAUST Repository

    Fava, Eleonora

    2016-07-21

    A visible light photoredox-catalyzed aldehyde olefin cyclization is reported. The method represents a formal hydroacylation of alkenes and alkynes and provides chromanol derivatives in good yields. The protocol takes advantage of the double role played by trialkylamines (NR3) which act as (i) electron donors for reducing the catalyst and (ii) proton donors to activate the substrate via a proton-coupled electron transfer. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  11. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Fluoroalkyl-Containing Compounds by Three-Component Photoredox Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiajia; Xie, Xiulan; Meggers, Eric

    2018-01-02

    Multicomponent reactions allow the construction of molecular complexity in an economical fashion, fluorinated compounds play an important role in pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals, whereas visible light is an abundant and sustainable source of energy for activating chemical transformations. Here we report a visible-light-induced asymmetric three-component fluoroalkylation reaction scheme catalyzed by a chiral-at-rhodium Lewis acid. The photoredox process is mediated by the inexpensive, commercially available organic photoredox mediator 4,4'-difluorobenzil, which upon activation by visible light induces the generation of perfluoroalkyl radicals from their sulfinates via single electron transfer oxidation. The fluorinated radicals are trapped by electron-rich C-C double bonds to deliver α-oxy carbon-centered radicals, followed by a subsequent stereocontrolled reaction with acceptor-substituted alkenes. This three-component fluoroalkylation scheme provides a range of complex fluoroalkyl-containing chiral compounds under dual C-C bond formation with high enantioselectivities (up to 98 % ee) and modest diastereoselectivities (up to 6:1 dr). Excellent diastereoselectivities (up to >38:1:1 dr) for natural chiral compound derivatives are observed. Broad substrate scope (25 examples), excellent functional group tolerance, scalability of the reaction, along with the option to recover the chiral catalyst and photoredox mediator reveal the practicability of this methodology in organic synthesis for the rapid synthesis of fluorinated chiral molecules. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Occlusion of 22Na+ and 86Rb+ in membrane-bound and soluble protomeric alpha beta-units of Na,K-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilsen, B.; Andersen, J.P.; Petersen, J.; Jorgensen, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    In this work, we examined occlusion of 22 Na+ and 86 Rb+ in membranous and detergent-solubilized Na,K-ATPase from outer renal medulla. Optimum conditions for occlusion of 22 Na+ were provided by formation of the phosphorylated complex from the beta,gamma-bidentate complex of chromium (III) with ATP (CrATP). Release of occluded cations occurred at equally slow rates in soluble and membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase. Values of 22 Na+ occlusion as high as 11 nmol/mg of protein were measured, corresponding to 1.8-2.7 mol of Na+/mol of phosphorylated Na,K-ATPase as determined by 32 P incorporation from [gamma- 32 P]CrATP. Maximum capacity for phosphorylation from [gamma- 32 P]CrATP was 6 nmol/mg of protein and equal to capacities for binding of [48V]vanadate and [ 3 H]ouabain. The stoichiometry for occlusion of Rb+ was close to 2 Rb+ ions/phosphorylation site. In an analytical ultracentrifuge, the soluble Na+- or Rb+-occluded complexes showed sedimentation velocities (S20,w = 6.8-7.4) consistent with monomeric alpha beta-units. The data show that soluble monomeric alpha beta-units of Na,K-ATPase can occlude Rb+ or Na+ with the same stoichiometry as the membrane-bound enzyme. The structural basis for occlusion of cations in Na,K-ATPase is suggested to be the formation of a cavity inside a monomeric alpha beta-unit constituting the minimum protein unit required for active Na,K-transport

  13. Activation of the Arabidopsis membrane-bound transcription factor bZIP28 is mediated by site-2 protease, but not site-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yuji; Ashida, Makoto; Hasegawa, Chisa; Tabara, Kazuki; Mishiba, Kei-Ichiro; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2017-08-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a homeostatic cellular response conserved in eukaryotic cells to alleviate the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Arabidopsis bZIP28 is a membrane-bound transcription factor activated by proteolytic cleavage in response to ER stress, thereby releasing its cytosolic portion containing the bZIP domain from the membrane to translocate into the nucleus where it induces the transcription of genes encoding ER-resident molecular chaperones and folding enzymes. It has been widely recognized that the proteolytic activation of bZIP28 is mediated by the sequential cleavage of site-1 protease (S1P) and site-2 protease (S2P). In the present study we provide evidence that bZIP28 protein is cleaved by S2P, but not by S1P. We demonstrated that wild-type and s1p mutant plants produce the active, nuclear form of bZIP28 in response to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin. In contrast, tunicamycin-treated s2p mutants do not accumulate the active, nuclear form of bZIP28. Consistent with these observations, s2p mutants, but not s1p mutants, exhibited a defective transcriptional response of ER stress-responsive genes and significantly higher sensitivity to tunicamycin. Interestingly, s2p mutants accumulate two membrane-bound bZIP28 fragments with a shorter ER lumen-facing C-terminal domain. Importantly, the predicted cleavage sites are located far from the canonical S1P recognition motif previously described. We propose that ER stress-induced proteolytic activation of bZIP28 is mediated by the sequential actions of as-yet-unidentified protease(s) and S2P, and does not require S1P. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Occlusion of /sup 22/Na+ and /sup 86/Rb+ in membrane-bound and soluble protomeric alpha beta-units of Na,K-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilsen, B.; Andersen, J.P.; Petersen, J.; Jorgensen, P.L.

    1987-08-05

    In this work, we examined occlusion of /sup 22/Na+ and /sup 86/Rb+ in membranous and detergent-solubilized Na,K-ATPase from outer renal medulla. Optimum conditions for occlusion of /sup 22/Na+ were provided by formation of the phosphorylated complex from the beta,gamma-bidentate complex of chromium (III) with ATP (CrATP). Release of occluded cations occurred at equally slow rates in soluble and membrane-bound Na,K-ATPase. Values of /sup 22/Na+ occlusion as high as 11 nmol/mg of protein were measured, corresponding to 1.8-2.7 mol of Na+/mol of phosphorylated Na,K-ATPase as determined by /sup 32/P incorporation from (gamma-/sup 32/P)CrATP. Maximum capacity for phosphorylation from (gamma-/sup 32/P)CrATP was 6 nmol/mg of protein and equal to capacities for binding of (48V)vanadate and (/sup 3/H)ouabain. The stoichiometry for occlusion of Rb+ was close to 2 Rb+ ions/phosphorylation site. In an analytical ultracentrifuge, the soluble Na+- or Rb+-occluded complexes showed sedimentation velocities (S20,w = 6.8-7.4) consistent with monomeric alpha beta-units. The data show that soluble monomeric alpha beta-units of Na,K-ATPase can occlude Rb+ or Na+ with the same stoichiometry as the membrane-bound enzyme. The structural basis for occlusion of cations in Na,K-ATPase is suggested to be the formation of a cavity inside a monomeric alpha beta-unit constituting the minimum protein unit required for active Na,K-transport.

  15. ATPaseTb2, a unique membrane-bound FoF1-ATPase component, is essential in bloodstream and dyskinetoplastic trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolína Šubrtová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the infectious stage of Trypanosoma brucei, an important parasite of humans and livestock, the mitochondrial (mt membrane potential (Δψm is uniquely maintained by the ATP hydrolytic activity and subsequent proton pumping of the essential FoF1-ATPase. Intriguingly, this multiprotein complex contains several trypanosome-specific subunits of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate that one of the largest novel subunits, ATPaseTb2, is membrane-bound and localizes with monomeric and multimeric assemblies of the FoF1-ATPase. Moreover, RNAi silencing of ATPaseTb2 quickly leads to a significant decrease of the Δψm that manifests as a decreased growth phenotype, indicating that the FoF1-ATPase is impaired. To further explore the function of this protein, we employed a trypanosoma strain that lacks mtDNA (dyskinetoplastic, Dk and thus subunit a, an essential component of the proton pore in the membrane Fo-moiety. These Dk cells generate the Δψm by combining the hydrolytic activity of the matrix-facing F1-ATPase and the electrogenic exchange of ATP4- for ADP3- by the ATP/ADP carrier (AAC. Surprisingly, in addition to the expected presence of F1-ATPase, the monomeric and multimeric FoF1-ATPase complexes were identified. In fact, the immunoprecipitation of a F1-ATPase subunit demonstrated that ATPaseTb2 was a component of these complexes. Furthermore, RNAi studies established that the membrane-bound ATPaseTb2 subunit is essential for maintaining normal growth and the Δψm of Dk cells. Thus, even in the absence of subunit a, a portion of the FoF1-ATPase is assembled in Dk cells.

  16. Preparation of chiral-at-metal catalysts and their use in asymmetric photoredox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiajia; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Shipeng; Meggers, Eric

    2018-04-01

    Asymmetric catalysis is a powerful approach for the synthesis of optically active compounds, and visible light constitutes an abundant source of energy to enable chemical transformations, which are often triggered by photoinduced electron transfer (photoredox chemistry). Recently, bis-cyclometalated iridium(III) and rhodium(III) complexes were introduced as a novel class of catalysts for combining asymmetric catalysis with visible-light-induced photoredox chemistry. These catalysts are attractive because of their unusual feature of chirality originating exclusively from a stereogenic metal center, which offers the prospect of an especially effective asymmetric induction upon direct coordination of the substrate to the metal center. As these chiral catalysts contain only achiral ligands, special strategies are required for their synthesis. In this protocol, we describe strategies for preparing two types of chiral-at-metal catalysts, namely the Λ- and Δ-enantiomers (left- and right-handed propellers, respectively) of the iridium complex IrS and the rhodium complex RhS. Both contain two cyclometalating 5-tert-butyl-2-phenylbenzothiazoles in addition to two acetonitrile ligands and a hexafluorophosphate counterion. The two cyclometalated ligands set the propeller-shaped chiral geometry, but the acetonitriles are labile and can be replaced by substrate molecules. The synthesis protocol consists of three stages: first, preparation of the ligand 5-tert-butyl-2-phenylbenzothiazole; second, preparation of salicylthiazoline (used for iridium) and salicyloxazoline (used for rhodium) chiral auxiliaries; and third, the auxiliary-mediated synthesis of the individual enantiopure Λ- and Δ-configured catalysts. This class of stereogenic-only-at-metal complexes is of substantial value in the field of asymmetric catalysis, offering stereocontrolled radical reactions based on visible-light-activated photoredox chemistry. Representative examples of visible-light-induced asymmetric

  17. Visible-light photoredox catalysis: selective reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by a nickel N-heterocyclic carbene-isoquinoline complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoi, V Sara; Kornienko, Nikolay; Margarit, Charles G; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher J

    2013-09-25

    The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene-amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni((Pr)bimiq1)](2+) (1c, where (Pr)bimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (E(cat) = -1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s(-1), respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

  18. Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide by a Nickel N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Isoquinoline Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoi, VanSara; Kornienko, Nick; Margarit, C; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher

    2013-06-07

    The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni(Prbimiq1)]2+ (1c, where Prbimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (Ecat = 1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s1, respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

  19. Aggressive re-warming at 38.5 degrees C following deep hypothermia at 21 degrees C increases neutrophil membrane bound elastase activity and pro-inflammatory factor release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Min; Zhao, Xiao-gang; He, Yi; Gu, Yan; Mei, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is often performed under hypothermic condition. The effects of hypothermia and re-warming on neutrophil activity are unclear. This study aimed to compare the effects of different hypothermia and re-warming regimens on neutrophil membrane bound elastase (MBE)

  20. Sulfonamides as new hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysts for photoredox allylic and benzylic C-H arylations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hirotaka; Sakai, Kentaro; Kawamura, Atsushi; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Kanai, Motomu

    2018-02-02

    A catalytic amount of a sterically and electronically tuned diarylsulfonamide promoted allylic and benzylic C-H arylations in cooperation with a visible light photoredox catalyst. This is the first example of the catalytic use of a sulfonamidyl radical to promote the hydrogen atom transfer process.

  1. Direct sp(3)C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinolines by merging photoredox catalysis with nucleophilic catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhu-Jia; Xuan, Jun; Xia, Xu-Dong; Ding, Wei; Guo, Wei; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zou, You-Quan; Lu, Liang-Qiu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2014-04-07

    Sequence catalysis merging photoredox catalysis (PC) and nucleophilic catalysis (NC) has been realized for the direct sp(3) C-H acroleination of N-aryl-tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ). The reaction was performed under very mild conditions and afforded products in 50-91% yields. A catalytic asymmetric variant was proved to be successful with moderate enantioselectivities (up to 83 : 17 er).

  2. Decarboxylative Arylation of α-Amino Acids via Photoredox Catalysis: A One-Step Conversion of Biomass to Drug Pharmacophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The direct decarboxylative arylation of α-amino acids has been achieved via visible light-mediated photoredox catalysis. This method offers rapid entry to prevalent benzylic amine architectures from an abundant biomass, specifically α-amino acid precursors. Significant substrate scope is observed with respect to both the amino acid and arene components. PMID:24712922

  3. Pathogen-expanded CD11b+ invariant NKT cells feedback inhibit T cell proliferation via membrane-bound TGF-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanmei; Jiang, Zhengping; Chen, Zhubo; Gu, Yan; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xiang; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-04-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) are effector cells, but also regulator of immune response, which either promote or suppress immune response through production of different cytokines. However, the subsets of NKT cells with definite phenotype and regulatory function need to be further identified. Furthermore, the mechanisms for NKT cells to regulate immune response remain to be fully elucidated. Here we identified CD11b(+) invariant NKT (CD11b(+) iNKT) cells as a new subset of regulatory NKT cells in mouse models with infection. αGalCer:CD1d complex(+)TCRβ(+)NK1.1(+) NKT cells could be categorized to CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) subsets. NKT cells are enriched in liver. During Listeria monocytogenes infection, hepatic CD11b(+) iNKT cells were significantly induced and expanded, with peak expansion on day 8. CD11b(+) iNKT cells were also expanded significantly in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. As compared to CD11b(-) iNKT cells, CD11b(+) iNKT cells expressed higher levels of CD27, FasL, B7H1, CD69, and particularly higher level of membrane-bound TGF-β1 (mTGF-β1), but produced less IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Hepatic CD11b(+) iNKT cells suppressed antigen-nonspecific and OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation through mTGF-β1 both in vitro and in vivo, meanwhile, they did not interfere with activation of CD4 T cells and cytotoxicity of the activated CD8 T cells. Thus, we have identified a new subset of pathogen-expanded CD11b(+) invariant NKT cells which can feedback inhibit T cell response through cell-to-cell contact via cell surface (membrane-bound) TGF-β1, especially at the late stage of immune response against infection. CD11b(+) regulatory iNKT cells may contribute to protect host from pathological injure by preventing immune overactivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the

  5. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y

    2005-06-14

    Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins--histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases--encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set) can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the highest IQ, including the current leader Wolinella succinogenes

  6. Cigarette smokers develop altered erythrocyte membrane composition: an investigation unmasking the role of membrane bound integral protein GLUT 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Jyotirmoy; Seal, Paromita; Roy, Amartya; Haldar, Rajen

    2017-04-01

    Erythrocytes in cigarette smokers are prone to oxidative damage. Here, we sought to elucidate the facts behind modifications and possible defense system developed in erythrocyte of cigarette smokers. We observed significant increase in stomatocytes and spherocytes, and osmotic fragility of erythrocyte, along with reduced level of protein thiol and increased fluorescence anisotropy in isolated membrane. Denaturing gel electrophoresis indicated alterations in band 3, band 4.2 and band 4.5. Among those, Glut 1 (i.e. band 4.5), which transports glucose (insulin independent) and dehydroascorbate (DHA), was selectively chosen for its long history in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased Glut 1 level in smokers was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, smokers showed significantly higher glucose uptake in whole blood. The intracellular (Ic) ROS (as indicated by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin) was significantly higher in smokers as evidenced by flow cytometric assay. Glucose and DHA alone or together significantly reduced IcROS at higher rate in smokers. However, in presence of Glut 1 specific blocker, phloretin, neither glucose nor DHA could reduce IcROS in both non-smokers and smokers. This confirms that Glut 1 by transporting glucose or DHA attenuates IcROS. Therefore, we conclude that erythrocytes, although altered morphologically, also develop a defense system by upregulating Glut 1 to combat with enhanced Ic oxidative insult in cigarette smokers.

  7. Kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response in relation to the H+-permeability of the membrane bound ATPase in spinach chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R.L.; van Kooten, O.; Vredenberg, W.J.

    1985-08-01

    The effect of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) on the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response and on the activity of the ATPase was investigated in isolated spinach chloroplasts. It was found that after the addition of 5 X 10(-8)mol DCCD the rate of ATP hydrolysis induced by a period of 60 sec illumination was decreased to less than 5% of its original value. At this concentration, hardly any effect, if at all, could be detected on the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response, neither in dark-adapted nor in light-activated chloroplasts. It was concluded that the presence of concentrations of DCCD, sufficiently high to affect the ATPase activity, does not affect the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response. Since DCCD decreases the H+ permeability of the membrane-bound ATPase, it was concluded that this permeability coefficient for protons is not an important factor in the regulation of the flash-induced membrane potential and, therefore, does not affect the kinetics of the flash-induced P515 response.

  8. Cloning, sequencing, and characterization of the gene encoding the smallest subunit of the three-component membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase from Acetobacter pasteurianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Beppu, T; Horinouchi, S

    1995-09-01

    The membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) of Acetobacter pasteurianus NCI1452 consists of three different subunits, a 78-kDa dehydrogenase subunit, a 48-kDa cytochrome c subunit, and a 20-kDa subunit of unknown function. For elucidation of the function of the smallest subunit, this gene was cloned from this strain by the oligonucleotide-probing method, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence and the NH2-terminal sequence determined for the purified protein indicated that the smallest subunit contained a typical signal peptide of 28 amino acids, as did the larger two subunits. This gene complemented the ADH activity of a mutant strain which had lost the smallest subunit. Disruption of this gene on the chromosome resulted in loss of ADH activity in Acetobacter aceti, indicating that the smallest subunit was essential for ADH activity. Immunoblot analyses of cell lysates prepared from various ADH mutants suggested that the smallest subunit was concerned with the stability of the 78-kDa subunit and functioned as a molecular coupler of the 78-kDa subunit to the 48-kDa subunit on the cytoplasmic membrane.

  9. The extracellular membrane-proximal domain of membrane-bound IgE restricts B cell activation by limiting B cell antigen receptor surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanshylla, Kanika; Opazo, Felipe; Gronke, Konrad; Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2018-03-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are key mediators of allergic reactions. Due to their potentially harmful anaphylactic properties, their production is tightly regulated. The membrane-bound isoform of IgE (mIgE), which is an integral component of the B cell antigen receptor, has been shown to be critical for the regulation of IgE responses in mice. In primate species including humans, mIgE can be expressed in two isoforms that are produced by alternative splicing of the primary ε Ig heavy chain transcript, and differ in the absence or presence of an extracellular membrane-proximal domain (EMPD) consisting of 52 amino acids. However, the function of the EMPD remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the EMPD restricts surface expression of mIgE-containing BCRs in human and murine B cells. The EMPD does not interfere with BCR assembly but acts as an autonomous endoplasmic reticulum retention domain. Limited surface expression of EMPD-containing mIgE-BCRs caused impaired activation of intracellular signaling cascades and hence represents a regulatory mechanism that may control the production of potentially anaphylactic IgE antibodies in primate species. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  11. In Situ Proteolysis for Crystallization of Membrane Bound Cytochrome P450 17A1 and 17A2 Proteins from Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Li; Egli, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Fish and human cytochrome P450 (P450) 17A1 catalyze both steroid 17α-hydroxylation and 17α,20-lyase reactions. Fish P450 17A2 catalyzes only 17α-hydroxylation. Both enzymes are microsomal-type P450s, integral membrane proteins that bind to the membrane through their N-terminal hydrophobic segment, the signal anchor sequence. The presence of this N-terminal region renders expression of full-length proteins challenging or impossible. For some proteins, variable truncation of the signal anchor sequence precludes expression or results in poor expression levels. To crystallize P450 17A1 and 17A2 in order to gain insight into their different activities, we used an alternative N-terminal sequence to boost expression together with in situ proteolysis. Key features of our approach to identify crystallizable P450 fragments were the use of an N-terminal leader sequence, a screen composed of 12 proteases to establish optimal cleavage, variations of protease concentration in combination with an SDS-PAGE assay, and analysis of the resulting fragments using Edman sequencing. Described in this unit are protocols for vector preparation, expression, purification, and in situ proteolytic crystallization of two membrane-bound P450 proteins. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Dual gold/photoredox-catalyzed bis-arylative cyclization of chiral homopropargyl sulfonamides with diazonium salts: rapid access to enantioenriched 2,3-dihydropyrroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Shu; Tan, Tong-De; Wang, Cai-Ming; Yuan, Ding-Qiang; Zhang, Te; Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Chunyin; Zhou, Jin-Mei; Ye, Long-Wu

    2017-06-22

    A novel dual gold/photoredox-catalyzed bis-arylative cyclization of chiral homopropargyl sulfonamides with diazonium salts has been developed, allowing the facile synthesis of various enantioenriched 2,3-dihydropyrroles in generally moderate to good yields with excellent enantioselectivities under very mild conditions without using any strong oxidants. The reaction is proposed to undergo an Au I /Au III redox cycle promoted by visible-light photoredox catalysis.

  13. The membrane-bound aspartyl protease BACE1:Molecular and functional properties in Alzheimer’s disease and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian eDislich

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 is a transmembrane aspartyl protease involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis and in myelination. BACE1 initiates the generation of the pathogenic amyloid β-peptide, which makes BACE1 a major drug target for AD. BACE1 also cleaves and activates neuregulin 1, thereby contributing to postnatal myelination, in particular in the peripheral nervous system. Additional proteins are also cleaved by BACE1, but less is known about the physiological consequences of their cleavage. Recently, new phenotypes were described in BACE1-deficient mice. Although it remains unclear through which BACE1 substrates they are mediated, the phenotypes suggest a versatile role of this protease for diverse physiological processes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and cellular properties of BACE1 as well as its regulation by lipids, by transcriptional and by translational mechanisms. The main focus will be on the recent progress in understanding BACE1 function and its implication for potential mechanism-based side effects upon therapeutic inhibition.

  14. Construction of a plasmid for co-expression of mouse membrane-bound form of IL-15 and RAE-1ε and its biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Li; Ji, Ming-Chun; Pan, Xin-Yuan; Gong, Wei-Juan; Tian, Fang; Duan, Qiu-Fang

    2011-05-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) is a pivotal cytokine for the proliferation and activation of a specific group of immune cells such as natural killer (NK), IFN-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDC) and CD8 T cells. RAE-1ε, the ligand for the activating NKG2D receptor, which also play an important role in the proliferation and activation of NK cells and IKDCs. In this study, a membrane-bound form of IL-15 (termed mb15) encoding sequence and RAE-1ε gene were obtained by SOE-PCR or PCR amplification. The amplified mb15 and RAE-1ε gene were then digested and inserted into the multiple cloning site1 (MCS1) and MCS2 of pVITRO2-mcs vector, respectively. A recombinant eukaryotic expression vector for co-expression of mb15 and RAE-1ε was successfully constructed. After it was transfected to BaF3 cells, the expression of IL-15 and RAE-1ε in recombinant BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells were verified by RT-PCR, western blot and FCM analysis. Furthermore, BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells had the ability of promoting NK cells proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. In conclusion, BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells were successfully constructed, which is very useful for further studies, especially for the expansion and activation of certain subsets of immune cells such as NK cells and IKDCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Roles of Agrobacterium tumefaciens membrane-bound ferritin (MbfA) in iron transport and resistance to iron under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhubhanil, Sakkarin; Chamsing, Jareeya; Sittipo, Panida; Chaoprasid, Paweena; Sukchawalit, Rojana; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2014-05-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens membrane-bound ferritin (MbfA) is a member of the erythrin (Er)-vacuolar iron transport family. The MbfA protein has an Er or ferritin-like domain at its N terminus and has been predicted to have five transmembrane segments in its C-terminal region. Analysis of protein localization using PhoA and LacZ reporter proteins supported the view that the N-terminal di-iron site is located in the cytoplasm whilst the C-terminal end faces the periplasm. An A. tumefaciens mbfA mutant strain had 1.5-fold higher total iron content than the WT strain. Furthermore, multi-copy expression of mbfA reduced total iron content two- and threefold in WT and mbfA mutant backgrounds, respectively. These results suggest that MbfA may function as an iron exporter rather than an iron storage protein. The mbfA mutant showed 10-fold increased sensitivity to the iron-activated antibiotic streptonigrin, implying that the mutant had increased accumulation of intracellular free iron. Growth of the mbfA mutant was reduced in the presence of high iron under acidic conditions. The expression of mbfA was induced highly in cells grown in iron-replete medium at pH 5.5, further supporting the view that mbfA is involved in the response to iron under acidic conditions. A. tumefaciens MbfA may play a protective role against increased free iron in the cytoplasm through iron binding and export, thus preventing iron-induced toxicity via the Fenton reaction.

  16. Role of a membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase complex AldFGH in acetic acid fermentation with Acetobacter pasteurianus SKU1108.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Fukunari, Seiya; Kodama, Tomohiro; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Nina, Shun; Kataoka, Naoya; Theeragool, Gunjana; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2018-04-03

    Acetic acid fermentation is widely considered a consequence of ethanol oxidation by two membrane-bound enzymes-alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-of acetic acid bacteria. Here, we used a markerless gene disruption method to construct a mutant of the Acetobacter pasteurianus strain SKU1108 with a deletion in the aldH gene, which encodes the large catalytic subunit of a heterotrimeric ALDH complex (AldFGH), to examine the role of AldFGH in acetic acid fermentation. The ΔaldH strain grew less on ethanol-containing medium, i.e., acetic acid fermentation conditions, than the wild-type strain and significantly accumulated acetaldehyde in the culture medium. Unexpectedly, acetaldehyde oxidase activity levels of the intact ΔaldH cells and the ΔaldH cell membranes were similar to those of the wild-type strain, which might be attributed to an additional ALDH isozyme (AldSLC). The apparent K M values of the wild-type and ΔaldH membranes for acetaldehyde were similar to each other, when the cells were cultured in nonfermentation conditions, where ΔaldH cells grow as well as the wild-type cells. However, the membranes of the wild-type cells grown under fermentation conditions showed a 10-fold lower apparent K M value than those of the cells grown under nonfermentation conditions. Under fermentation conditions, transcriptional levels of a gene for AldSLC were 10-fold lower than those under nonfermentation conditions, whereas aldH transcript levels were not dramatically changed under the two conditions. We suggest that A. pasteurianus SKU1108 has two ALDHs, and the AldFGH complex is indispensable for acetic acid fermentation and is the major enzyme under fermentation conditions.

  17. Matriptase-2, a membrane-bound mosaic serine proteinase predominantly expressed in human liver and showing degrading activity against extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Gloria; Cal, Santiago; Quesada, Victor; Sánchez, Luis M; López-Otín, Carlos

    2002-10-04

    We have identified and cloned a fetal liver cDNA encoding a new serine proteinase that has been called matriptase-2. This protein exhibits a domain organization similar to other members of an emerging family of membrane-bound serine proteinases known as type II transmembrane serine proteinases. Matriptase-2 contains a short cytoplasmic domain, a type II transmembrane sequence, a central region with several modular structural domains including two CUB (complement factor C1s/C1r, urchin embryonic growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein) domains and three low density lipoprotein receptor tandem repeats, and finally, a C-terminal catalytic domain with all typical features of serine proteinases. The human matriptase-2 gene maps to 22q12-q13, a location that differs from all type II transmembrane serine proteinase genes mapped to date. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis of COS-7 cells transfected with the isolated cDNA confirmed that matriptase-2 is anchored to the cell surface. Matriptase-2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant protein hydrolyzed synthetic substrates used for assaying serine proteinases and endogenous proteins such as type I collagen, fibronectin, and fibrinogen. Matriptase-2 could also activate single-chain urokinase plasminogen activator, albeit with low efficiency. These activities were abolished by inhibitors of serine proteinases but not by inhibitors of other classes of proteolytic enzymes. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that matriptase-2 transcripts are only detected at significant levels in both fetal and adult liver, suggesting that this novel serine proteinase may play a specialized role in matrix remodeling processes taking place in this tissue during development or in adult tissues.

  18. Characterization and modelling of VanT: a novel, membrane-bound, serine racemase from vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus gallinarum BM4174.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, C A; Martín-Martinez, M; Blundell, T L; Arthur, M; Courvalin, P; Reynolds, P E

    1999-03-01

    Sequence determination of a region downstream from the vanXYc gene in Enterococcus gallinarum BM4174 revealed an open reading frame, designated vanT, that encodes a 698-amino-acid polypeptide with an amino-terminal domain containing 10 predicted transmembrane segments. The protein contained a highly conserved pyridoxal phosphate attachment site in the C-terminal domain, typical of alanine racemases. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and serine racemase activity was detected in the membrane but not in the cytoplasmic fraction after centrifugation of sonicated cells, whereas alanine racemase activity was located almost exclusively in the cytoplasm. When the protein was overexpressed as a polypeptide lacking the predicted transmembrane domain, serine racemase activity was detected in the cytoplasm. The serine racemase activity was partially (64%) inhibited by D-cycloserine, whereas host alanine racemase activity was almost totally inhibited (97%). Serine racemase activity was also detected in membrane preparations of constitutively vancomycin-resistant E. gallinarum BM4174 but not in BM4175, in which insertional inactivation of the vanC-1 D-Ala:D-Ser ligase gene probably had a polar effect on expression of the vanXYc and vanT genes. Comparative modelling of the deduced C-terminal domain was based on the alignment of VanT with the Air alanine racemase from Bacillus stearothermophilus. The model revealed that almost all critical amino acids in the active site of Air were conserved in VanT, indicating that the C-terminal domain of VanT is likely to adopt a three-dimensional structure similar to that of Air and that the protein could exist as a dimer. These results indicate that the source of D-serine for peptidoglycan synthesis in vancomycin-resistant enterococci expressing the VanC phenotype involves racemization of L- to D-serine by a membrane-bound serine racemase.

  19. Late-stage functionalization of biologically active heterocycles through photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirocco, Daniel A; Dykstra, Kevin; Krska, Shane; Vachal, Petr; Conway, Donald V; Tudge, Matthew

    2014-05-05

    The direct CH functionalization of heterocycles has become an increasingly valuable tool in modern drug discovery. However, the introduction of small alkyl groups, such as methyl, by this method has not been realized in the context of complex molecule synthesis since existing methods rely on the use of strong oxidants and elevated temperatures to generate the requisite radical species. Herein, we report the use of stable organic peroxides activated by visible-light photoredox catalysis to achieve the direct methyl-, ethyl-, and cyclopropylation of a variety of biologically active heterocycles. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, and unique tolerability of this method make it an important tool for drug discovery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Access to Alkyl-Substituted Lactone via Photoredox-Catalyzed Alkylation/Lactonization of Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Wanxing; Ni, Shengyang; Han, Jianlin; Pan, Yi

    2017-11-03

    An efficient photoredox-catalyzed alkylation/lactonization reaction of unsaturated carboxylic acids by using alkyl N-hydroxyphthalimide esters as alkylation reagents has been developed. Varieties of redox-active esters derived from aliphatic carboxylic acids were proved viable in this method, affording alkyl substituted lactones in moderate to good yields. This redox-neutral procedure features mild conditions and operational simplicity, which provides a new strategy for the synthesis of alkyl substituted lactones.

  1. Cross-Coupling of Sodium Sulfinates with Aryl, Heteroaryl and Vinyl Halides by Nickel/photoredox dual catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Huifeng

    2017-12-06

    An efficient photoredox/nickel dual catalyzed sulfonylation reaction of aryl, heteroaryl, and vinyl halides has been achieved for the first time. This newly developed sulfonylation protocol provides a versatile method for the synthesis of diverse aromatic sulfones at room temperature and shows excellent functional group tolerance. The electrophilic coupling partners are not limited to aryl, heteroaryl and vinyl bromides but also less reactive aryl chlorides are suitable substrates for this transformation.

  2. Trifluoromethylation of arenes and heteroarenes by means of photoredox catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagib, David A.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Modern drug discovery relies on the continual development of synthetic methodology to address the many challenges associated with the design of new pharmaceutical agents1. One such challenge arises from the enzymatic metabolism of drugs in vivo by cytochrome P450 oxidases, which use single-electron oxidative mechanisms to rapidly modify small molecules to facilitate their excretion2. A commonly used synthetic strategy to protect against in vivo metabolism involves the incorporation of electron-withdrawing functionality, such as the trifluoromethyl (CF3) group, into drug candidates3. The CF3 group enjoys a privileged role in the realm of medicinal chemistry because its incorporation into small molecules often enhances efficacy by promoting electrostatic interactions with targets, improving cellular membrane permeability, and increasing robustness towards oxidative metabolism of the drug4–6. Although common pharmacophores often bear CF3 motifs in an aromatic system, access to such analogues typically requires the incorporation of the CF3 group, or a surrogate moiety, at the start of a multi-step synthetic sequence. Here we report a mild, operationally simple strategy for the direct trifluoromethylation of unactivated arenes and heteroarenes through a radical-mediated mechanism using commercial photocatalysts and a household light bulb. We demonstrate the broad utility of this transformation through addition of CF3 to a number of heteroaromatic and aromatic systems. The benefit to medicinal chemistry and applicability to late-stage drug development is also shown through examples of the direct trifluoromethylation of widely prescribed pharmaceutical agents. PMID:22158245

  3. Generation of a novel regulatory NK cell subset from peripheral blood CD34+ progenitors promoted by membrane-bound IL-15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giuliani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NK cells have been long time considered as cytotoxic lymphocytes competent in killing virus-infected cells and tumors. However, NK cells may also play essential immuno-regulatory functions. In this context, the real existence of a defined NK subset with negative regulatory properties has been hypothesized but never clearly demonstrated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we show the in vitro generation from human peripheral blood haematopoietic progenitors (PB-HP, of a novel subset of non-cytolytic NK cells displaying a mature phenotype and remarkable immuno-regulatory functions (NK-ireg. The main functional hallmark of these NK-ireg cells is represented by the surface expression/release of HLA-G, a major immunosuppressive molecule. In addition, NK-ireg cells secrete two powerful immuno-regulatory factors: IL-10 and IL-21. Through these factors, NK-ireg cells act as effectors of the down-regulation of the immune response: reconverting mature myeloid DC (mDC into immature/tolerogenic DC, blocking cytolytic functions on conventional NK cells and inducing HLA-G membrane expression on PB-derived monocytes. The generation of "NK-ireg" cells is obtained, by default, in culture conditions favouring cell-to-cell contacts, and it is strictly dependent on reciprocal trans-presentation of membrane-bound IL-15 forms constitutively and selectively expressed by human CD34(+ PB-HP. Finally, a small subset of NKp46(+ HLA-G(+ IL-10(+ is detected within freshly isolated decidual NK cells, suggesting that these cells could represent an in vivo counterpart of the NK-ireg cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, NK-ireg cells represent a novel truly differentiated non-cytolytic NK subset with a self-sustainable phenotype (CD56(+ CD16(+ NKp30(+ NKp44(+ NKp46(+ CD94(+ CD69(+ CCR7(+ generated from specific pSTAT6(+ GATA3(+ precursors. NK-ireg cells could be employed to develop new immuno-suppressive strategies in autoimmune diseases, transplant

  4. Two unrelated putative membrane-bound progestin receptors, progesterone membrane receptor component 1 (PGMRC1 and membrane progestin receptor (mPR beta, are expressed in the rainbow trout oocyte and exhibit similar ovarian expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fostier Alexis

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In lower vertebrates, steroid-induced oocyte maturation is considered to involve membrane-bound progestin receptors. Two totally distinct classes of putative membrane-bound progestin receptors have been reported in vertebrates. A first class of receptors, now termed progesterone membrane receptor component (PGMRC; subtypes 1 and 2 has been studied since 1996 but never studied in a fish species nor in the oocyte of any animal species. A second class of receptors, termed membrane progestin receptors (mPR; subtypes alpha, beta and gamma, was recently described in vertebrates and implicated in the progestin-initiated induction of oocyte maturation in fish. Methods In the present study, we report the characterization of the full coding sequence of rainbow trout PGMRC1 and mPR beta cDNAs, their tissue distribution, their ovarian expression profiles during oogenesis, their hormonal regulation in the full grown ovary and the in situ localization of PGMRC1 mRNA in the ovary. Results Our results clearly show, for the first time in any animal species, that rainbow trout PGMRC1 mRNA is present in the oocyte and has a strong expression in ovarian tissue. In addition, we show that both mPR beta and PGMRC1, two members of distinct membrane-bound progestin receptor classes, exhibit highly similar ovarian expression profiles during the reproductive cycle with maximum levels during vitellogenesis and a down-expression during late vitellogenesis. In addition, the mRNA abundance of both genes is not increased after in vitro hormonal stimulation of full grown follicles by maturation inducing hormones. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that PGMRC1 is a new possible participant in the progestin-induced oocyte maturation in fish. However, its participation in the process of oocyte maturation, which remains to be confirmed, would occur at post-transcriptional levels.

  5. Site-specific incorporation of 5-fluorotryptophan as a probe of the structure and function of the membrane-bound D-lactate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli: A 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peersen, O.B.; Pratt, E.A.; Truong, H.T. N.; Ho, C.; Rule, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the membrane-bound D-lactate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli have been investigated by fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 5-fluorotryptophan-labeled enzyme in conjunction with oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis. 5-Fluorotryptophan has been substituted for nine phenylalanine, tyrosine, and leucine residues in the enzyme molecule without loss of activity. The 19 F signals from these additional tryptophan residues have been used as markers for sensitivity to substrate, exposure to aqueous solvent, and proximity to a lipid-bound spin-label. The nuclear magnetic resonance data show that two mutational sites, at amino acid residues 340 and 361, are near the lipid environment used to stabilize the enzyme. There are a number of amino acid residues on the carboxyl side of this region that are strongly sensitive to the aqueous solvent. The environment of the wide-type tryptophan residue at position 469 changes as a result of two of the substitution mutations, suggesting some amino acid residue-residue interactions. Secondary structure prediction methods indicate a possible binding site for the flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor in the carboxyl end of the enzyme molecule. These results suggest that the membrane-bound D-lactate dehydrogenase may have the two-domain structure of many cytoplasmic dehydrogenases but with the addition of a membrane-binding domain between the catalytic and cofactor-binding domains. This type of three-domain structure may be of general significance for understanding the structure of membrane-bound proteins which do not traverse the lipid bilayer of membranes

  6. A Facile Steam Reforming Strategy to Delaminate Layered Carbon Nitride Semiconductors for Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengju; Ou, Honghui; Fang, Yuanxing; Wang, Xinchen

    2017-03-27

    The delamination of layered crystals that produces single or few-layered nanosheets while enabling exotic physical and chemical properties, particularly for semiconductor functions in optoelectronic applications, remains a challenge. Here, we report a facile and green approach to prepare few-layered polymeric carbon nitride (PCN) semiconductors by a one-step carbon/nitrogen steam reforming reaction. Bulky PCN, obtained from typical precursors including urea, melamine, dicyandiamide, and thiourea, are exfoliated into few-layered nanosheets, while engineering its surface carbon vacancies. The unique sheet structures with strengthened surface properties endow PCNs with more active sites, and an increased charge separation efficiency with a prolonged charge lifetime, drastically promoting their photoredox performance. After an assay of a H 2 evolution reaction, an apparent quantum yield of 11.3 % at 405 nm was recorded for the PCN nanosheets, which is much higher than those of PCN nanosheets. This delamination method is expandable to other carbon-based 2D materials for advanced applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Merging Photoredox and Nickel Catalysis: The Direct Synthesis of Ketones by the Decarboxylative Arylation of α-Oxo Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Lingling; Lipshultz, Jeffrey M; MacMillan, David W C

    2015-06-26

    The direct decarboxylative arylation of α-oxo acids has been achieved by synergistic visible-light-mediated photoredox and nickel catalysis. This method offers rapid entry to aryl and alkyl ketone architectures from simple α-oxo acid precursors via an acyl radical intermediate. Significant substrate scope is observed with respect to both the oxo acid and arene coupling partners. This mild decarboxylative arylation can also be utilized to efficiently access medicinal agents, as demonstrated by the rapid synthesis of fenofibrate. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Photoredox catalysis by [Ru(bpy)3]2+ to trigger transformations of organic molecules. Organic synthesis using visible-light photocatalysis and its 20th century roots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teplý, Filip

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 7 (2011), s. 859-917 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/10/2391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Ruthenium complexes * catalysis with dyes * visible light photoredox catalysis * photocatalysis * review Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.283, year: 2011

  9. Oxidative Photoredox-Catalytic Activation of Aliphatic Nucleophiles for C(sp3)-C(sp2) Cross-Coupling Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jahn, Emanuela; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 49 (2014), s. 13326-13328 ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : amino acids * cross-coupling * nickel * persistent radical effect * photoredox catalysis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.261, year: 2014

  10. Assessment of different fixation protocols on the presence of membrane-bound vesicles in Caco-2 cells: a multidimensional view by means of correlative light and 3-D transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shami, Gerald; Cheng, Delfine; Henriquez, Jeffrey; Braet, Filip

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we present a comparative analysis of a variety of chemical and physical fixation protocols for the specific visualisation of the membrane-bound vesicles (MBVs) in the Caco-2 colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line. In so doing, we validated the applicability of specific specimen preparation protocols for the preservation and contrasting of membrane-associated vesicles. Next, by employing the best respective chemical (GOT) and physical (SHPF) fixation methods for the application of transmission electron tomography and modelling we were able to characterise MBVs in three-dimensions and at the nanometer scale. In the second part of this study, we employ a correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) approach in order to determine which vesicular compartments are implicated in the uptake of FITC-BSA as a model protein drug. In so doing, we provide a solid foundation for future studies investigating chemotherapeutic drug uptake, transport and fate in cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A microassay for the determination of soluble and membrane-bound glutamate decarboxylase activity--influences of cations, lipid composition, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate on the glutamate decarboxylase binding to liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagel, C.; Fleissner, A.; Seifert, R.

    1989-01-01

    A radiochemical microassay for soluble and membrane-bound glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is described. Up to 180 samples can be determined per day with a variation coefficient of 2%. The method detects newly synthesized gamma-amino-n-butyric acid in the picomole range and can easily be applied to other enzymes whose substrate and product differ by charge. In an aqueous homogenate of brain (1 + 10; w/v) about 15% of the total GAD activity are spun down by centrifugation (1 h, 100,000g) increasing to 35% of the total GAD activity in solutions with 8 mM calcium chloride or 100 mM potassium acetate. There is similar dependence on the cation concentration when GAD binds to phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as well as dependence on lipid concentration and lipid composition. The coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate has no influence on GAD binding to liposomes

  12. Reductive Umpolung of Carbonyl Derivatives with Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Direct Access to Vicinal Diamines and Amino Alcohols via α-Amino Radicals and Ketyl Radicals

    KAUST Repository

    Fava, Eleonora

    2016-05-02

    Visible-light-mediated photoredox-catalyzed aldimine-aniline and aldehyde-aniline couplings have been realized. The reductive single electron transfer (SET) umpolung of various carbonyl derivatives enabled the generation of intermediary ketyl and α-amino radical anions, which were utilized for the synthesis of unsymmetrically substituted 1,2-diamines and amino alcohols. Anilines can be coupled with aldimines or aldehydes in a visible-light-mediated photoredox-catalyzed process. Reductive single electron transfer (SET) umpolung of the carbonyl derivatives leads to the generation of intermediary ketyl and α-amino radical anions, which were used for the synthesis of unsymmetrically substituted 1,2-diamines and amino alcohols.

  13. Improving the throughput of batch photochemical reactions using flow: Dual photoredox and nickel catalysis in flow for C(sp2)C(sp3) cross-coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdiaj, Irini; Alcázar, Jesús

    2017-12-01

    We report herein the transfer of dual photoredox and nickel catalysis for C(sp 2 )C(sp 3 ) cross coupling form batch to flow. This new procedure clearly improves the scalability of the previous batch reaction by the reactor's size and operating time reduction, and allows the preparation of interesting compounds for drug discovery in multigram amounts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Visible-Light Photoredox-Catalyzed Giese Reaction: Decarboxylative Addition of Amino Acid Derived α-Amino Radicals to Electron-Deficient Olefins

    KAUST Repository

    Millet, Anthony

    2016-06-20

    A tin- and halide-free, visible-light photoredox-catalyzed Giese reaction was developed. Primary and secondary α-amino radicals were generated readily from amino acids in the presence of catalytic amounts of an iridium photocatalyst. The reactivity of the α-amino radicals has been evaluated for the functionalization of a variety of activated olefins. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  15. ATPaseTb2, a Unique Membrane-bound FoF1-ATPase Component, Is Essential in Bloodstream and Dyskinetoplastic Trypanosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šubrtová, Karolína; Panicucci, Brian; Zíková, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2015), e1004660 E-ISSN 1553-7374 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1205; GA ČR GAP302/12/2513 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mitochondrial ATP synthase * inducible expression system * sequence analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 7.003, year: 2015

  16. Membrane-bound MinDE complex acts as a toggle switch that drives Min oscillation coupled to cytoplasmic depletion of MinD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Li, Min; Mizuuchi, Michiyo; Hwang, Ling Chin; Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Min system self-organizes into a cell-pole to cell-pole oscillator on the membrane to prevent divisions at the cell poles. Reconstituting the Min system on a lipid bilayer has contributed to elucidating the oscillatory mechanism. However, previous in vitro patterns were attained with protein densities on the bilayer far in excess of those in vivo and failed to recapitulate the standing wave oscillations observed in vivo. Here we studied Min protein patterning at limiting MinD concentrations reflecting the in vivo conditions. We identified “burst” patterns—radially expanding and imploding binding zones of MinD, accompanied by a peripheral ring of MinE. Bursts share several features with the in vivo dynamics of the Min system including standing wave oscillations. Our data support a patterning mechanism whereby the MinD-to-MinE ratio on the membrane acts as a toggle switch: recruiting and stabilizing MinD on the membrane when the ratio is high and releasing MinD from the membrane when the ratio is low. Coupling this toggle switch behavior with MinD depletion from the cytoplasm drives a self-organized standing wave oscillator. PMID:26884160

  17. The expression and functional activity of membrane-bound human leukocyte antigen-G1 are influenced by the 3'-untranslated region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Signe Goul; Hantash, Basil M; Zhao, Longmei

    2013-01-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an immunosuppressive molecule acting on both the innate and adaptive immune system. A 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs66554220) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-G gene has been associated with a number of diseases, pregnancy complications...... insertion were the most efficient in inhibiting NK cytotoxicity but showed a lower soluble HLA-G1 per mHLA-G1 ratio than the HLA-G1 K562 cells lacking the 14 bp insertion. Our data suggest 3'UTR polymorphism may play an important role in HLA-G regulation with implications on a range of diseases....

  18. Characterization of plasma membrane bound inorganic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... N-ethylmaliemide (NEM), phenylarsineoxide, ABC superfamily transport modulator verapamil and was also by F1Fo-ATPase inhibitor quercetin. Conclusion: We conclude that there are significant differences within promastigote, amastigote and mammalian host in cytosolic pH homeostasis to merit the inclusion of PPase ...

  19. Positrons in biomolecular systems. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, J.C.; Graf, G.; Costabal, H.; Ewert, D.H.; English, L.

    1982-01-01

    Pickoff-annihilation parameters, as related to the free volume model, are shown to be indicators of structural fluctuations in membranes and membrane bound proteins. Nitrous oxide anesthetic induces lateral rigidity in a membrane, and an anesthetic mechanism is suggested. Conformational changes of (Na + ,K + )ATPase in natural membrane are observed with ATP and Mg-ion binding. New positron applications to active transport and photosynthetic systems are suggested. (Auth.)

  20. Membrane-bound versus soluble major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A and major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain B differential expression: Mechanisms of tumor eradication versus evasion and current drug development strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A/chain B (MICA/MICB is stress-inducible, highly polymorphic ligands whose expression at the transcript level has been detected in all tissues except the central nervous system. However, their restricted protein expression is due to their regulation at the posttranslational level. Its levels are elevated in virally infected and neoplastically transformed cells. Membrane expression of this NKG2DL marks the aberrant cells for elimination by those immune effector cells that express the cognate NKG2D receptor. Among the evasion strategies developed by tumors, the metalloprotease-dependent shedding of MICA/MICB from tumors (either the free or the exosome form can contribute to the inhibition of cytolysis by the immune effector cells (all NK cells, most NKT cells; γδ CD8+ T cells and αβ CD8+ T cells, as well as some αβ CD4+ T cells. There are micro-RNA clusters that regulate surface expression and shedding. Polymorphic variants can be used as susceptibility/associative markers and can also possibly be used to correlate with tumor survival as well as staging/grading of tumors. Variations in the expression level require quantification of this marker for diagnostic/prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Mechanism-based studies would provide a better tumor-specific understanding of their relative roles in the processes of tumor cell elimination versus growth and progression. Last but not least, conventional, interlaboratory validated assays (for, e.g., antibody-based methods should be replaced by robust, reproducible, feasible biophysics-based methods using tumor biopsies. Further, correlative DNA polymorphism-based studies can be done using biological fluids (for, e.g., human saliva that can be sampled by minimally invasive means.

  1. Membrane-bound versus soluble major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A and major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain B differential expression: Mechanisms of tumor eradication versus evasion and current drug development strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, P K

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A/chain B (MICA/MICB) is stress-inducible, highly polymorphic ligands whose expression at the transcript level has been detected in all tissues except the central nervous system. However, their restricted protein expression is due to their regulation at the posttranslational level. Its levels are elevated in virally infected and neoplastically transformed cells. Membrane expression of this NKG2DL marks the aberrant cells for elimination by those immune effector cells that express the cognate NKG2D receptor. Among the evasion strategies developed by tumors, the metalloprotease-dependent shedding of MICA/MICB from tumors (either the free or the exosome form) can contribute to the inhibition of cytolysis by the immune effector cells (all NK cells, most NKT cells; γδ CD8+ T cells and αβ CD8+ T cells, as well as some αβ CD4+ T cells). There are micro-RNA clusters that regulate surface expression and shedding. Polymorphic variants can be used as susceptibility/associative markers and can also possibly be used to correlate with tumor survival as well as staging/grading of tumors. Variations in the expression level require quantification of this marker for diagnostic/prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Mechanism-based studies would provide a better tumor-specific understanding of their relative roles in the processes of tumor cell elimination versus growth and progression. Last but not least, conventional, interlaboratory validated assays (for, e.g., antibody-based methods) should be replaced by robust, reproducible, feasible biophysics-based methods using tumor biopsies. Further, correlative DNA polymorphism-based studies can be done using biological fluids (for, e.g., human saliva) that can be sampled by minimally invasive means.

  2. Isolation and purification of membrane-bound cytochrome c from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    ferrochrome and redox spectra showed the presence of heme-c. Key words: Cytochrome c, respiratory chain and Proteus mirabilis. INTRODUCTION. Proteus mirabilis is facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped, gram negative bacterium.

  3. Investigating membrane-bound Argonaute functions in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barghetti, Andrea

    by direct cleavage or by inhibition of their translation. Arabidopsis genome encode for 10 different AGO proteins, of which AGO1 is the main effector of post-transcriptional gene silencing mediated by sRNA. Importantly, a fraction of AGO1 population is associated with endomembranes, in particular...

  4. Biogenesis of membrane bound respiratory complexes in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Claire E.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia colt is one of the preferred bacteria for studies on the energetics and regulation of respiration Respiratory chains consist of primary dehydrogenases and terminal reductases or oxidases linked by quinones. In order to assemble this complex arrangement of protein complexes, synthesis of the subunits occurs in the cytoplasm followed by assembly in the cytoplasm and/or membrane, the incorporation of metal or organic cofactors and the anchoring of the complex to the membrane In the c...

  5. Biogenesis of membrane bound respiratory complexes in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, Claire E.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    Escherichia colt is one of the preferred bacteria for studies on the energetics and regulation of respiration Respiratory chains consist of primary dehydrogenases and terminal reductases or oxidases linked by quinones. In order to assemble this complex arrangement of protein complexes, synthesis of

  6. Isolation and purification of membrane-bound cytochrome c from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present studies, respiratory chain pathogenic bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, was investigated. In the first phase, growth profile study was performed to optimize the P. mirabilis growth. Maximum bacterial growth could be obtained between 10 – 12 h of culturing time. Down-stream processing was performed by using ...

  7. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  8. Homogeneous and heterogeneous photoredox-catalyzed hydroxymethylation of ketones and keto esters: catalyst screening, chemoselectivity and dilution effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel G. Griesbeck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous titanium- and dye-catalyzed as well as the heterogeneous semiconductor particle-catalyzed photohydroxymethylation of ketones by methanol were investigated in order to evaluate the most active photocatalyst system. Dialkoxytitanium dichlorides are the most efficient species for chemoselective hydroxymethylation of acetophenone as well as other aromatic and aliphatic ketones. Pinacol coupling is the dominant process for semiconductor catalysis and ketone reduction dominates the Ti(OiPr4/methanol or isopropanol systems. Application of dilution effects on the TiO2 catalysis leads to an increase in hydroxymethylation at the expense of the pinacol coupling.

  9. Purification of a membrane-bound trypsin-like enzyme from the gut of the velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner =Purificação de uma enzima “tipo tripsina” não-solúvel do intestino da lagarta da soja (Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Matos Santoro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of protein digestion in insects by specific endoprotease inhibitors is being regarded as an alternative to conventional insecticides for pest control. To optimize the effectiveness of this strategy, the understanding of the endoprotease diversity of the target insect is crucial. In this sense, a membrane-bound trypsin-like enzyme from the gut of Anticarsia gemmatalis fifth-instar larvae was purified. Non-soluble fraction of the gut extract was solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyldimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS and subjected to a p-aminobenzamidine affinity chromatography followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The yield of the purified enzyme was 11% with a purification factor of 143 and a final specific activity of 18.6 µM min.-1 mg-1 protein using N-α-benzoyl-L- Arg-p-nitroanilide (L-BApNA as substrate. The purified sample showed a single band with proteolytic activity active and apparent molecular mass of 25 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Molecular mass determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was 28,632 ± 26 Da. Although the low recovery and the difficulties in purifying large enzyme amounts limited its further characterization, the results contribute for the understanding of the proteases present on A. gemmatalis gut, which are potential targets for natural or specifically designed protease inhibitors.Comprometer a digestão de proteínas dos insetos pelo uso de inibidores específicos de endoproteases tem sido amplamente estudado como um método de controle de pragas alternativo ao uso dos inseticidas convencionais. No processo de otimização desta estratégia, o conhecimento da diversidade das endoproteases do inseto alvo torna-se crucial. Neste sentido, uma enzima “tipo-tripsina” ligada à membrana obtida do intestino de larvas do 5° instar de A. gemmatalis foi purificada. A fração insolúvel do extrato do intestino foi solubilizada com 3-[(3-cholamidopropyldimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS e submetida

  10. Extracellular matrix molecules play diverse roles in the growth and guidance of central nervous system axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Pires-Neto

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth and guidance represent complex biological processes in which probably intervene diverse sets of molecular cues that allow for the appropriate wiring of the central nervous system (CNS. The extracellular matrix (ECM represents a major contributor of molecular signals either diffusible or membrane-bound that may regulate different stages of neural development. Some of the brain ECM molecules form tridimensional structures (tunnels and boundaries that appear during time- and space-regulated events, possibly playing relevant roles in the control of axon elongation and pathfinding. This short review focuses mainly on the recognized roles played by proteoglycans, laminin, fibronectin and tenascin in axonal development during ontogenesis.

  11. Merging Visible Light Photoredox Catalysis with Metal Catalyzed C–H Activations: On the Role of Oxygen and Superoxide Ions as Oxidants

    KAUST Repository

    Fabry, David C.

    2016-08-24

    ConspectusThe development of efficient catalytic systems for direct aromatic C-H bond functionalization is a long-desired goal of chemists, because these protocols provide environmental friendly and waste-reducing alternatives to classical methodologies for C-C and C-heteroatom bond formation. A key challenge for these transformations is the reoxidation of the in situ generated metal hydride or low-valent metal complexes of the primary catalytic bond forming cycle. To complete the catalytic cycle and to regenerate the C-H activation catalyst, (super)stoichiometric amounts of Cu(II) or Ag(I) salts have often been applied. Recently,

  12. Mild and Low-Pressure fac-Ir(ppy)3 -Mediated Radical Aminocarbonylation of Unactivated Alkyl Iodides through Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Shiao Y; Stevens, Marc Y; Åkerbladh, Linda; Bergman, Sara; Odell, Luke R

    2016-06-27

    A novel, mild and facile preparation of alkyl amides from unactivated alkyl iodides employing a fac-Ir(ppy)3 -catalyzed radical aminocarbonylation protocol has been developed. Using a two-chambered system, alkyl iodides, fac-Ir(ppy)3 , amines, reductants, and CO gas (released ex situ from Mo(CO)6 ), were combined and subjected to an initial radical reductive dehalogenation generating alkyl radicals, and a subsequent aminocarbonylation with amines affording a wide range of alkyl amides in moderate to excellent yields. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Trans and surface membrane bound zervamicin IIB: 13C-MAOSS-NMR at high spinning speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raap, J.; Hollander, J.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.; Swischeva, N. V.; Skladnev, D.; Kiihne, S.

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between 15 N-labelled peptides or proteins and lipids can be investigated using membranes aligned on a thin polymer film, which is rolled into a cylinder and inserted into the MAS-NMR rotor. This can be spun at high speed, which is often useful at high field strengths. Unfortunately, substrate films like commercially available polycarbonate or PEEK produce severe overlap with peptide and protein signals in 13 C-MAOSS NMR spectra. We show that a simple house hold foil support allows clear observation of the carbonyl, aromatic and C α signals of peptides and proteins as well as the ester carbonyl and choline signals of phosphocholine lipids. The utility of the new substrate is validated in applications to the membrane active peptide zervamicin IIB. The stability and macroscopic ordering of thin PC10 bilayers was compared with that of thicker POPC bilayers, both supported on the household foil. Sidebands in the 31 P-spectra showed a high degree of alignment of both the supported POPC and PC10 lipid molecules. Compared with POPC, the PC10 lipids are slightly more disordered, most likely due to the increased mobilities of the shorter lipid molecules. This mobility prevents PC10 from forming stable vesicles for MAS studies. The 13 C-peptide peaks were selectively detected in a 13 C-detected 1 H-spin diffusion experiment. Qualitative analysis of build-up curves obtained for different mixing times allowed the transmembrane peptide in PC10 to be distinguished from the surface bound topology in POPC. The 13 C-MAOSS results thus independently confirms previous findings from 15 N spectroscopy [Bechinger, B., Skladnev, D.A., Ogrel, A., Li, X., Rogozhkina, E.V., Ovchinnikova, T.V., O'Neil, J.D.J. and Raap, J. (2001) Biochemistry, 40, 9428-9437]. In summary, application of house hold foil opens the possibility of measuring high resolution 13 C-NMR spectra of peptides and proteins in well ordered membranes, which are required to determine the secondary and supramolecular structures of membrane active peptides, proteins and aggregates

  14. Inositol phosphates influence the membrane bound Ca2+/Mg2+ stimulated ATPase from human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, M.; Ekholm, J.; Kumar, R.; Hanahan, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The modulation by exogenous inositol phosphates of the membrane Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ ATPase from saponin/EGTA lysed human erythrocytes was determined in a buffer (pH 7.6) containing histidine, 80 mM, MgCl 2 , 3.3 mM, NaCl, 74 mM, KCl, 30 mM, Na 2 ATP, 2.3 mM, ouabain, 0.83 mM, with variable amounts of CaCl 2 and EGTA. The ATPase assay was linear with time at 44 0 C. The inositol phosphates were commercially obtained and were also prepared from 32 P labeled rabbit platelet inositol phospholipids. Inositol triphosphate (IP 3 ) elevated the Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ ATPase activity over basal levels in a dose, time, and calcium dependent manner and were increased up to 85% of control values. Activities for the Na + /K + -ATPase and a Mg 2+ ATPase were not effected by IP 3 . Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ APTase activity with IP 2 or IP 3 could be synergistically elevated with calmodulin addition. The activation of the ATPase with IP 3 was calcium dependent in a range from .001 to .02 mM. The apparent Km and Vmax values were determined for IP 3 stimulated Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ ATPase

  15. Detection of membrane-bound and soluble antigens by magnetic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Schou; Howard, Emily; Lu, Shulin

    2017-01-01

    blood cell-bound Epstein-Barr viral particles, and soluble IL-6, and validate the results by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy performed in parallel. Additionally, employing an inexpensive, single lens, manual focus, wifi-enabled camera, we extend the portability of our method for its...

  16. Effect of zinc and calcium ions on the rat kidney membrane-bound ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-07-11

    Jul 11, 2013 ... 2009, Yilmaz et al. 2009). Strategies for inhibition of DPP-IV activity have been developed for the treatment of various diseases, in particular type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer (Matteucci and. Giampietro 2009; Peters 2010; Stulc and Sedo 2010). In several of these pathologies, a deficiency of cations (e.g..

  17. An amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on epoxy resin membrane bound cholesterol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, C S; Narang, Jagriti; Chauhan, Nidhi; Sharma, Preety; Sharma, Renu

    2012-10-01

    The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of enzyme has resulted into improved sensitivity and stability of biosensors for uric acid, ascorbic acid and polyphenols. The present work was aimed to prepare an improved amperometric biosensor for determination of serum cholesterol required in the diagnostics and management of certain pathological conditions. Epoxy resin membrane with immobilized cholesterol oxidase was mounted on the cleaned platinum (Pt) electrode with a parafilm to construct a working electrode. This working electrode along with Ag/AgCl as reference and Ag wire as an auxiliary electrode were connected through a three terminal electrometer to construct a cholesterol biosensor. The sensor showed optimum response within 25 sec at pH 7.0 and 45°C. The linear working range of biosensor was 1.0 to 8.0 mM cholesterol. K m and I max for cholesterol were 5.0 mM and 9.09 μA, respectively. The biosensor measured serum cholesterol. The minimum detection limit of the sensor was 1.0 mM. The mean analytical recoveries of added cholesterol in serum (2.84 and 4.13 mM) were 91.4 ± 2.8 and 92.3 ± 3.1 per cent (n=6), respectively. Within and between assay coefficient of variation (CV) were epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of cholesterol oxidase has resulted into an improved amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The present biosensor had an advantage over the existing biosensors as it worked at comparatively lower potential.

  18. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  19. Evidence for a plasma-membrane-bound nitrate reductase involved in nitrate uptake of Chlorella sorokiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischner, R.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-nitrate-reductase (NR) immunoglobulin-G (IgG) fragments inhibited nitrate uptake into Chlorella cells but had no affect on nitrate uptake. Intact anti-NR serum and preimmune IgG fragments had no affect on nitrate uptake. Membrane-associated NR was detected in plasma-membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The PM-associated NR was not removed by sonicating PM vesicles in 500 mM NaCl and 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and represented up to 0.8% of the total Chlorella NR activity. The PM NR was solubilized by Triton X-100 and inactivated by Chlorella NR antiserum. Plasma-membrane NR was present in ammonium-grown Chlorella cells that completely lacked soluble NR activity. The subunit sizes of the PM and soluble NRs were 60 and 95 kDa, respectively, as determined by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis and western blotting.

  20. Revealing the membrane-bound structure of neurokinin A using neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkes, Malcolm J. M.; Hauss, Thomas; Dante, Silvia; Bradshaw, Jeremy P.

    2000-03-01

    Neurokinin A (or substance K) belongs to the tachykinin family, a group of small amphipathic peptides that bind to specific membrane-embedded, G-protein coupled receptors. The agonist/receptor complex is quaternary in nature because the receptor binding sites are thought to be located within the lipid bilayer and because the role of water cannot be ignored. The cell membrane acts as a solvent to accumulate peptide and an inducer of peptide secondary structure. The three-dimensional shape that the peptide assumes when associated to the cell membrane will be an important parameter with regards to the receptor selectivity and affinity. Neutron diffraction measurements were carried out in order to define the location of the N-terminus of the peptide in synthetic phospholipid multi-bilayer stacks.

  1. Novel Fabrication of CA Membrane Bound Carbon Electrode for Bi-enzymatic Determination of Lactate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIKAS

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactate oxidase from Pediococcus species has been immobilized onto cellulose acetate (CA membrane to form an enzymatic membrane. HRP has been incorporated into carbon paste electrode. Enzymatic membrane was mounted over the HRP-carbon paste electrode with the help of dialyses membrane, which acts as working electrode. Lactate biosensor was constructed by connecting this fabricated working electrode to Ag/AgCl reference electrode along with platinum wire auxiliary electrode through potentiostate. The biosensor showed an excellent performance with a linear response range between 5µM to 1mML-1 of lactate with a correlation coefficient (r of .94 for n=30, when compared to standard colorimetric methods. The optimum pH of the biosensor is 6.5 and incubation temperature is 25°C. This bi-enzyme electrode can be used for 150 determinants; over 45 days with out any considerable lose of activity, when stored at 4°C in 0.5M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 6.5. The response time was 1 second and no major metabolic interference was observed.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Conformational Changes in Membrane-Bound Sodium Potassium ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus; Abdali, Salim; Lundbæk, Jens August

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation we assess the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for probing conformational changes in membrane-spanning proteins — in this case, the sodium potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+,K+-ATPase). Spectral analysis of protein-lipid complexes is complicated by the presence...

  3. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF A POLYURETHANE-BASED SUPPORT FOR IMMOBILIZING MEMBRANE-BOUND LIPASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Soares

    Full Text Available Abstract This study conducted an assessment of polyurethane foams that were synthesized by one-shot process and used as a low-cost support to immobilize Mucor circinelloides URM 4182 whole-cells presenting high lipolytic activity. Polyols with different molecular weights (1100 to 6000 g mol-1 were applied to synthesize the polymer matrix, and the agitation speed effect was used for controlling the average pore size of the investigated polyurethane foams. The physical and mechanical properties of the polymers were evaluated by standard test methods, and their morphology was identified by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The immobilization procedure efficiency was assessed by quantifying the capability of the matrices to attach the cells and the catalytic activity of the biocatalysts in both aqueous (olive oil hydrolysis and non-aqueous media (ethanolysis of babassu oil under single and consecutive batch runs. Although all synthesized matrices were suitable to immobilize the whole cells with high catalytic performance, a better set of parameters was attained when the polyol ether with molecular weight of 6000 g mol-1 and 1100 g mol-1 was used. Both matrices yielded immobilized biocatalysts with high hydrolysis and transesterification activities, and exhibited a satisfactory operational stability with 96% and 81% retention of their initial hydrolytic and transesterification activities after three consecutive batch runs.

  4. An expression tag toolbox for microbial production of membrane bound plant cytochromes P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez Albacete, Dario; Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Christensen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    tag chimeras of the model plant P450 CYP79A1 in different Escherichia coli strains. Using a high-throughput screening platform based on C-terminal GFP fusions, we identify several highly expressing and robustly performing chimeric designs. Analysis of long-term cultures by flow cytometry showed...

  5. Plant plasma membrane-bound staphylococcal-like DNases as a novel class of eukaryotic nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leśniewicz Krzysztof

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of degradative nucleases responsible for genomic DNA digestion has been observed in all kingdoms of life. It is believed that the main function of DNA degradation occurring during plant programmed cell death is redistribution of nucleic acid derived products such as nitrogen, phosphorus and nucleotide bases. Plant degradative nucleases that have been studied so far belong mainly to the S1-type family and were identified in cellular compartments containing nucleic acids or in the organelles where they are stored before final application. However, the explanation of how degraded DNA components are exported from the dying cells for further reutilization remains open. Results Bioinformatic and experimental data presented in this paper indicate that two Arabidopsis staphylococcal-like nucleases, named CAN1 and CAN2, are anchored to the cell membrane via N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation modifications. Both proteins possess a unique hybrid structure in their catalytic domain consisting of staphylococcal nuclease-like and tRNA synthetase anticodon binding-like motifs. They are neutral, Ca2+-dependent nucleaces showing a different specificity toward the ssDNA, dsDNA and RNA substrates. A study of microarray experiments and endogenous nuclease activity revealed that expression of CAN1 gene correlates with different forms of programmed cell death, while the CAN2 gene is constitutively expressed. Conclusions In this paper we present evidence showing that two plant staphylococcal-like nucleases belong to a new, as yet unidentified class of eukaryotic nucleases, characterized by unique plasma membrane localization. The identification of this class of nucleases indicates that plant cells possess additional, so far uncharacterized, mechanisms responsible for DNA and RNA degradation. The potential functions of these nucleases in relation to their unique intracellular location are discussed.

  6. Study on the changes in the levels of membrane-bound ATPases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    in the level of lipid peroxidation in liver was also observed. The results of the present investigation have .... membrane phospholipids not only altered the lipid milieu and structural as well as functional integrity of cell .... uncoupling of the human erythrocyte Ca2+ pump. Eur. J. Biochem.,. 221: 1103-1110. FAO (1999).

  7. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca 2+ -mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1

  8. Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic techniques for investigating membrane-bound ion channel activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Székács

    Full Text Available Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic (OWLS techniques were probed for monitoring ion permeation through channels incorporated into artificial lipid environment. A novel sensor set-up was developed by depositing liposomes or cell-derived membrane fragments onto hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membrane. The fibrous material of PTFE membrane could entrap lipoid vesicles and the water-filled pores provided environment for the hydrophilic domains of lipid-embedded proteins. The sensor surface was kept clean from the lipid holder PTFE membrane by a water- and ion-permeable polyethylene terephthalate (PET mesh. The sensor set-up was tested with egg yolk lecithin liposomes containing gramicidin ion channels and with cell-derived membrane fragments enriched in GABA-gated anion channels. The method allowed monitoring the move of Na(+ and organic cations through gramicidin channels and detecting the Cl(--channel functions of the (α5β2γ2 GABAA receptor in the presence or absence of GABA and the competitive GABA-blocker bicuculline.

  9. Effect of zinc and calcium ions on the rat kidney membrane-bound ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-07-11

    Jul 11, 2013 ... which a mixed inhibition mechanism was observed (Ki values of the competitive component: 0.15±0.01 mM and. 50.0±1.05 mM ... porcine DPP-IV with a Ki value near circulating concentra- tions in mammals while the effect ..... peptidase-IV: Is there a risk of oncological and immunological adverse effects?

  10. The membrane-bound form of gene 9 minor coat protein of bacteriophage M13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houbiers, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriophage M13 is a virus that infects the bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli ), a single cell organism that resides in our intestines. It consists of the cytoplasm (contents) and a double membrane that keeps the

  11. Membrane-bound ATPase of intact vacuoles and tonoplasts isolated from mature plant tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Wagner, G.J.; Siegelman, H.W.; Hind, G.

    1977-01-01

    Intact vacuoles were isolated from petals of Hippeastrum and Tulipa (Wagner, G. J. and Siegelman, H. W. (1975) Science 190, 1298 to 1299). The ATPase activity of fresh vacuole suspensions was found to be 2 to 3 times that of protoplasts from the same tissue. 70 to 80% of the ATPase activity of intact vacuoles was recovered in tonoplast preparations. The antibiotic Dio-9 at 6 ..mu..g/10/sup 6/ vacuoles or protoplasts causes 40% inhibition. However, only the protoplast ATPase is sensitive to oligomycin. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbondiimide (DCCD) slightly stimulates ATPase activity in both vacuole and protoplast suspensions, whereas ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide) (EDAC) strongly inhibits. Spectrophotometric studies show that in the petal the vacuolar contents have a pH of 4.0 for Tulipa and 4.3 for Hippeastrum, whereas the intact isolated vacuole has an internal pH of 7.0 (in pH 8.0 buffer) for Tulipa and about 7.3 for Hippeastrum. Internal ion concentrations of 150, 46, 30, 30 and 6 mM were found for K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Cl/sup -/, and Ca/sup 2 +/ respectively, which are about the same as those in protoplasts.

  12. Interactions between membrane-bound cellulose synthases involved in the synthesis of the secondary cell wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, J.F.P.; Vernhettes, S.; Desprez, T.; Vincken, J.P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    It has not yet been reported how the secondary CESA (cellulose synthase) proteins are organized in the rosette structure. A membrane-based yeast two-hybrid (MbYTH) approach was used to analyze the interactions between the CESA proteins involved in secondary cell wall synthesis of Arabidopsis and the

  13. Effect of zinc and calcium ions on the rat kidney membrane-bound ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Structural Biology and Biocomputing Programme, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), C/Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, Madrid E-28029, Spain; Departamento de Genética del Desarrollo y Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Cuernavaca, ...

  14. Ultrasound effects on the antioxidative defense systems of Porphyridium cruentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bilian; Huang, Jian; Wang, Juan; Huang, Lingling

    2008-01-15

    Ultrasound is a special physical stimulus that has a variety of biological effects. This study provides a first systemic investigation on the ultrasound-induced oxidation and protection actions of the antioxidant defense system in Porphyridium cruentum. The hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion radical scavenging ability of the cells and the electrolyte leakage of the cell membrane were examined. The change of glutathione and carotenoids produced with/without ultrasonic processing were measured; the enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and membrane bound ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-ATPase) were evaluated for either ultrasound-treated or untreated P. cruentum. The hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion radical scavenging ability of ultrasound-treated P. cruentum increase 49.8 and 76.0%, respectively, of which the electrolyte leakage and malonyldialdehyde accumulation are also found increased 48.6 and 48.0%, respectively, indicating a state of oxidative stress. A significant enhancement of the activities of superoxide dismutase by 53.5%, catalase, membrane bound ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-ATPase increased by 67.7 and 69.3%, respectively), and the increment of glutathione and carotenoids production are also observed. These results suggested that oxidative stress manifested by elevated reactive oxygen species levels and malonyldialdehyde contents might be resulted from the biophysical responses of P. cruentum to the physical stimuli, and most likely the enhanced antioxidation ability of the algal cells stimuli by ultrasonic comes from the enhancement of enzymatic and nonenzymatic preventive substances as observed in this work.

  15. A day of systems and synthetic biology for non-experts: reflections on day 1 of the EMBL/EMBO joint conference on Science and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    From understanding ageing to the creation of artificial membrane-bounded 'organisms', systems biology and synthetic biology are seen as the latest revolutions in the life sciences. They certainly represent a major change of gear, but paradigm shifts? This is open to debate, to say the least. For scientists they open up exciting ways of studying living systems, of formulating the 'laws of life', and the relationship between the origin of life, evolution and artificial biological systems. However, the ethical and societal considerations are probably indistinguishable from those of human genetics and genetically modified organisms. There are some tangible developments just around the corner for society, and as ever, our ability to understand the consequences of, and manage, our own progress lags far behind our technological abilities. Furthermore our educational systems are doing a bad job of preparing the next generation of scientists and non-scientists.

  16. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  17. Ultrastructural Characterization of Turnip Mosaic Virus-Induced Cellular Rearrangements Reveals Membrane-Bound Viral Particles Accumulating in Vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Juan; Basu, Kaustuv; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    Positive-strand RNA [(+) RNA] viruses remodel cellular membranes to facilitate virus replication and assembly. In the case of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the viral membrane protein 6K2 plays an essential role in endomembrane alterations. Although 6K2-induced membrane dynamics have been widely studied by confocal microscopy, the ultrastructure of this remodeling has not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the formation of TuMV-induced membrane changes by chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF/FS) for transmission electron microscopy at different times of infection. We observed the formation of convoluted membranes connected to rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) early in the infection process, followed by the production of single-membrane vesicle-like (SMVL) structures at the midstage of infection. Both SMVL and double-membrane vesicle-like structures with electron-dense cores, as well as electron-dense bodies, were found late in the infection process. Immunogold labeling results showed that the vesicle-like structures were 6K2 tagged and suggested that only the SMVL structures were viral RNA replication sites. Electron tomography (ET) was used to regenerate a three-dimensional model of these vesicle-like structures, which showed that they were, in fact, tubules. Late in infection, we observed filamentous particle bundles associated with electron-dense bodies, which suggests that these are sites for viral particle assembly. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. Our work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. Positive-strand RNA viruses remodel cellular membranes for different stages of the infection process, such as protein translation and processing, viral RNA synthesis, particle assembly, and virus transmission. The ultrastructure of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV)-induced membrane remodeling was investigated over several days of infection. The first change that was observed involved endoplasmic reticulum-connected convoluted membrane accumulation. This was followed by the formation of single-membrane tubules, which were shown to be viral RNA replication sites. Later in the infection process, double-membrane tubular structures were observed and were associated with viral particle bundles. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. This work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Construction of membrane-bound artificial cells using microfluidics: a new frontier in bottom-up synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elani, Yuval

    2016-06-15

    The quest to construct artificial cells from the bottom-up using simple building blocks has received much attention over recent decades and is one of the grand challenges in synthetic biology. Cell mimics that are encapsulated by lipid membranes are a particularly powerful class of artificial cells due to their biocompatibility and the ability to reconstitute biological machinery within them. One of the key obstacles in the field centres on the following: how can membrane-based artificial cells be generated in a controlled way and in high-throughput? In particular, how can they be constructed to have precisely defined parameters including size, biomolecular composition and spatial organization? Microfluidic generation strategies have proved instrumental in addressing these questions. This article will outline some of the major principles underpinning membrane-based artificial cells and their construction using microfluidics, and will detail some recent landmarks that have been achieved. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Arf and RhoA regulate both the cytosolic and the membrane-bound phospholipase D from human placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.; Provost, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that human placenta contains a cytosolic phospholipase D (PLD) activity. This activity had a pH optimum of 7.0 and was stimulated by PIP and inhibited by oleate. Furthermore, cytosolic PLD was stimulated by 30 µM GTP¿S (6-14-fold) and by the small G...... placenta, which is stimulated by PIP, but not by oleate. Here we show that oleic acid and a-linolenic acid both dose-dependently inhibited solubilized membrane PLD (65% inhibition at 4 mM), whereas stearic acid (4 mM) had no effect. Thus, the presence of double bonds in the fatty acid is important...... was devoid of endogenous RhoA and Arf and could not be stimulated by GTP¿S. However, mArf3 (1 µM) still activated this partially purified membrane PLD, whereas RhoA (0.37 nM) was not able to activate this PLD fraction. In concludion, our results suggest that the human placenta contains a PLD that is located...

  20. IRON UPTAKE BY LEAF MESOPHYLL-CELLS - THE ROLE OF THE PLASMA MEMBRANE-BOUND FERRIC-CHELATE REDUCTASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUGGEMANN, W; MAASKANTEL, K; MOOG, PR

    The uptake of Fe-59 from FeCl3, ferric (Fe3+) citrate (FeCitr) and Fe3+-EDTA (FeEDTA) was studied in leaf mesophyll of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Uptake rates decreased in the order FeCl3>FeCitr much greater than FeEDTA, and uptake depended on an obligatory reduction step of Fe3+ to Fe2+, after

  1. Multi-membrane-bound structures of Apicomplexa: II. the ovoid mitochondrial cytoplasmic (OMC) complex of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Apicomplexa including the causative agents of toxoplasmosis and malaria reportedly possess one or few tubular-shaped mitochondria that permeate, more or less branched, throughout these unicellular parasites. Electron micrographs generated herein from serial-sectioned Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites demonstrated, however, a greater diversity regarding both the shape of the cultured parasite's single mitochondrion and its sub-structural organization. Moreover, a unique subcellular construction was detected that basically comprised a pouch-shaped subdivision of the tachyzoite mitochondrion plus a fraction of parasitic cytoplasm enclosed therein. This composite assembling, termed ovoid mitochondrial cytoplasmic (OMC) complex, characteristically displayed a highly reduced matrix lumen of its mitochondrial border construction, which furthermore often failed to possess any cristae or contained tightly pleated cristae, thus creating a pouch-shaped multi-laminar wall of four or more membranous layers, respectively. Given this architecture, cross-sectioned OMC complexes of T. gondii tachyzoites frequently mimicked in size and shape the parasites' plastid-like organelle (apicoplast). Moreover, like the apicoplast, the OMC complex was often found adjacent to the tachyzoite's single Golgi complex and constantly located in close proximity to the outer membrane of the parasite's nuclear envelope. The T. gondii OMC complex differed, however, from the apicoplast in its exact fine structural organization and a stage-restricted presence that was apparently linked to mitochondrial growth and/or division. Any special function(s) possibly performed by the T. gondii OMC complex remains, nevertheless, to be elucidated.

  2. Membrane-bound conformation of M13 major coat protein : a structure validation through FRET-derived constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, W.L.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    M13 major coat protein, a 50-amino-acid-long protein, was incorporated into DOPC/DOPG (80/20 molar ratio) unilamellar vesicles. Over 60% of all amino acid residues was replaced with cysteine residues, and the single cysteine mutants were labeled with the fluorescent label I-AEDANS. The coat protein

  3. Substrate specificity of membrane-bound alcohol oxidase from the tobacco hornworm moth (Manduca sexta) female pheromone glands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luxová, Anna; Svatoš, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2006), s. 37-42 ISSN 1381-1177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : alcohol oxidase * insects * aldehydes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.149, year: 2006

  4. Aminophospholipid glycation causes lipid bilayer structure alterations and inhibition of membrane-bound Na+, K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obšil, Tomáš; Amler, Evžen; Pavlíček, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 63, - (1998), s. 1060-1073 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/95/0624; GA AV ČR IAA5011503 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 182/97/B Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.546, year: 1998

  5. Properties of the cyanobacterial coupling factor ATPase from Spirulina platensis. II. Activity of the purified and membrane-bound enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D B; Yocum, C F

    1986-02-15

    Cyanobacterial (Spirulina platensis) photosynthetic membranes and isolated F1 ATPase were characterized with respect to ATP activity. The following results indicate that the regulation of expression of ATPase activity in Spirulina platensis is similar to that found in chloroplasts: the ATPase activity of Spirulina membranes and isolated F1 ATPase is mostly latent, a characteristic of chloroplast ATPase activity; treatments that elicit ATPase activity in higher plant chloroplast thylakoids and isolated chloroplast coupling factor (CF1) greatly stimulate the activity of Spirulina membranes and F1, and the cation specificity of chloroplast ATPase activity, e. g., light-induced membrane activity that is magnesium dependent and trypsin-activated CF1 activity that is calcium dependent, is also observed in Spirulina. Thus, an 8- to 15-fold increase in specific activity (to 13-15 mumol Pi min-1 mg chl-1) is obtained when Spirulina membranes are treated with trypsin (CaATPase) or with methanol (MgATPase): a light-induced, dithiothreitol-dependent MgATPase activity is also found in the membranes. Purified Spirulina F1 is a CaATPase when activated with trypsin (endogenous activity increases from 4 to 27-37 mumol Pi min-1 mg protein-1) or with dithiothreitol (5.6 mumol Pi min-1 mg-1), but a MgATPase when assayed with methanol (18-20 mumol Pi min-1 mg-1). The effects of varying calcium and ATP concentrations on the kinetics of trypsin-induced CaATPase activity of Spirulina F1 were examined. When the calcium concentration is varied at constant ATP concentration, the velocity plot shows a marked sigmoidicity. By varying Ca-ATP metal-nucleotide complex concentration at constant concentrations of free calcium or ATP, it is shown that the sigmoidicity is due to the effect of free ATP, which changes the Hill constant to 1.6 from 1.0 observed when the free calcium concentration is kept constant at 5 mM. Therefore not only is ATP an inhibitor but it is also an allosteric effector of Spirulina F1 ATPase activity. At 5 mM free calcium, the Km for teh Ca-ATP metal-nucleotide complex is 0.42 mM.

  6. Transformations of membrane-bound organelles in sec 14 mutants of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambourg, A; Clermont, Y; Nicaud, J M; Gaillardin, C; Kepes, F

    1996-07-01

    In early descriptions of ultrastructural alterations of secretory (sec) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mutants, sec7 and sec14, were shown to produce cell structures, the so-called Berkeley bodies thought at first to correspond to Golgi structures. In sec7 mutants grown at restrictive temperature, secretion granules soon dis-appeared, whereas networks of Golgi tubules increased in size and transformed into stacks of seven to eight flattened elements. At these time intervals, structures resembling Berkeley bodies appeared to be extensions of the endoplasmic reticulum (Rambourg et al., 1993). It is the purpose of the present study to examine by electron microscopy S. cerevisiae sec14 mutants and to compare the modifications along their secretory pathway with those occurring in a homologous mutant of Yarrowia lipolytica. S. cerevisiae sec 14 mutant cells coming from exponentially growing cultures were examined either at 24 degrees C or after shifting at 37 degrees C for 0, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. Y. lipolytica mutant cells were first cultured in YNB in 5000 medium and then transferred for 0, 6, 8, 12, 20, and 24 hr, in a phosphate-buffered YPD medium, which allows wild cells to differentiate from yeast to mycelian form. In both cases, cells were fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde, treated for 15 min in 1% sodium metaperiodate, post-fixed in reduced osmium, and embedded in Epon. To visualize the three-dimensional configuration of cell organelles, stereopairs were prepared from section stained with lead citrate and tilted at +/- 15 degrees from the 0 degree position of the goniometric stage of the electron microscope. In S. cerevisiae mutant cells shifted for 2 min at the restrictive temperature, faintly stained networks of thin anastomosed tubules were located at close proximity and often continuous with faintly stained ER cisternae. More intensely stained tubular networks with nodular dilations having the size of secretion granules were dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Later on, the faintly stained ER elements and related tubular networks decreased in number, whereas the intensely stained nodular tubular networks increased in frequency. The incidence of secretion granules also increased and were distributed at random throughout the cytoplasm. Widemeshed, intensely stained fenestrated spheres were often encountered and increased in number, in parallel to the increase in the number of nodular tubular networks. At late time intervals, the fenestrated spheres decreased in number as they seemingly transformed into spherical bodies identical to vacuoles. In contrast to what occurred in S. cerevisiae sec14 mutant, the main ultrastructural modification observed in Y. lipolytica transferred to the YPD medium was the formation of deep plasma membrane invaginations. It appears that two functionally homologous PI/PC transfer proteins (Sec14psc and Sec14pyl) control distinct physiological processes in the two sec14 mutants examined. Such differences are perhaps related to the regulatory role of these proteins in different target organelles, i.e., the Golgi apparatus in S. cerevisiae or the plasma membrane in Y. lipolytica.

  7. Enzyme II/sup Mtl/ of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system: identification of the activity-linked cysteine on the mannitol carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pas, H.H.; Robillard, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    The cysteine of the membrane-bound mannitol-specific enzyme II (EII/sup Mtl/) of the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system have been labeled with 4-vinylpyridine. After proteolytic breakdown and reversed-phase HPLC, the peptides containing cysteines 110, 384, and 571 could be identified. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) treatment of the native unphosphorylated enzyme results in incorporation of one NEM label per molecule and loss of enzymatic activity. NEM treatment and inactivation prevented 4-vinylpyridine incorporation into the Cys-384-containing peptide, identifying this residue as the activity-linked cysteine. Both oxidation and phosphorylation of the native enzyme protected the enzyme against NEM labeling of Cys-384. Positive identification of the activity-linked cysteine was accomplished by inactivation with [ 14 C]iodoacetamide, proteolytic fragmentation, isolation of the peptide, and amino acid sequencing

  8. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Polymers toward Sustainable Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yun; Lin, Lihua; Wang, Bo; Wang, Xinchen

    2015-10-26

    As a promising two-dimensional conjugated polymer, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) has been utilized as a low-cost, robust, metal-free, and visible-light-active photocatalyst in the field of solar energy conversion. This Review mainly describes the latest advances in g-C3 N4 photocatalysts for water splitting. Their application in CO2 conversion, organosynthesis, and environmental purification is also briefly discussed. The methods to modify the electronic structure, nanostructure, crystal structure, and heterostructure of g-C3 N4 , together with correlations between its structure and performance are illustrated. Perspectives on the challenges and opportunities for the future exploration of g-C3 N4 photocatalysts are provided. This Review will promote the utilization of g-C3 N4 materials in the fields of photocatalysis, energy conversion, environmental remediation, and sensors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Preparative semiconductor photoredox catalysis: An emerging theme in organic synthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Manley, David W.; Walton, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, Sep 9 (2015), s. 1570-1582 ISSN 1860-5397 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : carboxylic acids * free radicals * organic synthesis * photocatalysis * titania Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.697, year: 2015 http://www.beilstein-journals.org/bjoc/single/articleFullText.htm?publicId=1860-5397-11-173

  10. Expression of the E.coli pntA and pntB genes encoding nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its effect on product formation during anaerobic glucose fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlund, M.; Nissen, Torben Lauesgaard; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1999-01-01

    We studied the physiological effect of the interconversion between the NAD(H) and NADP(H) coenzyme systems in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the membrane-bound transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli. Our objective was to determine if the membrane-bound transhydrogenase could work...

  11. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  12. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  13. Mitochondrial protein quality control systems in aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Karin; Weil, Andrea C; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2010-01-01

    Preserving the integrity of proteins, biomolecules prone to molecular damage, is a fundamental function of all biological systems. Impairments in protein quality control (PQC) may lead to degenerative processes, such as aging and various disorders and diseases. Fortunately, cells contain a hierarchical system of pathways coping protein damage. Specific molecular pathways detect misfolded proteins and act either to unfold or degrade them. Degradation of proteins generates peptides and amino acids that can be used for remodelling of impaired pathways and cellular functions. At increased levels of cellular damage whole organelles can be removed via autophagy, a process that depends on the activity oflysosomes. In addition, cells may undergo apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, which in single-cellular and lower multicellular organisms can lead to death of the individual. Molecular damage of cellular compartments is mainly caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS is generated via different cellular pathways and frequently arises in the mitochondrial electron transport chain as a by-product of oxygenic energy transduction. Consequently, mitochondrial proteins are under high risk to become damaged. Perhaps for this reason mitochondria contain a very efficient PQC system that keeps mitochondrial proteins functional as long as damage does not reach a certain threshold and the components of this system themselves are not excessively damaged. The mitochondrial PQC system consists of chaperones that counteract protein aggregation through binding and refolding misfolded polypeptides and of membrane-bound and soluble ATP-dependent proteases that are involved in degradation of damaged proteins. During aging and in neurodegenerative diseases components of this PQC system, including Lon protease present in the mitochondrial matrix, become functionally impaired. In this chapter we summarise the current knowledge of cellular quality control systems with special emphasis

  14. Integrative functions of the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Stefan; van der Laan, Martin

    2018-04-01

    Mitochondria are complex double-membrane-bound organelles of eukaryotic cells that function as energy-converting powerhouses, metabolic factories and signaling centers. The outer membrane controls the exchange of material and information with other cellular compartments. The inner membrane provides an extended, highly folded surface for selective transport and energy-coupling reactions. It can be divided into an inner boundary membrane and tubular or lamellar cristae membranes that accommodate the oxidative phosphorylation units. Outer membrane, inner boundary membrane and cristae come together at crista junctions, where the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) acts as a membrane-shaping and -connecting scaffold. This peculiar architecture is of pivotal importance for multiple mitochondrial functions. Many elaborate studies in the past years have shed light on the subunit composition and organization of MICOS. In this review article, we summarize these insights and then move on to discuss exciting recent discoveries on the integrative functions of MICOS. Multi-faceted connections to other major players of mitochondrial biogenesis and physiology, like the protein import machineries, the oxidative phosphorylation system, carrier proteins and phospholipid biosynthesis enzymes, are currently emerging. Therefore, we propose that MICOS acts as a central hub in mitochondrial membrane architecture and functionality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Membrane-initiated estrogen signaling via Gq-coupled GPCR in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Gwyndolin; Roepke, Troy A

    2018-01-29

    The last few decades have revealed increasing complexity and depth to our knowledge of receptor-mediated estrogen signaling. Nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ remain the fundamental dogma, but recent research targeting membrane-bound ERs urges for a more expanded view on ER signaling. ERα and ERβ are also involved in membrane-delineated signaling alongside membrane-specific G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), ER-X, and the Gq-coupled membrane ER (Gq-mER). Membrane ERs are responsible for eliciting rapid responses to estrogen signaling, and their importance has been increasingly indicated in central nervous system (CNS) regulation of such functions as reproduction, energy homeostasis, and stress. While the Gq-mER signaling pathway is well characterized, the receptor structure and gene remains uncharacterized, although it is not similar to the nuclear ERα/β. This review will describe the current knowledge of this putative membrane ER and its selective ligand, STX, from its initial characterization in hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry to recent research exploring its role in the CNS outside of the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation, purification, and partial characterization of a membrane-bound Cl-/HCO3--activated ATPase complex from rat brain with sensitivity to GABAAergic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzikov, Sergey A

    2017-02-07

    This study describes the isolation and purification of a protein complex with [Formula: see text]-ATPase activity and sensitivity to GABA A ergic ligands from rat brain plasma membranes. The ATPase complex was enriched using size-exclusion, affinity, and ion-exchange chromatography. The fractions obtained at each purification step were subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), which revealed four subunits with molecular mass ∼48, 52, 56, and 59 kDa; these were retained at all stages of the purification process. Autoradiography revealed that the ∼52 and 56 kDa subunits could bind [ 3 H]muscimol. The [Formula: see text]-ATPase activity of this enriched protein complex was regulated by GABA A ergic ligands but was not sensitive to blockers of the NKCC or KCC cotransporters.

  17. Survival of the fittest: positive selection of CD4+ T cells expressing a membrane-bound fusion inhibitor following HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpel, Janine; Braun, Stephen E; Qiu, Gang; Wong, Fay Eng; Conolle, Michelle; Schmitz, Jörn E; Brendel, Christian; Humeau, Laurent M; Dropulic, Boro; Rossi, John J; Berger, Annemarie; von Laer, Dorothee; Johnson, R Paul

    2010-08-23

    Although a variety of genetic strategies have been developed to inhibit HIV replication, few direct comparisons of the efficacy of these inhibitors have been carried out. Moreover, most studies have not examined whether genetic inhibitors are able to induce a survival advantage that results in an expansion of genetically-modified cells following HIV infection. We evaluated the efficacy of three leading genetic strategies to inhibit HIV replication: 1) an HIV-1 tat/rev-specific small hairpin (sh) RNA; 2) an RNA antisense gene specific for the HIV-1 envelope; and 3) a viral entry inhibitor, maC46. In stably transduced cell lines selected such that >95% of cells expressed the genetic inhibitor, the RNA antisense envelope and viral entry inhibitor maC46 provided the strongest inhibition of HIV-1 replication. However, when mixed populations of transduced and untransduced cells were challenged with HIV-1, the maC46 fusion inhibitor resulted in highly efficient positive selection of transduced cells, an effect that was evident even in mixed populations containing as few as 1% maC46-expressing cells. The selective advantage of the maC46 fusion inhibitor was also observed in HIV-1-infected cultures of primary T lymphocytes as well as in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. These results demonstrate robust inhibition of HIV replication with the fusion inhibitor maC46 and the antisense Env inhibitor, and importantly, a survival advantage of cells expressing the maC46 fusion inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. Evaluation of the ability of genetic inhibitors of HIV-1 replication to confer a survival advantage on genetically-modified cells provides unique information not provided by standard techniques that may be important in the in vivo efficacy of these genes.

  18. Membrane-bound human orphan cytochrome P450 2U1: Sequence singularities, construction of a full 3D model, and substrate docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducassou, Lionel; Dhers, Laura; Jonasson, Gabriella; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; André, François

    2017-09-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2U1 (CYP2U1) is an orphan CYP that exhibits several distinctive characteristics among the 57 human CYPs with a highly conserved sequence in almost all living organisms. We compared its protein sequence with those of the 57 human CYPs and constructed a 3D structure of a full-length CYP2U1 model bound to a POPC membrane. We also performed docking experiments of arachidonic acid (AA) and N-arachidonoylserotonin (AS) in this model. The protein sequence of CYP2U1 displayed two unique characteristics when compared to those of the human CYPs, the presence of a longer N-terminal region upstream of the putative trans-membrane helix (TMH) containing 8 proline residues, and of an insert of about 20 amino acids containing 5 arginine residues between helices A' and A. Its N-terminal part upstream of TMH involved an additional short terminal helix, in a manner similar to what was reported in the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CYP51. Our model also showed a specific interaction between the charged residues of insert AA' and phosphate groups of lipid polar heads, suggesting a possible role of this insert in substrate recruitment. Docking of AA and AS in this model showed these substrates in channel 2ac, with the terminal alkyl chain of AA or the indole ring of AS close to the heme, in agreement with the reported CYP2U1-catalyzed AA and AS hydroxylation regioselectivities. This model should be useful to find new endogenous or exogenous CYP2U1 substrates and to interpret the regioselectivity of their hydroxylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  19. Membrane-bound SIV envelope trimers are immunogenic in ferrets after intranasal vaccination with a replication-competent canine distemper virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia; Wright, Kevin J; Backer, Martin; Coleman, John W; Koehnke, Rebecca; Frenk, Esther; Domi, Arban; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; DeStefano, Joanne; Narpala, Sandeep; Powell, Rebecca; Morrow, Gavin; Boggiano, Cesar; Zamb, Timothy J; Richter King, C; Parks, Christopher L

    2013-11-01

    We are investigating canine distemper virus (CDV) as a vaccine vector for the delivery of HIV envelope (Env) that closely resembles the native trimeric spike. We selected CDV because it will promote vaccine delivery to lymphoid tissues, and because human exposure is infrequent, reducing potential effects of pre-existing immunity. Using SIV Env as a model, we tested a number of vector and gene insert designs. Vectors containing a gene inserted between the CDV H and L genes, which encoded Env lacking most of its cytoplasmic tail, propagated efficiently in Vero cells, expressed the immunogen on the cell surface, and incorporated the SIV glycoprotein into progeny virus particles. When ferrets were vaccinated intranasally, there were no signs of distress, vector replication was observed in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues, and the animals produced anti-SIV Env antibodies. These data show that live CDV-SIV Env vectors can safely induce anti-Env immune responses following intranasal vaccination. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adhesion force sensing and activation of a membrane-bound sensor to activate nisin efflux pumps in Staphylococcus aureus under mechanical and chemical stresses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carniello, Vera; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2018-01-01

    Nisin-associated-sensitivity-response-regulator (NsaRS) in Staphylococcus aureus is important for its adhesion to surfaces and resistance against antibiotics, like nisin. NsaRS consists of an intra-membrane-located sensor NsaS and a cytoplasmatically-located response-regulator NsaR, which becomes

  1. 2-Keto-D-Gluconate-Yielding Membrane-Bound D-Glucose Dehydrogenase from Arthrobacter globiformis C224: Purification and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose dehydrogenase (GlcDH is the rate-limiting catalyst for microbial conversion of glucose to the important organic acid 2-ketogluconic acid (2KGlcA. In this study, a D-glucose dehydrogenase was purified from the industrial 2KGlcA producer Arthrobacter globiformis C224. After four purification steps, the GlcDH was successfully purified over 180 folds and specific activity of 88.1 U/mg. A single protein band of 87 kDa was detected by SDS-PAGE. The purified GlcDH had the broad substrate specificity with the Km values for D-glucose, D-xylose, D-galactose and maltose of 0.21 mM, 0.34 mM, 0.46 mM and 0.59 mM, respectively. The kinetic studies proved that A. globiformis GlcDH followed the ping-pong kinetic mechanism. The GlcDH showed an optimum catalytic activity at pH 5.0 and 45 °C with the stable activity at temperature of 20–40 °C and pH of 6.0–7.0. Organic solvents, metal ions or EDTA could significantly influence the GlcDH activity to different degrees.

  2. The cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase CKX1 is a membrane-bound protein requiring homooligomerization in the endoplasmic reticulum for its cellular activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, M.C.E.; Weber, H.; Hluska, T.; Leonte, G.; Anderson, S. P.; Novák, Ondřej; Senes, A.; Werner, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 176, č. 3 (2018), s. 2024-2039 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA15-22322S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : HELIX-HELIX ASSOCIATION * VIRUS MOVEMENT PROTEIN * RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEINS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  3. The presence of a membrane-bound progesterone receptor sensitizes the estradiol-induced effect on the proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Hans; Yang, Yang; Seeger, Harald; Fehm, Tanja; Cahill, Michael A; Tong, Xiaowen; Ruan, Xiangyan; Mueck, Alfred O

    2011-08-01

    Breast cancer risk is still an important topic regarding hormone therapy as well as oral contraception. Evidence that progestogens may play a crucial role is accumulating. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) expressed in breast cancer may be important in tumorigenesis and thus may increase breast cancer risk. The aim of this project was to investigate the influence of different estradiol (E2) concentrations and the addition of two progestogens on MCF-7 breast cancer cells overexpressing PGRMC1. MCF-7 cells were stably transfected with PGRMC1 expression plasmid (MCF-7/PGRMC1-3HA [WT-12]). To test the effects of E2 and progestogens on cell proliferation, MCF-7 and WT-12 cells were stimulated with different concentrations of E2 (10 and 10 M) alone and in combination with progesterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate (each 10 M). E2 elicited a concentration-dependent proliferative effect on both cell lines, which was much more pronounced in WT-12 cells (50% vs 200%). This effect could be completely abrogated by the addition of the E2 antagonist fulvestrant. Addition of progesterone had no influence on the E2-induced effect, whereas medroxy-progesterone acetate enhanced the E2-induced effect at a low E2 concentration, which was, again, more pronounced in the WT-12 cells. The figures were between 20% and 40% in MCF-7 and between 60% and 250% in WT-12 cells. Overexpression of PGRMC1 sensitizes the proliferative response of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line to estradiol. The effect of progestogens on breast cancer tumorigenesis may depend on the specific progestogen used for hormone therapy or oral contraception.

  4. Membrane-bound and cytosolic forms of heterotrimeric G proteins in young and adult rat myocardium: influence of neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotný, Jiří; Bouřová, Lenka; Kolář, František; Svoboda, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2001), s. 215-224 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1660; GA MŠk VS97099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : development * G proteins * young and adult rat myocardium Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2001

  5. Membrane-Bound and Exosomal Metastasis-Associated C4.4A Promotes Migration by Associating with the α6β4 Integrin and MT1-MMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honoré Ngora

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis-associated C4.4A, which becomes upregulated during wound healing and, in some tumors, during tumor progression, is known to be frequently associated with hypoxia. With the function of C4.4A still unknown, we explored the impact of hypoxia on C4.4A expression and functional activity. Metastatic rat and human tumor lines upregulate C4.4A expression when cultured in the presence of CoCl2. Although hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α becomes upregulated concomitantly, HIF-1α did not induce C4.4A transcription. Instead, hypoxia-induced C4.4A up-regulation promoted in vivo and in vitro wound healing, where increased migration on the C4.4A ligands laminin-111 and -332 was observed after a transient period of pronounced binding. Increased migration was accompanied by C4.4A associating with α6β4, MT1-MMP1, and TACE and by laminin fragmentation. Hypoxia also promoted the release of C4.4A in exosomes and TACE-mediated C4.4A shedding. The association of C4.4A with α6β4 and MT1-MMP1 was maintained in exosomes and exosomal α6β4- and MT1-MMP1-associated C4.4A but not shed C4.4A sufficient for laminin degradation. Hypoxia-induced recruitment of α6β4 toward raft-located C4.4A, MT1-MMP, and TACE allows for a shift from adhesion to motility, which is supported by laminin degradation. These findings provide the first explanation for the C4.4A contribution to wound healing and metastasis.

  6. Humanised IgG1 antibody variants targeting membrane-bound carcinoembryonic antigen by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S Q; Umana, P; Mössner, E; Ntouroupi, T; Brünker, P; Schmidt, C; Wilding, J L; Mortensen, N J; Bodmer, W F

    2009-11-17

    The effect of glycoengineering a membrane specific anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (this paper uses the original term CEA for the formally designated CEACAM5) antibody (PR1A3) on its ability to enhance killing of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines by human immune effector cells was assessed. In vivo efficacy of the antibody was also tested. The antibody was modified using EBNA cells cotransfected with beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III and the humanised hPR1A3 antibody genes. The resulting alteration of the Fc segment glycosylation pattern enhances the antibody's binding affinity to the FcgammaRIIIa receptor on human immune effector cells but does not alter the antibody's binding capacity. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is inhibited in the presence of anti-FcgammaRIII blocking antibodies. This glycovariant of hPR1A3 enhances ADCC 10-fold relative to the parent unmodified antibody using either unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear or natural killer (NK) cells and CEA-positive CRC cells as targets. NK cells are far more potent in eliciting ADCC than either freshly isolated monocytes or granulocytes. Flow cytometry and automated fluorescent microscopy have been used to show that both versions of hPR1A3 can induce antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by monocyte-derived macrophages. However, the glycovariant antibody did not mediate enhanced ADCP. This may be explained by the relatively low expression of FcgammaRIIIa on cultured macrophages. In vivo studies show the efficacy of glycoengineered humanised IgG1 PR1A3 in significantly improving survival in a CRC metastatic murine model. The greatly enhanced in vitro ADCC activity of the glycoengineered version of hPR1A3 is likely to be clinically beneficial.

  7. Specific Binding of Protoporphyrin IX to a Membrane-Bound 63 Kilodalton Polypeptide in Cucumber Cotyledons Treated with Diphenyl Ether-Type Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ryo; Oshio, Hiromichi; Koike, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Yorinao; Yoshida, Shigeo; Takahashi, Nobutaka

    1991-01-01

    Porphyrin accumulation in excised cucumber cotyledons (Cucumis sativus L.) treated with a N-phenylimide S-23142 (N-[4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-propargyloxyphenyl]-3,4,5,6- tetrahydrophthalimide) and a diphenylether acifluorfen-ethyl (ethyl-5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitro benzoic acid) was studied. Most of the accumulated porphyrins were found in the membrane fractions of 6,000g and 30,000g pellets, forming a complex with a membrane polypeptide. The complex was solubilized with 1% n-dodecyl β-d-maltoside and its molecular mass was estimated to be 63,000 and 66,000 daltons by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel permeation high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The polypeptide also existed in untreated cotyledons but had little protoporphyrin IX. The complex was also formed in vitro by mixing the 30,000g pellets from untreated cotyledons and authentic protoporphyrin IX. However, protoporphyrin IX formed the complex specifically with the 63,000 dalton polypeptide and not with the other proteins both in vivo and in vitro. At least four fluorescent porphyrins, including protoporphyrin IX, were found in the acetone extract of the cotyledons by HPLC using a reversed phase column. Protoporphyrin IX was one of the two porphyrins that formed the complex. These results suggest that S-23142 and acifluorfenethyl enhance the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX, which forms the complex with the membrane protein. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3 PMID:16668204

  8. Effects of electric fields on membrane-bound Na, K-ATPase. Progress report, 1 July 1989-30 June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsong, T.Y.

    1990-06-30

    We continued to work on effects of oscillating electric fields on membrane functions, in particular the electric activation of Na, K-ATPase, and to develop theory of electro-conformational coupling. We believe transmembrane electric fields are involved in the regulation of the internal activity of a cell and also in the cell-to-cell communications. An in depth study of Na, K-ATPase will provide useful information concerning the molecular design of a cell to sense and to transmit signals.

  9. Electrostatic control by lipids upon the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase. II. The influence of surface potential upon the activating ion equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, M L

    1983-07-13

    Electrostatic influences upon the enzymatic activity of the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase from ox brain (EC 3.6.1.3) have been studied. (1) The characteristics of the temperature dependence of the activity - the slopes and inflection temperature, Ti, of the Arrhenius plots - have been shown to depend on the total concentration, but not on the specific properties of added monovalent ions. (2) The enzymatic activity has been shown to be subject simultaneously to unspecific and specific influences of alkali-metal ions or NH+4. Ion-specific effects result from different binding constants of complexation between activating ions and enzyme. These stability constants are affected by the formation of an electrical double layer at the membrane surface. With increasing electrostatic screening, the complex formation is destabilized and, as a consequence, the enzymatic activity decreases. (3) This interaction between ion binding and surface electrostatics enables the enzyme to adapt its activity to the actual ionic conditions. This gives rise to a complex net dependence of the enzymatic activity upon the concentrations of activating ions. Such dependencies are analyzed, and an 'activity surface' has been constructed which represents the enzymatic activity as a function of simultaneously varying concentrations of sodium and potassium. The shape of this activity surface is determined by the relations between ion concentrations, surface potential and the resulting stability of the complexation between the activating ions and the enzyme. By means of three-dimensional representation it is demonstrated that the adaptability of the stability constants is of great importance with respect to the maintenance of the optimal ionic concentrations within the living cell. Therefore, by means of the surrounding membrane, the ATPase is provided with a quality, in addition to its substrate specificity and catalytic ability, which is necessary for its function as a transport enzyme.

  10. [Study of the receptor for black widow spider neurotoxin. I. Characteristics of membrane-bound and solubilized receptors from the bovine brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, A G; Shamotienko, O G; Surkova, I N; Kovalenko, V A; Grishin, E V

    1990-02-01

    Iodine-125 labelled alpha-latrotoxin from the venom of Central Asia black widow spider Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus binds specifically to the bovine brain membrane receptor producing a stable slowly dissociating complex with Kd = 1.6 x 10(-10) M and Bmax = 0.5 pmol/mg protein. Treatment of the complex with alkaline high-salt buffer induces reversible dissociation of the bound toxin. The antitoxin polyclonal antibody does not increase the dissociation rate of the bound toxin. Wheat germ lectin as well as concanavalin A inhibit the toxin binding to the membrane receptor. The receptor is solubilized with ionic and non-ionic detergents, and methods of latrotoxin binding assay are developed. The solubilized receptor is shown to retain high affinity to toxin, its binding activity being stable but critically dependent on the presence of calcium ions. Chromatographic properties of the receptor suggest its glycoprotein nature.

  11. Brain-specific interaction of a 91-kDa membrane-bound protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Issinger, O G; Braulke, T

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the 300 kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300-CT) is thought to play an important role in sorting and targeting of lysosomal enzymes and the insulin-like growth factor II along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway. In this study a brain specific 91 kDa protein and a 35...... kDa protein salt-washed from membranes (referred as TIP 91-M and TIP 35-M) were found to interact with the cytoplasmic receptor tail as assayed by cross-linkage with recombinant [32P] labeled MPR 300-CT. Subcellular fractionation revealed a distinct pattern of distribution of TIP 35-M and TIP 91-M...

  12. Regulation of microtubule nucleation from membranes by complexes of membrane-bound gamma-tubulin with Fyn kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macůrek, Libor; Dráberová, Eduarda; Richterová, Věra; Sulimenko, Vadym; Sulimenko, Tetyana; Dráberová, Lubica; Marková, Vladimíra; Dráber, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 416, č. 3 (2008), s. 421-430 ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GA204/05/2375; GA ČR GA304/04/1273; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : detergent -resistant membrane * Fyn * PI3K gamma-tubulin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.371, year: 2008

  13. The digestive system of the "stick bug" Cladomorphus phyllinus (Phasmida, Phasmatidae): a morphological, physiological and biochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Emiliano C; Tamaki, Fábio K; Terra, Walter R; Ribeiro, Alberto F

    2014-03-01

    This work presents a detailed morphofunctional study of the digestive system of a phasmid representative, Cladomorphus phyllinus. Cells from anterior midgut exhibit a merocrine secretion, whereas posterior midgut cells show a microapocrine secretion. A complex system of midgut tubules is observed in the posterior midgut which is probably related to the luminal alkalization of this region. Amaranth dye injection into the haemolymph and orally feeding insects with dye indicated that the anterior midgut is water-absorbing, whereas the Malpighian tubules are the main site of water secretion. Thus, a putative counter-current flux of fluid from posterior to anterior midgut may propel enzyme digestive recycling, confirmed by the low rate of enzyme excretion. The foregut and anterior midgut present an acidic pH (5.3 and 5.6, respectively), whereas the posterior midgut is highly alkaline (9.1) which may be related to the digestion of hemicelluloses. Most amylase, trypsin and chymotrypsin activities occur in the foregut and anterior midgut. Maltase is found along the midgut associated with the microvillar glycocalix, while aminopeptidase occurs in the middle and posterior midgut in membrane bound forms. Both amylase and trypsin are secreted mainly by the anterior midgut through an exocytic process as revealed by immunocytochemical data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of gravitropism in single-celled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuel, Nicole; Braun, Markus; Hauslage, Jens; Wiemann, Katharina

    Physiological processes in plants are influenced by a variety of external stimuli. Gravity is the only constant factor that provides plants with reliable information for their orientation. Gravity-oriented growth responses, called gravitropism, enable plants to adapt to a diversity of habitats on Earth and to survive changing environmental conditions. For instance, the ability to respond gravitropically prevents crop, flattened by a windstorm, from decay. Even small deviations from the genetically programmed set-point angle of plant organs are recognized by specialized cells, the statocytes, in which dense particles, the statoliths, sediment in the direction of gravity and activate gravity sensors - membrane bound gravity-receptor proteins. Activation of receptor proteins creates a physiological signal that initiates a stimulus-specific signal transduction cascade causing the gravitropic response. To unravel the gravitropic signalling pathways in plant statocytes, our research focused on a unicellular model system, the rhizoid of the green alga Chara. Experiments under microgravity conditions during sounding-rocket and parabolic plane flights have shown that the actin cytoskeleton is a key element of the gravityinduced statolith-sedimentation process in characean rhizoids. Actomyosin, consisting of a dense meshwork of mainly axially oriented actin microfilaments and motor proteins (myosins), actively guides sedimenting statoliths to gravisensitive plasma membrane areas where gravireceptor molecules are exclusively located. TEXUS and MAXUS sounding rocket missions were performed to determine the threshold acceleration level (< 0.1g) required for lateral statolith displacement. parabolic flight experiments aboard the airbus A300 Zero-G have shown that sedimented but weightless statoliths are still capable of activating the membrane-bound gravireceptor in characean rhizoids. The results contradict the classical model of a mechanoreceptor that is activated by the

  15. Virulence control in group A Streptococcus by a two-component gene regulatory system: global expression profiling and in vivo infection modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Morag R; Smoot, Laura M; Migliaccio, Cristi A Lux; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Federle, Michael J; Adams, Gerald J; Scott, June R; Musser, James M

    2002-10-15

    Two-component gene regulatory systems composed of a membrane-bound sensor and cytoplasmic response regulator are important mechanisms used by bacteria to sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Group A Streptococcus, the causative agent of mild infections and life-threatening invasive diseases, produces many virulence factors that promote survival in humans. A two-component regulatory system, designated covRS (cov, control of virulence; csrRS), negatively controls expression of five proven or putative virulence factors (capsule, cysteine protease, streptokinase, streptolysin S, and streptodornase). Inactivation of covRS results in enhanced virulence in mouse models of invasive disease. Using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR, we found that CovR influences transcription of 15% (n = 271) of all chromosomal genes, including many that encode surface and secreted proteins mediating host-pathogen interactions. CovR also plays a central role in gene regulatory networks by influencing expression of genes encoding transcriptional regulators, including other two-component systems. Differential transcription of genes influenced by covR also was identified in mouse soft-tissue infection. This analysis provides a genome-scale overview of a virulence gene network in an important human pathogen and adds insight into the molecular mechanisms used by group A Streptococcus to interact with the host, promote survival, and cause disease.

  16. MECHANISMS OF VITAMIN D ACTION ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Snopov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Besides the well-known effects upon bone metabolism, vitamin D (VD plays important roles in many other processes in the body, including immune regulation. VD action is carried out through its cellular membrane receptor, which is expressed in a variety of human organs and tissues, e.g., most cells of immune system, as well as epithelial cells lining the mucous membranes. The cell-membrane bound VD receptor is transferred to the cytoplasm, to form a functional complex with vitamin A and its receptor. This complex provides either inhibiting, or enhancing effect upon transcription of hundreds genes in the nuclear DNA, including those that regulate cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, thus preventing malignancy and angiogenesis. The following effects of VD are supposed with respect to immune system: VD inhibits antigen presentation by dendritic cells, supresses Th1-cell differentiation and the production of Th1-cytokines, shifts the balance of Th1/Th2 cell responses towards the Th2 response, exerts inhibitory effect upon Th17 cells, promotes Treg cell development, and increases their activity. In addition, VD boosts production of «endogenous antibiotics» that may provide powerful effects upon Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi and viruses. Therefore, VD seems quite important for prevention of autoimmune and atopic diseases: multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, development of asthma in children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. VD protects from a wide range of infections, including tuberculosis, leprosy and respiratory infections, and prevents the development of several tumors. Almost half the population of different countries has a VD hypovitaminosis, often hidden and undiagnosed, and this can be a leading cause of weakened immunity and increased morbidity. The diagnostics of VD hypovitaminosis, prevention and treatment of hypovitaminosis should be among the

  17. Functional behavior of bio-electrochemical treatment system with increasing azo dye concentrations: Synergistic interactions of biocatalyst and electrode assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelatha, S; Velvizhi, G; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of dye bearing wastewater through biological machinery is particularly challenging due to its recalcitrant and inhibitory nature. In this study, functional behavior and treatment efficiency of bio-electrochemical treatment (BET) system was evaluated with increasing azo dye concentrations (100, 200, 300 and 500mg dye/l). Maximum dye removal was observed at 300mg dye/l (75%) followed by 200mg dye/l (65%), 100mg dye/l (62%) and 500mg dye/l (58%). Concurrent increment in dye load resulted in enhanced azo reductase and dehydrogenase activities respectively (300mg dye/l: 39.6U; 4.96μg/ml). Derivatives of cyclic voltammograms also supported the involvement of various membrane bound redox shuttlers, viz., cytochrome-c, cytochrome-bc1 and flavoproteins during the electron transfer. Bacterial respiration during BET operation utilized various electron acceptors such as electrodes and dye intermediates with simultaneous bioelectricity generation. This study illustrates the synergistic interaction of biocatalyst with electrode assembly for efficient treatment of azo dye wastewater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reorganization of the Endosomal System in Salmonella-Infected Cells: The Ultrastructure of Salmonella-Induced Tubular Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Viktoria; Liebl, David; Zhang, Yuying; Rajashekar, Roopa; Chlanda, Petr; Giesker, Katrin; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Hensel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the intracellular life of Salmonella enterica, a unique membrane-bound compartment termed Salmonella-containing vacuole, or SCV, is formed. By means of translocated effector proteins, intracellular Salmonella also induce the formation of extensive, highly dynamic membrane tubules termed Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. Here we report the first detailed ultrastructural analyses of the SCV and SIF by electron microscopy (EM), EM tomography and live cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We found that a subset of SIF is composed of double membranes that enclose portions of host cell cytosol and cytoskeletal filaments within its inner lumen. Despite some morphological similarities, we found that the formation of SIF double membranes is independent from autophagy and requires the function of the effector proteins SseF and SseG. The lumen of SIF network is accessible to various types of endocytosed material and our CLEM analysis of double membrane SIF demonstrated that fluid phase markers accumulate only between the inner and outer membrane of these structures, a space continual with endosomal lumen. Our work reveals how manipulation of the endosomal membrane system by an intracellular pathogen results in a unique tubular membrane compartmentalization of the host cell, generating a shielded niche permissive for intracellular proliferation of Salmonella. PMID:25254663

  19. Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Papers in this session describe the concept of mined geologic disposal system and methods for ensuring that the system, when developed, will meet all technical requirements. Also presented in the session are analyses of system parameters, such as cost and nuclear criticality potential, as well as a technical analysis of a requirement that the system permit retrieval of the waste for some period of time. The final paper discusses studies under way to investigate technical alternatives or complements to the mined geologic disposal system. Titles of the presented papers are: (1) Waste Isolation System; (2) Waste Isolation Economics; (3) BWIP Technical Baseline; (4) Criticality Considerations in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Waste; (5) Retrieving Nuclear Wastes from Repository; (6) NWTS Programs for the Evaluation of Technical Alternatives or Complements to Mined Geologic Repositories - Purpose and Objectives

  20. systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Leonessa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear robust control-system design framework predicated on a hierarchical switching controller architecture parameterized over a set of moving nominal system equilibria is developed. Specifically, using equilibria-dependent Lyapunov functions, a hierarchical nonlinear robust control strategy is developed that robustly stabilizes a given nonlinear system over a prescribed range of system uncertainty by robustly stabilizing a collection of nonlinear controlled uncertain subsystems. The robust switching nonlinear controller architecture is designed based on a generalized (lower semicontinuous Lyapunov function obtained by minimizing a potential function over a given switching set induced by the parameterized nominal system equilibria. The proposed framework robustly stabilizes a compact positively invariant set of a given nonlinear uncertain dynamical system with structured parametric uncertainty. Finally, the efficacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated on a jet engine propulsion control problem with uncertain pressure-flow map data.

  1. An in vivo transfection system for inducible gene expression and gene silencing in murine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Eric K; Lechler, Christian; Kohnke-Ertel, Birgit; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Sage, Julien; Schmid, Roland M; Ehmer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Hydrodynamic tail vein injection (HTVI) of transposon-based integration vectors is an established system for stably transfecting mouse hepatocytes in vivo that has been successfully employed to study key questions in liver biology and cancer. Refining the vectors for transposon-mediated hepatocyte transfection will further expand the range of applications of this technique in liver research. In the present study, we report an advanced transposon-based system for manipulating gene expression in hepatocytes in vivo. Transposon-based vector constructs were generated to enable the constitutive expression of inducible Cre recombinase (CreER) together with tetracycline-inducible transgene or miR-small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression (Tet-ON system). Transposon and transposase expression vectors were co-injected into R26R-mTmG reporter mice by HTVI. Cre-mediated gene recombination was induced by tamoxifen, followed by the administration of doxycycline to drive tetracycline-inducible gene or shRNA expression. Expression was visualized by immunofluorescence staining in livers of injected mice. After HTVI, Cre recombination by tamoxifen led to the expression of membrane-bound green fluorescent protein in transfected hepatocytes. Activation of inducible gene or shRNA expression was detected by immunostaining in up to one-third of transfected hepatocytes, with an efficiency dependent on the promoter driving the Tet-ON system. Our vector system combines Cre-lox mediated gene mutation with inducible gene expression or gene knockdown, respectively. It provides the opportunity for rapid and specific modification of hepatocyte gene expression and can be a useful tool for genetic screening approaches and analysis of target genes specifically in genetically engineered mouse models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Invitro Synthesis of Barley Endosperm Proteins on Wild Type and Mutant Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, A.; Ingversen, J.

    1976-01-01

    Membrane bound and free polyribosomes were isolated from 20 day old barley endosperms. Sucrose gradient analysis revealed distinct polysomal peaks up to heptamers. The isolated polysomes were active in a cell-free protein synthesizing system employing wheat germ extract. SDS-polyacrylamide gel...... electrophoresis showed that proteins with molecular weights ranging from 200,000 to 10,000 daltons were synthesized. A substantial part of the polypeptides coded for by the template associated with the membrane bound polysomes was identified as hordeins by their solubility in 55% isopropanol and by their co......-migration with native hordein on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Membrane bound endosperm polysomes from a barley mutant defective in hordein synthesis produced in the cell-free protein synthesizing system only a small amount of hordein. Conversely membrane bound polysomes from the endosperm of a mutant giving rise...

  3. A novel system for heterologous expression of flavocytochrome c in phototrophic bacteria using the Allochromatium vinosum rbcA promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, L; Kostanjevecki, V; Guisez, Y; Van Beeumen, J

    2001-07-01

    Flavocytochrome c-sulfide dehydrogenase (FCSD), an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of sulfide to elemental sulfur in vitro, is common to bacteria that utilize reduced sulfur compounds as electron donors in the process of carbon dioxide fixation. FCSD is a heterodimer containing two different cofactors, a flavin (FAD) and one or two heme c groups, located on the separate protein subunits. Efforts to produce the holoproteins of the soluble Allochromatium vinosum FCSD and the membrane-bound Ectothiorhodospira vacuolata protein in Escherichia coli using several expression systems were unsuccessful. Although all systems used were able to export the recombinant FCSDs to the periplasm, the proteins did not incorporate heme. In order to develop a new expression system involving photosynthetic hosts (Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ect. vacuolata), plasmid mobilisation from E. coli donors was studied. In the search for efficient promoters for such hosts, a system was developed combining the broad-host-range plasmid pGV910 and the promoter of the A. vinosum RuBisCo gene, rbcA. Conjugation was used to enable transfer from the expression plasmid of E. coli into Rba. capsulatus, Rba. sphaeroides strains and into Ect. vacuolata. Both Rhodobacter hosts were able to transcribe the genes coding for FCSD from the rbcA promoter and to produce detectable amounts of recombinant FCSD holoprotein. Western blots showed that the best production was obtained from cells grown photosynthetically on malate or acetate with sulfide. This system may prove to be of general use for the production of recombinant c-type cytochromes in homologous or related host systems.

  4. systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick L. Brockett

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Suppose S={{Xnj,   j=1,2,…,kn}} is an infinitesimal system of random variables whose centered sums converge in law to a (necessarily infinitely divisible distribution with Levy representation determined by the triple (γ,σ2,M. If {Yj,   j=1,2,…} are independent indentically distributed random variables independent of S, then the system S′={{YjXnj,j=1,2,…,kn}} is obtained by randomizing the scale parameters in S according to the distribution of Y1. We give sufficient conditions on the distribution of Y in terms of an index of convergence of S, to insure that centered sums from S′ be convergent. If such sums converge to a distribution determined by (γ′,(σ′2,Λ, then the exact relationship between (γ,σ2,M and (γ′,(σ′2,Λ is established. Also investigated is when limit distributions from S and S′ are of the same type, and conditions insuring products of random variables belong to the domain of attraction of a stable law.

  5. SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Swarnalatha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk analysis of urban aquatic systems due to heavy metals turns significant due to their peculiar properties viz. persis tence, non-degradab ility, toxicity, and accumulation. Akkulam Veli (AV, an urba n tropical lake in south India is subjected to various environmental stresses due to multiple waste discharge, sand mining, developmental activities, tour ism related activitie s etc. Hence, a comprehensive approach is adopted for risk assessment using modified degree of contamination factor, toxicity units based on numerical sediment quality guidelines (SQGs, and potentialecological risk indices. The study revealed the presence of toxic metals such as Cr, C d, Pb and As and the lake is rated under ‘low ecological risk’ category.

  6. Variation among Desulfovibrio species in electron transfer systems used for syntrophic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers linked by interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate-reducing species (e.g., Desulfovibrio). Physiological differences and various gene repertoires implicated in syntrophic metabolism among Desulfovibrio species suggest considerable variation in the biochemical basis of syntrophy. In this study, comparative transcriptional and mutant analyses of Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough growing syntrophically with Methanococcus maripaludis on lactate were used to develop new and revised models for their alternative electron transfer and energy conservation systems. Lactate oxidation by strain G20 generates a reduced thiol-disulfide redox pair(s) and ferredoxin that are energetically coupled to H(+)/CO(2) reduction by periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase via a flavin-based reverse electron bifurcation process (electron confurcation) and a menaquinone (MQ) redox loop-mediated reverse electron flow involving the membrane-bound Qmo and Qrc complexes. In contrast, strain Hildenborough uses a larger number of cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins linked in three intertwining pathways to couple H(+) reduction to lactate oxidation. The faster growth of strain G20 in coculture is associated with a kinetic advantage conferred by the Qmo-MQ-Qrc loop as an electron transfer system that permits higher lactate oxidation rates under elevated hydrogen levels (thereby enhancing methanogenic growth) and use of formate as the main electron-exchange mediator (>70% electron flux), as opposed to the primarily hydrogen-based exchange by strain Hildenborough. This study further demonstrates the absence of a conserved gene core in Desulfovibrio that would determine the ability for a syntrophic lifestyle.

  7. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rhea Sieber

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomic approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detected were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. The proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis macromolecular stability and energy metabolism to S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.

  8. Synthesis of Ag/polyaniline nanocomposite via an in situ photo-redox mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, P.K.; Singh, Narendra; Charan, Shobhit; Viswanath, A. Kasi

    2005-01-01

    Silver/polyaniline nanocomposites are prepared via in situ reduction of silver salt in aniline by mild photolysis performed with 8 W long wavelength (365 nm) and short wavelength (254 nm) radiation from UV lamp. Reduction of the silver salt in aqueous aniline leads to the formation of silver nanoparticles which in turn catalyze oxidation of aniline to polyaniline. Systematic observation of the progress of the reaction by means of absorption spectroscopy revealed that the reaction completes faster under the UV light of 254 nm wavelength than the visible source of 365 nm. The absorption bands of the reaction solution revealed that the bands at about 400-420 nm due to benzonoid ring of the polyaniline are overlapped and red-shifted due to the presence of nano-silver in powdered state. A slightly broadened X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern indicating, small particle size (∼30 nm), is consistent with cubic silver. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the nanocomposite showed a uniform size distribution with spherical and granular morphology. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the composites have a higher degradation temperature than polyaniline alone

  9. Photoredox ketone catalysis for the direct C-H imidation and acyloxylation of arenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Chandra Bhushan; Ohtani, Tsuyoshi; Corbett, Michael T; Ooi, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    The photoexcited aryl ketone-catalyzed C-H imidation of arenes and heteroarenes is reported. Using 3,6-dimethoxy-9 H -thioxanthen-9-one as a catalyst in combination with a bench-stable imidating reagent, C-N bond formation proceeds with high efficiency and a broad substrate scope. A key part of this method is that the thioxanthone catalyst acts as an excited-state reductant, thus establishing an oxidative quenching cycle for radical aromatic substitution. The synthetic potential of this photoexcited ketone catalysis is further demonstrated by application to the direct C-H acyloxylation of arenes.

  10. Comparative evaluation of optical methods and conventional isotope techniques for the detection of insulin receptors in heterogenous cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thun, C.

    1984-01-01

    The findings of studies using radioactively labelled (I-125) insulin to characterise its binding to various heterogenous cell systems had led to a classification of the relevant receptors with those of high affinity and low capacity or vice versa. This, in turn, raised questions as to the binding properties of each individual cell or cell material of a heterogenous nature. Apparently homogenous (lymphocytes) and heterogenous (blood and islet cells) cell populations were investigated on the basis of various techniques for the separate evaluation of individual cells, which were cytofluorometry using FITC insulin and the analysis of gold insulin under the electron microscope. For the association kinetics and equilibration analysis or affinity and receptor quantity a radioactive tracer and light microscope were used. Insulin was shown to bind to erythrocytes, reticulocytes, monocytes and lymphocytes and this result finds confirmation in the relevant literature. Furthermore, binding parameters could be determined for isolated islet cells. Cytofluorometry pointed to the fact that the insulin receptors of an apparently homogenous cell system differed in affinity and number and permitted the use of a multiple parameter procedure. Thus, it holds out promise as a method to be routinely used in the clinical diagnosis of binding parameters, without requiring previous separation procedures that are complicated or involve a loss of material. Transmission electron microscopy permitted conclusions to be drawn as to the type of cell to which insulin is attached. Owing to the use of gold insulin it was possible to throw some light on the factors determining the fate of membrane-bound insulin during its uptake into the cell. (TRV) [de

  11. Absorption spectroscopic analysis of Astacus rhodopsin systems and evidence of metabolic regeneration of rhodopsins after light adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamacher, K.

    1981-05-01

    A method was developed to isolate, from a single Astacus retina, purified rhabdoms almost entirely free from screening pigments. SDS-gelelectrophoretical analysis of the protein pattern of purified photoreceptor membranes yields a rhodopsin portion of 40 to 50% of the total protein. Absorption spectra of the rhodopsin system show that both, the membrane-bound chromoprotein (sonicated rhabdom suspension) and the digitonin-solubilized chromoprotein are thermostable and photoreversible at 0/sup 0/C and pH 7.0. Due to its photoreversibility metarhodopsin can be isomerized to rhodopsin by irradiation at lambda < 630 nm. As the extinction spectra of the two chromoprotein isomers overlap, only partial photochemical isomerization to rhodopsin is possible. The light-induced decrease of the rhodopsin portion in vivo depends on the state of adaptation of the Astacus eyes. The light-induced decrease of the rhodopsin mole fraction in vivo can be restored by a metabolic process of rhodopsin regeneration. The question whether dark regeneration is an enzymatic isomerization of metarhodopsin and/or a biochemical synthesis of rhodopsin cannot yet be answered. The course of the spectra of the digitonin-solubilized chromoprotein is remarkably dependent on the temperature. The kinetic of the thermal denaturation of the metarhodopsin corresponds to a first-order reaction with a half time tau/sub 1/2/ = 34 min at 30/sup 0/C. The process of the denaturation of the digitonin-solubilized chromoprotein at 20/sup 0/C, or 30/sup 0/C, respectively, - accompanied by the separation of retinal - is accelerated by irradiation of the system.

  12. The CsrR/CsrS two-component system of group A Streptococcus responds to environmental Mg2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryllos, Ioannis; Levin, James C; Wessels, Michael R

    2003-04-01

    Group A streptococci control expression of key virulence determinants via the two-component sensorregulator system CsrRCsrS. The membrane-bound sensor CsrS is thought to respond to previously unknown environmental signal(s) by controlling phosphorylation of its cognate regulator component CsrR. Phosphorylation of CsrR increases its affinity for binding to the promoter regions of Csr-regulated genes to repress transcription. Here we show that environmental Mg(2+) concentration is a potent and specific stimulus for CsrRCsrS-mediated regulation. We studied the effect of divalent cations on expression of the Csr-regulated hyaluronic acid capsule genes (hasABC) by measuring chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in a reporter strain of group A Streptococcus carrying a has operon promoter-cat fusion. Addition of Mg(2+), but not of Ca(2+), Mn(2+), or Zn(2+), repressed capsule gene expression by up to 80% in a dose-dependent fashion. The decrease in capsule gene transcription was associated with a marked reduction in cell-associated capsular polysaccharide. RNA hybridization analysis demonstrated reduced expression of the Csr-regulated hasABC operon, streptokinase (ska), and streptolysin S (sagA) during growth in the presence of 15 mM Mg(2+) for the wild-type strain 003CAT but not for an isogenic csrS mutant. We propose that Mg(2+) binds to CsrS to induce phosphorylation of CsrR and subsequent repression of virulence gene expression. The low concentration of Mg(2+) in extracellular body fluids predicts that the CsrRCsrS system is maintained in the inactive state during infection, thereby allowing maximal expression of critical virulence determinants in the human host.

  13. Oral delivery of the Sj23LHD-GST antigen by Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system protects against Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease and oral vaccine delivery system would be benefit for prevention of this disease. Although attenuated salmonella has been used as an antigen expression vector for oral vaccine development, the membrane-bound vacuoles in which bacteria reside hinders the presentation of expressed heterologous antigens to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. The present work used an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain VNP20009 to secretory expression of Sj23LHDGST bivalent antigen from Schistosoma japonicum and tested the protective efficacy against S. japonicum infection in orally immunized mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Promoters (nirB or pagC were used to express the antigen (Sj23LHDGST and the Salmonella type III or α-hemolysin secretion system was employed to secrete it. The immunoblotting analysis and fluorescent microscopy revealed that the antigen was effectively expressed and delivered to the cytosol of macrophages in vitro. Among recombinant vaccine strains, an engineered VNP20009 which expressed the antigen by nirB promoter and secreted it through type III secretion system (nirB-sopE(1-104-Sj23LHD-GST efficiently protected against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. This strain elicited a predominantly IgG(2a antibody response and a markedly increase in the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that this strain caused T cell activation as evidenced by significantly increased expression of CD44 and CD69. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral delivery of antigen by nirB-driven Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system is a novel, safe, inexpensive, efficient and convenient approach for schistosome vaccine development.

  14. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in vitro peptidase activities: identification and cleavage of kallikrein-kinin system-like substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Kondo, Marcia Y; Oliveira, Lilian C G; Okamoto, Debora N; Paes, Jéssica A; Machado, Mauricio F M; Veronez, Camila L; Motta, Guacyara; Andrade, Sheila S; Juliano, Maria A; Ferreira, Henrique B; Juliano, Luiz; Gouvea, Iuri E

    2013-05-03

    Bacterial proteases are important for metabolic processes and pathogenesis in host organisms. The bacterial swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has 15 putative protease-encoding genes annotated, but none of them have been functionally characterized. To identify and characterize peptidases that could be relevant for infection of swine hosts, we investigated the peptidase activity present in the pathogenic 7448 strain of M. hyopneumoniae. Combinatorial libraries of fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides, specific inhibitors and pH profiling were used to screen and characterize endopeptidase, aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase activities in cell lysates. One metalloendopeptidase, one serine endopeptidase, and one aminopeptidase were detected. The detected metalloendopeptidase activity, prominent at neutral and basic pH ranges, was due to a thimet oligopeptidase family member (M3 family), likely an oligoendopeptidase F (PepF), which cleaved the peptide Abz-GFSPFRQ-EDDnp at the F-S bond. A chymotrypsin-like serine endopeptidase activity, possibly a subtilisin-like serine protease, was prominent at higher pH levels, and was characterized by its preference for a Phe residue at the P1 position of the substrate. The aminopeptidase P (APP) activity showed a similar profile to that of human membrane-bound APP. Genes coding for these three peptidases were identified and their transcription was confirmed in the 7448 strain. Furthermore, M. hyopneumoniae cell lysate peptidases showed effects on kallikrein-kinin system-like substrates, such as bradykinin-derived substrates and human high molecular weight kininogen. The M. hyopneumoniae peptidase activities, here characterized for the first time, may be important for bacterial survival strategies and thus represent possible targets for drug development against M. hyopneumoniae swine infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Diffuse reticuloendothelial system involvement in type IV glycogen storage disease with a novel GBE1 mutation: a case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoulas, Pilar L; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Roy, Angshumoy; Bali, Deeksha S; Finegold, Milton J; Craigen, William J

    2012-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of glycogen metabolism caused by mutations in the GBE1 gene that encodes the 1,4-alpha-glucan-branching enzyme 1. Its clinical presentation is variable, with the most common form presenting in early childhood with primary hepatic involvement. Histologic manifestations in glycogen storage disease type IV typically consist of intracytoplasmic non-membrane-bound inclusions containing abnormally branched glycogen (polyglucosan bodies) within hepatocytes and myocytes. We report a female infant with classic hepatic form of glycogen storage disease type IV who demonstrated diffuse reticuloendothelial system involvement with the spleen, bone marrow, and lymph nodes infiltrated by foamy histiocytes with intracytoplasmic polyglucosan deposits. Sequence analysis of the GBE1 gene revealed compound heterozygosity for a previously described frameshift mutation (c.1239delT) and a novel missense mutation (c.1279G>A) that is predicted to alter a conserved glycine residue. GBE enzyme analysis revealed no detectable activity. A review of the literature for glycogen storage disease type IV patients with characterized molecular defects and deficient enzyme activity reveals most GBE1 mutations to be missense mutations clustering in the catalytic enzyme domain. Individuals with the classic hepatic form of glycogen storage disease type IV tend to be compound heterozygotes for null and missense mutations. Although the extensive reticuloendothelial system involvement that was observed in our patient is not typical of glycogen storage disease type IV, it may be associated with severe enzymatic deficiency and a poor outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacotherapeutic targeting of the endocannabinoid signaling system: drugs for obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuri, V Kiran; Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2008-03-18

    Endogenous signaling lipids ("endocannabinoids") functionally related to Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana (Cannabis), are important biomediators and metabolic regulators critical to mammalian (patho)physiology. The growing family of endocannabinoids, along with endocannabinoid biosynthetic and inactivating enzymes, transporters, and at least two membrane-bound, G-protein coupled receptors, comprise collectively the mammalian endocannabinoid signaling system. The ubiquitous and diverse regulatory actions of the endocannabinoid system in health and disease have supported the regulatory approval of natural products and synthetic agents as drugs that alter endocannabinoid-system activity. More recent data support the concept that the endocananbinoid system may be modulated for therapeutic gain at discrete pharmacological targets with safety and efficacy. Potential medications based on the endocannabinoid system have thus become a central focus of contemporary translational research for varied indications with important unmet medical needs. One such indication, obesity, is a global pandemic whose etiology has a pathogenic component of endocannabinoid-system hyperactivity and for which current pharmacological treatment is severely limited. Application of high-affinity, selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor ligands to attenuate endocannabinoid signaling represents a state-of-the-art approach for improving obesity pharmacotherapy. To this intent, several selective CB1 receptor antagonists with varied chemical structures are currently in advanced preclinical or clinical trials, and one (rimonabant) has been approved as a weight-management drug in some markets. Emerging preclinical data suggest that CB1 receptor neutral antagonists may represent breakthrough medications superior to antagonists/inverse agonists such as rimonabant for therapeutic attenuation of CB1 receptor transmission. Since obesity is a predisposing condition for the

  17. Postreplication Roles of the Brucella VirB Type IV Secretion System Uncovered via Conditional Expression of the VirB11 ATPase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P. Smith

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Brucella abortus, the bacterial agent of the worldwide zoonosis brucellosis, primarily infects host phagocytes, where it undergoes an intracellular cycle within a dedicated membrane-bound vacuole, the Brucella-containing vacuole (BCV. Initially of endosomal origin (eBCV, BCVs are remodeled into replication-permissive organelles (rBCV derived from the host endoplasmic reticulum, a process that requires modulation of host secretory functions via delivery of effector proteins by the Brucella VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS. Following replication, rBCVs are converted into autophagic vacuoles (aBCVs that facilitate bacterial egress and subsequent infections, arguing that the bacterium sequentially manipulates multiple cellular pathways to complete its cycle. The VirB T4SS is essential for rBCV biogenesis, as VirB-deficient mutants are stalled in eBCVs and cannot mediate rBCV biogenesis. This has precluded analysis of whether the VirB apparatus also drives subsequent stages of the Brucella intracellular cycle. To address this issue, we have generated a B. abortus strain in which VirB T4SS function is conditionally controlled via anhydrotetracycline (ATc-dependent complementation of a deletion of the virB11 gene encoding the VirB11 ATPase. We show in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs that early VirB production is essential for optimal rBCV biogenesis and bacterial replication. Transient expression of virB11 prior to infection was sufficient to mediate normal rBCV biogenesis and bacterial replication but led to T4SS inactivation and decreased aBCV formation and bacterial release, indicating that these postreplication stages are also T4SS dependent. Hence, our findings support the hypothesis of additional, postreplication roles of type IV secretion in the Brucella intracellular cycle.

  18. The origin and evolution of the surfactant system in fish: insights into the evolution of lungs and swim bladders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher B; Orgeig, Sandra; Sullivan, Lucy C; Ling, Nicholas; Bennett, Michael B; Schürch, Samuel; Val, Adalberto Luis; Brauner, Colin J

    2004-01-01

    Several times throughout their radiation fish have evolved either lungs or swim bladders as gas-holding structures. Lungs and swim bladders have different ontogenetic origins and can be used either for buoyancy or as an accessory respiratory organ. Therefore, the presence of air-filled bladders or lungs in different groups of fishes is an example of convergent evolution. We propose that air breathing could not occur without the presence of a surfactant system and suggest that this system may have originated in epithelial cells lining the pharynx. Here we present new data on the surfactant system in swim bladders of three teleost fish (the air-breathing pirarucu Arapaima gigas and tarpon Megalops cyprinoides and the non-air-breathing New Zealand snapper Pagrus auratus). We determined the presence of surfactant using biochemical, biophysical, and morphological analyses and determined homology using immunohistochemical analysis of the surfactant proteins (SPs). We relate the presence and structure of the surfactant system to those previously described in the swim bladders of another teleost, the goldfish, and those of the air-breathing organs of the other members of the Osteichthyes, the more primitive air-breathing Actinopterygii and the Sarcopterygii. Snapper and tarpon swim bladders are lined with squamous and cuboidal epithelial cells, respectively, containing membrane-bound lamellar bodies. Phosphatidylcholine dominates the phospholipid (PL) profile of lavage material from all fish analyzed to date. The presence of the characteristic surfactant lipids in pirarucu and tarpon, lamellar bodies in tarpon and snapper, SP-B in tarpon and pirarucu lavage, and SPs (A, B, and D) in swim bladder tissue of the tarpon provide strong evidence that the surfactant system of teleosts is homologous with that of other fish and of tetrapods. This study is the first demonstration of the presence of SP-D in the air-breathing organs of nonmammalian species and SP-B in actinopterygian

  19. Horse serum reduces expression of membrane-bound and soluble isoforms of the preadipocyte marker Delta-like 1 homolog (Dlk1), but is inefficient for adipogenic differentiation of mouse preadipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Nielsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte H

    2013-01-01

    horse serum, this did not correlate with a high degree of adipogenic differentiation. In conclusion, our novel results thus reveal that horse serum clearly is insufficient for adipogenic differentiation of mouse preadipocytes and that low levels of Dlk1 alone are a poor marker of mouse in vitro...

  20. The Mouse-Specific Splice Variant mRAGE_v4 Encodes a Membrane-Bound RAGE That Is Resistant to Shedding and Does Not Contribute to the Production of Soluble RAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jaron; Bertolotti, Matteo; Fritz, Günter; Bianchi, Marco E.; Raucci, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is involved in the onset and progression of several inflammatory diseases. The RAGE primary transcript undergoes numerous alternative splicing (AS) events, some of which are species-specific. Here, we characterize the mouse-specific mRAGE_v4 splice variant, which is conserved in rodents and absent in primates. mRAGE_v4 derives from exon 9 skipping and encodes a receptor (M-RAGE) that lacks 9 amino acids between the transmembrane and the immunoglobulin (Ig) domains. RNA-Seq data confirm that in mouse lung mRAGE_v4 is the most abundant RAGE mRNA isoform after mRAGE, which codes for full-length RAGE (FL-RAGE), while in heart all RAGE variants are almost undetectable. The proteins M-RAGE and FL-RAGE are roughly equally abundant in mouse lung. Contrary to FL-RAGE, M-RAGE is extremely resistant to shedding because it lacks the peptide motif recognized by both ADAM10 and MMP9, and does not contribute significantly to soluble cRAGE formation. Thus, a cassette exon in RAGE corresponds to a specific function of the RAGE protein–the ability to be shed. Given the differences in RAGE AS variants between rodents and humans, caution is due in the interpretation of results obtained in mouse models of RAGE-dependent human pathologies. PMID:27655137

  1. Generation of H9 T-cells stably expressing a membrane-bound form of the cytoplasmic tail of the Env-glycoprotein: lack of transcomplementation of defective HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Valerie

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract H9-T-cells do not support the replication of mutant HIV-1 encoding Env protein lacking its long cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (Env-CT. Here we describe the generation of a H9-T-cell population constitutively expressing the HIV-1 Env-CT protein domain anchored in the cellular membrane by it homologous membrane-spanning domain (TMD. We confirmed that the Env-TMD-CT protein was associated with cellular membranes, that its expression did not have any obvious cytotoxic effects on the cells and that it did not affect wild-type HIV-1 replication. However, as measured in both a single-round assay as well as in spreading infections, replication competence of mutant pNL-Tr712, lacking the Env-CT, was not restored in this H9 T-cell population. This means that the Env-CT per se cannot transcomplement the replication block of HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env proteins and suggests that the Env-CT likely exerts its function only in the context of the complete Env protein.

  2. Single-molecule tracking in live Vibrio cholerae reveals that ToxR recruits the membrane-bound virulence regulator TcpP to the toxT promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Beth L; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J; Biteen, Julie S

    2015-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes the human disease cholera by producing a potent toxin. The V. cholerae virulence pathway involves an unusual transcription step: the bitopic inner-membrane proteins TcpP and ToxR activate toxT transcription. As ToxT is the primary direct transcription activator in V. cholerae pathogenicity, its regulation by membrane-localized activators is key in the disease process. However, the molecular mechanisms by which membrane-localized activators engage the transcription process have yet to be uncovered in live cells. Here we report the use of super-resolution microscopy, single-molecule tracking, and gene knockouts to examine the dynamics of individual TcpP proteins in live V. cholerae cells with < 40 nm spatial resolution on a 50 ms timescale. Single-molecule trajectory analysis reveals that TcpP diffusion is heterogeneous and can be described by three populations of TcpP motion: one fast, one slow, and one immobile. By comparing TcpP diffusion in wild-type V. cholerae to that in mutant strains lacking either toxR or the toxT promoter, we determine that TcpP mobility is greater in the presence of its interaction partners than in their absence. Our findings support a mechanism in which ToxR recruits TcpP to the toxT promoter for transcription activation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... analyzed in this study. GAD65 has a shorter half-life than the GAD64 forms, remains hydrophilic and soluble, and does not resolve into isomers. Comparative analysis of the brain and beta-cell forms of GAD show that GAD65 and GAD64 in pancreatic beta-cells correspond to the larger and smaller forms of GAD...... in brain, respectively. The expression of different forms and the flexibility in subcellular localization of the GAD autoantigen in beta-cells may have implications for both its function and autoantigenicity....

  4. Expression of Membrane-Bound Human AminopeptidaseP as a Soluble Enzyme and an Investigation into Its Efficacy Towards Offering Protection Against the Toxicity of Chemical Warfare Nerve Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    provided food and water ad libitum. Mice (n=6) were injected with 2 × 1011 viral particles of Ad-shmAPP or Ad-null per mouse via the tail vein. Prior...Interact, 2010. 187(1-3): p. 349-54. 10. Hsu, Y.T., et al., Evaluation of organophosphorus chemicals- degrading enzymes: a comparison of Escherichia coli...against the toxicity of the organophosphorus pesticide toxicant diazoxon. Gene Ther, 2011. 18(3): p. 250-7. 22. Broomfield, C.A., et al., Protection

  5. Generation of H9 T-cells stably expressing a membrane-bound form of the cytoplasmic tail of the Env-glycoprotein: lack of transcomplementation of defective HIV-1 virions encoding C-terminally truncated Env

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch Valerie; Pfeiffer Tanya; Holtkotte Denise

    2006-01-01

    Abstract H9-T-cells do not support the replication of mutant HIV-1 encoding Env protein lacking its long cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (Env-CT). Here we describe the generation of a H9-T-cell population constitutively expressing the HIV-1 Env-CT protein domain anchored in the cellular membrane by it homologous membrane-spanning domain (TMD). We confirmed that the Env-TMD-CT protein was associated with cellular membranes, that its expression did not have any obvious cytotoxic effects on the ce...

  6. Membrane-bound dd-carboxypeptidases from Bacillus megaterium KM. General properties, substrate specificity and sensitivity to penicillins, cephalosporins and peptide inhibitors of the activity at pH5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Mauriño, Teresa; Nieto, Manuel; Perkins, Harold R.

    1974-01-01

    1. The membrane from Bacillus megaterium KM contained a dd-carboxypeptidase with optimum activity under the following conditions: pH5.2, bivalent cation, 3mm; ionic strength, 40mm; temperature, 35°C. It was inactivated by treatment with p-chloromercuribenzoate but was fairly insensitive to 2-mercaptoethanol. 2. The enzyme was inhibited by penicillins and cephalosporins. The inhibition of this enzyme was partially reversed on dialysis but 0.2m-2-mercaptoethanol could neither prevent nor reverse the inhibition. 3. The enzyme was extremely sensitive to changes in the configuration and size of the side chain of the C-terminal dipeptide of the substrate. An aliphatic side chain of a well-defined length and polarity was required in the residue that precedes the C-terminal dipeptide. 4. The enzyme was inhibited by a wide range of analogues of the peptidic portion of the natural substrate. PMID:4218954

  7. Staphylococcal phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system: purification and characterization of the mannitol-specific enzyme III/sup mtl/ of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus carnosus and homology with the enzyme II/sup mtl/ of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, B.; Frank, R.; Deutscher, J.; Meyer, N.; Hengstenberg, W.

    1988-01-01

    Enzyme III/sup mtl/ is part of the mannitol phosphotransferase system of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus carnosus and is phosphorylated by phosphoenolpyruvate in a reaction sequence requiring enzyme I (phosphoenolpyruvate-protein phosphotransferase) and the histidine-containing protein HPr. In this paper, the authors report the isolation of III/sup mtl/ from both S. aureus and S. carnosus and the characterization of the active center. After phosphorylation of III/sup mtl/ with [ 32 P]PEP, enzyme I, and HPr, the phosphorylated protein was cleaved with endoproteinase GLu(C). The amino acid sequence of the S. aureus peptide carrying the phosphoryl group was found to be Gln-Val-Val-Ser-Thr-Phe-Met-Gly-Asn-Gly-Leu-Ala-Ile-Pro-His-Gly-Thr-Asp-Asp. The corresponding peptide from S. carnosus shows an equal sequence except that the first residue is Ala instead of Gln. These peptides both contain a single histidyl residue which they assume to carry the phosphoryl group. All proteins of the PTS so far investigated indeed carry the phosphoryl group attached to a histidyl residue. According to sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, the molecular weight of the III/sup mtl/ proteins was found to be 15,000. They have also determined the N-terminal sequence of both proteins. Comparison of the III/sup mtl/ peptide sequences and the C-terminal part of the enzyme II/sup mtl/ of Escherichia coli reveals considerable sequence homology, which supports the suggestion that II/sup mtl/ of E. coli is a fusion protein of a soluble III protein with a membrane-bound enzyme II

  8. Signaling mechanism by the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system LytSR: role of acetyl phosphate in bypassing the cell membrane electrical potential sensor LytS [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Patel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The two-component system LytSR has been linked to the signal transduction of cell membrane electrical potential perturbation and is involved in the adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to cationic antimicrobial peptides. It consists of a membrane-bound histidine kinase, LytS, which belongs to the family of multiple transmembrane-spanning domains receptors, and a response regulator, LytR, which belongs to the novel family of non-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain proteins. LytR regulates the expression of cidABC and lrgAB operons, the gene products of which are involved in programmed cell death and lysis. In vivo studies have demonstrated involvement of two overlapping regulatory networks in regulating the lrgAB operon, both depending on LytR. One regulatory network responds to glucose metabolism and the other responds to changes in the cell membrane potential. Herein, we show that LytS has autokinase activity and can catalyze a fast phosphotransfer reaction, with 50% of its phosphoryl group lost within 1 minute of incubation with LytR. LytS has also phosphatase activity. Notably, LytR undergoes phosphorylation by acetyl phosphate at a rate that is 2-fold faster than the phosphorylation by LytS. This observation is significant in lieu of the in vivo observations that regulation of the lrgAB operon is LytR-dependent in the presence of excess glucose in the medium. The latter condition does not lead to perturbation of the cell membrane potential but rather to the accumulation of acetate in the cell. Our study provides insights into the molecular basis for regulation of lrgAB in a LytR-dependent manner under conditions that do not involve sensing by LytS.

  9. Comprehensive enzymatic analysis of the amylolytic system in the digestive fluid of the sea hare, Aplysia kurodai: Unique properties of two α-amylases and two α-glucosidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Tsuji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sea lettuce (Ulva pertusa is a nuisance species of green algae that is found all over the world. East-Asian species of the marine gastropod, the sea hare Aplysia kurodai, shows a clear feeding preference for sea lettuce. Compared with cellulose, sea lettuce contains a higher amount of starch as a storage polysaccharide. However, the entire amylolytic system in the digestive fluid of A. kurodai has not been studied in detail. We purified α-amylases and α-glucosidases from the digestive fluid of A. kurodai and investigated the synergistic action of these enzymes on sea lettuce. A. kurodai contain two α-amylases (59 and 80 kDa and two α-glucosidases (74 and 86 kDa. The 59-kDa α-amylase, but not the 80-kDa α-amylase, was markedly activated by Ca2+ or Cl−. Both α-amylases degraded starch and maltoheptaose, producing maltotriose, maltose, and glucose. Glucose production from starch was higher with 80-kDa α-amylase than with 59-kDa α-amylase. Kinetic analysis indicated that 74-kDa α-glucosidase prefers short α-1,4-linked oligosaccharide, whereas 86-kDa α-glucosidase prefers large α-1,6 and α-1,4-linked polysaccharides such as glycogen. When sea lettuce was used as a substrate, a 2-fold greater amount of glucose was released by treatment with 59-kDa α-amylase and 74-kDa α-glucosidase than by treatment with 45-kDa cellulase and 210-kDa β-glucosidase of A. kurodai. Unlike mammals, sea hares efficiently digest sea lettuce to glucose by a combination of two α-amylases and two α-glucosidases in the digestive fluids without membrane-bound maltase–glucoamylase and sucrase–isomaltase complexes.

  10. Metabolism of fatty acids in rat brain in microsomal membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeberhard, E.E.; Gan-Elepano, M.; Mead, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    Using a technique in which substrate fatty acids are incorporated into microsomal membranes followd by comparison of their rates of desaturation or elongation with those of exogenous added fatty acids it has been found that the desaturation rate is more rapid for the membrane-bound substrate than for the added fatty acid. Moreover, the product of the membrane-bound substrate is incorporated into membrane phospholipid whereas the product of the exogenous substrate is found in di- and triacyl glycerols and in free fatty acids as well. These and other findings point to a normal sequence of reaction of membrane liqids with membrane-bound substrates involving transfer of fatty acid from phospholipid to the coupled enzyme systems without ready equilibration with the free fatty acid pool

  11. Characterization and partial purification of beta-1,3-D-glucan (callose) synthase from barley (Hordeum vulgare) leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L.H.; Jacobsen, S.; Hejgaard, J.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma membrane bound beta-1,3-D-glucan (callose) synthase. assumed to be involved in the resistance to the powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei), was partially purified from a microsomal fraction of green barley leaves (Hordeum vulgare L.). Plasma membranes were enriched...... by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning of the microsomal fraction.in a polyethylene glycol 3350/Dextran T-500 system. The plasma membrane bound callose synthase was dependent on uridine 5' diphosphate (UDP)-glucose (K(m) 0.39 mM) and was activated by Ca2+, digitonin, cellobiose and polyamines. The enzyme...

  12. Biophysical characterisation of electrofused giant HEK293-cells as a novel electrophysiological expression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, D.; Terpitz, U.; Zhou, A.; Reuss, R.; Mueller, K.; Sukhorukov, V.L.; Gessner, P.; Nagel, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Bamberg, E.

    2006-01-01

    Giant HEK293 cells of 30-65 μm in diameter were produced by three-dimensional multi-cell electrofusion in 75 mOsm sorbitol media. These strong hypotonic conditions facilitated fusion because of the spherical shape and smooth membrane surface of the swollen cells. A regulatory volume decrease (RVD), as observed at higher osmolalities, did not occur at 75 mOsm. In contrast to field-treated, but unfused cells, the increase in volume induced by hypotonic shock was only partly reversible in the case of fused giant cells after their transfer into isotonic medium. The large size of the electrofused cells allowed the study of their electrophysiological properties by application of both whole-cell and giant excised patch-clamp techniques. Recordings on giant cells yielded a value of 1.1 ± 0.1 μF/cm 2 for the area-specific membrane capacitance. This value was consistent with that of the parental cells. The area-specific conductivity of giant cells (diameter > 50 μm) was found to be between 12.8 and 16.1 μS/cm 2 , which is in the range of that of the parental cells. Measurements with patch-pipettes containing fluorescein showed uniform dye uptake in the whole-cell configuration, but not in the cell-attached configuration. The diffusion-controlled uniform uptake of the dye into the cell interior excludes internal compartmentalisation. The finding of a homogeneous fusion was also supported by expression of the yellow fluorescent protein YFP (as part of the fusion-protein ChR2-YFP) in giant cells since no plasma-membrane bound YFP-mediated fluorescence was detected in the interior of the electrofused cells. Functional expression and the electrophysiological characterisation of the light-activated cation channel Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) yielded similar results as for parental cells. Most importantly, the giant cells exhibited a comparable expression density of the channel protein in the plasma membrane as observed in parental cells. This demonstrates that electrofused cells

  13. Combining the catalytic enantioselective reaction of visible-light-generated radicals with a by-product utilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Shipeng; Burghaus, Olaf; Webster, Richard D; Harms, Klaus; Meggers, Eric

    2017-10-01

    We report an unusual reaction design in which a chiral bis-cyclometalated rhodium(iii) complex enables the stereocontrolled chemistry of photo-generated carbon-centered radicals and at the same time catalyzes an enantioselective sulfonyl radical addition to an alkene. Specifically, employing inexpensive and readily available Hantzsch esters as the photoredox mediator, Rh-coordinated prochiral radicals generated by a selective photoinduced single electron reduction are trapped by allyl sulfones in a highly stereocontrolled fashion, providing radical allylation products with up to 97% ee. The hereby formed fragmented sulfonyl radicals are utilized via an enantioselective radical addition to form chiral sulfones, which minimizes waste generation.

  14. Chapter 15. transforming lepidopteran insect cells for continuous recombinant protein expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    The baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) is widely used to produce large quantities of recombinant proteins. However, yields of extracellular and membrane-bound proteins obtained with this system often are very low, possibly due to the adverse effects of baculovirus infection on the host ins...

  15. Selective Hydrogen Atom Abstraction via Induced Bond Polarization: The Direct -Arylation of Alcohols via Photoredox, HAT and Nickel Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilton, Jack; Christensen, Melodie; DiRocco, Daniel A; Ruck, Rebecca T; Davies, Ian W; MacMillan, David William

    2018-02-28

    The combination of nickel metallaphotoredox catalysis, hydrogen atom transfer catalysis, and a Lewis acid activation mode, has led to the development of an arylation protocol for the selective functionalization of alcohol -hydroxy C-H bonds. This approach employs zinc-mediated alcohol deprotonation to activate -hydroxy C-H bonds while simultaneously suppressing C-O bond formation by inhibiting formation of nickel alkoxide species. The use of Zn based Lewis acids also deactivates other hydridic bonds such as -amino and -oxy C-H bonds. This technology facilitates rapid access to benzylic alcohols, an important motif in drug discovery. A 3-step synthesis of the Prozac exemplifies the utility of this new method. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Pharmacological inhibition of carbonic anhydrase XII interferes with cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis in T-cell lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lounnas, Nadia; Rosilio, Célia; Nebout, Marielle; Mary, Didier; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Neffati, Zouhour; Chiche, Johanna; Spits, Hergen; Hagenbeek, Thijs J.; Asnafi, Vahid; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Supuran, Claudiu T.; Peyron, Jean-François; Imbert, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The membrane-bound carbonic anhydrase isoforms CAIX and CAXII, underpin a pH-regulating system that enables hypoxic tumor cell survival. Here, we observed for the first time an upregulation of CAXII in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL/LL) cells. First we showed that CAXII is

  17. Cell-surface Associated p43/Endothelial-monocyte-activating-polypeptide-II in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Induces Apoptosis in T-lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasek Faisal

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data suggest that membrane-bound EMAP-II is cytotoxic to lymphocytes and, therefore, might constitute a component of a novel, immunosuppressive pathway by which HCC cells may eliminate attacking T-cells and evade the immune system. The mechanism by which it does so is currently under investigation.

  18. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth r...

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Controlled by Membrane Potential. The guard cell plasma membrane has all the major transport systems present in plants [1]. The plasma membrane bound. A TPase acts as a proton pump, which hydrolyzes A TP and transports protons from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior, thereby generating a transmembrane potential.

  20. Pyrroloquinoline quinone and its versatile roles in biological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... Pyrroloquinoline-quinine (PQQ) was initially characterized as a redox cofactor for membrane-bound dehydrogenases in the bacterial system. Subsequently, PQQ was shown to be an antioxidant protecting the living cells from oxidative damage in vivo and the biomolecules from artificially produced reaction ...

  1. The importance of being cigar-shaped

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Blom (Joke); M.A. Peletier (Mark)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn [1, 6, 7] we studied whether metabolic pathways with membrane-bound enzymes can give rise to significant concentration gradients in the cytosolic pathway components. We investigated this issue using a theoretical model for the phosphoenolpyruvate:glucose phosphotransferase system in

  2. An overview of the biological disease modifying drugs available for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, the combined use of TNF-α inhibitors and methotrexate prevents the formation of antibodies to the TNF-α inhibitors. The available TNF-α inhibitors bind to both soluble and membrane bound TNF-α.2,4. Adverse effects associated with TNF-α inhibitors are associated with the role of TNF-α in the immune system.

  3. Visible-Light-Irradiated Graphitic Carbon Nitride Photocatalyzed Diels-Alder Reactions with Dioxygen as Sustainable Mediator for Photoinduced Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yubao; Antonietti, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Photocatalytic Diels-Alder (D-A) reactions with electron rich olefins are realized by graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) under visible-light irradiation and aerobic conditions. This heterogeneous photoredox reaction system is highly efficient, and the apparent quantum yield reaches a remarkable value of 47 % for the model reaction. Dioxygen plays a critical role as electron mediator, which is distinct from the previous reports in the homogeneous Ru II complex photoredox system. Moreover, the reaction intermediate vinylcyclobutane is captured and monitored during the reaction, serving as a direct evidence for the proposed reaction mechanism. The cycloaddition process is thereby determined to be the combination of direct [4+2] cycloaddition and [2+2] cycloaddition followed by photocatalytic rearrangement of the vinylcyclobutane intermediate. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Two-Component Signaling System VgrRS Directly Senses Extracytoplasmic and Intracellular Iron to Control Bacterial Adaptation under Iron Depleted Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both iron starvation and excess are detrimental to cellular life, especially for animal and plant pathogens since they always live in iron-limited environments produced by host immune responses. However, how organisms sense and respond to iron is incompletely understood. Herein, we reveal that in the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, VgrS (also named ColS is a membrane-bound receptor histidine kinase that senses extracytoplasmic iron limitation in the periplasm, while its cognate response regulator, VgrR (ColR, detects intracellular iron excess. Under iron-depleted conditions, dissociation of Fe3+ from the periplasmic sensor region of VgrS activates the VgrS autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphotransfer to VgrR, an OmpR-family transcription factor that regulates bacterial responses to take up iron. VgrR-VgrS regulon and the consensus DNA binding motif of the transcription factor VgrR were dissected by comparative proteomic and ChIP-seq analyses, which revealed that in reacting to iron-depleted environments, VgrR directly or indirectly controls the expressions of hundreds of genes that are involved in various physiological cascades, especially those associated with iron-uptake. Among them, we demonstrated that the phosphorylated VgrR tightly represses the transcription of a special TonB-dependent receptor gene, tdvA. This regulation is a critical prerequisite for efficient iron uptake and bacterial virulence since activation of tdvA transcription is detrimental to these processes. When the intracellular iron accumulates, the VgrR-Fe2+ interaction dissociates not only the binding between VgrR and the tdvA promoter, but also the interaction between VgrR and VgrS. This relieves the repression in tdvA transcription to impede continuous iron uptake and avoids possible toxic effects of excessive iron accumulation. Our results revealed a signaling system that directly senses both extracytoplasmic and intracellular

  5. Generating Hydrated Electrons for Chemical Syntheses by Using a Green Light-Emitting Diode (LED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert; Lehmann, Florian; Goez, Martin

    2018-01-22

    We present the first working system for accessing and utilizing laboratory-scale concentrations of hydrated electrons by photoredox catalysis with a green light-emitting diode (LED). Decisive are micellar compartmentalization and photon pooling in an intermediate that decays with second-order kinetics. The only consumable is the nontoxic and bioavailable vitamin C. A turnover number of 1380 shows the LED method to be on par with electron generation by high-power pulsed lasers, but at a fraction of the cost. The extreme reducing power of the electron and its long unquenched life as a ground-state species are synergistic. We demonstrate the applicability to the dechlorination, defluorination, and hydrogenation of compounds that are inert towards all other visible-light photoredox catalysts known to date. A comprehensive mechanistic investigation from microseconds to hours yields results of general validity for photoredox catalysis with photon pooling, allowing optimization and upscaling. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. System Budgets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1996-01-01

    The lecture note is aimed at introducing system budgets for optical communication systems. It treats optical fiber communication systems (six generations), system design, bandwidth effects, other system impairments and optical amplifiers.......The lecture note is aimed at introducing system budgets for optical communication systems. It treats optical fiber communication systems (six generations), system design, bandwidth effects, other system impairments and optical amplifiers....

  7. Effects of estrogen on the vascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Tostes

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular protective actions of estrogen are partially mediated by a direct effect on the vessel wall. Estrogen is active both on vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells where functionally competent estrogen receptors have been identified. Estrogen administration promotes vasodilation in humans and in experimental animals, in part by stimulating prostacyclin and nitric oxide synthesis, as well as by decreasing the production of vasoconstrictor agents such as cyclooxygenase-derived products, reactive oxygen species, angiotensin II, and endothelin-1. In vitro, estrogen exerts a direct inhibitory effect on smooth muscle by activating potassium efflux and by inhibiting calcium influx. In addition, estrogen inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. In vivo, 17ß-estradiol prevents neointimal thickening after balloon injury and also ameliorates the lesions occurring in atherosclerotic conditions. As is the case for other steroids, the effect of estrogen on the vessel wall has a rapid non-genomic component involving membrane phenomena, such as alteration of membrane ionic permeability and activation of membrane-bound enzymes, as well as the classical genomic effect involving estrogen receptor activation and gene expression.

  8. Summary of International Exhibition and Congress (3rd): BIOTECHNICA 󈨛 Hannover Held in Hannover (Germany, F.R.) on 22-24 September 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-21

    resin (acetate The fluidized bed reactor is de- form) and is again freeze-dried. Synthe- signed to provide the mass transfer rates sis of peptide...which cause foaming. scribed a fluidized bed bioreactor system Venkat stated that the fluidized bed for continuous culture with particular system scales...contain numerous membrane-bound Ddhler and Forssmann’s groups are storage granules . These characteristic engaged in collaborative efforts in the

  9. Ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossler

    1980-01-01

    The present paper deals with - controlled area ventilation systems - ventilation systems for switchgear-building and control-room - other ventilation systems for safety equipments - service systems for ventilation systems. (orig./RW)

  10. Uroguanylin induces electroencephalographic spikes in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, MDA.; Nascimento, NRF.; Fonteles, MC.; Vale, OC.

    2013-01-01

    Uroguanylin (UGN) is an endogenous peptide that acts on membrane-bound guanylate cyclase receptors of intestinal and renal cells increasing cGMP production and regulating electrolyte and water epithelial transport. Recent research works demonstrate the expression of this peptide and its receptor in the central nervous system. The current work was undertaken in order to evaluate modifications of electroencephalographic spectra (EEG) in anesthetized Wistar rats, submitted to intracisternal infu...

  11. In Vitro Evaluation of a Soluble Leishmania Promastigote Surface Antigen as a Potential Vaccine Candidate against Human Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Chamakh-Ayari, Rym; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Petitdidier, Elodie; Markikou-Ouni, Wafa; Aoun, Karim; Moreno, Javier; Carrillo, Eugenia; Salotra, Poonam; Kaushal, Himanshu; Negi, Narender Singh; Arevalo, Jorge; Falconi-Agapito, Francesca; Privat, Angela; Cruz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    PSA (Promastigote Surface Antigen) belongs to a family of membrane-bound and secreted proteins present in several Leishmania (L.) species. PSA is recognized by human Th1 cells and provides a high degree of protection in vaccinated mice. We evaluated humoral and cellular immune responses induced by a L. amazonensis PSA protein (LaPSA-38S) produced in a L. tarentolae expression system. This was done in individuals cured of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to L. major (CCLm) or L. braziliensis (CCLb)...

  12. Thermal systems; Systemes thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalot, S. [Valenciennes Univ. et du Hainaut Cambresis, LME, 59 (France); Lecoeuche, S. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Dept. GIP, 59 - Douai (France)]|[Lille Univ. des Sciences et Technologies, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Ahmad, M.; Sallee, H.; Quenard, D. [CSTB, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Bontemps, A. [Universite Joseph Fourier, LEGI/GRETh, 38 - Grenoble (France); Gascoin, N.; Gillard, P.; Bernard, S. [Laboratoire d' Energetique, Explosion, Structure, 18 - Bourges (France); Gascoin, N.; Toure, Y. [Laboratoire Vision et Robotique, 18 - Bourges (France); Daniau, E.; Bouchez, M. [MBDA, 18 - Bourges (France); Dobrovicescu, A.; Stanciu, D. [Bucarest Univ. Polytechnique, Faculte de Genie Mecanique (Romania); Stoian, M. [Reims Univ. Champagne Ardenne, Faculte des Sciences, UTAP/LTM, 51 (France); Bruch, A.; Fourmigue, J.F.; Colasson, S. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. Greth, 38 (France); Bontemps, A. [Universite Joseph Fourier, LEGI/GRETh, 38 - Grenoble (France); Voicu, I.; Mare, T.; Miriel, J. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), LGCGM, IUT, 35 - Rennes (France); Galanis, N. [Sherbrooke Univ., Genie Mecanique, QC (Canada); Nemer, M.; Clodic, D. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre Energetique et Procedes, 75 (France); Lasbet, Y.; Auvity, B.; Castelain, C.; Peerhossaini, H. [Nantes Univ., Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. de Thermocinetiquede Nantes, UMR-CNRS 6607, 44 (France)

    2005-07-01

    This session about thermal systems gathers 26 articles dealing with: neural model of a compact heat exchanger; experimental study and numerical simulation of the thermal behaviour of test-cells with walls made of a combination of phase change materials and super-insulating materials; hydraulic and thermal modeling of a supercritical fluid with pyrolysis inside a heated channel: pre-dimensioning of an experimental study; energy analysis of the heat recovery devices of a cryogenic system; numerical simulation of the thermo-hydraulic behaviour of a supercritical CO{sub 2} flow inside a vertical tube; mixed convection inside dual-tube exchangers; development of a nodal approach with homogenization for the simulation of the brazing cycle of a heat exchanger; chaotic exchanger for the cooling of low temperature fuel cells; structural optimization of the internal fins of a cylindrical generator; a new experimental approach for the study of the local boiling inside the channels of exchangers with plates and fins; experimental study of the flow regimes of boiling hydrocarbons on a bundle of staggered tubes; energy study of heat recovery exchangers used in Claude-type refrigerating systems; general model of Carnot engine submitted to various operating constraints; the free pistons Stirling cogeneration system; natural gas supplied cogeneration system with polymer membrane fuel cell; influence of the CRN coating on the heat flux inside the tool during the wood unrolling process; transport and mixture of a passive scalar injected inside the wake of a Ahmed body; control of a laser welding-brazing process by infrared thermography; 2D self-adaptative method for contours detection: application to the images of an aniso-thermal jet; exergy and exergy-economical study of an 'Ericsson' engine-based micro-cogeneration system; simplified air-conditioning of telephone switching equipments; parametric study of the 'low-energy' individual dwelling; brief synthesis of

  13. Ionic liquid-assisted synthesis of Br-modified g-C3N4 semiconductors with high surface area and highly porous structure for photoredox water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuo; Zhang, Yiwei; Wang, Yanyun; Zhou, Yuming; Qiu, Kaibo; Zhang, Chao; Fang, Jiasheng; Sheng, Xiaoli

    2017-12-01

    Coping with the gradually increasing worldwide energy and environmental issues, it is urgent to develop efficient, cheap and visible-light-driven photocatalysts for hydrogen production. Here, we present a facile way to synthesize bromine doped graphitic carbon nitride (CN-BrX) with highly porous structure by using ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide) as the Br source and soft-template for the first time, which applied in hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation. A systematic study is conducted on the optimization in the doping amount. The results find that the as-fabricated CN-BrX photocatalysts possess a uniform porous network with thin walls due to the release of volatile domains and decomposition of ionic liquids. The highly porous structure with the large surface area (≤150 m2/g) benefits the exposure of active sites. Moreover, the bromine modification and porous structure can narrow the band gap, enhance the transportation capability of photogenerated electrons, improve the optical and conductive properties of CN, thus contribute to an outstanding H2 evolution rate under visible light irradiation (120 μmol h-1), which is about 3.6 times higher than pure CN. This work provides a new insight for designing the novel g-C3N4 based photocatalysts for hydrogen production, CO2 conversion and environmental remediation.

  14. Tin-free visible light photoredox catalysed cyclisation of enamides as a mild procedure for the synthesis of γ-lactams

    KAUST Repository

    Fava, Eleonora

    2016-07-13

    The first visible light mediated tin-free cyclisation of α-chloroenamides leading to the synthesis of substituted γ-lactams with excellent stereoselectivity is reported. The protocol employs the single-electron reduction of activated C–Cl bonds, which are typically inert towards reduction.

  15. Logic-Controlled Radical Polymerization with Heat and Light: Multiple-Stimuli Switching of Polymer Chain Growth via a Recyclable, Thermally Responsive Gel Photoredox Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao; Deng, Shihong; Gu, Yuwei; Lin, Jun; MacLeod, Michelle J; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2017-02-15

    Strategies for switching polymerizations between "ON" and "OFF" states offer new possibilities for materials design and fabrication. While switching of controlled radical polymerization has been achieve using light, applied voltage, allosteric effects, chemical reagents, pH, and mechanical force, it is still challenging to introduce multiple external switches using the same catalyst to achieve logic gating of controlled polymerization reactions. Herein, we report an easy-to-synthesize thermally responsive organo-/hydro-gel that features covalently bound 10-phenylphenothiazine (PTH). With this "Gel-PTH", we demonstrate switching of controlled radical polymerization reactions using temperature "LOW"/"HIGH", light "ON"/"OFF", and catalyst presence "IN"/"OUT". Various iniferters/initiators and a wide range of monomers including acrylates, methacrylates, acrylamides, vinyl esters, and vinyl amides were polymerized by RAFT/iniferter and ATRP methods using Gel-PTH and a readily available compact fluorescent light (CFL) source. In all cases, polymer molar masses increased linearly with conversion, and narrow molar mass distributions were obtained. To further highlight the utility of Gel-PTH, we achieved "AND" gating of controlled radical polymerization wherein various combinations of three stimuli were required to induce polymer chain growth. Finally, block copolymer synthesis and catalyst recycling were demonstrated. Logic-controlled polymerization with Gel-PTH offers a straightforward approach to achieve multiplexed external switching of polymer chain growth using a single catalyst without the need for addition of exogenous reagents.

  16. Data Systems vs. Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Amatayakul, Margret K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the current status of “hospital information systems” with respect to the distinction between data systems and information systems. It is proposed that the systems currently existing are incomplete data dystems resulting in ineffective information systems.

  17. EXPERT SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiana Marin; Mihai Catalin Andrei

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades IT and computer systems have evolved rapidly in economic informatics field. The goal is to create user friendly information systems that respond promptly and accurately to requests. Informatics systems evolved into decision assisted systems, and such systems are converted, based on gained experience, in expert systems for creative problem solving that an organization is facing. Expert systems are aimed at rebuilding human reasoning on the expertise obtained from experts, sto...

  18. Multibody Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens

    1999-01-01

    Multibody Systems is one area, in which methods for solving DAEs are of special interst. This chapter is about multibody systems, why they result in DAE systems and what kind of problems that can arise when dealing with multibody systems and formulating their corresponding DAE system....

  19. Closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kube, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates generally to gas-cooled nuclear reactor systems and, more particularly, to an improved closure system for a pressure vessel in such a system wherein a penetration is provided for accommodating a heat exchanger. (author)

  20. Lymph system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymphatic system ... neck, under the arms, and groin. The lymph system includes the: Tonsils Adenoids Spleen Thymus ... JE, Flynn JA, Solomon BS, Stewart RW. Lymphatic system. In: Ball JW, Dains JE, Flynn JA, Solomon ...

  1. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Ameliorates Allergic Rhinitis by Reversing the Imbalance of Th1/Th2 and Up-Regulation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Regulatory T Cells, Interleukin-10, and Membrane-Bound Transforming Growth Factor-β in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Yu, Shaoqing; Qin, Mali; Mao, Yong; Jin, Ling; Che, Na; Liu, Shuangxi; Ge, Rongming

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells play an important role in the development of allergic rhinitis (AR); the defect of cell numbers and functions contribute to AR. Hydrogen has been proven effective in alleviating symptoms of AR. We herein aim to verify the protective effects of hydrogen on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in guinea pigs with AR and to explore the effect of hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in animals with AR and investigate the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism. Eighteen guinea pigs were randomly divided into three groups (control group/AR group/AR-HRS group). The guinea pigs were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (AR-HRS group) for 10 days after sensitization. The control group was injected with an equal volume of normal saline. The number of sneezes, degree of runny nose, and nasal-rubbing movements were scored. Peripheral blood eosinophil count was recorded. The proportions of Th1/Th2 of the peripheral blood and the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T cells in the CD4+T cells of the spleen and peripheral blood were determined by flow cytometry. The content of interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in the serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The protein and mRNA expression of Foxp3, IL-10, and TGF-β were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence, and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. Scores of symptoms, number of eosinophils,and nasal mucosa damage were dramatically reduced after HRS treatment. HRS increased the expression of Foxp3, IL-10, TGF-β, and number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells, which were reduced in AR. HRS also revised the dysregulation of Th1/Th2 balance. Both the number and biological activity of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells increased with up-regulation of Th1/Th2 after HRS administration. HRS could play a protective role in attenuating AR through improving the proportion and functions of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells.

  2. INIS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokalski, A.

    1982-01-01

    History, organizational structure and operation principles of INIS system are presented. The preparation of input, checking and data processing as well as output production, computer forms of files and information retrieval systems are described in detail. The active participation of Poland in the system is emphasized. The possible ways of system development are presented. (author)

  3. Metalloprotease Dependent Release of Placenta Derived Fractalkine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Siwetz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine fractalkine is considered as unique since it exists both as membrane-bound adhesion molecule and as shed soluble chemoattractant. Here the hypothesis was tested whether placental fractalkine can be shed and released into the maternal circulation. Immunohistochemical staining of human first trimester and term placenta sections localized fractalkine at the apical microvillous plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast. Gene expression analysis revealed abundant upregulation in placental fractalkine at term, compared to first trimester. Fractalkine expression and release were detected in the trophoblast cell line BeWo, in primary term trophoblasts and placental explants. Incubation of BeWo cells and placental explants with metalloprotease inhibitor Batimastat inhibited the release of soluble fractalkine and at the same time increased the membrane-bound form. These results demonstrate that human placenta is a source for fractalkine, which is expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast and can be released into the maternal circulation by constitutive metalloprotease dependent shedding. Increased expression and release of placental fractalkine may contribute to low grade systemic inflammatory responses in third trimester of normal pregnancy. Aberrant placental metalloprotease activity may not only affect the release of placenta derived fractalkine but may at the same time affect the abundance of the membrane-bound form of the chemokine.

  4. Systems effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Habayeb, A R

    1987-01-01

    Highlights three principal applications of system effectiveness: hardware system evaluation, organizational development and evaluation, and conflict analysis. The text emphasizes the commonality of the system effectiveness discipline. The first part of the work presents a framework for system effectiveness, partitioning and hierarchy of hardware systems. The second part covers the structure, hierarchy, states, functions and activities of organizations. Contains an extended Appendix on mathematical concepts and also several project suggestions.

  5. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...

  6. Organic Electronics: An El Dorado in the Quest of New Photocatalysts for Polymerization Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumur, Frédéric; Gigmes, Didier; Fouassier, Jean-Pierre; Lalevée, Jacques

    2016-09-20

    Photoinitiated polymerization has been the subject of continued research efforts due to the numerous applications in which this polymerization technique is involved (coatings, inks, adhesives, optoelectronic, laser imaging, stereolithography, nanotechnology, etc.). More recently, photopolymerization has received renewed interest due to the emergence of 3D-printing technologies. However, despite current academic and industrial interest in photopolymerization methodologies, a major limitation lies in the slow rates of photopolymerization. The development of new photoinitiating systems aimed at addressing this limitation is an active area of research. Photopolymerization occurs through the exposure of a curable formulation to light, generating radical and/or cationic species to initiate polymerization. At present, photopolymerization is facing numerous challenges related to safety, economic and ecological concerns. Furthermore, practical considerations such as the curing depth and the competition for light absorption between the chromophores and other species in the formulation are key parameters drastically affecting the photopolymerization process. To address these issues, photoinitiating systems operating under low intensity visible light irradiation, in the absence of solvents are highly sought after. In this context, the use of photoredox catalysis can be highly advantageous; that is, photoredox catalysts can provide high reactivities with low catalyst loading, permitting access to high performance photoinitiating systems. However, to act as efficient photoredox catalysts, specific criteria have to be fulfilled. A strong absorption over the visible range, an ability to easily oxidize or reduce as well as sufficient photochemical stability are basic prerequisites to make these molecules desirable candidates for photoredox catalysis. Considering the similarity of requirements between organic electronics and photopolymerization, numerous materials initially designed

  7. Bitcoin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lánský

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptocurrency systems are purely digital and decentralized systems that use cryptographic principles to confirm transactions. Bitcoin is the first and also the most widespread cryptocurrency. The aim of this article is to introduce Bitcoin system using a language understandable also to readers without computer science education. This article captures the Bitcoin system from three perspectives: internal structure, network and users. Emphasis is placed on brief and clear definitions (system components and their mutual relationships. A new system view of the stated terms constitutes author’s own contribution.

  8. Intelligent Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The autonomous systems (AS) project, led by NASA Ames, is developing software for system operation automation. AS technology will help astronauts make more decisions...

  9. Crystal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Verner; Lingafelter, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of crystal systems, comparing (in table format) crystal systems with lattice types, number of restrictions, nature of the restrictions, and other lattices that can accidently show the same metrical symmetry. (JN)

  10. Filter systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanin, V.R.

    1990-01-01

    The multidetector systems for high resolution gamma spectroscopy are presented. The observable parameters for identifying nuclides produced simultaneously in the reaction are analysed discussing the efficiency of filter systems. (M.C.K.)

  11. Tear System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and symptoms may result from the tear drainage system becoming obstructed at any point from the puncta ... specializes in the eyelids, orbit, and tear drain system. It’s also important that he or she is ...

  12. Biliary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biliary system creates, moves, stores, and releases bile into the duodenum . This helps the body digest food. It also assists ... from the liver to the duodenum. The biliary system includes: The gallbladder Bile ducts and certain cells ...

  13. Photochemical separation of actinides in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Friedman, H.A.; Bell, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    Photo-redox reactions of MO 2 2+ and M 4+ (where M is plutonium or uranium) in aqueous acid solutions containing hydrazine, ethanol, or formic acid reductants are briefly reviewed. These reactions suggest that Pu 4+ can be separated from UO 2 2+ and NpO 2 2+ by a photoreductive reaction using hydrazine as the reductant. Hydrazine by itself is too slow a reductant, but illumination with 1 W of 300 nm UV radiation increases the hydrazine rate of reduction at least six-fold and produces an 18-fold increase in the Pu-O separation factor in a non-optimized laboratory-scale system

  14. Synthesis of 1,4-Dicarbonyl Compounds from Silyl Enol Ethers and Bromocarbonyls, Catalyzed by an Organic Dye under Visible-Light Irradiation with Perfect Selectivity for the Halide Moiety over the Carbonyl Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esumi, Naoto; Suzuki, Kensuke; Nishimoto, Yoshihiro; Yasuda, Makoto

    2016-11-04

    We report the visible-light-induced radical coupling reaction of silyl enol ethers with α-bromocarbonyl compounds to give 1,4-dicarbonyls. The reaction was effectively accelerated using an inexpensive organic dye (eosin Y) as a photoredox catalyst. 1,4-Dicarbonyl compounds alone were afforded, without the generation of carbonyl adducts of the α-halocarbonyls, which are usually generated in the presence of fluoride anions or Lewis acids. A variety of silyl enol ethers, α-bromoketones, α-bromoesters, and α-bromoamides were applied to this system to produce the coupling compounds.

  15. Expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haldy, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The definitions of the terms 'artificial intelligence' and 'expert systems', the methodology, areas of employment and limits of expert systems are discussed. The operation of an expert system is described, especially the presentation and organization of knowledge as well as interference and control. Methods and tools for expert system development are presented and their application in nuclear energy are briefly addressed. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  16. Watchdog System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Tanja Kidholm Osmann; Bahnsen, Chris Holmberg; Jensen, Morten Bornø

    This deliverable is part of WP4. Overall WP4 is motivated by the need for automatic systems that can ease the task of annotating massive amounts of traffic data. Concretely this deliverable is related to WP4.2 - the watchdog system. The idea with the watchdog is to develop a system that can remov...

  17. Embedded Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    system programmers should take into consideration all possi- bilities and write programs that do not fail. Responsiveness: Embedded systems should respond to events as soon as possible. For example, a patient monitoring system should process the patient'S heart signals quickly and immedi- ately notify if any abnormality ...

  18. Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerano, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This short course provides information on what systems engineering is and how the systems engineer guides requirements, interfaces with the discipline leads, and resolves technical issues. There are many system-wide issues that either impact or are impacted by the thermal subsystem. This course will introduce these issues and illustrate them with real life examples.

  19. Creative Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manelius, Anne-Mette; Beim, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Opsamling af diskussioner på konferencen og udstillingen Creative Systems i september/oktober 2007. Konferencen og Udstillingen Creative Systems sætter fokus på systemer som en positiv drivkraft i den kreative skabelsesproces. CINARK inviterede fire internationale kapaciteter, som indenfor hver...

  20. Systems Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Systems biology seeks to study biological systems as a whole, contrary to the reductionist approach that has dominated biology. Such a view of biological systems emanating from strong foundations of molecular level understanding of the individual components in terms of their form, function and interactions is promising to ...

  1. Digestive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Digestive System KidsHealth / For Parents / Digestive System What's in this ... the body can absorb and use. About the Digestive System Almost all animals have a tube-type digestive ...

  2. Embedded Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sumer electronic systems, they are cost sensitive. Thus their cost must be low. Robustness: Embedded systems should be robust since they operate in a harsh environment. They should endure vibrations, power supply fluctuations and excessive heat. Due to limited power supply in an embedded system, the power ...

  3. Operating systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tsichritzis, Dionysios C; Rheinboldt, Werner

    1974-01-01

    Operating Systems deals with the fundamental concepts and principles that govern the behavior of operating systems. Many issues regarding the structure of operating systems, including the problems of managing processes, processors, and memory, are examined. Various aspects of operating systems are also discussed, from input-output and files to security, protection, reliability, design methods, performance evaluation, and implementation methods.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of what constitutes an operating system, followed by a discussion on the definition and pr

  4. Multifunction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wauthier, J.; Fiori, R.

    1990-01-01

    The development, the characteristics and the applications of a multifunction system are presented. The system is used on the RBES laboratory pipes, at Marcoule. The system was developed in order to allow, without time loss, the modification of the circuit function by replacing only one component. The following elements form the multifunction system: a fixed base, which is part of the tube, a removable piece, which is inserted into the base, a cover plate and its locking system. The material, chosen among commercial trade marks, required small modifications in order to be used in the circuit [fr

  5. Cognitive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The tutorial will discuss the definition of cognitive systems as the possibilities to extend the current systems engineering paradigm in order to perceive, learn, reason and interact robustly in open-ended changing environments. I will also address cognitive systems in a historical perspective an...... in cognitive systems include e.g. personalized information systems, sensor network systems, social dynamics system and Web2.0, and cognitive components analysis. I will use example from our own research and link to other research activities.......The tutorial will discuss the definition of cognitive systems as the possibilities to extend the current systems engineering paradigm in order to perceive, learn, reason and interact robustly in open-ended changing environments. I will also address cognitive systems in a historical perspective...... to be modeled within a limited set of predefined specifications. There will inevitably be a need for robust decisions and behaviors in novel situations that include handling of conflicts and ambiguities based on the capability and knowledge of the artificial cognitive system. Further, there is a need...

  6. Expert System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas Troels; Cattani, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    An expert system is a computer system for inferring knowledge from a knowledge base, typically by using a set of inference rules. When the concept of expert systems was introduced at Stanford University in the early 1970s, the knowledge base was an unstructured set of facts. Today the knowledge...... base of expert systems is often given in terms of an ontology, extracted and built from various data sources by employing natural language-processing and statistics. To emphasize such capabilities, the term “expert” is now often replaced by “cognitive,” “knowledge,” “knowledge-based,” or “intelligent......” system. With very few exceptions, general-purpose expert systems have failed to emerge so far. However, expert systems are applied in specialized domains, particularly in healthcare. The increasing availability of large quantities of data to organizations today provides a valuable opportunity...

  7. Ternary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, D.N.; Hubberstey, P.; Barker, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the experimental and theoretical studies carried out on multicomponent alkali metal systems. Solid-liquid phase equilibria studies are mainly concerned with the systems Na-K-Rb and Na-K-Cs, and data on the liquidus temperatures in these systems are presented. The thermodynamic properties of the ternary Na-K-Cs eutectic system have been determined experimentally, and the enthalpy, heat capacity and excess functions of the alloy are given. An analysis of calculational methods used in determining thermodynamic functions of ternary liquid metals systems is described. Finally, data are tabulated for the density, compressibility, saturated vapour pressure, viscosity and thermal conductivity of the ternary Na-K-Cs eutectic system. (UK)

  8. Material Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Mortensen, Henrik Rubæk; Mullins, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and reflects upon the results of an investigative project which explores the setting up of a material system - a parametric and generative assembly consisting of and taking into consideration material properties, manufacturing constraints and geometric behavior. The project...... approaches the subject through the construction of a logic-driven system aiming to explore the possibilities of a material system that fulfills spatial, structural and performative requirements concurrently and how these are negotiated in situations where they might be conflicting....

  9. Recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kembellec, Gérald; Saleh, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Acclaimed by various content platforms (books, music, movies) and auction sites online, recommendation systems are key elements of digital strategies. If development was originally intended for the performance of information systems, the issues are now massively moved on logical optimization of the customer relationship, with the main objective to maximize potential sales. On the transdisciplinary approach, engines and recommender systems brings together contributions linking information science and communications, marketing, sociology, mathematics and computing. It deals with the understan

  10. Energetic Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetic Systems Division provides full-spectrum energetic engineering services (project management, design, analysis, production support, in-service support,...

  11. Intelligent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, J David

    2011-01-01

    Technology has now progressed to the point that intelligent systems are replacing humans in the decision making processes as well as aiding in the solution of very complex problems. In many cases intelligent systems are already outperforming human activities. Artificial neural networks are not only capable of learning how to classify patterns, such images or sequence of events, but they can also effectively model complex nonlinear systems. Their ability to classify sequences of events is probably more popular in industrial applications where there is an inherent need to model nonlinear system

  12. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  13. Anticipatory systems as linguistic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Bertil

    2000-05-01

    The idea of system is well established although not well defined. What makes up a system depends on the observer. Thinking in terms of systems is only a convenient way to conceptualize organizations, natural or artificial, that show coherent properties. Among all properties, which can be ascribed to systems, one property seems to be more outstanding than others, namely that of being anticipatory. In nature, anticipatory properties are found only in living organizations. In this way it can be said to separate non-living systems from living because there is no indication that any natural phenomenon occurring in systems where there is no indication of life is anticipatory. The characteristic of living systems is that they are exposed to the evolution contrary to causal systems that do not undergo changes due to the influence of the environment. Causal systems are related to the past in such a way that subsequent situations can be calculated from knowledge of past situations. In causal systems the past is the cause of the present and there is no reference to the future as a determining agent, contrary to anticipatory systems where expectations are the cause of the present action. Since anticipatory properties are characteristic of living systems, this property, as all other properties in living systems, is a result of the evolution and can be found in plants as well as in animals. Thus, it is not only tied to consciousness but is found at a more basic level, i.e., in the interplay between genotype and phenotype. Anticipation is part of the genetic language in such a way that appropriate actions, for events in the anticipatory systems environment, are inscribed in the genes. Anticipatory behavior, as a result of the interpretation of the genetic language, has been selected by the evolution. In this paper anticipatory systems are regarded as linguistic systems and I argue that as such anticipation cannot be fragmented but must be holistically studied. This has the

  14. Vacuum system

    OpenAIRE

    Gröbner, Oswald

    2006-01-01

    The vacuum system of a particle accelerator must provide the necessary conditions for the high energy beam to avoid loss of particles and deterioration of the beam quality. In this talk we will review basic design concepts, vacuum components and procedures required for an accelerator vacuum system.

  15. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... jobs to do: B lymphocytes are like the body's military intelligence system, seeking out their targets and sending defenses ... like the soldiers, destroying the invaders that the intelligence system has ... that invades the body is called an antigen (pronounced: AN-tih-jun). ...

  16. Retrofitting Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the different retrofitting possibilities that are available today. The report looks at both external and internal systems for external wall constructions, roof constructions, floor constructions and foundations. All systems are described in detail in respect to use...

  17. GEOMASS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuya; Saegusa, Hiromitsu

    2009-03-01

    As a part of the research and development regarding characterisation of deep geological environment, the GEOMASS (GEOLOGICAL MODELLING ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION SOFTWARE) system has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency in order to carry out geological and hydrogeological modelling and groundwater flow simulation and so on. The GEOMASS system integrates a commercial geological interpretation system (EarthVision), which is used for geological modelling and visualisation, with a proprietary code for groundwater flow (FracAffinity). This integrated system allows users to make rapid improvement of models as data increases. Also, it is possible to perform more realistic groundwater flow simulation due to the capability of modelling the rock mass as a continuum with discrete hydro-structural features in the rock mass. This paper consists of 'Overview of GEOMASS system', FracAffinity Theoretical Background' and 'FracAffinity User Guide' and is edited as a GEOMASS system manual. 'Overview of GEOMASS system' describes the outline of this system. 'FracAffinity Theoretical Background' describes the information of technical background of FracAffinity software. FracAffinity User Guide' describes the structure of the FracAffinity input files, the usage of FracAffinity Interface and flow-solver. Updating of the FracAffinity has been continued as needed and FracAffinity version3.3 is the latest version at present (July 2008). (author)

  18. Operating Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Suresh Babu is currently a fourth year undergraduate student in the Department of. Computer Science and. Engineering, Narayana. Engineering College,. Nellore, Andhra Pradesh. He would like to work in operating systems, computer networks and also in Internet security concepts. Keywords. Operating systems, file sys-.

  19. Operating Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process concept and concurrency are at the heart of modern operating systems (OS). A process is the unit of work in a computer system. A process must be in main memory during execution. To improve the utilization of central processing unit. (CPU) as well as the speed of its response to its users, the computer must ...

  20. Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Karla

    2016-01-01

    In standard economics, individuals are rational actors and economic forces undermine institutions that impose large inefficiencies. The persistence of the caste system is evidence of the need for psychologically more realistic models of decision-making in economics. The caste system divides South Asian society into hereditary groups whose lowest ranks are represented as innately polluted. ...

  1. Energy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, Yoichi

    1987-01-10

    In the wake of the oil shock in 1973, the need for developing more effective energy systems has been mounting. The dominant views and topics for power generation systems in terms of scale merit shifted from the advocacy of centralization/scaling-up of facilities to the soft energy path theory insisting on the efficiency of dispersed small-scale plants, followed by the recent holonic path theory which maintains that large and small scale plants should be centralized or dispersed in an optimum manner. At the same time, an autonomous-type system concept has emerged which points out that the energy systems can be operated efficiently through mutual coordination and cooperation between the suppliers and users to find a balance point that meets the market principle, while abolishing the conventional suppliers-governed system. As a result, the load management system based on time-of-use pricing or adaptive pricing is expected to be adopted widely in near future. All these new theories are aimed at developing flexible and reasonable system structures that can be adapted to the changing circumstances. (4 figs, 17 refs)

  2. Imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froggatt, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a two dimensional imaging system in which a pattern of radiation falling on the system is detected to give electrical signals for each of a plurality of strips across the pattern. The detection is repeated for different orientations of the strips and the whole processed by compensated back projection. For a shadow x-ray system a plurality of strip x-ray detectors are rotated on a turntable. For lower frequencies the pattern may be rotated with a Dove prism and the strips condensed to suit smaller detectors with a cylindrical lens. (author)

  3. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Celebrated mathematician Shlomo Sternberg, a pioneer in the field of dynamical systems, created this modern one-semester introduction to the subject for his classes at Harvard University. Its wide-ranging treatment covers one-dimensional dynamics, differential equations, random walks, iterated function systems, symbolic dynamics, and Markov chains. Supplementary materials offer a variety of online components, including PowerPoint lecture slides for professors and MATLAB exercises.""Even though there are many dynamical systems books on the market, this book is bound to become a classic. The the

  4. Kaonic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oset E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available I make a short review of the situation of the kaonic systems, with novel information supporting the two Λ(1405 states from the K-d → nπΣ reaction. A review is made of the K¯$ar K$NN system with recent calculations converging to smaller bindings and larger widths. Novel systems involving two kaons and one nucleon or three kaons are also reported and finally a short discussion is made of the analogous state DNN for which recent studies find a large binding and a small width.

  5. Saturn Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U Rehman, Habib; McKee, Nida A; McKee, Michael L

    2016-01-15

    Several ring systems (Saturn systems) have been studied using DFT methods that include dispersion effects. Comparison with X-ray structures are made with three systems, and the agreement is quite good. Binding enthalpies and binding free energies in dichloromethane and toluene have been computed. The effect of an encapsulated lithium cation is accessed by comparing C60 @(C6 H4 )10 and [Li@C60 @(C6 H4 )10 ](+). The [Li@C60 ](+) cation is a much better acceptor than C60 which leads to greater donor-acceptor interactions and larger charge transfer from the ring to [Li@C60 ](+). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Bubble systems

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic analysis of bubble system mathematics, using the mechanics of two-phase systems in non-equilibrium as the scope of analysis. The author introduces the thermodynamic foundations of bubble systems, ranging from the fundamental starting points to current research challenges. This book addresses a range of topics, including description methods of multi-phase systems, boundary and initial conditions as well as coupling requirements at the phase boundary. Moreover, it presents a detailed study of the basic problems of bubble dynamics in a liquid mass: growth (dynamically and thermally controlled), collapse, bubble pulsations, bubble rise and breakup. Special emphasis is placed on bubble dynamics in turbulent flows. The analysis results are used to write integral equations governing the rate of vapor generation (condensation) in non-equilibrium flows, thus creating a basis for solving a number of practical problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive theory of boil...

  7. ring system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1,3,2-DIAZABORACYCLOALKANE. RING SYSTEM. Negussie Retta" and Robert H. Neilson. 'Department of Chemistry, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Department of Chemistry, Texas Christian University.

  8. Respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  9. Dryland systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wessels, Konrad J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes the current condition of dryland systems with respect to the services they provide and the drivers that determine trends in their provision. Within the context of the mounting global concern caused by land degradation...

  10. Nanorobotic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Dong

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Two strategies towards the realization of nanotechnology have been presented, i.e., top-down and bottom up. The former one is mainly based on nanofabrication and includes technologies such as nano-lithography, nano-imprint, and etching. Presently, they are still 2D fabrication processes with low resolution. The later one is an assembly-based technique. At present, it includes such items as self-assembly, dip-pen lithography, and directed self-assembly. These techniques can generate regular nano patterns in large scales. To fabricate 3D complex nano devices there are still no effective ways by so far. Here we show our effort on the development of a nano laboratory, a prototype nanomanufacturing system, based on nanorobotic manipulations. In which, we take a hybrid strategy as shown in Fig. 1. In this system, nano fabrication and nano assembly can be performed in an arbitrary order to construct nano building blocks and finally nano devices. The most important feature in this system is that the products can be fed back into the system to shrink the system part by part leading to nanorobots. Property characterization can be performed in each intermediate process. Due to the nanorobotic manipulation system, dynamic measurement can be performed rather than conventional static observations.

  11. System-of-Systems Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Kopetz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The global availability of communication services makes it possible to interconnect independently developed systems, called constituent systems, to provide new synergistic services and more efficient economic processes. The characteristics of these new Systems-of-Systems are qualitatively different from the classic monolithic systems. In the first part of this presentation we elaborate on these differences, particularly with respect to the autonomy of the constituent systems, to dependability, continuous evolution, and emergence. In the second part we look at a SoS from the point of view of cognitive complexity. Cognitive complexity is seen as a relation between a model of an SoS and the observer. In order to understand the behavior of a large SoS we have to generate models of adequate simplicity, i.e, of a cognitive complexity that can be handled by the limited capabilities of the human mind. We will discuss the importance of properly specifying and placing the relied-upon message interfaces between the constituent systems that form an open SoS and discuss simplification strategies that help to reduce the cognitive complexity.

  12. Systems Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.

    1998-03-17

    The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

  13. Fiscal system analysis - contractual systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Production sharing contracts are one of the most popular forms of contractual system used in petroleum agreements around the world, but the manner in which the fiscal terms and contract parameters impact system measures is complicated and not well understood. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the influence of private and market uncertainty in contractual fiscal systems. A meta-modelling approach is employed that couples the results of a simulation model with regression analysis to construct numerical functionals that quantify the fiscal regime. Relationships are derived that specify how the present value, rate of return, and take statistics vary as a function of the system parameters. The deepwater Girassol field development in Angola is taken as a case study. (author)

  14. Computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lola

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the discussions, Ocean Climate Data Workshop hosts gave participants an opportunity to hear about, see, and test for themselves some of the latest computer tools now available for those studying climate change and the oceans. Six speakers described computer systems and their functions. The introductory talks were followed by demonstrations to small groups of participants and some opportunities for participants to get hands-on experience. After this familiarization period, attendees were invited to return during the course of the Workshop and have one-on-one discussions and further hands-on experience with these systems. Brief summaries or abstracts of introductory presentations are addressed.

  15. Microbiology System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Technology originating in a NASA-sponsored study of the measurement of microbial growth in zero gravity led to the development of Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.'s VITEK system. VITEK provides a physician with accurate diagnostic information and identifies the most effective medication. Test cards are employed to identify organisms and determine susceptibility to antibiotics. A photo-optical scanner scans the card and monitors changes in the growth of cells contained within the card. There are two configurations - VITEK and VITEK JR as well as VIDAS, a companion system that detects bacteria, viruses, etc. from patient specimens. The company was originally created by McDonnell Douglas, the NASA contractor.

  16. System Description:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Poswolsky, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Delphin is a functional programming language [Adam Poswolsky and Carsten Schürmann. Practical programming with higher-order encodings and dependent types. In European Symposium on Programming (ESOP), 2008] utilizing dependent higher-order datatypes. Delphin's two-level type-system cleanly separates...... data from computation, allowing for decidable type checking. The data level is LF [Robert Harper, Furio Honsell, and Gordon Plotkin. A framework for defining logics. Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery, 40(1):143-184, January 1993], which allows for the specification of deductive systems...

  17. Distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Van Steen, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    For this third edition of "Distributed Systems," the material has been thoroughly revised and extended, integrating principles and paradigms into nine chapters: 1. Introduction 2. Architectures 3. Processes 4. Communication 5. Naming 6. Coordination 7. Replication 8. Fault tolerance 9. Security A separation has been made between basic material and more specific subjects. The latter have been organized into boxed sections, which may be skipped on first reading. To assist in understanding the more algorithmic parts, example programs in Python have been included. The examples in the book leave out many details for readability, but the complete code is available through the book's Website, hosted at www.distributed-systems.net.

  18. Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H S.

    2006-06-01

    The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most biologists because it took us into increasingly familiar territory. It took mysterious processes, such as the replication of genetic material and assigned them parts that could be readily understood by the human mind. When we think of ''molecular machines'' as being the underlying basis of life, we are using a paradigm derived from everyday experience. However, the price that we paid was a relentless drive towards reductionism and the attendant balkanization of biology. Now along comes ''systems biology'' that promises us a solution to the problem of ''knowing more and more about less and less''. Unlike molecular biology, systems biology appears to be taking us into unfamiliar intellectual territory, such as statistics, mathematics and computer modeling. Not surprisingly, systems biology has met with widespread skepticism and resistance. Why do we need systems biology anyway and how does this new area of research promise to change the face of biology in the next couple of decades?

  19. Operating Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    areas in which this type is useful are multimedia, virtual reality, and advanced scientific projects such as undersea exploration and planetary rovers. Because of the expanded uses for soft real-time functionality, it is finding its way into most current operating systems, including major versions of Unix and Windows NT OS.

  20. Solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Samantha

    2018-01-01

    "Using the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the My World of Science series provides the earliest readers with background on key STEM concepts. Solar System explores basic planetary astronomy in a simple, engaging way that will help readers develop word recognition and reading skills. Includes a glossary and index."-- Provided by publisher.

  1. Systems Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Alexander; Hammond, Debora; Jackson, Michael; Laszlo, Alexander; Mitroff, Ian; Snowden, Dave; Troncale, Len; Carr-Chellman, Alison; Spector, J. Michael; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of systems science were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Alexander Christakis, Debora Hammond, Michael Jackson, Alexander Laszlo, Ian Mitroff, Dave…

  2. Bioenergy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that a bioenergy system has to be considered as an integrated process in which each stage or step interacts with other steps in the overall process. There are a number of stages in the supply and conversion of woody biomass for energy. Each step in the chain has implications for the next step and for overall system efficiency. The resource can take many forms and will have varying physical and chemical characteristics which will influence the efficiency and cost of conversion. The point in the supply chain at which size and moisture content is reduced and the manner in which it is done is influential in determining feedstock delivered cost and overall system costs. To illustrate the interactions within the overall system, the influence of the nature, size and moisture content of delivered feedstocks on costs of generating electricity via thermal conversion processes is examined using a model developed to investigate the inter-relationships between the stages in the supply chain. (author)

  3. Transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    The transport system comprises at least one road surface (2) and at least one vehicle (4) on wheels (6). The road surface (2) has a substantially bowl-shaped cross section and the vehicle (4) is designed so that the wheels (6) run directly on the road surface (2) while the road surface (2) acts as a

  4. Barrier Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Barrier-system dynamics are a function of antecedent topography and substrate lithology, Relative sea-level (RSL) changes, sediment availability and type, climate, vegetation type and cover, and various aero- and hydrodynamic processes during fair-weather conditions and extreme events. Global change

  5. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  6. Fusion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aschbacher, Michael; Oliver, Bob

    2016-01-01

    This is a survey article on the theory of fusion systems, a relatively new area of mathematics with connections to local finite group theory, algebraic topology, and modular representation theory. We first describe the general theory and then look separately at these connections.

  7. Glymphatic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, Helene; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-01-01

    a so-called glymphatic pathway which comprise the peri-vascular space and acuaporin-4 water channels on astroglial endfeet. As such the glymphatic pathway can be perceived as a hitherto overlooked compartment of the extracellular space of the central nervous system which is involved in clearance...

  8. Combinations of Aminocatalysts and Metal Catalysts: A Powerful Cooperative Approach in Selective Organic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afewerki, Samson; Córdova, Armando

    2016-11-23

    The cooperation and interplay between organic and metal catalyst systems is of utmost importance in nature and chemical synthesis. Here innovative and selective cooperative catalyst systems can be designed by combining two catalysts that complement rather than inhibit one another. This refined strategy can permit chemical transformations unmanageable by either of the catalysts alone. This review summarizes innovations and developments in selective organic synthesis that have used cooperative dual catalysis by combining simple aminocatalysts with metal catalysts. Considerable efforts have been devoted to this fruitful field. This emerging area employs the different activation modes of amine and metal catalysts as a platform to address challenging reactions. Here, aminocatalysis (e.g., enamine activation catalysis, iminium activation catalysis, single occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) activation catalysis, and photoredox activation catalysis) is employed to activate unreactive carbonyl substrates. The transition metal catalyst complements by activating a variety of substrates through a range of interactions (e.g., electrophilic π-allyl complex formation, Lewis acid activation, allenylidene complex formation, photoredox activation, C-H activation, etc.), and thereby novel concepts within catalysis are created. The inclusion of heterogeneous catalysis strategies allows for "green" chemistry development, catalyst recyclability, and the more eco-friendly synthesis of valuable compounds.

  9. Bricks / Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    At first glance, this book may appear eclectic. It contains writings from architectural practice in a language and structure based on subjective views and experiences, combined with research contributions based on systematic design investigations of discrete computational systems. Discussions range...... from an undulating masonry wall at the University of Virginia erected by then-U.S. President Thomas Jefferson to agile robotic manufacturing processes and computational solver strategies based on graph networks. Conversely, the focus of this anthology is expressed directly in the title: bricks...... and systems. The basis for this theme is the work conducted at the Utzon(x) Research Group at Aalborg University, in combination with the rich tradition and implementation of masonry work in Denmark, which has attracted increasing attention from architectural practitioners and researchers alike. How should...

  10. TUBO system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, H.J.C.; Guerreiro, J.N.C.; Toledo, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Proceedings recently incorporated to TUBO system like the seismic analysis and the stress verification acccording to ASME-Boiler Rule and Pressure Vessel Code-section III are presented. The seismic analysis comprehend the consideration of uniform motion of the support, its multiple excitation, and the attainment of the spectral response for both cases. The module for stress verification uses stresses resulting fromthe combination of the loads specified by the user, in the automatic verification of permissible stresses for the pipings class 1 and 2, based on criteria NB-3650 and NC-3650 of ASME. The implementation of these proceedings in the TUBO system are discussed and a numerical example that covers the different phases of a stress analysis in a piping is presented [pt

  11. Systemic Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poletto, Marco; Pasquero, Claudia

    This is a manual investigating the subject of urban ecology and systemic development from the perspective of architectural design. It sets out to explore two main goals: to discuss the contemporary relevance of a systemic practice to architectural design, and to share a toolbox of informational...... design protocols developed to describe the city as a territory of self-organization. Collecting together nearly a decade of design experiments by the authors and their practice, ecoLogicStudio, the book discusses key disciplinary definitions such as ecologic urbanism, algorithmic architecture, bottom......-up or tactical design, behavioural space and the boundary of the natural and the artificial realms within the city and architecture. A new kind of "real-time world-city" is illustrated in the form of an operational design manual for the assemblage of proto-architectures, the incubation of proto...

  12. Bilateral system. The ABACC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, Ruben O.

    2001-01-01

    After relating the antecedents of the creation of the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for the Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), the paper describes the common system of accounting and control set up by Argentina and Brazil. The organization of ABACC is also outlined

  13. Physical system requirements: Overall system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy (DOE) the responsibility for managing the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for that purpose. The Secretary of Energy, in his November 1989 report to Congress (DOE/RW-0247), announced three new initiatives for conduct of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) program. One of these initiatives was to establish improved management structure and procedures. In response, OCRWM performed a management study and the Direct subsequently issued the Management Systems Improvement Strategy (MSIS) on August 10, 1990, calling for a rigorous implementation of systems engineering principles with a special emphasis on functional analysis. This approach establishes a framework for integrating the program management efforts with the technical requirements analysis into a single, unified, and consistent program. The functional analysis approach recognizes that just the facilities and equipment comprising the physical waste management system must perform certain functions, so must certain programmatic and management functions be performed within the program in order to successfully bring the physical system into being

  14. Cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulen, R.L.; Grosh, J.

    1984-01-01

    Invasive cardiovascular diagnostic procedures involve a finite risk and therefore can be recommended only when the benefit appears to exceed the risk by a substantial margin. The risk/benefit ratio varies not only with the procedure concerned but with the status of the vascular system, concomitant diseases, and the risks of both the suspected illness and its treatment. The risks inherent in the procedures per se are detailed in the sections to follow

  15. Security system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Mark J.; Kuca, Michal; Aragon, Mona L.

    2016-02-02

    A security system includes a structure having a structural surface. The structure is sized to contain an asset therein and configured to provide a forceful breaching delay. The structure has an opening formed therein to permit predetermined access to the asset contained within the structure. The structure includes intrusion detection features within or associated with the structure that are activated in response to at least a partial breach of the structure.

  16. Systemic Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-31

    early lifecycle phases will have intended quality outcomes. Requirements and Quality Validation Develop requirements elicitation and management...gradients within a system. That is, there are attack surfaces at internal APIs and service interfaces. The complexity also arises from particular features...interoperation (compatibility and support for with SoS APIs and practices), as well as a diverse range of ilities (evolvability/extensibility

  17. CONTROL SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

    1962-10-30

    A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

  18. Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum instanton (QI approximation is recently proposed for the evaluations of the chemical reaction rate constants with use of full dimensional potential energy surfaces. Its strategy is to use the instanton mechanism and to approximate time-dependent quantum dynamics to the imaginary time propagation of the quantities of partition function. It thus incorporates the properties of the instanton idea and the quantum effect of partition function and can be applied to chemical reactions of complex systems. In this paper, we present the QI approach and its applications to several complex systems mainly done by us. The concrete systems include, (1 the reaction of H+CH4→H2+CH3, (2 the reaction of H+SiH4→H2+SiH3, (3 H diffusion on Ni(100 surface; and (4 surface-subsurface transport and interior migration for H/Ni. Available experimental and other theoretical data are also presented for the purpose of comparison.

  19. Chloroplast Fe(III) chelate reductase activity is essential for seedling viability under iron limiting conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Jeeyon; Cohu, Christopher; Kerkeb, Loubna; Pilon, Marinus; Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthesis, heme biosynthesis, and Fe-S cluster assembly all take place in the chloroplast, and all require iron. Reduction of iron via a membrane-bound Fe(III) chelate reductase is required before iron transport across membranes in a variety of systems, but to date there has been no definitive genetic proof that chloroplasts have such a reduction system. Here we report that one of the eight members of the Arabidopsis ferric reductase oxidase (FRO) family, FRO7, localizes to the chloropla...

  20. Immunomodulatory effects of testosterone evaluated in all-trans retinoic acid differentiated HL-60 cells, granulocytes, and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boje, Alex; Moesby, Lise; Timm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The sex hormones are known to affect innate immunity in humans. In this study we evaluated the immunomodulatory effects of testosterone in a model system comprising of all-trans retinoic acid differentiated HL-60 cells, and confirmed the results in human granulocytes and monocytes. Results showed...... demonstrated that the suppressive effect of testosterone has a short onset time. Our results suggest that testosterone affects the fast operating membrane bound androgen receptor or a rapid acting enzyme system. Testosterone, at pharmacological doses, was also shown to suppress generation of reactive oxygen...

  1. GTP (gammaS) and GDP (betaS) as electron donors: new wine in old bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D A; Peterson, D C; Reeve, H L; Archer, S L; Weir, E K

    1999-01-01

    G proteins are membrane-bound regulatory proteins which modulate the activity of ion channels and other effector systems. The GTP and GDP analogs GTP (gammaS) and GDP (betaS) have been used to study the role of G proteins in numerous physiologic systems. The prolonged effects of these analogs have been thought to be due to the fact that they are nonhydrolyzable. However, in this paper we show that the GTP (gammaS) and GDP (betaS) analogs are potent reducing agents at physiologic pH. This observation suggests that previous data obtained using these compounds may need to be reinterpreted.

  2. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Birkhoff, George D

    1927-01-01

    His research in dynamics constitutes the middle period of Birkhoff's scientific career, that of maturity and greatest power. -Yearbook of the American Philosophical Society The author's great book€¦is well known to all, and the diverse active modern developments in mathematics which have been inspired by this volume bear the most eloquent testimony to its quality and influence. -Zentralblatt MATH In 1927, G. D. Birkhoff wrote a remarkable treatise on the theory of dynamical systems that would inspire many later mathematicians to do great work. To a large extent, Birkhoff was writing about his o

  3. Videobasierte Systeme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Peter

    Videosensoren spielen für Fahrerassistenz systeme eine zentrale Rolle, da sie die Interpretation visueller Informationen (Objektklassifikation) gezielt unterstützen. Im Heckbereich kann die Video sensorik in der einfachsten Variante die ultraschallbasierte Einparkhilfe bei Einpark- und Rangiervorgängen unterstützen. Beim Nachtsichtsystem NightVision wird das mit Infrarotlicht angestrahlte Umfeld vor dem Fahrzeug mit einer Frontkamera aufgenommen und im Fahrzeugcockpit auf einem Display dem Fahrer angezeigt (s. Nachtsichtsysteme). Andere Fahrerassistenzsysteme verarbeiten die Videosignale und generieren daraus gezielt Informationen, die für eigenständige Funktionen (z. B. Spurverlassenswarner) oder aber als Zusatzinformation für andere Funktionen ausgewertet werden (Sensordatenfusion).

  4. Linear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bourlès, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Linear systems have all the necessary elements (modeling, identification, analysis and control), from an educational point of view, to help us understand the discipline of automation and apply it efficiently. This book is progressive and organized in such a way that different levels of readership are possible. It is addressed both to beginners and those with a good understanding of automation wishing to enhance their knowledge on the subject. The theory is rigorously developed and illustrated by numerous examples which can be reproduced with the help of appropriate computation software. 60 exe

  5. Nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Todreas, Neil E

    2011-01-01

    Principal Characteristics of Power ReactorsIntroductionPower CyclesPrimary Coolant SystemsReactor CoresFuel AssembliesAdvanced Water- and Gas-Cooled Reactors (Generation III And III+)Advanced Thermal and Fast Neutron Spectrum Reactors (Generation IV)ReferencesProblemsThermal Design Principles and ApplicationIntroductionOverall Plant Characteristics Influenced by Thermal Hydraulic ConsiderationsEnergy Production and Transfer ParametersThermal Design LimitsThermal Design MarginFigures of Merit for Core Thermal PerformanceThe Inverted Fuel ArrayThe Equivalent Annulus ApproximationReferencesProble

  6. Sterilization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Cox Sterile Products, Inc.'s Rapid Heat Transfer Sterilizer employs a heat exchange process that induces rapid air movement; the air becomes the heat transfer medium, maintaining a uniform temperature of 375 degrees Fahrenheit. It features pushbutton controls for three timing cycles for different instrument loads, a six-minute cycle for standard unpackaged instruments, eight minutes for certain specialized dental/medical instruments and 12 minutes for packaged instruments which can then be stored in a drawer in sterile condition. System will stay at 375 degrees all day. Continuous operation is not expensive because of the sterilizer's very low power requirements.

  7. Bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  8. Expert Systems: What Is an Expert System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Beverly K.; Main, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Describes expert systems and discusses their use in libraries. Highlights include parts of an expert system; expert system shells; an example of how to build an expert system; a bibliography of 34 sources of information on expert systems in libraries; and a list of 10 expert system shells used in libraries. (Contains five references.) (LRW)

  9. Booking System

    OpenAIRE

    Jersák, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Cílem studie je definovat možné směry dalšího vývoje nové aplikace pro potřeby cestovního ruchu, online rezervačního systému Booking System. Tohoto cíle je dosaženo jednak zkoumáním dosavadního vývoje aplikace a zásadních inovací, které přináší, a dále analýzou socioekonomického prostředí a konkurenčních služeb.

  10. Posting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackney, S.

    1983-01-01

    A system for posting hazardous materials into and out of an enclosure, such as a glovebox, through a port in a wall of the enclosure. The port is normally closed by a door which cooperates with a removable end closure, on a container or the like when the latter is presented to and secured at the port. The container is secured in position at the port by means of a rotatable coupling ring. A single interlock ensures that the door cannot be opened in the absence of a container at the port and also that the container cannot be removed from the port when the door is open. In place of the container, a glove secured to a rigid sleeve may be used to enable the operator to perform a work function within the glovebox. (author)

  11. Systemic Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leleur, Steen

    This book presents principles and methodology for planning in a complex world. It sets out a so-called systemic approach to planning, among other things, by applying “hard” and “soft” methodologies and methods in combination. The book is written for Ph.D and graduate students in engineering......, business and other fields, and it is useful for all professionals, across a wide range of employment areas, who share an interest in renewing planning practice. Such an endeavour is seen as both important and timely, recognising that many complex planning tasks necessitate organisations – be they public...... or private – to engage in planning to prepare proactive decision-making....

  12. Nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Palmero, Faustino; Lemos, M; Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Casado-Pascual, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the most recent advances in nonlinear science. It provides a unified view of nonlinear properties in many different systems and highlights many  new developments. While volume 1 concentrates on mathematical theory and computational techniques and challenges, which are essential for the study of nonlinear science, this second volume deals with nonlinear excitations in several fields. These excitations can be localized and transport energy and matter in the form of breathers, solitons, kinks or quodons with very different characteristics, which are discussed in the book. They can also transport electric charge, in which case they are known as polarobreathers or solectrons. Nonlinear excitations can influence function and structure in biology, as for example, protein folding. In crystals and other condensed matter, they can modify transport properties, reaction kinetics and interact with defects. There are also engineering applications in electric lattices, Josephson junction a...

  13. Posting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    A posting system for the movement of equipment, such as a manipulator, into and out of an enclosure e.g. a cell or glovebox, for toxic or radioactive materials has the manipulator arranged within a collapsible bellows-like container with an end of the container cooperating with a port entry to the enclosure. The collapsible container isolates the manipulator from the environment outside the enclosure and allows the manipulator to enter and leave the contaminated enclosure without breach of the containment. A particular construction of cell for use with radioactive material is described, having a thick wall of shielding material such as concrete provided with a door normally closed by a Pb shutter and having a cylindrical gamma shield block located over the shutter on the exterior of the wall. (author)

  14. Systems engineering simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Cloutier, Robert; Bone, Mary Alice

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionOverviewDiscussion of Common TerminologyThe Case for Systems EngineeringA Brief History of Systems EngineeringSystem ExamplesSummaryThe System Life CycleManaging System Development-The Vee ModelSystem ProductionSystem Utilization and SupportSystem Retirement and DisposalOther Systems Engineering Development ModelsSpiral ModelAgile Model for Systems EngineeringSystem of InterestAbstraction and DecompositionIntegrationDeveloping and Managing RequirementsCyclone Requiremen

  15. Chem systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that world styrene demand, paced by a near doubling of combined requirements in East Asia and Oceania, could reach 19.3 million metric tons by 2000, an average growth rate of 3.7%/year. So concludes Chem Systems Inc., Tarrytown, N.Y., in a study of world styrene markets through the end of the century. Pacific Rim styrene production and consumption throughout the 1990s are predicted to make up increasingly larger shares of world markets, while demand and production lag in the U.S. and western Europe. Demand and capacity in other parts of the world will grow in real terms, increasing combined market shares only slightly. Most of the increase will be driven by demand in East Asia and Oceania, where consumption by century's end is expected to increase 4.48 million metric tons from 2.25 million tons in 1991. Meantime, Japan's styrene demand in 2000 is projected at 2.64 million tons, a 500,000 ton increase from 1991 demand but a net market loss of 1.9%

  16. On archaebacterial ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Hochstein, L.; Altekar, W.

    1984-01-01

    The energy transducing ATPase from Halobacterium saccharovorum was studied in order to define the origin of energy transducing systems. The ATPase required high salt concentration (4M NaCl) for activity; activity was rapidly lost when NaCl was below 1 Molar. At low salt concentration, the membrane bound ATPase activity could be stabilized in presence of spermine. However, following solubilization spermine was ineffective. Furthermore, F1 ATPase activity was stabilized by ammonium sulfate even when the NaCl concentration was less than 1 Molar. These studies suggest that stabilization by hydrophobic interactions preceded ionic ones in the evolution of the energy transducing ATPases.

  17. Enterococcus faecalis PcfC, a Spatially Localized Substrate Receptor for Type IV Secretion of the pCF10 Transfer Intermediate▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuqing; Zhang, Xiaolin; Manias, Dawn; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Dunny, Gary M.; Christie, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Upon sensing of peptide pheromone, Enterococcus faecalis efficiently transfers plasmid pCF10 through a type IV secretion (T4S) system to recipient cells. The PcfF accessory factor and PcfG relaxase initiate transfer by catalyzing strand-specific nicking at the pCF10 origin of transfer sequence (oriT). Here, we present evidence that PcfF and PcfG spatially coordinate docking of the pCF10 transfer intermediate with PcfC, a membrane-bound putative ATPase related to the coupling proteins of gram-...

  18. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth...... of reducing equivalents. We interpret these data as indicating that E. coli makes use of its ability to respire even if it cannot directly couple this ability to ATP synthesis; by respiring away excess reducing equivalents E. coli enhances substrate level ATP synthesis....

  19. New Systems Produced by Systemic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Wendy; Clem, Jo; Caine, Renate N.; Reigeluth, Charles M.; Chapman, Carrie; Flinders, David J.; Malopinsky, Larissa V.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents new systems produced by systemic change. First is Systemic Changes in the Chugach School District by Wendy Battino and Jo Clem. Second is Systemic Changes in Public Schools through Brain-Based Learning by Renate N. Caine. Third is A Vision of an Information-Age Educational System by Charles M. Reigeluth. Fourth is Systemic…

  20. Formate hydrogenlyase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rákhely Gábor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermococcus litoralis is a heterotrophic facultative sulfur dependent hyperthermophilic Archaeon, which was isolated from a shallow submarine thermal spring. It has been successfully used in a two-stage fermentation system, where various keratinaceous wastes of animal origin were converted to biohydrogen. In this system T. litoralis performed better than its close relative, P. furiosus. Therefore, new alternative enzymes involved in peptide and hydrogen metabolism were assumed in T. litoralis. Results An about 10.5 kb long genomic region was isolated and sequenced from Thermococcus litoralis. In silico analysis revealed that the region contained a putative operon consisting of eight genes: the fdhAB genes coding for a formate dehydrogenase and the mhyCDEFGH genes encoding a [NiFe] hydrogenase belonging to the group of the H2-evolving, energy-conserving, membrane-bound hydrogenases. Reverse transcription linked quantitative Real-Time PCR and Western blotting experiments showed that the expression of the fdh-mhy operon was up-regulated during fermentative growth on peptides and down-regulated in cells cultivated in the presence of sulfur. Immunoblotting and protein separation experiments performed on cell fractions indicated that the formate dehydrogenase part of the complex is associated to the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase. Conclusion The formate dehydrogenase together with the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase formed a formate hydrogenlyase (formate dehydrogenase coupled hydrogenase, FDH-MHY complex. The expression data suggested that its physiological role is linked to the removal of formate likely generated during anaerobic peptide fermentation.

  1. System safety education focused on system management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    System safety is defined and characteristics of the system are outlined. Some of the principle characteristics include role of humans in hazard analysis, clear language for input and output, system interdependence, self containment, and parallel analysis of elements.

  2. Airport Information Retrieval System (AIRS) System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-07-01

    This report presents the system design for a prototype air traffic flow control automation system developed for the FAA's Systems Command Center. The design was directed toward the immediate automation of airport data for use in traffic load predicti...

  3. Systems Biology and Health Systems Complexity in;

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donald Combs, C.; Barham, S.R.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Systems biology addresses interactions in biological systems at different scales of biological organization, from the molecular to the cellular, organ, organism, societal, and ecosystem levels. This chapter expands on the concept of systems biology, explores its implications for individual patients

  4. Variability and Evolution in Systems of Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goetz Botterweck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this position paper (1 we discuss two particular aspects of Systems of Systems, i.e., variability and evolution. (2 We argue that concepts from Product Line Engineering and Software Evolution are relevant to Systems of Systems Engineering. (3 Conversely, concepts from Systems of Systems Engineering can be helpful in Product Line Engineering and Software Evolution. Hence, we argue that an exchange of concepts between the disciplines would be beneficial.

  5. System specifications for the NDS Dictionary System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attree, P.M.; Smith, P.M.

    1979-09-01

    The NDS Dictionary System is a computerized system for maintaining and distributing the EXFOR dictionaries and for preparing internal versions of these dictionaries for use in the NDS EXFOR System and other NDS systems. This document is an internal manual for the system specifications of the NDS Dictionary System. It includes flow charts, system and program summaries, input and output specifications and file and record descriptions. This manual is updated from time to time when system modifications are made; this is the version of January 1979

  6. Quality management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mu Sung

    2009-08-01

    This book deals with ISO9001 quality management system which includes summary of this system such as classification of quality, principle of quality management, and definition, requirement and procedure of quality management system, introduction of ISO9001 system like model of ISO9001 quality management system, ISO certificate system, structure of ISO9001 standard, requirement of ISO9001 quality management system, process approach and documentation of system, propel cases of ISO9001 quality management system.

  7. Polymeric capsule-cushioned leukocyte cell membrane vesicles as a biomimetic delivery platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Changyong; Wu, Zhiguang; Lin, Zhihua; Lin, Xiankun; He, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We report a biomimetic delivery of microsized capsule-cushioned leukocyte membrane vesicles (CLMVs) through the conversion of freshly reassembled leukocyte membrane vesicles (LMVs), including membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins onto the surface of layer-by-layer assembled polymeric multilayer microcapsules. The leukocyte membrane coating was verified by using electron microscopy, a quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The resulting CLMVs have the ability to effectively evade clearance by the immune system and thus prolong the circulation time in mice. Moreover, we also show that the right-side-out leukocyte membrane coating can distinctly improve the accumulation of capsules in tumor sites through the molecular recognition of membrane-bound proteins of CLMVs with those of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The natural cell membrane camouflaged polymeric multilayer capsules with the immunosuppressive and tumor-recognition functionalities of natural leukocytes provide a new biomimetic delivery platform for disease therapy.We report a biomimetic delivery of microsized capsule-cushioned leukocyte membrane vesicles (CLMVs) through the conversion of freshly reassembled leukocyte membrane vesicles (LMVs), including membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins onto the surface of layer-by-layer assembled polymeric multilayer microcapsules. The leukocyte membrane coating was verified by using electron microscopy, a quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The resulting CLMVs have the ability to effectively evade clearance by the immune system and thus prolong the circulation time in mice. Moreover, we also show that the right-side-out leukocyte membrane coating can distinctly improve the accumulation of capsules in tumor sites through the molecular recognition of membrane-bound proteins of CLMVs with those of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The natural

  8. Protecting Information in Systems of Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trivellato, Daniel; Zannone, Nicola; Etalle, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    Systems of Systems (SoS) are dynamic, distributed coalitions of autonomous and heterogeneous systems that collaborate to achieve a common goal. While offering several advantages in terms of scalability and flexibility, the SoS paradigm has a strong impact on system interoperability and on the

  9. Networked control of microgrid system of systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Rahman, Mohamed Saif Ur; AL-Sunni, Fouad M.

    2016-08-01

    The microgrid has made its mark in distributed generation and has attracted widespread research. However, microgrid is a complex system which needs to be viewed from an intelligent system of systems perspective. In this paper, a network control system of systems is designed for the islanded microgrid system consisting of three distributed generation units as three subsystems supplying a load. The controller stabilises the microgrid system in the presence of communication infractions such as packet dropouts and delays. Simulation results are included to elucidate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  10. System design specification Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System (FS), and Ground Demonstration System (GDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The system design specification for ground demonstration, development, and flight qualification of a Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) is presented. The requirements for both a BIPS conceptual Flight System (FS) and a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) are defined

  11. Situation awareness with systems of systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tretmans, Jan; Borth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book discusses various aspects, challenges, and solutions for developing systems-of-systems for situation awareness, using applications in the domain of maritime safety and security.  Topics include advanced, multi-objective visualization methods for situation awareness, stochastic outlier selection, rule-based anomaly detection, an ontology-based event model for semantic reasoning, new methods for semi-automatic generation of adapters bridging communication gaps, security policies for systems-of-systems, trust assessment, and methods to deal with the dynamics of systems-of-systems in run-time monitoring, testing, and diagnosis. Architectural considerations for designing information-centric systems-of-systems such as situation awareness systems, and an integrated demonstrator implementing many of the investigated aspects, complete the book.

  12. In-vivo identification of direct electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to electrodes via outer-membrane OmcA-MtrCAB protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Akihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuhei, E-mail: nakamura@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito, E-mail: hashimoto@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); ERATO/JST, HASHIMOTO Light Energy Conversion Project (Japan)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: > Monolayer biofilm of Shewanella cells was prepared on an ITO electrode. > Extracellular electron transfer (EET) process was examined with series of mutants. > Direct ET was confirmed with outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB complex. > The EET process was not prominently influenced by capsular polysaccharide. - Abstract: The direct electron-transfer (DET) property of Shewanella bacteria has not been resolved in detail due to the complexity of in vivo electrochemistry in whole-cell systems. Here, we report the in vivo assignment of the redox signal indicative of the DET property in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a series of mutants and a chemical marking technique. The CV measurements of monolayer biofilms formed by deletion mutants of c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrA, {Delta}mtrB, {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA, and {Delta}cymA), and pilin ({Delta}pilD), capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) and menaquinone ({Delta}menD) biosynthetic proteins demonstrated that the electrochemical redox signal with a midpoint potential at 50 mV (vs. SHE) was due to an outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB protein complex of decaheme cytochromes, and did not involve either inner-membrane-bound CymA protein or secreted menaquinone. Using the specific binding affinity of nitric monoxide for the heme groups of c-type cytochromes, we further confirmed this conclusion. The heterogeneous standard rate constant for the DET process was estimated to be 300 {+-} 10 s{sup -1}, which was two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for the electron shuttling process via riboflavin. Experiments using a mutant unable to produce capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) revealed that the DET property of the OmcA-MtrCAB complex was not influenced by insulating and hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide. Accordingly, under physiological conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 utilizes a high density of outer-membrane-bound

  13. Computer System Design System-on-Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Flynn, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The next generation of computer system designers will be less concerned about details of processors and memories, and more concerned about the elements of a system tailored to particular applications. These designers will have a fundamental knowledge of processors and other elements in the system, but the success of their design will depend on the skills in making system-level tradeoffs that optimize the cost, performance and other attributes to meet application requirements. This book provides a new treatment of computer system design, particularly for System-on-Chip (SOC), which addresses th

  14. Highly Fluorinated Ir(III)-2,2':6',2″-Terpyridine-Phenylpyridine-X Complexes via Selective C-F Activation: Robust Photocatalysts for Solar Fuel Generation and Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Jonathan A; Mills, Isaac N; Transue, Wesley J; Bernhard, Stefan

    2016-08-03

    A series of fluorinated Ir(III)-terpyridine-phenylpyridine-X (X = anionic monodentate ligand) complexes were synthesized by selective C-F activation, whereby perfluorinated phenylpyridines were readily complexed. The combination of fluorinated phenylpyridine ligands with an electron-rich tri-tert-butyl terpyridine ligand generates a "push-pull" force on the electrons upon excitation, imparting significant enhancements to the stability, electrochemical, and photophysical properties of the complexes. Application of the complexes as photosensitizers for photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water and as redox photocatalysts for decarboxylative fluorination of several carboxylic acids showcases the performance of the complexes in highly coordinating solvents, in some cases exceeding that of the leading photosensitizers. Changes in the photophysical properties and the nature of the excited states are observed as the compounds increase in fluorination as well as upon exchange of the ancillary chloride ligand to a cyanide. These changes in the excited states have been corroborated using density functional theory modeling.

  15. Smart electromechanical systems the central nervous system

    CERN Document Server

    Kurbanov, Vugar

    2017-01-01

    This book describes approaches to solving the problems of developing the central nervous system of robots (CNSR) based on smart electromechanical systems (SEMS) modules, principles of construction of the various modules of the central nervous system and variants of mathematical software CNSR in control systems for intelligent robots. It presents the latest advances in theory and practice at the Russian Academy of Sciences. Developers of intelligent robots to solve modern problems in robotics are increasingly addressing the use of the bionic approach to create robots that mimic the complexity and adaptability of biological systems. These have smart electromechanical system (SEMS), which are used in various cyber-physical systems (CPhS), and allow the functions of calculation, control, communications, information storage, monitoring, measurement and control of parameters and environmental parameters to be integrated. The behavior of such systems is based on the information received from the central nervous syst...

  16. Linking Political Systems and War Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    military coercion to be the appropriate mean. Using the system theory and the theory of systemic risks displayed by the German sociologist Niklas Luhmann the article demonstrates how military systems due to their own autonomy and autopoiesis do not fit into the idea of political government......Decisive parts of the Western political system have demonstrated a seemingly surprising misinterpretation of military might. As Madelaine Albright has suggested, the mighty perceived themselves as "almighty". Political power seems to have invested in instrumental coercive power relations and found....... The Clausewitzian ideal of a political system that could continue its power games by means of war was moderated by Clausewitz' own analysis of "friction". How can a political system be so blind towards the possibilities of another system? What are the risks of systemic blind spots? The argument of the paper...

  17. Situation Awareness with Systems of Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, P. van de; Tretmans, J.; Borth, M.

    2013-01-01

    This book discusses various aspects, challenges, and solutions for developing systems-of-systems for situation awareness, using applications in the domain of maritime safety and security. Topics include advanced, multi-objective visualization methods for situation awareness, stochastic outlier

  18. Designing information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Blethyn, Stanley G

    2014-01-01

    Designing Information Systems focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in designing information systems. The book first describes systems, management and control, and how to design information systems. Discussions focus on documents produced from the functional construction function, users, operators, analysts, programmers and others, process management and control, levels of management, open systems, design of management information systems, and business system description, partitioning, and leveling. The text then takes a look at functional specification and functiona

  19. Solar photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryba, G.; Shelnutt, J.; Prairie, M.R.; Assink, R.A.

    1997-02-01

    This report summarizes the three-year LDRD program directed at developing catalysts based on metalloporphyrins to reduce carbon dioxide. Ultimately it was envisioned that such catalysts could be made part of a solar-driven photoredox cycle by coupling metalloporphyrins with semiconductor systems. Such a system would provide the energy required for CO{sub 2} reduction to methanol, which is an uphill 6-electron reduction. Molecular modeling and design capabilities were used to engineer metalloporphyrin catalysts for converting CO{sub 2} to CO and higher carbon reduction products like formaldehyde, formate, and methanol. Gas-diffusion electrochemical cells were developed to carry out these reactions. A tin-porphyrin/alumina photocatalyst system was partially developed to couple solar energy to this reduction process.

  20. Triggering system innovation in agricultural innovation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, James A.; Williams, Tracy; Nicholas, Graeme; Foote, Jeff; Rijswijk, Kelly; Barnard, Tim; Beechener, Sam; Horita, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a process for stimulating engagement among change agents to develop a shared understanding of systemic problems in the agricultural innovation system (AIS), challenge prevalent institutional logics and identify actions they might undertake to stimulate system innovation.

  1. Expert systems in process control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittig, T.

    1987-01-01

    To illustrate where the fundamental difference between expert systems in classical diagnosis and in industrial control lie, the work of process control instrumentation is used as an example for the job of expert systems. Starting from the general process of problem-solving, two classes of expert systems can be defined accordingly. (orig.) [de

  2. System Design of the SWRL Financial System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masumi

    To produce various management and accounting reports in order to maintain control of SWRL (Southwest Regional Laboratory) operational and financial activities, a computer-based SWRL financial system was developed. The system design is outlined, and various types of system inputs described. The kinds of management and accounting reports generated…

  3. Modeling learning technology systems as business systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Retalis, Symeon; Papaspyrou, Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    The design of Learning Technology Systems, and the Software Systems that support them, is largely conducted on an intuitive, ad hoc basis, thus resulting in inefficient systems that defectively support the learning process. There is now justifiable, increasing effort in formalizing the engineering

  4. Expert Systems for auditing management information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheroghe Popescu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Expert systems are built with the help of: specialised programming languages or expert system generators (shell. But this structure was reached after tens of years of work and research, because expert systems are nothing but pragmatic capitalisation of the results of research carried out in artificial intelligence and theory of knowledge.

  5. General Systems Theory and Instructional Systems Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, David F.

    1990-01-01

    Describes basic concepts in the field of general systems theory (GST) and identifies commonalities that exist between GST and instructional systems design (ISD). Models and diagrams that depict system elements in ISD are presented, and two matrices that show how GST has been used in ISD literature are included. (11 references) (LRW)

  6. Optical system defect propagation in ABCD systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKinley, W.G.; Yura, H.T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    1988-01-01

    We describe how optical system defects (tilt/jitter, decenter, and despace) propagate through an arbitrary paraxial optical system that can be described by an ABCD ray transfer matrix. A pedagogical example is given that demonstrates the effect of alignment errors on a typical optical system...

  7. Central metabolism of angiotensins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camara, C.G.

    1984-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography analyses of the radioactivity derived from 125 I-angiotensins and bound to cellular receptors in the brain and peripheral tissue reveal that, first, the specifically bound radioactivity is a heterogeneous mixture of several molecular species. Second, the observed patterns of 125 I-angiotensin degradation are largely the result of the activity of membrane-bound amino peptidases, which are enriched in the crude mitochrondrial tissue fraction; third, in general, peptidase inhibitors decrease the apparent binding of 125 I-angiotensins to brain tissue, and they decrease this binding more than they decrease the degradation of the radioligands; fourth, peptidase inhibitors specific for individual enzymes, but not broad-spectrum peptidase inhibitors, actually decrease the amount of 125 I-angiotensin II bound to brain tissue, suggesting that angiotensin receptors in the brain may be associated with membrane-bound peptidases; fifth, tyrosine and other aromatic and branched-chain aliphatic amino acids, end products of angiotensin degradation by membrane peptidases, are quickly removed from the extracellular compartment by the activity of a high-affinity transport system, identical with the leucine-preferring uptake system, which is enriched in the crude mitochondrial tissue fraction, containing the synaptosomes; and sixth, the distribution of this uptake system in rat and gerbil brain is nearly identical and corresponds with the central distribution of 125 I-angiotensin binding in the gerbil, but neither with the distribution of 125 I-angiotensin II binding in the rat brain

  8. Biomedical signals and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquillo, Joseph V

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical Signals and Systems is meant to accompany a one-semester undergraduate signals and systems course. It may also serve as a quick-start for graduate students or faculty interested in how signals and systems techniques can be applied to living systems. The biological nature of the examples allows for systems thinking to be applied to electrical, mechanical, fluid, chemical, thermal and even optical systems. Each chapter focuses on a topic from classic signals and systems theory: System block diagrams, mathematical models, transforms, stability, feedback, system response, control, time

  9. Psychology of system design

    CERN Document Server

    Meister, D

    2014-01-01

    This is a book about systems, including: systems in which humans control machines; systems in which humans interact with humans and the machine component is relatively unimportant; systems which are heavily computerized and those that are not; and governmental, industrial, military and social systems. The book deals with both traditional systems like farming, fishing and the military, and with systems just now tentatively emerging, like the expert and the interactive computer system. The emphasis is on the system concept and its implications for analysis, design and evaluation of these many di

  10. Operating System Security

    CERN Document Server

    Jaeger, Trent

    2008-01-01

    Operating systems provide the fundamental mechanisms for securing computer processing. Since the 1960s, operating systems designers have explored how to build "secure" operating systems - operating systems whose mechanisms protect the system against a motivated adversary. Recently, the importance of ensuring such security has become a mainstream issue for all operating systems. In this book, we examine past research that outlines the requirements for a secure operating system and research that implements example systems that aim for such requirements. For system designs that aimed to

  11. Intrusion Detection Systems with Live Knowledge System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-31

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0058 Intrusion Detection Systems with Live Knowledge System Byeong Ho Kang UNIVERSITY OF TASMANIA Final Report 05/31/2016...COVERED (From - To) 20 May 2015 to 19 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Intrusion Detection Systems with Live Knowledge System 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...298 10/26/2016https://livelink.ebs.afrl.af.mil/livelink/llisapi.dll Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-15-1-4061 “ Intrusion Detection Systems with

  12. Systems Measures of Water Distribution System Resilience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klise, Katherine A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Murray, Regan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, La Tonya Nicole [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Resilience is a concept that is being used increasingly to refer to the capacity of infrastructure systems to be prepared for and able to respond effectively and rapidly to hazardous events. In Section 2 of this report, drinking water hazards, resilience literature, and available resilience tools are presented. Broader definitions, attributes and methods for measuring resilience are presented in Section 3. In Section 4, quantitative systems performance measures for water distribution systems are presented. Finally, in Section 5, the performance measures and their relevance to measuring the resilience of water systems to hazards is discussed along with needed improvements to water distribution system modeling tools.

  13. Lighting system with thermal management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  14. Automatic control systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Yun Gi

    2004-01-01

    This book gives descriptions of automatic control for electrical electronics, which indicates history of automatic control, Laplace transform, block diagram and signal flow diagram, electrometer, linearization of system, space of situation, state space analysis of electric system, sensor, hydro controlling system, stability, time response of linear dynamic system, conception of root locus, procedure to draw root locus, frequency response, and design of control system.

  15. Root production method system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Lovelace

    2002-01-01

    The RPM system (Root Production Method) is a multistep production system of container tree production that places primary emphasis on the root system because the root system ultimately determines the tree's survival and performance in its outplanted environment. This particular container production system has been developed to facilitate volume production, in a...

  16. Collaborative Systems Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocatilu, Paul; Ciurea, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative systems are widely used today in various activity fields. Their complexity is high and the development involves numerous resources and costs. Testing collaborative systems has a very important role for the systems' success. In this paper we present taxonomy of collaborative systems. The collaborative systems are classified in many…

  17. Systems Intelligence Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törmänen, Juha; Hämäläinen, Raimo P.; Saarinen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Systems intelligence (SI) (Saarinen and Hämäläinen, 2004) is a construct defined as a person's ability to act intelligently within complex systems involving interaction and feedback. SI relates to our ability to act in systems and reason about systems to adaptively carry out productive actions within and with respect to systems such as…

  18. Mapping biological systems to network systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rathore, Heena

    2016-01-01

    The book presents the challenges inherent in the paradigm shift of network systems from static to highly dynamic distributed systems – it proposes solutions that the symbiotic nature of biological systems can provide into altering networking systems to adapt to these changes. The author discuss how biological systems – which have the inherent capabilities of evolving, self-organizing, self-repairing and flourishing with time – are inspiring researchers to take opportunities from the biology domain and map them with the problems faced in network domain. The book revolves around the central idea of bio-inspired systems -- it begins by exploring why biology and computer network research are such a natural match. This is followed by presenting a broad overview of biologically inspired research in network systems -- it is classified by the biological field that inspired each topic and by the area of networking in which that topic lies. Each case elucidates how biological concepts have been most successfully ...

  19. TWRSview system requirements specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, J.A.; Lee, A.K.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides the system requirements specification for the TWRSview software system. The TWRSview software system is being developed to integrate electronic data supporting the development of the TWRS technical baseline

  20. Antiskid braking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazdera, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Published report describes analytical development and simulation of braking system. System prevents wheels from skidding when brakes are applied, significantly reducing stopping distance. Report also presents computer simulation study on system as applied to aircraft.

  1. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  2. The Trinity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, Billy Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vigil, Benny Manuel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-13

    This paper describes the Trinity system, the first ASC Advanced Technology System (ATS-1). We describe the Trinity procurement timeline, the ASC computing strategy, the Trinity specific mission needs, and the Trinity system specifications.

  3. Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Forms of Vasculitis / Central Nervous System (CNS) Vasculitis Central Nervous System (CNS) Vasculitis Swap out your current Facebook Profile ... your Facebook personal page. Replace with this image. Central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is inflammation of blood vessel walls ...

  4. What Are Expert Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Agapeyeff, A.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for potential business users, this paper describes the main characteristics of expert systems; discusses practical use considerations; presents a taxonomy of the systems; and reviews several expert system development projects in business and industry. (MBR)

  5. Connected motorcycle system performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This project characterized the performance of Connected Vehicle Systems (CVS) on motorcycles based on two key components: global positioning and wireless communication systems. Considering that Global Positioning System (GPS) and 5.9 GHz Dedicated Sh...

  6. Pneumatic transfer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bichler, H.; Boeck, H.; Hammer, J.; Buchtela, K.

    1988-11-01

    A pneumatic transfer system for research reactors, including a sample changer system and to be used for neutron activation analysis, is described. The system can be obtained commercially from the Atominstitut. 2 figs. (qui)

  7. System Software 7 Macintosh

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    System 7 is a single-user graphical user interface-based operating system for Macintosh computers and was part of the classic Mac OS line of operating systems. It was introduced on May 13, 1991, by Apple Computer. It succeeded System 6, and was the main Macintosh operating system until it was succeeded by Mac OS 8 in 1997. Features added with the System 7 release included virtual memory, personal file sharing, QuickTime, QuickDraw 3D, and an improved user interface. This is the first real major evolution of the Macintosh system, bringing a significant improvement in the user interface, improved stability and many new features such as the ability to use multiple applications at the same time. "System 7" is the last operating system name of the Macintosh that contains the word "system". Macintosh operating systems were later called "Mac OS" (for Macintosh Operating System).

  8. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth / For Kids / Quiz: Immune System Print How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! Partner Message ...

  9. Male Reproductive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Male Reproductive System KidsHealth / For Parents / Male Reproductive System What's in ... your son's reproductive health. About the Male Reproductive System Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  10. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  11. Gas transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlin, J.C.; Frick, G.; Kempfer, C.; North, C.

    1988-09-01

    The state of work on the Vivitron gas transfer system and the system functions are summarized. The system has to: evacuate the Vivitron reservoir; transfer gas from storage tanks to the Vivitron; recirculate gas during operation; transfer gas from the Vivitron to storage tanks; and assure air input. The system is now being installed. Leak alarms are given by SF6 detectors, which set off a system of forced ventilation. Another system continuously monitors the amount of SF6 in the tanks [fr

  12. Battery systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahn, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    A complete all-in-one reference on the important interdisciplinary topic of Battery Systems Engineering Focusing on the interdisciplinary area of battery systems engineering, this book provides the background, models, solution techniques, and systems theory that are necessary for the development of advanced battery management systems. It covers the topic from the perspective of basic electrochemistry as well as systems engineering topics and provides a basis for battery modeling for system engineering of electric and hybrid electric vehicle platforms. This original

  13. Small test SDHW systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejen, Niels Kristian

    1999-01-01

    Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different.......Three small test SDHW systems was tested in a laboratory test facility.The three SDHW systems where all based on the low flow principe and a mantle tank but the design of the systems where different....

  14. Bridge Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper bridge management systems are discussed with special emphasis on management systems for reinforced concrete bridges. Management systems for prestressed concrete bridges, steel bridges, or composite bridges can be developed in a similar way.......In this paper bridge management systems are discussed with special emphasis on management systems for reinforced concrete bridges. Management systems for prestressed concrete bridges, steel bridges, or composite bridges can be developed in a similar way....

  15. Geometric Fuzzy Logic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Coupland, Simon

    2006-01-01

    There has recently been a significant increase in academic interest in the field oftype-2 fuzzy sets and systems. Type-2 fuzzy systems offer the ability to model and reason with uncertain concepts. When faced with uncertainties type-2 fuzzy systems should, theoretically, give an increase in performance over type-l fuzzy systems. However, the computational complexity of generalised type-2 fuzzy systems is significantly higher than type-l systems. A direct consequence of this is that, prior to ...

  16. Marketing reporting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanić Hasan M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main components of a developed and good organized marketing information system are: internal reporting system, marketing reporting system, market research system and analytical marketing system. Marketing reporting system provides data and information about changes in business and micro marketing environment. This component of MIS ensures that marketing managers are up-to-date with what is going on, and to be informed about changes in company marketing environment.

  17. Avionics System Performance Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damania, Bhavesh

    1998-01-01

    .... The reasons for improved performance management include advances in processor technology and architectures, increasingly integrated systems, and the requirement of reducing costs in developing and deploying the systems...

  18. Airports Geographic Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airports Geographic Information System maintains the airport and aeronautical data required to meet the demands of the Next Generation National Airspace System....

  19. Control system design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David G [Tijeras, NM; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  20. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  1. Credit Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Credit Management System. Outsourced Internet-based application. CMS stores and processes data related to USAID credit programs. The system provides information...

  2. Aeronautical Information System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Aeronautical Information System (AIS) is a leased weather automated system that provides a means of collecting and distributing aeronautical weather information...

  3. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems. This paper analyses the increased intelligence of the CMDS system, which motivates its use for different medical problem’s solving.

  4. Systems engineering for very large systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewkowicz, Paul E.

    Very large integrated systems have always posed special problems for engineers. Whether they are power generation systems, computer networks or space vehicles, whenever there are multiple interfaces, complex technologies or just demanding customers, the challenges are unique. 'Systems engineering' has evolved as a discipline in order to meet these challenges by providing a structured, top-down design and development methodology for the engineer. This paper attempts to define the general class of problems requiring the complete systems engineering treatment and to show how systems engineering can be utilized to improve customer satisfaction and profit ability. Specifically, this work will focus on a design methodology for the largest of systems, not necessarily in terms of physical size, but in terms of complexity and interconnectivity.

  5. Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

  6. Systems analysis of a security alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiff, A.

    1975-01-01

    When the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory found that its security alarm system was causing more false alarms and maintenance costs than LLL felt was tolerable, a systems analysis was undertaken to determine what should be done about the situation. This report contains an analysis of security alarm systems in general and ends with a review of the existing Security Alarm Control Console (SACC) and recommendations for its improvement, growth and change. (U.S.)

  7. Formal System Verification for Trustworthy Embedded Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    step is for the first time formal and machine-checked. Contemporary OS verification projects include Verisoft, Verisoft XT, and Verve . The Verisoft...tens of thousands lines of code. The Verve kernel [22] shows that type and memory safety properties can be established on the assembly level via type...systems and therefore with much lower cost. Verve contains a formally verified runtime system, in particular a garbage collector that the type system

  8. L-system fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Jibitesh

    2007-01-01

    The book covers all the fundamental aspects of generating fractals through L-system. Also it provides insight to various researches in this area for generating fractals through L-system approach & estimating dimensions. Also it discusses various applications of L-system fractals. Key Features: - Fractals generated from L-System including hybrid fractals - Dimension calculation for L-system fractals - Images & codes for L-system fractals - Research directions in the area of L-system fractals - Usage of various freely downloadable tools in this area - Fractals generated from L-System including hybrid fractals- Dimension calculation for L-system fractals- Images & codes for L-system fractals- Research directions in the area of L-system fractals- Usage of various freely downloadable tools in this area

  9. SYSTEMS APPROACH FOR CONTEMPORARY COMPLEX TOURISM SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Jere Jakulin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Systems approach represents thinking outside the box and is connected to the transformation of common linear approach and thinking. Western society followed rules of classical western science, which form many centuries took analysis as mainstream of thinking and researching. One can find perfect and logical explanation for this. In the past, classical science researched matter and reached optimal results with analysis and analytical thinking. Nowadays more and more scientists research intangible world around matter and cooperate with prevailed, fastest growing service industry such as tourism. Following paper presents systems approach in tourism, which defines wideness, co-dependency among tourism system elements, and "big picture" point of view. In a frame of systems methodology, we will show the importance of systems approach in order to understand complexity in the area of tourism. At once an excellent example of the analytical approach will be shown in so called "the tip of the iceberg" theory, where events represent analytical thinking and structure or base of the iceberg represents systems approach. Complexity of the tourism systems will be explained and a model of a common tourism system developed. We claim that the analysis, in the past, caused technological progress; it caused the development of western science, which we now know it. It led to the discoveries but for dealing with contemporary complex challenges is not sufficient. Today a systems approach is suitable enough for dealing with complex question in the area of tourism and of course in global society.

  10. Power system protection 2 systems and methods

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The worldwide growth in demand for electricity has forced the pace of developments in electrical power system design to meet consumer needs for reliable, secure and cheap supplies. Power system protection, as a technology essential to high quality supply, is widely recognised as a specialism of growing and often critical importance, in which power system needs and technological progress have combined to result in rapid developments in policy and practice in recent years. In the United Kingdom, the need for appropriate training in power system protection was recognised in the early 1960s with t

  11. Automating System Assembly of Aerospace Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolios, Panagiotis

    2008-01-01

    One of the major challenges in modern aerospace designs is the integration and assembly of independently developed components. We have formalized this as the system assembly problem: from a sea of available components, which should be selected and how should they be connected, integrated, and assembled so that the overall system requirements are satisfied in a certifiable way? We present a powerful framework for automatically solving the system assembly problem directly from system requirements by using formal verification technology. We also present a case study where we applied our work to large-scale industrial examples from the Boeing Dreamliner.

  12. Site systems engineering: Systems engineering management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygiel, M.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-03

    The Site Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) implementation document for the Hanford Site Systems Engineering Policy, (RLPD 430.1) and Systems Engineering Criteria Document and Implementing Directive, (RLID 430.1). These documents define the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) processes and products to be used at Hanford to implement the systems engineering process at the site level. This SEMP describes the products being provided by the site systems engineering activity in fiscal year (FY) 1996 and the associated schedule. It also includes the procedural approach being taken by the site level systems engineering activity in the development of these products and the intended uses for the products in the integrated planning process in response to the DOE policy and implementing directives. The scope of the systems engineering process is to define a set of activities and products to be used at the site level during FY 1996 or until the successful Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) is onsite as a result of contract award from Request For Proposal DE-RP06-96RL13200. Following installation of the new contractor, a long-term set of systems engineering procedures and products will be defined for management of the Hanford Project. The extent to which each project applies the systems engineering process and the specific tools used are determined by the project`s management.

  13. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System''s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section

  14. Information Systems Security Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Popescu; Veronica Adriana Popescu; Cristina Raluca Popescu

    2007-01-01

    The article covers:Defining an information system; benefits obtained by introducing new information technologies; IT management;Defining prerequisites, analysis, design, implementation of IS; Information security management system; aspects regarding IS security policy; Conceptual model of a security system; Auditing information security systems and network infrastructure security.

  15. Product Service Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Departing from Product Development models based on physical artefacts. Moving towards integrated Product Development and System Operations models suited Product/Service-systems......Departing from Product Development models based on physical artefacts. Moving towards integrated Product Development and System Operations models suited Product/Service-systems...

  16. ERP–systems

    OpenAIRE

    Shustova I.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analyzed the existing ERP–systems of foreign and domestic manufacturers. Popular ERP–systems in the Republic of Belarus were considered. The leading ERP-systems in the domestic market and their features were described in detail. Finally, we described the steps that must be taken to select the most suitable ERP-system for a particular company.

  17. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  18. Expert Systems: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, Sadashiv

    1984-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the architecture of expert systems; (2) features that distinguish expert systems from conventional programs; (3) conditions necessary to select a particular application for the development of successful expert systems; (4) issues to be resolved when building expert systems; and (5) limitations. Examples of selected expert systems…

  19. CDMA systems capacity engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kiseon

    2004-01-01

    This new hands-on resource tackles capacity planning and engineering issues that are crucial to optimizing wireless communication systems performance. Going beyond the system physical level and investigating CDMA system capacity at the service level, this volume is the single-source for engineering and analyzing systems capacity and resources.

  20. Combinatorial Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Wisniewski, Rafal; Grunnet, Jacob Deleuran

    2008-01-01

    As initially suggested by E. Sontag, it is possible to approximate an arbitrary nonlinear system by a set of piecewise linear systems. In this work we concentrate on how to control a system given by a set of piecewise linear systems defined on simplices. By using the results of L. Habets and J. v...

  1. EUCLID ARCHIVE SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belikov, Andrey; Williams, Owen; Droge, Bob; Tsyganov, Andrey; Boxhoorn, Danny; McFarland, John; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Valentijn, E; Altieri, Bruno; Dabin, Christophe; Pasian, F.; Osuna, Pedro; Soille, P.; Marchetti, P.G.

    2014-01-01

    The Euclid Archive System prototype is a functional information system which is used to address the numerous challenges in the development of fully functional data processing system for Euclid. The prototype must support the highly distributed nature of the Euclid Science Ground System, with Science

  2. System Performance and Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frei, U.; Oversloot, H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter compares and contrasts the system performance of two widely used solar thermal systems using testing and simulation programs. Solar thermal systems are used in many countries for heating domestically used water. In addition to the simple thermosiphon systems, better designed pumped

  3. Hybrid intelligent engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, L C; Adelaide, Australia University of

    1997-01-01

    This book on hybrid intelligent engineering systems is unique, in the sense that it presents the integration of expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy systems, genetic algorithms, and chaos engineering. It shows that these new techniques enhance the capabilities of one another. A number of hybrid systems for solving engineering problems are presented.

  4. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Immune System KidsHealth / For Parents / Immune System What's in this ... can lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  5. The Linux Operating System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Linux Distributions. Linux per se refers only to the kernel of the operating system. A full fledged Unix system however requires a set of applications and support software that make the system user friendly. Hundreds of programmers around the world ,have contributed to bring the Linux system to its current state of robustness.

  6. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H. Carrick

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant “CelTag” DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  7. Development of a novel probiotic delivery system based on microencapsulation with protectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Zhao, Qian; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Shu, Quan; Weir, Iona; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-02-01

    The establishment of the health-promoting benefits of probiotics is challenged by the antimicrobial bio-barriers throughout the host's gastrointestinal (GI) tract after oral administration. Although microencapsulation has been frequently utilised to enhance the delivery of probiotics, microcapsules of sub-100 μm were found to be ineffective and therefore questioned as an effective delivery vehicle for viable probiotics despite the sensory advantage. In this study, four probiotics strains were encapsulated in chitosan-coated alginate microcapsules of sub-100 μm. Only a minor protective effect was observed from this original type of microcapsule. In order to enhance the survival of these probiotics, sucrose, a metabolisable sugar, and lecithin vesicles were added to the wall material. Both of the ingredients could be readily encapsulated with the probiotics, and protected them from stresses in the simulated GI fluids. The metabolisable sugar effectively increased the survival of the probiotics in gastric acid, mainly through energizing the membrane-bound F1F0-ATPases. The lecithin vesicles proved to alleviate the bile salt stress, and hence notably reduced the viability loss at the elevated bile salt concentrations. Overall, three out of the total four probiotics in the reinforced sub-100 μm microencapsules could significantly survive through an 8-h sequential treatment of the simulated GI fluids, giving less than 1-log drop in viable count. The most vulnerable strain of bifidobacteria also yielded a viability increase of 3-logs from this protection. In conclusion, the sub-100 μm microcapsules can be a useful vehicle for the delivery of probiotics, as long as suitable protectants are incorporated in the wall matrix.

  8. A Multiagent System for Distributed Systems Management

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. Kelash; H. M. Faheem; M. Amoon

    2007-01-01

    The demand for autonomous resource management for distributed systems has increased in recent years. Distributed systems require an efficient and powerful communication mechanism between applications running on different hosts and networks. The use of mobile agent technology to distribute and delegate management tasks promises to overcome the scalability and flexibility limitations of the currently used centralized management approach. This work proposes a multiagent s...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT AND SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Systems Management is the management of environmental problems at the systems level fully accounting for the multi-dimensional nature of the environment. This includes socio-economic dimensions as well as the usual physical and life science aspects. This is importa...

  10. Transdisciplinarity Needs Systemism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hofkirchner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The main message of this paper is that systemism is best suited for transdisciplinary studies. A description of disciplinary sciences, transdisciplinary sciences and systems sciences is given, along with their different definitions of aims, scope and tools. The rationale for transdisciplinarity is global challenges, which are complex. The rationale for systemism is the concretization of understanding complexity. Drawing upon Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s intention of a General System Theory, three items deserve attention—the world-view of a synergistic systems technology, the world picture of an emergentist systems theory, and the way of thinking of an integrationist systems method.

  11. What is systems engineering?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahill, A.T. [comp.] [Arizona Univ. (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering

    1995-08-01

    Systems Engineering is an interdisciplinary process that ensures that the customers` needs are satisfied throughout a system`s entire life cycle. This process includes: understanding customer needs; stating the problem; specifying requirements; defining performance and cost measures, prescribing tests, validating requirements, conducting design reviews, exploring alternative concepts, sensitivity analyses, functional decomposition, system design, designing and managing interfaces, system integration, total system test, configuration management, risk management, reliability analysis; total quality management; project management; and documentation. Material for this paper was gathered from senior Systems Engineers at Sandia National Laboratories.

  12. Photovoltaic systems and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations given at a project review meeting held at Albuquerque, NM. The proceedings cover the past accomplishments and current activities of the Photovoltaic Systems Research, Balance-of-System Technology Development and System Application Experiments Projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The status of intermediate system application experiments and residential system analysis is emphasized. Some discussion of the future of the Photovoltaic Program in general, and the Sandia projects in particular is also presented.

  13. SQL injection detection system

    OpenAIRE

    Vargonas, Vytautas

    2017-01-01

    SQL injection detection system Programmers do not always ensure security of developed systems. That is why it is important to look for solutions outside being reliant on developers. In this work SQL injection detection system is proposed. The system analyzes HTTP request parameters and detects intrusions. It is based on unsupervised machine learning. Trained by regular request data system detects outlier user parameters. Since training is not reliant on previous knowledge of SQL injections, t...

  14. Multiprocessor data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haumann, J.R.; Crawford, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    A multiprocessor data acquisition system has been built to replace the single processor systems at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory. The multiprocessor system was needed to accommodate the higher data rates at IPNS brought about by improvements in the source and changes in instrument configurations. This paper describes the hardware configuration of the system and the method of task sharing and compares results to the single processor system

  15. Intrusion detection system elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, M.J.; Mangan, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    This report highlights elements required for an intrusion detection system and discusses problems which can be encountered in attempting to make the elements effective. Topics discussed include: sensors, both for exterior detection and interior detection; alarm assessment systems, with the discussion focused on video assessment; and alarm reporting systems, including alarm communication systems and dislay/console considerations. Guidance on careful planning and design of a new or to-be-improved system is presented

  16. Licensing open spectrum systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Neira, Ana Isabel; Lagunas Hernandez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies how the spectrum regulation could change in the future open spectrum communication systems. Due to their huge success in short-range communication systems (WiFi, Zigbee, ...), broader area telecommunication providers might mimic the open spectrum philosophy to their systems. Nevertheless, current wireless open spectrum systems are not designed for wide areas and they do not provide QoS to their users. This work proposes an alternative to the nowadays open spectrum systems i...

  17. The control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The present control system has matured both in terms of age and capacity. Thus a new system based on a local area network (LAN) is being developed. A pilot project has been started but, owing to difficulties encountered with the present operating system used with the microprocessors, it has become necessary to reconsider the choice of operating system. A recently-released multi-tasking operating system that runs on the existing hardware has been chosen. 1 fig

  18. Structures and semiotic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Somov, Georgij Yu

    2007-01-01

    A model of interrelations between various types of mentation and semiotic systems is suggested. The relations of structures, forms, and signs in different mentation processes and their effect on semiotic systems are discussed. Major features of these systems are examined from the viewpoint of simulation of changes in physical objects and human environment. Most are multilateral and are clearly structures of various systems. Their organizing role in semiotic systemity are evinced through the a...

  19. Systems Theory and Systems Approach to Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Berim Ramosaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systems theory is product of the efforts of many researchers to create an intermediate field of coexistence of all sciences. If not for anything else, because of the magnitude that the use of systemic thinking and systemic approach has taken, it has become undisputed among the theories. Systems theory not only provides a glossary of terms with which researchers from different fields can be understood, but provides a framework for the presentation and interpretation of phenomena and realities. This paper addresses a systematic approach to leadership, as an attempt to dredge leadership and systems theory literature to find the meeting point. Systems approach is not an approach to leadership in terms of a manner of leader’s work, but it’s the leader's determination to factorize in his leadership the external environment and relationships with and among elements. Leader without followers is unable to exercise his leadership and to ensure their conviction he should provide a system, a structure, a purpose, despite the alternative chaos. Systems approach clarifies the thought on the complexity and dynamism of the environment and provides a framework for building ideas. If the general system theory is the skeleton of science (Boulding: 1956, this article aims to replenish it with leadership muscles by prominent authors who have written on systems theory and leadership, as well as through original ideas. In this work analytical methods were used (by analyzing approaches individually as well as synthetic methods (by assaying individual approaches in context of entirety. The work is a critical review of literature as well as a deductive analysis mingled with models proposed by authors through inductive analysis. Meta-analysis has been used to dissect the interaction and interdependence between leadership approaches.

  20. A systematic approach for peptide characterization of B-cell receptor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Paula; Ibarrola, Nieves; Dégano, Rosa M; Lécrevisse, Quentin; Rodriguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Nieto, Wendy G; Góngora, Rafael; González, Marcos; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2017-06-27

    A wide variety of immunoglobulins (Ig) is produced by the immune system thanks to different mechanisms (V(D)J recombination, somatic hypermutation, and antigen selection). The profiling of Ig sequences (at both DNA and peptide levels) are of great relevance to developing targeted vaccines or treatments for specific diseases or infections. Thus, genomics and proteomics techniques (such as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry (MS)) have notably increased the knowledge in Ig sequencing and serum Ig peptide profiling in a high-throughput manner. However, the peptide characterization of membrane-bound Ig (e.g., B-cell receptors, BCR) is still a challenge mainly due to the poor recovery of mentioned Ig.Herein, we have evaluated three different sample processing methods for peptide sequencing of BCR belonging to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells identifying up to 426 different peptide sequences (MS/MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004466). Moreover, as a consequence of the results here obtained, recommended guidelines have been described for BCR-sequencing of B-CLL samples by MS approaches.For this purpose, an in-house algorithm has been designed and developed to compare the MS/MS results with those obtained by molecular biology in order to integrate both proteomics and genomics results and establish the steps to follow when sequencing membrane-bound Ig by MS/MS.