WorldWideScience

Sample records for membrane vesicle-mediated release

  1. Outer Membrane Vesicle-Mediated Export of Processed PrtV Protease from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompikuntal, Pramod K; Vdovikova, Svitlana; Duperthuy, Marylise; Johnson, Tanya L; Åhlund, Monika; Lundmark, Richard; Oscarsson, Jan; Sandkvist, Maria; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are known to release from almost all Gram-negative bacteria during normal growth. OMVs carry different biologically active toxins and enzymes into the surrounding environment. We suggest that OMVs may therefore be able to transport bacterial proteases into the target host cells. We present here an analysis of the Vibrio cholerae OMV-associated protease PrtV. In this study, we demonstrated that PrtV was secreted from the wild type V. cholerae strain C6706 via the type II secretion system in association with OMVs. By immunoblotting and electron microscopic analysis using immunogold labeling, the association of PrtV with OMVs was examined. We demonstrated that OMV-associated PrtV was biologically active by showing altered morphology and detachment of cells when the human ileocecum carcinoma (HCT8) cells were treated with OMVs from the wild type V. cholerae strain C6706 whereas cells treated with OMVs from the prtV isogenic mutant showed no morphological changes. Furthermore, OMV-associated PrtV protease showed a contribution to bacterial resistance towards the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Our findings suggest that OMVs released from V. cholerae can deliver a processed, biologically active form of PrtV that contributes to bacterial interactions with target host cells.

  2. Membrane vesicle release in bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea: a conserved yet underappreciated aspect of microbial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatherage, Brooke L; Cookson, Brad T

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of microbes with their environment depends on features of the dynamic microbial surface throughout cell growth and division. Surface modifications, whether used to acquire nutrients, defend against other microbes, or resist the pressures of a host immune system, facilitate adaptation to unique surroundings. The release of bioactive membrane vesicles (MVs) from the cell surface is conserved across microbial life, in bacteria, archaea, fungi, and parasites. MV production occurs not only in vitro but also in vivo during infection, underscoring the influence of these surface organelles in microbial physiology and pathogenesis through delivery of enzymes, toxins, communication signals, and antigens recognized by the innate and adaptive immune systems. Derived from a variety of organisms that span kingdoms of life and called by several names (membrane vesicles, outer membrane vesicles [OMVs], exosomes, shedding microvesicles, etc.), the conserved functions and mechanistic strategies of MV release are similar, including the use of ESCRT proteins and ESCRT protein homologues to facilitate these processes in archaea and eukaryotic microbes. Although forms of MV release by different organisms share similar visual, mechanistic, and functional features, there has been little comparison across microbial life. This underappreciated conservation of vesicle release, and the resulting functional impact throughout the tree of life, explored in this review, stresses the importance of vesicle-mediated processes throughout biology.

  3. Arct'Alg release from hydrogel membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Renata H.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Shihomatsu, Helena M.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogel properties make them attractive for a variety of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, primarily in drug delivery system. Synthetic hydrogels have been studied to develop new devices for drugs or cosmetic active agents release. Arct'Alg R is an extract derived from red algae biomass which has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and tissue regeneration stimulant properties. This extract was incorporated to poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel membranes obtained by gamma rays crosslinking technique. The ionizing radiation presents the advantage to occur polymerization and sterilization simultaneously in the same process. The aim of this work was the in vitro release kinetic study of Arct'Alg R from hydrogel membranes during 24 hours to verify the possibility of use in cosmetic and dermatological treatments. Results showed that about 50% and 30% of incorporated Arct'Alg R was released from PVP and PVA hydrogel membrane devices respectively. (author)

  4. Preparation of temperature responsive fragrance release membranes by UV curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kaetsu, Isao; Uchida, Kumao; Okuda, Jyunya; Kitami, Toshiaki; Matsubara, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The authors have studied the preparation and the function of intelligent drug release membranes by UV curing. Temperature responsive fragrance release membranes were prepared by UV curing process and the release functions were investigated as the function of thickness and composition of membrane. Microscopic observations were used to prove the postulated release mechanism

  5. Melanosome transfer to keratinocyte in the chicken embryonic skin is mediated by vesicle release associated with Rho-regulated membrane blebbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Murai, Hidetaka; Sakai, Ken-Ichiro; Okui, Takahiro; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2016-12-02

    During skin pigmentation in amniotes, melanin synthesized in the melanocyte is transferred to keratinocytes by a particle called the melanosome. Previous studies, mostly using dissociated cultured cells, have proposed several different models that explain how the melanosome transfer is achieved. Here, using a technique that labels the plasma membrane of melanocytes within a three-dimensional system that mimics natural tissues, we have visualized the plasma membrane of melanocytes with EGFP in chicken embryonic skin. Confocal time-lapse microscopy reveals that the melanosome transfer is mediated, at least in part, by vesicles produced by plasma membrane. Unexpectedly, the vesicle release is accompanied by the membrane blebbing of melanocytes. Blebs that have encapsulated a melanosome are pinched off to become vesicles, and these melanosome-containing vesicles are finally engulfed by neighboring keratinocytes. For both the membrane blebbing and vesicle release, Rho small GTPase is essential. We further show that the membrane vesicle-mediated melanosome transfer plays a significant role in the skin pigmentation. Given that the skin pigmentation in inter-feather spaces in chickens is similar to that in inter-hair spaces of humans, our findings should have important consequences in cosmetic medicine.

  6. Ceramide transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus is not vesicle-mediated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, JW; Babia, T; Klappe, K; Egea, G; Hoekstra, D

    1998-01-01

    Ceramide (Cer) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus was measured under conditions that block vesicle-mediated protein transfer. This was done either in intact cells by reducing the incubation temperature to 15 degrees C, or in streptolysin O-permeabilized cells by

  7. diffusion of metronidazole released through cellulose membrane

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prof kokwaro

    Three different topical formulations namely gel, cream and ointment, each containing 1% w/w metronidazole, were prepared and in vitro permeation studies carried out. The permeation of metronidazole from each of the topical formulation was determined using dialyzing cellulose membrane in a dissolution tester. Glycerin,.

  8. Arct'Alg release from hydrogel membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Renata H.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Shihomatsu, Helena M.; Lugao, Ademar B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: rhamaral@ipen.br, e-mail: sorogero@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The hydrogel properties make them attractive for a variety of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, primarily in drug delivery system. Synthetic hydrogels have been studied to develop new devices for drugs or cosmetic active agents release. Arct'Alg{sup R} is an extract derived from red algae biomass which has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and tissue regeneration stimulant properties. This extract was incorporated to poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel membranes obtained by gamma rays crosslinking technique. The ionizing radiation presents the advantage to occur polymerization and sterilization simultaneously in the same process. The aim of this work was the in vitro release kinetic study of Arct'Alg{sup R} from hydrogel membranes during 24 hours to verify the possibility of use in cosmetic and dermatological treatments. Results showed that about 50% and 30% of incorporated Arct'Alg{sup R} was released from PVP and PVA hydrogel membrane devices respectively. (author)

  9. Validation of kinetic modeling of progesterone release from polymeric membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia Irma Romero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling in drug release systems is fundamental in development and optimization of these systems, since it allows to predict drug release rates and to elucidate the physical transport mechanisms involved. In this paper we validate a novel mathematical model that describes progesterone (Prg controlled release from poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB membranes. A statistical analysis was conducted to compare the fitting of our model with six different models and the Akaike information criterion (AIC was used to find the equation with best-fit. A simple relation between mass and drug released rate was found, which allows predicting the effect of Prg loads on the release behavior. Our proposed model was the one with minimum AIC value, and therefore it was the one that statistically fitted better the experimental data obtained for all the Prg loads tested. Furthermore, the initial release rate was calculated and therefore, the interface mass transfer coefficient estimated and the equilibrium distribution constant of Prg between the PHB and the release medium was also determined. The results lead us to conclude that our proposed model is the one which best fits the experimental data and can be successfully used to describe Prg drug release in PHB membranes.

  10. Modulation of Tenoxicam release from hydrophilic matrix: modulator membrane versus rate-controlling membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabarawi, Mohamed Ahmed

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes the preparation of two layered device comprising of tenoxicam containing layer and a drug free membrane layer based on Geomatrix Technology. Our device based on bilaminated films which produced by a casting/solvent evaporation technique. The drug-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) layer was covered by drug free membrane layer composed of a mixture of different ratios of HPMC and ethyl cellulose (EC). The prepared devices were evaluated for thickness, weight, drug content uniformity, water absorption capacity and in-vitro drug release. The films were also evaluated for appearance, smoothness and transparency. The influence of drug free membrane layer composition and thickness on the drug release pattern was studied on 12 devices (D1 to D12). The results indicate that, the release of drug from HPMC matrixes without the drug free membrane layer was fast and follows diffusion controlled mechanism. The release of drug from the devices D1, D4, D9 and D12 follow the same mechanism, while the release of drug from other devices become linear with time (zero order) and extended for long time especially when thickness and the ratio of EC was increased in the drug free membrane layer. From this study it is concluded that, changing the geometry of drug layer by addition of drug free membrane layer and changing its composition and thickness plays an important role in determining whether the drug free membrane layer is rate-controlling or modulator membrane. Hence it can facilitate the development of different pharmaceutical products with different release pattern.

  11. Ultrastructural analysis of nanoparticles and ions released in periprosthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Maurizio; Gatti, Giorgio; Renò, Filippo; Bosetti, Michela; Marchese, Leonardo; Cannas, Mario

    2014-12-30

    The distribution and relationship of hydroxyapatite debris, nanometric organic and metal wear particles and metal ions on periimplant interface membranes following aseptic and septic arthroplastic loosening were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopic analysis were used to analyze debris and ion distribution. Hydroxyapatite debris appeared with different morphology in a particular distribution among several membranes. These differences may reflect the occurrence of different friction forces taking place between prosthesis and bone interface in the several types of prostheses studied. Metal wear particles were detected in greater numbers in membranes from noncemented prostheses compared with those from cemented ones. In contrast, more organic particles were present in membrane from cemented prosthesis. No differences were observed between aseptic and septic membranes. Our findings support the need to evaluate the occurrence of friction forces that periprosthetic bone debris production may induce to exacerbate cellular reactivity. Furthermore, cellular engulfment of debris and the high level of different ions released indicate the occurrence of a toxic environment that may induce failure of any reparative pathways.

  12. PH-triggered micellar membrane for controlled release microchips

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaoqiang

    2011-01-01

    A pH-responsive membrane based on polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymer was developed on a model glass microchip as a promising controlled polymer delivery system. The PS-b-P4VP copolymer assembles into spherical and/or worm-like micelles with styrene block cores and pyridine coronas in selective solvents. The self-assembled worm-like morphology exhibited pH-responsive behaviour due to the protonation of the P4VP block at low pH and it\\'s deprotonation at high pH and thus constituting a switchable "off/on" system. Doxorubicin (Dox) was used as cargo to test the PS-b-P4VP membrane. Luminescence experiments indicated that the membrane was able to store Dox molecules within its micellar structure at neutral pH and then release them as soon as the pH was raised to 8.0. The performance of the cast membrane was predictable and most importantly reproducible. The physiochemical and biological properties were also investigated carefully in terms of morphology, cell viability and cell uptake. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Nanoparticle-triggered release from lipid membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimhult, Erik

    2015-12-25

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. We highlight how recent developments in iron oxide nanoparticle design and understanding of nanoparticle membrane interactions have led to applications in magnetically triggered, liposome delivery vehicles with controlled structure. Nanoscale vesicles actuated by incorporated nanoparticles allow for controlling location and timing of compound release, which enables e.g. use of more potent drugs in drug delivery as the interaction with the right target is ensured. This review emphasizes recent results on the connection between nanoparticle design, vesicle assembly and the stability and release properties of the vesicles. While focused on lipid vesicles magnetically actuated through iron oxide nanoparticles, these insights are of general interest for the design of capsule and cell delivery systems for biotechnology controlled by nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Atomic force microscopy analysis of synthetic membranes applied in release studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olejnik, Anna; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We compare eight synthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy. • We predict the behavior of membranes in the release experiments. • The polymeric synthetic membranes varied in shape and size. • We detect substructures in pores of cellulose esters and nylon membranes. • Substructures limit the release rate of active compound. - Abstract: Synthetic membranes are commonly used in drug release studies and are applied mostly in quality control. They contain pores through which the drug can be diffused directly into the receptor fluid. Investigation of synthetic membranes permits determination of their structure and characterization of their properties. We suggest that the preliminary characterization of the membranes can be relevant to the interpretation of the release results. The aim of this study was to compare eight synthetic membranes by using atomic force microscopy in order to predict and understand their behavior in the release experiments. The results proved that polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was not suitable for the release study of tetrapeptide due to its hydrophobic nature, thickness and the specific structure with high trapezoid shaped blocks. The additional substructures in pores of mixed cellulose esters and nylon membranes detected by AFM influenced the diffusion rate of the active compound. These findings indicate that the selection of the membrane for the release studies should be performed cautiously by taking into consideration the membrane properties and by analyzing them prior the experiment.

  15. Membrane sialic acid influences basophil histamine release by interfering with calcium dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Norn, S; Skov, P S

    1987-01-01

    by insertion of sialic acid containing gangliosides into the membrane inhibited the mediator release. The reduction in membrane sialic acid content abolished the inhibitory capacity of the calcium channel antagonist nimodipine, whereas the inhibition produced by verapamil and lanthanum was not affected....... This difference, together with the previous finding that alterations in membrane sialic acid content is reflected in the cell sensitivity to extracellular calcium, suggest an interaction between membrane sialic acid and the calcium channels involved in basophil histamine release....

  16. Drug release assays from new chitosan/pHEMA membranes obtained by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casimiro, M.H.; Gil, M.H.; Leal, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    With the purpose of obtaining a biocompatible and microbiologically safe matrix that simultaneously could be used as wound dressing material and as a controlled drug release system, membranes with different thickness and different contents in chitosan and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) have been prepared by γ irradiation from a 60 Co source. Antibiotic release experiments were performed before or after irradiation over amoxicillin loaded chitosan/pHEMA membranes in physiological saline solution, and monitored by UV-Vis spectrometry. Results point out a fast amoxicillin release with similar release profile in all studied membranes. The amount of released drug was shown to be dependent on membranes network crosslinking due composition, radiation and membrane thickness

  17. Drug release assays from new chitosan/pHEMA membranes obtained by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casimiro, M.H. [Department of Physics, Nuclear and Technological Institute, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)], E-mail: casimiro@itn.pt; Gil, M.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra, Polo II Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal); Leal, J.P. [Department of Chemistry, Nuclear and Technological Institute, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Chemistry and Biochemistry Centre and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-12-15

    With the purpose of obtaining a biocompatible and microbiologically safe matrix that simultaneously could be used as wound dressing material and as a controlled drug release system, membranes with different thickness and different contents in chitosan and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) have been prepared by {gamma} irradiation from a {sup 60}Co source. Antibiotic release experiments were performed before or after irradiation over amoxicillin loaded chitosan/pHEMA membranes in physiological saline solution, and monitored by UV-Vis spectrometry. Results point out a fast amoxicillin release with similar release profile in all studied membranes. The amount of released drug was shown to be dependent on membranes network crosslinking due composition, radiation and membrane thickness.

  18. Vesicle-Mediated Transfer of Virulence Genes from Escherichia coli O157:H7 to Other Enteric Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Yaron, Sima; Kolling, Glynis L.; Simon, Lee; Matthews, Karl R.

    2000-01-01

    Membrane vesicles are released from the surfaces of many gram-negative bacteria during growth. Vesicles consist of proteins, lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, RNA, and DNA. Results of the present study demonstrate that membrane vesicles isolated from the food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 facilitate the transfer of genes, which are then expressed by recipient Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis or E. coli JM109. Electron micrographs of purified DNA from E. coli O157:H7 vesicles...

  19. The membrane fraction of homogenized rat kidney contains an enzyme that releases epidermal growth factor from the kidney membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1991-01-01

    High levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) are excreted in the urine and high levels of mRNA for the EGF-precursor have been demonstrated in the kidney. The EGF-precursor is a membrane bound peptide in the kidney, but little is known about the renal processing of the precursor. The present stud....... The EGF releasing enzyme is inhibited by the serine proteinase inhibitor aprotinin and by low temperatures (4 degrees C). The pH optimum of the reaction is pH 7.5-8.0....... shows that the membrane fraction of homogenized rat kidney contains an enzyme that releases immuno and receptor reactive EGF from the kidney membranes when incubated at 37 degrees C. Gel filtration shows that the EGF reactivity released from the membranes is similar to the EGF reactivity in rat urine...

  20. A comparison of gaseous emboli release in five membrane oxygenators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, P D; Shinko, P D; Sites, J P

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the air handling capability of five currently used membrane oxygenators: the Avecor Affinity, the Bentley SpiralGold, the Medtronic Maxima Plus, the Sarns Turbo and the Sorin Monolyth M. A circuit was constructed to include a hardshell venous reservoir and roller pump. Pressure monitoring sites and ultrasonic microbubble detection probes were located proximal and distal to the oxygenator. An air injection/infusion site was provided proximal to the roller pump inlet. Each circuit was primed with fresh anticoagulated bovine blood, adjusted to a haematocrit of 25% and maintained at 38 +/- 1 degree C. Three different bolus amounts of air (10, 20 and 40 cm3) were injected at three blood flow rates (3, 4.5 and 6 l/min). A 1-min infusion of air delivered at 1 ml/s was also administered at three blood flow rates (3, 4.5 and 6 l/min). The hardshell reservoir was also completely emptied at each flow rate to simulate a massive air infusion. At any given blood flow, outlet microbubble counts were usually higher with greater bolus amounts of air. When indexed to the inlet bubble counts, the following average percent microbubbles were released from the outlet: Turbo 25%, Affinity 7%, Monolyth 5%, Maxima 3% and SpiralGold 1%. With a constant air infusion of 1 ml/s, greater outlet microbubble counts were associated with higher blood flow rates. Again, when indexed to the inlet bubble counts, the following average percent microbubbles were released from the outlet: Turbo 44%, Affinity 25%, Maxima 19%, Monolyth 16% and SpiralGold 0%. All oxygenators deprimed when the hardshell reservoir was emptied and all shed microbubbles into the outlet blood except the SpiralGold. The results of this study indicate that air handling is not a simple function of blood flow pattern (i.e. top to bottom versus bottom to top), but also includes dynamics associated with oxygenator design, fibre arrangement and flow resistance.

  1. An investigation into solvent-membrane interactions when assessing drug release from organic vehicles using regenerated cellulose membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Monica L; Brown, Marc B; Moss, Gary P; Jones, Stuart A

    2008-09-01

    The influence of organic solvents on artificial membranes when assessing drug release from topical formulations is, generally, poorly characterised yet current guidelines require no characterisation of the membrane before, during or after an experiment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of solvent-membrane interactions when using in-vitro Franz cell methods for the assessment of corticosteroid release and to assess compliance or otherwise with Higuchi's equation. The rate of beclometasone dipropionate monohydrate (BDP) and betamethasone 17-valerate (BMV) release across a regenerated cellulose membrane (RCM), from both saturated solutions and commercial formulations, was determined. Increasing the ratio of organic solvent, compared with aqueous phase, in the donor fluid (DF) resulted in up to a 416-fold increase in steady-state flux. Further, alterations in the receiver fluid (RF) composition caused, in some cases, 337-fold increases in flux. Analysis indicated that the RCM remained chemically unchanged, that its pore size remained constant and that no drug partitioned into the membrane, regardless of the DF or RF employed. However, it was observed that the organic solvents had a thinning effect on the RCM, resulting in enhanced flux, which was potentially due to the variation in the diffusional path length. Such findings raise issues of the veracity of data produced from any membrane release study involving a comparison of formulations with differing solvent content.

  2. Atomic force microscopy analysis of synthetic membranes applied in release studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Anna; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic membranes are commonly used in drug release studies and are applied mostly in quality control. They contain pores through which the drug can be diffused directly into the receptor fluid. Investigation of synthetic membranes permits determination of their structure and characterization of their properties. We suggest that the preliminary characterization of the membranes can be relevant to the interpretation of the release results. The aim of this study was to compare eight synthetic membranes by using atomic force microscopy in order to predict and understand their behavior in the release experiments. The results proved that polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was not suitable for the release study of tetrapeptide due to its hydrophobic nature, thickness and the specific structure with high trapezoid shaped blocks. The additional substructures in pores of mixed cellulose esters and nylon membranes detected by AFM influenced the diffusion rate of the active compound. These findings indicate that the selection of the membrane for the release studies should be performed cautiously by taking into consideration the membrane properties and by analyzing them prior the experiment.

  3. Choleragen-stimulated release of guanyl nucleotides from turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, D L; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1982-01-10

    Choleragen stimulates adenylate cyclase by ADP ribosylating a guanyl nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G/F). beta-Adrenergic hormones also activate the adenylate cyclase of turkey erythrocytes, and it is currently believed that they do so in part by decreasing the affinity of G/F factor for GDP, an effect which is manifested by a hormone-stimulated release of guanyl nucleotides from the membranes. Since choleragen might also activate adenylate cyclase by a similar mechanism, the effect of toxin treatment on the release of guanyl nucleotides from turkey erythrocyte membranes was examined. In the presence of NAD, choleragen was found to stimulate release of guanyl nucleotides from membranes which had been preloaded with radiolabeled GTP. No stimulation of release was observed with cAMP or when NAD was replaced by NADP, which does not serve as a substrate for choleragen-catalyzed ADP ribosylation. While either isoproterenol or choleragen can stimulate release of guanyl nucleotides from the membranes, the amount of guanyl nucleotide released in the presence of both isoproterenol and choleragen was no greater than that released by isoproterenol alone. Furthermore, when membranes were first treated with choleragen and NAD, the subsequent release of guanyl nucleotides induced by isoproterenol was reduced to approximately 15% of that observed with membranes not treated with the toxin. Therefore, choleragen may enhance release of guanine nucleotides from sites on the membranes that are also affected by beta-adrenergic agonists, sites which are thought to correspond to G/F. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that choleragen may stimulate adenylate cyclase, in part, by enhancing release of guanyl nucleotides, a mechanism similar to that of beta-adrenergic agonists.

  4. Lateral release of proteins from the TOM complex into the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Max; Neupert, Walter; Deponte, Marcel

    2011-07-15

    The TOM complex of the outer membrane of mitochondria is the entry gate for the vast majority of precursor proteins that are imported into the mitochondria. It is made up by receptors and a protein conducting channel. Although precursor proteins of all subcompartments of mitochondria use the TOM complex, it is not known whether its channel can only mediate passage across the outer membrane or also lateral release into the outer membrane. To study this, we have generated fusion proteins of GFP and Tim23 which are inserted into the inner membrane and, at the same time, are spanning either the TOM complex or are integrated into the outer membrane. Our results demonstrate that the TOM complex, depending on sequence determinants in the precursors, can act both as a protein conducting pore and as an insertase mediating lateral release into the outer membrane.

  5. InAs migration on released, wrinkled InGaAs membranes used as virtual substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipe Covre da Silva, S; Lanzoni, E M; De Araujo Barboza, V; Deneke, Ch; Malachias, A; Kiravittaya, S

    2014-01-01

    Partly released, relaxed and wrinkled InGaAs membranes are used as virtual substrates for overgrowth with InAs. Such samples exhibit different lattice parameters for the unreleased epitaxial parts, the released flat, back-bond areas and the released wrinkled areas. A large InAs migration towards the released membrane is observed with a material accumulation on top of the freestanding wrinkles during overgrowth. A semi-quantitative analysis of the misfit strain shows that the material migrates to the areas of the sample with the lowest misfit strain, which we consider as the areas of the lowest chemical potential of the surface. Material migration is also observed for the edge-supported, freestanding InGaAs membranes found on these samples. Our results show that the released, wrinkled nanomembranes offer a growth template for InAs deposition that fundamentally changes the migration behavior of the deposited material on the growth surface. (paper)

  6. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M; Romano, Fabian B; Heuck, Alejandro P; Hebert, Daniel N

    2013-06-04

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results revealed that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-3-indacene-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of 1-5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers.

  7. Fusion of Selected Cells and Vesicles Mediated by Optically Trapped Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahadori, Azra

    . In this work, we introduce a novel and extremely flexible physical method which can trigger membrane fusion in a highly selective manner not only between synthetic GUVs of different compositions, but also between live cells which remain viable after fusion. Optical tweezers’ laser (1064 nm) is used to position......Selective fusion of two membrane surrounded volumes is of great interest in nanochemistry and nanomedicine as it can pave the way for performing controlled nanoscale chemical reactions and for delivering a cargo (e.g., chemicals, genetic regulatory factors, etc.) to a desired living cell...... the two desired cells and/or GUVs next to each other and in immediate contact. Then, the same laser is placed in the contact zone between the two adjacent membranes until one or more gold nanoparticles diffuse into the focus. Gold nanoparticles absorb part of near infrared light and dissipate the absorbed...

  8. Design Considerations for Silica-Particle-Doped Nitric-Oxide-Releasing Polyurethane Glucose Biosensor Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Robert J; Schofield, Jonathon B; Walter, Shaylyn E; Malone-Povolny, Maggie J; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2017-01-27

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing polymers have proven useful for improving the biocompatibility of in vivo glucose biosensors. Unfortunately, leaching of the NO donor from the polymer matrix remains a critical design flaw of NO-releasing membranes. Herein, a toolbox of NO-releasing silica nanoparticles (SNPs) was utilized to systematically evaluate SNP leaching from a diverse selection of biomedical-grade polyurethane sensor membranes. Glucose sensor analytical performance and NO-release kinetics from the sensor membranes were also evaluated as a function of particle and polyurethane (PU) chemistries. Particles modified with N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors were prone to leaching from PU membranes due to the zwitterionic nature of the NO donor modification. Leaching was minimized (formulation (HP-93A-100 PU), while particles with greater degrees of thiol modification did not leach from any of the PUs tested. A functional glucose sensor was developed using an optimized HP-93A-100 PU membrane doped with RSNO-modified SNPs as the outer, glucose diffusion-limiting layer. The realized sensor design responded linearly to physiological concentrations of glucose (minimum 1-21 mM) over 2 weeks incubation in PBS and released NO at >0.8 pmol cm -2 s -1 for up to 6 days with no detectable (<0.6%) particle leaching.

  9. Relationship between presynaptic membrane potential and acetylcholine release in synaptosomes from Torpedo electric organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, F M

    1984-01-01

    The membrane potential of purely cholinergic synaptosomes isolated from Torpedo electric organ was monitored with fluorescent carbocyanine dyes. An increased fluorescence was associated with depolarization and a quenching with hyperpolarization. Fluorescence data provided evidence that Torpedo synaptosomes have a membrane potential mainly driven by a K+ diffusion potential and a membrane potential of about -50 mV could be estimated after calibration of fluorescence signals with ionophore antibiotics. The release of acetylcholine (ACh) from Torpedo synaptosomes was monitored continuously by measuring the light emitted by a chemiluminescent method (Israël & Lesbats, 1981 a). Using fluorescence data, the release of ACh was expressed as a function of membrane potential. The relationship between presynaptic potential and transmitter release as determined by biochemical methods at cholinergic nerve endings showed striking similarities to that observed at the squid giant synapse. Several substances were also tested with regard to their depolarizing and releasing properties and it was found that the toxin isolated from the venom of the annelid Glycera convoluta, which induced a large increase in quantal release of transmitter (Manaranche, Thieffry, & Israël, 1980) promoted a depolarization of Torpedo synaptosomes in addition to ACh release. PMID:6207289

  10. Release of DNA from cryogel PVA-DNA membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA hydrogels have been used for numerous biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, as a consequence of their non-toxic, non-carcinogenic and bioadhesive properties. In this communication the effect of different factors, such as type of electrolyte, ionic strength, temperature (ranging from 20 to 40°C and cationic surfactants on the distribution coefficients (α and release rate constants (kR of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA from PVA-DNA blend gel matrices (of a sheet shape, will be presented and discussed. The release kinetic constant and the distribution coefficient of DNA are quite sensitive to the surrounding matrix media (e.g., kR ranges from 1.5•10–8 to 4.7•10–7 s–1. The analysis of the temperature dependence on kR shows that the activation energy for the DNA desorption to an aqueous solution is equal to 21.2 kJ/mol. These results constitute a step forward towards the design of controlled DNA release PVA-based devices.

  11. Structure and function of ABCG2-rich extracellular vesicles mediating multidrug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Goler-Baron

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major impediment to curative cancer chemotherapy. The ATP-Binding Cassette transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC2 form a unique defense network against multiple structurally and functionally distinct chemotherapeutics, thereby resulting in MDR. Thus, deciphering novel mechanisms of MDR and their overcoming is a major goal of cancer research. Recently we have shown that overexpression of ABCG2 in the membrane of novel extracellular vesicles (EVs in breast cancer cells results in mitoxantrone resistance due to its dramatic sequestration in EVs. However, nothing is known about EVs structure, biogenesis and their ability to concentrate multiple antitumor agents. To this end, we here found that EVs are structural and functional homologues of bile canaliculi, are apically localized, sealed structures reinforced by an actin-based cytoskeleton and secluded from the extracellular milieu by the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. Apart from ABCG2, ABCB1 and ABCC2 were also selectively targeted to the membrane of EVs. Moreover, Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein complex selectively localized to the border of the EVs membrane, suggesting a key role for the tethering of MDR pumps to the actin cytoskeleton. The ability of EVs to concentrate and sequester different antitumor drugs was also explored. Taking advantage of the endogenous fluorescence of anticancer drugs, we found that EVs-forming breast cancer cells display high level resistance to topotecan, imidazoacridinones and methotrexate via efficient intravesicular drug concentration hence sequestering them away from their cellular targets. Thus, we identified a new modality of anticancer drug compartmentalization and resistance in which multiple chemotherapeutics are actively pumped from the cytoplasm and highly concentrated within the lumen of EVs via a network of MDR transporters differentially targeted to the EVs membrane. We propose a composite model for the structure and

  12. Electrospun Gelatin/poly(Glycerol Sebacate Membrane with Controlled Release of Antibiotics for Wound Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Shirazaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important risk that threatens the skin wounds is infections. Therefore, fabrication of a membrane as a wound dressing with the ability of antibiotic delivery in a proper delivery rate is especially important. Materials and Methods: Poly(glycerol sebacate (PGS was prepared from sebacic acid and glycerol with 1:1 ratio; then, it was added to gelatin in the 1:3 ratio and was dissolved in 80% (v/v acetic acid, and finally, ciprofloxacin was added in 10% (w/v of polymer solution. The gelatin/PGS membrane was fabricated using an electrospinning method. The membrane was cross-linked using ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiim (EDC and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS in different time periods to achieve a proper drug release rate. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy was being used to manifest the peaks of polymers and drug in the membrane. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to evaluate the morphology, fibers diameter, pore size, and porosity before and after crosslinking process. Ultraviolet (UV-visible spectrophotometry was used to show the ciprofloxacin release from the cross-linked membrane. Results: FTIR analysis showed the characteristic peaks of gelatin, PGS, and ciprofloxacin without any added peaks after the crosslinking process. SEM images revealed that nanofibers' size increased during the crosslinking process and porosity was higher than 80% before and after crosslinking process. UV-visible spectrophotometry showed the proper rate of ciprofloxacin release occurred from cross-linked membrane that remaining in EDC/NHS ethanol solution for 120 min. Conclusion: The obtained results suggest that this recently developed gelatin/PGS membrane with controlled release of ciprofloxacin could be a promising biodegradable membrane for wound dressing.

  13. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  14. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  15. Controlled drug release from cross-linked κ-carrageenan/hyaluronic acid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aassar, M R; El Fawal, G F; Kamoun, Elbadawy A; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2015-01-01

    In this work, hydrogel membrane composed of; kappa carrageenan (κC) and hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinked with epichlorohydrine is produced. The optimum condition has been established based on their water absorption properties. Tensile strength (TS) and elongation (E%) for the formed films are evaluated. The obtained films were characterized by FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis. All membranes were loaded with l-carnosine as a drug model. The swelling properties and kinetics of the release of the model drug from the crosslinked hydrogel membrane were monitored in buffer medium at 37°C. The equilibrium swelling of films showed fair dependency on the high presence of HA in the hydrogel. Moreover, the cumulative release profile increased significantly and ranged from 28% to 93%, as HA increases. SEM explored that, the porosity increased by increasing HA content; consequently, drug release into the pores and channels of the membranes is facilitated. In addition, water uptake % increased as well. A slight change in TS occurred by increasing the HA% to κC, while the highest value of strain for κC membrane was 498.38% by using 3% HA. The thermal stability of the κC/HA was higher than that of HA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypersonic Poration of Membranes : From Triggered Release and Encapsulation to Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Yao

    2018-01-01

    In this thesis, hypersonic poration is introduced as a new physical method to precisely control membrane permeability for the applications of controlled release and encapsulation, and enhanced drug delivery. Bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators of gigahertz (GHz) frequency have been fabricated using

  17. Novel meloxicam releasing electrospun polymer/ceramic reinforced biodegradable membranes for periodontal regeneration applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yar, Muhammad; Farooq, Ariba; Shahzadi, Lubna; Khan, Abdul Samad; Mahmood, Nasir; Rauf, Abdul; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham ur

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with the destruction of periodontal tissues, along with other disorders/problems including inflammation of tissues and severe pain. This paper reports the synthesis of meloxicam (MX) immobilized biodegradable chitosan (CS)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/hydroxyapatite (HA) based electrospun (e-spun) fibers and films. Electrospinning was employed to produce drug loaded fibrous mats, whereas films were generated by solvent casting method. In-vitro drug release from materials containing varying concentrations of MX revealed that the scaffolds containing higher amount of drug showed comparatively faster release. During initial first few hours fast release was noted from membranes and films; however after around 5 h sustained release was achieved. The hydrogels showed good swelling property, which is highly desired for soft tissue engineered implants. To investigate the biocompatibility of our synthesized materials, VERO cells (epithelial cells) were selected and cell culture results showed that these all materials were non-cytotoxic and also these cells were very well proliferated on these synthesized scaffolds. These properties along with the anti-inflammatory potential of our fabricated materials suggest their effective utilization in periodontital treatments. - Highlights: • NSAIDs releasing scaffolds for periodontal regeneration applications • Meloxicam immobilized biodegradable nanocomposite electrospun membranes and films • Good swelling properties • Controlled drug release • VERO cells were very well proliferated and synthesized materials were found to be non-cytotoxic.

  18. Novel meloxicam releasing electrospun polymer/ceramic reinforced biodegradable membranes for periodontal regeneration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yar, Muhammad, E-mail: drmyar@ciitlahore.edu.pk [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Farooq, Ariba [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Shahzadi, Lubna; Khan, Abdul Samad [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Mahmood, Nasir [Department of Allied Health Sciences and Chemical Pathology, Department of Human Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Rauf, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rehman, Ihtesham ur [Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Kroto Research Institute, The University of Sheffield, North Campus, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with the destruction of periodontal tissues, along with other disorders/problems including inflammation of tissues and severe pain. This paper reports the synthesis of meloxicam (MX) immobilized biodegradable chitosan (CS)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/hydroxyapatite (HA) based electrospun (e-spun) fibers and films. Electrospinning was employed to produce drug loaded fibrous mats, whereas films were generated by solvent casting method. In-vitro drug release from materials containing varying concentrations of MX revealed that the scaffolds containing higher amount of drug showed comparatively faster release. During initial first few hours fast release was noted from membranes and films; however after around 5 h sustained release was achieved. The hydrogels showed good swelling property, which is highly desired for soft tissue engineered implants. To investigate the biocompatibility of our synthesized materials, VERO cells (epithelial cells) were selected and cell culture results showed that these all materials were non-cytotoxic and also these cells were very well proliferated on these synthesized scaffolds. These properties along with the anti-inflammatory potential of our fabricated materials suggest their effective utilization in periodontital treatments. - Highlights: • NSAIDs releasing scaffolds for periodontal regeneration applications • Meloxicam immobilized biodegradable nanocomposite electrospun membranes and films • Good swelling properties • Controlled drug release • VERO cells were very well proliferated and synthesized materials were found to be non-cytotoxic.

  19. [Oxidation of mercury by CuBr2 decomposition under controlled-release membrane catalysis condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin-Gang; Qu, Zan; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Guo, Yong-Fu; Xie, Jiang-Kun; Jia, Jin-Ping

    2014-02-01

    CuBr2 in the multi-porous ceramic membrane can release Br2 at high temperature, which was employed as the oxidant for Hg0 oxidation. Hg0 oxidation efficiency was studied by a membrane catalysis device. Meanwhile, a reaction and in situ monitoring device was designed to avoid the impact of Br2 on the downstream pipe. The result showed that the MnO(x)/alpha-Al2O3 catalysis membrane had a considerable "controlled-release" effect on Br2 produced by CuBr2 decomposition. The adsorption and reaction of Hg0 and Br2 on the surface of catalysis membrane obeyed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The removal efficiency of Hg0 increased with the rising of Br2 concentration. However, when Br2 reached a certain concentration, the removal efficiency was limited by adsorption rate and reaction rate of Hg0 and Br2 on the catalysis membrane. From 473 K to 573 K, the variation of Hg0 oxidation efficiency was relatively stable. SO2 in flue gas inhibited the oxidation of Hg0 while NO displayed no obvious effect.

  20. Immobilization and release study of a red alga extract in hydrogel membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Renata Hage

    2009-01-01

    In pharmaceutical technology hydrogel is the most used among the polymeric matrices due to its wide application and functionality, primarily in drug delivery system. In view of the large advance innovations in cosmetic products, both through the introduction of new active agents as the matrices used for its controlled release, the objective of this study was to evaluate the release and immobilization of a natural active agent, the Arct'Alg in hydrogel membranes to obtain a release device for cosmetics. Arct'Alg is an aqueous extract which has excellent anti-oxidant, lipolytic, anti-inflammatory and cytostimulant action. Study on mechanical and physical-chemical properties and biocompatibility in vitro of hydrogel membranes of poly(vinyl-2- pyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) obtained by ionizing radiation crosslinking have been performed. The physical-chemical characterization of polymeric matrices was carried out by gel fraction and swelling tests and biocompatibility by in vitro test of cytotoxicity by using the technique of neutral red incorporation. In the gel fraction test, both the PVP and PVA hydrogel showed a high crosslinking degree. The PVP hydrogel showed a greater percentage of swelling in relation to PVA and the cytotoxicity test of the hydrogels showed non-toxicity effect. The cytostimulation property of Arct'Alg was verified by the cytostimulation test with rabbit skin cells, it was showed an increase at about 50% of the cells when in contact with 0,5% of active agent. The hydrogel membranes prepared with 3% of Arct'Alg were subjected to the release test in an incubator at 37 degree C and aliquots collected during the test were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results obtained in the kinetics of release showed that the PVP hydrogel membranes released about 50% of Arct'Alg incorporated and the PVA hydrogel membranes at about 30%. In the cytostimulation test of released Arct'Alg, the PVP device showed an

  1. Vesicle-mediated transfer of virulence genes from Escherichia coli O157:H7 to other enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, S; Kolling, G L; Simon, L; Matthews, K R

    2000-10-01

    Membrane vesicles are released from the surfaces of many gram-negative bacteria during growth. Vesicles consist of proteins, lipopolysaccharide, phospholipids, RNA, and DNA. Results of the present study demonstrate that membrane vesicles isolated from the food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 facilitate the transfer of genes, which are then expressed by recipient Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis or E. coli JM109. Electron micrographs of purified DNA from E. coli O157:H7 vesicles showed large rosette-like structures, linear DNA fragments, and small open-circle plasmids. PCR analysis of vesicle DNA demonstrated the presence of specific genes from host and recombinant plasmids (hly, L7095, mobA, and gfp), chromosomal DNA (uidA and eaeA), and phage DNA (stx1 and stx2). The results of PCR and the Vero cell assay demonstrate that genetic material, including virulence genes, is transferred to recipient bacteria and subsequently expressed. The cytotoxicity of the transformed enteric bacteria was sixfold higher than that of the parent isolate (E. coli JM109). Utilization of the nonhost plasmid (pGFP) permitted the evaluation of transformation efficiency (ca. 10(3) transformants microg of DNA(-1)) and demonstrated that vesicles can deliver antibiotic resistance. Transformed E. coli JM109 cells were resistant to ampicillin and fluoresced a brilliant green. The role vesicles play in genetic exchange between different species in the environment or host has yet to be defined.

  2. Dynamics of dye release from nanocarriers of different types in model cell membranes and living cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkacheva T. N.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the dynamics of lipophilic content release from nanocarriers of different types, organic molecular ensembles and inorganic nanoparticles (NPs in vitro experiments. Methods. Two-channel ratiometric fluorescence detection method based on Forster Resonance Energy Transfer, fluorescent spectroscopy and micro-spectroscopy have been used. Results. It has been found that the profiles of lipophilic dyes release from organic nanocarriers (PC liposomes and SDS micelles and inorganic ones (GdYVO4:Eu3+ and CeO2 NPs are well fitted by the first-order reaction kinetics in both model cell membranes and living cells (rat hepatocytes. The dye release constants (K and half-lives (t1/2 were analyzed. Conclusions. GdYVO4:Eu3+ and CeO2 NPs have been shown to provide faster lipophilic content release in model cell membranes as compared to PC liposomes. Negatively charged or lipophilic compounds added into nanocarriers can decrease the rate of lipophilic dyes release. Specific interaction of GdYVO4:Eu3+ NPs with rat hepatocytes has been observed.

  3. Membrane Vesicle Release in Bacteria, Eukaryotes, and Archaea: a Conserved yet Underappreciated Aspect of Microbial Life

    OpenAIRE

    Deatherage, Brooke L.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of microbes with their environment depends on features of the dynamic microbial surface throughout cell growth and division. Surface modifications, whether used to acquire nutrients, defend against other microbes, or resist the pressures of a host immune system, facilitate adaptation to unique surroundings. The release of bioactive membrane vesicles (MVs) from the cell surface is conserved across microbial life, in bacteria, archaea, fungi, and parasites. MV production occurs not ...

  4. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits intracellular calcium release in beta-cells by a plasma membrane-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongmin; Ren, Min; Bing, Xinyu; Stotts, Corey; Deorah, Sundeep; Love-Homan, Laurie; Dillon, Joseph S

    2006-08-01

    Both dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) affect glucose stimulated insulin secretion, though their cellular mechanisms of action are not well characterized. We tested the hypothesis that human physiological concentrations of DHEA alter insulin secretion by an action initiated at the plasma membrane of beta-cells. DHEA alone had no effect on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in a rat beta-cell line (INS-1). However, it caused an immediate and dose-dependent inhibition of carbachol-induced Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, with a 25% inhibition at zero. One nanometer DHEA. DHEA also inhibited the Ca(2+) mobilizing effect of bombesin (29% decrease), but did not inhibit the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) evoked by glyburide (100 microM) or glucose (15 mM). The steroids (androstenedione, 17-alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, and DHEAS) had no inhibitory effect on carbachol-induced intracellular Ca(2+) release. The action of DHEA depended on a signal initiated at the plasma membrane, since membrane impermeant DHEA-BSA complexes also inhibited the carbachol effect on [Ca(2+)](i) (39% decrease). The inhibition of carbachol-induced Ca(2+) release by DHEA was blocked by pertussis toxin (PTX). DHEA also inhibited the carbachol induction of phosphoinositide generation, with a maximal inhibition at 0.1 nM DHEA. Furthermore, DHEA inhibited insulin secretion induced by carbachol in INS-1 cells by 25%, and in human pancreatic islets by 53%. Taken together, this is the first report showing that human physiological concentrations of DHEA decrease agonist-induced Ca(2+) release by a rapid, non-genomic mechanism in INS-1 cells. Furthermore, these data provide evidence consistent with the existence of a specific plasma membrane DHEA receptor, mediating this signal transduction pathway by pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins.

  5. Voltage dependence of membrane charge movement and calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, R F; Best, P M; James-Kracke, M R

    1985-08-01

    Voltage dependent membrane charge movement (gating current) and the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores have been measured simultaneously in intact frog skeletal muscle fibres. Charge movement was measured using the three microelectrode voltage clamp technique. Ca2+ release was measured using the metallochromic indicator dye arsenazo III. Fibres were bathed in 2.3 X hypertonic solutions to prevent contraction. Rb+, tetraethylammonium and tetrodotoxin (TTX) were used to eliminate voltage-dependent ionic currents. The maximum rate of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in response to voltage-clamp step depolarizations to 0 mV was calculated using the dye-related parameters of model 2 of Baylor et al. (1983) and a method described in the Appendix for calculating a scaling factor (1 + p) that accounts for the additional Ca2+ buffering power of the indicator dye. The estimates of the maximum rate of Ca2+ release at 5-6 degrees C ranged from 3 to 19 microM ms-1 in the 17 fibres examined. The mean value was 8.9 +/- 1.1 microM ms-1 (S.E.M.) The maximum rate of Ca2+ release was linearly related to the magnitude of the nonlinear membrane change moved during suprathreshold depolarizing steps. The voltage dependence of charge movement and the maximum rate of Ca2+ releases were nearly identical at 6 degrees C. The voltage-dependence of the delay between the test step and the onset of Ca2+ release could be adequately described by an equation having the same functional form as the voltage dependence of nonlinear charge movement. The relationship between the test pulse voltage and the delay was shifted to more negative voltages and to shorter delays as the temperature was raised from 6 degrees C to 15 degrees C. The inactivation of Ca2+ release was found to occur at more negative holding voltages and to be more steeply voltage dependent than the immobilization of nonlinear membrane charge movement. The above data are discussed using the 'hypothetical coupler' model

  6. Intact transmembrane isoforms of the neural cell adhesion molecule are released from the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M; Krog, L; Edvardsen, K

    1993-01-01

    . By density-gradient centrifugation it was shown that shed transmembrane NCAM-B was present in fractions of high, as well as low, density, indicating that a fraction of the shed NCAM is associated with minor plasma membrane fragments. Finally, it was shown that isolated soluble NCAM inhibited cell binding......-s1 and NCAM-s2 and the function of soluble NCAM forms were investigated. It was shown that all three soluble forms could be released from brain membranes with M(r) values identical to the three major membrane-associated forms: the large transmembrane 190,000-M(r) form (NCAM-A), the smaller...... intact soluble form from membranes of cells transfected with this isoform. Thus, NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 probably represent intact released transmembrane NCAM-A and NCAM-B. The soluble transmembrane forms are likely to exist in vivo, as NCAM-s1 and NCAM-s2 were readily demonstrated in cerebrospinal fluid...

  7. Inhibition of basophil histamine release by gangliosides. Further studies on the significance of cell membrane sialic acid in the histamine release process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C; Norn, S; Thastrup, Ole

    1987-01-01

    Histamine release from human basophils was inhibited by preincubation of the cells with a glucolipid mixture containing sialic acid-containing gangliosides. This was true for histamine release induced by anti-IgE, Concanavalin A and the calcium ionophore A23187, whereas the release induced by S...... with the glucolipid mixture increased the sialic acid content of the cells, and this increase was attributed to an insertion of gangliosides into the cell membrane. The inhibition of histamine release was abolished by increasing the calcium concentration, which substantiates our previous findings that cell membrane...... sialic acid in basophil leukocytes is involved in the regulation of histamine release, possibly by a modulation of the transmembraneous calcium fluxes preceding histamine release....

  8. The SV40 late protein VP4 is a viroporin that forms pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Raghava

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonenveloped viruses are generally released by the timely lysis of the host cell by a poorly understood process. For the nonenveloped virus SV40, virions assemble in the nucleus and then must be released from the host cell without being encapsulated by cellular membranes. This process appears to involve the well-controlled insertion of viral proteins into host cellular membranes rendering them permeable to large molecules. VP4 is a newly identified SV40 gene product that is expressed at late times during the viral life cycle that corresponds to the time of cell lysis. To investigate the role of this late expressed protein in viral release, water-soluble VP4 was expressed and purified as a GST fusion protein from bacteria. Purified VP4 was found to efficiently bind biological membranes and support their disruption. VP4 perforated membranes by directly interacting with the membrane bilayer as demonstrated by flotation assays and the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated into large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. The central hydrophobic domain of VP4 was essential for membrane binding and disruption. VP4 displayed a preference for membranes comprised of lipids that replicated the composition of the plasma membranes over that of nuclear membranes. Phosphatidylethanolamine, a lipid found at high levels in bacterial membranes, was inhibitory against the membrane perforation activity of VP4. The disruption of membranes by VP4 involved the formation of pores of ∼3 nm inner diameter in mammalian cells including permissive SV40 host cells. Altogether, these results support a central role of VP4 acting as a viroporin in the perforation of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release.

  9. Preparation of uniform starch microcapsules by premix membrane emulsion for controlled release of avermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Liu, Baoxia; Yang, Fei; Wang, Xing; Shen, Hong; Wu, Decheng

    2016-01-20

    In recent years, starch microparticles have gained interest in many fields. However, low production, uncontrollable size, and varying size distribution hinder their practical application. Here, we adopt a premix membrane emulsification (PME) method to prepare starch microcapsules at high production rates. The process conditions were optimized to fabricate uniform microcapsules with controllable sizes and narrow size distribution (PDImicrocapsules in situ during the process, we developed a pesticide delivery system that enabled a controlled and consistent release of Av over a period of 2 weeks. Kinetic analysis indicated that the mechanisms of Av release involved non-Fickian and Case-II transport. The diameters (0.70-4.8 μm) of the microcapsules and Av contents (16-47%) were adjusted to achieve suitable release profiles. The results will lay the foundation for further field experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Uptake and release protocol for assessing membrane binding and permeation by way of isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamaloukas, Alekos D; Keller, Sandro; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2007-01-01

    The activity of many biomolecules and drugs crucially depends on whether they bind to biological membranes and whether they translocate to the opposite lipid leaflet and trans aqueous compartment. A general strategy to measure membrane binding and permeation is the uptake and release assay, which compares two apparent equilibrium situations established either by the addition or by the extraction of the solute of interest. Only solutes that permeate the membrane sufficiently fast do not show any dependence on the history of sample preparation. This strategy can be pursued for virtually all membrane-binding solutes, using any method suitable for detecting binding. Here, we present in detail one example that is particularly well developed, namely the nonspecific membrane partitioning and flip-flop of small, nonionic solutes as characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry. A complete set of experiments, including all sample preparation procedures, can typically be accomplished within 2 days. Analogous protocols for studying charged solutes, virtually water-insoluble, hydrophobic compounds or specific ligands are also considered.

  11. A split ubiquitin system to reveal topology and released peptides of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-Ping; Wang, Shuai; Gou, Jin-Ying

    2017-09-02

    Membrane proteins define biological functions of membranes in cells. Extracellular peptides of transmembrane proteins receive signals from pathogens or environments, and are the major targets of drug developments. Despite of their essential roles, membrane proteins remain elusive in topological studies due to technique difficulties in their expressions and purifications. First, the target gene is cloned into a destination vector to fuse with C terminal ubiquitin at the N or C terminus. Then, Cub vector with target gene and Nub WT or Nub G vectors are transformed into AP4 or AP5 yeast cells, respectively. After mating, the diploid cells are dipped onto selection medium to check the growth. Topology of the target protein is determined according to Table 1. We present a split ubiquitin topology (SUT) analysis system to study the topology and truncation peptide of membrane proteins in a simple yeast experiment. In the SUT system, transcription activator (TA) fused with a nucleo-cytoplasmic protein shows strong auto-activation with both positive and negative control vectors. TA fused with the cytoplasmic end of membrane proteins activates reporter genes only with positive control vector with a wild type N terminal ubiquitin (Nub WT ). However, TA fused with the extracellular termini of membrane proteins can't activate reporter genes even with Nub WT . Interestingly,TA fused with the released peptide of a membrane protein shows autoactivation in the SUT system. The SUT system is a simple and fast experimental procedure complementary to computational predictions and large scale proteomic techniques. The preliminary data from SUT are valuable for pathogen recognitions and new drug developments.

  12. Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Localization of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor: Mechanistic Implications for Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Woon Yu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  13. New type of chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin composite membrane for gallic acid encapsulation and controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Gabriela; Neagu, Elena; Tache, Andreia; Radu, G L

    2014-01-01

    A new type of chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin composite membrane have been developed for the encapsulation and controlled release of gallic acid. The morphology of the composite membrane was investigated by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), whereas swelling gallic acid and release properties were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy. The release behavior with pH changes was also explored. The composite membrane based on chitosan/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin with gallic acid included showed improved antioxidant capacities compared to plain chitosan membrane. The information obtained in this study will facilitate the design and preparation of composite membrane based on chitosan and could open a wide range of applications, particularly its use as an antioxidant in food, food packaging, biomedical (biodegradable soft porous scaffolds for enhance the surrounding tissue regeneration), pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries.

  14. Interpenetrating network hydrogel membranes of sodium alginate and poly(vinyl alcohol) for controlled release of prazosin hydrochloride through skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra V; Sreedhar, V; Mutalik, Srinivas; Setty, C Mallikarjun; Sa, Biswanath

    2010-11-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogel membranes of sodium alginate (SA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were prepared by solvent casting method for transdermal delivery of an anti-hypertensive drug, prazosin hydrochloride. The prepared membranes were thin, flexible and smooth. The X-ray diffraction studies indicated the amorphous dispersion of drug in the membranes. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis confirmed the IPN formation and suggests that the membrane stiffness increases with increased concentration of glutaraldehyde (GA) in the membranes. All the membranes were permeable to water vapors depending upon the extent of cross-linking. The in vitro drug release study was performed through excised rat abdominal skin; drug release depends on the concentrations of GA in membranes. The IPN membranes extended drug release up to 24 h, while SA and PVA membranes discharged the drug quickly. The primary skin irritation and skin histopathology study indicated that the prepared IPN membranes were less irritant and safe for skin application. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DIDS prevents ischemic membrane degradation in cultured hippocampal neurons by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Pamenter

    Full Text Available During stroke, cells in the infarct core exhibit rapid failure of their permeability barriers, which releases ions and inflammatory molecules that are deleterious to nearby tissue (the penumbra. Plasma membrane degradation is key to penumbral spread and is mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, which are released via vesicular exocytosis into the extracellular fluid in response to stress. DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid preserves membrane integrity in neurons challenged with an in vitro ischemic penumbral mimic (ischemic solution: IS and we asked whether this action was mediated via inhibition of MMP activity. In cultured murine hippocampal neurons challenged with IS, intracellular proMMP-2 and -9 expression increased 4-10 fold and extracellular latent and active MMP isoform expression increased 2-22 fold. MMP-mediated extracellular gelatinolytic activity increased ∼20-50 fold, causing detachment of 32.1±4.5% of cells from the matrix and extensive plasma membrane degradation (>60% of cells took up vital dyes and >60% of plasma membranes were fragmented or blebbed. DIDS abolished cellular detachment and membrane degradation in neurons and the pathology-induced extracellular expression of latent and active MMPs. DIDS similarly inhibited extracellular MMP expression and cellular detachment induced by the pro-apoptotic agent staurosporine or the general proteinase agonist 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA. Conversely, DIDS-treatment did not impair stress-induced intracellular proMMP production, nor the intracellular cleavage of proMMP-2 to the active form, suggesting DIDS interferes with the vesicular extrusion of MMPs rather than directly inhibiting proteinase expression or activation. In support of this hypothesis, an antagonist of the V-type vesicular ATPase also inhibited extracellular MMP expression to a similar degree as DIDS. In addition, in a proteinase-independent model of vesicular exocytosis, DIDS

  16. Vesicle-independent extracellular release of a proinflammatory outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarsson Jan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral bacterium associated with aggressively progressing periodontitis. Extracellular release of bacterial outer membrane proteins has been suggested to mainly occur via outer membrane vesicles. This study investigated the presence and conservation of peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (AaPAL among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, the immunostimulatory effect of AaPAL, and whether live cells release this structural outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form independent of vesicles. Results The pal locus and its gene product were confirmed in clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunoblotting. Culturing under different growth conditions revealed no apparent requirement for the AaPAL expression. Inactivation of pal in a wild-type strain (D7S and in its spontaneous laboratory variant (D7SS resulted in pleiotropic cellular effects. In a cell culture insert model (filter pore size 0.02 μm, AaPAL was detected from filtrates when strains D7S and D7SS were incubated in serum or broth in the inserts. Electron microscopy showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans vesicles (0.05–0.2 μm were larger than the filter pores and that there were no vesicles in the filtrates. The filtrates were immunoblot negative for a cytoplasmic marker, cyclic AMP (cAMP receptor protein. An ex vivo model indicated cytokine production from human whole blood stimulated by AaPAL. Conclusion Free-soluble AaPAL can be extracellularly released in a process independent of vesicles.

  17. Leveraging electrokinetics for the active control of dendritic fullerene-1 release across a nanochannel membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Giacomo; Geninatti, Thomas; Hood, R. Lyle; Fine, Daniel; Scorrano, Giovanni; Schmulen, Jeffrey; Hosali, Sharath; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian dysfunction, pain, and stress, among others.General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian

  18. Novel meloxicam releasing electrospun polymer/ceramic reinforced biodegradable membranes for periodontal regeneration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yar, Muhammad; Farooq, Ariba; Shahzadi, Lubna; Khan, Abdul Samad; Mahmood, Nasir; Rauf, Abdul; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-07-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with the destruction of periodontal tissues, along with other disorders/problems including inflammation of tissues and severe pain. This paper reports the synthesis of meloxicam (MX) immobilized biodegradable chitosan (CS)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/hydroxyapatite (HA) based electrospun (e-spun) fibers and films. Electrospinning was employed to produce drug loaded fibrous mats, whereas films were generated by solvent casting method. In-vitro drug release from materials containing varying concentrations of MX revealed that the scaffolds containing higher amount of drug showed comparatively faster release. During initial first few hours fast release was noted from membranes and films; however after around 5h sustained release was achieved. The hydrogels showed good swelling property, which is highly desired for soft tissue engineered implants. To investigate the biocompatibility of our synthesized materials, VERO cells (epithelial cells) were selected and cell culture results showed that these all materials were non-cytotoxic and also these cells were very well proliferated on these synthesized scaffolds. These properties along with the anti-inflammatory potential of our fabricated materials suggest their effective utilization in periodontital treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acetate-induced apoptosis in colorectal carcinoma cells involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin D release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, C; Oliveira, C S F; Alves, S; Chaves, S R; Coutinho, O P; Côrte-Real, M; Preto, A

    2013-02-21

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. Short-chain fatty acids secreted by dietary propionibacteria from the intestine, such as acetate, induce apoptosis in CRC cells and may therefore be relevant in CRC prevention and therapy. We previously reported that acetic acid-induced apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells involves partial vacuole permeabilization and release of Pep4p, the yeast cathepsin D (CatD), which has a protective role in this process. In cancer cells, lysosomes have emerged as key players in apoptosis through selective lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and release of cathepsins. However, the role of CatD in CRC survival is controversial and has not been assessed in response to acetate. We aimed to ascertain whether LMP and CatD are involved in acetate-induced apoptosis in CRC cells. We showed that acetate per se inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. More importantly, we uncovered that acetate triggers LMP and CatD release to the cytosol. Pepstatin A (a CatD inhibitor) but not E64d (a cathepsin B and L inhibitor) increased acetate-induced apoptosis of CRC cells, suggesting that CatD has a protective role in this process. Our data indicate that acetate induces LMP and subsequent release of CatD in CRC cells undergoing apoptosis, and suggest exploiting novel strategies using acetate as a prevention/therapeutic agent in CRC, through simultaneous treatment with CatD inhibitors.

  20. Hsp70 translocates into the plasma membrane after stress and is released into the extracellular environment in a membrane-associated form that activates macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Virginia L; Rodríguez-Silva, Monica; Frey, Tiffany; Gehrmann, Mathias; Diaz, Juan Carlos; Steinem, Claudia; Multhoff, Gabriele; Arispe, Nelson; De Maio, Antonio

    2008-03-15

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) are intracellular chaperones that play a key role in the recovery from stress. Hsp70, the major stress-induced hsp, has been found in the extracellular medium and is capable of activating immune cells. The mechanism involved in Hsp70 release is controversial because this protein does not present a consensual secretory signal. In this study, we have shown that Hsp70 integrates into artificial lipid bilayer openings of ion conductance pathways. In addition, this protein was found inserted into the plasma membrane of cells after stress. Hsp70 was released into the extracellular environment in a membrane-associated form, sharing the characteristics of this protein in the plasma membrane. Extracellular membranes containing Hsp70 were at least 260-fold more effective than free recombinant protein in inducing TNF-alpha production as an indicator of macrophage activation. These observations suggest that Hsp70 translocates into the plasma membrane after stress and is released within membranous structures from intact cells, which could act as a danger signal to activate the immune system.

  1. Trace level analysis of VOCs and semi-VOCs in aqueous solution using a direct insertion membrane probe and trap and release membrane introduction mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, MA; Eberlin, MN

    2000-01-01

    A new design for a trap and release membrane introduction mass spectrometry (T&R-MIMS) system using a removable direct insertion membrane probe (DIMP) for combined trace level analysis (low or sub ppb range) of volatile (VOC) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) is reported. The system differs from the original T&R-MIMS system (M. Leth and F. R. Lauritsen, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 1995, 9, 591) as it uses a removable DIMP probe to place a capillary membrane loop inside the ion sou...

  2. Characterization of a poly(ether urethane)-based controlled release membrane system for delivery of ketoprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macocinschi, Doina; Filip, Daniela; Vlad, Stelian; Oprea, Ana Maria; Gafitanu, Carmen Anatolia

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ketoprofen incorporation in poly(ether urethane) microporous membrane. ► Moisture sorption properties of as-cast membrane. ► Drug release mechanisms in function of pH and composition of membranes. - Abstract: A poly(ether urethane) based on polytetrahydrofuran containing hydroxypropyl cellulose for biomedical applications was tested for its biocompatibility. Ketoprofen was incorporated (3% and 6%) in the polyurethane matrix as an anti-inflammatory drug. Kinetic and drug release mechanisms were studied. The pore size and pore size distribution of the polyurethane membranes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Surface tension characteristics as well as moisture sorption properties such as diffusion coefficients and equilibrium moisture contents of the membrane material were studied. It was found that kinetics and release mechanisms are in function of medium pH, composition of polymer–drug system, pore morphology and pore size distribution. Prolonged nature of release of ketoprofen is assured by low amount of drug in polyurethane membrane and physiological pH.

  3. Drug release characterization and preparation of Ca-Alginate microparticle drug carrier using membrane emulsification method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jin Oh; Park, Seong Bae; Park, Ham Yong; Haam, Seung Joo; Kim, Jung Hyun; Kim, Woo Sik [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    Conventional alginate bead has been limited to be used as a drug carrier because of its large size. To overcome the disadvantages of conventional large-size alginate drug beads, Ca-alginate microparticles were prepared using membrane emulsification method controlled with the sodium alginate concentration and the pressure of reactor. The optimal monodispersed microparticles were obtained with the concentration of 2 wt % alginate solution and the pressure of 0.4*10{sup 5} Pa. The mean size of our prepared microparticles was about 4 {gamma}m. As the drug solutions, lidocaine{center_dot}HCI(cationic), sodium salicylate(anionic) and 4-acetamidophenol(nonionic) were selected. These three different drugs were loaded in the drug carrier of prepared alginate microparticles. Drug releases were performed in the sodium phosphate buffers of pH 2 and pH 7 and ionic strength of 0.2. The release behavior with the variation of drug charge shoed that of the cationic drug release was retarded more than anionic one due to the ionic interaction between carboxyl group of alginates and positive charge of cationic drug. >From the comparison experiments of the buffers of pH 2 and pH 7, the release was much retarded at pH 2 buffer due to the ionic repulsive force or ionic attractive force between the carboxyl group and the hydroxy or sodium ion in the buffer. Conclusively, the usage of small-size pH sensitive microparticle as a drug carrier has a high potential for the application of drug delivery systems. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Evaluation of the release behavior of the dexamethasone embedded in polycarbonate polyurethane membranes: an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kang, Sung Gwon; Lee, Chul Gab; Park, Sang Soo; Lee, Don Haeng; Lee, Gyu Baek; Song, Ho Young

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the release behavior of dexamethasone embedded in a polycarbonate polyurethane membrane. Both water-soluble and water-insoluble dexamethasone were tested, and the release behavior of five water-insoluble dexamethasone films of different thickness (78 to 211 μm) was also evaluated. The amount of dexamethasone used was 10% of the total weight of the polyurethan film mass. Each film was placed in a centrifuge tube containing 25 ml of 0.1-M neutral phosphate buffer, and the tubes were placed in a shaking incubator to quantify the amount of drug released into the buffer, absorption spectroscopy (λ max=242 nm) was employed. In the test involving water-soluble dexamethasone, 60%, of the drug was released during the first two hours of the study. Films containing water-insoluble dexamethasone, on the other hand, released 40%, 60% and 75% of the dexamethasone in one, three and seven days, respectively. Both types of film maintained low-dose drug release for 28 days. When release behavior was compared between water-insoluble films of different thickness, thicker film showed less initial burst and more sustained release. Dexamethasone release behavior varies according to drug solubility and membrane thickness, and may thus be conrolled

  5. Enhancement of the release of azelaic acid through the synthetic membranes by inclusion complex formation with hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosroi, Jiradej; Apriyani, Maria Goretti; Foe, Kuncoro; Manosroi, Aranya

    2005-04-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the release rates of azelaic acid and azelaic acid-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD) inclusion complex through three types of synthetic membranes, namely cellophane, silicone and elastomer membranes. Solid inclusion complexes of azelaic acid-HPbetaCD at the molar ratio of 1:1 were prepared by coevaporation and freeze-drying methods, subsequently characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry and dissolution studies. Solid inclusion complex obtained by coevaporation method which exhibited the inclusion of azelaic acid in the HPbetaCD cavity and gave the highest dissolution rate of azelaic acid was selected for the release study. Release studies of azelaic acid and this complex through the synthetic membranes were conducted using vertical Franz diffusion cells at 30 degrees C for 6 days. The release rates of azelaic acid through the synthetic membranes were enhanced by the formation of inclusion complex with HPbetaCD at the molar ratio of 1:1, with the increasing fluxes of about 41, 81 and 28 times of the uncomplexed system in cellophane, silicone and elastomer membranes, respectively. The result from this study can be applied for the development of azelaic acid for topical use.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of tamsulosin hydrochloride sustained-release pellets modified by two-layered membrane techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop tamsulosin hydrochloride sustained-release pellets using two-layered membrane techniques. Centrifugal granulator and fluidized-bed coater were employed to prepare drug-loaded pellets and to employ two-layered membrane coating respectively. The prepared pellets were evaluated for physicochemical characterization, subjected to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and in vitro release of different pH. Different release models and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were utilized to analyze the release mechanism of Harnual® and home-made pellets. By comparing the dissolution profiles, the ratio and coating weight gain of Eudragit® NE30D and Eudragit® L30D55 which constitute the inside membrane were identified as 18:1 and 10%–11%. The coating amount of outside membrane containing Eudragit® L30D55 was determined to be 0.8%. The similarity factors (f2 of home-made capsule and commercially available product (Harnual® were above 50 in different dissolution media. DSC studies confirmed that drug and excipients had good compatibility and SEM photographs showed the similarities and differences of coating surface between Harnual® and self-made pellets before and after dissolution. According to Ritger-Peppas model, the two dosage form had different release mechanism.

  7. Abrupt onset of large scale nonproton ion release in purple membranes caused by increasing pH or ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, T

    1987-06-01

    The abrupt onset of large scale nonproton ion release by photo-excited purple membrane suspensions has been observed near neutral pH using transient conductivity measurements. At pH 7 and low ionic strength, the conductivity transients due to proton and nonproton ions are of comparable magnitude but of opposite sign: fast proton release and ion uptake, followed by slow proton uptake and ion release. By increasing either the pH or the NaCl concentration, the amplitude of the conductivity transient increases sharply and the signal is then dominated by nonproton ion release. These results can be understood in terms of light-induced changes in the population of counterions condensed at the purple membrane surface caused by changes in the surface charge density. The critical charge density required for condensation to occur is evidently achieved near neutral pH by ionizing dissociable groups on the membrane by either titration (increasing the pH) or shifting their pKs (increasing the ionic strength).

  8. Galanin can inhibit insulin release by a mechanism other than membrane hyperpolarization or inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, G W; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y; Yada, T; Russo, L L; Bliss, C R; Cormont, M; Monge, L; Van Obberghen, E

    1989-05-05

    Studies on the mode of action of galanin to inhibit insulin release in RINm5F cells have shown that basal and glyceraldehyde-stimulated release were both inhibited. Galanin was inhibitory at concentrations in the low nanomolar range. Binding studies with 125I-labeled galanin indicated that the RINm5F cells exhibit a single set of sites estimated to be of the order of 30,000 sites/cell. Displacement of 125I-galanin by galanin from the receptor sites occurred over a similar concentration range to that which inhibited insulin release. Half-displacement was achieved with 2 nM galanin. Measurements of bis-(1,3-diethylthiobarbiturate) trimethineoxonol (bis-oxonol) fluorescence showed that galanin hyperpolarized the RINm5F cell plasma membrane. Measurements of intracellular free calcium, [Ca2+]i by means of the fluorescent indicator fura-2 showed that galanin decreased [Ca2+]i. As galanin did not inhibit either basal or glyceraldehyde-stimulated insulin release in the presence of the Ca2+ channel blocker nitrendipine, the hyperpolarization and reduction of Ca2+ entry appear to be a possible explanation for the galanin effects. However, quantitatively, the effects on membrane potential and [Ca2+]i appear to be insufficient to account for the potent inhibition of insulin release. Furthermore, evidence for an additional mechanism of action was obtained from experiments with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a phorbol ester which stimulates insulin secretion by at least two mechanisms, one Ca2+ dependent and one Ca2+ independent. TPA-stimulated insulin release was inhibited by galanin over the same concentration range as for the inhibition of glyceraldehyde-stimulated release. Galanin inhibited TPA-stimulated release in the presence of maximally effective concentrations of nitrendipine and in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. These effects cannot be explained by hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane and consequent reduction of Ca2+ entry via the voltage

  9. Design of poly(vinylidene fluoride)-g-p(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) membrane via surface modification for enhanced fouling resistance and release property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Guili; Chen, Wei Ning

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PVDF modified membranes were designed by grafting PNIPAAm, PHEMA and their copolymer. • Fouling resistance and release property of membrane were both improved after modification. • Bacterial attachment and detachment were investigated to evaluate fouling release property. • Improvement of the antifouling property was justified by surface property analysis. • The copolymer modified membrane exhibited higher performance to release foulant. - Abstract: Thermo-sensitive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), hydrophilic polymer poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and copolymer p(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) [P(HEMA-co-NIPAAm)] were synthesized onto poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) in order to improve not only fouling resistance but also fouling release property. The physicochemical properties of membranes including hydrophilicity, morphology and roughness were examined by contact angle analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The antifouling property of membranes was improved remarkably after surface modification according to protein and bacterial adhesion testing, and filtration experiment. Minimum protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion were both obtained on PVDF-g-P(HEMA-co-NIPAAm) membrane, with reduction by 44% and 71% respectively compared to the pristine membrane. The minimum bacterial cells after detachment at 25 °C were observed on the PVDF-g-P(HEMA-co-NIPAAm) membrane with the detachment rate of 77%, indicating high fouling release property. The filtration testing indicated that the copolymer modified membrane exhibited high resistance to protein fouling and the foulant on the surface was released and removed easily by washing, suggesting high fouling release and easy-cleaning capacity. This study provides useful insight in the combined “fouling resistance” and “fouling release

  10. Design of poly(vinylidene fluoride)-g-p(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) membrane via surface modification for enhanced fouling resistance and release property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Guili [Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); Advanced Environmental Biotechnology Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore); Chen, Wei Ning, E-mail: WNChen@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 62 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637459 (Singapore)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • PVDF modified membranes were designed by grafting PNIPAAm, PHEMA and their copolymer. • Fouling resistance and release property of membrane were both improved after modification. • Bacterial attachment and detachment were investigated to evaluate fouling release property. • Improvement of the antifouling property was justified by surface property analysis. • The copolymer modified membrane exhibited higher performance to release foulant. - Abstract: Thermo-sensitive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), hydrophilic polymer poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and copolymer p(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) [P(HEMA-co-NIPAAm)] were synthesized onto poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) in order to improve not only fouling resistance but also fouling release property. The physicochemical properties of membranes including hydrophilicity, morphology and roughness were examined by contact angle analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The antifouling property of membranes was improved remarkably after surface modification according to protein and bacterial adhesion testing, and filtration experiment. Minimum protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion were both obtained on PVDF-g-P(HEMA-co-NIPAAm) membrane, with reduction by 44% and 71% respectively compared to the pristine membrane. The minimum bacterial cells after detachment at 25 °C were observed on the PVDF-g-P(HEMA-co-NIPAAm) membrane with the detachment rate of 77%, indicating high fouling release property. The filtration testing indicated that the copolymer modified membrane exhibited high resistance to protein fouling and the foulant on the surface was released and removed easily by washing, suggesting high fouling release and easy-cleaning capacity. This study provides useful insight in the combined “fouling resistance” and “fouling release

  11. Release of LHRH-activity from human fetal membranes upon exposure to PGE/sub 2/, oxytocin and isoproterenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poisner, A.M.; Poisner, R.; Becca, C.R.; Conn, P.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that superfused chorion laeve (fetal membranes) release LHRH-like immunoreactivity upon exposure to angiotensin II. They have now studied the effects of other agonists on the release of LHRH-activity and something of its chemical nature. Fetal membranes were obtained from placentas delivered by cesarean section, the amnion stripped from the chorion, and the chorion superfused in an Amicon thin-channel device with the maternal surface facing up. The whole device was submerged in a 37 C water bath and perfused with a modified Locke's solution at 0.4 - 1.0 ml/min. LHRH-activity was measured by radioimmunoassay using three different antisera against LHRH. The release of LHRH-activity was stimulated by 6-10 min exposure to PGE/sub 2/, oxytocin, and isoproterenol. Extracts of chorion were studied using gel filtration on Sephacryl S-200 and ultrafiltration with Amicon PM-10 filters. The bulk of the LHRH-activity appeared as a higher molecular weight form (about 70,000 daltons). Since oxytocin has been reported to release PGE/sub 2/ from chorion, it may release LHRH-activity by virtue of liberating endogenous PGE/sub 2/. The chemical nature of the LHRH-activity is presently under investigation.

  12. Ca2+releases E-Syt1 autoinhibition to couple ER-plasma membrane tethering with lipid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xin; Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2018-01-17

    The extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) are endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins that bind the plasma membrane (PM) via C2 domains and transport lipids between them via SMP domains. E-Syt1 tethers and transports lipids in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner, but the role of Ca 2+ in this regulation is unclear. Of the five C2 domains of E-Syt1, only C2A and C2C contain Ca 2+ -binding sites. Using liposome-based assays, we show that Ca 2+ binding to C2C promotes E-Syt1-mediated membrane tethering by releasing an inhibition that prevents C2E from interacting with PI(4,5)P 2 -rich membranes, as previously suggested by studies in semi-permeabilized cells. Importantly, Ca 2+ binding to C2A enables lipid transport by releasing a charge-based autoinhibitory interaction between this domain and the SMP domain. Supporting these results, E-Syt1 constructs defective in Ca 2+ binding in either C2A or C2C failed to rescue two defects in PM lipid homeostasis observed in E-Syts KO cells, delayed diacylglycerol clearance from the PM and impaired Ca 2+ -triggered phosphatidylserine scrambling. Thus, a main effect of Ca 2+ on E-Syt1 is to reverse an autoinhibited state and to couple membrane tethering with lipid transport. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Circulating endothelial cell-derived extracellular vesicles mediate the acute phase response and sickness behaviour associated with CNS inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Yvonne; Akbar, Naveed; Roodselaar, Jay; Evans, Matthew C; Gardiner, Chris; Sargent, Ian; Romero, Ignacio A; Bristow, Adrian; Buchan, Alastair M; Haughey, Norman; Anthony, Daniel C

    2017-08-29

    Brain injury elicits a systemic acute-phase response (APR), which is responsible for co-ordinating the peripheral immunological response to injury. To date, the mechanisms responsible for signalling the presence of injury or disease to selectively activate responses in distant organs were unclear. Circulating endogenous extracellular vesicles (EVs) are increased after brain injury and have the potential to carry targeted injury signals around the body. Here, we examined the potential of EVs, isolated from rats after focal inflammatory brain lesions using IL-1β, to activate a systemic APR in recipient naïve rats, as well as the behavioural consequences of EV transfer. Focal brain lesions increased EV release, and, following isolation and transfer, the EVs were sequestered by the liver where they initiated an APR. Transfer of blood-borne EVs from brain-injured animals was also enough to suppress exploratory behaviours in recipient naïve animals. EVs derived from brain endothelial cell cultures treated with IL-1β also activated an APR and altered behaviour in recipient animals. These experiments reveal that inflammation-induced circulating EVs derived from endothelial cells are able to initiate the APR to brain injury and are sufficient to generate the associated sickness behaviours, and are the first demonstration that EVs are capable of modifying behavioural responses.

  14. Chemotherapy-Induced Tissue Injury: An Insight into the Role of Extracellular Vesicles-Mediated Oxidative Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chontida Yarana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The short- and long-term side effects of chemotherapy limit the maximum therapeutic dose and impair quality of life of survivors. Injury to normal tissues, especially chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy, is an unintended outcome that presents devastating health impacts. Approximately half of the drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration for cancer treatment are associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species, and Doxorubicin (Dox is one of them. Dox undergoes redox cycling by involving its quinone structure in the production of superoxide free radicals, which are thought to be instrumental to the role it plays in cardiomyopathy. Dox-induced protein oxidation changes protein function, translocation, and aggregation that are toxic to cells. To maintain cellular homeostasis, oxidized proteins can be degraded intracellularly by ubiquitin-proteasome pathway or by autophagy, depending on the redox status of the cell. Alternatively, the cell can remove oxidized proteins by releasing extracellular vesicles (EVs, which can be transferred to neighboring or distant cells, thereby instigating an intercellular oxidative stress response. In this article, we discuss the role of EVs in oxidative stress response, the potential of EVs as sensitive biomarkers of oxidative stress, and the role of superoxide dismutase in attenuating EV-associated oxidative stress response resulting from chemotherapy.

  15. Extracellular vesicle-mediated transfer of CLIC1 protein is a novel mechanism for the regulation of glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setti, Matteo; Osti, Daniela; Richichi, Cristina; Ortensi, Barbara; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Beznoussenko, Galina; Mironov, Alexandre; Rappa, Germana; Cuomo, Alessandro; Faretta, Mario; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Lorico, Aurelio; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2015-10-13

    Little progresses have been made in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive and lethal among brain tumors. Recently we have demonstrated that Chloride Intracellular Channel-1 (CLIC1) is overexpressed in GBM compared to normal tissues, with highest expression in patients with poor prognosis. Moreover, CLIC1-silencing in cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from human GBM patients negatively influences proliferative capacity and self-renewal properties in vitro and impairs the in vivo tumorigenic potential. Here we show that CLIC1 exists also as a circulating protein, secreted via extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by either cell lines or GBM-derived CSCs. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), comprising exosomes and microvesicles based on their composition and biophysical properties, have been shown to sustain tumor growth in a variety of model systems, including GBM. Interestingly, treatment of GBM cells with CLIC1-containing EVs stimulates cell growth both in vitro and in vivo in a CLIC1-dose dependent manner. EVs derived from CLIC1-overexpressing GBM cells are strong inducers of proliferation in vitro and tumor engraftment in vivo. These stimulations are significantly attenuated by treatment of GBM cells with EVs derived from CLIC1-silenced cells. However, CLIC1 modulation appears to have no direct role in EV structure, biogenesis and secretion. These findings reveal that, apart from the function of CLIC1 cellular reservoir, CLIC1 contained in EVs is a novel regulator of GBM growth.

  16. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  17. Extracellular vesicle-mediated transfer of long non-coding RNA ROR modulates chemosensitivity in human hepatocellular cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Yan, Irene K.; Kogure, Takayuki; Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular cancers (HCC) are highly resistant to chemotherapy. TGFβ has been associated with chemoresistance in some human cancers but the mechanisms involved are unknown. We explored how TGFβ might contribute to altered responses to therapy by assessing the involvement and mechanistic contribution of extracellular vesicle long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) in mediating TGFβ-dependent chemoresistance. TGFβ reduced the sensitivity of HCC cells to sorafenib or doxorubicin and altered the release of both extracellular vesicles and of selected lncRNA within these vesicles. Amongst these, lincRNA-ROR (linc-ROR), a stress-responsive lncRNA was highly expressed in HCC cells and enriched within extracellular vesicles derived from tumor cells. Incubation with HCC-derived extracellular vesicles increased linc-ROR expression and reduced chemotherapy-induced cell death in recipient cells. Sorafenib increased linc-ROR expression in both tumor cells and extracellular vesicles, whereas siRNA to linc-ROR increased chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Tumor-initiating cells that express CD133 have an increased resistance to therapy. TGFβ increased expression of CD133+ cells and colony growth in limiting dilution assays, both of which were attenuated by linc-ROR knockdown. These data provide mechanistic insights into primary chemoresistance in HCC by showing that: (a) TGFβ selectively enriches linc-RoR within extracellular vesicles, which has a potential role in intercellular signaling in response to TGFβ; (b) expression and enrichment of linc-ROR during chemotherapeutic stress plays a functional role in chemoresistance; and (c) the effects of TGFβ on chemoresistance in HCC may involve linc-RoR-dependent effects on tumor-initiating cells. These findings implicate extracellular vesicle lncRNA as mediators of the chemotherapeutic response, and support targeting linc-ROR to enhance chemosensitivity in HCC. PMID:24918061

  18. Extracellular vesicle-mediated transfer of long non-coding RNA ROR modulates chemosensitivity in human hepatocellular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Yan, Irene K; Kogure, Takayuki; Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular cancers (HCC) are highly resistant to chemotherapy. TGFβ has been associated with chemoresistance in some human cancers but the mechanisms involved are unknown. We explored how TGFβ might contribute to altered responses to therapy by assessing the involvement and mechanistic contribution of extracellular vesicle long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) in mediating TGFβ-dependent chemoresistance. TGFβ reduced the sensitivity of HCC cells to sorafenib or doxorubicin and altered the release of both extracellular vesicles and of selected lncRNA within these vesicles. Amongst these, lincRNA-ROR (linc-ROR), a stress-responsive lncRNA was highly expressed in HCC cells and enriched within extracellular vesicles derived from tumor cells. Incubation with HCC-derived extracellular vesicles increased linc-ROR expression and reduced chemotherapy-induced cell death in recipient cells. Sorafenib increased linc-ROR expression in both tumor cells and extracellular vesicles, whereas siRNA to linc-ROR increased chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Tumor-initiating cells that express CD133 have an increased resistance to therapy. TGFβ increased expression of CD133+ cells and colony growth in limiting dilution assays, both of which were attenuated by linc-ROR knockdown. These data provide mechanistic insights into primary chemoresistance in HCC by showing that: (a) TGFβ selectively enriches linc-RoR within extracellular vesicles, which has a potential role in intercellular signaling in response to TGFβ; (b) expression and enrichment of linc-ROR during chemotherapeutic stress plays a functional role in chemoresistance; and (c) the effects of TGFβ on chemoresistance in HCC may involve linc-RoR-dependent effects on tumor-initiating cells. These findings implicate extracellular vesicle lncRNA as mediators of the chemotherapeutic response, and support targeting linc-ROR to enhance chemosensitivity in HCC.

  19. Integrating sol-gel with cold plasmas modified porous polycaprolactone membranes for the drug-release of silver-sulfadiazine and ketoprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangindaan, Dave; Chen, Chao-Ting [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43, Keelung Rd., Sec. 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wang, Meng-Jiy, E-mail: mjwang@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43, Keelung Rd., Sec. 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated control-release system of sol-gel and biodegradable polycaprolactone membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biocompatible and nontoxic chitosan-SiO{sub 2} sol-gel for drug loading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterizations of the oxygen plasma modified biodegradable PCL porous membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Achieved controllable in vitro release for ketoprofen and silver sulfadiazine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sol-gel/plasma modified porous membranes showed excellent biocompatibility. - Abstract: A controlled release system composed of surface modified porous polycaprolactone (PCL) membranes combined with a layer of tetraorthosilicate (TEOS)-chitosan sol-gel was reported in this study. PCL is a hydrophobic, semi-crystalline, and biodegradable polymer with a relatively slow degradation rate. The drugs chosen for release experiments were silver-sulfadiazine (AgSD) and ketoprofen which were impregnated in the TEOS-chitosan sol-gel. The surface modification was achieved by O{sub 2} plasma and the surfaces were characterized by water contact angle (WCA) measurements, atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). The results showed that the release of AgSD on O{sub 2} plasma treated porous PCL membranes was prolonged when compared with the pristine sample. On the contrary, the release rate of ketoprofen revealed no significant difference on pristine and plasma treated PCL membranes. The prepared PCL membranes showed good biocompatibility for the wound dressing biomaterial applications.

  20. Release of membrane-bound vesicles and inhibition of tumor cell adhesion by the peptide Neopetrosiamide A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Austin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Neopetrosiamide A (NeoA is a 28-amino acid tricyclic peptide originally isolated from a marine sponge as a tumor cell invasion inhibitor whose mechanism of action is unknown.We show that NeoA reversibly inhibits tumor cell adhesion, disassembles focal adhesions in pre-attached cells, and decreases the level of beta1 integrin subunits on the cell surface. NeoA also induces the formation of dynamic, membrane-bound protrusions on the surface of treated cells and the release of membrane-bound vesicles into the culture medium. Proteomic analysis indicates that the vesicles contain EGF and transferrin receptors as well as a number of proteins involved in adhesion and migration including: beta1 integrin and numerous alpha integrin subunits; actin and actin-binding proteins such as cofilin, moesin and myosin 1C; and membrane modulating eps15 homology domain (EHD proteins. Surface labeling, trafficking inhibition, and real-time imaging experiments all suggest that beta1 integrin-containing vesicles are released directly from NeoA-induced cell surface protrusions rather than from vesicles generated intracellularly. The biological activity of NeoA is dependent on its disulfide bond pattern and NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide is globular with a continuous ridge of hydrophobic groups flanked by charged amino acid residues that could facilitate a simultaneous interaction with lipids and proteins in the membrane.NeoA is an anti-adhesive peptide that decreases cell surface integrin levels through a novel, yet to be elucidated, mechanism that involves the release of adhesion molecule-containing vesicles from the cell surface.

  1. Controlled release of human growth hormone fused with a human hybrid Fc fragment through a nanoporous polymer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eung-Sam; Jang, Do Soo; Yang, Seung Yun; Lee, Mi Nam; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Cha, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jin Kon; Sung, Young Chul; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to the development of more effective and compatible drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Human growth hormone (hGH) was fused with a hybrid Fc fragment containing partial Fc domains of human IgD and IgG4 to produce a long-acting fusion protein. The fusion protein, hGH-hyFc, resulted in the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (ca. 11 nm) compared with the diameter (ca. 5 nm) of the recombinant hGH. A diblock copolymer membrane with nanopores (average diameter of 14.3 nm) exhibited a constant release rate of hGH-hyFc. The hGH-hyFc protein released in a controlled manner for one month was found to trigger the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in human B lymphocyte and to exhibit an almost identical circular dichroism spectrum to that of the original hGH-hyFc, suggesting that the released fusion protein should maintain the functional and structural integrity of hGH. Thus, the nanoporous release device could be a potential delivery system for the long-term controlled release of therapeutic proteins fused with the hybrid Fc fragment.Nanotechnology has been applied to the development of more effective and compatible drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Human growth hormone (hGH) was fused with a hybrid Fc fragment containing partial Fc domains of human IgD and IgG4 to produce a long-acting fusion protein. The fusion protein, hGH-hyFc, resulted in the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (ca. 11 nm) compared with the diameter (ca. 5 nm) of the recombinant hGH. A diblock copolymer membrane with nanopores (average diameter of 14.3 nm) exhibited a constant release rate of hGH-hyFc. The hGH-hyFc protein released in a controlled manner for one month was found to trigger the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in human B lymphocyte and to exhibit an almost identical circular dichroism spectrum to that of the original hGH-hyFc, suggesting that the released fusion protein should maintain the functional and

  2. Potassium currents induced by hydrostatic pressure modulate membrane potential and transmitter release in vestibular type II hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong Dinh, Thien An; Haasler, Thorsten; Homann, Georg; Jüngling, Eberhard; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    Vestibular type II hair cells respond to increases in the hydrostatic pressure with pressure-dependent K(+) currents. We examined whether such currents may modulate transmitter release (assessed as membrane capacitance increments) by altering membrane potentials and voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents. Capacitance increments were dependent on voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx. Stimulating currents (0.7 nA) in current clamp induced depolarisations that were more negative by 8.7 +/- 2.1 mV when the bath height was elevated from 0.2 to 0.5 cm. In voltage clamp, protocols were used that simulated the time course of the membrane potential in current clamp at either low (control) or high hydrostatic pressure (high bath). The low bath protocol induced significantly larger Ca(2+) currents and increases in capacitance than the high bath protocol. We conclude that pressure-dependent K(+) currents may alter the voltage response of vestibular hair cells to an extent critical for Ca(2+) currents and transmitter release. This mechanism may contribute to vestibular dysfunction in Meniere's disease.

  3. Detergent release prolongs the lifetime of native-like membrane protein conformations in the gas-phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysik, Antoni J; Hewitt, Dominic J; Robinson, Carol V

    2013-04-24

    Recent studies have suggested that detergents can protect the structure of membrane proteins during their transition from solution to the gas-phase. Here we provide mechanistic insights into this process by interrogating the structures of membrane protein-detergent assemblies in the gas-phase using ion mobility mass spectrometry. We show a clear correlation between the population of native-like protein conformations and the degree of detergent attachment to the protein in the gas-phase. Interrogation of these protein-detergent assemblies, by tandem mass spectrometry, enables us to define the mechanism by which detergents preserve native-like protein conformations in a solvent free environment. We show that the release of detergent is more central to the survival of these conformations than the physical presence of detergent bound to the protein. We propose that detergent release competes with structural collapse for the internal energy of the ion and permits the observation of transient native-like membrane protein conformations that are otherwise lost to structural rearrangement in the gas-phase.

  4. Lack of Outer Membrane Protein A Enhances the Release of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Suppresses Viability of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Priya Valeru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, survives in aquatic environments. The bacterium has developed a survival strategy to grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. It has been shown that V. cholerae expresses outer membrane proteins as virulence factors playing a role in the adherence to interacted host cells. This study examined the role of outer membrane protein A (OmpA and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs in survival of V. cholerae alone and during its interaction with A. castellanii. The results showed that an OmpA mutant of V. cholerae survived longer than wild-type V. cholerae when cultivated alone. Cocultivation with A. castellanii enhanced the survival of both bacterial strains and OmpA protein exhibited no effect on attachment, engulfment, and survival inside the amoebae. However, cocultivation of the OmpA mutant of V. cholerae decreased the viability of A. castellanii and this bacterial strain released more OMVs than wild-type V. cholerae. Surprisingly, treatment of amoeba cells with OMVs isolated from the OmpA mutant significantly decreased viable counts of the amoeba cells. In conclusion, the results might highlight a regulating rule for OmpA in survival of V. cholerae and OMVs as a potent virulence factor for this bacterium towards eukaryotes in the environment.

  5. Disruption of lolCDE, Encoding an ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter, Is Lethal for Escherichia coli and Prevents Release of Lipoproteins from the Inner Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kimie; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE was previously identified, by using reconstituted proteoliposomes, as an apparatus catalyzing the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Mutations resulting in defective LolD were previously shown to be lethal for E. coli. The amino acid sequences of LolC and LolE are similar to each other, but the necessity of both proteins for lipoprotein release has not been proved. Moreover, previous reconstituti...

  6. Effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the membrane vesicle release and growth of respiratory pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgers, Charlotte; Benedikter, Birke J; Grauls, Gert E; Hellebrand, Pauline H M; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Stassen, Frank R M

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial infections contribute to the disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by stimulating mucus production in the airways. This increased mucus production and other symptoms are often alleviated when patients are treated with mucolytics such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Moreover, NAC has been suggested to inhibit bacterial growth. Bacteria can release membrane vesicles (MVs) in response to stress, and recent studies report a role for these proinflammatory MVs in the pathogenesis of airways disease. Yet, until now it is not clear whether NAC also affects the release of these MVs. This study set out to determine whether NAC, at concentrations reached during high-dose nebulization, affects bacterial growth and MV release of the respiratory pathogens non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), Moraxella catarrhalis (Mrc), Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psa). We observed that NAC exerted a strong bacteriostatic effect, but also induced the release of proinflammatory MVs by NTHi, Mrc and Psa, but not by Spn. Interestingly, NAC also markedly blunted the release of TNF-α by naive macrophages in response to MVs. This suggests that the application of NAC by nebulization at a high dosage may be beneficial for patients with airway conditions associated with bacterial infections. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Membrane wounding triggers ATP release and dysferlin-mediated intercellular calcium signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Covian-Nares, J. Fernando; Koushik, Srinagesh V.; Puhl, Henry L.; Vogel, Steven S.

    2010-01-01

    Dysferlin is a Ca2+-binding protein found in many different cell types. It is required for membrane wound repair in muscle, but it is not known whether it has the same function in other cells. Here we report the activation of an intercellular signaling pathway in sea urchin embryos by membrane wounding that evokes Ca2+ spikes in neighboring cells. This pathway was mimicked by ATP application, and inhibited by apyrase, cadmium, and ω-agatoxin-IVA. Microinjection of dysferlin antisense phosphor...

  8. Encapsulation and controlled release of lysozyme from electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/poly(ethylene glycol) non-woven membranes by formation of lysozyme-oleate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Jiang, Hongliang; Zhu, Kangjie

    2008-02-01

    In this study, the concept of hydrophobic ion pairing was adopted for incorporating lysozyme into electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) non-woven membranes. The solubility of lysozyme in organic solvent was enhanced through the formation of lysozyme-oleate complexes, which could be directly loaded into PCL/PEG membranes using electrospinning technique. The resultant PCL/PEG nanofibers have a compact structure with an average diameter ranged from about 0.4 microm to 0.9 microm. The addition of PEG into the PCL nanofibers not only improved the hydrophilicity of the membrane, but also played an important role on in vitro lysozyme release rate. It was found that the release rate of lysozyme was enhanced with the increase of PEG content. In addition, the increase of salt concentration in the release medium accelerated lysozyme release. It has also been shown that the released lysozyme retained most of its enzymatic activity.

  9. Overcoming the membrane barrier: Recruitment of γ-glutamyl transferase for intracellular release of metabolic cargo from peptide vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzl, Tilmann; Sroka, Magdalena; Srivastava, Puneet; Herdewijn, Piet; Marlière, Philippe; Panke, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Semipermeable membranes of cells frequently pose an obstacle in metabolic engineering by limiting uptake of substrates, intermediates, or xenobiotics. Previous attempts to overcome this barrier relied on the promiscuous nature of peptide transport systems, but often suffered from low versatility or chemical instability. Here, we present an alternative strategy to transport cargo molecules across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli based on chemical synthesis of a stable cargo-peptide vector construct, transport through the peptide import system, and efficient intracellular release of the cargo by the promiscuous enzyme γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT). Retaining the otherwise periplasmic GGT in the cytoplasm was critical for the functionality of the system, as was fine-tuning its expression in order to minimize toxic effects associated to cytoplasmic GGT expression. Given the established protocols of peptide synthesis and the flexibility of peptide transport and GGT, the system is expected to be suitable for a broad range of cargoes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Expression and functional characterization of membrane-integrated mammalian corticotropin releasing factor receptors 1 and 2 in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Jappelli

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptors (CRFRs are class B1 G-protein-coupled receptors, which bind peptides of the corticotropin releasing factor family and are key mediators in the stress response. In order to dissect the receptors' binding specificity and enable structural studies, full-length human CRFR1α and mouse CRFR2β as well as fragments lacking the N-terminal extracellular domain, were overproduced in E. coli. The characteristics of different CRFR2β-PhoA gene fusion products expressed in bacteria were found to be in agreement with the predicted ones in the hepta-helical membrane topology model. Recombinant histidine-tagged CRFR1α and CRFR2β expression levels and bacterial subcellular localization were evaluated by cell fractionation and Western blot analysis. Protein expression parameters were assessed, including the influence of E. coli bacterial hosts, culture media and the impact of either PelB or DsbA signal peptide. In general, the large majority of receptor proteins became inserted in the bacterial membrane. Across all experimental conditions significantly more CRFR2β product was obtained in comparison to CRFR1α. Following a detergent screen analysis, bacterial membranes containing CRFR1α and CRFR2β were best solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent FC-14. Binding of different peptide ligands to CRFR1α and CRFR2β membrane fractions were similar, in part, to the complex pharmacology observed in eukaryotic cells. We suggest that our E. coli expression system producing functional CRFRs will be useful for large-scale expression of these receptors for structural studies.

  11. Lack of the host membrane protease FtsH hinders release of the Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage TP712.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roces, Clara; Wegmann, Udo; Campelo, Ana B; García, Pilar; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2013-12-01

    The temperate bacteriophage TP712 was unable to plaque on Lactococcus lactis ΔftsH lacking the membrane protease FtsH and complementation in trans restored the WT phenotype. Absence of ftsH did not hinder phage adsorption, phage DNA delivery or activation of the lytic cycle. Thin sections revealed that TP712 virions appeared to be correctly assembled inside the ΔftsH host, but were not released. These virions were infective, demonstrating that a functional host FtsH is required by TP712 to proceed effectively with lysis of the host.

  12. Oncolytic Group B Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Mediates Non-apoptotic Cell Death with Membrane Disruption and Release of Inflammatory Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Dyer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enadenotucirev (EnAd is a chimeric group B adenovirus isolated by bioselection from a library of adenovirus serotypes. It replicates selectively in and kills a diverse range of carcinoma cells, shows effective anticancer activity in preclinical systems, and is currently undergoing phase I/II clinical trials. EnAd kills cells more quickly than type 5 adenovirus, and speed of cytotoxicity is dose dependent. The EnAd death pathway does not involve p53, is predominantly caspase independent, and appears to involve a rapid fall in cellular ATP. Infected cells show early loss of membrane integrity; increased exposure of calreticulin; extracellular release of ATP, HSP70, and HMGB1; and influx of calcium. The virus also causes an obvious single membrane blister reminiscent of ischemic cell death by oncosis. In human tumor biopsies maintained in ex vivo culture, EnAd mediated release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB1. In accordance with this, EnAd-infected tumor cells showed potent stimulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells in a mixed tumor-leukocyte reaction in vitro. Whereas many viruses have evolved for efficient propagation with minimal inflammation, bioselection of EnAd for rapid killing has yielded a virus with a short life cycle that combines potent cytotoxicity with a proinflammatory mechanism of cell death.

  13. B lymphocytes and macrophages release cell membrane deposited C3-fragments on exosomes with T cell response-enhancing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Krisztián; Végh, Péter; Prechl, József; Kerekes, Krisztina; Kovács, János; Csikós, György; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna

    2008-04-01

    Recently exosomes have been shown to play important roles in several immune phenomena. These small vesicles contain MHC proteins along with co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules, and mediate antigen presentation to T cells. In the present study we show that upon incubation with autologous serum, murine macrophages and B cells--but not T lymphocytes--fix C3-fragments covalently to the cell membrane and release them on exosomes in a time dependent fashion. While in the case of human B lymphocytes CR2 has been shown to serve as the main C3b-acceptor site, here we clearly demonstrate that cells derived from CR1/2 KO animals also have the capacity to fix C3b covalently. This finding points to a major difference between human and murine systems, and suggests the existence of additional acceptor sites on the cell membrane. Here we show that C3-fragment containing exosomes derived from OVA loaded antigen presenting cells induce a significantly elevated T cell response in the presence of suboptimal antigen stimulus. These data reveal a novel function of cell surface-deposited C3-fragments and provide further evidence for the role of exosomes secreted by antigen presenting cells. Since fixation of C3b to plasma membranes can be substantial in the presence of pathogens; moreover tumor cells are also known to activate the complement system resulting in complement-deposition, C3-carrying exosomes released by these cells may play an important immunomodulatory role in vivo, as well.

  14. Cancer Patient T Cells Genetically Targeted to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Specifically Lyse Prostate Cancer Cells and Release Cytokines in Response to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Gong

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of immunoglobulin-based artificial receptors in normal T lymphocytes provides a means to target lymphocytes to cell surface antigens independently of major histocompatibility complex restriction. Such artificial receptors have been previously shown to confer antigen-specific tumoricidal properties in murine T cells. We constructed a novel ζ chain fusion receptor specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA termed Pz-1. PSMA is a cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on prostate cancer cells and the neovascular endothelium of multiple carcinomas. We show that primary T cells harvested from five of five patients with different stages of prostate cancer and transduced with the Pz-1 receptor readily lyse prostate cancer cells. Having established a culture system using fibroblasts that express PSMA, we next show that T cells expressing the Pz-1 receptor release cytokines in response to cell-bound PSMA. Furthermore, we show that the cytokine release is greatly augmented by B7.1-mediated costimulation. Thus, our findings support the feasibility of adoptive cell therapy by using genetically engineered T cells in prostate cancer patients and suggest that both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte functions can be synergistically targeted against tumor cells.

  15. Nonproton ion release by purple membranes exhibits cooperativity as shown by determination of the optical cross-section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, T

    1988-08-01

    The amplitudes of the conductivity transients in photoexcited purple membranes were studied as a function of the energy of the actinic flash to determine the optical cross section of the process giving rise to the conductivity transient. Heating of the solution by the absorbed light causes an additional conductivity change and serves as an internal actinometer; the experiment directly yields the ratio of the cross section of ion release/uptake to that for light absorption. In effect, this counts the number of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) molecules involved in the conductivity transient per photon absorbed. At pH 7 in 0.4-0.5 M NaCl, where the conductivity signals are dominated by nonproton ions, the ratio is between 3 and 4, i.e., excitation of any one of several chromophores generates the same ion release signal. The simplest interpretation is that at pH 7 cooperative conformational changes cause a transient change in the surface charge distribution near all the affected bR molecules, resulting in the transient release of numerous counterions. As a comparison, at pH 4 where the signals are due to protons alone, the cross section data indicate that only a single bR molecule is involved in the proton movements. In this case, the results also show that the sum of the primary forward and reverse quantum yields (for the reactions: bR----K) is 0.88 +/- 0.09.

  16. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-08

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  17. Uterine and placental expression of HPGD in cows during pregnancy and release of fetal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hof, Jessica; Sprekeler, Nele; Schuler, Gerhard; Boos, Alois; Kowalewski, Mariusz P

    2017-01-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) plays a key role in prostaglandins (PGs) catabolism. Its expression and activity appear to be regulated by progesterone (P4). We investigated the HPGD mRNA-expression and protein localization in placentomes and interplacental uterine sites throughout gestation (Study I), and after fetal membranes retention (RFM) compared with normally delivered fetal membranes (DFM) (Study II). Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of aglepristone (AP), dexamethasone (GC) or cloprostenol (CP), on HPGD expression in bovine placentomes (Study III). Tissues from late gestation (D272) and at normal term (NT) served as controls. HPGD was highest in all sites at the beginning of pregnancy and at (NT). Following induced parturition HPGD was lower after (AP) and (GC) compared with (NT), and was similar in RFM and DFM. Placentomes stained primarily in fetal compartments; interplacentomal signals were observed in endometrial glandular and luminal epithelium. Results indicate that HPGD may play a role during establishment and termination of gestation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulated Erlin-dependent release of the B12 transmembrane J-protein promotes ER membrane penetration of a non-enveloped virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Inoue

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism by which non-enveloped viruses penetrate biological membranes remains enigmatic. The non-enveloped polyomavirus SV40 penetrates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane to reach the cytosol and cause infection. We previously demonstrated that SV40 creates its own membrane penetration structure by mobilizing select transmembrane proteins to distinct puncta in the ER membrane called foci that likely function as the cytosol entry sites. How these ER membrane proteins reorganize into the foci is unknown. B12 is a transmembrane J-protein that mobilizes into the foci to promote cytosol entry of SV40. Here we identify two closely related ER membrane proteins Erlin1 and Erlin2 (Erlin1/2 as B12-interaction partners. Strikingly, SV40 recruits B12 to the foci by inducing release of this J-protein from Erlin1/2. Our data thus reveal how a non-enveloped virus promotes its own membrane translocation by triggering the release and recruitment of a critical transport factor to the membrane penetration site.

  19. Composite membrane of bacterially-derived cellulose and molecularly imprinted polymer for use as a transdermal enantioselective controlled-release system of racemic propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodhibukkana, Chatchada; Srichana, Teerapol; Kaewnopparat, Sanae; Tangthong, Naruedom; Bouking, Pisit; Martin, Gary P; Suedee, Roongnapa

    2006-06-12

    A composite membrane for transdermal delivery of S-propranolol enantiomer was developed based on the controlled pore functionalization of bacterial cellulose membranes using a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer synthesis. The reactive pore-filling of an asymmetric porous cellulose membrane with a MIP thin-layer was effected using a silanized coupler as an additional anchor for the MIP. MIP thin-layers with specific binding sites for S-propranolol were synthesized by copolymerization of methacrylic acid with a cross-linker, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of S-propranolol as the template molecule and the latter was subsequently extracted. Selective transport of S-propranolol through the MIP composite membrane was obtained, although this was determined mostly by the parent cellulose membrane with some ancillary contributory effect from the MIP layer. In addition, an enantioselectivity in the transport of propranolol prodrug enantiomers was found, suggesting that the shape and functional groups orientation, which are similar to that of the print molecule were essential for enantiomeric recognition of the MIP composite membrane. The enantioselectivity of S-MIP membranes was also shown when the release of propranolol enantiomers was studied in vitro using rat skin, with racemic propranolol contained in the donor compartment. The composite membrane of bacterially-derived cellulose and molecularly imprinted polymer may have great potential for use as a transdermal enantioselective controlled-release system for racemic propranolol.

  20. Presynaptic membrane receptors in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomàs, Josep; Santafé, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Marta; Besalduch, Núria; Obis, Teresa; Priego, Mercedes; Hurtado, Erica

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few years, we have studied, in the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the local involvement in transmitter release of the presynaptic muscarinic ACh autoreceptors (mAChRs), purinergic adenosine autoreceptors (P1Rs), and trophic factor receptors (TFRs; for neurotrophins and trophic cytokines) during development and in the adult. At any given moment, the way in which a synapse works is largely the logical outcome of the confluence of these (and other) metabotropic signalling pathways on intracellular kinases, which phosphorylate protein targets and materialize adaptive changes. We propose an integrated interpretation of the complementary function of these receptors in the adult NMJ. The activity of a given receptor group can modulate a given combination of spontaneous, evoked, and activity-dependent release characteristics. For instance, P1Rs can conserve resources by limiting spontaneous quantal leak of ACh (an A1 R action) and protect synapse function, because stimulation with adenosine reduces the magnitude of depression during repetitive activity. The overall outcome of the mAChRs seems to contribute to upkeep of spontaneous quantal output of ACh, save synapse function by decreasing the extent of evoked release (mainly an M2 action), and reduce depression. We have also identified several links among P1Rs, mAChRs, and TFRs. We found a close dependence between mAChR and some TFRs and observed that the muscarinic group has to operate correctly if the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (trkB) is also to operate correctly, and vice versa. Likewise, the functional integrity of mAChRs depends on P1Rs operating normally. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Ultra Structural Characterisation of Tetherin - a Protein Capable of Preventing Viral Release from the Plasma Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra K. Gupta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin is an antiviral restriction factor made by mammalian cells to protect them from viral infection. It prevents newly formed virus particles from leaving infected cells. Its antiviral mechanism appears to be remarkably uncomplicated. In 2 studies published in PLoS Pathogens electron microscopy is used to support the hypothesis that the tethers that link HIV-1 virions to tetherin expressing cells contain tetherin and are likely to contain tetherin alone. They also show that the HIV-1 encoded tetherin antagonist that is known to cause tetherin degradation, Vpu, serves to reduce the amount of tetherin in the particles thereby allowing their release.

  2. The human gonadotropin releasing hormone type I receptor is a functional intracellular GPCR expressed on the nuclear membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Re

    Full Text Available The mammalian type I gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R is a structurally unique G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that lacks cytoplasmic tail sequences and displays inefficient plasma membrane expression (PME. Compared to its murine counterparts, the primate type I receptor is inefficiently folded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER leading to a further reduction in PME. The decrease in PME and concomitant increase in intracellular localization of the mammalian GnRH-RI led us to characterize the spatial distribution of the human and mouse GnRH receptors in two human cell lines, HEK 293 and HTR-8/SVneo. In both human cell lines we found the receptors were expressed in the cytoplasm and were associated with the ER and nuclear membrane. A molecular analysis of the receptor protein sequence led us to identify a putative monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS in the first intracellular loop of GnRH-RI. Surprisingly, however, neither the deletion of the NLS nor the addition of the Xenopus GnRH-R cytoplasmic tail sequences to the human receptor altered its spatial distribution. Finally, we demonstrate that GnRH treatment of nuclei isolated from HEK 293 cells expressing exogenous GnRH-RI triggers a significant increase in the acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3, thereby revealing that the nuclear-localized receptor is functional. Based on our findings, we conclude that the mammalian GnRH-RI is an intracellular GPCR that is expressed on the nuclear membrane. This major and novel discovery causes us to reassess the signaling potential of this physiologically and clinically important receptor.

  3. Voltage clamp methods for the study of membrane currents and SR Ca2+ release in adult skeletal muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Schneider, Martin F.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (E-C)1 coupling is a process composed of multiple sequential stages, by which an action potential triggers sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)2 Ca2+ release and subsequent contractile activation. The various steps in the E-C coupling process in skeletal muscle can be studied using different techniques. The simultaneous recordings of sarcolemmal electrical signals and the accompanying elevation in myoplasmic Ca2+, due to depolarization-initiated SR Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle fibres, have been useful to obtain a better understanding of muscle function. In studying the origin and mechanism of voltage dependency of E-C coupling a variety of different techniques have been used to control the voltage in adult skeletal fibres. Pioneering work in muscles isolated from amphibians or crustaceans used microelectrodes or ‘high resistance gap’ techniques to manipulate the voltage in the muscle fibres. The development of the patch clamp technique and its variant, the whole-cell clamp configuration that facilitates the manipulation of the intracellular environment, allowed the use of the voltage clamp techniques in different cell types, including skeletal muscle fibres. The aim of this article is to present an historical perspective of the voltage clamp methods used to study skeletal muscle E-C coupling as well as to describe the current status of using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in studies in which the electrical and Ca2+ signalling properties of mouse skeletal muscle membranes are being investigated. PMID:22306655

  4. Fibrous guided tissue regeneration membrane loaded with anti-inflammatory agent prepared by coaxial electrospinning for the purpose of controlled release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Min; Xue, Jiajia; Geng, Huan; Gu, Hao; Chen, Dafu; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The metronidazole released from PCL/gelatin core/sheath nanofiber membranes can effectively inhibit the colonization of anerobic bacteria. - Highlights: • Core/sheath PCL/gelatin nanofiber membrane loaded with metronidazole in a wide range of drug loading (5–35 wt.%) were successfully fabricated in good quality. • The encapsulation of gelatin can effectively alleviate the initial burst release of drugs. • The membrane can inhibit the growth of bacteria as the drug content reaches 10% (w/w), and the bacterial inhibition ability can effectively last at least 4 weeks. • The encapsulation of gelatin can overcome the disadvantage of PCL's hydrophobicity, which can effectively promote the adhesion and proliferation of cells. - Abstract: Here, with the aim of inhibiting inflammation during guided tissue regeneration membrane (GTRM) implant surgery, coaxial electrospinning was used to fabricate drug-loaded core/sheath nanofiber GTRMs capable of controlled drug release. Various amounts of the anti-inflammatory agent metronidazole (MNA) were encapsulated into the core/sheath nanofibers (where PCL was the core, gelatin the sheath, and the gelatin shell was crosslinked with genipin) in order to establish the minimal drug content necessary to achieve the appropriate anti-inflammatory effect. By using TEM and SEM, the core/sheath structure was confirmed. In vitro drug disolution results showed that the core/sheath nanofibers exhibited sustained release profiles that were superior to those nanofibers produced by blending electrospinning. Additionally, the membrane significantly inhibited the colonization of anaerobic bacteria. Furthermore, with gelatin as a shell, the core/shell nanofiber membranes showed improved hydrophilicity, which resulted in better cell adhesion and proliferation without cytotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, a simple and effective coaxial electrospinning approach was demonstrated for the fabrication of anti

  5. Fibrous guided tissue regeneration membrane loaded with anti-inflammatory agent prepared by coaxial electrospinning for the purpose of controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Min; Xue, Jiajia [Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Geng, Huan; Gu, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Dafu [Laboratory of Bone Tissue Engineering of Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Beijing 100035 (China); Shi, Rui, E-mail: sharell@126.com [Laboratory of Bone Tissue Engineering of Beijing Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics, Beijing 100035 (China); Zhang, Liqun, E-mail: zhanglq@mail.buct.edu.cn [Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Organic–Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: The metronidazole released from PCL/gelatin core/sheath nanofiber membranes can effectively inhibit the colonization of anerobic bacteria. - Highlights: • Core/sheath PCL/gelatin nanofiber membrane loaded with metronidazole in a wide range of drug loading (5–35 wt.%) were successfully fabricated in good quality. • The encapsulation of gelatin can effectively alleviate the initial burst release of drugs. • The membrane can inhibit the growth of bacteria as the drug content reaches 10% (w/w), and the bacterial inhibition ability can effectively last at least 4 weeks. • The encapsulation of gelatin can overcome the disadvantage of PCL's hydrophobicity, which can effectively promote the adhesion and proliferation of cells. - Abstract: Here, with the aim of inhibiting inflammation during guided tissue regeneration membrane (GTRM) implant surgery, coaxial electrospinning was used to fabricate drug-loaded core/sheath nanofiber GTRMs capable of controlled drug release. Various amounts of the anti-inflammatory agent metronidazole (MNA) were encapsulated into the core/sheath nanofibers (where PCL was the core, gelatin the sheath, and the gelatin shell was crosslinked with genipin) in order to establish the minimal drug content necessary to achieve the appropriate anti-inflammatory effect. By using TEM and SEM, the core/sheath structure was confirmed. In vitro drug disolution results showed that the core/sheath nanofibers exhibited sustained release profiles that were superior to those nanofibers produced by blending electrospinning. Additionally, the membrane significantly inhibited the colonization of anaerobic bacteria. Furthermore, with gelatin as a shell, the core/shell nanofiber membranes showed improved hydrophilicity, which resulted in better cell adhesion and proliferation without cytotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, a simple and effective coaxial electrospinning approach was demonstrated for the fabrication of anti

  6. Exceptionally tight membrane-binding may explain the key role of the synaptotagmin-7 C 2 A domain in asynchronous neurotransmitter release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voleti, Rashmi; Tomchick, Diana R.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Rizo, Josep

    2017-09-18

    Synaptotagmins (Syts) act as Ca2+ sensors in neurotransmitter release by virtue of Ca2+-binding to their two C2 domains, but their mechanisms of action remain unclear. Puzzlingly, Ca2+-binding to the C2B domain appears to dominate Syt1 function in synchronous release, whereas Ca2+-binding to the C2A domain mediates Syt7 function in asynchronous release. Here we show that crystal structures of the Syt7 C2A domain and C2AB region, and analyses of intrinsic Ca2+-binding to the Syt7 C2 domains using isothermal titration calorimetry, did not reveal major differences that could explain functional differentiation between Syt7 and Syt1. However, using liposome titrations under Ca2+ saturating conditions, we show that the Syt7 C2A domain has a very high membrane affinity and dominates phospholipid binding to Syt7 in the presence or absence of L-α-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate (PIP2). For Syt1, the two Ca2+-saturated C2 domains have similar affinities for membranes lacking PIP2, but the C2B domain dominates binding to PIP2-containing membranes. Mutagenesis revealed that the dramatic differences in membrane affinity between the Syt1 and Syt7 C2A domains arise in part from apparently conservative residue substitutions, showing how striking biochemical and functional differences can result from the cumulative effects of subtle residue substitutions. Viewed together, our results suggest that membrane affinity may be a key determinant of the functions of Syt C2 domains in neurotransmitter release.

  7. Immobilization and release study of a red alga extract in hydrogel membranes; Estudo da incorporacao e liberacao de um extrato de algas vermelhas em membranas de hidrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Renata Hage

    2009-07-01

    In pharmaceutical technology hydrogel is the most used among the polymeric matrices due to its wide application and functionality, primarily in drug delivery system. In view of the large advance innovations in cosmetic products, both through the introduction of new active agents as the matrices used for its controlled release, the objective of this study was to evaluate the release and immobilization of a natural active agent, the Arct'Alg in hydrogel membranes to obtain a release device for cosmetics. Arct'Alg is an aqueous extract which has excellent anti-oxidant, lipolytic, anti-inflammatory and cytostimulant action. Study on mechanical and physical-chemical properties and biocompatibility in vitro of hydrogel membranes of poly(vinyl-2- pyrrolidone) (PVP) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) obtained by ionizing radiation crosslinking have been performed. The physical-chemical characterization of polymeric matrices was carried out by gel fraction and swelling tests and biocompatibility by in vitro test of cytotoxicity by using the technique of neutral red incorporation. In the gel fraction test, both the PVP and PVA hydrogel showed a high crosslinking degree. The PVP hydrogel showed a greater percentage of swelling in relation to PVA and the cytotoxicity test of the hydrogels showed non-toxicity effect. The cytostimulation property of Arct'Alg was verified by the cytostimulation test with rabbit skin cells, it was showed an increase at about 50% of the cells when in contact with 0,5% of active agent. The hydrogel membranes prepared with 3% of Arct'Alg were subjected to the release test in an incubator at 37 degree C and aliquots collected during the test were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results obtained in the kinetics of release showed that the PVP hydrogel membranes released about 50% of Arct'Alg incorporated and the PVA hydrogel membranes at about 30%. In the cytostimulation test of released Arct

  8. Membrane events and ionic processes involved in dopamine release from tuberoinfundibular neurons. II. Effect of the inhibition of the Na+-Ca++ exchange by amiloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taglialatela, M.; Amoroso, S.; Canzoniero, L.M.; Di Renzo, G.F.; Annunziato, L.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the effect of amiloride, a rather specific inhibitor of the membrane Na+-Ca++ exchange system, on the release of endogenous dopamine (DA) and previously taken-up [3H]DA from tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons. Amiloride (300 microM) stimulated either endogenous DA or [3H]DA release. Amiloride-induced stimulation of [3H]DA release was prevented in a Ca++-free plus ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid medium. Amiloride, at the same concentration, reinforced both high K+- and electrically-induced stimulation of [3H]DA release. These results are explained on the basis of the ability of amiloride in blocking the Na+-Ca++ exchange system, therefore causing an elevation of intracellular Ca++ levels in resting conditions, and a further accumulation of Ca++ ions after high K+- or electrically elicited opening of voltage-operated channels specific for Ca++ ions. The enhanced intracellular Ca++ availability may trigger the stimulation of neurotransmitter release. In addition, amiloride was able to block in a dose-dependent manner (70-300 microM) the ouabain-induced [3H]DA release, suggesting that, when intracellular concentrations of Na+ are increased by the blockade of Na+,K+-adenosine triphosphatase the Na+-Ca+;+ exchange carrier reverses its resting mode of operation, mediating the influx of extracellular Ca++ ions. Amiloride, by blocking the Na+-Ca++ exchange mechanism, prevents the ouabain-elicited entrance of extracellular Ca++ ions, therefore inhibiting [3H]DA release stimulated by the cardioactive glycoside. Collectively, the results of the present study seem to be compatible with the idea that the Na+-Ca++ exchange mechanism is involved in the regulation of [3H]DA release from tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons, through the regulation of Ca++ movements across the plasma membrane

  9. Controlled Release of Linalool Using Nanofibrous Membranes of Poly(lactic acid) Obtained by Electrospinning and Solution Blow Spinning: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Michelle A; Oliveira, Juliano E; Medeiros, Eliton S; Glenn, Gregory M; Mattoso, Luiz H C

    2015-08-01

    The controlled-release of natural plant oils such as linalool is of interest in therapeutics, cosmetics, and antimicrobial and larvicidal products. The present study reports the release characteristics of linalool encapsulated at three concentrations (10, 15 and 20 wt.%) in poly(lactic acid) nanofibrous membranes produced by electrospinning and solution blow spinning (SBS) as well as the effect of linalool on fiber morphology and structural properties. PLA nanofibrous membranes were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and contact angle measurements. The average diameters of the electrospun and solution blow spun nanofibers were similar, ranging from 176 to 240 nm. Linalool behaved as a plasticizer to PLA decreasing the glass transition temperature (Tg), melting point (Tm) and crystallization temperature (TC) of PLA. Curves of the release of linalool at 35 °C were non-linear, showing a clear biphasic pattern consistent with one or more Fickian release components. The time required to release 50% of linalool (t1/2) decreased with increasing linalool concentration. The range in t1/2 values for SBS nanofibers was higher (291-1645s) than the t1/2 values for electrospun fibers (76-575s).

  10. Effect of Na2SO3 concentration to drug loading and drug release of ascorbic acid in chitosan edible film as drug delivery system membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kistriyani Lilis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a type of carbohydrate compounds produced from waste marine products, in particular the class of shrimp, crabs and clams. Chitosan is often process into edible films and utilized for food packaging also has potential as a membrane for drug delivery system. Drug loading and drug release can be controlled by improve the characteristics of the membrane by adding crosslinker. The purpose of this research is to study the effect of addition of crosslinker to the rate of loading and release of ascorbic acid in the chitosan edible film. Na2SO3 was used as crosslinker. Two grams of chitosan was dissolved into 100 ml of distilled water. Acetic acid and plasticizer were added in the solution then heated at 50°C. Na2SO3 solution with mass various of Na2SO3 dissolved, 01026 0.3; and 0.5 grams were added about 30 mL to make edible film. The analysis include of drug loading, drug release and tensile strength. The result showed that the loading of edible film with crosslinker 0.15 g; 0.3 g; and 0.5 g respectively were 60.98 ppm; 52.53 ppm; and 40.88 ppm, meanwhile for the release with crosslinker 0.15 g; 0.3 g; and 0.5 g respectively were 3.78 ppm; 5.72 ppm; and 5.97 ppm.

  11. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  12. Body weight loss, reduced urge for palatable food and increased release of GLP-1 through daily supplementation with green-plant membranes for three months in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelius, Caroline; Erlandsson, Daniel; Vitija, Egzona; Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Egecioglu, Emil; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of obesity has risen dramatically in recent years but only few effective and safe drugs are available. We investigated if green-plant membranes, previously shown to reduce subjective hunger and promote satiety signals, could affect body weight when given long-term. 38 women (40-65 years of age, body mass index 25-33 kg/m(2)) were randomized to dietary supplementation with either green-plant membranes (5 g) or placebo, consumed once daily before breakfast for 12 weeks. All individuals were instructed to follow a three-meal paradigm without any snacking between the meals and to increase their physical activity. Body weight change was analysed every third week as was blood glucose and various lipid parameters. On days 1 and 90, following intake of a standardized breakfast, glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in plasma were measured, as well as subjective ratings of hunger, satiety and urge for different palatable foods, using visual analogue scales. Subjects receiving green-plant membranes lost significantly more body weight than did those on placebo (p weight loss with green-plant extract was 5.0 ± 2.3 kg compared to 3.5 ± 2.3 kg in the control group. Consumption of green-plant membranes also reduced total and LDL-cholesterol (p meal tests performed on day 1 and day 90 demonstrated an increased postprandial release of GLP-1 and decreased urge for sweet and chocolate on both occasions in individuals supplemented with green-plant membranes compared to control. Waist circumference, body fat and leptin decreased in both groups over the course of the study, however there were no differences between the groups. In conclusion, addition of green-plant membranes as a dietary supplement once daily induces weight loss, improves obesity-related risk-factors, and reduces the urge for palatable food. The mechanism may reside in the observed increased release of GLP-1. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  13. A cost-benefit analysis of the physical mechanisms of membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Brodsky, Frances M; Miller, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-01

    Many cellular membrane-bound structures exhibit distinct curvature that is driven by the physical properties of their lipid and protein constituents. Here we review how cells manipulate and control this curvature in the context of dynamic events such as vesicle-mediated membrane traffic. Lipids and cargo proteins each contribute energy barriers that must be overcome during vesicle formation. In contrast, protein coats and their associated accessory proteins drive membrane bending using a variety of interdependent physical mechanisms. We survey the energy costs and drivers involved in membrane curvature, and draw a contrast between the stochastic contributions of molecular crowding and the deterministic assembly of protein coats. These basic principles also apply to other cellular examples of membrane bending events, including important disease-related problems such as viral egress.

  14. Cavin-1/PTRF alters prostate cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicle content and internalization to attenuate extracellular vesicle-mediated osteoclastogenesis and osteoblast proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry L. Inder

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumour-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs play a role in tumour progression; however, the spectrum of molecular mechanisms regulating EV secretion and cargo selection remain to be fully elucidated. We have reported that cavin-1 expression in prostate cancer PC3 cells reduced the abundance of a subset of EV proteins, concomitant with reduced xenograft tumour growth and metastasis. Methods: We examined the functional outcomes and mechanisms of cavin-1 expression on PC3-derived EVs (PC3-EVs. Results: PC3-EVs were internalized by osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells and primary human osteoblasts (hOBs in vitro, stimulating osteoclastogenesis 37-fold and hOB proliferation 1.5-fold, respectively. Strikingly, EVs derived from cavin-1-expressing PC3 cells (cavin-1-PC3-EVs failed to induce multinucleate osteoblasts or hOB proliferation. Cavin-1 was not detected in EVs, indicating an indirect mechanism of action. EV morphology, size and quantity were also not affected by cavin-1 expression, suggesting that cavin-1 modulated EV cargo recruitment rather than release. While cavin-1-EVs had no osteoclastogenic function, they were internalized by RAW264.7 cells but at a reduced efficiency compared to control EVs. EV surface proteins are required for internalization of PC3-EVs by RAW264.7 cells, as proteinase K treatment abolished uptake of both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs. Removal of sialic acid modifications by neuraminidase treatment increased the amount of control PC3-EVs internalized by RAW264.7 cells, without affecting cavin-1-PC3-EVs. This suggests that cavin-1 expression altered the glycosylation modifications on PC3-EV surface. Finally, cavin-1 expression did not affect EV in vivo tissue targeting as both control and cavin-1-PC3-EVs were predominantly retained in the lung and bone 24 hours after injection into mice. Discussion: Taken together, our results reveal a novel pathway for EV cargo sorting, and highlight the potential of utilizing

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors stimulate macrophage plasma-membrane actin assembly via ADP release, ATP synthesis and P2X7R activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnel, Mark P; Reiss, Miriam; Anand, Paras K; Treede, Irina; Holzer, Daniela; Hoffmann, Eik; Klapperstueck, Manuela; Steinberg, Thomas H; Markwardt, Fritz; Griffiths, Gareth

    2009-02-15

    Eukaryotic plasma membranes assemble actin filaments within seconds of activation of many receptors, especially during chemotaxis. Here, serum or sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulation of J774 and RAW macrophages released ADP within seconds into the extracellular medium, along with an adenylate kinase activity that converted ADP to ATP. ATP then activated the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) that was necessary for a peak of plasma-membrane actin assembly within 5 to 10 seconds in P2X7R-expressing J774, RAW and primary macrophages. Neither actin assembly nor characteristic P2X7R channel activity was seen in response to ATP in P2X7R-knockout macrophages, as detected by patch-clamp analysis. Since P2X7R has been shown previously to form a macromolecular complex with actin we propose that it is involved in the membrane assembly of actin. Our data reveal a surprisingly rapid and complex relay of signaling and externalization events that precede and control actin assembly induced by sphingosine-1-phosphate. The overall model we present is strongly supported by the data presented in the accompanying paper that focuses on latex bead phagosomes.

  16. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Cheryl S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. Methods We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels, and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2 phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively. Results All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Conclusions Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are

  17. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Kochukov, Mikhail; Watson, Cheryl S

    2010-10-15

    Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone) at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels), and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels) in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2) phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER) were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively). All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation) of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are vulnerable to very low concentrations of these structurally

  18. Anthrax lethal toxin induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cytosolic cathepsin release is Nlrp1b/Nalp1b-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Averette

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available NOD-like receptors (NLRs are a group of cytoplasmic molecules that recognize microbial invasion or 'danger signals'. Activation of NLRs can induce rapid caspase-1 dependent cell death termed pyroptosis, or a caspase-1 independent cell death termed pyronecrosis. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT, is recognized by a subset of alleles of the NLR protein Nlrp1b, resulting in pyroptotic cell death of macrophages and dendritic cells. Here we show that LT induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP. The presentation of LMP requires expression of an LT-responsive allele of Nlrp1b, and is blocked by proteasome inhibitors and heat shock, both of which prevent LT-mediated pyroptosis. Further the lysosomal protease cathepsin B is released into the cell cytosol and cathepsin inhibitors block LT-mediated cell death. These data reveal a role for lysosomal membrane permeabilization in the cellular response to bacterial pathogens and demonstrate a shared requirement for cytosolic relocalization of cathepsins in pyroptosis and pyronecrosis.

  19. Identification and characterization of muscarinic receptors potentiating the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by corticotropin-releasing hormone in membranes of rat frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onali, P; Olianas, M C

    1998-08-01

    In membranes of the rat frontal cortex, acetylcholine (ACh) and other cholinergic agonists were found to potentiate the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity elicited by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Oxotremorine-M, carbachol and methacholine were as effective as ACh, whereas oxotremorine and arecoline were much less effective. The facilitating effect of Ach was potently blocked by the M1 antagonists R-trihexyphenidyl, telenzepine and pirenzepine and by the M3 antagonists hexahydro-sila-difenidol and p-fluorohexahydro-sila-difenidol, whereas the M2 and M4 antagonists himbacine, methoctramine, AF-DX 116 and AQ-RA 741 were less potent. The mamba venom toxin MT-1, which binds with high affinity to M1 receptors, was also a potent blocker. The pharmacological profile of the muscarinic potentiation of CRH receptor activity was markedly different from that displayed by the muscarinic inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase, which could be detected in the same membrane preparations. Moreover, the intracerebral injection of pertussis toxin impaired the muscarinic inhibition of cyclic AMP formation and reduced the Ach stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding to membrane G proteins but failed to affect the facilitating effect on CRH receptor activity. The latter response was also insensitive to the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine and to the inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid. These data demonstrate that in the rat frontal cortex, muscarinic receptors of the M1 subtype potentiate CRH transmission by interacting with pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins.

  20. Why do cells release vesicles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwland, Rienk; Sturk, Augueste

    2010-01-01

    Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells release vesicles into their environment. To answer the question why eukaryotic cells release vesicles, we may learn from prokaryotes. Bacteria release outer membrane vesicles, resembling microparticles, which act as "multi-purpose carriers". They contain signalling

  1. A novel sphingomyelin/cholesterol domain-specific probe reveals the dynamics of the membrane domains during virus release and in Niemann-Pick type C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Asami; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Murate, Motohide; Kishimoto, Takuma; Sakai, Shota; Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Shimada, Yukiko; Inaba, Takehiko; Miyatake, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Hideko; Kurahashi, Atsushi; Pack, Chan-Gi; Kasai, Rinshi S; Kubo, Shuku; Schieber, Nicole L; Dohmae, Naoshi; Tochio, Naoya; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Sasaki, Yutaka; Aida, Yoko; Fujimori, Fumihiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Nishibori, Kozo; Parton, Robert G; Kusumi, Akihiro; Sako, Yasushi; Anderluh, Gregor; Yamashita, Makoto; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Greimel, Peter; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2017-04-01

    We identified a novel, nontoxic mushroom protein that specifically binds to a complex of sphingomyelin (SM), a major sphingolipid in mammalian cells, and cholesterol (Chol). The purified protein, termed nakanori, labeled cell surface domains in an SM- and Chol-dependent manner and decorated specific lipid domains that colocalized with inner leaflet small GTPase H-Ras, but not K-Ras. The use of nakanori as a lipid-domain-specific probe revealed altered distribution and dynamics of SM/Chol on the cell surface of Niemann-Pick type C fibroblasts, possibly explaining some of the disease phenotype. In addition, that nakanori treatment of epithelial cells after influenza virus infection potently inhibited virus release demonstrates the therapeutic value of targeting specific lipid domains for anti-viral treatment.-Makino, A., Abe, M., Ishitsuka, R., Murate, M., Kishimoto, T., Sakai, S., Hullin-Matsuda, F., Shimada, Y., Inaba, T., Miyatake, H., Tanaka, H., Kurahashi, A., Pack, C.-G., Kasai, R. S., Kubo, S., Schieber, N. L., Dohmae, N., Tochio, N., Hagiwara, K., Sasaki, Y., Aida, Y., Fujimori, F., Kigawa, T., Nishibori, K., Parton, R. G., Kusumi, A., Sako, Y., Anderluh, G., Yamashita, M., Kobayashi, T., Greimel, P., Kobayashi, T. A novel sphingomyelin/cholesterol domain-specific probe reveals the dynamics of the membrane domains during virus release and in Niemann-Pick type C. © FASEB.

  2. Plasma membrane ordering agent pluronic F-68 (PF-68) reduces neurotransmitter uptake and release and produces learning and memory deficits in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M. S.; Prendergast, M. A.; Terry, A. V. Jr

    1999-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence indicates that aged-related changes in the fluidity and lipid composition of the plasma membrane contribute to cellular dysfunction in humans and other mammalian species. In the CNS, reductions in neuronal plasma membrane order (PMO) (i.e., increased plasma membrane fluidity) have been attributed to age as well as the presence of the beta-amyloid peptide-25-35, known to play an important role in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These PMO increases may influence neurotransmitter synthesis, receptor binding, and second messenger systems as well as signal transduction pathways. The effects of neuronal PMO on learning and memory processes have not been adequately investigated, however. Based on the hypothesis that an increase in PMO may alter a number of aspects of synaptic transmission, we investigated several neurochemical and behavioral effects of the membrane ordering agent, PF-68. In cell culture, PF-68 (nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein) reduced [3H]norepinephrine (NE) uptake into differentiated PC-12 cells as well as reduced nicotine stimulated [3H]NE release. The compound (800-2400 microg/kg, i.p., resulting in nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein in the brain) decreased step-through latencies and increased the frequencies of crossing into the unsafe side of the chamber in inhibitory avoidance training. In the Morris water maze, PF-68 increased the latencies and swim distances required to locate a hidden platform and reduced the time spent and distance swam in the previous target quadrant during transfer (probe) trials. PF-68 did not impair performance of a well-learned working memory task, the rat delayed stimulus discrimination task (DSDT), however. Studies with 14C-labeled PF-68 indicated that significant (pmoles/mg wet tissue) levels of the compound entered the brain from peripheral (i.p.) injection. No PF-68 related changes were observed in swim speeds or in visual acuity tests in water maze experiments, rotorod

  3. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochford, Kevin; Chen, Feng; Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W; Kharel, Madan K; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel; Hsia, S Victor

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency.

  4. Helicobacter pylori-elicited induction in gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) release involves ERK-dependent cPLA2 activation and its recruitment to the membrane-localized Rac1/p38 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2016-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases implicated in a wide rage of degenerative and inflammatory diseases, including Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, and gastric and duodenal ulcer. As gastric mucosal inflammatory responses to H. pylori are characterized by the rise in MMP-9 production, as well as the induction in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 activation, we investigated the role of Rac1/MAPK in the processes associated with the release of MMP-9. We show that H. pylori LPS-elicited induction in gastric mucosal MMP-9 release is associated with MAPK, ERK and p38 activation, and occurs with the involvement of Rac1 and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). Further, we demonstrate that the LPS-induced MMP-9 release requires ERK-mediated phosphorylation of cPLA2 on Ser(505) that is essential for its membrane localization with Rac1, and that this process necessitates p38 participation. Moreover, we reveal that the activation and membrane translocation of p38 to the Rac1-GTP complex plays a pivotal role in cPLA2-dependent enhancement in MMP-9 release. Hence, our findings provide a strong evidence for the role of ERK/cPLA2 and Rac1/p38/cPLA2 cascade in H. pylori LPS-induced up-regulation in gastric mucosal MMP-9 release.

  5. Membrane Vesicles Released by a hypervesiculating Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 tolR Mutant Are Highly Heterogeneous and Show Reduced Capacity for Epithelial Cell Interaction and Entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Pérez-Cruz

    Full Text Available Membrane vesicles (MVs produced by Gram-negative bacteria are being explored for novel clinical applications due to their ability to deliver active molecules to distant host cells, where they can exert immunomodulatory properties. MVs released by the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN are good candidates for testing such applications. However, a drawback for such studies is the low level of MV isolation from in vitro culture supernatants, which may be overcome by the use of mutants in cell envelope proteins that yield a hypervesiculation phenotype. Here, we confirm that a tolR mutation in EcN increases MV production, as determined by protein, LPS and fluorescent lipid measurements. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM of negatively stained MVs did not reveal significant differences with wild type EcN MVs. Conversely, TEM observation after high-pressure freezing followed by freeze substitution of bacterial samples, together with cryo-TEM observation of plunge-frozen hydrated isolated MVs showed considerable structural heterogeneity in the EcN tolR samples. In addition to common one-bilayer vesicles (OMVs and the recently described double-bilayer vesicles (O-IMVs, other types of MVs were observed. Time-course experiments of MV uptake in Caco-2 cells using rhodamine- and DiO-labelled MVs evidenced that EcN tolR MVs displayed reduced internalization levels compared to the wild-type MVs. The low number of intracellular MVs was due to a lower cell binding capacity of the tolR-derived MVs, rather than a different entry pathway or mechanism. These findings indicate that heterogeneity of MVs from tolR mutants may have a major impact on vesicle functionality, and point to the need for conducting a detailed structural analysis when MVs from hypervesiculating mutants are to be used for biotechnological applications.

  6. Cytochrome b561, copper, β-cleaved amyloid precursor protein and niemann-pick C1 protein are involved in ascorbate-induced release and membrane penetration of heparan sulfate from endosomal S-nitrosylated glypican-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Fransson, Lars-Åke; Mani, Katrin

    2017-11-15

    Ascorbate-induced release of heparan sulfate from S-nitrosylated heparan sulfate proteoglycan glypican-1 takes place in endosomes. Heparan sulfate penetrates the membrane and is transported to the nucleus. This process is dependent on copper and on expression and processing of the amyloid precursor protein. It remains unclear how exogenously supplied ascorbate can generate HS-anMan in endosomes and how passage through the membrane is facilitated. Here we have examined wild-type, Alzheimer Tg2576 and amyloid precursor protein (-/-) mouse fibroblasts and human fetal and Niemann-Pick C1 fibroblasts by using deconvolution immunofluorescence microscopy, siRNA technology and [S 35 ]sulfate-labeling, vesicle isolation and gel chromatography. We found that ascorbate-induced release of heparan sulfate was dependent on expression of endosomal cytochrome b561. Formation and nuclear transport of heparan sulfate was suppressed by inhibition of β-processing of the amyloid precursor protein and formation was restored by copper (I) ions. Membrane penetration was not dependent on amyloid beta channel formation. Inhibition of endosomal exit resulted in accumulation of heparan sulfate in vesicles that exposed the C-terminal of the amyloid precursor protein externally. Endosome-to-nucleus transport was also dependent on expression of the Niemann-Pick C1 protein. We propose that ascorbate is taken up from the medium and is oxidized by cytochrome b561 which, in turn, reduces copper (II) to copper (I) present in the N-terminal, β-cleaved domain of the amyloid precursor protein. Re-oxidation of copper (I) is coupled to reductive, deaminative release of heparan sulfate from glypican-1. Passage through the membrane may be facilitated by the C-terminal, β-cleaved fragment of the amyloid precursor protein and the Niemann-Pick C1 protein. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Rasagiline prevents apoptosis induced by PK11195, a ligand of the outer membrane translocator protein (18 kDa), in SH-SY5Y cells through suppression of cytochrome c release from mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako; Yi, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Rasagiline protects neuronal cells from cell death caused by various lines of insults. Its neuroprotective function is due to suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis signaling and induction of neuroprotective genes, including Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. Rasagiline inhibits the mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, an initial stage in apoptosis, but the mechanism has been elusive. In this paper, it was investigated how rasagiline regulates mitochondrial death cascade in apoptosis induced in SH-SY5Y cells by PK11195, a ligand of the outer membrane translocator protein of 18 kDa. Rasagiline prevented release of cytochrome c (Cyt-c), and the following caspase 3 activation, ATP depletion and apoptosis, but did not inhibit the mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, in contrast to Bcl-2 overexpression. Rasagiline stabilized the mitochondrial contact site and suppressed Cyt-c release into cytoplasm, which should be the critical point for the regulation of apoptosis. Monoamine oxidase was not associated with anti-apoptotic activity of rasagiline in PK11195-induced apoptosis.

  8. Controlled release of linalool using nanofibrous membranes of poly(lactic acid) obtained by electrospinning and solution blow spinning: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The controlled-release of natural plant oils such as linalool is of interest in therapeutics, cosmetics, and antimicrobial and larvicidal products. The present study reports the release characteristics of linalool encapsulated at three concentrations (10, 15 and 20 wt.%) in poly(lactic acid) nanofib...

  9. Investigating a new drug delivery nano composite membrane system based on PVA/PCL and PVA/HA(PEG) for the controlled release of biopharmaceuticals for bone infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Taoyu; Stylios, George K; Giannoudi, Marilena; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    The capability for sustained and gradual release of pharmaceuticals is a major requirement in the development of a guided antimicrobial bacterial control system for clinical applications. In this study, PVA gels with varying constituents that were manufactured via a refreeze/thawing route, were found to have excellent potential for antimicrobial delivery for bone infections. Cefuroxime Sodium with poly(ethylene glycol) was incorporated into 2 delivery systems poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA), by a modified emulsion process. Our results indicate that the Cefuroxime Sodium released from poly(e-caprolactone) in PVA was tailored to a sustained release over more than 45 days, while the release from hydroxyapatite PVA reach burst maximum after 20 days. These PVA hydrogel-systems were also capable of controlled and sustained release of other biopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Activation of moesin, a protein that links actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, occurs by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding sequentially to two sites and releasing an autoinhibitory linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Belkina, Natalya V; Maniti, Ofelia; Rosales, Tilman; Hao, Jian-Jiang; Kruhlak, Michael J; Knutson, Jay R; Picart, Catherine; Shaw, Stephen

    2012-05-11

    Many cellular processes depend on ERM (ezrin, moesin, and radixin) proteins mediating regulated linkage between plasma membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Although conformational activation of the ERM protein is mediated by the membrane PIP2, the known properties of the two described PIP2-binding sites do not explain activation. To elucidate the structural basis of possible mechanisms, we generated informative moesin mutations and tested three attributes: membrane localization of the expressed moesin, moesin binding to PIP2, and PIP2-induced release of moesin autoinhibition. The results demonstrate for the first time that the POCKET containing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate on crystal structure (the "POCKET" Lys-63, Lys-278 residues) mediates all three functions. Furthermore the second described PIP2-binding site (the "PATCH," Lys-253/Lys-254, Lys-262/Lys-263) is also essential for all three functions. In native autoinhibited ERM proteins, the POCKET is a cavity masked by an acidic linker, which we designate the "FLAP." Analysis of three mutant moesin constructs predicted to influence FLAP function demonstrated that the FLAP is a functional autoinhibitory region. Moreover, analysis of the cooperativity and stoichiometry demonstrate that the PATCH and POCKET do not bind PIP2 simultaneously. Based on our data and supporting published data, we propose a model of progressive activation of autoinhibited moesin by a single PIP2 molecule in the membrane. Initial transient binding of PIP2 to the PATCH initiates release of the FLAP, which enables transition of the same PIP2 molecule into the newly exposed POCKET where it binds stably and completes the conformational activation.

  11. The Golgi puppet master: COG complex at center stage of membrane trafficking interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Rose; Ungar, Daniel; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    The central organelle within the secretory pathway is the Golgi apparatus, a collection of flattened membranes organized into stacks. The cisternal maturation model of intra-Golgi transport depicts Golgi cisternae that mature from cis to medial to trans by receiving resident proteins, such as glycosylation enzymes via retrograde vesicle-mediated recycling. The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex, a multi-subunit tethering complex of the complexes associated with tethering containing helical rods family, organizes vesicle targeting during intra-Golgi retrograde transport. The COG complex, both physically and functionally, interacts with all classes of molecules maintaining intra-Golgi trafficking, namely SNAREs, SNARE-interacting proteins, Rabs, coiled-coil tethers, vesicular coats, and molecular motors. In this report, we will review the current state of the COG interactome and analyze possible scenarios for the molecular mechanism of the COG orchestrated vesicle targeting, which plays a central role in maintaining glycosylation homeostasis in all eukaryotic cells.

  12. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane in different species reveals variations in lactation and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Weiqing; Liu, Lu; Pang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Shuwen; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    In present study, 312, 554, 175 and 143 proteins were identified and quantified by label-free quantitative proteomics in human, cow, goat and yak milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), respectively. Fifty proteins involved in vesicle mediate transport and milk fat globule secretion were conserved among species. Moreover, proteins involved in lipid synthesis and secretion (xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase, stomatin and CD36), showed different expression pattern and the host defense proteins exhibited various profiles within species. Notably, the content and activity of lipid catabolic enzymes were significantly higher in human MFGM, which could be indicative of the superior fat utilization in breast fed infants. Our findings unraveled the significant differences in protein composition of human milk and conventionally used substitutes of it. The in-depth study of lipid metabolic enzymes in human MFGM will probably contribute to the improvement of the fat utilization through modulation of lipid catabolic enzymes in infant formula. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Streptococcus mutans Extracellular DNA Is Upregulated during Growth in Biofilms, Actively Released via Membrane Vesicles, and Influenced by Components of the Protein Secretion Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sumei; Klein, Marlise I.; Heim, Kyle P.; Fan, Yuwei; Bitoun, Jacob P.; Ahn, San-Joon; Burne, Robert A.; Koo, Hyun; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological agent of human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in biofilms. Limited information is available concerning the extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a scaffolding matrix in S. mutans biofilms. This study demonstrates that S. mutans produces eDNA by multiple avenues, including lysis-independent membrane vesicles. Unlike eDNAs from cell lysis that were abundant and mainly concentrated around broken cells or cell debris with floating open ends, eDNAs produced via the lysis-independent pathway appeared scattered but in a structured network under scanning electron microscopy. Compared to eDNA production of planktonic cultures, eDNA production in 5- and 24-h biofilms was increased by >3- and >1.6-fold, respectively. The addition of DNase I to growth medium significantly reduced biofilm formation. In an in vitro adherence assay, added chromosomal DNA alone had a limited effect on S. mutans adherence to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads, but in conjunction with glucans synthesized using purified glucosyltransferase B, the adherence was significantly enhanced. Deletion of sortase A, the transpeptidase that covalently couples multiple surface-associated proteins to the cell wall peptidoglycan, significantly reduced eDNA in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Sortase A deficiency did not have a significant effect on membrane vesicle production; however, the protein profile of the mutant membrane vesicles was significantly altered, including reduction of adhesin P1 and glucan-binding proteins B and C. Relative to the wild type, deficiency of protein secretion and membrane protein insertion machinery components, including Ffh, YidC1, and YidC2, also caused significant reductions in eDNA. PMID:24748612

  14. Deep sequencing of RNA from immune cell-derived vesicles uncovers the selective incorporation of small non-coding RNA biotypes with potential regulatory functions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte-'t Hoen, E.N.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/261632175; Buermans, H.P.; Waasdorp, M.; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385; Wauben, M.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112675735; `t Hoen, P.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Cells release RNA-carrying vesicles and membrane-free RNA/protein complexes into the extracellular milieu. Horizontal vesicle-mediated transfer of such shuttle RNA between cells allows dissemination of genetically encoded messages, which may modify the function of target cells. Other studies used

  15. Xenoestrogens at Picomolar to Nanomolar Concentrations Trigger Membrane Estrogen Receptor-α–Mediated Ca2+ Fluxes and Prolactin Release in GH3/B6 Pituitary Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Ann L.; Bulayeva, Nataliya N.; Watson, Cheryl S.

    2005-01-01

    Xenoestrogens (XEs) are widespread in our environment and are known to have deleterious effects in animal (and perhaps human) populations. Acting as inappropriate estrogens, XEs are thought to interfere with endogenous estrogens such as estradiol (E2) to disrupt normal estrogenic signaling. We investigated the effects of E2 versus several XEs representing organochlorine pesticides (dieldrin, endosulfan, o′p′-dichlorodiphenylethylene), plastics manufacturing by-products/detergents (nonylphenol, bisphenol A), a phytoestrogen (coumestrol), and a synthetic estrogen (diethylstilbestrol) on the pituitary tumor cell subline GH3/B6/F10, previously selected for expression of high levels of membrane estrogen receptor-α. Picomolar to nanomolar concentrations of both E2 and XEs caused intracellular Ca2+ changes within 30 sec of administration. Each XE produced a unique temporal pattern of Ca2+ elevation. Removing Ca2+ from the extracellular solution abolished both spontaneous and XE-induced intracellular Ca2+ changes, as did 10 μM nifedipine. This suggests that XEs mediate their actions via voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane. None of the Ca2+ fluxes came from intracellular Ca2+ stores. E2 and each XE also caused unique time- and concentration-dependent patterns of prolactin (PRL) secretion that were largely complete within 3 min of administration. PRL secretion was also blocked by nifedipine, demonstrating a correlation between Ca2+ influx and PRL secretion. These data indicate that at very low concentrations, XEs mediate membrane-initiated intracellular Ca2+ increases resulting in PRL secretion via a mechanism similar to that for E2, but with distinct patterns and potencies that could explain their abilities to disrupt endocrine functions. PMID:15811834

  16. Deuterium Labeling Together with Contrast Variation Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Suggests How Skp Captures and Releases Unfolded Outer Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccai, Nathan R; Sandlin, Clifford W; Hoopes, James T; Curtis, Joseph E; Fleming, Patrick J; Fleming, Karen G; Krueger, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the chaperone protein Skp forms specific and stable complexes with membrane proteins while they are transported across the periplasm to the outer membrane. The jellyfish-like architecture of Skp is similar to the eukaryotic and archaeal prefoldins and the mitochondrial Tim chaperones, that is the α-helical "tentacles" extend from a β-strand "body" to create an internal cavity. Contrast variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments on Skp alone in solution and bound in two different complexes to unfolded outer membrane proteins (uOMPs), OmpA and OmpW, demonstrate that the helical tentacles of Skp bind their substrate in a clamp-like mechanism in a conformation similar to that previously observed in the apo crystal structure of Skp. Deuteration of the uOMP component combined with contrast variation analysis allowed the shapes of Skp and uOMP as well as the location of uOMP with respect to Skp to be determined in both complexes. This represents unique information that could not be obtained without deuterium labeling of the uOMPs. The data yield the first direct structural evidence that the α-helical Skp tentacles move closer together on binding its substrate and that the structure of Skp is different when binding different uOMPs. This work presents, by example, a tutorial on performing SANS experiments using both deuterium labeling and contrast variation, including SANS theory, sample preparation, data collection, sample quality validation, data analysis, and structure modeling. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ascorbic acid pre-treated quartz stimulates TNF-α release in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages through ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenuto Federica

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhalation of crystalline silica induces a pulmonary fibrotic degeneration called silicosis caused by the inability of alveolar macrophages to dissolve the crystalline structure of phagocytosed quartz particles. Ascorbic acid is capable of partially dissolving quartz crystals, leading to an increase of soluble silica concentration and to the generation of new radical sites on the quartz surface. The reaction is specific for the crystalline forms of silica. It has been already demonstrated an increased cytotoxicity and stronger induction of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 by ascorbic acid pre-treated quartz (QA compared to untreated quartz (Q in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Methods Taking advantage of the enhanced macrophage response to QA as compared to Q particles, we investigated the first steps of cell activation and the contribution of early signals generated directly from the plasma membrane to the production of TNF-α, a cytokine that activates both inflammatory and fibrogenic pathways. Results Here we demonstrate that TNF-α mRNA synthesis and protein secretion are significantly increased in RAW 264.7 macrophages challenged with QA as compared to Q particles, and that the enhanced response is due to an increase of intracellular ROS. Plasma membrane-particle contact, in the absence of phagocytosis, is sufficient to trigger TNF-α production through a mechanism involving membrane lipid peroxidation and this appears to be even more detrimental to macrophage survival than particle phagocytosis itself. Conclusion Taken together these data suggest that an impairment of pulmonary macrophage phagocytosis, i.e. in the case of alcoholic subjects, could potentiate lung disease in silica-exposed individuals.

  18. Ascorbic acid pre-treated quartz stimulates TNF-alpha release in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages through ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfì, Sonia; Magnone, Mirko; Ferraris, Chiara; Pozzolini, Marina; Benvenuto, Federica; Benatti, Umberto; Giovine, Marco

    2009-03-19

    Inhalation of crystalline silica induces a pulmonary fibrotic degeneration called silicosis caused by the inability of alveolar macrophages to dissolve the crystalline structure of phagocytosed quartz particles. Ascorbic acid is capable of partially dissolving quartz crystals, leading to an increase of soluble silica concentration and to the generation of new radical sites on the quartz surface. The reaction is specific for the crystalline forms of silica. It has been already demonstrated an increased cytotoxicity and stronger induction of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by ascorbic acid pre-treated quartz (QA) compared to untreated quartz (Q) in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Taking advantage of the enhanced macrophage response to QA as compared to Q particles, we investigated the first steps of cell activation and the contribution of early signals generated directly from the plasma membrane to the production of TNF-alpha, a cytokine that activates both inflammatory and fibrogenic pathways. Here we demonstrate that TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis and protein secretion are significantly increased in RAW 264.7 macrophages challenged with QA as compared to Q particles, and that the enhanced response is due to an increase of intracellular ROS. Plasma membrane-particle contact, in the absence of phagocytosis, is sufficient to trigger TNF-alpha production through a mechanism involving membrane lipid peroxidation and this appears to be even more detrimental to macrophage survival than particle phagocytosis itself. Taken together these data suggest that an impairment of pulmonary macrophage phagocytosis, i.e. in the case of alcoholic subjects, could potentiate lung disease in silica-exposed individuals.

  19. Ascorbic acid pre-treated quartz stimulates TNF-α release in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages through ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfì, Sonia; Magnone, Mirko; Ferraris, Chiara; Pozzolini, Marina; Benvenuto, Federica; Benatti, Umberto; Giovine, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Background Inhalation of crystalline silica induces a pulmonary fibrotic degeneration called silicosis caused by the inability of alveolar macrophages to dissolve the crystalline structure of phagocytosed quartz particles. Ascorbic acid is capable of partially dissolving quartz crystals, leading to an increase of soluble silica concentration and to the generation of new radical sites on the quartz surface. The reaction is specific for the crystalline forms of silica. It has been already demonstrated an increased cytotoxicity and stronger induction of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by ascorbic acid pre-treated quartz (QA) compared to untreated quartz (Q) in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Methods Taking advantage of the enhanced macrophage response to QA as compared to Q particles, we investigated the first steps of cell activation and the contribution of early signals generated directly from the plasma membrane to the production of TNF-α, a cytokine that activates both inflammatory and fibrogenic pathways. Results Here we demonstrate that TNF-α mRNA synthesis and protein secretion are significantly increased in RAW 264.7 macrophages challenged with QA as compared to Q particles, and that the enhanced response is due to an increase of intracellular ROS. Plasma membrane-particle contact, in the absence of phagocytosis, is sufficient to trigger TNF-α production through a mechanism involving membrane lipid peroxidation and this appears to be even more detrimental to macrophage survival than particle phagocytosis itself. Conclusion Taken together these data suggest that an impairment of pulmonary macrophage phagocytosis, i.e. in the case of alcoholic subjects, could potentiate lung disease in silica-exposed individuals. PMID:19298665

  20. Spontaneous release of epiretinal membrane in a young weight-lifting athlete by presumed central rupture and centrifugal pull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour AM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad M Mansour,1,2 Hana A Mansour,3 J Fernando Arevalo4,5 1Department of Ophthalmology, Rafic Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Department of Ophthalmology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; 3Department of Biology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; 4Retina Department, The King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 5Retina Department, Wilmer Eye Institute, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: This patient presented for surgery at the age of 32 years, 14 months after his initial complaint of metamorphopsia and visual loss in the right eye. Past tests demonstrated a whitish epiretinal membrane (ERM with translucent stress lines over a thickened macula. Visual acuity was found on last presentation to be normal with minimal alteration on Amsler grid testing. A torn ERM was found in the center with left-over ERM temporally and rolled-over ERM nasally at the site of the epicenter with no posterior vitreous detachment. Visual recovery occurred gradually over several days 2 months prior to presentation apparently following heavy weight-lifting with a sensation of severe eye pressure. Sequential funduscopy and optical coherence tomography scans demonstrated the peeling of an ERM accompanied by normalization of foveal thickness. Valsalva maneuver had put excessive tension on ERM which tore in its center at the weakest line with gradual contraction of the ERM away from the fovea towards the peripapillary area. This is a new mechanism of self-separation of ERM induced by Valsalva. ERM in young subjects is subject to rupture and subsequent separation by tangential traction. There are three mechanisms for spontaneous separation of ERM: 1 posterior vitreous detachment with pulling of ERM by detaching vitreous (most common in adults; 2 the contracting forces of the immature ERM become stronger than its adhesions to the retina resulting in slow tangential traction on the

  1. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...

  2. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  3. Biobased Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.A.B.; Zlopasa, J.; Picken, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane applicable to building material, such as concrete, cement, etc., to a meth od of applying said composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane, a biocompatible membrane, use of said membrane for various

  4. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... check for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis Complement levels Cryoglobulin test Treatment The goal of treatment ... not as helpful for people with membranous nephropathy. Medicines used treat membranous nephropathy include: Angiotensin-converting enzyme ( ...

  5. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  6. Radiation curing of intelligent coating for controlled release and permeation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kaetsu, Isao; Uchida, Kumao; Sakata, Shoei; Tougou, Kazuhide; Hara, Takamichi; Matsubara, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    Intelligent membranes for pH and temperature-responsive drug releases were developed by coating and curing of polymer-drug composite film with electrolyte or N-isopropyl acrylamide curable mixture. It was proved that those intelligent membranes showed the stimule-sensitive and responsive release functions and could be produced efficiently by radiation curing processing with a conveyer system

  7. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  8. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  9. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granstrom, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and

  10. Membrane paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Thorne, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane paradigm is a modified frozen star approach to modeling black holes, with particles and fields assuming a complex, static, boundary-layer type structure (membrane) near the event horizon. The membrane has no effects on the present or future evolution of particles and fields above itself. The mathematical representation is a combination of a formalism containing terms for the shear and bulk viscosity, surface pressure, momentum, temperature, entropy, etc., of the horizon and the 3+1 formalism. The latter model considers a family of three-dimensional spacelike hypersurfaces in one-dimensional time. The membrane model considers a magnetic field threading the hole and undergoing torque from the hole rotation. The field is cleaned by the horizon and distributed over the horizon so that ohmic dissipation is minimized. The membrane paradigm is invalid inside the horizon, but is useful for theoretically probing the properties of slowly evolving black holes

  11. Membrane processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    The membrane processes have played important role in the industrial separation process. These technologies can be found in all industrial areas such as food, beverages, metallurgy, pulp and paper, textile, pharmaceutical, automotive, biotechnology and chemical industry, as well as in water treatment for domestic and industrial application. Although these processes are known since twentieth century, there are still many studies that focus on the testing of new membranes' materials and determining of conditions for optimal selectivity, i. e. the optimum transmembrane pressure (TMP) or permeate flux to minimize fouling. Moreover the researchers proposed some calculation methods to predict the membrane processes properties. In this article, the laboratory scale experiments of membrane separation techniques, as well their validation by calculation methods are presented. Because membrane is the "heart" of the process, experimental and computational methods for its characterization are also described.

  12. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during...... the various evolutionary stages that led from inanimate to living matter. It is also likely that primitive membranes played a similar role in protocell 'physiology'. The composition of such ancestral membranes has been proposed as mixtures of single hydrocarbon chain amphiphiles, which are simpler versions...

  13. Aggressive re-warming at 38.5 degrees C following deep hypothermia at 21 degrees C increases neutrophil membrane bound elastase activity and pro-inflammatory factor release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Min; Zhao, Xiao-gang; He, Yi; Gu, Yan; Mei, Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is often performed under hypothermic condition. The effects of hypothermia and re-warming on neutrophil activity are unclear. This study aimed to compare the effects of different hypothermia and re-warming regimens on neutrophil membrane bound elastase (MBE)

  14. Metalloprotease Dependent Release of Placenta Derived Fractalkine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Siwetz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine fractalkine is considered as unique since it exists both as membrane-bound adhesion molecule and as shed soluble chemoattractant. Here the hypothesis was tested whether placental fractalkine can be shed and released into the maternal circulation. Immunohistochemical staining of human first trimester and term placenta sections localized fractalkine at the apical microvillous plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast. Gene expression analysis revealed abundant upregulation in placental fractalkine at term, compared to first trimester. Fractalkine expression and release were detected in the trophoblast cell line BeWo, in primary term trophoblasts and placental explants. Incubation of BeWo cells and placental explants with metalloprotease inhibitor Batimastat inhibited the release of soluble fractalkine and at the same time increased the membrane-bound form. These results demonstrate that human placenta is a source for fractalkine, which is expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast and can be released into the maternal circulation by constitutive metalloprotease dependent shedding. Increased expression and release of placental fractalkine may contribute to low grade systemic inflammatory responses in third trimester of normal pregnancy. Aberrant placental metalloprotease activity may not only affect the release of placenta derived fractalkine but may at the same time affect the abundance of the membrane-bound form of the chemokine.

  15. Stapes Release in Tympanosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedri, Es-Hak; Teferi, Nebiat; Redleaf, Miriam

    2018-02-01

    : Tympanosclerosis in the middle ear space is common in Ethiopia and often involves the ossicles and particularly the stapes. Ear operations in Ethiopia are relatively expensive in this country of limited medical resources and a low average living wage. In this setting, 2-stage operations using prostheses become prohibitively expensive. Therefore, the recommended 2-stage approach for tympanic membrane perforation with tympanosclerosis and stapes fixation is impractical for Ethiopia.We present a series of 67 patients who had a single stage tympanoplasty, removal of tympanosclerosis from the stapes suprastructure, and ossicular chain reconstruction using ossicular interposition. Crucial is the surgical technique employed for peeling the mound of tympanosclerotic plaque off of the stapes, which we term the stapes release. Controls were 67 patients with similar perforations and air-bone gap, but no tympanosclerosis. Most controls had ossciular discontinuity and were reconstructed with type III tympanoplasty.Air-bone gap improved in both groups: 18 dB (11 dB standard deviation) in the stapes release group, and 23 dB (11 dB standard deviation) in the control group. Paired t test found these improvements in each group significant at p < 0.001. Among the preoperative subjects there were 40 with air-bone gap greater than 45 dB, and none less than 20 dB. Among the postoperative subjects, none had air-bone gap worse than 45 dB, while 25/67 (37%) stapes release and 44/67 (66%) controls had air-bone gap better than 20 dB. Three patients in each group failed to close their perforations completely (96% closure rate).The only complications were two early cases of transient facial nerve weakness, which was avoided in subsequent cases by an alteration in technique. There was no deterioration of sensorineural hearing levels in either group's subjects postoperatively.In conclusion, stapes release with ossicular interposition can be performed at the same time as

  16. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    , Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  17. Stimuli-Responsive Materials for Controlled Release Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2015-04-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. To address this outstanding problem, the design and fabrication of stimuli-responsive materials are pursued to guarantee the controlled release of cargo at a specific time and with an accurate amount. Upon applying different stimuli such as light, magnetic field, heat, pH change, enzymes or redox, functional materials change their physicochemical properties through physical transformation or chemical reactions, allowing the release of payload agents on demand. This dissertation studied three stimuli-responsive membrane systems for controlled release from films of macro sizes to microcapsules of nano sizes. The first membrane system is a polymeric composite film which can decrease and sustain diffusion upon light irradiation. The photo-response of membranes is based on the photoreaction of cinnamic derivatives. The second one is composite membrane which can improve diffusion upon heating. The thermo-response of membranes comes from the volume phase transition ability of hydrogels. The third one is microcapsule which can release encapsulated agents upon light irradiation. The photo-response of capsules results from the photoreaction of nitrobenzyl derivatives. The study on these membrane systems reveals that stimuli-responsive release can be achieved by utilizing different functional materials on either macro or micro level. Based on the abundant family of smart materials, designing and fabricating stimuli-responsive systems shall lead to various advanced release processes on demand for biomedical applications.

  18. Nanofiber Composite Membranes for Alkaline Fuel Cells: Generation of Compositional, Morphological, and Functional Property Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    properties of nanofiber composite anion-exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells. A new membrane fabrication strategy, utilizing polymer fiber...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Nanofiber Composite Membranes for Alkaline Fuel Cells: Generation of Compositional...Park, NC 27709-2211 nanofibers, electrospinning, composite membranes, alkaline fuel cells REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER

  19. Living Membranes as Environmental Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-19

    the original proposal. Working with the bacterial cellulose “ Living Membrane” system, we have addressed the major design and structural impediments...cloning of the cellulose genetic machinery. We have also identified potential future directions to optimize and 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...Oct-2011 30-Sep-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Living Membranes as Environmental Detectors The views, opinions

  20. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detai...

  1. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  2. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  3. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism.

  4. Cell membrane structures during exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savigny, Pascale; Evans, John; McGrath, Kathryn M

    2007-08-01

    Exocytosis is a key biological process that controls the neurotransmission and release of hormones from cells. In endocrine cells, hormones are packed into secretory vesicles and released into the extracellular environment via openings in the plasma membrane, a few hundred nanometers wide, which form as a result of fusion of the membranes of the granule and cell. The complex processes and dynamics that result in the formation of the fusion pore, as well as its structure, remain scantly understood. A number of different exocytosis mechanisms have been postulated. Furthermore, the possibility exists that several mechanisms occur simultaneously. We present here an investigation of the cell membrane dynamics during exocytosis in anterior pituitary cells, especially gonadotropes, which secrete LH, a hormone central to ovulation. Gonadotrope enrichment was achieved using immunolabeled magnetic nanobeads. Three complementary imaging techniques were used to realize a fine structure study of the dynamics of the exocytosis-like sites occurring during secretion. Living pituitary and gonadotrope-enriched cells were imaged with atomic force microscopy, as well as cells that had been fixed to obtain better resolution. Atomic force microscopy, along with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, studies of these cells revealed that there are at least two different site configurations: simple single fusion pores and a complex association of pores consisting of a simple primary site combined with secondary attachments.

  5. Molecular Interactions at Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagalski, Vivien

    Biological membranes are essential and complex structures in every living cell consisting of a fluid lipid bilayer sheet and membrane proteins. Its significance makes biological membranes not only interesting for medical research, but also has made it a target for toxins in the course of evolution....... Today, we know more than ever before about the properties of biological membranes. Advanced biophysical techniques and sophisticated membrane models allow us to answer specific questions about the structure of the components within membranes and their interactions. However, many detailed structural...... mechanisms of membrane compounds, including compounds associated with membranes, are still unknown due to the challenges that arise when probing the hydrophobic nature of the membrane's interior. For integral membrane proteins that span through the entire membrane, the amphiphilic environment is essential...

  6. Na-K activated ATPase and the release of acetylcholine and noradrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizi, E S; Tŏrŏk, T; Seregi, A; Serfŏzŏ, P; Adam-Vizi, V

    1982-01-01

    1. It has been shown that different experimental conditions known to inhibit Na-K-activated ATPase, and enzyme present in the neuronal membranes, are able to promote transmitter release (ACh, NA, etc.) from different tissues, simply by making the membrane leaky. 2. Under physiological conditions, Ca entering the cell transiently inhibits membrane ATPase, resulting in a transient change in membrane permeability and a subsequent release of transmitter. 3. When membrane ATPase inhibitor was used one part of the release proved to be Ca-independent. This finding indicates that the voltage and Ca-dependent link of transmitter release can be by-passed by direct membrane ATPase inhibitors (ouabain). 4. Neurochemical and electrophysiological evidence was obtained on mouse diaphragm that most of the released ACh is cytoplasmic and Na-K ATPase inhibition is responsible for its release. 5. The stimulation of membrane ATPase (by switching off K and its readmission) results in an inhibition of both ACh and noradrenaline release evoked by axonal stimulation. 6. It is suggested that, in those cases where the varicose axon terminals do not make synaptic contact, the transmitter released from the cytoplasmic pool contributes to the transmission, since during diffusion (sometimes few thousand nm) transmitter of different origins becomes mixed up.

  7. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  8. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  9. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  10. Dynamics of HIV-1 assembly and release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Ivanchenko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Assembly and release of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV occur at the plasma membrane of infected cells and are driven by the Gag polyprotein. Previous studies analyzed viral morphogenesis using biochemical methods and static images, while dynamic and kinetic information has been lacking until very recently. Using a combination of wide-field and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have investigated the assembly and release of fluorescently labeled HIV-1 at the plasma membrane of living cells with high time resolution. Gag assembled into discrete clusters corresponding to single virions. Formation of multiple particles from the same site was rarely observed. Using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein fused to Gag, we determined that assembly was nucleated preferentially by Gag molecules that had recently attached to the plasma membrane or arrived directly from the cytosol. Both membrane-bound and cytosol derived Gag polyproteins contributed to the growing bud. After their initial appearance, assembly sites accumulated at the plasma membrane of individual cells over 1-2 hours. Assembly kinetics were rapid: the number of Gag molecules at a budding site increased, following a saturating exponential with a rate constant of approximately 5 x 10(-3 s(-1, corresponding to 8-9 min for 90% completion of assembly for a single virion. Release of extracellular particles was observed at approximately 1,500+/-700 s after the onset of assembly. The ability of the virus to recruit components of the cellular ESCRT machinery or to undergo proteolytic maturation, or the absence of Vpu did not significantly alter the assembly kinetics.

  11. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  12. Polymeric Membrane Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    José M. Sousa; Luís M. Madeira; João C. Santos; Adélio Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is the study of membrane reactors with polymeric membranes, particularly catalytic polymeric membranes. After an introduction where the main advantages and disadvantages of the use of polymeric membranes are summarised, a review of the main areas where they have been applied, integrated in chemical reactors, is presented. This excludes the field of bio-membranes processes, which is analysed in a specific chapter of this book. Particular attention is then given to model...

  13. Dynamic coating of mf/uf membranes for fouling mitigation

    KAUST Repository

    Tabatabai, S. Assiyeh Alizadeh

    2017-01-19

    A membrane system including an anti-fouling layer and a method of applying an anti-fouling layer to a membrane surface are provided. In an embodiment, the surface is a microfiltration (MF) or an ultrafiltration (UF) membrane surface. The anti-fouling layer can include a stimuli responsive layer and a dynamic protective layer applied over the stimuli responsive layer that can be a coating on a surface of the membrane. The stimuli responsive polymer layer can act as an adhesive prior to coating with the dynamic protective layer to aid in adhering the dynamic protective layer to the membrane surface. The dynamic protective layer can be formed by suitable nanoparticles that can prevent adhesion of foulants directly to the membrane surface. The stimuli responsive layer can be responsive to physio- chemical stimuli to cause a release of the stimuli responsive layer and the dynamic protective layer including foulants from the membrane.

  14. Introduction to Extracellular Vesicles: Biogenesis, RNA Cargo Selection, Content, Release, and Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Erik R; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous group of membrane-limited vesicles loaded with various proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Release of extracellular vesicles from its cell of origin occurs either through the outward budding of the plasma membrane or through the inward budding of the endosomal membrane, resulting in the formation of multivesicular bodies, which release vesicles upon fusion with the plasma membrane. The release of vesicles can facilitate intercellular communication by contact with or by internalization of contents, either by fusion with the plasma membrane or by endocytosis into "recipient" cells. Although the interest in extracellular vesicle research is increasing, there are still no real standards in place to separate or classify the different types of vesicles. This review provides an introduction into this expanding and complex field of research focusing on the biogenesis, nucleic acid cargo loading, content, release, and uptake of extracellular vesicles.

  15. Versatile membrane deformation potential of activated pacsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Lin Goh

    Full Text Available Endocytosis is a fundamental process in signaling and membrane trafficking. The formation of vesicles at the plasma membrane is mediated by the G protein dynamin that catalyzes the final fission step, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteins that sense or induce membrane curvature. One such protein, the F-BAR domain-containing protein pacsin, contributes to this process and has been shown to induce a spectrum of membrane morphologies, including tubules and tube constrictions in vitro. Full-length pacsin isoform 1 (pacsin-1 has reduced activity compared to its isolated F-BAR domain, implicating an inhibitory role for its C-terminal Src homology 3 (SH3 domain. Here we show that the autoinhibitory, intramolecular interactions in pacsin-1 can be released upon binding to the entire proline-rich domain (PRD of dynamin-1, resulting in potent membrane deformation activity that is distinct from the isolated F-BAR domain. Most strikingly, we observe the generation of small, homogenous vesicles with the activated protein complex under certain experimental conditions. In addition, liposomes prepared with different methods yield distinct membrane deformation morphologies of BAR domain proteins and apparent activation barriers to pacsin-1's activity. Theoretical free energy calculations suggest bimodality of the protein-membrane system as a possible source for the different outcomes, which could account for the coexistence of energetically equivalent membrane structures induced by BAR domain-containing proteins in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest a versatile role for pacsin-1 in sculpting cellular membranes that is likely dependent both on protein structure and membrane properties.

  16. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  17. Plasma membrane changes during programmed cell deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Xin; Gueydan, Cyril; Han, Jiahuai

    2018-01-01

    Ruptured and intact plasma membranes are classically considered as hallmarks of necrotic and apoptotic cell death, respectively. As such, apoptosis is usually considered a non-inflammatory process while necrosis triggers inflammation. Recent studies on necroptosis and pyroptosis, two types of programmed necrosis, revealed that plasma membrane rupture is mediated by MLKL channels during necroptosis but depends on non-selective gasdermin D (GSDMD) pores during pyroptosis. Importantly, the morphology of dying cells executed by MLKL channels can be distinguished from that executed by GSDMD pores. Interestingly, it was found recently that secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells, a previously believed non-regulated form of cell lysis that occurs after apoptosis, can be programmed and executed by plasma membrane pore formation like that of pyroptosis. In addition, pyroptosis is associated with pyroptotic bodies, which have some similarities to apoptotic bodies. Therefore, different cell death programs induce distinctive reshuffling processes of the plasma membrane. Given the fact that the nature of released intracellular contents plays a crucial role in dying/dead cell-induced immunogenicity, not only membrane rupture or integrity but also the nature of plasma membrane breakdown would determine the fate of a cell as well as its ability to elicit an immune response. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the field of apoptosis, necroptosis and pyroptosis, with an emphasis on the mechanisms underlying plasma membrane changes observed on dying cells and their implication in cell death-elicited immunogenicity.

  18. Enzyme-triggered compound release using functionalized antimicrobial peptide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Shin; Kashibe, Masayoshi; Matsumoto, Kengo; Hori, Yuichiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2017-04-01

    Controlled release is one of the key technologies for medical innovation, and many stimulus-responsive nanocarriers have been developed to utilize this technology. Enzyme activity is one of the most useful stimuli, because many enzymes are specifically activated in diseased tissues. However, controlled release stimulated by enzyme activity has not been frequently reported. One of the reasons for this is the lack of versatility of carriers. Most of the reported stimulus-responsive systems involve a sophisticated design and a complicated process for the synthesis of stimulus-responsive nanocarrier components. The purpose of this study was to develop versatile controlled release systems triggered by various stimuli, including enzyme activity, without modifying the nanocarrier components. We developed two controlled release systems, both of which comprised a liposome as the nanocarrier and a membrane-damaging peptide, temporin L (TL), and its derivatives as the release-controllers. One system utilized branched peptides for proteases, and the other utilized phosphopeptides for phosphatases. In our systems, the target enzymes converted the non-membrane-damaging TL derivatives into membrane-damaging peptides and released the liposome inclusion. We demonstrated the use of our antimicrobial peptide-based controlled release systems for different enzymes and showed the promise of this technology as a novel theranostic tool.

  19. Influence of nimodipine, verapamil and lanthanum on histamine release from human basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C B; Thastrup, Ole; Norn, S

    1987-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that the membrane content of sialic acid influences histamine release from human basophils by interfering with the transmembraneous calcium fluxes preceding histamine release. In this study we investigated a possible interaction between membrane sialic acid...... and the calcium channels, using the calcium antagonists nimodipine, verapamil and lanthanum. Anti-IgE-induced histamine release was inhibited by verapamil, nimodipine and lanthanum. When cells were pretreated with sialidase in order to remove sialic acid from the cell membrane, the inhibitory action of nimodipine...

  20. Extracellular vesicle-mediated transfer of processed and functional RNY5 RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabortty, Sudipto K.; Prakash, Ashwin; Nechooshtan, Gal; Hearn, Stephen; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been proposed as a means to promote intercellular communication. We show that when human primary cells are exposed to cancer cell EVs, rapid cell death of the primary cells is observed, while cancer cells treated with primary or cancer cell EVs do not display this response. The active agents that trigger cell death are 29- to 31-nucleotide (nt) or 22- to 23-nt processed fragments of an 83-nt primary transcript of the human RNY5 gene that are highly likely to be formed within the EVs. Primary cells treated with either cancer cell EVs, deproteinized total RNA from either primary or cancer cell EVs, or synthetic versions of 31- and 23-nt fragments trigger rapid cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The transfer of processed RNY5 fragments through EVs may reflect a novel strategy used by cancer cells toward the establishment of a favorable microenvironment for their proliferation and invasion. PMID:26392588

  1. Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Receptor-Independent Transmission of Novel Tick-Borne Bunyavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvas, Jesus A.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus is a newly recognized member of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. The virus was isolated from patients presenting with hemorrhagic manifestations and an initial case fatality rate of 12 to 30% was reported. Due to the recent emergence of this pathogen, there is limited knowledge on the molecular virology of SFTS virus. Recently, we reported that the SFTS virus NSs protein inhibited the activation of the beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter. Furthermore, we also found that SFTS virus NSs relocalizes key components of the IFN response into NSs-induced cytoplasmic structures. Due to the important role these structures play during SFTS virus replication, we conducted live cell imaging studies to gain further insight into the role and trafficking of these cytoplasmic structures during virus infection. We found that some of the SFTS virus NSs-positive cytoplasmic structures were secreted to the extracellular space and endocytosed by neighboring cells. We also found that these secreted structures isolated from NSs-expressing cells and SFTS virus-infected cells were positive for the viral protein NSs and the host protein CD63, a protein associated with extracellular vesicles. Electron microscopy studies also revealed that the isolated CD63-immunoprecipitated extracellular vesicles produced during SFTS virus infection contained virions. The virions harbored within these structures were efficiently delivered to uninfected cells and were able to sustain SFTS virus replication. Altogether, these results suggest that SFTS virus exploits extracellular vesicles to mediate virus receptor-independent transmission to host cells and open the avenue for novel therapeutic strategies against SFTS virus and related pathogens. IMPORTANCE SFTS virus is novel bunyavirus associated with hemorrhagic fever illness. Currently, limited information is available about SFTS virus. In the present study, we demonstrated that extracellular vesicles produced by SFTS virus-infected cells harbor infectious virions. We sought to determine whether these “infectious” extracellular vesicles can mediate transmission of the virus and confirmed that the SFTS virions were efficiently transported by these secreted structures into uninfected cells and were able to sustain efficient replication of SFTS virus. These results have significant impact on our understanding of how the novel tick-borne phleboviruses hijack cellular machineries to establish infection and point toward a novel mechanism for virus replication among arthropod-borne viruses. PMID:26512089

  2. Extracellular vesicle-mediated phenotype switching in malignant and non-malignant colon cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvey, Hillary E.; Chang, Audrey; Adler, Jason; Del Tatto, Michael; Perez, Kimberly; Quesenberry, Peter J.; Chatterjee, Devasis

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted from many cells, carrying cargoes including proteins and nucleic acids. Research has shown that EVs play a role in a variety of biological processes including immunity, bone formation and recently they have been implicated in promotion of a metastatic phenotype. EVs were isolated from HCT116 colon cancer cells, 1459 non-malignant colon fibroblast cells, and tumor and normal colon tissue from a patient sample. Co-cultures were performed with 1459 cells and malignant vesicles, as well as HCT116 cells and non-malignant vesicles. Malignant phenotype was measured using soft agar colony formation assay. Co-cultures were also analyzed for protein levels using mass spectrometry. The importance of 14-3-3 zeta/delta in transfer of malignant phenotype was explored using siRNA. Additionally, luciferase reporter assay was used to measure the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. This study demonstrates the ability of EVs derived from malignant colon cancer cell line and malignant patient tissue to induce the malignant phenotype in non-malignant colon cells. Similarly, EVs derived from non-malignant colon cell lines and normal patient tissue reversed the malignant phenotype of HCT116 cells. Cells expressing an EV-induced malignant phenotype showed increased transcriptional activity of NF-κB which was inhibited by the NF--κB inhibitor, BAY117082. We also demonstrate that knock down of 14-3-3 zeta/delta reduced anchorage-independent growth of HCT116 cells and 1459 cells co-cultured with HCT derived EVs. Evidence of EV-mediated induction of malignant phenotype, and reversal of malignant phenotype, provides rational basis for further study of the role of EVs in tumorigenesis. Identification of 14-3-3 zeta/delta as up-regulated in malignancy suggests its potential as a putative drug target for the treatment of colorectal cancer

  3. Novel bioresorbable strontium hydroxyapatite membrane for guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J; Acharya, A; Chen, K; Chou, J; Kasugai, S; Lang, N P

    2015-01-01

    Membrane materials have been widely used for guided bone regeneration (GBR). However, due to bio-functional limitation of the current membranes, the ideal resorbable membrane that can stimulate bone regeneration has yet to be developed. This study seeks to investigate the effects of a strontium hydroxyapatite (SrHA)-containing membrane for GBR. Strontium hydroxyapatite powder was synthesized and mixed with gelatin solution to the final concentration of 10 mg/ml (Sr10) and 20 mg/ml (Sr20). Approximately 100-μm-thick membranes were fabricated, and the mechanical properties and strontium ion release pattern were analyzed. Rat bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) responses were investigated in vitro. Bilaterial rat calvarial defects were used in vivo to compare the SrHA membranes against commercially available collagen membranes and evaluated radiologically and histologically. Strontium hydroxyapatite membranes exhibited higher elasticity and strength than the collagen membrane, and slow strontium ion release was also confirmed. No BMSC cytotoxicity was found on the SrHA membranes, and the alkaline phosphatase positively stained area was significantly greater than the collagen membrane at earlier time point. At 4 weeks, both micro-CT and histological analyses revealed that the Sr20 group yielded significantly greater bone formation. The SrHA-containing membrane developed in this study was found to be a biocompatible material that can stimulate BMSC differentiation as well as bone regeneration and maturation in rat calvarial defects at early time point compared with collagen membrane. The best result was observed in Sr20 group, which can be potentially effective for GBR. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Silver nanoparticles delivery system based on natural rubber latex membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, Eder Jose, E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo/FFCLRP-DF (Brazil); Kinoshita, Angela [Universidade do Sagrado Coracao (Brazil); Ramos, Ana Paula [Universidade de Sao Paulo/FFCLRP-DQ (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo [Universidade de Sao Paulo/FFCLRP-DF (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    The search for new materials for biomedical applications is extremely important. Here, we present results on the performance of a silver nanoparticles delivery system using natural rubber latex (NRL) as the polymeric matrix. Our aim was to obtain an optimized wound dressing by combining materials with potential healing action. The synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are depicted. The NRL membranes are good matrix for silver nanoparticles and allow for their gradual release. The release of 30 nm silver nanoparticles by the NRL membranes depends on their mass percentage in NRL membranes. The total concentration of AgNP released by the NRL membranes was calculated. The AgNP attached to the cis-isoprene molecules in the NRL matrix remain attached to the membrane ({approx}0.1 % w/w). So, only the AgNP bound to the non-rubber molecules are released. FTIR spectra suggest that non-rubber molecules, like aminoacids and proteins, associated with the serum fraction of the NRL may be attached to the surfaces of the released nanoparticles, thereby increasing the release of such molecules. The released silver nanoparticles are sterically stabilized, more stable and well dispersed. Because the serum fraction of the NRL is responsible for the angiogenic properties of the matrix, the silver nanoparticles could increment the angiogenic properties of NRL. This biomaterial has desirable properties for the fabrication of a wound dressing with potential healing action, since it combines the angiogenic and antibacterial properties of the silver nanoparticles with the increased angiogenic properties of the NRL.Graphical AbstractThe AgNP attached to the cis-isoprene molecules remain in the NRL matrix and only the AgNP bound to the non-rubber molecules (NRL serum fraction) are released. The released AgNP are

  5. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Randy D.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoactive drugs, these transport systems have important roles in transmitter release, but we are only beginning to understand their contribution to synaptic transmission, plasticity, behavior, and disease. Recent work has started to provide a structural basis for their activity, to characterize their trafficking and potential for regulation. The results indicate that far from the passive target of psychoactive drugs, neurotransmitter transporters undergo regulation that contributes to synaptic plasticity. PMID:22199021

  6. Synthetic Biological Membrane (SBM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ultimate goal of the Synthetic Biological Membrane project is to develop a new type of membrane that will enable the wastewater treatment system required on...

  7. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  8. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  9. Premature rupture of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000512.htm Premature rupture of membranes To use the sharing features on this page, ... water that surrounds your baby in the womb. Membranes or layers of tissue hold in this fluid. ...

  10. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  11. In-vitro Degradation Behaviour of Irradiated Bacterial Cellulose Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Darwis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose membrane synthesized by Acetobacter xylinum in coconut water medium has potential application for Guided bone Regeneration. However, this membrane may not meet some application requirements due to its low biodegradation properties. In this paper, incorporation of gamma irradiation into the membrane is a developed strategy to increase its biodegradability properties. The in–vitro degradation study in synthetic body fluid (SBF of the irradiated membrane has been analyzed during periods of 6 months by means of weight loss, mechanical properties and scanning electron microscopy observation compared to that the un-irradiated one. The result showed that weight loss of irradiated membrane with 25 kGy and 50 kGy and immersed in SBF solution for 6 months reached 18% and 25% respectively. While un-irradiated membrane did not give significant weight loss. Tensile strength of membranes decreases with increasing of irradiation dose and further decreases in tensile strength is observed when irradiated membrane was followed by immersion in SBF solution. Microscope electron image of cellulose membranes shows that un-irradiated bacterial cellulose membrane consists of dense ultrafine fibril network structures, while irradiation result in cleavage of fibrils network of cellulose. The fibrils network become loosely after irradiated membrane immersed in SBF solution due to released of small molecular weight carbohydrates formed during by irradiation from the structure

  12. Glutamate release from platelets: exocytosis versus glutamate transporter reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkina, Ludmila A; Borisova, Tatiana A

    2013-11-01

    Platelets express neuronal and glial glutamate transporters EAAT 1-3 in the plasma membrane and vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT 1,2 in the membrane of secretory granules. This study is focused on the assessment of non-exocytotic glutamate release, that is, the unstimulated release, heteroexchange and glutamate transporter reversal in platelets. Using the glutamate dehydrogenase assay, the absence of unstimulated release of endogenous glutamate from platelets was demonstrated, even after inhibition of glutamate transporters and cytoplasmic enzyme glutamine synthetase by dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate and methionine sulfoximine, respectively. Depolarization of the plasma membrane by exposure to elevated [K(+)] did not induce the release of glutamate from platelets that was shown using the glutamate dehydrogenase assay and radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate. Glutamate efflux by means of heteroexchange with transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporters dl-threo-β-hydroxyaspartate (dl-THA) was not observed. Furthermore, the protonophore cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon (FCCP) and inhibitor of V-type H(+)-ATPase bafilomycin A1 also failed to stimulate the release of glutamate from platelets. However, exocytotic release of glutamate from secretory granules in response to thrombin stimulation was not prevented by elevated [K(+)], dl-THA, FCCP and bafilomycin A1. In contrast to nerve terminals, platelets cannot release glutamate in a non-exocytotic manner. Heteroexchange, transporter-mediated and unstimulated release of glutamate are not inherent to platelets. Therefore, platelets may be used as a peripheral marker/model for the analysis of glutamate uptake by brain nerve terminals only (direct function of transporters), whereas the mechanisms of glutamate release are different in platelets and nerve terminals. Glutamate is released by platelets exclusively by means of exocytosis. Also, reverse function of vesicular glutamate transporters of platelets is

  13. Fluoroelastomer Fouling Release Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malik, Aslam

    1998-01-01

    Our goal is to develop novel fluoroelastomers that exhibit fouling release capabilities and to understand the polymer characteristics that influence the adhesion of biofouling organisms to polymeric substrates...

  14. Compassionate release in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, J

    1997-01-01

    Several States have instituted compassionate release programs to allow terminally ill inmates to be released early. The programs are politically sensitive, and the California program is highlighted. Early release, called recall of sentence under the State penal code, is a lengthy and cumbersome process that has resulted in early release of nearly 100 prisoners in the past 5 years. Guidelines for community activists who are trying to establish similar programs are provided. The guidelines include contact and discussion with prisoners, outside support through influential organizations, support of State legislators and policy makers, and media involvement in building support for the initiative.

  15. Release the Body, Release the Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Martha Goff

    1998-01-01

    A college English teacher describes the anxiety and resentment of students during in-class writing assignments and the successful classroom use of meditation and body movement. Movement seemed to relax the students, change their attitudes, and release their creative impulses to write. Implications related to the body-mind connection are pondered.…

  16. Enterococcus faecalis and pathogenic streptococci inactivate daptomycin by releasing phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, Elizabeth V K; Pader, Vera; Edwards, Andrew M

    2017-10-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic with activity against Gram-positive bacteria. We showed previously that Staphylococcus aureus can survive daptomycin exposure by releasing membrane phospholipids that inactivate the antibiotic. To determine whether other pathogens possess this defence mechanism, phospholipid release and daptomycin activity were measured after incubation of Staphylococcus epidermidis, group A or B streptococci, Streptococcus gordonii or Enterococcus faecalis with the antibiotic. All bacteria released phospholipids in response to daptomycin, which resulted in at least partial inactivation of the antibiotic. However, E. faecalis showed the highest levels of lipid release and daptomycin inactivation. As shown previously for S. aureus, phospholipid release by E. faecalis was inhibited by the lipid biosynthesis inhibitor platensimycin. In conclusion, several pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecalis, inactivate daptomycin by releasing phospholipids, which may contribute to the failure of daptomycin to resolve infections caused by these pathogens.

  17. Idiopathic epiretinal membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roelof; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M M; Los, Leonoor I

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is a fibrocellular membrane that proliferates on the inner surface of the retina at the macular area. Membrane contraction is an important sight-threatening event and is due to fibrotic remodeling. Methods: Analysis of the current literature

  18. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  19. Membrane contactor applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.; Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a membrane contactor the membrane separation is completely integrated with an extraction or absorption operation in order to exploit the benefits of both technologies fully. Membrane contactor applications that have been developed can be found in both water and gas treatment. Several recently

  20. On "spinning" membrane models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Several alternative actions for a bosonic membrane have recently been proposed. We show that a linearly realized locally world-volume-supersymmetric (spinning membrane) extension of any of these actions implies an analogous extension of the standard Dirac membrane action. We further show that a

  1. Meniscus Membranes For Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2005-09-20

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  2. Meniscus membranes for separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C [Irvine, CA; Jorgensen, Betty [Jemez Springs, NM; Pesiri, David R [Aliso Viejo, CA

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  3. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2011-01-01

    membrane include ABC transporters, vacuolar (V-type) H+ pumps, and P-type pumps. These pumps all utilize ATP as a fuel for energizing pumping. This review focuses on the physiological roles of plasma membrane P-type pumps, as they represent the major ATP hydrolytic activity in this membrane....

  4. The ER membrane protein complex is a transmembrane domain insertase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guna, Alina; Volkmar, Norbert; Christianson, John C.; Hegde, Ramanujan S.

    2018-01-01

    Insertion of proteins into membranes is an essential cellular process. The extensive biophysical and topological diversity of membrane proteins necessitates multiple insertion pathways that remain incompletely defined. Here, we found that known membrane insertion pathways fail to effectively engage tail-anchored membrane proteins with moderately hydrophobic transmembrane domains. These proteins are instead shielded in the cytosol by calmodulin. Dynamic release from calmodulin allowed sampling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC) was shown to be essential for efficient insertion in vitro and in cells. Purified EMC in synthetic liposomes catalyzed insertion of its substrates in a reconstituted system. Thus, EMC is a transmembrane domain insertase, a function that may explain its widely pleiotropic membrane-associated phenotypes across organisms. PMID:29242231

  5. Thermal sensors cointegrated within a MEMS thermally actuated ultrathin membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salette, A; Lefevre, R; Agraffeil, C; Guillen, J; Morfouli, P; Montès, L; Déhan, C

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the simulation, design, fabrication and characterization of thermal sensors integrated into an ultrathin active MEMS membrane. Temperature detection is combined without any additional fabrication steps to thermal actuation. Mixing the actuation with a thermal measurement within the membrane allows us to monitor temperature during membrane deflection. Prototypes are fabricated using standard CMOS processes and a deep reactive ion etching process to release the membrane. Inner and outer actuation lead to large membrane deflection. Using such sensors, we extract the temperature profile of the thermally actuated membrane. A good fitting between finite element method simulation and characterization results validates the sensors. Finally, the optimal position of thermal sensors is extracted from this study. (paper)

  6. Electrospinning polyvinylidene fluoride fibrous membranes containing anti-bacterial drugs used as wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ting; Wang, Jingnan; Huang, Peilin; Zeng, Baozhen; Li, Haihong; Cao, Qingyun; Zhang, Shiying; Luo, Zhuo; Deng, David Y B; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhou, Wuyi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesis drug-loaded fibrous membrane scaffolds for potential applications as wound dressing. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibrous membranes were loaded with enrofloxacin (Enro) drugs by using an electrospinning process, and their mechanical strength, drug release profile and anti-bacterial properties were evaluated. Enro drug-loaded PVDF membranes exhibited good elasticity, flexibility and excellent mechanical strength. The electrospinning Enro/PVDF membranes showed a burst drug release in the initial 12h, followed by sustained release for the next 3 days, which was an essential property for antibiotic drugs applied for wound healing. The drug-loaded PVDF fibrous membranes displayed excellent anti-bacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggest that electrospinning PVDF membrane scaffolds loaded with drugs can be used as wound dressing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Large scientific releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics

  8. Microporous silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability is a crucial factor for the application of microporous silica-based membranes in industrial processes. Indeed, it is well established that steam exposure may cause densification and defect formation in microporous silica membranes, which are detrimental to both membrane...... permeability and selectivity. Numerous previous studies show that microporous transition metal doped-silica membranes are hydrothermally more stable than pure silica membranes, but less permeable. Here we present a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions...... on the microporous structure, stability and permeability of amorphous silica-based membranes, providing information on how to design chemical compositions and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile microporous structure....

  9. Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezeshkian, Weria; Ipsen, John H

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of extracellular ligands and proteins on the plasma membrane is required to perform specific cellular functions, such as signaling and endocytosis. Attractive forces that originate in perturbations of the membrane's physical properties contribute to this clustering, in addition to direct...... protein-protein interactions. However, these membrane-mediated forces have not all been equally considered, despite their importance. In this review, we describe how line tension, lipid depletion, and membrane curvature contribute to membrane-mediated clustering. Additional attractive forces that arise...... from protein-induced perturbation of a membrane's fluctuations are also described. This review aims to provide a survey of the current understanding of membrane-mediated clustering and how this supports precise biological functions....

  10. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  11. Supported ionic liquid membrane in membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane reactor is a device that integrates membrane based separation and (catalytic) chemical reaction vessel in a single device. Ionic liquids, considered to be a relatively recent magical chemical due to their unique properties, have a large variety of applications in all areas of chemical industries. Moreover, the ionic liquid can be used as membrane separation layer and/or catalytically active site. This paper will review utilization of ionic liquid in membrane reactor related applications especially Fischer-Tropsch, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation reaction. This paper also reviews about the capability of ionic liquid in equilibrium reaction that produces CO2 product so that the reaction will move towards the product. Water gas shift reaction in ammonia production also direct Dimethyl Ether (DME) synthesis that produces CO2 product will be discussed. Based on a review of numerous articles on supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) indicate that ionic liquids have the potential to support the process of chemical reaction and separation in a membrane reactor.

  12. Novel membrane-based electrochemical sensor for real-time bio-applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya; Dimaki, Maria

    2014-01-01

    experiments showed that the membrane-sensor was suitable as a cell culturing substrate for bio-applications. Real-time measurements of dopamine exocytosis in cell cultures were performed, where the transmitter release was recorded at the point of release. The developed membrane-sensor provides a new......This article presents a novel membrane-based sensor for real-time electrochemical investigations of cellular- or tissue cultures. The membrane sensor enables recording of electrical signals from a cell culture without any signal dilution, thus avoiding loss of sensitivity. Moreover, the porosity...

  13. Emulsification using microporous membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane emulsification is a process of injecting a pure dispersed phase or pre-emulsion through a microporous membrane into the continuous phase. As a result of the immiscibility of the two phases, droplets of the dispersed phase are formed at the outlets of membrane pores. The droplets formed in the process are removed from the membrane surface by applying cross-flow or stirring of the continuous phase or using a dynamic (rotating or vibrating membrane. The most commonly used membrane for emulsification is the Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG membrane, fabricated through spinodal decomposition in a melt consisting of Japanese volcanic ash (Shirasu, boric acid and calcium carbonate. Microsieve membranes are increasingly popular as an alternative to highly tortuous glass and ceramic membranes. Microsieves are usually fabricated from nickel by photolithography and electroplating or they can be manufactured from silicon nitride via Reactive Ion Etching (RIE. An advantage of microsieves compared to the SPG membrane is in much higher transmembrane fluxes and higher tolerance to fouling by the emulsion ingredients due to the existence of short, straight through pores. Unlike conventional emulsification devices such as high-pressure valve homogenisers and rotor-stator devices, membrane emulsification devices permit a precise control over the mean pore size over a wide range and during the process insignificant amount of energy is dissipated as heat. The drop size is primarily determined by the pore size, but it depends also on other parameters, such as membrane wettability, emulsion formulation, shear stress on the membrane surface, transmembrane pressure, etc.

  14. Mechanism of Action of a Membrane-Active Quinoline-Based Antimicrobial on Natural and Model Bacterial Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alasdair T M; Barker, Robert; Rehal, Reg; Vandera, Kalliopi-Kelli A; Harvey, Richard D; Coates, Anthony R M

    2017-02-28

    HT61 is a quinoline-derived antimicrobial, which exhibits bactericidal potency against both multiplying and quiescent methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, and has been proposed as an adjunct for other antimicrobials to extend their usefulness in the face of increasing antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we have examined HT61's effect on the permeability of S. aureus membranes and whether this putative activity can be attributed to an interaction with lipid bilayers. Using membrane potential and ATP release assays, we have shown that HT61 disrupts the membrane enough to result in depolarization of the membrane and release of intercellular constituents at concentrations above and below the minimum inhibitory concentration of the drug. Utilizing both monolayer subphase injection and neutron reflectometry, we have shown that increasing the anionic lipid content of the membrane leads to a more marked effect of the drug. In bilayers containing 25 mol % phosphatidylglycerol, neutron reflectometry data suggest that exposure to HT61 increases the level of solvent in the hydrophobic region of the membrane, which is indicative of gross structural damage. Increasing the proportion of PG elicits a concomitant level of membrane damage, resulting in almost total destruction when 75 mol % phosphatidylglycerol is present. We therefore propose that HT61's primary action is directed toward the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria.

  15. Apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1) deposition in, and release from, the enterocyte brush border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina

    2012-01-01

    resistant membranes (DRMs), indicative of localization in lipid raft microdomains. The apolipoprotein was not readily released from microvillar vesicles by high salt or by incubation with phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C or trypsin, indicating a relatively firm attachment to the membrane bilayer...

  16. Ion-conducting membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Sajjad, Syed Dawar; Gao, Yan; Liu, Zengcai; Chen, Qingmei

    2017-12-26

    An anion-conducting polymeric membrane comprises a terpolymer of styrene, vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x. R.sub.s is a positively charged cyclic amine group. R.sub.x is at least one constituent selected from the group consisting Cl, OH and a reaction product between an OH or Cl and a species other than a simple amine or a cyclic amine. The total weight of the vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x groups is greater than 0.3% of the total weight of the membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  17. Gas separation with membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, G.; Michele, H.; Werner, U.

    1982-01-01

    Gas separation with membranes has already been tested in numerous fields of application, e.g. uranium enrichment of H 2 separation. In many of these processes the mass transfer units, so-called permeators, have to be connected in tandem in order to achieve high concentrations. A most economical operating method provides for each case an optimization of the cascades with regard to the membrane materials, construction and design of module. By utilization of the concentration gradient along the membrane a new process development has been accomplished - the continuously operating membrane rectification unit. Investment and operating costs can be reduced considerably for a number of separating processes by combining a membrane rectification unit with a conventional recycling cascade. However, the new procedure requires that the specifications for the module construction, flow design, and membrane properties be reconsidered. (orig.) [de

  18. Miniature Release Mechanism Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to design, build and functionally test a miniature release mechanism for CubeSats and other small satellites. The WFF 6U satellite structure will be...

  19. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report is a compliation of news releases from the Energy Information Administration. The september-october report includes articles on energy conservation, energy consumption in commercial buildings, and a short term energy model for a personal computer

  20. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-01-22

    The present application offers a solution to the current problems associated with recovery and recycling of precious metals from scrap material, discard articles, and other items comprising one or more precious metals. The solution is premised on a microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  1. Polyarylether composition and membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Joyce; Brunelle, Daniel Joseph; Harmon, Marianne Elisabeth; Moore, David Roger; Stone, Joshua James; Zhou, Hongyi; Suriano, Joseph Anthony

    2010-11-09

    A composition including a polyarylether copolymer is provided. The copolymer includes a polyarylether backbone; and a sulfonated oligomeric group bonded to the polyarylether suitable for use as a cation conducting membrane. Method of bonding a sulfonated oligomeric group to the polyarylether backbone to form a polyarylether copolymer. The membrane may be formed from the polyarylether copolymer composition. The chain length of the sulfonated oligomeric group may be controlled to affect or control the ion conductivity of the membrane.

  2. Silver nanoparticles delivery system based on natural rubber latex membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelli, Éder José; Kinoshita, Angela; Ramos, Ana Paula; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2013-04-01

    The search for new materials for biomedical applications is extremely important. Here, we present results on the performance of a silver nanoparticles delivery system using natural rubber latex (NRL) as the polymeric matrix. Our aim was to obtain an optimized wound dressing by combining materials with potential healing action. The synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are depicted. The NRL membranes are good matrix for silver nanoparticles and allow for their gradual release. The release of 30 nm silver nanoparticles by the NRL membranes depends on their mass percentage in NRL membranes. The total concentration of AgNP released by the NRL membranes was calculated. The AgNP attached to the cis-isoprene molecules in the NRL matrix remain attached to the membrane ( 0.1 % w/w). So, only the AgNP bound to the non-rubber molecules are released. FTIR spectra suggest that non-rubber molecules, like aminoacids and proteins, associated with the serum fraction of the NRL may be attached to the surfaces of the released nanoparticles, thereby increasing the release of such molecules. The released silver nanoparticles are sterically stabilized, more stable and well dispersed. Because the serum fraction of the NRL is responsible for the angiogenic properties of the matrix, the silver nanoparticles could increment the angiogenic properties of NRL. This biomaterial has desirable properties for the fabrication of a wound dressing with potential healing action, since it combines the angiogenic and antibacterial properties of the silver nanoparticles with the increased angiogenic properties of the NRL.

  3. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Gas separation membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.

  5. Molecular machines open cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Víctor; Chen, Fang; Nilewski, Lizanne G; Duret, Guillaume; Aliyan, Amir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Robinson, Jacob T; Wang, Gufeng; Pal, Robert; Tour, James M

    2017-08-30

    Beyond the more common chemical delivery strategies, several physical techniques are used to open the lipid bilayers of cellular membranes. These include using electric and magnetic fields, temperature, ultrasound or light to introduce compounds into cells, to release molecular species from cells or to selectively induce programmed cell death (apoptosis) or uncontrolled cell death (necrosis). More recently, molecular motors and switches that can change their conformation in a controlled manner in response to external stimuli have been used to produce mechanical actions on tissue for biomedical applications. Here we show that molecular machines can drill through cellular bilayers using their molecular-scale actuation, specifically nanomechanical action. Upon physical adsorption of the molecular motors onto lipid bilayers and subsequent activation of the motors using ultraviolet light, holes are drilled in the cell membranes. We designed molecular motors and complementary experimental protocols that use nanomechanical action to induce the diffusion of chemical species out of synthetic vesicles, to enhance the diffusion of traceable molecular machines into and within live cells, to induce necrosis and to introduce chemical species into live cells. We also show that, by using molecular machines that bear short peptide addends, nanomechanical action can selectively target specific cell-surface recognition sites. Beyond the in vitro applications demonstrated here, we expect that molecular machines could also be used in vivo, especially as their design progresses to allow two-photon, near-infrared and radio-frequency activation.

  6. Molecular machines open cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Víctor; Chen, Fang; Nilewski, Lizanne G.; Duret, Guillaume; Aliyan, Amir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Robinson, Jacob T.; Wang, Gufeng; Pal, Robert; Tour, James M.

    2017-08-01

    Beyond the more common chemical delivery strategies, several physical techniques are used to open the lipid bilayers of cellular membranes. These include using electric and magnetic fields, temperature, ultrasound or light to introduce compounds into cells, to release molecular species from cells or to selectively induce programmed cell death (apoptosis) or uncontrolled cell death (necrosis). More recently, molecular motors and switches that can change their conformation in a controlled manner in response to external stimuli have been used to produce mechanical actions on tissue for biomedical applications. Here we show that molecular machines can drill through cellular bilayers using their molecular-scale actuation, specifically nanomechanical action. Upon physical adsorption of the molecular motors onto lipid bilayers and subsequent activation of the motors using ultraviolet light, holes are drilled in the cell membranes. We designed molecular motors and complementary experimental protocols that use nanomechanical action to induce the diffusion of chemical species out of synthetic vesicles, to enhance the diffusion of traceable molecular machines into and within live cells, to induce necrosis and to introduce chemical species into live cells. We also show that, by using molecular machines that bear short peptide addends, nanomechanical action can selectively target specific cell-surface recognition sites. Beyond the in vitro applications demonstrated here, we expect that molecular machines could also be used in vivo, especially as their design progresses to allow two-photon, near-infrared and radio-frequency activation.

  7. Redefining the essential trafficking pathway for outer membrane lipoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowicz, Marcin; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, most lipoproteins synthesized in the inner membrane (IM) are trafficked to the outer membrane (OM). The Lol pathway is the trafficking paradigm: LolCDE releases lipoproteins from the IM; LolA shuttles them between membranes to LolB in the OM. Several OM lipoproteins are essential for viability. In apparent concordance, the Lol proteins are each essential in wild-type cells. However, we show that Escherichia coli grows well without LolA and LolB in the absence of one...

  8. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baul, Upayan, E-mail: upayanb@imsc.res.in; Vemparala, Satyavani, E-mail: vani@imsc.res.in [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C.I.T. Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India); Kuroda, Kenichi, E-mail: kkuroda@umich.edu [Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  9. Mechanistic model and analysis of doxorubicin release from liposomal formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugit, Kyle D; Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Choi, Du H; Kangarlou, Sogol; Csuhai, Eva; Bummer, Paul M; Anderson, Bradley D

    2015-11-10

    Reliable and predictive models of drug release kinetics in vitro and in vivo are still lacking for liposomal formulations. Developing robust, predictive release models requires systematic, quantitative characterization of these complex drug delivery systems with respect to the physicochemical properties governing the driving force for release. These models must also incorporate changes in release due to the dissolution media and methods employed to monitor release. This paper demonstrates the successful development and application of a mathematical mechanistic model capable of predicting doxorubicin (DXR) release kinetics from liposomal formulations resembling the FDA-approved nanoformulation DOXIL® using dynamic dialysis. The model accounts for DXR equilibria (e.g. self-association, precipitation, ionization), the change in intravesicular pH due to ammonia release, and dialysis membrane transport of DXR. The model was tested using a Box-Behnken experimental design in which release conditions including extravesicular pH, ammonia concentration in the release medium, and the dilution of the formulation (i.e. suspension concentration) were varied. Mechanistic model predictions agreed with observed DXR release up to 19h. The predictions were similar to a computer fit of the release data using an empirical model often employed for analyzing data generated from this type of experimental design. Unlike the empirical model, the mechanistic model was also able to provide reasonable predictions of release outside the tested design space. These results illustrate the usefulness of mechanistic modeling to predict drug release from liposomal formulations in vitro and its potential for future development of in vitro - in vivo correlations for complex nanoformulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determining drug release rates of hydrophobic compounds from nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Addio, Suzanne M.; Bukari, Abdallah A.; Dawoud, Mohammed; Bunjes, Heike; Rinaldi, Carlos; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining meaningful drug release profiles for drug formulations is essential prior to in vivo testing and for ensuring consistent quality. The release kinetics of hydrophobic drugs from nanocarriers (NCs) are not well understood because the standard protocols for maintaining sink conditions and sampling are not valid owing to mass transfer and solubility limitations. In this work, a new in vitroassay protocol based on ‘lipid sinks’ and magnetic separation produces release conditions that mimic the concentrations of lipid membranes and lipoproteins in vivo, facilitates separation, and thus allows determination of intrinsic release rates of drugs from NCs. The assay protocol is validated by (i) determining the magnetic separation efficiency, (ii) demonstrating that sink condition requirements are met, and (iii) accounting for drug by completing a mass balance. NCs of itraconazole and cyclosporine A (CsA) were prepared and the drug release profiles were determined. This release protocol has been used to compare the drug release from a polymer stabilized NC of CsA to a solid drug NP of CsA alone. These data have led to the finding that stabilizing block copolymer layers have a retarding effect on drug release from NCs, reducing the rate of CsA release fourfold compared with the nanoparticle without a polymer coating. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation’. PMID:27298440

  11. Cells release subpopulations of exosomes with distinct molecular and biological properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willms, Eduard; Johansson, Henrik J.; Mäger, Imre; Lee, Yi; Blomberg, K. Emelie M.; Sadik, Mariam; Alaarg, Amr Muhmed Sabry Abdelhakeem; Smith, C.I. Edvard; Lehtio, Janne; El Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Vader, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Cells release nano-sized membrane vesicles that are involved in intercellular communication by transferring biological information between cells. It is generally accepted that cells release at least three types of extracellular vesicles (EVs): apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. While a

  12. Enantioseparation with liquid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gössi, Angelo; Riedl, Wolfgang; Schuur, Boelo

    Chiral resolution of racemic products is a challenging and important task in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, flavor, polymer and fragrances industries. One of the options for these challenging separations is to use liquid membranes. Although liquid membranes have been known for almost four decades

  13. Porous ceramic membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten

    2000-01-01

    Synthetic membranes are increasingly used for energy-efficient separation of liquid and gaseous mixtures in household applications, environmental technology and the chemical and energy industry. Besides, membranes are used in component-specific sensors in gas and liquid streams, preferably combined

  14. Polymide gas separation membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Bikson, Benjamin; Nelson, Joyce Katz

    2004-09-14

    Soluble polyamic acid salt (PAAS) precursors comprised of tertiary and quaternary amines, ammonium cations, sulfonium cations, or phosphonium cations, are prepared and fabricated into membranes that are subsequently imidized and converted into rigid-rod polyimide articles, such as membranes with desirable gas separation properties. A method of enhancing solubility of PAAS polymers in alcohols is also disclosed.

  15. Membrane module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  16. Antibacterial effects of electrospun chitosan/poly(ethylene oxide) nanofibrous membranes loaded with chlorhexidine and silver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, J.; Remmers, S.J.; Shao, J.; Kolwijck, E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.; Yang, F.

    2016-01-01

    To prevent percutaneous device associated infections (PDAIs), we prepared electrospun chitosan/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) nanofibrous membrane containing silver nanoparticles as an implantable delivery vehicle for the dual release of chlorhexidine and silver ions. We observed that the silver

  17. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Membrane projection lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  19. Membrane technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, F.H.

    1997-01-01

    The main purpose of this dissertation is to prepare and characterize some synthetic membranes obtained by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of and A Am unitary and binary system onto nylon-6 films. The optimum conditions at which the grafting process proceeded homogeneously were determined. Some selected properties of the prepared membranes were studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), mechanical properties and U.V./vis, instruments and techniques were used to characterize the prepared membranes. The use of such membranes for the decontamination of radioactive waste and some heavy metal ions as water pollutants were investigated. These grafted membranes showed good cation exchange properties and may be of practical interest in waste water treatment whether this water was radioactive or not. 4 tabs., 68 figs., 146 refs

  20. Lysis of bacterial cells in the process of bacteriophage release – canonical and newly discovered mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioleta M. Woźnica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The release of phage progeny from an infected bacterium is necessary for the spread of infection. Only helical phages are secreted from a cell without causing its destruction. The release of remaining phages is correlated with bacterial lysis and death. Thus, the understanding of phage lytic functions is crucial for their use in the fight with bacterial pathogens. Bacteriophages with small RNA or DNA genomes encode single proteins which are called amurins and cause lysis by the inhibition of cell wall synthesis. Bacteriophages of double-stranded DNA genomes, which dominate in the environment, encode enzymes that are called endolysins and contribute to lysis by the cleavage of cell wall peptydoglycan. Endolysins that do not contain signal sequences cannot pass the cytoplasmic membrane by themselves. Their access to peptidoglycan is provided by membrane proteins – holins, which can form in the membrane large pores, that are called “holes”. Some endolysins do not require holins for their transport, owing to the presence of the so called SAR sequence at their N-terminus. It enables their transport through the membrane by the bacterial sec system. However, it is not cleaved off, and thus these endolysins remain trapped in the membrane in an inactive form. Their release, which is correlated with the activation, occurs as a result of membrane depolarization and depends on proteins that are called pinholins. Pinholins form in membrane pores that are too small for the passage of endolysins but sufficient for membrane depolarization. Proteins that are called antiholins regulate the timing of lysis, through the blockage of holins action until the end of phage morphogenesis. Additionally, newly identified lytic proteins, spanins, participate in the release of progeny phages from Gram-negative bacteria cells. They cause the destruction of outer cell membrane by its spanning with the cytoplasmic membrane. This is possible after the endolysin

  1. RAVEN Beta Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Mandelli, Diego; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Wang, Congjian; Maljovec, Daniel Patrick; Talbot, Paul William

    2016-01-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  2. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  3. Metaxin deficiency alters mitochondrial membrane permeability and leads to resistance to TNF-induced cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Koh; Wang, Xiaofei; Kim, Sung Ouk; Armstrong, Lucas C; Bornstein, Paul; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-02-01

    Metaxin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, is critical for TNF-induced cell death in L929 cells. Its deficiency, caused by retroviral insertion-mediated mutagenesis, renders L929 cells resistance to TNF killing. In this study, we further characterized metaxin deficiency-caused TNF resistance in parallel with Bcl-X(L) overexpression-mediated death resistance. We did not find obvious change in mitochondria membrane potential in metaxin-deficient (Met(mut)) and Bcl-X(L)-overexpressing cells, but we did find an increase in the release rate of the mitochondrial membrane potential probe rhodamine 123 (Rh123) that was preloaded into mitochondria. In addition, overexpression of a function-interfering mutant of metaxin (MetaΔTM/C) or Bcl-X(L) in MCF-7.3.28 cells also resulted in an acquired resistance to TNF killing and a faster rate of Rh123 release, indicating a close correlation between TNF resistance and higher rates of the dye release from the mitochondria. The release of Rh123 can be controlled by the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (PT) pore, as targeting an inner membrane component of the PT pore by cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibited Rh123 release. However, metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression apparently affect Rh123 release from a site(s) different from that of CsA, as CsA can overcome their effect. Though both metaxin and Bcl-X(L) appear to function on the outer mitochondrial membrane, they do not interact with each other. They may use different mechanisms to increase the permeability of Rh123, since previous studies have suggested that metaxin may influence certain outer membrane porins while Bcl-X(L) may form pores on the outer membrane. The alteration of the mitochondrial outer membrane properties by metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression, as indicated by a quicker Rh123 release, may be helpful in maintaining mitochondrial integrity.

  4. Influence of nimodipine, verapamil and lanthanum on histamine release from human basophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C B; Thastrup, Ole; Norn, S

    1987-01-01

    and the calcium channels, using the calcium antagonists nimodipine, verapamil and lanthanum. Anti-IgE-induced histamine release was inhibited by verapamil, nimodipine and lanthanum. When cells were pretreated with sialidase in order to remove sialic acid from the cell membrane, the inhibitory action of nimodipine...... was abolished, whereas the inhibition by verapamil or lanthanum was unaffected. This difference may be explained by the different mode of action of the calcium channel antagonists, and the results suggest an association between membrane sialic acid and the calcium channel.......Our previous studies suggest that the membrane content of sialic acid influences histamine release from human basophils by interfering with the transmembraneous calcium fluxes preceding histamine release. In this study we investigated a possible interaction between membrane sialic acid...

  5. Computational modeling and analysis of iron release from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka A Potdar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A major process of iron homeostasis in whole-body iron metabolism is the release of iron from the macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Macrophages recognize and phagocytose senescent or damaged erythrocytes. Then, they process the heme iron, which is returned to the circulation for reutilization by red blood cell precursors during erythropoiesis. The amount of iron released, compared to the amount shunted for storage as ferritin, is greater during iron deficiency. A currently accepted model of iron release assumes a passive-gradient with free diffusion of intracellular labile iron (Fe2+ through ferroportin (FPN, the transporter on the plasma membrane. Outside the cell, a multi-copper ferroxidase, ceruloplasmin (Cp, oxidizes ferrous to ferric ion. Apo-transferrin (Tf, the primary carrier of soluble iron in the plasma, binds ferric ion to form mono-ferric and di-ferric transferrin. According to the passive-gradient model, the removal of ferrous ion from the site of release sustains the gradient that maintains the iron release. Subcellular localization of FPN, however, indicates that the role of FPN may be more complex. By experiments and mathematical modeling, we have investigated the detailed mechanism of iron release from macrophages focusing on the roles of the Cp, FPN and apo-Tf. The passive-gradient model is quantitatively analyzed using a mathematical model for the first time. A comparison of experimental data with model simulations shows that the passive-gradient model cannot explain macrophage iron release. However, a facilitated-transport model associated with FPN can explain the iron release mechanism. According to the facilitated-transport model, intracellular FPN carries labile iron to the macrophage membrane. Extracellular Cp accelerates the oxidation of ferrous ion bound to FPN. Apo-Tf in the extracellular environment binds to the oxidized ferrous ion, completing the release process. Facilitated-transport model can

  6. Membrane-protein integration and the role of the translocation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Tom A; Goder, Veit; Heinrich, Sven U; Matlack, Kent E S

    2004-10-01

    Most eukaryotic membrane proteins are integrated into the lipid bilayer during their synthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Their integration occurs with the help of a protein-conducting channel formed by the heterotrimeric Sec61 membrane-protein complex. The crystal structure of an archaeal homolog of the complex suggests mechanisms that enable the channel to open across the membrane and to release laterally hydrophobic transmembrane segments of nascent membrane proteins into lipid. Many aspects of membrane-protein integration remain controversial and poorly understood, but new structural data provide testable hypotheses. We propose a model of how the channel recognizes transmembrane segments, orients them properly with respect to the plane of the membrane and releases them into lipid. We also discuss how the channel would prevent small molecules from crossing the lipid bilayer while it is integrating proteins.

  7. Catalyst layers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells prepared by electrospray deposition on Nafion membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, A. M.; Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Folgado, M. A.; Martín, A. J.; Daza, L.

    The electrospray deposition method has been used for preparation of catalyst layers for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) on Nafion membrane. Deposition of Pt/C + ionomer suspensions on Nafion 212 gives rise to layers with a globular morphology, in contrast with the dendritic growth observed for the same layers when deposited on the gas diffusion layer, GDL (microporous carbon black layer on carbon cloth) or on metallic Al foils. Such a change is discussed in the light of the influence of the Nafion substrate on the electrospray deposition process. Nafion, which is a proton conductor and electronic insulator, gives rise to the discharge of particles through proton release and transport towards the counter electrode, compared with the direct electron transfer that takes place when depositing on an electronic conductor. There is also a change in the electric field distribution in the needle to counter-electrode gap due to the presence of Nafion, which may alter conditions for the electrospray effect. If discharging of particles is slow enough, for instances with a low membrane protonic conductivity, the Nafion substrate may be charged positively yielding a change in the electric field profile and, with it, in the properties of the film. Single cell characterization is carried out with Nafion 212 membranes catalyzed by electrospray on the cathode side. It is shown that the internal resistance of the cell decreases with on-membrane deposited cathodic catalyst layers, with respect to the same layers deposited on GDL, giving rise to a considerable improvement in cell performance. The lower internal resistance is due to higher proton conductivity at the catalyst layer-membrane interface resulting from on-membrane deposition. On the other hand, electroactive area and catalyst utilization appear little modified by on-membrane deposition, compared with on-GDL deposition.

  8. Phosphoinositides direct equine infectious anemia virus gag trafficking and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fiona; Chen, Kang; Ehrlich, Lorna S; Jin, Jing; Chen, Min H; Medina, Gisselle N; Symons, Marc; Montelaro, Ronald; Donaldson, Julie; Tjandra, Nico; Carter, Carol A

    2011-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2) ], the predominant phosphoinositide (PI) on the plasma membrane, binds the matrix (MA) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) with similar affinities in vitro. Interaction with PI(4,5)P(2) is critical for HIV-1 assembly on the plasma membrane. EIAV has been shown to localize in internal compartments; hence, the significance of its interaction with PI(4,5)P(2) is unclear. We therefore investigated the binding in vitro of other PIs to EIAV MA and whether intracellular association with compartments bearing these PIs was important for assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by Gag. In vitro, EIAV MA bound phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] with higher affinity than PI(4,5)P(2) as revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra upon lipid titration. Gag was detected on the plasma membrane and in compartments enriched in phosphatidylinositol 3,5-biphosphate [PI(3,5)P(2) ]. Treatment of cells with YM201636, a kinase inhibitor that blocks production of PI(3,5)P(2) from PI(3)P, caused Gag to colocalize with aberrant compartments and inhibited VLP release. In contrast to HIV-1, release of EIAV VLPs was not significantly diminished by coexpression with 5-phosphatase IV, an enzyme that specifically depletes PI(4,5)P(2) from the plasma membrane. However, coexpression with synaptojanin 2, a phosphatase with broader specificity, diminished VLP production. PI-binding pocket mutations caused striking budding defects, as revealed by electron microscopy. One of the mutations also modified Gag-Gag interaction, as suggested by altered bimolecular fluorescence complementation. We conclude that PI-mediated targeting to peripheral and internal membranes is a critical factor in EIAV assembly and release. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Hydraulic release oil tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member

  10. NASTRAN: April 1982 Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugh, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Latest public release of NASTRAN, April 1982 most efficient and versatile to date. Intended range of applications of NASTRAN includes almost every kind of structure and construction. Users may develop their own analysis capabilities by using Direct Matrix Abstraction Programming (DMAP) language to direct NASTRAN in solution of general matrix problems.

  11. Release the Prisoners Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  12. Novel Membrane-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Real-Time Bio-Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima AlZahra'a Alatraktchi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a novel membrane-based sensor for real-time electrochemical investigations of cellular- or tissue cultures. The membrane sensor enables recording of electrical signals from a cell culture without any signal dilution, thus avoiding loss of sensitivity. Moreover, the porosity of the membrane provides optimal culturing conditions similar to existing culturing techniques allowing more efficient nutrient uptake and molecule release. The patterned sensor electrodes were fabricated on a porous membrane by electron-beam evaporation. The electrochemical performance of the membrane electrodes was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, and the detection of synthetic dopamine was demonstrated down to a concentration of 3.1 pM. Furthermore, to present the membrane-sensor functionality the dopamine release from cultured PC12 cells was successfully measured. The PC12 cells culturing experiments showed that the membrane-sensor was suitable as a cell culturing substrate for bio-applications. Real-time measurements of dopamine exocytosis in cell cultures were performed, where the transmitter release was recorded at the point of release. The developed membrane-sensor provides a new functionality to the standard culturing methods, enabling sensitive continuous in vitro monitoring and closely mimicking the in vivo conditions.

  13. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Membrane Vesicles and Lactamase in Erwinia herbicola Essam A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    yakoub@AHMED

    ... parent strain (Kadurugamuwa et al. 1998). Beveridge (1999) reported that MVs are spherical bilayered membranous structures (50 - 250 nm in diameter) released from the surface of gram-negative bacteria. Hayashi et al. (2002) concluded that an autolysin mutant of Porphyromonas gingivalis constructed and produced ...

  15. PERSISTENT PUPILLARY MEMBRANE OR ACCESSORY IRIS MEMBRANE?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriş, Monica; Horge, Ioan; Avram, Elena; Belicioiu, Roxana; Olteanu, Ioana Alexandra; Kedves, Hanga

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, in literature and curent practice, accessory iris membrane (AIM) and persistant pupillary membrane (PPM) are confused. Both AIM and PPM are congenital iris anomalies in which fine or thick iris strands arrise form the collarette and obscure the pupil. AIM, which is also called iris duplication, closely resembles the normal iris tissue in color and thickness and presents a virtual second pseudopupil aperture in the centre while PPM even in its extreme forms presents as a translucent or opaque membranous structure that extends across the pupil and has no pseudopupil. Mydriatiscs, laser treatment or surgery is used to clear the visual axis and optimize visual development. Surgical intervention is reserved for large, dense AIMs and PPMs. Our patient, a 29 year old male, has come with bilateral dense AIM, bilateral compound hyperopic astigmatism, BCVA OD = 0.6, BCVA OS = 0.4, IOP OU = 17 mmHg. To improve the visual acuity of the patient we decided to do a bilateral membranectomy, restoring in this way transparency of the visual axis. After surgery, the visual acuity improved to BCVA OD= 0.8, BCVA OS=0.8.

  16. Fuel cell membrane humidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1999-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell assembly has an anode side and a cathode side separated by the membrane and generating electrical current by electrochemical reactions between a fuel gas and an oxidant. The anode side comprises a hydrophobic gas diffusion backing contacting one side of the membrane and having hydrophilic areas therein for providing liquid water directly to the one side of the membrane through the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing are formed by sewing a hydrophilic thread through the backing. Liquid water is distributed over the gas diffusion backing in distribution channels that are separate from the fuel distribution channels.

  17. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a treatment that uses a pump to circulate blood through an artificial lung back into the bloodstream of a very ill baby. This system provides heart-lung bypass support ...

  18. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on the development and application of nonporous high gas flux perfluoro membranes with high temperature rating and excellent chemical resistance.

  19. Fabricating PFPE Membranes for Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael C.; Willis, Peter A.; Greer, Frank; Rolland, Jason

    2009-01-01

    A process has been developed for fabricating perfluoropolyether (PFPE) membranes that contain microscopic holes of precise sizes at precise locations. The membranes are to be incorporated into laboratory-on-a-chip microfluidic devices to be used in performing capillary electrophoresis. The present process is a modified version of part of the process, described in the immediately preceding article, that includes a step in which a liquid PFPE layer is cured into solid (membrane) form by use of ultraviolet light. In the present process, one exploits the fact that by masking some locations to prevent exposure to ultraviolet light, one can prevent curing of the PFPE in those locations. The uncured PFPE can be washed away from those locations in the subsequent release and cleaning steps. Thus, holes are formed in the membrane in those locations. The most straightforward way to implement the modification is to use, during the ultraviolet-curing step, an ultraviolet photomask similar to the photomasks used in fabricating microelectronic devices. In lieu of such a photomask, one could use a mask made of any patternable ultraviolet-absorbing material (for example, an ink or a photoresist).

  20. Membrane emulsification to produce perfume microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuemiao

    Microencapsulation is an efficient technology to deliver perfume oils from consumer products onto the surface of fabrics. Microcapsules having uniform size/mechanical strength, may provide better release performance. Membrane emulsification in a dispersion cell followed by in-situ polymerization was used to prepare narrow size distribution melamine-formaldehyde (MF) microcapsules containing several types of oil-based fragrances or ingredients. Investigated in this study are the parameters impacting to the size and size distribution of the droplets and final MF microcapsules. A pilot plant-scale cross-flow membrane system was also used to produce MF microcapsules, demonstrating that the membrane emulsification process has potential to be scaled up for industrial applications. In this study, health and environmental friendly poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microcapsules with narrow size distribution were also prepared for the first time using the dispersion cell membrane emulsification system. Characterization methods previously used for thin-shell microcapsules were expanded to analyse microcapsules with thick shells. The intrinsic mechanical properties of thick shells were determined using a micromanipulation technique and finite element analysis (FEM). The microcapsules structure was also considered in the determination of the permeability and diffusivity of the perfume oils in good solvents..

  1. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Fabrication of electrospun nanofibrous membranes for membrane distillation application

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2013-02-01

    Nanofibrous membranes of Matrimid have been successfully fabricated using an electrospinning technique under optimized conditions. Nanofibrous membranes are found to be highly hydrophobic with a high water contact angle of 130°. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and pore size distribution analysis revealed the big pore size structure of electrospun membranes to be greater than 2 μm and the pore size distribution is found to be narrow. Flat sheet Matrimid membranes were fabricated via casting followed by phase inversion. The morphology, pore size distribution, and water contact angle were measured and compared with the electrospun membranes. Both membranes fabricated by electrospinning and phase inversion techniques were tested in a direct contact membrane distillation process. Electrospun membranes showed high water vapor flux of 56 kg/m2-h, which is very high compared to the casted membrane as well as most of the fabricated and commercially available highly hydrophobic membranes. ©2013 Desalination Publications.

  3. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  4. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  5. Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I [Champaign, IL; York, Cynthia A [Newington, CT; Waszczuk, Piotr [White Bear Lake, MN; Wieckowski, Andrzej [Champaign, IL

    2009-08-04

    A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

  6. Humanin decreases mitochondrial membrane permeability by inhibiting the membrane association and oligomerization of Bax and Bid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ze-Wei; Liu, Dong-Xiang

    2017-12-21

    Humanin (HN) is a 24-residue peptide identified from the brain of a patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD). HN has been found to protect against neuronal insult caused by Aβ peptides or transfection of familial AD mutant genes. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of HN neuroprotection, we explored the effects of HN on the association of Bax or Bid with lipid bilayers and their oligomerization in the membrane. By using single-molecule fluorescence and Förster resonance energy transfer techniques, we showed that Bax was mainly present as monomers, dimers and tetramers in lipid bilayers, while truncated Bid (tBid) enhanced the membrane association and tetramerization of Bax. HN (100 nmol/L) inhibited the self-association and tBid-activated association of Bax with the bilayers, and significantly decreased the proportion of Bax in tetramers. Furthermore, HN inhibited Bid translocation to lipid bilayers. HN could bind with Bax and Bid either in solution or in the membrane. However, HN could not pull the proteins out of the membrane. Based on these results, we propose that HN binds to Bax and cBid in solution and inhibits their translocation to the membrane. Meanwhile, HN interacts with the membrane-bound Bax and tBid, preventing the recruitment of cytosolic Bax and its oligomerization in the membrane. In this way, HN inhibits Bax pore formation in mitochondrial outer membrane and suppresses cytochrome c release and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  7. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  8. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  9. Platelets contain releasable coagulation factor IX antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romp, K G; Monroe, D M; Hoffman, M

    1993-12-01

    Platelets take up plasma proteins into their alpha granules. Platelet activation releases the alpha granule contents. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that human platelets also contain some coagulation factor IX in their alpha granules. Platelets were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Activated and unactivated platelets were quick frozen on to slides and dehydrated in situ to preserve optimal morphology. The slides were stained by indirect immunofluorescence for factors V and IX. Unactivated platelets showed coarsely granular staining for factor V and finely granular staining for factor IX. Staining for factor V was diffuse after activation, while staining for factor IX disappeared. Thus, the results support the conclusion that platelets contain factor IX which can be released upon activation. Immunoelectron microscopic studies were conducted to more precisely localize the site of the platelet factor IX. As expected, factor V was primarily localized in the alpha granules of unactivated platelets. By contrast, factor IX was observed both in alpha granules and diffusely in the platelet cytoplasm and membrane-bounded vesicles. After activation, staining for both factors V and IX was primarily in the open canalicular system. The physiological importance of this small amount of factor IX is unknown. However, it may be significant since only a few percent of normal IX levels are required to support haemostasis in the absence of trauma, and platelet factor IX could be released at sites of active coagulation.

  10. Carpal tunnel release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Sørensen, A I; Crone, K L

    2013-01-01

    A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel release using classic incision, short incision, or endoscopic technique. In total, 90 consecutive cases were included. Follow-up was 24 weeks. We found a significantly shorter sick leave in the endoscopi...... incision could be found. There were no serious complications in either group. The results indicate that the endoscopic procedure is safe and has the benefit of faster rehabilitation and return to work....

  11. Hydra Code Release

    OpenAIRE

    Couchman, H. M. P.; Pearce, F. R.; Thomas, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Comment: A new version of the AP3M-SPH code, Hydra, is now available as a tar file from the following sites; http://coho.astro.uwo.ca/pub/hydra/hydra.html , http://star-www.maps.susx.ac.uk/~pat/hydra/hydra.html . The release now also contains a cosmological initial conditions generator, documentation, an installation guide and installation tests. A LaTex version of the documentation is included here

  12. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students

  13. Sudden releases of gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaloupecká Hana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conurbations all over the world have enlarged for numberless years. The accidental or intentional releases of gases become more frequent. Therefore, these crises situations have to be studied. The aim of this paper is to describe experiments examining these processes that were carried out in the laboratory of Environmental Aerodynamics of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR in Nový Knín. Results show huge puff variability from replica to replica.

  14. Slow-release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  15. Biomimetic membranes and methods of making biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, David Michael; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Yang, Shaorong

    2016-11-08

    The present disclosure is directed to biomimetic membranes and methods of manufacturing such membranes that include structural features that mimic the structures of cellular membrane channels and produce membrane designs capable of high selectivity and high permeability or adsorptivity. The membrane structure, material and chemistry can be selected to perform liquid separations, gas separation and capture, ion transport and adsorption for a variety of applications.

  16. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  17. Liberated PKA Catalytic Subunits Associate with the Membrane via Myristoylation to Preferentially Phosphorylate Membrane Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillo, Shane E; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Takahashi, Maho; Miao, Sheng; Andrade, Adriana L; Fortin, Dale A; Yang, Guang; Qin, Maozhen; Smoody, Barbara F; Stork, Philip J S; Zhong, Haining

    2017-04-18

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has diverse functions in neurons. At rest, the subcellular localization of PKA is controlled by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). However, the dynamics of PKA upon activation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that elevation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in neuronal dendrites causes a significant percentage of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKA-C) molecules to be released from the regulatory subunit (PKA-R). Liberated PKA-C becomes associated with the membrane via N-terminal myristoylation. This membrane association does not require the interaction between PKA-R and AKAPs. It slows the mobility of PKA-C and enriches kinase activity on the membrane. Membrane-residing PKA substrates are preferentially phosphorylated compared to cytosolic substrates. Finally, the myristoylation of PKA-C is critical for normal synaptic function and plasticity. We propose that activation-dependent association of PKA-C renders the membrane a unique PKA-signaling compartment. Constrained mobility of PKA-C may synergize with AKAP anchoring to determine specific PKA function in neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of the activation of small GTPases by their GEFs on membranes using artificial membrane tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurois, François; Veyron, Simon; Ferrandez, Yann; Ladid, Ilham; Benabdi, Sarah; Zeghouf, Mahel; Peyroche, Gérald; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2017-03-23

    Active, GTP-bound small GTPases need to be attached to membranes by post-translational lipid modifications in order to process and propagate information in cells. However, generating and manipulating lipidated GTPases has remained difficult, which has limited our quantitative understanding of their activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their termination by GTPase-activating proteins. Here, we replaced the lipid modification by a histidine tag in 11 full-length, human small GTPases belonging to the Arf, Rho and Rab families, which allowed to tether them to nickel-lipid-containing membranes and characterize the kinetics of their activation by GEFs. Remarkably, this strategy uncovered large effects of membranes on the efficiency and/or specificity in all systems studied. Notably, it recapitulated the release of autoinhibition of Arf1, Arf3, Arf4, Arf5 and Arf6 GTPases by membranes and revealed that all isoforms are efficiently activated by two GEFs with different regulatory regimes, ARNO and Brag2. It demonstrated that membranes stimulate the GEF activity of Trio toward RhoG by ∼30 fold and Rac1 by ∼10 fold, and uncovered a previously unknown broader specificity toward RhoA and Cdc42 that was undetectable in solution. Finally, it demonstrated that the exceptional affinity of the bacterial RabGEF DrrA for the phosphoinositide PI(4)P delimits the activation of Rab1 to the immediate vicinity of the membrane-bound GEF. Our study thus validates the histidine-tag strategy as a potent and simple means to mimic small GTPase lipidation, which opens a variety of applications to uncover regulations brought about by membranes. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Protecting privacy in data release

    CERN Document Server

    Livraga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive approach to protecting sensitive information when large data collections are released by their owners. It addresses three key requirements of data privacy: the protection of data explicitly released, the protection of information not explicitly released but potentially vulnerable due to a release of other data, and the enforcement of owner-defined access restrictions to the released data. It is also the first book with a complete examination of how to enforce dynamic read and write access authorizations on released data, applicable to the emerging data outsou

  20. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  1. Avaliação da libertação de azoto a partir de correctivos orgânicos utilizando membranas de troca aniónica e um medidor de clorofila SPAD-502 Nitrogen release from organic amendments assessed by using anion exchange membranes and the SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pereira

    2009-01-01

    senescência por falta de azoto.Results from pot experiments where anion exchange membranes (MTA were inserted into the soil to monitor soil nitrate levels over time, and the plant N nutritional status assessed with a SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter, are reported in this work. Maize was grown in the summer season and turnip and rye in the winter period. Maize was sown on June 5, 2004, and turnip and rye on September 23, 2004. The plants were subjected to the following treatments: Nutrisoil (Nut; Beiraadubo (Bei; Phenix (Phe; Vegethumus (Veg; cow manure (EB; chestnut fruit bark (CC; ammonium nitrate (NA; and control treatment, without N fertilization (T. Two weeks after the maize was sown, soil nitrate levels extracted by MTA ranged between 18.9 and 239.0 mg L-1 in the CC and Bei treatments, respectively. In the first week of August mean soil nitrate values ranged between 12.9 and 52.3 mg L-1 in the CC and Bei treatments. In September, the last sampling date, mean soil nitrate levels were found to be in the range of 9.7 and 67.9 mg L-1 in the CC and Nut treatments. Relationships between MTA and SPAD results with dry matter yield and N uptake were established. The MTA were able to differentiate well as the organic amendments released their N during the season and this aspect influenced N uptake and plant growth. SPAD readings were also a good index of plant N nutritional status. SPAD values were linearly related with dry matter yield and N uptake. In this study, where the pots were managed to avoid nitrate leaching and denitrification, winter grown species recovered the residual N of maize fertilization. At the end of experiment the plants showed senescent leaves with deep N deficiency symptoms.

  2. The TOM complex is involved in the release of superoxide anion from mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzińska, Małgorzata; Gałgańska, Hanna; Karachitos, Andonis; Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Kmita, Hanna

    2009-08-01

    Available data indicate that superoxide anion (O(2)(*-) ) is released from mitochondria, but apart from VDAC (voltage dependent anion channel), the proteins involved in its transport across the mitochondrial outer membrane still remain elusive. Using mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant depleted of VDAC (Deltapor1 mutant) and the isogenic wild type, we studied the role of the TOM complex (translocase of the outer membrane) in the efflux of O(2)(*-) from the mitochondria. We found that blocking the TOM complex with the fusion protein pb(2)-DHFR decreased O(2)(*-) release, particularly in the case of Deltapor1 mitochondria. We also observed that the effect of the TOM complex blockage on O(2)(*-) release from mitochondria coincided with the levels of O(2)(*-) release as well as with levels of Tom40 expression in the mitochondria. Thus, we conclude that the TOM complex participates in O(2)(*-) release from mitochondria.

  3. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated by an arti...... by an artificial liquid membrane. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction is a modification of hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction, where the hollow fibers are replaced by flat membranes in a 96-well plate format....

  4. Influence of cholesterol and ceramide VI on the structure of multilamellar lipid membranes at water exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabova, N. Yu.; Kiselev, M. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The structural changes in the multilamellar lipid membranes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol and DPPC/ceramide VI binary systems during hydration and dehydration have been studied by neutron diffraction. The effect of cholesterol and ceramide on the kinetics of water exchange in DPPC membranes is characterized. Compared to pure DPPC, membranes of binary systems swell faster during hydration (with a characteristic time of ∼30 min). Both compounds, ceramide VI and cholesterol, similarly affect the hydration of DPPC membranes, increasing the repeat distance due to the bilayer growth. However, in contrast to cholesterol, ceramide significantly reduces the thickness of the membrane water layer. The introduction of cholesterol into a DPPC membrane slows down the change in the parameters of the bilayer internal structure during dehydration. In the DPPC/ceramide VI/cholesterol ternary system (with a molar cholesterol concentration of 40%), cholesterol is partially released from the lamellar membrane structure into the crystalline phase.

  5. Antibacterial Membrane with a Bone-Like Structure for Guided Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuYuan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An antibacterial membrane with a bone-like structure was developed for guided bone regeneration (GBR by mineralising acellular bovine pericardium (ABP and loading it with the antibiotic minocycline. The bovine pericardium (BP membrane was processed using physical and chemical methods to remove the cellular components and obtain ABP membranes. Then, the ABP membranes were biomimetically mineralised using a calcium phosphate-loaded agarose hydrogel system aided by electrophoresis. Minocycline was adsorbed to the mineralised ABP membrane, and the release profile in vitro was studied. The membranes were characterised through scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that the ABP membrane had an asymmetric structure with a layer of densely arranged and irregularly aligned collagen fibrils. Collagen fibrils were calcified with the formation of intrafibrillar and interfibrillar hydroxyapatites similar to the bone structure. Minocycline was incorporated into the mineralised collagen membrane and could be released in vitro. This process endowed the membrane with an antibacterial property. This novel composite membrane offers promising applications in bioactive GBR.

  6. A novel release mechanism from responsive microgel capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Hassan; Alexeev, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    We use a mesoscale computational model for responsive gels to study the release of nanoparticles from hollow microcapsules. Our model explicitly describes the transport of nanoparticles in swelling/deswelling polymer networks with complex geometries and associated fluid flows. Our simulations show that capsule swelling results in a steady release of encapsulated nanoparticle, which is set by the ability of particles to diffuse through the capsule network. For deswelling capsules, we show that a fluid flow induced by capsule shrinking leads to rapid nanoparticle release. This release, however, is limited due to decreasing mesh size of the deswelling shell. We show that by introducing solid microrods inside deswelling capsules, we can control the rapid release. Our calculations reveal that the rods stretch the deswelling membrane and promote the formation of large pores in the shell, which allow massive flow-driven release of nanoparticles. Thus, our findings reveal a new approach for regulating the release from stimulus responsive micro-carriers that may be useful for designing new drug delivery systems. Financial support from the Donors of the PetroleumResearchFund, administered by theACS, is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Smart membranes for monitoring membrane based desalination processes

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-10-12

    Various examples are related to smart membranes for monitoring membrane based process such as, e.g., membrane distillation processes. In one example, a membrane, includes a porous surface and a plurality of sensors (e.g., temperature, flow and/or impedance sensors) mounted on the porous surface. In another example, a membrane distillation (MD) process includes the membrane. Processing circuitry can be configured to monitor outputs of the plurality of sensors. The monitored outputs can be used to determine membrane degradation, membrane fouling, or to provide an indication of membrane replacement or cleaning. The sensors can also provide temperatures or temperature differentials across the porous surface, which can be used to improve modeling or control the MD process.

  8. Polyurethane Nanofiber Membranes for Waste Water Treatment by Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jiříček

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-sustained electrospun polyurethane nanofiber membranes were manufactured and tested on a direct-contact membrane distillation unit in an effort to find the optimum membrane thickness to maximize flux rate and minimize heat losses across the membrane. Also salt retention and flux at high salinities up to 100 g kg−1 were evaluated. Even though the complex structure of nanofiber layers has extreme specific surface and porosity, membrane performance was surprisingly predictable; the highest flux was achieved with the thinnest membranes and the best energy efficiency was achieved with the thickest membranes. All membranes had salt retention above 99%. Nanotechnology offers the potential to find modern solutions for desalination of waste waters, by introducing new materials with revolutionary properties, but new membranes must be developed according to the target application.

  9. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Buonomenna, M. G.

    2012-06-24

    Membrane reactors are generally applied in high temperature reactions (>400 °C). In the field of fine chemical synthesis, however, much milder conditions are generally applicable and polymeric membranes were applied without their damage. The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane is to be used in. In this chapter a review of up to date literature about polymers and configuration catalyst/ membranes used in some recent polymeric membrane reactors is given. The new emerging concept of polymeric microcapsules as catalytic microreactors has been proposed. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  10. Physics of biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.

    The biological membrane is a complex system consisting of an aqueous biomolecular planar aggregate of predominantly lipid and protein molecules. At physiological temperatures, the membrane may be considered a thin (˜50Å) slab of anisotropic fluid characterized by a high lateral mobility of the various molecular components. A substantial fraction of biological activity takes place in association with membranes. As a very lively piece of condensed matter, the biological membrane is a challenging research topic for both the experimental and theoretical physicists who are facing a number of fundamental physical problems including molecular self-organization, macromolecular structure and dynamics, inter-macromolecular interactions, structure-function relationships, transport of energy and matter, and interfacial forces. This paper will present a brief review of recent theoretical and experimental progress on such problems, with special emphasis on lipid bilayer structure and dynamics, lipid phase transitions, lipid-protein and lipid-cholesterol interactions, intermembrane forces, and the physical constraints imposed on biomembrane function and evolution. The paper advocates the dual point of view that there are a number of interesting physics problems in membranology and, at the same time, that the physical properties of biomembranes are important regulators of membrane function.

  11. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence spectrosc......Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...... spectroscopy approaches provide very valuable structurally and dynamically related information on membranes, they generally produce mean parameters from data collected on bulk solutions of many vesicles and lack direct information on the spatial organization at the level of single membranes, a quality that can...... be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  12. Riola release report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, E.C.

    1983-08-04

    Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables.

  13. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  14. Biopores/membrane proteins in synthetic polymer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garni, Martina; Thamboo, Sagana; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2017-04-01

    Mimicking cell membranes by simple models based on the reconstitution of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers represents a straightforward approach to understand biological function of these proteins. This biomimetic strategy has been extended to synthetic membranes that have advantages in terms of chemical and mechanical stability, thus providing more robust hybrid membranes. We present here how membrane proteins and biopores have been inserted both in the membrane of nanosized and microsized compartments, and in planar membranes under various conditions. Such bio-hybrid membranes have new properties (as for example, permeability to ions/molecules), and functionality depending on the specificity of the inserted biomolecules. Interestingly, membrane proteins can be functionally inserted in synthetic membranes provided these have appropriate properties to overcome the high hydrophobic mismatch between the size of the biomolecule and the membrane thickness. Functional insertion of membrane proteins and biopores in synthetic membranes of compartments or in planar membranes is possible by an appropriate selection of the amphiphilic copolymers, and conditions of the self-assembly process. These hybrid membranes have new properties and functionality based on the specificity of the biomolecules and the nature of the synthetic membranes. Bio-hybrid membranes represent new solutions for the development of nanoreactors, artificial organelles or active surfaces/membranes that, by further gaining in complexity and functionality, will promote translational applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Computational molecular modeling and structural rationalization for the design of a drug-loaded PLLA/PVA biopolymeric membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibeko, B; Pillay, V; Choonara, Y E; Khan, R A; Danckwerts, M P; Modi, G; Iyuke, S E; Naidoo, D

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design, characterize and assess the influence of triethanolamine (TEA) on the physicomechanical properties and release of methotrexate (MTX) from a composite biopolymeric membrane. Conjugated poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes were prepared by immersion precipitation with and without the addition of TEA. Drug entrapment efficiency (DEE) and release studies were performed in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4, 37 deg. C). Scanning electron microscopy elucidated the membrane surface morphology. Computational and structural molecular modeling rationalized the potential mechanisms of membrane formation and MTX release. Bi-axial force-distance (F-D) extensibility profiles were generated to determine the membrane toughness, elasticity and fracturability. Membranes were significantly toughened by the addition of TEA as a discrete rubbery phase within the co-polymer matrix. MTX-TEA-PLLA-PVA membranes were tougher (F = 89 N) and more extensible (D = 8.79 mm) compared to MTX-PLLA-PVA (F = 35 N, D = 3.7 mm) membranes as a greater force of extension and fracture distance were required (N = 10). DEE values were relatively high (>80%, N = 5) for both formulations. Photomicrographs revealed distinct crystalline layered morphologies with macro-pores. MTX was released by tri-phasic kinetics with a lower fractional release of MTX from MTX-TEA-PLLA-PVA membranes compared to MTX-PLLA-PVA. TEA provided a synergistic approach to improving the membrane physicomechanical properties and modulation of MTX release. The composite biopolymeric membrane may therefore be suitable for the novel delivery of MTX in the treatment of chronic primary central nervous system lymphoma.

  16. Chemical activity of cholesterol in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, A; McConnell, H M

    2000-07-18

    Measurements are reported for the rate constants for the release of cholesterol (and dihydrocholesterol) to beta-cyclodextrin from mixtures with phospholipids in homogeneous monolayers at constant pressure at the air-water interface. In each mixture, it is found that the release rate shows a sharp decrease as the cholesterol concentration in the monolayer decreases through a composition corresponding to the stoichiometry of a cholesterol-phospholipid complex. The stoichiometry of the complex was established previously by the position of a sharp cusp in the thermodynamic phase diagram of each mixture and also by a minimum in average molecular area versus composition measurements. A theoretical model used earlier to account for the phase diagrams predicts the chemical potential and chemical activity of cholesterol in these mixtures. The calculated chemical activity also shows a sharp change at the complex stoichiometry in homogeneous monolayers. The similarities in change of observed release rate and calculated chemical activity are expected from reaction rate theory where the release rate is proportional to the cholesterol chemical activity. The chemical activity of cholesterol as determined by complex formation between some phospholipids and cholesterol in the plasma membrane of cells may serve a regulatory function with respect to intracellular cholesterol transport and biosynthesis.

  17. Liver plasma membranes: an effective method to analyze membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Liang, Songping

    2012-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are critical for the maintenance of biological systems and represent important targets for the treatment of disease. The hydrophobicity and low abundance of plasma membrane proteins make them difficult to analyze. The protocols given here are the efficient isolation/digestion procedures for liver plasma membrane proteomic analysis. Both protocol for the isolation of plasma membranes and protocol for the in-gel digestion of gel-embedded plasma membrane proteins are presented. The later method allows the use of a high detergent concentration to achieve efficient solubilization of hydrophobic plasma membrane proteins while avoiding interference with the subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis.

  18. Membranes and pathophysiological mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowska, Monika; Strzelecka-Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Bessueille, Laurence

    Vascular calcification accompanies the pathological process of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Artery calcification results from trans-differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into cells resembling mineralization-competent cells such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes. The activity of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), a GPI-anchored enzyme necessary for physiological mineralization, is induced in VSMCs in response to inflammation. TNAP achieves its mineralizing function being anchored to plasma membrane of mineralizing cells and to the surface of their derived matrix vesicles (MVs), and numerous important reports indicate that membranes play a crucial role in initiating the crystal formation. In this review, we would like to highlight various functions of lipids and proteins associated to membranes at different stages of both physiological mineralization and vascular calcification, with an emphasis on the pathological process of atherosclerotic plaque formation.

  19. Characterization of graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, Sean; Lee, Jongho; Jain, Tarun; Karnik, Rohit; Idrobo, Juan; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Motaz

    2011-11-01

    Graphene, which exhibits very high breaking strength, atomistic thickness, and the ability to maintain stable nanometer-scale pores, has the potential to be a superior membrane material in both liquid- and gas-phase separation processes. We have recently demonstrated high-quality transfer of ~1 cm2 LPCVD graphene from copper foil to 200 nm polycarbonate track etch membranes with less than 0.3% of the area constituting holes or tears in the graphene, which is essential for characterizing transport through graphene. Through gallium ion bombardment we have introduced nanometer-scale pores in the transferred graphene and will report on the molecular and ionic transport through these membranes. Funded by the Center for Clean Energy and Water at MIT and KFUPM.

  20. Effect of in vitro inorganic lead on dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnema, D.J.; Greenland, R.D.; Michaelson, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of inorganic lead in vitro in several aspects of [ 3 H]dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes was examined. Under conditions of spontaneous release, lead (1-30 microM) induced dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The onset of the lead-induced release was delayed by approximately 15-30 sec. The magnitude of dopamine release induced by lead was increased when calcium was removed from the superfusing buffer. Lead-induced release was unaffected in the presence of putative calcium, sodium, and/or potassium channel blockers (nickel, tetrodotoxin, tetraethylammonium, respectively). Depolarization-evoked dopamine release, produced by a 1-sec exposure to 61 mM potassium, was diminished at calcium concentrations below 0.254 mM. The onset of depolarization-evoked release was essentially immediate following exposure of the synaptosomes to high potassium. The combination of lead (3 or 10 microM) with high potassium reduced the magnitude of depolarization-evoked dopamine release. This depression of depolarization-evoked release by lead was greater in the presence of 0.25 mM than 2.54 mM calcium in the superfusing buffer. These findings demonstrate multiple actions of lead on synaptosomal dopamine release. Lead can induce dopamine release by yet unidentified neuronal mechanisms independent of external calcium. Lead can also reduce depolarization-evoked dopamine release by apparent competition with calcium influx at the neuronal membrane calcium channel

  1. Entropy and biological systems: experimentally-investigated entropy-driven stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Husen; Liggins, John R; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-02-24

    According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, an overall increase of entropy contributes to the driving force for any physicochemical process, but entropy has seldom been investigated in biological systems. Here, for the first time, we apply Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the Mg(2+)-induced spontaneous stacking of photosynthetic membranes isolated from spinach leaves. After subtracting a large endothermic interaction of MgCl₂ with membranes, unrelated to stacking, we demonstrate that the enthalpy change (heat change at constant pressure) is zero or marginally positive or negative. This first direct experimental evidence strongly suggests that an entropy increase significantly drives membrane stacking in this ordered biological structure. Possible mechanisms for the entropy increase include: (i) the attraction between discrete oppositely-charged areas, releasing counterions; (ii) the release of loosely-bound water molecules from the inter-membrane gap; (iii) the increased orientational freedom of previously-aligned water dipoles; and (iv) the lateral rearrangement of membrane components.

  2. Killing of Staphylococci by θ-Defensins Involves Membrane Impairment and Activation of Autolytic Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Wilmes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available θ-Defensins are cyclic antimicrobial peptides expressed in leukocytes of Old world monkeys. To get insight into their antibacterial mode of action, we studied the activity of RTDs (rhesus macaque θ-defensins against staphylococci. We found that in contrast to other defensins, RTDs do not interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis, but rather induce bacterial lysis in staphylococci by interaction with the bacterial membrane and/or release of cell wall lytic enzymes. Potassium efflux experiments and membrane potential measurements revealed that the membrane impairment by RTDs strongly depends on the energization of the membrane. In addition, RTD treatment caused the release of Atl-derived cell wall lytic enzymes probably by interaction with membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. Thus, the premature and uncontrolled activity of these enzymes contributes strongly to the overall killing by θ-defensins. Interestingly, a similar mode of action has been described for Pep5, an antimicrobial peptide of bacterial origin.

  3. Destabilization of the Outer and Inner Mitochondrial Membranes by Core and Linker Histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Conclusions We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage. PMID:22523586

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigations of Lantana camara oil diffusion from polyacrylonitrile membrane for pulsatile drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vivek; Balasubramanian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Porous composite membrane of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and Lantana camara essential oil was synthesized by solvent casting method. Stability of oil in PAN solution was measured by XiGo nano tool indicating constant relaxation time of 1487 time/s. Pore size of few microns confirmed by electron microscopy was supported by atomic force microscopy indicating roughness factor of 0.9 nm. Contact angle of 2° inveterates superhydrophilicity of the composite membrane. Membrane showed excellent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli with a 7–10 mm zone of inhibition. In vitro release of Lantana oil from the composite membrane was carried out in isotonic phosphate buffer solution (pH = 7.4). Lantana oil was released for 9 h, lag time of 3 h with constant 33% release confirmed PAN membranes as potential system for pulsatile drug delivery applications. Diffusion of E-caryophyllene (antibacterial component of oil) which was studied through molecular simulation using Material Studio software ensued diffusion coefficient value of 1.11 ∗ 10 −9 m 2 /s. Biocompatibility of the composite membrane was assessed by mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line (NIH 3T3) through MTT assay indicating more than 91% viable cell even at 200 μg/mL concentration. Such membranes can be efficiently used in biomedical applications as antibacterial and antifungal agent. - Highlights: • Pulsatile release • Lantana oil–PAN composite membrane as antibacterial material • Enhanced bactericidal activity of the membrane

  5. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  6. Membrane adsorber for endotoxin removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Moita de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The surface of flat-sheet nylon membranes was modified using bisoxirane as the spacer and polyvinyl alcohol as the coating polymer. The amino acid histidine was explored as a ligand for endotoxins, aiming at its application for endotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. Characterization of the membrane adsorber, analysis of the depyrogenation procedures and the evaluation of endotoxin removal efficiency in static mode are discussed. Ligand density of the membranes was around 7 mg/g dry membrane, allowing removal of up to 65% of the endotoxins. The performance of the membrane adsorber prepared using nylon coated with polyvinyl alcohol and containing histidine as the ligand proved superior to other membrane adsorbers reported in the literature. The lack of endotoxin adsorption on nylon membranes without histidine confirmed that endotoxin removal was due to the presence of the ligand at the membrane surface. Modified membranes were highly stable, exhibiting a lifespan of approximately thirty months.

  7. Fouling resistant membrane spacers

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2017-10-12

    Disclosed herein are spacers having baffle designs and perforations for efficiently and effectively separating one or more membrane layers a membrane filtration system. The spacer (504) includes a body (524) formed at least in part by baffles (520) that are interconnected, and the baffles define boundaries of openings or apertures (525) through a thickness direction of the body of the spacer. Alternatively or additionally, passages or perforations (526A, 526B) may be present in the spacer layer or baffles for fluid flow there through, with the passages and baffles having a numerous different shapes and sizes.

  8. Mitigating leaks in membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnik, Rohit N.; Bose, Suman; Boutilier, Michael S.H.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Jain, Tarun Kumar; O' Hern, Sean C.; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Muataz A.; Jang, Doojoon

    2018-02-27

    Two-dimensional material based filters, their method of manufacture, and their use are disclosed. In one embodiment, a membrane may include an active layer including a plurality of defects and a deposited material associated with the plurality of defects may reduce flow therethrough. Additionally, a majority of the active layer may be free from the material. In another embodiment, a membrane may include a porous substrate and an atomic layer deposited material disposed on a surface of the porous substrate. The atomic layer deposited material may be less hydrophilic than the porous substrate and an atomically thin active layer may be disposed on the atomic layer deposited material.

  9. Organic separations with membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of present and emerging applications of membrane technology for the separation and purification of organic materials. This technology is highly relevant for programs aimed at minimizing waste in processing and in the treatment of gaseous and liquid effluents. Application of membranes for organic separation is growing rapidly in the petrochemical industry to simplify processing and in the treatment of effluents, and it is expected that this technology will be useful in numerous other industries including the processing of nuclear waste materials

  10. Membrane order in the plasma membrane and endocytic recycling compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaea, David B; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2017-01-01

    The cholesterol content of membranes plays an important role in organizing membranes for signal transduction and protein trafficking as well as in modulating the biophysical properties of membranes. While the properties of model or isolated membranes have been extensively studied, there has been little evaluation of internal membranes in living cells. Here, we use a Nile Red based probe, NR12S, and ratiometric live cell imaging, to analyze the membrane order of the plasma membrane and endocytic recycling compartment. We find that after a brief incubation to allow endocytosis, NR12S is distributed between the plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment. The NR12S reports that the endocytic recycling compartment is more highly ordered than the plasma membrane. We also find that the plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment are differentially affected by altering cellular cholesterol levels. The membrane order of the plasma membrane, but not the endocytic recycling compartment, is altered significantly when cellular cholesterol content is increased or decreased by 20%. These results demonstrate that changes in cellular cholesterol differentially alter membrane order within different organelles.

  11. Dimensional analysis of membrane distillation flux through fibrous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauter, Meagan

    We developed a dimensional-analysis-based empirical modeling method for membrane distillation (MD) flux that is adaptable for novel membrane structures. The method makes fewer simplifying assumptions about membrane pore geometry than existing theoretical (i.e. mechanistic) models, and allows selection of simple, easily-measureable membrane characteristics as structural parameters. Furthermore, the model does not require estimation of membrane surface temperatures; it accounts for convective heat transfer to the membrane surface without iterative fitting of mass and heat transfer equations. The Buckingham-Pi dimensional analysis method is tested for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) using non-woven/fibrous structures as the model membrane material. Twelve easily-measured variables to describe DCMD operating conditions, fluid properties, membrane structures, and flux were identified and combined into eight dimensionless parameters. These parameters were regressed using experimentally-collected data for multiple electrospun membrane types and DCMD system conditions, achieving R2 values >95%. We found that vapor flux through isotropic fibrous membranes can be estimated using only membrane thickness, solid fraction, and fiber diameter as structural parameters. Buckingham-Pi model DCMD flux predictions compare favorably with previously-developed empirical and theoretical models, and suggest this simple yet theoretically-grounded empirical modeling method can be used practically for predicting MD vapor flux from membrane structural parameters.

  12. Fouling in Membrane Distillation, Osmotic Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Laqbaqbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Various membrane separation processes are being used for seawater desalination and treatment of wastewaters in order to deal with the worldwide water shortage problem. Different types of membranes of distinct morphologies, structures and physico-chemical characteristics are employed. Among the considered membrane technologies, membrane distillation (MD, osmotic distillation (OD and osmotic membrane distillation (OMD use porous and hydrophobic membranes for production of distilled water and/or concentration of wastewaters for recovery and recycling of valuable compounds. However, the efficiency of these technologies is hampered by fouling phenomena. This refers to the accumulation of organic/inorganic deposits including biological matter on the membrane surface and/or in the membrane pores. Fouling in MD, OD and OMD differs from that observed in electric and pressure-driven membrane processes such electrodialysis (ED, membrane capacitive deionization (MCD, reverse osmosis (RO, nanofiltration (NF, ultrafiltration (UF, microfiltration (MF, etc. Other than pore blockage, fouling in MD, OD and OMD increases the risk of membrane pores wetting and reduces therefore the quantity and quality of the produced water or the concentration efficiency of the process. This review deals with the observed fouling phenomena in MD, OD and OMD. It highlights different detected fouling types (organic fouling, inorganic fouling and biofouling, fouling characterization techniques as well as various methods of fouling reduction including pretreatment, membrane modification, membrane cleaning and antiscalants application.

  13. Isolation of Synaptosomes, Synaptic Plasma Membranes, and Synaptic Junctional Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Mary L; Jiang, Lei; Michaelis, Elias K

    2017-01-01

    Isolation of synaptic nerve terminals or synaptosomes provides an opportunity to study the process of neurotransmission at many levels and with a variety of approaches. For example, structural features of the synaptic terminals and the organelles within them, such as synaptic vesicles and mitochondria, have been elucidated with electron microscopy. The postsynaptic membranes are joined to the presynaptic "active zone" of transmitter release through cell adhesion molecules and remain attached throughout the isolation of synaptosomes. These "post synaptic densities" or "PSDs" contain the receptors for the transmitters released from the nerve terminals and can easily be seen with electron microscopy. Biochemical and cell biological studies with synaptosomes have revealed which proteins and lipids are most actively involved in synaptic release of neurotransmitters. The functional properties of the nerve terminals, such as responses to depolarization and the uptake or release of signaling molecules, have also been characterized through the use of fluorescent dyes, tagged transmitters, and transporter substrates. In addition, isolated synaptosomes can serve as the starting material for the isolation of relatively pure synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) that are devoid of organelles from the internal environment of the nerve terminal, such as mitochondria and synaptic vesicles. The isolated SPMs can reseal and form vesicular structures in which transport of ions such as sodium and calcium, as well as solutes such as neurotransmitters can be studied. The PSDs also remain associated with the presynaptic membranes during isolation of SPM fractions, making it possible to isolate the synaptic junctional complexes (SJCs) devoid of the rest of the plasma membranes of the nerve terminals and postsynaptic membrane components. Isolated SJCs can be used to identify the proteins that constitute this highly specialized region of neurons. In this chapter, we describe the steps involved

  14. Obtaining membranes for alternative treatment hydrogels of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Maria Jose Alves de

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric Hydrogels formed by crosslinked polymeric chains were obtained by ionizing radiation process according to Rosiak technique. In the last 40 years the use of hydrogels has been investigated for various applications as curatives. In this work hydrogel membranes were synthesized with poly (N-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP), poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA), chitosan and laponita clay for use as a vehicle for controlled glucantime release on the surface of skin tissues injured by leishmaniasis. Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Leishmania transmitted by the bite of phlebotomies sandfly. The traditional treatment of patients infected by these parasites is done with pentavalent antimony in injectable form. However, these antimonates are highly toxic and cause side effects in these patients. In addition, patients with heart and kidney disease can not use this treatment. In treatment with drug delivery hydrogel membrane applied on the surface of leishmaniasis injured tissues the drug is released directly to the wound in a controlled manner, reducing the side effects. Membranes prepared in this study were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TG), swelling, gel fraction, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The characterizations of cytotoxicity and drug release were made 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' with functional test according to ethical protocol of the Division of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases at the Hospital of Clinics, Sao Paulo University-School of Medicine, University. The 'in vivo' test of these membranes proved to be effective in controlled release of drugs directly into leishmaniasis damaged tissues. Results of 'in vivo' tests using PVP/PVAl / clay 1,5% and glucantime membrane showed remarkable contribution to wound reduction and cure in clinical therapy. (author)

  15. Microencapsulation within crosslinked polyethyleneimine membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncelet, D; Alexakis, T; Poncelet de Smet, B; Neufeld, R J

    1994-01-01

    A microencapsulation technique is proposed involving the formation of a polyethyleneimine (PEI) membrane crosslinked by an acid dichloride. The membranes were formed at pH 8 in a non-polar solvent, conditions which are better suited for the encapsulation of biocatalysts or fragile biochemicals than those using polyamide membranes. The mean diameter and size distribution of the PEI microcapsules were similar to that observed with nylon membranes. The resultant microcapsules were spherical, free-flowing with a strong membrane. The mass of membrane was seen to be independent of the reaction time (1-4 min), insensitive to the PEI concentration and proportional to the concentration of crosslinking agent.

  16. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adaptive silicone-membrane lenses: planar vs. shaped membrane

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schneider, F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors compare the performance and optical quality of two types of adaptive fluidic silicone-membrane lenses. The membranes feature either a homogeneous thickness, or it is shaped resulting in an inhomogeneous cross...

  18. Comparative study of NMP-preloaded and dip-loaded membranes for guided bone regeneration of rabbit cranial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S; Ghayor, Chafik; Siegenthaler, Barbara; Gjoksi, Bebeka; Pohjonen, Timo H; Weber, Franz E

    2017-02-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) has been utilized for several decades for the healing of cranio-maxillofacial bone defects and, particularly in the dental field, by creating space with a barrier membrane to exclude soft tissue and encourage bone growth in the membrane-protected volume. Although the first membranes were non-resorbable, a new generation of GBR membranes aims to biodegrade and provide bioactivity for better overall results. The Inion GTR™ poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membrane is not only resorbable but also bioactive, since it includes N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), which has been shown to promote bone regeneration. In this study, the effects of loading different amounts of NMP onto the membrane through chemical vapour deposition or dipping have been explored. In vitro release demonstrated that lower levels of NMP led to lower NMP concentrations and slower release, based on total NMP loaded in the membrane. The dipped membrane released almost all of the NMP within 15 min, leading to a high NMP concentration. For the in vivo studies in rabbits, 6 mm calvarial defects were created and left untreated or covered with an ePTFE membrane or PLGA membranes dipped in, or preloaded with, NMP. Evaluation of the bony regeneration revealed that the barrier membranes improved bony healing and that a decrease in NMP content improved the performance. Overall, we have demonstrated the potential of these PLGA membranes with a more favourable NMP release profile and the significance of exploring the effect of NMP on these PLGA membranes with regard to bone ingrowth. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A simple route to develop transparent doxorubicin-loaded nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes as potential wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaogang; Zhang, Hao; Cao, Zhenni; Cai, Ning; Xue, Yanan; Yu, Faquan

    2016-06-05

    The objective of this study is to develop transparent porous nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes with controlled release of doxorubicin for potential applications as wound dressings, which were fabricated by tape casting method from dispersing carboxylated nanodiamonds and dissolving cellulose homogeneously in 7 wt% NaOH/12 wt% urea aqueous solution. By adjusting the carboxylated nanodiamonds content, various nanocomposite membranes were obtained. The structure and properties of these membranes have been investigated by light transmittance measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile tests, water loss analyses, etc. The drug loading and release was investigated using doxorubicin hydrochloride as a model drug. In vitro cytotoxicity assay of the membranes was also studied. This work presented a proof-of-concept utility of these membranes for loading and release of bioactive compounds to be employed as a candidate for wound dressing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CARBOXYLIC ACID EFFECTS ON ETHANOL RECOVERY FROM AQUEOUS MIXTURES USING PERVAPORATION THROUGH MFI ZEOLITE-FILLED POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE MEMBRANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most bioethanol is produced by fermenting sugars released from biomass and using distillation to recover the ethanol. Recovering ethanol from the fermentation broths using pervaporation through hydrophobic membranes is potentially economically competitive with distillation for s...

  1. Hydrogen-selective membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

  2. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    small hemifusion diaphragm. To obtain a direct view of the fusion process, we have carried out extensive simulations of two bilayers, composed of block copolymers, which are immersed in a solvent which favors one of the blocks. As in the biological case, the membranes are placed under tension. This is essential as fusion ...

  3. Cell Membrane Coating Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronnie H; Kroll, Ashley V; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2018-03-27

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutic, prevention, and detection modalities have the potential to greatly impact how diseases are diagnosed and managed in the clinic. With the wide range of nanomaterials available, the rational design of nanocarriers on an application-specific basis has become increasingly commonplace. Here, a comprehensive overview is provided on an emerging platform: cell-membrane-coating nanotechnology. As a fundamental unit of biology, cells carry out a wide range of functions, including the remarkable ability to interface and interact with their surrounding environment. Instead of attempting to replicate such functions via synthetic techniques, researchers are now directly leveraging naturally derived cell membranes as a means of bestowing nanoparticles with enhanced biointerfacing capabilities. This top-down technique is facile, highly generalizable, and has the potential to greatly augment existing nanocarriers. Further, the introduction of a natural membrane substrate onto nanoparticles surfaces has enabled additional applications beyond those traditionally associated with nanomedicine. Despite its relative youth, there exists an impressive body of literature on cell membrane coating, which is covered here in detail. Overall, there is still significant room for development, as researchers continue to refine existing workflows while finding new and exciting applications that can take advantage of this developing technology. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 64; Issue 6. Fusion of biological ... The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in ...

  5. Bioelectrochemistry II membrane phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, M

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the lectures of the second course devoted to bioelectro­ chemistry, held within the framework of the International School of Biophysics. In this course another very large field of bioelectrochemistry, i. e. the field of Membrane Phenomena, was considered, which itself consists of several different, but yet related subfields. Here again, it can be easily stated that it is impossible to give a complete and detailed picture of all membrane phenomena of biological interest in a short course of about one and half week. Therefore the same philosophy, as the one of the first course, was followed, to select a series of lectures at postgraduate level, giving a synthesis of several membrane phenomena chosen among the most'important ones. These lectures should show the large variety of membrane-regulated events occurring in living bodies, and serve as sound interdisciplinary basis to start a special­ ized study of biological phenomena, for which the investigation using the dual approach, physico-che...

  6. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simu- lation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by tran- sient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified.

  7. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being employed in South African intensive care units for the management of patients with refractory hypoxaemia and for haemodynamic support, particularly following cardiothoracic procedures. ECMO is expensive, however, and there is a danger that this ...

  8. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by transient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified. Self-consistent ...

  9. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  10. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  11. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Marty, Michael T.; Wilcox, Kyle C.; Klein, William L.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membr...

  12. Membrane fission by protein crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Wilton T; Hayden, Carl C; Gadok, Avinash K; Zhao, Chi; Lafer, Eileen M; Rangamani, Padmini; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2017-04-18

    Membrane fission, which facilitates compartmentalization of biological processes into discrete, membrane-bound volumes, is essential for cellular life. Proteins with specific structural features including constricting rings, helical scaffolds, and hydrophobic membrane insertions are thought to be the primary drivers of fission. In contrast, here we report a mechanism of fission that is independent of protein structure-steric pressure among membrane-bound proteins. In particular, random collisions among crowded proteins generate substantial pressure, which if unbalanced on the opposite membrane surface can dramatically increase membrane curvature, leading to fission. Using the endocytic protein epsin1 N-terminal homology domain (ENTH), previously thought to drive fission by hydrophobic insertion, our results show that membrane coverage correlates equally with fission regardless of the hydrophobicity of insertions. Specifically, combining FRET-based measurements of membrane coverage with multiple, independent measurements of membrane vesiculation revealed that fission became spontaneous as steric pressure increased. Further, fission efficiency remained equally potent when helices were replaced by synthetic membrane-binding motifs. These data challenge the view that hydrophobic insertions drive membrane fission, suggesting instead that the role of insertions is to anchor proteins strongly to membrane surfaces, amplifying steric pressure. In line with these conclusions, even green fluorescent protein (GFP) was able to drive fission efficiently when bound to the membrane at high coverage. Our conclusions are further strengthened by the finding that intrinsically disordered proteins, which have large hydrodynamic radii yet lack a defined structure, drove fission with substantially greater potency than smaller, structured proteins.

  13. Dialysis membranes for blood purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K

    2000-01-01

    All of the artificial membranes in industrial use, such as a reverse-osmosis membrane, dialysis membrane, ultrafiltration membrane, microfiltration membrane and gas separation membrane, also have therapeutic applications. The most commonly used artificial organ is the artificial kidney, a machine that performs treatment known as hemodialysis. This process cleanses the body of a patient with renal failure by dialysis and filtration, simple physicochemical processes. Hemodialysis membranes are used to remove accumulated uremic toxins, excess ions and water from the patient via the dialysate, and to supply (deficit) insufficient ions from the dialysate. Dialysis membranes used clinically in the treatment of patients with renal failure account for by far the largest volume of membranes used worldwide; more than 70 million square meters are used a year. Almost all dialyzers now in use are of the hollow-fiber type. A hollow-fiber dialyzer contains a bundle of approximately 10000 hollow fibers, each with an inner diameter of about 200 microm when wet. The membrane thickness is about 20-45 microm, and the length is 160-250 mm. The walls of the hollow fibers function as the dialysis membrane. Various materials, including cellulose-based materials and synthetic polymers, are used for dialysis membranes. This paper reviews blood purification, hemodialysis and dialysis membranes.

  14. Deletions in the fifth alpha helix of HIV-1 matrix block virus release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, Bridget; Li, Yan; Maly, Connor J.; Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chen, Han [Center for Biotechnology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Zhou, You [Center for Biotechnology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The matrix (MA) protein of HIV-1 is the N-terminal component of the Gag structural protein and is critical for the early and late stages of viral replication. MA contains five α-helices (α1–α5). Deletions in the N-terminus of α5 as small as three amino acids impaired virus release. Electron microscopy of one deletion mutant (MA∆96-120) showed that its particles were tethered to the surface of cells by membranous stalks. Immunoblots indicated all mutants were processed completely, but mutants with large deletions had alternative processing intermediates. Consistent with the EM data, MA∆96-120 retained membrane association and multimerization capability. Co-expression of this mutant inhibited wild type particle release. Alanine scanning mutation in this region did not affect virus release, although the progeny virions were poorly infectious. Combined, these data demonstrate that structural ablation of the α5 of MA inhibits virus release. - Highlights: • Deletions were identified in the C-terminus of matrix that block virus release. • These deletion mutants still multimerized and associated with membranes. • TEM showed the mutant particles were tethered to the cell surface. • Amino acid mutagenesis of the region did not affect release. • The data suggests that disruption of matrix structure blocks virus release.

  15. Deletions in the fifth alpha helix of HIV-1 matrix block virus release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, Bridget; Li, Yan; Maly, Connor J.; Madson, Christian J.; Chen, Han; Zhou, You; Belshan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The matrix (MA) protein of HIV-1 is the N-terminal component of the Gag structural protein and is critical for the early and late stages of viral replication. MA contains five α-helices (α1–α5). Deletions in the N-terminus of α5 as small as three amino acids impaired virus release. Electron microscopy of one deletion mutant (MA∆96-120) showed that its particles were tethered to the surface of cells by membranous stalks. Immunoblots indicated all mutants were processed completely, but mutants with large deletions had alternative processing intermediates. Consistent with the EM data, MA∆96-120 retained membrane association and multimerization capability. Co-expression of this mutant inhibited wild type particle release. Alanine scanning mutation in this region did not affect virus release, although the progeny virions were poorly infectious. Combined, these data demonstrate that structural ablation of the α5 of MA inhibits virus release. - Highlights: • Deletions were identified in the C-terminus of matrix that block virus release. • These deletion mutants still multimerized and associated with membranes. • TEM showed the mutant particles were tethered to the cell surface. • Amino acid mutagenesis of the region did not affect release. • The data suggests that disruption of matrix structure blocks virus release

  16. XIAP impairs Smac release from the mitochondria during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, L; Sebastià, J; Tuffy, L P; Spring, A; Lichawska, A; Devocelle, M; Prehn, J H M; Rehm, M

    2010-06-03

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a potent inhibitor of caspases 3, 7 and 9, and mitochondrial Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase) release during apoptosis inhibits the activity of XIAP. In this study we show that cytosolic XIAP also feeds back to mitochondria to impair Smac release. We constructed a fluorescent XIAP-fusion protein by labelling NH(2)- and COOH-termini with Cerulean fluorescent protein (C-XIAP-C). Immunoprecipitation confirmed that C-XIAP-C retained the ability to interact with Smac and impaired extrinsically and intrinsically activated apoptosis in response to tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand/cycloheximide and staurosporine. In C-XIAP-C-expressing cells, cytochrome c release from mitochondria proceeded normally, whereas Smac release was significantly prolonged and incomplete. In addition, physiological expression of native XIAP prolonged or limited Smac release in HCT-116 colon cancer cells and primary mouse cortical neurons. The Smac-binding capacity of XIAP, but not caspase inhibition, was central for mitochondrial Smac retention, as evidenced in experiments using XIAP mutants that cannot bind to Smac or effector caspases. Similarly, the release of a Smac mutant that cannot bind to XIAP was not impaired by C-XIAP-C expression. Full Smac release could however be provoked by rapid cytosolic C-XIAP-C depletion upon digitonin-induced plasma membrane permeabilization. Our findings suggest that although mitochondria may already contain pores sufficient for cytochrome c release, elevated amounts of XIAP can selectively impair and limit the release of Smac.

  17. Autophagosomal membranes assemble at ER-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Codogno, Patrice; Morel, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    The biogenesis of autophagosome, the double membrane bound organelle related to macro-autophagy, is a complex event requiring numerous key-proteins and membrane remodeling events. Our recent findings identify the extended synaptotagmins, crucial tethers of Endoplasmic Reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites, as key-regulators of this molecular sequence.

  18. Alternative energy efficient membrane bioreactor using reciprocating submerged membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J; Smith, S; Roh, H K

    2014-01-01

    A novel membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot system, using membrane reciprocation instead of air scouring, was operated at constant high flux and daily fluctuating flux to demonstrate its application under peak and diurnal flow conditions. Low and stable transmembrane pressure was achieved at 40 l/m(2)/h (LMH) by use of repetitive membrane reciprocation. The results reveal that the inertial forces acting on the membrane fibers effectively propel foulants from the membrane surface. Reciprocation of the hollow fiber membrane is beneficial for the constant removal of solids that may build up on the membrane surface and inside the membrane bundle. The membrane reciprocation in the reciprocating MBR pilot consumed less energy than coarse air scouring used in conventional MBR systems. Specific energy consumption for the membrane reciprocation was 0.072 kWh/m(3) permeate produced at 40 LMH flux, which is 75% less than for a conventional air scouring system as reported in literature without consideration of energy consumption for biological aeration (0.29 kWh/m(3)). The daily fluctuating flux test confirmed that the membrane reciprocation is effective to handle fluctuating flux up to 50 LMH. The pilot-scale reciprocating MBR system successfully demonstrated that fouling can be controlled via 0.43 Hz membrane reciprocation with 44 mm or higher amplitude.

  19. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Michael T; Wilcox, Kyle C; Klein, William L; Sligar, Stephen G

    2013-05-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membrane proteins and have been used to study a wide variety of purified membrane proteins. This report details the incorporation of an unbiased population of membrane proteins from Escherichia coli membranes into Nanodiscs. This solubilized membrane protein library (SMPL) forms a soluble in vitro model of the membrane proteome. Since Nanodiscs contain isolated proteins or small complexes, the SMPL is an ideal platform for interactomics studies and pull-down assays of membrane proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the protein population before and after formation of the Nanodisc library indicates that a large percentage of the proteins are incorporated into the library. Proteomic identification of several prominent bands demonstrates the successful incorporation of outer and inner membrane proteins into the Nanodisc library.

  20. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  1. The destiny of Ca(2+) released by mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ayako; Kim, Bongju; Matsuoka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) is known to regulate diverse cellular functions, for example energy production and cell death, by modulating mitochondrial dehydrogenases, inducing production of reactive oxygen species, and opening mitochondrial permeability transition pores. In addition to the action of Ca(2+) within mitochondria, Ca(2+) released from mitochondria is also important in a variety of cellular functions. In the last 5 years, the molecules responsible for mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics have been identified: a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), a mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCLX), and a candidate for a mitochondrial H(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (Letm1). In this review, we focus on the mitochondrial Ca(2+) release system, and discuss its physiological and pathophysiological significance. Accumulating evidence suggests that the mitochondrial Ca(2+) release system is not only crucial in maintaining mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis but also participates in the Ca(2+) crosstalk between mitochondria and the plasma membrane and between mitochondria and the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  2. Membrane Cells for Brine Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, M.

    1982-01-01

    Membrane cells were developed as alternatives to mercury and diaphragm cells for the electrolysis of brine. Compares the three types of cells, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of membrane cells. (JN)

  3. Controlled release from stimuli-sensitive microgel capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Hassan; Alexeev, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    We introduce a mesoscale computational model for responsive gels, i.e. chemically cross-linked polymer networks immersed in Newtonian fluids, and use it to probe the release of nanoparticles from hollow microgel capsules that swell and deswell in response to external stimuli. Our model explicitly describes the transport of nanoparticles in swelling/deswelling polymer networks with complex geometries and associated fluid flows. Our simulations reveal that responsive microcapsules can be effectively utilized for steady and pulsatile release of encapsulated solutes. Steady, diffusive release of nanoparticle takes place from swollen gel capsules, whereas capsule deswelling cause burst-like discharge of solutes driven by a flow from the shrinking capsule interior. We demonstrate that this hydrodynamic release can be regulated by introducing rigid microscopic rods inside the capsule. Our calculations indicate that the rods stretch the deswelling membrane and promote the formation of large pores in the shell, which allow massive flow-driven release of nanoparticles. Thus, our findings unveil a new approach for regulating the release from stimulus responsive micro-carriers that will be especially useful for designing new drug delivery systems.

  4. Purification of highly active alphavirus replication complexes demonstrates altered fractionation of multiple cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; van Hemert, Martijn J; Ahola, Tero

    2018-01-24

    Positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-associated structures; alphaviruses and many other groups induce membrane invaginations called spherules. Here, we established a protocol to purify these membranous replication complexes (RCs) from cells infected with Semliki Forest virus (SFV). We isolated SFV spherules located on the plasma membrane and further purified them using two consecutive density gradients. This revealed that SFV infection strongly modifies cellular membranes. We removed soluble proteins, the Golgi and most of the mitochondria, but plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and late endosome markers enriched in the membrane fraction that contained viral RNA synthesizing activity, replicase proteins and minus- and plus-strand RNA. Electron microscopy revealed that the purified membranes displayed spherule-like structures with a narrow neck. This membrane enrichment was specific to viral replication as such a distribution of membrane markers was only observed after infection. Besides the plasma membrane, SFV infection remodeled the ER, and the co-fractionation of the RC-carrying plasma membrane and ER suggests that SFV may recruit ER proteins or membrane to the site of replication. The purified RCs were highly active in synthesizing both genomic and subgenomic RNA. Detergent solubilization destroyed the replication activity demonstrating that the membrane association of the complex is essential. Most of the newly made RNA was in double-stranded replicative molecules but the purified complexes also produced single-stranded RNA as well as released newly made RNA. This indicates that the purification established here maintained the functionality of RCs and thus enables further structural and functional studies of active RCs. IMPORTANCE Similar to all positive-strand RNA viruses, the arthropod-borne alphaviruses induce membranous genome factories but little is known about the arrangement of viral replicase proteins and the

  5. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  6. Does Ceramide Form Channels? The Ceramide-Induced Membrane Permeabilization Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artetxe, Ibai; Ugarte-Uribe, Begoña; Gil, David; Valle, Mikel; Alonso, Alicia; García-Sáez, Ana J; Goñi, Félix M

    2017-08-22

    Ceramide is a sphingolipid involved in several cellular processes, including apoptosis. It has been proposed that ceramide forms large and stable channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane that induce cell death through direct release of cytochrome c. However, this mechanism is still debated because the membrane permeabilizing activity of ceramide remains poorly understood. To determine whether the mechanism of ceramide-induced membrane leakage is consistent with the hypothesis of an apoptotic ceramide channel, we have used here assays of calcein release from liposomes. When assaying liposomes containing sphingomyelin and cholesterol, we observed an overall gradual phenomenon of contents release, together with some all-or-none leakage (at low ceramide concentrations or short times). The presence of channels in the bilayer should cause only an all-or-none leakage. When liposomes poor in sphingomyelin/cholesterol or mimicking the lipid composition of the mitochondrial outer membrane were tested, we did not detect any leakage. In consequence, the hypothesis of formation of large ceramide channels in the membrane is not consistent with our results. Instead we propose that the presence of ceramide in one of the membrane monolayers causes a surface area mismatch between both monolayers, which leads to vesicle collapse. The gradual phenomenon of calcein release would be due to a competition between two ceramide effects; namely, lateral segregation that facilitates permeabilization, and at longer times, trans-bilayer flip-flop that opposes asymmetric lateral segregation and causes a mismatch. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fundamentals of membrane bioreactors materials, systems and membrane fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical, carefully researched, up-to-date summary of membranes for membrane bioreactors. It presents a comprehensive and self-contained outline of the fundamentals of membrane bioreactors, especially their relevance as an advanced water treatment technology. This outline helps to bring the technology to the readers’ attention, and positions the critical topic of membrane fouling as one of the key impediments to its more widescale adoption. The target readership includes researchers and industrial practitioners with an interest in membrane bioreactors.

  8. Cheap Thin Film Oxygen Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a membrane, comprising a porous support layer a gas tight electronically and ionically conducting membrane layer and a catalyst layer, characterized in that the electronically and ionically conducting membrane layer is formed from a material having a crystallite...

  9. Cigarette smoke-induced damage-associated molecular pattern release from necrotic neutrophils triggers proinflammatory mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Irene H; Pouwels, Simon D; Leijendekker, Carin; de Bruin, Harold G; Zijlstra, G Jan; van der Vaart, Hester; ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Nawijn, Martijn C; van der Toorn, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major causative factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure can induce a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in airway epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized that CS promotes neutrophil necrosis with subsequent release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), alarming the innate immune system. We studied the effect of smoking two cigarettes on sputum neutrophils in healthy individuals and of 5-day CS or air exposure on neutrophil counts, myeloperoxidase, and HMGB1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of BALB/c mice. In human peripheral blood neutrophils, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis/necrosis markers, caspase activity, and DAMP release were studied after CS exposure. Finally, we assessed the effect of neutrophil-derived supernatants on the release of chemoattractant CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in sputum neutrophil numbers after 3 hours. In mice, neutrophil counts were significantly increased 16 hours after repeated CS exposure but reduced 2 hours after an additional exposure. In vitro, CS induced necrotic neutrophil cell death, as indicated by mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of apoptosis, and DAMP release. Supernatants from CS-treated neutrophils significantly increased the release of CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Together, these observations show, for the first time, that CS exposure induces neutrophil necrosis, leading to DAMP release, which may amplify CS-induced airway inflammation by promoting airway epithelial proinflammatory responses.

  10. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  11. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome ''depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs

  12. Development of transdermal system containing nicotine by using sustained release dosage design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirnaksiz, Figen; Yuce, Zeynep

    2005-09-01

    This study was carried out to develop a membrane-controlled transdermal formulation (TF) of nicotine by using sustained release dosage design (SRDD). TFs were prepared with polyethylene membrane as a rate-controlling barrier; a carbomer was used as the gel reservoir with or without propylene glycol (PG). The in vitro target flux (0.0535 mg cm(-2) h(-1)) was calculated according to SRDD calculations. Nicotine permeation through the membrane with or without transfer adhesive was also studied using diffusion cells. Nicotine permeated through membrane (without adhesive) with a flux of 0.0555 mg cm(-2) h(-1) and this value was similar to that of the in vitro target flux. The release from the TFs and from a commercial product (Nicotinell, 52.5 mg 30 cm(-2)) was studied using the FDA paddle method. The nicotine amount was increased from 22.7 to 56.5 mg in gel reservoir, and a plateau was reached beyond 45.4 mg of drug; the system attained the maximum thermodynamic activity with 56.5 mg of nicotine. The release rate from TFs (without adhesive layer) containing PG in the reservoir was very similar to the target release rate (1.07 mg h(-1)). The fluxes of nicotine from Nicotinell and TF containing 45.4 mg of nicotine were close to the in vitro target release rate.

  13. Antibacterial and anti-adhesion effects of the silver nanoparticles-loaded poly(L-lactide) fibrous membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shen [Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Zhao, Jingwen [Orthopedic Institute, Soochow University, 708 Renmin Road, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215007 (China); School of Biomedical Engineering and Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ruan, Hongjiang; Wang, Wei [Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Wu, Tianyi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 2nd Affiliated hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing Medical University, 121 Jiang Jia Yuan, Nanjing 210011 (China); Cui, Wenguo, E-mail: wgcui80@hotmail.com [Orthopedic Institute, Soochow University, 708 Renmin Road, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215007 (China); School of Biomedical Engineering and Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Fan, Cunyi, E-mail: fancunyi888@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2013-04-01

    The complications of tendon injury are frequently compromised by peritendinous adhesions and tendon sheath infection. Physical barriers for anti-adhesion may increase the incidence of postoperative infection. This study was designed to evaluate the potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)-loaded poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) electrospun fibrous membranes to prevent adhesion formation and infection. Results of an in vitro drug release study showed that a burst release was followed by sustained release from electrospun fibrous membranes with a high initial silver content. Fewer fibroblasts adhered to and proliferated on the AgNP-loaded PLLA electrospun fibrous membranes compared with pure PLLA electrospun fibrous membrane. In the antibacterial test, the AgNP-loaded PLLA electrospun fibrous membranes can prevent the adhesion of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AgNP-loaded PLLA electrospun fibrous membranes have the convenient practical medical potential of reduction of infection and adhesion formation after tendon injury. - Highlights: ► Silver nanoparticles are directly electrospun into PLLA fibrous membrane. ► Long-lasting release of Ag + ions is achieved. ► Cytotoxicity of silver ions benefits the anti-proliferation of physical barriers. ► Broad anti-microbial effect of drug-loaded fibrous membrane is revealed. ► Antibacterial and anti-adhesion effects of the physical barriers are combined.

  14. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  15. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  16. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    . In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...... fractionation, such as removal of a side activity from the main enzyme activity. As a proof-of-concept, amino acids were used as model solution to test the feasibility of EMF in the application of amphoteric molecule separation. A single amino acid was used to illustrate the effect of an electric field...... on the separation performance were very small in the investigated range. The mass transport of each enzyme can be well explained by the Extended-Nernst-Planck equation. Better separation was observed at lower feed concentration, higher solution pH in the investigated range and with a polysulfone (PS) MF membrane...

  17. Building membrane nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Membrane nanopores--hollow nanoscale barrels that puncture biological or synthetic membranes--have become powerful tools in chemical- and biosensing, and have achieved notable success in portable DNA sequencing. The pores can be self-assembled from a variety of materials, including proteins, peptides, synthetic organic compounds and, more recently, DNA. But which building material is best for which application, and what is the relationship between pore structure and function? In this Review, I critically compare the characteristics of the different building materials, and explore the influence of the building material on pore structure, dynamics and function. I also discuss the future challenges of developing nanopore technology, and consider what the next-generation of nanopore structures could be and where further practical applications might emerge.

  18. Aquaporin-2 membrane targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma T B; Fenton, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) to the apical plasma membrane of kidney collecting duct principal cells is regulated mainly by the antidiuretic peptide hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). This process is of crucial importance for the maintenance of body water homeostasis....... In this brief review we assess the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and discuss the emerging concept that type 2 AVP receptor (V2R)-mediated AQP2 trafficking is cAMP-independent. the ability of the kidney to concentrate the urine and thereby maintain body water homeostasis depends on targeting....... For example, 1) stimulation with the nonspecific AC activator forskolin increases AQP2 membrane accumulation in a mouse cortical collecting duct cell line [e.g., Norregaard et al. (16)]; 2) cAMP increases CD water permeability (15); 3) the cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) can phosphorylate AQP2 on its...

  19. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  20. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become more attractive and feasible, due to advantages provided by the combination with regard to developments for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. The major drawbacks of MBR technology are related w...

  1. Pulse radiolysis studies of model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijman, M.G.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis the influence of the structure of membranes on the processes in cell membranes were examined. Different models of the membranes were evaluated. Pulse radiolysis was used as the technique to examine the membranes. (R.B.)

  2. Simulation characterization of CMUT with vented square membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuan; Du, Fei; Jin, Shijiu; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2015-08-01

    Being one of the appealing MEMS devices for both immersion and air-coupled applications, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are often featuring vacuum/sealed cavities. However, the pressure differential across the membrane requires higher drive voltage to start the vibration. Besides, the air film formed in the narrow gap consequently being squeezed provides additional damping as well as stiffening for the membrane. Moreover, the fabrication technologies encounter difficulties in stress control and thin membrane releasing during the hermetical cavity formations. In this paper, we propose using surface micromaching technology to fabricate CMUTs with vented square membrane for air-coupled applications. In order to compare the performance of CMUTs with and without vented holes on the membrane using finite element analysis (FEA), we have developed several 3D finite element models using commercially available FEA software (COMSOL Multiphysics). According to the simulation results, our design remains the similar first resonant frequency and has higher frequency interval, indicating a better signal-to-noise rate (SNR). Eigenfrequency comparison between CMUTs with the same movable area implies that the presence of the vented holes lowers the first order frequency by around 5.7%. We have demonstrated that the idea of fabricating air-coupled CMUTs with vented holes on the square membrane is feasible and our proposal could stay around the designed resonant frequency. Further characterization will be done in the near future.

  3. Membrane-initiated actions of estrogens in neuroendocrinology: emerging principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Nandini; Pfaff, Donald W

    2007-02-01

    Hormonal ligands for the nuclear receptor superfamily have at least two interacting mechanisms of action: 1) classical transcriptional regulation of target genes (genomic mechanisms); and 2) nongenomic actions that are initiated at the cell membrane, which could impact transcription. Although transcriptional mechanisms are increasingly well understood, membrane-initiated actions of these ligands are incompletely understood. Historically, this has led to a considerable divergence of thought in the molecular endocrine field. We have attempted to uncover principles of hormone action that are relevant to membrane-initiated actions of estrogens. There is evidence that the membrane-limited actions of hormones, particularly estrogens, involve the rapid activation of kinases and the release of calcium. Membrane actions of estrogens, which activate these rapid signaling cascades, can also potentiate nuclear transcription. These signaling cascades may occur in parallel or in series but subsequently converge at the level of modification of transcriptionally relevant molecules such as nuclear receptors and/or coactivators. In addition, other hormones or neurotransmitters may also activate cascades to crosstalk with estrogen receptor-mediated transcription. The idea of synergistic coupling between membrane-initiated and genomic actions of hormones fundamentally revises the paradigms of cell signaling in neuroendocrinology.

  4. Dynamics of silver elution from functionalised antimicrobial nanofiltration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, S; Habimana, O; Hannon, J; Allen, A; Cummins, E; Casey, E

    2017-07-01

    In an effort to mitigate biofouling on thin film composite membranes such as nanofiltration and reverse osmosis, a myriad of different surface modification strategies has been published. The use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) has emerged as being particularly promising. Nevertheless, the stability of these surface modifications is still poorly understood, particularly under permeate flux conditions. Leaching or elution of Ag-NPs from the membrane surface can not only affect the antimicrobial characteristics of the membrane, but could also potentially present an environmental liability when applied in industrial-scale systems. This study sought to investigate the dynamics of silver elution and the bactericidal effect of an Ag-NP functionalised NF270 membrane. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy was used to show that the bulk of leached silver occurred at the start of experimental runs, and was found to be independent of salt or permeate conditions used. Cumulative amounts of leached silver did, however, stabilise following the initial release, and were shown to have maintained the biocidal characteristics of the modified membrane, as observed by a higher fraction of structurally damaged Pseudomonas fluorescens cells. These results highlight the need to comprehensively assess the time-dependent nature of bactericidal membranes.

  5. Underground water stress release models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Dang, Shenjun; Lü, Shaochuan

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of tectonic stress may cause earthquakes at some epochs. However, in most cases, it leads to crustal deformations. Underground water level is a sensitive indication of the crustal deformations. We incorporate the information of the underground water level into the stress release models (SRM), and obtain the underground water stress release model (USRM). We apply USRM to the earthquakes occurred at Tangshan region. The analysis shows that the underground water stress release model outperforms both Poisson model and stress release model. Monte Carlo simulation shows that the simulated seismicity by USRM is very close to the real seismicity.

  6. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future....... Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these...

  7. Electrochemical polymer electrolyte membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Jianhua; Wilkinson, David P

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical Polymer Electrolyte Membranes covers PEMs from fundamentals to applications, describing their structure, properties, characterization, synthesis, and use in electrochemical energy storage and solar energy conversion technologies. Featuring chapters authored by leading experts from academia and industry, this authoritative text: Discusses cutting-edge methodologies in PEM material selection and fabricationPoints out important challenges in developing PEMs and recommends mitigation strategies to improve PEM performanceAnalyzes the cur

  8. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  9. Hydrogen production from methane using oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Sedigheh

    Non-porous ceramic membranes with mixed ionic and electronic conductivity have received significant interest in membrane reactor systems for the conversion of methane and higher hydrocarbons to higher value products like hydrogen. However, hydrogen generation by this method has not yet been commercialized and suffers from low membrane stability, low membrane oxygen flux, high membrane fabrication costs, and high reaction temperature requirements. In this dissertation, hydrogen production from methane on two different types of ceramic membranes (dense SFC and BSCF) has been investigated. The focus of this research was on the effects of different parameters to improve hydrogen production in a membrane reactor. These parameters included operating temperature, type of catalyst, membrane material, membrane thickness, membrane preparation pH, and feed ratio. The role of the membrane in the conversion of methane and the interaction with a Pt/CeZrO2 catalyst has been studied. Pulse studies of reactants and products over physical mixtures of crushed membrane material and catalyst have clearly demonstrated that a synergy exists between the membrane and the catalyst under reaction conditions. The degree of catalyst/membrane interaction strongly impacts the conversion of methane and the catalyst performance. During thermogravimetric analysis, the onset temperature of oxygen release for BSCF was observed to be lower than that for SFC while the amount of oxygen release was significantly greater. Pulse injections of CO2 over crushed membranes at 800°C have shown more CO2 dissociation on the BSCF membrane than the SFC membrane, resulting in higher CO formation on the BSCF membrane. Similar to the CO2 pulses, when CO was injected on the samples at 800°C, CO2 production was higher on BSCF than SFC. It was found that hydrogen consumption on BSCF particles is 24 times higher than that on SFC particles. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption studies of

  10. Novicidin interactions with phospholipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balakrishnan, Vijay Shankar

    Antimicrobial peptides target bacterial cell membranes and are considered as potential antibiotics. Their interactions with cell membranes are studied using different approaches. This thesis comprises of the biophysical investigations on the antimicrobial peptide Novicidin, interacting...... with liposomes. The lipid-induced changes in the peptide due to membrane binding, and the peptide-induced changes in the membrane properties were investigated using various spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, and the structural and thermodynamic aspects of peptide-lipid interactions are discussed. This helps...... in understanding not only the antimicrobial nature of Novicidin, but also sheds light on the membrane-peptide interactions....

  11. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Ruben; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efrain

    2011-01-01

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  12. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  13. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  14. Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horster, M

    2000-12-01

    Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters are organized into transporter families that are functional in several epithelial organs, namely, in kidney, lung, pancreas, intestine, and salivary gland. Family members (subtypes) are developmentally expressed in plasma membranes in temporospatial patterns that are 1) similar for one subtype within different organs, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) in lung and kidney; 2) different between subtypes within the same organ, like the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in lung; and 3) apparently matched among members of different transporter families, as alpha-ENaC with AQP1 and -4 in lung and with AQP2 in kidney. Finally, comparison of temporal expression patterns in early embryonic development of transporters from different families [e.g., cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ENaC, and outer medullary potassium channel] suggests regulatory activating or inactivating interactions in defined morphogenic periods. This review focuses on embryonic patterns, at the mRNA and immunoprotein level, of the following transporter entities expressed in epithelial cell plasma membranes: ENaC; the chloride transporters CFTR, ClC-2, bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter, Cl/OH, and Cl/HCO(3); the sodium glucose transporter-glucose transporter; the sodium/hydrogen exchanger; the sodium-phosphate cotransporter; the ATPases; and AQP. The purpose of this article is to relate temporal and spatial expression patterns in embryonic and in early postnatal epithelia to developmental changes in organ structure and function.

  15. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas Zac. (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: amolgado@fisica.uaz.edu.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-03-21

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  16. Neutrons and model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragneto, G.

    2012-11-01

    Current research in membrane protein biophysics highlights the emerging role of lipids in shaping membrane protein function. Cells and organisms have developed sophisticated mechanisms for controlling the lipid composition and many diseases are related to the failure of these mechanisms. One of the recent advances in the field is the discovery of the existence of coexisting micro-domains within a single membrane, important for regulating some signaling pathways. Many important properties of these domains remain poorly characterized. The characterization and analysis of bio-interfaces represent a challenge. Performing measurements on these few nanometer thick, soft, visco-elastic and dynamic systems is close to the limits of the available tools and methods. Neutron scattering techniques including small angle scattering, diffraction, reflectometry as well as inelastic methods are rapidly developing for these studies and are attracting an increasing number of biologists and biophysicists at large facilities. This manuscript will review some recent progress in the field and provide perspectives for future developments. It aims at highlighting neutron reflectometry as a versatile method to tackle questions dealing with the understanding and function of biomembranes and their components. The other important scattering methods are only briefly introduced.

  17. Flash release - an alternative for releasing complex mems devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Svetovoy, Vitaly; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    A novel time-saving and cost-effective release technique has been developed and is described. The physical nature of the process is explained in combination with experimental observations. The results of the flash release process are compared with those of freeze-drying and supercritical CO2

  18. Flash release an alternative for releasing complex MEMS devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    A novel time-saving and cost-effective release technique has been developed and is described. The physical nature of the process is explained in combination with experimental observations. The results of the flash release process are compared with those of freeze-drying and supercritical CO2

  19. A new concept in polymeric thin-film composite nanofiltration membranes with antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollahosseini, Arash; Rahimpour, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    A new, thin film, biofouling resistant, nanofiltration (NF) membrane was fabricated with two key characteristics, viz. a low rate of silver (Ag) release and long-lasting antibacterial properties. In the new approach, nanoparticles were embedded completely in a polymeric thin-film layer. A comparison was made between the new thin-film composite (TFC), NF membrane and thin-film nanocomposite (TFN), and antibacterial NF membranes. Both types of NF membrane were fabricated by interfacial polymerization on a polysulphone sublayer using m-phenylenediamine and trimesoyl chloride as an amine monomer and an acid chloride monomer, respectively. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis demonstrated the presence of Ag nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study the cross-sectional and surface morphological properties of the NF membranes. Permeability and salt rejection were tested using a dead-end filtration cell. Ag leaching from the membranes was measured using inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Morphological studies showed that the TFC NF membranes had better thin-film formation (a more compact structure and a smoother surface) than TFN NF membranes. Performance experiments on TFC NF membranes revealed that permeability was good, without sacrificing salt rejection. The antibacterial properties of the fabricated membranes were tested using the disk diffusion method and viable plate counts. The antibiofouling properties of the membranes were examined by measuring the quantity of bacterial cells released from the biofilm formed (as a function of the amount of biofilm present). A more sensitive surface was observed compared to that of a typical antibacterial NF membrane. The Ag leaching rates were low, which will likely result in long-lasting antibacterial and biofouling resistant properties.

  20. Solid-state membrane module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John Howard [Salt Lake City, UT; Taylor, Dale M [Murray, UT

    2011-06-07

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  1. Flux Enhancement in Membrane Distillation Using Nanofiber Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jiříček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation (MD is an emerging separation technology, whose largest application potential lies in the desalination of highly concentrated solutions, which are out of the scope of reverse osmosis. Despite many attractive features, this technology is still awaiting large industrial application. The main reason is the lack of commercially available membranes with fluxes comparable to reverse osmosis. MD is a thermal separation process driven by a partial vapour pressure difference. Flux, distillate purity, and thermal efficiency are always in conflict, all three being strictly connected with pore size, membrane hydrophobicity, and thickness. The world has not seen the ideal membrane yet, but nanofibers may offer a solution to these contradictory requirements. Membranes of electrospun PVDF were tested under various conditions on a direct contact (DCMD unit, in order to determine the optimum conditions for maximum flux. In addition, their performance was compared to commonly available PTFE, PE, and PES membranes. It was confirmed that thinner membranes have higher fluxes and a lower distillate purity and also higher energy losses via conduction across the membrane. As both mass and heat transfer are connected, it is best to develop new membranes with a target application in mind, for the specific membrane module and operational conditions.

  2. Characterization of taurine binding, uptake, and release in the rat hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanretta, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    The neurotransmitter criteria of specific receptors, inactivation, and release were experimentally examined for taurine in the hypothalamus. Specific membrane binding and synaptosomal uptake of taurine both displayed high affinity and low affinity systems. The neurotransmitter criterion of release was studied in superfused synaptosomes. Exposure of synaptosomes which had been preloaded with a concentration of [ 3 H]taurine in the high affinity uptake range (1.5 μM) to either 56 mM K + or 100 μM veratridine evoked a Ca 2+ -independent release. Exposure of synaptosomes which had been preloaded with a concentration of [ 3 H]taurine in the low affinity uptake range (2 mM) to 56 mM K + induced a Ca 2+ -independent release, whereas 100 + M veratridine did not, either in the presence or absence of Ca 2+ . Based on these results, as well as other observations, a model is proposed in which the high affinity uptake system is located on neuronal membranes and the low affinity uptake system is located on glial membranes. The mechanisms of binding, uptake, and release in relation to the cellular location of each are discussed. We conclude that the neurotransmitter criterion of activation by re-uptake is satisfied for taurine in the hypothalamus. However, the failure to demonstrate both a specific taurine receptor site and a Ca 2+ -dependent evoked release, necessitates that we conclude that taurine appears not to function as a hypothalamic neurotransmitter, at least not in the classical sense

  3. Sustained-release, extended-release, and other time-release formulations in neuropsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-08-01

    Pills and capsules may release their contents within minutes of ingestion; these are immediate-release formulations. Pills and capsules may also release their contents after a time lag, or a little at a time, or in some other predetermined way; these are time-release formulations. Many drugs in psychiatry have been time-release formulated to reduce their local adverse effects in the gastrointestinal tract, to reduce adverse effects associated with peak blood levels, or to artificially extend their half-life. Time-release formulations are associated with the added advantages of convenience of dosing, improved compliance, and less fluctuation in blood levels across the course of the day. A disadvantage of time-release formulations is that they may be incompletely absorbed; this is a serious issue in patients with acute or chronic intestinal hurry disorders, such as gastroenteritis or irritable bowel syndrome. Time-release formulations may also be more expensive than immediate-release formulations. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  4. Separation of tritiated water using graphene oxide membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Motkuri, Radha K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gotthold, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Frost, Anthony P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bratton, Wesley [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-28

    In future nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and possibly for nuclear power plants, the cleanup of tritiated water will be needed for hundreds of thousands of gallons of water with low activities of tritium. This cleanup concept utilizes graphene oxide laminar membranes (GOx) for the separation of low-concentration (10-3-10 µCi/g) tritiated water to create water that can be released to the environment and a much smaller waste stream with higher tritium concentrations. Graphene oxide membranes consist of hierarchically stacked, overlapping molecular layers and represent a new class of materials. A permeation rate test was performed with a 2-µm-thick cast Asbury membrane using mixed gas permeability testing with zero air (highly purified atmosphere) and with air humidified with either H2O or D2O to a nominal 50% relative humidity. The membrane permeability for both H2O and D2O was high with N2 and O2 at the system measurement limit. The membrane water permeation rate was compared to a Nafion® membrane and the GOx permeation was approximately twice as high at room temperature. The H2O vapor permeation rate was 5.9 × 102 cc/m2/min (1.2 × 10-6 g/min-cm2), which is typical for graphene oxide membranes. To demonstrate the feasibility of such isotopic water separation through GOX laminar membranes, an experimental setup was constructed to use pressure-driven separation by heating the isotopic water mixture at one side of the membrane to create steam while cooling the other side. Several membranes were tested and were prepared using different starting materials and by different pretreatment methods. The average separation result was 0.8 for deuterium and 0.6 for tritium. Higher or lower temperatures may also improve separation efficiency but neither has been tested yet. A rough estimate of cost compared to current technology was also included as an indication of potential viability of the process. The relative process costs were based on the rough size of facility to

  5. Use of rhamnolipid biosurfactant for membrane biofouling prevention and cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lan Hee; Jung, Yongmoon; Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Chang-Min; Yu, Hye-Weon; Park, Hee-Deung; Kim, In S

    2015-01-01

    Rhamnolipids were evaluated as biofouling reducing agents in this study. The permeability of the bacterial outer membrane was increased by rhamnolipids while the growth rate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was not affected. The surface hydrophobicity was increased through the release of lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polymeric substances from the outer cell membrane. Rhamnolipids were evaluated as agents for the prevention and cleaning of biofilms. A high degree of biofilm detachment was observed when the rhamnolipids were used as a cleaning agent. In addition, effective biofilm reduction occurred when rhamnolipids were applied to various species of Gram-negative bacteria isolated from seawater samples. Biofilm reduction using rhamnolipids was comparable to commercially available surfactants. In addition, 20% of the water flux was increased after rhamnolipid treatment (300 μg ml(-1), 6 h exposure time) in a dead-end filtration system. Rhamnolipids appear to have promise as biological agents for reducing membrane biofouling.

  6. Herpesvirus glycoproteins undergo multiple antigenic changes before membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Glauser

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 entry machinery--gB, gH/gL and gp150--changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion.

  7. Activity and distribution of urease following microencapsulation within polyamide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshipouri, M; Neufeld, R J

    1991-04-01

    Urease was microencapsulated by forming a semipermeable polyamide membrane around aqueous microdroplets (266 microns mean diameter) containing the soluble enzyme. The yield of the interfacial polymerization technique, determined spectrophotometrically, was 83% of the original enzyme on a mass basis, resulting in a final intracapsular urease concentration of 62.3 mg ml-1 or 0.1 mM. Similar absorption spectra of broken and intact microcapsules suggested that spectrophotometry may be applied in performing direct studies on the intact microcapsules. The high activity yield of urease microcapsules relative to the mass of entrapped enzyme (92.5%) indicated minimal effects of mass transfer limitation. The mass of active urease incorporated into the nylon membrane represented 6% of the encapsulated enzyme activity. The soluble intracapsular enzyme fraction (94%) was released into solution upon rupture of the membrane. A complete mass and activity balance of the encapsulated enzyme was achieved.

  8. Perturbations of cellular membranes with synthetic polymers and ultrafast lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher Vaughn-Daigneau

    This dissertation examines the response of the plasma membrane to perturbations by synthetic nanoparticles and ultra-fast laser pulses. Both model membranes and living cells were examined in to characterize membrane disruption and the biological response to perturbation. These studies provide a deeper understanding of cell biology and guide the design of effective nanoparticle- or laser-based therapies, as well as warning about unintended exposure. In regards to membrane disruption by pulsed-laser irradiation, irradiation induced giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) on the surface of the living cell. This process involved the incorporation of material from the extracellular media into both the cytoplasm and the GPMV as the cell responded to the intense pressure and temperature gradients induced by irradiation and the subsequent cavitation. Further, the cell exposed phosphotidylserine to the exterior surface of the plasma membrane and GPMV and initiated caspase activity. Single particle tracking of 20 nm fluorescent beads within the GPMVs demonstrated a complex, gelatinous structure within the GPMV. In regards to nanoparticle-based perturbations, techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular dynamics were used to investigate the relationship between nanoparticle properties and membrane disruption. Molecular dynamics simulations examined the binding of third-generation poly(amidoamine) dendrimers to phosphatidylcholine bilayers as a function on nanoparticle termination and membrane phase. A potential of mean force was calculated and demonstrated that the charged dendrimers bound to the zwitterionic phospholipids with approximately 50% more free energy release than uncharged dendrimers. Further, the difference in dendrimer binding to gel and fluid lipids was largely due to the hydrophobic interactions between the lipid tails and the non-polar dendrimer moieties. Isothermal titration calorimetry examined the heat release upon interaction between

  9. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.

    2004-01-01

    A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer of photo...

  10. Press Oil Final Release Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    There are forty-eight 55 gallon barrels filled with hydraulic oil that are candidates for release and recycle. This oil needs to be characterized prior to release. Principles of sampling as provided in MARSAME/MARSSIM approaches were used as guidance for sampling.

  11. Membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of separating gases using membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, W. S. Winston

    2012-10-02

    Membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of separating gases using membranes are provided. The membranes can include at least one hydrophilic polymer, at least one cross-linking agent, at least one base, and at least one amino compound. The methods of separating gases using membranes can include contacting a gas stream containing at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl with one side of a nonporous and at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl selectively permeable membrane such that at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl is selectively transported through the membrane.

  12. Extracellular vesicles as a platform for membrane-associated therapeutic protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yoosoo; Hong, Yeonsun; Cho, Eunji; Kim, Gi Beom; Kim, In-San

    2018-01-01

    Membrane proteins are of great research interest, particularly because they are rich in targets for therapeutic application. The suitability of various membrane proteins as targets for therapeutic formulations, such as drugs or antibodies, has been studied in preclinical and clinical studies. For therapeutic application, however, a protein must be expressed and purified in as close to its native conformation as possible. This has proven difficult for membrane proteins, as their native conformation requires the association with an appropriate cellular membrane. One solution to this problem is to use extracellular vesicles as a display platform. Exosomes and microvesicles are membranous extracellular vesicles that are released from most cells. Their membranes may provide a favourable microenvironment for membrane proteins to take on their proper conformation, activity, and membrane distribution; moreover, membrane proteins can cluster into microdomains on the surface of extracellular vesicles following their biogenesis. In this review, we survey the state-of-the-art of extracellular vesicle (exosome and small-sized microvesicle)-based therapeutics, evaluate the current biological understanding of these formulations, and forecast the technical advances that will be needed to continue driving the development of membrane protein therapeutics.

  13. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  14. Polyazole hollow fiber membranes for direct contact membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Maab, Husnul

    2013-08-07

    Porous hollow fiber membranes were fabricated from fluorinated polyoxadiazole and polytriazole by a dry-wet spinning method for application in desalination of Red Sea water by direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The data were compared with commercially available hollow fiber MD membranes prepared from poly(vinylidene fluoride). The membranes were characterized by electron microscopy, liquid entry pressure (LEP), and pore diameter measurements. Finally, the hollow fiber membranes were tested for DCMD. Salt selectivity as high as 99.95% and water fluxes as high as 35 and 41 L m -2 h-1 were demonstrated, respectively, for polyoxadiazole and polytriazole hollow fiber membranes, operating at 80 C feed temperature and 20 C permeate. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Multiple targeted drugs carrying biodegradable membrane barrier: anti-adhesion, hemostasis, and anti-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heran; Li, Min; Hu, Jianming; Wang, Chenhong; Xu, Shanshan; Han, Charles C

    2013-04-08

    A multiple targeted drug carrying bilayer membrane for preventing an abdominal adhesion is prepared by electrospinning. Two bioactive drugs were successfully incorporated into this bilayer membrane and can be independently released from nanofibrous scaffolds without losing structural integrity and functionality of the anti-adhesion membrane. Besides, the drug release profile could be easily adjusted by optimizing the swelling behavior of the fibrous scaffold. The inner layer of the bilayered fibrous membranes loaded with carbazochrome sodium sulfonate (CA) showed an excellent vascular hemostatic efficacy and formed little clot during in vivo experiment. The outer layer loaded with tinidazole (TI) had outstanding antibacterial effect against the anaerobe. We believe this approach could serve as a model technique to guide the design of implants with drug delivery functions.

  16. Dual delivery of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs from chitosan/diatomaceous earth composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cebral, Rita; Peng, Guangjia; Reys, Lara L; Silva, Simone S; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Chen, Jie; Silva, Tiago H; Reis, Rui L

    2018-02-02

    Oral administration of drugs presents important limitations, which are frequently not granted the importance that they really have. For instance, hepatic metabolism means an important drug loss, while some patients have their ability to swell highly compromised (i.e. unconsciousness, cancer…). Sublingual placement of an accurate Pharmaceutical Dosage Form is an attractive alternative. This work explores the use of the β-chitosan membranes, from marine industry residues, composed with marine sediments for dual sublingual drug delivery. As proof of concept, the membranes were loaded with a hydrophilic (gentamicin) and a hydrophobic (dexamethasone) drug. The physico-chemical and morphological characterization indicated the successful incorporated of diatomaceous earth within the chitosan membranes. Drug delivery studies showed the potential of all formulations for the immediate release of hydrophilic drugs, while diatomaceous earth improved the loading and release of the hydrophobic drug. These results highlight the interest of the herein developed membranes for dual drug delivery.

  17. In vitro dissolution/release methods for mucosal delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Jug

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro dissolution/release tests are an indispensable tool in the drug product development, its quality control and the regulatory approval process. Mucosal drug delivery systems are designed to provide both local and systemic drug action following ocular, nasal, oromucosal, vaginal or rectal administration. They exhibit significant differences in formulation design, physicochemical characteristics and drug release properties. Therefore it is not possible to devise a single method which would be suitable for release testing of such versatile and complex dosage forms. Different apparatuses and techniques for in vitro release testing for mucosal delivery systems considering the specific conditions at the administration site are described. In general, compendial apparatuses and methods should be used as a first approach in method development when applicable. However, to assure adequate simulation of conditions in vivo, novel biorelevant in vitro dissolution/release methods should be developed. Equipment set up, the selection of dissolution media and volume, membrane type, agitation speed, temperature, and assay analysis technique need to be carefully defined based on mucosal drug delivery system characteristics. All those parameters depend on the delivery system and physiological conditions at the site of application and may vary in a wide range, which will be discussed in details.

  18. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A method for preparing polybenzimidazole or polybenzimidazole blend membranes and fabricating gas diffusion electrodes and membrane-electrode assemblies is provided for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Blend polymer electrolyte membranes based on PBI and various thermopl......A method for preparing polybenzimidazole or polybenzimidazole blend membranes and fabricating gas diffusion electrodes and membrane-electrode assemblies is provided for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Blend polymer electrolyte membranes based on PBI and various...... thermoplastic polymers for high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells have also been developed. Miscible blends are used for solution casting of polymer membranes (solid electrolytes). High conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength were obtained for the blend polymer solid electrolytes...... electrolyte membrane by hot-press. The fuel cell can operate at temperatures up to at least 200 °C with hydrogen-rich fuel containing high ratios of carbon monoxide such as 3 vol% carbon monoxide or more, compared to the carbon monoxide tolerance of 10-20 ppm level for Nafion$m(3)-based polymer electrolyte...

  19. Extracellular vesicle-mediated transfer of genetic information between the hematopoietic system and the brain in response to inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Ridder

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms behind how the immune system signals to the brain in response to systemic inflammation are not fully understood. Transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase specifically in the hematopoietic lineage in a Cre reporter background display recombination and marker gene expression in Purkinje neurons. Here we show that reportergene expression in neurons is caused by intercellular transfer of functional Cre recombinase messenger RNA from immune cells into neurons in the absence of cell fusion. In vitro purified secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs from blood cells contain Cre mRNA, which induces recombination in neurons when injected into the brain. Although Cre-mediated recombination events in the brain occur very rarely in healthy animals, their number increases considerably in different injury models, particularly under inflammatory conditions, and extend beyond Purkinje neurons to other neuronal populations in cortex, hippocampus, and substantia nigra. Recombined Purkinje neurons differ in their miRNA profile from their nonrecombined counterparts, indicating physiological significance. These observations reveal the existence of a previously unrecognized mechanism to communicate RNA-based signals between the hematopoietic system and various organs, including the brain, in response to inflammation.

  20. Paromomycin affects translation and vesicle-mediated trafficking as revealed by proteomics of paromomycin -susceptible -resistant Leishmania donovani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna Chawla

    Full Text Available Leishmania donovani is a protozoan parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL and is responsible for significant mortality and morbidity. Increasing resistance towards antimonial drugs poses a great challenge in chemotherapy of VL. Paromomycin is an aminoglycosidic antibiotic and is one of the drugs currently being used in the chemotherapy of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. To understand the mode of action of this antibiotic at the molecular level, we have investigated the global proteome differences between the wild type AG83 strain and a paromomycin resistant (PRr strain of L. donovani. Stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC followed by quantitative mass spectrometry of the wild type AG83 strain and the paromomycin resistant (PRr strain identified a total of 226 proteins at ≥ 95% confidence. Data analysis revealed upregulation of 29 proteins and down-regulation of 21 proteins in the PRr strain. Comparative proteomic analysis of the wild type and the paromomycin resistant strains showed upregulation of the ribosomal proteins in the resistant strain indicating role in translation. Elevated levels of glycolytic enzymes and stress proteins were also observed in the PRr strain. Most importantly, we observed upregulation of proteins that may have a role in intracellular survival and vesicular trafficking in the PRr strain. Furthermore, ultra-structural analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated increased number of vesicular vacuoles in PRr strain when compared to the wild-type strain. Drug affinity pull-down assay followed by mass spectrometery identified proteins in L. donovani wild type strain that were specifically and covalently bound to paromomycin. These results provide the first comprehensive insight into the mode of action and underlying mechanism of resistance to paromomycin in Leishmania donovani.

  1. Amodiaquine polymeric membrane electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malongo, T Kimbeni; Blankert, B; Kambu, O; Amighi, K; Nsangu, J; Kauffmann, J-M

    2006-04-11

    The construction and electrochemical response characteristics of two types of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane sensors for the determination of amodiaquine hydrochloride (ADQ.2HCl) are described. The sensing membrane comprised an ion-pair formed between the cationic drug and sodium tetraphenyl borate (NaTPB) or potassium tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl) borate (KTCPB) in a plasticized PVC matrix. Eight PVC membrane ion-selective electrodes were fabricated and studied. Several plasticizers were studied namely, dioctyl phthalate (DOP), 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE), dioctyl phenylphosphonate (DOPP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (EHA). The sensors display a fast, stable and near-Nernstian response over a relative wide ADQ concentration range (3.2 x 10(-6) to 2.0 x 10(-2) M), with slopes comprised between 28.5 and 31.4 mV dec(-1) in a pH range comprised between pH 3.7 and 5.5. The assay of amodiaquine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms using one of the proposed sensors gave average recoveries of 104.3 and 99.9 with R.S.D. of 0.3 and 0.6% for tablets (Malaritab) and a reconstituted powder containing ADQ.2HCl, respectively. The sensor was also used for dissolution profile studies of two drug formulations. The sensor proved to have a good selectivity for ADQ.2HCl over some inorganic and organic compounds, however, berberine chloride interfered significantly. The results were validated by comparison with a spectrophotometric assay according to the USP pharmacopoeia.

  2. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  3. [Juvenile idiopathic epiretinal membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopoulou, K; Krause, S; Fili, S; Hayvazov, S; Schilling, H; Kohlhaas, M

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is very rare in adolescent patients. The pathogenesis remains unclear although the role of hyalocytes is of major importance. The clinical features in young patients are different from those in older patients. We describe a case of iERM in a 15-year-old girl who presented with metamorphopsia of the right eye. This case report presents the basis for the decision for surgical treatment as well as the clinical features at follow-up examination 9 months after surgery.

  4. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  5. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared

  6. Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seng Koon; Sandén, Camilla; Selegård, Robert; Liedberg, Bo; Aili, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Membrane active peptides are of large interest for development of drug delivery vehicles and therapeutics for treatment of multiple drug resistant infections. Lack of specificity can be detrimental and finding routes to tune specificity and activity of membrane active peptides is vital for improving their therapeutic efficacy and minimize harmful side effects. We describe a de novo designed membrane active peptide that partition into lipid membranes only when specifically and covalently anchored to the membrane, resulting in pore-formation. Dimerization with a complementary peptide efficiently inhibits formation of pores. The effect can be regulated by proteolytic digestion of the inhibitory peptide by the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-7, an enzyme upregulated in many malignant tumors. This system thus provides a precise and specific route for tuning the permeability of lipid membranes and a novel strategy for development of recognition based membrane active peptides and indirect enzymatically controlled release of liposomal cargo.

  7. Spectrin and Other Membrane-Skeletal Components in Human Red Blood Cells of Different Age

    OpenAIRE

    Annarita Ciana; Cesare Achilli; Giampaolo Minetti

    2017-01-01

    Background: Old human red blood cells (RBCs) have a reduced surface area with respect to young RBCs. If this decrease occurred through the release of vesicles similar to the spectrin-free vesicles that are shed in vitro under different experimental conditions or during storage, there would be no decrease of membrane-skeleton, but only of lipid bilayer surface area, during RBC ageing in vivo. However, we observed a decrease in spectrin and other membrane-skeletal proteins in old RBCs. Because ...

  8. Evaluation of Microcrystalline Chitosan and Fibrin Membranes as Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB Carriers with Amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimiera H. Bodek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the mechanical and sorption features of homogeneous and composite membranes which consist of microcrystalline chitosan (MCCh and fibrin (Fb in various proportions as well as the in vitro kinetics of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB released from ten types of membranes in the presence or absence of amoxicillin (Am. The films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, mechanical tests: breaking strength (Bs and elongation at break (Eb, as well as SEM images, and swelling study. The influence of the form of samples (dry or wet on Young’s modulus (E was also examined. The homogeneous MCCh (M1 and composite M3 and M4 (MCCh : Fb = 2 : 1 and 1 : 1 membranes were characterized by good sorption properties and higher mechanical strength, when compared with Fb (M2 membrane. Connecting MCCh with Fb decreases release of PDGF-BB and increases release of Am. The most efficient release of PDGF-BB was observed in the case of M4 (the optimum MCCh : Fb ratio was 1 : 1 membrane. It was found that the degree of PDGF-BB release from the membrane is influenced by the physicochemical and mechanical characteristics of the films and by its affinity to growth factor PDGF-BB.

  9. Gas separations using inorganic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egan, B.Z.; Singh, S.P.N. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a research and development program to develop, fabricate, and evaluate inorganic membranes for separating gases at high temperatures and pressures in hostile process environments encountered in fossil energy conversion processes such as coal gasification. The primary emphasis of the research was on the separation and recovery of hydrogen from synthesis gas. Major aspects of the program included assessment of the worldwide research and development activity related to gas separations using inorganic membranes, identification and selection of candidate membrane materials, fabrication and characterization of membranes using porous membrane technology developed at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and evaluation of the separations capability of the fabricated membranes in terms of permeabilities and fluxes of gases.

  10. Iron release from ferritin and lipid peroxidation by radiolytically generated reducing radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.W.; Schubert, J.; Aust, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Iron is involved in the formation of oxidants capable of damaging membranes, protein, and DNA. Using 137 Cs gamma radiation, we investigated the release of iron from ferritin and concomitant lipid peroxidation by radiolytically generated reducing radicals, superoxide and the carbon dioxide anion radical. Both radicals released iron from ferritin with similar efficiencies and iron mobilization from ferritin required an iron chelator. Radiolytically generated superoxide anion resulted in peroxidation of phospholipid liposomes as measured by malondialdehyde formation only when ferritin was included as an iron source and the released iron was found to be chelated by the phospholipid liposomes

  11. Fabrication and application of coaxial polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan nanofiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ting-Yun; Jhang, Cuei-Fang; Lin, Che-Min; Hsien, Tzu-Yang; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen

    2017-12-01

    It is difficult to fabricate chitosan-wrapped coaxial nanofibers, because highly viscous chitosan solutions might hinder the manufacturing process. To overcome this difficulty, our newly developed method, which included the addition of a small amount of gum arabic, was utilized to prepare much less viscous chitosan solutions. In this way, coaxial polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/chitosan (as core/shell) nanofiber membranes were fabricated successfully by coaxial electrospinning. The core/shell structures were confirmed by TEM, and the existence of PVA and chitosan was also verified using FT-IR and TGA. The tensile strength of the nanofiber membranes was increased from 0.6-0.7 MPa to 0.8-0.9 MPa after being crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. The application potential of the PVA/chitosan nanofiber membranes was tested in drug release experiments by loading the core (PVA) with theophylline as a model drug. The use of the coaxial PVA/chitosan nanofiber membranes in drug release extended the release time of theophylline from 5 minutes to 24 hours. Further, the release mechanisms could be described by the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. In summary, by combining the advantages of PVA and chitosan (good mechanical strength and good biocompatibility respectively), the coaxial PVA/chitosan nanofiber membranes are potential biomaterials for various biomedical applications.

  12. Fabrication and application of coaxial polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan nanofiber membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Ting-Yun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to fabricate chitosan-wrapped coaxial nanofibers, because highly viscous chitosan solutions might hinder the manufacturing process. To overcome this difficulty, our newly developed method, which included the addition of a small amount of gum arabic, was utilized to prepare much less viscous chitosan solutions. In this way, coaxial polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/chitosan (as core/shell nanofiber membranes were fabricated successfully by coaxial electrospinning. The core/shell structures were confirmed by TEM, and the existence of PVA and chitosan was also verified using FT-IR and TGA. The tensile strength of the nanofiber membranes was increased from 0.6-0.7 MPa to 0.8-0.9 MPa after being crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. The application potential of the PVA/chitosan nanofiber membranes was tested in drug release experiments by loading the core (PVA with theophylline as a model drug. The use of the coaxial PVA/chitosan nanofiber membranes in drug release extended the release time of theophylline from 5 minutes to 24 hours. Further, the release mechanisms could be described by the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. In summary, by combining the advantages of PVA and chitosan (good mechanical strength and good biocompatibility respectively, the coaxial PVA/chitosan nanofiber membranes are potential biomaterials for various biomedical applications.

  13. Membrane fouling and wetting in membrane distillation and their mitigation by novel membranes with special wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhangxin; Lin, Shihong

    2017-04-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) has been identified as a promising technology to desalinate the hypersaline wastewaters from fracking and other industries. However, conventional hydrophobic MD membranes are highly susceptible to fouling and/or wetting by the hydrophobic and/or amphiphilic constituents in these wastewaters of complex compositions. This study systematically investigates the impact of the surface wetting properties on the membrane wetting and/or fouling behaviors in MD. Specifically, we compare the wetting and fouling resistance of three types of membranes of different wetting properties, including hydrophobic and omniphobic membranes as well as composite membranes with a hydrophobic substrate and a superhydrophilic top surface. We challenged the MD membranes with hypersaline feed solutions that contained a relatively high concentration of crude oil with and without added synthetic surfactants, Triton X-100. We found that the composite membranes with superhydrophilic top surface were robustly resistant to oil fouling in the absence of Triton X-100, but were subject to pore wetting in the presence of Triton X-100. On the other hand, the omniphobic membranes were easily fouled by oil-in-water emulsion without Triton X-100, but successfully sustained stable MD performance with Triton X-100 stabilized oil-in-water emulsion as the feed solution. In contrast, the conventional hydrophobic membranes failed readily regardless whether Triton X-100 was present, although via different mechanisms. These findings are corroborated by contact angle measures as well as oil-probe force spectroscopy. This study provides a holistic picture regarding how a hydrophobic membrane fails in MD and how we can leverage membranes with special wettability to prevent membrane failure in MD operations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell invasion through basement membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Sherwood, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is an essential part of normal development and physiology, and occurs during the pathological progression of human inflammatory diseases and cancer. F-actin-rich membrane protrusions, called invadopodia, have been hypothesized to be the “drill bits” of invasive cells, mediating invasion through the dense, highly cross-linked basement membrane matrix. Though studied in vitro for over 30 y, invadopodia function in vivo has remained elusive. We have recent...

  15. Inorganic membranes and catalytic reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Maria do Carmo

    1997-01-01

    Membrane reactors are reviewed with emphasis in their applications in catalysis field. The basic principles of these systems are presented as well as a historical development. The several kinds of catalytic membranes and their preparations are discussed including the problems, needs and challenges to be solved in order to use these reactors in commercial processes. Some applications of inorganic membrane reactors are also shown. It was concluded that these systems have a great potential for i...

  16. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  17. Conical Nanopore PC Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clochard, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Template synthesis can be considered an alternative to conventional lithography methods. It is one way of providing a panel of nanoscale metallic wires, tubes or organic polymeric devices. Our interest is focused on track-etched membranes produced from swift heavy ions bombardment of polymer films. In comparison with self-assembly of block copolymers, this bottom-up approach has the advantage of being economic, it is not time-consuming and it allows track formation of diverse geometries. Tailoring of the conical nanopore tip opening would have a tremendous impact on sensing domain, as well as on fundamental understanding of perpendicular giant magneto Resistance properties observed in metallic multilayered cylindrical nanowires. By combining low-energy heavy ion beam radiation effects with asymmetric etching, the etching temperature and time can be tuned to prepare conical nanopores of controlled geometry from 0.5 to 1μm at the base to a few nanometers at the top. Asymmetric etching onto PC films was pH-monitored at various temperatures in the range of 65 degree to 80 degree. Fluence impact onto track etch pores was also investigated. The pore shape characterization was achieved by electronic microscopy measurements on membrane surfaces and on electrodeposited nanowires. We have also observed a difference in the conical shape of replicated nanowires. Some showed sting shapes and others displayed shell shapes depending on whether a neutralizing agent was used during etching or not

  18. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  19. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  20. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    The advent of nanoparticle-based delivery systems has made a significant impact on clinical patient outcomes. In recent decades, myriad nanoparticle-based therapeutic agents have been developed for the treatment and management of ailments such as cancer, diabetes, pain, bacterial infections, and asthma, among many others. Nanotherapeutics offer many distinct advantages over conventional free drug formulations. For example, nanoparticles are able to accumulate at tumor sites by extravasation through leaky vasculature at tumor sites via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect; nanoparticles can also be tailored to have desirable characteristics, such as prolonged circulation in the blood stream, improved drug encapsulation, and sustained or triggered drug release. Currently, a growing number of nanoformulations with favorable pharmacological profiles and promising efficacy are being used in clinical trials for the treatment of various cancers. Building on the success of these encouraging clinical results, new engineering strategies have emerged that combine synthetic nanoparticles with natural biomaterials to create nature-inspired biomimetic delivery systems. The work presented in this dissertation focuses on the biointerfacing between synthetic and natural materials, namely in the manifestation of cell membrane-coated nanoparticles. By exploiting the natural functionalities of source cell membranes, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have huge potential in the delivery of therapeutic agents for a variety of applications. The first portion of this thesis will focus on understanding the fundamentals underlying cell membrane coating on synthetic nanoparticles. First introduced in 2011, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles showed immediate promise in drug delivery applications, but further understanding was necessary to be able to harness the full potential of the membrane coating platform. The first section provides further insight into the interfacial

  1. Release of apoptogenic proteins from the mitochondrial intermembrane space during the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, J L; Murphy, M P

    1997-12-01

    The Bcl-2-sensitive release of proteins such as cytochrome c from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol is a critical early event in apoptosis. The mitochondrial permeability transition is also an important event in many forms of apoptotic cell death. To determine whether the permeability transition led to the release of apoptogenic proteins from mitochondria we induced the permeability transition in isolated rat liver mitochondria and characterised the proteins which were released. The permeability transition led to a generalised, non-specific release of proteins, including cytochrome c, from the mitochondrial intermembrane space which was prevented by an inhibitor of the permeability transition. To determine the mechanism of this protein release we measured both mitochondrial matrix swelling and protein release during the permeability transition in media of different osmolarities. Protein release correlated with mitochondrial matrix swelling, therefore the permeability transition causes release of proteins from the intermembrane space by rupturing the mitochondrial outer membrane. Supporting an apoptotic role for the proteins released by this mechanism, supernatants from mitochondria undergoing the permeability transition caused apoptotic changes in isolated nuclei. These data support the proposal that the mitochondrial permeability transition can induce apoptosis by releasing apoptogenic proteins into the cytoplasm [Skulachev, V.P., FEBS Lett. 397 (1996) 7-10].

  2. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release

  3. Dynamic Membrane Formation in Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Bioreactors: Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongguang Yu

    Full Text Available Dynamic membrane (DM formation in dynamic membrane bioreactors plays an important role in achieving efficient solid-liquid separation. In order to study the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS to DM formation in anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR processes, EPS extraction from and re-addition to bulk sludge were carried out in short-term filtration tests. DM formation behaviors could be well simulated by cake filtration model, and sludge with EPS re-addition showed the highest resistance coefficient, followed by sludge after EPS extraction. The DM layers exhibited a higher resistance and a lower porosity for the sludge sample after EPS extraction and for the sludge with EPS re-addition. Particle size of sludge flocs decreased after EPS extraction, and changed little with EPS re-addition, which was confirmed by interaction energy analysis. Further investigations by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis and batch tests suggested that the removal of in-situ EPS stimulated release of soluble EPS, and re-added EPS were present as soluble EPS rather than bound EPS, which thus improved the formation of DM. The present work revealed the role of EPS in anaerobic DM formation, and could facilitate the operation of AnDMBR processes.

  4. Characterization of Polymeric Nanofiltration Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoncic, B.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As membrane processes are increasingly used in industrial applications, there is a growing interest in methods of membrane characterization. Traditional membrane characteristics, such as cut-off value and pore size distribution, are being supplemented by membrane surface characteristics, such as charge density or zeta potential and hydrophobicity. This study, therefore, characterizes the three different polymeric membranes used (NFT-50, DL and DK. The molecular mass cut-off (MMCO value was determined using a set of reference solutes within the molecular range 150-600 Da, whereas streaming potential measurements enabled quantification of the surface charge characteristics. Hydrophobicity was studied using contact angle measurements. The results indicated that even though all three membranes had very similar layer compositions which consisted of poly(piperazneamide, as top layers they showed different values of measured quantitive. The NFT-50 membrane had the lowest MMCO value and the most hydrophilic membrane surface, followed by DK and DL. Membrane fouling as measured by flux reduction was determined by streaming potential measurements and accompanied by a positive change in zeta potential.

  5. Track membranes, production, properties, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesjan, Yu.Ts.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of producing track membranes on heavy ion beams of the Flerov Laboratory are considered. The parameters of the running accelerators and equipment for the irradiation of polymer foils are presented. The process of production of track membranes based on different polymeric materials and various applications of the membranes are described. Special attention is given to the principally new applications and devices developed at the Laboratory. This report presents the results obtained by a big group of scientists and engineers working in the field of elaboration, investigation and application of track membranes (author). 21 refs, 20 figs, 1 tab

  6. Amniotic membrane for burn trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamaluddin Zainol; Hasim Mohammad

    1999-01-01

    Amniotic membranes are derived from human placentae at birth. They have two layers mainly the amniotic and the chorionic surfaces which are separated by a thin layer of connective tissues. The two layers are separated during procurement, the placenta and the chorionic side are discarded and the amnion membranes are then further processed. Amnion membranes are normally procured from placentae which are normally free of infections, i.e; the mothers are antenatally screened for sexually transmitted diseases or AlDs related diseases. Intrapartum the mother should not be having chorioamnionitis or jaundice. Sometimes the amniotic membranes are acquired from fresh elective caeserian sections. After processing, the amniotic membranes are packed in two layers of polypropylene and radiated with cobalt 60 at a dose of about 25 kGy. The amniotic membranes are clinically used to cover burn surfaces especially effective for superficial or partial thickness burns. The thin membranes adhered well to the trauma areas and peeled off automatically by the second week. No change of dressing were necessary during these times because of the close adherence, there were less chance of external contamination or infections of these wounds. Due to their flexibility they are very useful to cover difference contours of the human body for example the face, body, elbows or knees. However our experience revealed that amniotic membranes are not useful for third degree bums because the membranes dissolves by the enzymes present in the wounds

  7. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  8. Challenges in commercializing biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine Elkjær

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One...... of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments...... relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes....

  9. Composite membrane with integral rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

    2015-01-27

    Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

  10. Drug loaded homogeneous electrospun PCL/gelatin hybrid nanofiber structures for anti-infective tissue regeneration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jiajia; He, Min; Liu, Hao; Niu, Yuzhao; Crawford, Aileen; Coates, Phil D; Chen, Dafu; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Liqun

    2014-11-01

    Infection is the major reason for guided tissue regeneration/guided bone regeneration (GTR/GBR) membrane failure in clinical application. In this work, we developed GTR/GBR membranes with localized drug delivery function to prevent infection by electrospinning of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and gelatin blended with metronidazole (MNA). Acetic acid (HAc) was introduced to improve the miscibility of PCL and gelatin to fabricate homogeneous hybrid nanofiber membranes. The effects of the addition of HAc and the MNA content (0, 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 wt.% of polymer) on the properties of the membranes were investigated. The membranes showed good mechanical properties, appropriate biodegradation rate and barrier function. The controlled and sustained release of MNA from the membranes significantly prevented the colonization of anaerobic bacteria. Cells could adhere to and proliferate on the membranes without cytotoxicity until the MNA content reached 30%. Subcutaneous implantation in rabbits for 8 months demonstrated that MNA-loaded membranes evoked a less severe inflammatory response depending on the dose of MNA than bare membranes. The biodegradation time of the membranes was appropriate for tissue regeneration. These results indicated the potential for using MNA-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun membranes as anti-infective GTR/GBR membranes to optimize clinical application of GTR/GBR strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Deoxygenation Affects Composition of Membrane-Bound Proteins in Human Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana G. Luneva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: ATP release from erythrocyte plays a key role in hypoxia-induced elevation of blood flow in systematic circulation. We have previously shown that hemolysis contributes to erythrocyte ATP release triggered by several stimuli, including hypoxia, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-increased membrane fragility remain unknown. Methods: In this study, we compared the action of hypoxia on hemolysis, ATP release and the composition of membrane-bound proteins in human erythrocytes. Results: Twenty minutes incubation of human erythrocytes in the oxygen-free environment increased the content of extracellular hemoglobin by ∼1.5 fold. Paired measurements of hemoglobin and ATP content in the same samples, showed a positive correlation between hemolysis and ATP release. Comparative analysis of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of erythrocyte ghosts obtained under control and deoxygenated conditions revealed a ∼2-fold elevation of the content of membrane-bound protein with Mr of ∼60 kDa. Conclusion: Deoxygenation of human erythrocytes affects composition of membrane-bound proteins. Additional experiments should be performed to identify the molecular origin of 60 kDa protein and its role in the attenuation of erythrocyte integrity and ATP release in hypoxic conditions.

  12. Lidocaine/ketorolac-loaded biodegradable nanofibrous anti-adhesive membranes that offer sustained pain relief for surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ching-Wei; Lee, Demei; Wu, Min-Hsuan; Chen, Jan-Kan; He, Hong-Lin; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of biodegradable nanofibrous lidocaine/ketorolac-loaded anti-adhesion membranes to sustainably release analgesics on abdominal surgical wounds. The analgesic-eluting membranes with two polymer-to-drug ratios (6:1 and 4:1) were produced via an electrospinning technique. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay was employed to characterize the in vivo and in vitro release behaviors of the pharmaceuticals from the membranes. It was found that all biodegradable anti-adhesion nanofibers released effective concentrations of lidocaine and ketorolac for over 20 days post surgery. In addition, a transverse laparotomy was setup in a rat model for an in vivo assessment of activity of postoperative recovery. No tissue adhesion was observed at 2 weeks post surgery, demonstrating the potential anti-adhesion capability of the drug-eluting nanofibrous membrane. The postoperative activities were recorded for two groups of rats as follows: rats that did not have any membrane implanted (group A) and rats that had the analgesic-eluting membrane implanted (group B). Rats in group B exhibited faster recovery times than those in group A with regard to postoperative activities, confirming the pain relief effectiveness of the lidocaine- and ketorolac-loaded nanofibrous membranes. The experimental results suggested that the anti-adhesion nanofibrous membranes with sustainable elution of lidocaine and ketorolac are adequately effective and durable for the purposes of postoperative pain relief in rats.

  13. Modulation of TRESK background K+ channel by membrane stretch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Callejo

    Full Text Available The two-pore domain K(+ channel TRESK is expressed in dorsal root ganglion and trigeminal sensory neurons where it is a major contributor to background K(+ current. TRESK acts as a break to prevent excessive sensory neuron activation and decreases in its expression or function have been involved in neuronal hyperexcitability after injury/inflammation, migraine or altered sensory perception (tingling, cooling and pungent burning sensations. All these effects have implicated this channel in nociception and mechanotransduction. To determine the role of TRESK in sensory transduction, we studied its sensitivity to changes in membrane tension (stretch in heterologous systems, F-11 cells and trigeminal neurons. Laminar shear stress increased TRESK currents by 22-30%. An increase in membrane tension induced by cell swelling (hypotonic medium produced a reversible elevation of TRESK currents (39.9%. In contrast, cell shrinkage (hypertonic solution produced the opposite effect. Membrane crenators or cup-formers produced equivalent effects. In trigeminal sensory neurons, TRESK channels were mechanically stimulated by negative pressure, which led to a 1.51-fold increase in channel open probability. TRESK-like currents in trigeminal neurons were additively inhibited by arachidonic acid, acidic pH and hypertonic stimulation, conditions usually found after tissue inflammation. Our results show that TRESK is modulated by changes in cell membrane tension and/or cell volume. Several key players released during inflammation or tissue injury could modulate sensory neuron activation through small changes in membrane tension.

  14. Comparison and analysis of membrane fouling between flocculent sludge membrane bioreactor and granular sludge membrane bioreactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing-Feng

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of inoculating granules on reducing membrane fouling. In order to evaluate the differences in performance between flocculent sludge and aerobic granular sludge in membrane reactors (MBRs, two reactors were run in parallel and various parameters related to membrane fouling were measured. The results indicated that specific resistance to the fouling layer was five times greater than that of mixed liquor sludge in the granular MBR. The floc sludge more easily formed a compact layer on the membrane surface, and increased membrane resistance. Specifically, the floc sludge had a higher moisture content, extracellular polymeric substances concentration, and negative surface charge. In contrast, aerobic granules could improve structural integrity and strength, which contributed to the preferable permeate performance. Therefore, inoculating aerobic granules in a MBR presents an effective method of reducing the membrane fouling associated with floc sludge the perspective of from the morphological characteristics of microbial aggregates.

  15. Reaper Induced Cytochrome C Release

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    .... The interaction of reaper with scythe liberates a soluble factor (SCF) that induces apoptosis by effecting the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, a critical step in activating apoptosis in many systems...

  16. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007555.htm Birth control - slow release methods To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Certain birth control methods contain man-made forms of hormones. ...

  17. Degradation of Polypropylene Membranes Applied in Membrane Distillation Crystallizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Gryta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The studies on the resistance to degradation of capillary polypropylene membranes assembled in a membrane crystallizer were performed. The supersaturation state of salt was achieved by evaporation of water from the NaCl saturated solutions using membrane distillation process. A high feed temperature (363 K was used in order to enhance the degradation effects and to shorten the test times. Salt crystallization was carried out by the application of batch or fluidized bed crystallizer. A significant membrane scaling was observed regardless of the method of realized crystallization. The SEM-EDS, DSC, and FTIR methods were used for investigations of polypropylene degradation. The salt crystallization onto the membrane surface accelerated polypropylene degradation. Due to a polymer degradation, the presence of carbonyl groups on the membranes’ surface was identified. Besides the changes in the chemical structure a significant mechanical damage of the membranes, mainly caused by the internal scaling, was also found. As a result, the membranes were severely damaged after 150 h of process operation. A high level of salt rejection was maintained despite damage to the external membrane surface.

  18. Effect of temperature shocks on membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den P.; Satpradit, O.A.; Bentem, van A.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Temmink, B.G.; Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature is known to influence the biological performance of conventional activated sludge systems. In membrane bioreactors (MBRs), temperature not only affects the bioconversion process but is also shown to have an effect on the membrane performance. Four phenomena are generally reported to

  19. Taming Membranes : Functional Immobilization of Biological Membranes in Hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Ilja; Mukherjee, Nobina; de Jong, Menno R.; Tans, Sander; Kocer, Armagan; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Single molecule studies on membrane proteins embedded in their native environment are hampered by the intrinsic difficulty of immobilizing elastic and sensitive biological membranes without interfering with protein activity. Here, we present hydrogels composed of nano-scaled fibers as a generally

  20. Phosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane liberates calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, V.P.S.; Brockerhoff, H.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorylation of permeabilized erythrocyte ghost membranes with ATP results in an increase free calcium level as measured with the help of Ca 2+ electrode and 45 Ca. This effect could not be observed in the presence of p - chloromercuric benzoate, an inhibitor of kinases. The rise in the free calcium due to phosphorylation of the membrane was accompanied by a decrease in the level of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and an increase in phosphatidylinositolmonophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositolbisphosphate (PIP 2 ). These results support the proposal that an inositol shuttle, PI ↔ PIP ↔ PIP 2 , operates to maintain the intracellular calcium concentration. The cation is believed to be sequestered in a cage formed by the head groups of two acidic phospholipid molecules, e.g., phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, with the participation of both PO and fatty acid ester CO groups. When the inositol group of such a cage is phosphorylated, inter-headgroup hydrogen bonding between the lipids is broken. As a result the cage opens and calcium is released

  1. PCDD/PCDF release inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, H. [UNEP Chemicals, Chatelaine (Switzerland)

    2004-09-15

    The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) entered into force on 17 May 2004 with 50 Parties. In May 2004, 59 countries had ratified or acceded the Convention. The objective of the Convention is ''to protect human health and the environment from persistent organic pollutants''. For intentionally produced POPs, e.g., pesticides and industrial chemicals such as hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls, this will be achieved by stop of production and use. For unintentionally generated POPs, such as polychlorinated dibenzo-pdioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), measures have to be taken to ''reduce the total releases derived from anthropogenic sources''; the final goal is ultimate elimination, where feasible. Under the Convention, Parties have to establish and maintain release inventories to prove the continuous release reduction. Since many countries do not have the technical and financial capacity to measure all releases from all potential PCDD/PCDF sources, UNEP Chemicals has developed the ''Standardized Toolkit for the Identification of Quantification of Dioxin and Furan Releases'' (''Toolkit'' for short), a methodology to estimate annual releases from a number of sources. With this methodology, annual releases can be estimated by multiplying process-specific default emission factors provided in the Toolkit with national activity data. At the seventh session of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee, the Toolkit was recommended to be used by countries when reporting national release data to the Conference of the Parties. The Toolkit is especially used by developing countries and countries with economies in transition where no measured data are available. Results from Uruguay, Thailand, Jordan, Philippines, and Brunei Darussalam have been published.

  2. Study of polyvinyl alcohol nanofibrous membrane by electrospinning as a magnetic nanoparticle delivery approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ger, Tzong-Rong; Huang, Hao-Ting; Hu, Keng-Shiang; Huang, Chen-Yu; Lai, Jun-Yang; Chen, Jiann-Yeu; Lai, Mei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning technique was used to fabricate polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based magnetic biodegradable nanofibers. PVA solution was mixed with ferrofluid or magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) powder and formed two individual nanofibrous membranes (PVA/ferrofluid and PVA/MNPs powder) by electrospinning. The surface morphology of the nanofibrous membrane was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and the magnetic properties were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. Macrophages (RAW 264.7) were co-cultured with the nanofibrous membranes for 12, 24, and 48 h and exhibited good cell viability (>95%). Results showed that the PVA fibers would be degraded and the embedded Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles would be released and delivered to cells

  3. Physicochemical characterization of liposomes after ultrasound exposure - mechanisms of drug release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evjen, Tove J; Hupfeld, Stefan; Barnert, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    -mediated drug release of liposomes (sonosensitivity) was shown to strongly depend on liposome membrane composition. In the current study the ultrasound-mediated drug release mechanism of liposomes was investigated. The results showed that differences in ultrasound drug release kinetics obtained for different......Ultrasound is investigated as a novel drug delivery tool within cancer therapy. Non-thermal ultrasound treatment of solid tumours post i.v.-injection of drug-carrying liposomes may induce local drug release from the carrier followed by enhanced intracellular drug uptake. Recently, ultrasound...... liposomal compositions were caused by distinctive release mechanisms of the carriers. Two types of liposomes composed of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and hydrogenated soy L-α-phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) as main lipids, respectively, were recently shown to vary in sonosensitivity...

  4. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  5. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  6. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  7. Evaluation of sodium diclofenac release using natural rubber latex as carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aielo, Patricia B.; Borges, Felipe A.; Romeira, Karoline M.; Herculano, Rondinelli D.; Miranda, Matheus Carlos Romeiro; Arruda, Larisa B. de; Lisboa Filho, Paulo Noronha; Drago, Bruno de C.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) taken to reduce inflammation and, as an analgesic, reduce pain. Although this drug is widely used in the general population, properties such as the short half-time and some side effects restrict its clinical use. The most common side effects are: gastric irritation, gastritis, peptic ulcer and bleeding. Studies involving biomaterials as carrier for drug release have been proving their efficiency in overcoming those problems and better controlling the release rate and targeting of the drug. Natural rubber latex (NRL) has been proven excellent for its biocompatibility and ability to stimulate angiogenesis, cellular adhesion and the formation of extracellular matrix, promoting the replacement and regeneration of tissue. In this work, a NRL membrane is used to deliver sodium diclofenac. Sodium diclofenac (NaDic) was found to be adsorbed on the NRL membrane, with little or no incorporation into the membrane bulk, according to energy dispersive Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-Ray microanalysis (SEM-EDS) spectroscopy. In addition, FT-IR shows that there is no molecular-level interaction between drug and NRL. Already, the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) of NaDic-NRL shows a broader one spectrum than the sharper halo (amorphous characteristic XRD spectrum) of pure NRL. More importantly, the release time of diclofenac in a NRL membrane in vitro was increased from the typical 2-3 h for oral tablets to ca. 74 h. The kinetics of the drug release could be fitted with a double exponential function, with two characteristic times of 0.899 and 32.102 h. In this study, we demonstrated that the interesting properties provided by NRL membranes combined with a controlled release of drug is relevant for biomedical applications.(author)

  8. Evaluation of sodium diclofenac release using natural rubber latex as carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aielo, Patricia B.; Borges, Felipe A.; Romeira, Karoline M.; Herculano, Rondinelli D., E-mail: rond@assis.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Assis, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Miranda, Matheus Carlos Romeiro [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Arruda, Larisa B. de; Lisboa Filho, Paulo Noronha; Drago, Bruno de C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias. Dept. de Fisica

    2014-08-15

    Sodium Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) taken to reduce inflammation and, as an analgesic, reduce pain. Although this drug is widely used in the general population, properties such as the short half-time and some side effects restrict its clinical use. The most common side effects are: gastric irritation, gastritis, peptic ulcer and bleeding. Studies involving biomaterials as carrier for drug release have been proving their efficiency in overcoming those problems and better controlling the release rate and targeting of the drug. Natural rubber latex (NRL) has been proven excellent for its biocompatibility and ability to stimulate angiogenesis, cellular adhesion and the formation of extracellular matrix, promoting the replacement and regeneration of tissue. In this work, a NRL membrane is used to deliver sodium diclofenac. Sodium diclofenac (NaDic) was found to be adsorbed on the NRL membrane, with little or no incorporation into the membrane bulk, according to energy dispersive Scanning Electron Microscopy with X-Ray microanalysis (SEM-EDS) spectroscopy. In addition, FT-IR shows that there is no molecular-level interaction between drug and NRL. Already, the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) of NaDic-NRL shows a broader one spectrum than the sharper halo (amorphous characteristic XRD spectrum) of pure NRL. More importantly, the release time of diclofenac in a NRL membrane in vitro was increased from the typical 2-3 h for oral tablets to ca. 74 h. The kinetics of the drug release could be fitted with a double exponential function, with two characteristic times of 0.899 and 32.102 h. In this study, we demonstrated that the interesting properties provided by NRL membranes combined with a controlled release of drug is relevant for biomedical applications.(author)

  9. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  10. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  11. Enhancement of proton conduction at low humidity by incorporating imidazole microcapsules into polymer electrolyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingtao; Yue, Xiujun; Zhang, Zizhuo; Yang, Zheng; Li, Yifan; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhongyi [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology, Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Han; Yang, Xinlin [Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Institute of Polymer Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2012-11-07

    Design and fabrication of hierarchically structured membranes with high proton conductivity is crucial to many energy-relevant applications including proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Here, a series of imidazole microcapsules (IMCs) with tunable imidazole group loading, shell thickness, and lumen size are synthesized and incorporated into a sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) matrix to prepare composite membranes. The IMCs play two roles: i) Improving water retention properties of the membrane. The IMCs, similar to the vacuoles in plant cells, can render membrane a stable water environment. The lumen of the IMCs acts as a water reservoir and the shell of IMCs can manipulate water release. ii) They form anhydrous proton transfer pathways and low energy barrier pathways for proton hopping, imparting an enhanced proton transfer via either a vehicle mechanism or Grotthuss mechanism. In particular, at the relative humidity (RH) as low as 20%, the composite membrane exhibits an ultralow proton conductivity decline and the proton conductivity is one to two orders of magnitude higher than that of SPEEK control membrane. The enhanced proton conductivity affords the composite membrane an elevated peak power density from 69.5 to 104.5 mW cm{sup -2} in a single cell. Moreover, the application potential of the composite membrane for CO{sub 2} capture is explored. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Biocompatibility Assessment of PLCL-Sericin Copolymer Membranes Using Wharton’s Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kewalin Inthanon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells based tissue engineering requires biocompatible materials, which allow the cells to adhere, expand, and differentiate in a large scale. An ideal biomaterial for clinical application should be free from mammalian products which cause immune reactivities and pathogen infections. We invented a novel biodegradable poly(L-lactic-co-ε-caprolactone-sericin (PLCL-SC copolymer membrane which was fabricated by electrospinning. Membranes with concentrations of 2.5 or 5% (w/v SC exhibited qualified texture characteristics with a noncytotoxic release profile. The hydrophilic properties of the membranes were 35–40% higher than those of a standard PLCL and commercial polystyrene (PS. The improved characteristics of the membranes were due to an addition of new functional amide groups, C=O, N–H, and C–N, onto their surfaces. Degradation of the membranes was controllable, depending on the content proportion of SC. Results of thermogram indicated the superior stability and crystallinity of the membranes. These membranes enhanced human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSC proliferation by increasing cyclin A and also promoted cell adhesion by upregulating focal adhesion kinase (FAK. On the membranes, hWJMSC differentiated into a neuronal lineage with the occurrence of nestin. These data suggest that PLCL-SC electrospun membrane represents some properties which will be useful for tissue engineering and medical applications.

  13. Fabrication of electrospun polycaprolactone coated withchitosan-silver nanoparticles membranes for wound dressing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhi, Tra Thanh; Khon, Huynh Chan; Hoai, Nguyen Thi Thu; Bao, Bui Chi; Quyen, Tran Ngoc; Van Toi, Vo; Hiep, Nguyen Thi

    2016-10-01

    In this study, electrospun polycaprolactone membrane coated with chitosan-silver nanoparticles (CsAg), electrospun polycaprolactone/chitosan/Ag nanoparticles, was fabricated by immersing the plasma-treated electrospun polycaprolactone membrane in the CsAg gel. The plasma modification of electrospun polycaprolactone membrane prior to CsAg coating was tested by methylene blue stain and scanning electron microscope. The presence of silver and chitosan on the plasma-treated electrospun polycaprolactone membrane was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and FT-IR spectrum. Scanning electron microscope observation was employed to observe the morphology of the membranes. The release of Ag ions from electrospun polycaprolactone/chitosan/Ag nanoparticles membrane was tested using atomic absorption spectrometry. Electrospun polycaprolactone/chitosan/Ag nanoparticles membrane inherited advantages from both CsAg gel and electrospun polycaprolactone membrane such as: increasing biocompatibility, mechanical strength, and antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Thus, this investigation introduces a highly potential membrane that can increase the efficacy of the wound dressing process.

  14. Characterization of Microvesicles Released from Human Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Bach Nguyen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are spherical fragments of cell membrane released from various cell types under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Based on their size and origin, EVs are classified as exosome, microvesicles (MVs and apoptotic bodies. Recently, the release of MVs from human red blood cells (RBCs under different conditions has been reported. MVs are released by outward budding and fission of the plasma membrane. However, the outward budding process itself, the release of MVs and the physical properties of these MVs have not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the formation process, isolation and characterization of MVs released from RBCs under conditions of stimulating Ca2+ uptake and activation of protein kinase C. Methods: Experiments were performed based on single cell fluorescence imaging, fluorescence activated cell sorter/flow cytometer (FACS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and dynamic light scattering (DLS. The released MVs were collected by differential centrifugation and characterized in both their size and zeta potential. Results: Treatment of RBCs with 4-bromo-A23187 (positive control, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, or phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA in the presence of 2 mM extracellular Ca2+ led to an alteration of cell volume and cell morphology. In stimulated RBCs, exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS and formation of MVs were observed by using annexin V-FITC. The shedding of MVs was also observed in the case of PMA treatment in the absence of Ca2+, especially under the transmitted bright field illumination. By using SEM, AFM and DLS the morphology and size of stimulated RBCs, MVs were characterized. The sizes of the two populations of MVs were 205.8 ± 51.4 nm and 125.6 ± 31.4 nm, respectively. Adhesion of stimulated RBCs and MVs was observed. The zeta potential of MVs was determined in the range from - 40 mV to - 10 m

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-06-30

    A non-agglomerated and nanocrystalline-sized powder was successfully produced using ethylene glycol nitrate methods. The LSFT powder prepared using this method exhibits well dispersed and nano-sized particles about 100-200 nm. The density of LSFT sintered at 1300 C was about 90% of the theoretical density at which is 100 C less than that of the previous LSFT which was sintered at 1400 C. The sample sintered at 1400 C exhibited the evidence of a liquid phase at the grain boundaries and 2nd phase formation which probably caused low mechanical stability. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature. The LSFT-CGO specimens were cut from the as sintered bars and used for the evaluation of Mechanical Properties after polishing. The effect of strain rate on the flexural strength of the LSFT-CGO test specimens was studied. Three strain rates 6, 60 and 600 {micro}m/ min were chosen for this study. It is observed from the results that with increasing cross head speed the membrane takes higher loads to fail. A reduction in the strength of the membrane was observed at 1000 C in N{sub 2}. Two different routes were investigated to synthesis GDC using either formate or carbonate precursors. The precursor and CGO particle morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal decomposition behaviors of Ce(Gd)(HCOO){sub 3} and Ce(Gd)(CO{sub 3})(OH) were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a rate of 3 C/min in air. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the precursor and CGO were collected and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured. Conductivity measurements were made by AC impedance spectroscopy on sintered disks in air using platinum electrodes.

  16. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  17. Magnetically Triggered Release From Giant Unilamellar Vesicles: Visualization By Means Of Confocal Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Nappini, Silvia

    2011-04-07

    Magnetically triggered release from magnetic giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) loaded with Alexa fluorescent dye was studied by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) under a low-frequency alternating magnetic field (LF-AMF). Core/shell cobalt ferrite nanoparticles coated with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (MP@SiO 2(RITC)) were prepared and adsorbed on the GUV membrane. The MP@SiO 2(RITC) location and distribution on giant lipid vesicles were determined by 3D-CLSM projections, and their effect on the release properties and GUV permeability under a LF-AMF was investigated by CLSM time-resolved experiments. We show that the mechanism of release of the fluorescent dye during the LF-AMF exposure is induced by magnetic nanoparticle energy and mechanical vibration, which promote the perturbation of the GUV membrane without its collapse. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Viral release from HIV-I-induced syncytia of CD4+ C8166 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J R; Kitchen, A D; Harrison, J F; Tovey, G

    1989-06-01

    Infection of the permissive C8166 CD4+ lymphoid cell line with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-I rapidly leads to syncytium formation. Ultrastructural features of medium-sized (40 to 60 microns) syncytia and larger syncytia are presented, with emphasis upon HIV-I release from the syncytial surface and into intrasyncytial vacuoles. Although surface release of HIV-I is shown to diminish with increasing syncytial size, it does not totally stop. Massive HIV-I release and entrapment within intrasyncytial vacuoles is clearly apparent within the "foamy" multivacuolated zones within medium and large syncytia. Numerous multicored aberrant viruses are routinely detected within the intrasyncytial vacuoles, and double-budding events likewise are readily detectable at the vacuolar membranes, but less so at the syncytial surface. It is suggested that this observation may be a reflection of the more restricted availability of vacuolar membrane area for excessive viral budding as compared with that at the syncytial surface.

  19. Electro-catalytic membrane reactors and the development of bipolar membrane technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balster, J.H.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Membrane reactors are currently under extensive research and development. Hardly any concept, however, is realized yet in practice. Frequently, forgotten as membrane reactors are electro-catalytic membrane reactors where electrodes perform chemical conversations and membranes separate the locations

  20. Biogenesis of plasma membrane cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A striking feature of the molecular organization of eukaryotic cells is the singular enrichment of their plasma membranes in sterols. The authors studies are directed at elucidating the mechanisms underlying this inhomogeneous disposition. Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of plasma membrane cholesterol in intact cells, leaving intracellular cholesterol pools untouched. With this technique, the plasma membrane was shown to contain 95% of the unesterified cholesterol of cultured human fibroblasts. Cholesterol synthesized from [ 3 H] acetate moved to the plasma membrane with a half-time of 1 h at 37 0 C. They used equilibrium gradient centrifugation of homogenates of biosynthetically labeled, cholesterol oxidase treated cells to examine the distribution of newly synthesized sterols among intracellular pools. Surprisingly, lanosterol, a major precursor of cholesterol, and intracellular cholesterol both peaked at much lower buoyant density than did 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. This suggests that cholesterol biosynthesis is not taken to completion in the endoplasmic reticulum. The cholesterol in the buoyant fraction eventually moved to the plasma membrane. Digitonin treatment increased the density of the newly synthesized cholesterol fractions, indicating that nascent cholesterol in transit is associated with cholesterol-rich membranes. The authors are testing the hypothesis that the pathway of cholesterol biosynthesis is spatially organized in various intracellular membranes such that the sequence of biosynthetic steps both concentrates the sterol and conveys it to the plasma membrane

  1. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...

  2. Fabrication of green polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2017-06-16

    Provided herein are methods of fabricating membranes using polymers with functionalized groups such as sulfone (e.g., PSf and PES), ether (e.g., PES), acrylonitrile (e.g., PAN), fluoride(e.g., pvdf and other fluoropolymers), and imide (e.g., extem) and ionic liquids. Also provided are membranes made by the provided methods.

  3. Inorganic membranes for pervaporation technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekulic, J.; Luiten-Olieman, Maria W.J.; Luiten, M.W.J.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Keizer, Klaas

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is the development of inorganic membranes that will enable broad application of pervaporation/vapour permeation technology in the chemical industry. This can be achieved by improvement of the existing microporous membranes and the development of new types with enhanced

  4. Mathematical modelling of membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank

    This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate mathemat......This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate...... mathematical models, each with a different approach to membrane separation. The first model is a statistical model investigating the interplay between solute shape and the probability of entering the membrane. More specific the transition of solute particles from being spherical to becoming more elongated...... and the rejection coefficient. The second model is a stationary model for the flux of solvent and solute in a hollow fibre membrane. In the model we solve the time independent equations for transport of solvent and solute within the hollow fibre. Furthermore, the flux of solute and solvent through the membrane...

  5. Membranes and Films from Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Avrom A.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on polymeric films and membranes including production methods, special industrial and medical applications, laboratory preparation, and an experimental investigation of a porous cellulose acetate membrane. Presents a demonstration to distinguish between high- and low-density polyethylene. (JM)

  6. Nitrocellulose Membrane: The New Canvas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Jasmin R; Kurien, Bianca A

    2015-01-01

    The use of nitrocellulose membranes for invisible ink-messaging or marking for orientation purposes has been carried out with diluted alkaline phosphatase, followed by development with nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate and chemiluminescence detection systems. Here, we show that nitrocellulose membrane can serve as a canvas for art using alkaline phosphatase and NBT/BCIP detection method.

  7. Gas separation membranes current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    Membrane-based gas separation systems are now widely accepted and employed as unit operation in industrial gas, chemical and allied industries. Following their successful commercialization in the late Seventies to recover hydrogen from ammonia purge gas streams, membrane-based systems have gained acceptance in a wide variety of applications

  8. Membranes for Enhanced Emulsification Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güell, Carme; Ferrando, Montse; Schroen, C.G.P.H.

    2016-01-01

    The use of membrane technology for the production of single and double emulsions has been proven feasible for a wide range of systems. The low energy requirements and mild process conditions (shear stress and temperature) of membrane emulsification (ME) compared to conventional processes makes it of

  9. Comparison of filtration and treatment performance between polymeric and ceramic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor treatment of domestic wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Yeongmi

    2018-02-28

    The feasibility of an anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactor (AnCMBR) was investigated by comparison with a conventional anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). With regard to treatment performance, the AnCMBR achieved higher organic removal rates than the AnMBR because the ceramic membranes retained a high concentration of biomass in the reactor. Despite a high mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) concentration, the AnCMBR exhibited lower membrane fouling. To elucidate effects of sludge properties on membrane fouling in the AnCMBR and AnMBR, soluble microbial products (SMPs) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) were analyzed. The SMP and EPS concentrations in the AnCMBR were higher than in the AnMBR. This may be because some suspended solids bio-degraded and likely released protein-like SMPs in the AnCMBR. Hydrophobicity and surface charges were analyzed; the sludge in the AnCMBR was found to be more hydrophobic and less negative than in the AnMBR because protein was abundant in the AnCMBR. Despite the adverse properties of the sludge in the AnCMBR, it showed more stable filtration performance than the AnMBR. This is because the alumina-based ceramic membrane had a superhydrophilic surface and could thus mitigate membrane fouling by hydrophilic-hydrophobic repulsion. The findings from this study have significant implications for extending the application of AnCMBRs to, for example, treatment of high-strength organic waste such as food waste or livestock manure.

  10. Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapatsis, Michael [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Daoutidis, Prodromos [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Elyassi, Bahman [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Lima, Fernando [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Iyer, Aparna [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Agrawal, Kumar [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Sabnis, Sanket [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    2015-04-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate an innovative membrane technology at process conditions that would be representative of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) advanced power generation with pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). This research focused on hydrogen (H2)-selective zeolite membranes that could be utilized to separate conditioned syngas into H2-rich and CO2-rich components. Both experiments and process design and optimization calculations were performed to evaluate the concept of ultra-thin membranes made from zeolites nanosheets. In this work, efforts in the laboratory were made to tackle two fundamental challenges in application of zeolite membranes in harsh industrial environments, namely, membrane thickness and membrane stability. Conventional zeolite membranes have thicknesses in the micron range, limiting their performance. In this research, we developed a method for fabrication of ultimately thin zeolite membranes based on zeolite nanosheets. A range of layered zeolites (MWW, RWR, NSI structure types) suitable for hydrogen separation was successfully exfoliated to their constituent nanosheets. Further, membranes were made from one of these zeolites, MWW, to demonstrate the potential of this group of materials. Moreover, long-term steam stability of these zeolites (up to 6 months) was investigated in high concentrations of steam (35 mol% and 95 mole%), high pressure (10 barg), and high temperatures (350 °C and 600 °C) relevant to conditions of water-gas-shift and steam methane reforming reactions. It was found that certain nanosheets are stable, and that stability depends on the concentration of structural defects. Additionally, models that represent a water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor equipped with the zeolite membrane were developed for systems studies. These studies had the aim of analyzing the effect of the membrane reactor integration into IGCC plants

  11. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  12. Guided bone regeneration with asymmetric collagen-chitosan membranes containing aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayu; Ma, Shiqing; Liu, Zihao; Geng, Hongjuan; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Xi; Li, Hongjie; Gao, Chenyuan; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Membranes allowing the sustained release of drugs that can achieve cell adhesion are very promising for guided bone regeneration. Previous studies have suggested that aspirin has the potential to promote bone regeneration. The purpose of this study was to prepare a local drug delivery system with aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (ACS) contained in an asymmetric collagen-chitosan membrane (CCM). In this study, the ACS were fabricated using different concentrations of aspirin (5 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, and 75 mg). The drug release behavior of ACS was studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to examine the micromorphology of ACS and aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles contained in chitosan-collagen membranes (ACS-CCM). In vitro bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were cultured and critical-sized cranial defects on Sprague-Dawley rats were made to evaluate the effect of the ACS-CCM on bone regeneration. Drug release behavior results of ACS showed that the nanoparticles fabricated in this study could successfully sustain the release of the drug. TEM showed the morphology of the nanoparticles. SEM images indicated that the asymmetric membrane comprised a loose collagen layer and a dense chitosan layer. In vitro studies showed that ACS-CCM could promote the proliferation of BMSCs, and that the degree of differentiated BMSCs seeded on CCMs containing 50 mg of ACS was higher than that of other membranes. Micro-computed tomography showed that 50 mg of ACS-CCM resulted in enhanced bone regeneration compared with the control group. This study shows that the ACS-CCM would allow the sustained release of aspirin and have further osteogenic potential. This membrane is a promising therapeutic approach to guiding bone regeneration.

  13. Proton migration along the membrane surface in the absence of charged or titratable groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as energy transduction. For example, proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is considered to be the dominant mechanism of proton exchange between membrane sites of high and low proton concentrations. For the investigation of this mechanism, kinetic experiments on proton diffusion are evaluated to determine the ability of lipid membranes to retain protons on their surfaces. Experiments on different lipid bilayer membranes (DPhPC, DPhPE and GMO) are performed under the influence of two types of mobile buffer molecules (Capso, NH4CL). During these experiments the surface diffusion of photolytically released protons is visualized in terms of fluorescence changes of a lipid bound pH-sensitive dye (DHPE +fluorescein). The protons under investigation are released by flash photolysis of a hydrophobic caged compound (DMCM, caged diethyl phosphate). The experimental data confirm the existence of an energy barrier, which prevents the protons from escaping into the bulk. So far this effect was attributed to the proton binding to titrateable groups (e.g. ethanolamine) or electrostatic forces created by charged moieties (e.g. phosphate groups) on the membrane/water interface. However, upon removal of the titrateable groups and charged moieties from the membrane surface, a significant energy barrier remained as indicated by the experiments with glycerol monooleate (GMO) bilayers. To estimate the size of the barrier a semi-analytical model is presented that describes the two and three dimensional proton diffusion and the related physical and chemical processes. Common models describe surface proton diffusion as a series of subsequent hopping processes between membrane-anchored buffer molecules. Our experiments provide evidence for an alternative model. We released membrane-bound caged protons by UV flashes and monitored their arrival at distant sites s by fluorescence

  14. Controlled release of drugs from cellulose acetate matrices produced from sugarcane bagasse: monitoring by square-wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Filho, Guimes; Almeida, Flávia; Ribeiro, Sabrina D; Tormin, Thiago F; Muñoz, Rodrigo A A; Assunção, Rosana M N; Barud, Hernane

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, cellulose triacetate (CTA) was produced from sugarcane bagasse and used as matrices for controlled release of paracetamol. Symmetric and asymmetric membranes were obtained by formulations of CTA/dichloromethane/drug and CTA/dichloromethane/water/drug, respectively, and they were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Different morphologies of membranes were observed by SEM, and the incorporation of paracetamol was confirmed by lowering of the glass transition temperature (Tg) in the DSC curves. This indicates the existence of interactions between the matrix and the drug. The evaluation of drug release was based on the electrochemical monitoring of paracetamol through its oxidation at a glassy carbon electrode surface using square-wave voltammetry (SWV), which provides fast, precise and accurate in situ measurements. The studies showed a content release of 27% and 45% by the symmetric and asymmetric membranes, respectively, during 8 h.

  15. Noninvasive Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging of in vivo Premature Drug Release from Polymeric Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng; Chen, Hongwei; Paholak, Hayley J.; Sun, Duxin

    2013-01-01

    Understanding in vivo drug release kinetics is critical for the development of nanoparticle-based delivery systems. In this study, we developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging approach to noninvasively monitor in vitro and in vivo cargo release from polymeric nanoparticles. The FRET donor dye (DiO or DiD) and acceptor dye (DiI or DiR) were individually encapsulated into poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polystyrene (PEO-PS) nanoparticles. When DiO (donor) nanoparticles and DiI (acceptor) nanoparticles were co-incubated with cancer cells for 2 h, increased FRET signals were observed from cell membranes, suggesting rapid release of DiO and DiI to cell membranes. Similarly, increased FRET ratios were detected in nude mice after intravenous co-administration of DiD (donor) nanoparticles and DiR (acceptor) nanoparticles. In contrast, another group of nude mice i.v. administrated with DiD/DiR co-loaded nanoparticles showed decreased FRET ratios. Based on the difference in FRET ratios between the two groups, in vivo DiD/DiR release half-life from PEO-PS nanoparticles was determined to be 9.2 min. In addition, it was observed that the presence of cell membranes facilitated burst release of lipophilic cargos while incorporation of oleic acid-coated iron oxide into PEO-PS nanoparticles slowed the release of DiD/DiR to cell membranes. The developed in vitro and in vivo FRET imaging techniques can be used to screening stable nano-formulations for lipophilic drug delivery. PMID:24033270

  16. Drug-model membrane interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Usha K.

    1994-01-01

    In the present day world, drugs play a very important role in medicine and it is necessary to understand their mode of action at the molecular level, in order to optimise their use. Studies of drug-biomembrane interactions are essential for gaining such as understanding. However, it would be prohibitively difficult to carry out such studies, since biomembranes are highly complex systems. Hence, model membranes (made up of these lipids which are important components of biomembranes) of varying degrees of complexity are used to investigate drug-membrane interactions. Bio- as well as model-membranes undergo a chain melting transition when heated, the chains being in a disordered state above the transition point, T CM . This transition is of physiological importance since biomembranes select their components such that T CM is less than the ambient temperature but not very much so, so that membrane flexibility is ensured and porosity, avoided. The influence of drugs on the transition gives valuable clues about various parameters such as the location of the drug in the membrane. Deep insights into drug-membrane interactions are obtained by observing the effect of drugs on membrane structure and the mobilities of the various groups in lipids, near T CM . Investigation of such changes have been carried out with several drugs, using techniques such as DSC, XRD and NMR. The results indicate that the drug-membrane interaction not only depends on the nature of drug and lipids but also on the form of the model membrane - stacked bilayer or vesicles. The light that these results shed on the nature of drug-membrane interactions is discussed. (author). 13 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  17. Nanoporous Membrane Technologies for Pathogen Collection, Separation, and Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Sang W; Shang, Hao; Lee, Gil U; Griffin, Matthew T; Fulton, Jack

    2003-01-01

    Partial contents: Nanoporous Membranes, Membrane Chemistries, Characterization of Membrane Chemistries,Protein Fouling, Collector,Gas and Liquid Permeabilities, Membrane Permeabilities in the Presence of Water...

  18. Releases of radioactivity from uranium mills and effluent treatment costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, J.P.; Sears, M.B.; Blanco, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Airborne releases of radioactive materials from uranium milling to the environment consist of ore dust, yellowcake dust, tailings dust, and radon gas while the mill is active. After a mill has ceased operations, tailings may be stabilized to minimize or prevent airborne releases of radioactive particulates. However, radon gas will continue to be released in amounts inversely proportional to the degree of stabilization treatment (and expense). Liquid waste disposal is by evaporation and natural seepage to the ground beneath the tailings impoundment area. The release of radioactive materials (and potential radiation exposures) determines the majority of costs associated with minimizing the environmental impact of uranium milling. Radwaste treatments to reduce estimated radiation doses to individuals to 3 to 5% of those received with current milling practices are equivalent to $0.66 per pounds of U 3 O 8 and 0.032 mill per kWhr of electricity. This cost would cover a high efficiency reverse jet bag filter and high energy venturi scrubbers for dusts, neutralization of liquids, and an asphalt-lined tailings basin with a clay core dam to reduce seepage. In addition, this increased cost would cover stabilization of tailings, after mill closure, with a 1-in. asphalt membrane topped by 2 ft of earth and 0.5 ft of crushed rock to provide protection against future leaching and wind erosion. The cost of reducing the radiological hazards associated with uranium milling to this degree would contribute about 0.4% to the current total cost of nuclear power

  19. Cellular ATP release in the lung and airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Ito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP is a universal energy source synthesized by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cytosolic glycolysis and transported by the vesicular nucleotide transporter for storage in secretory vesicles. Extracellular ATP regulates physiological functions and homeostasis of the respiratory system and is associated with pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Thus, modulation of ATP and purinergic signaling may be a novel therapeutic approach to pulmonary disease. ATP is released from alveolar epithelial cells, airway epithelial cells, airway smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in response to various chemical and mechanical stimuli. In addition to conductive pathways such as connexins and pannexins, vesicular exocytosis is involved in the mechanisms of ATP release from the cells. Imaging approaches enable us to visualize ATP release from not only cultured cells but also lung tissue ex vivo. Extracellular vesicles, exosomes and membrane-derived microvesicles, containing cytoplasmic proteins, mRNA and microRNA, represent important mediators of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular microenvironment. However, it is not known whether extracellular vesicles contain ATP as an intercellular messenger. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of cellular ATP release and purinergic signaling in the respiratory system.

  20. Microbubbles-Assisted Ultrasound Triggers the Release of Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuana Yuana

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbubbles-assisted ultrasound (USMB has shown promise in improving local drug delivery. The formation of transient membrane pores and endocytosis are reported to be enhanced by USMB, and they contribute to cellular drug uptake. Exocytosis also seems to be linked to endocytosis upon USMB treatment. Based on this rationale, we investigated whether USMB triggers exocytosis resulting in the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs. USMB was performed on a monolayer of head-and-neck cancer cells (FaDu with clinically approved microbubbles and commonly used ultrasound parameters. At 2, 4, and 24 h, cells and EV-containing conditioned media from USMB and control conditions (untreated cells, cells treated with microbubbles and ultrasound only were harvested. EVs were measured using flow cytometric immuno-magnetic bead capture assay, immunogold electron microscopy, and western blotting. After USMB, levels of CD9 exposing-EVs significantly increased at 2 and 4 h, whereas levels of CD63 exposing-EVs increased at 2 h. At 24 h, EV levels were comparable to control levels. EVs released after USMB displayed a heterogeneous size distribution profile (30–1200 nm. Typical EV markers CD9, CD63, and alix were enriched in EVs released from USMB-treated FaDu cells. In conclusion, USMB treatment triggers exocytosis leading to the release of EVs from FaDu cells.

  1. Membranes and theoretical modeling of membrane distillation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayet, Mohamed

    2011-05-11

    Membrane distillation (MD) is one of the non-isothermal membrane separation processes used in various applications such desalination, environmental/waste cleanup, food, etc. It is known since 1963 and is still being developed at laboratory stage for different purposes and not fully implemented in industry. An abrupt increase in the number of papers on MD membrane engineering (i.e. design, fabrication and testing in MD) is seen since only 6 years ago. The present paper offers a comprehensive MD state-of-the-art review covering a wide range of commercial membranes, MD membrane engineering, their MD performance, transport mechanisms, experimental and theoretical modeling of different MD configurations as well as recent developments in MD. Improved MD membranes with specific morphology, micro- and nano-structures are highly demanded. Membranes with different pore sizes, porosities, thicknesses and materials as well as novel structures are required in order to carry out systematic MD studies for better understanding mass transport in different MD configurations, thereby improving the MD performance and looking for MD industrialization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of paradigm for the study of amino acid neurotransmitter release in human autopsy brain samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, K.-W.; Dodd, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This study attempted to establish a release protocol to characterize both the vesicular and cytoplasmic components of amino acid transmitter release in human synaptosomes. Experiments with rat synaptosomes showed that, with depolarizing concentrations of K + ions, vesicular release could be successfully differentiated from cytoplasmic release for preloaded L-[ 3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA. However, human tissue studies did not give clear-cut results. Experiments were carried out to optimize the release paradigm as well as to improve the vesicular uptake of labeled transmitters. A 'pulse- chase' protocol, with an unlabelled D-aspartate chase, was performed in human tissue samples in order to enhance the L-[ 3 H ] glutamate release signal derived from exocytosis by removing the cytoplasmic pool of L-[ 3 H ] glutamate first. However, the results showed that total release was not enhanced effectively in comparison with the non-pulse-chase protocol. In brief, the pulse-chase protocol did not build up the vesicular pool of L-[ 3 H ]glutamate, though the cytoplasmic L- [ 3 H ] glutamate pool was effectively depressed by D-aspartate. Further studies applied 4- aminopyridine (4-AP) to trigger release, to circumvent the problem of the reversal of plasma membrane transporters caused by raised K + ion concentrations. The results showed that the application of 4-AP elicited the release of amino acid transmitters from rat synaptosomes, but failed to produce successful release signals in the human tissue experiments. Our findings suggest that the vesicular compartment may be impaired by freezing and affected by post-mortem delay (PMD). Rat studies showed that the freezing step had a major effect on Ca 2+-dependent release, as less L- [3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA were released from the frozen rat tissue preparations. Moreover, there was an indication of a decline in L-[ 3 H ]glutamate release with increasing PMD. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  3. Monocyte activation drives preservation of membrane thiols by promoting release of oxidised membrane moieties via extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó-Taylor, K É; Tóth, E Á; Balogh, A M; Sódar, B W; Kádár, L; Pálóczi, K; Fekete, N; Németh, A; Osteikoetxea, X; Vukman, K V; Holub, M; Pállinger, É; Nagy, Gy; Winyard, P G; Buzás, E I

    2017-07-01

    The redox state of cellular exofacial molecules is reflected by the amount of available thiols. Furthermore, surface thiols can be considered as indicators of immune cell activation. One group of thiol containing proteins, peroxiredoxins, in particular, have been associated with inflammation. In this study, we assessed surface thiols of the U937 and Thp1 monocyte cell lines and primary monocytes in vitro upon inflammatory stimulation by irreversibly labelling the cells with a fluorescent derivative of maleimide. We also investigated exofacial thiols on circulating blood mononuclear cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls. When analysing extracellular vesicles, we combined thiol labelling with the use of antibodies to specific CD markers to exclude extracellular vesicle mimicking signals from thiol containing protein aggregates. Furthermore, differential detergent lysis was applied to confirm the vesicular nature of the detected extracellular events in blood plasma. We found an increase in exofacial thiols on monocytes upon in vitro stimulation by LPS or TNF, both in primary monocytes and monocytic cell lines (pextracellular vesicles showed a decrease in their exofacial thiols compared with those from unstimulated cells (pextracellular vesicles of isolated CD14 + cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients had decreased thiol levels compared with healthy subjects (pextracellular vesicles was increased in rheumatoid arthritis blood plasma (pextracellular vesicle-enriched preparations from blood plasma. Our data show that cell surface thiols play a protective role and reflect oxidative stress resistance state in activated immune cells. Furthermore, they support a role of extracellular vesicles in the redox regulation of human monocytes, possibly representing an antioxidant mechanism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Polymer-controlled release of tobramycin from bone graft void filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Amanda E; Brooks, Benjamin D; Davidoff, Sherry N; Hogrebe, Paul C; Fisher, Mark A; Grainger, David W

    2013-12-01

    Despite clinical, material, and pharmaceutical advances, infection remains a major obstacle in total joint revision surgery. Successful solutions must extend beyond bulk biomaterial and device modifications, integrating locally delivered pharmaceuticals and physiological cues at the implant site, or within large bone defects with prominent avascular spaces. One approach involves coating clinically familiar allograft bone with an antibiotic-releasing rate-controlling polymer membrane for use as a matrix for local drug release in bone. The kinetics of drug release from this system can be tailored via alterations in the substrate or the polymeric coating. Drug-loaded polycaprolactone coating releases bioactive tobramycin from both cadaveric-sourced cancellous allograft fragments and synthetic hybrid coralline ceramic bone graft fragments with similar kinetics over a clinically relevant 6-week timeframe. However, micron-sized allograft particulate provides extended bioactive tobramycin release. Addition of porogen polyethylene glycol to the polymer coating formulation changes tobramycin release kinetics without significant impact on released antibiotic bioactivity. Incorporation of oil-microencapsulated tobramycin into the polymer coating did not significantly modify tobramycin release kinetics. In addition to releasing inhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, antibiotic-loaded allograft bone provides recognized beneficial osteoconductive potential, attractive for decreasing orthopedic surgical infections with improved filling of dead space and new bone formation.

  5. Cellular automata model for drug release from binary matrix and reservoir polymeric devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes Laaksonen, Timo; Mikael Laaksonen, Hannu; Tapio Hirvonen, Jouni; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2009-04-01

    Kinetics of drug release from polymeric tablets, inserts and implants is an important and widely studied area. Here we present a new and widely applicable cellular automata model for diffusion and erosion processes occurring during drug release from polymeric drug release devices. The model divides a 2D representation of the release device into an array of cells. Each cell contains information about the material, drug, polymer or solvent that the domain contains. Cells are then allowed to rearrange according to statistical rules designed to match realistic drug release. Diffusion is modeled by a random walk of mobile cells and kinetics of chemical or physical processes by probabilities of conversion from one state to another. This is according to the basis of diffusion coefficients and kinetic rate constants, which are on fundamental level just probabilities for certain occurrences. The model is applied to three kinds of devices with different release mechanisms: erodable matrices, diffusion through channels or pores and membrane controlled release. The dissolution curves obtained are compared to analytical models from literature and the validity of the model is considered. The model is shown to be compatible with all three release devices, highlighting easy adaptability of the model to virtually any release system and geometry. Further extension and applications of the model are envisioned.

  6. Electrospun superhydrophobic membranes with unique structures for membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Loh, Chun-Heng; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-09-24

    With modest temperature demand, low operating pressure, and high solute rejection, membrane distillation (MD) is an attractive option for desalination, waste treatment, and food and pharmaceutical processing. However, large-scale practical applications of MD are still hindered by the absence of effective membranes with high hydrophobicity, high porosity, and adequate mechanical strength, which are important properties for MD permeation fluxes, stable long-term performance, and effective packing in modules without damage. This study describes novel design strategies for highly robust superhydrophobic dual-layer membranes for MD via electrospinning. One of the newly developed membranes comprises a durable and ultrathin 3-dimensional (3D) superhydrophobic skin and porous nanofibrous support whereas another was fabricated by electrospinning 3D superhydrophobic layers on a nonwoven support. These membranes exhibit superhydrophobicity toward distilled water, salty water, oil-in-water emulsion, and beverages, which enables them to be used not only for desalination but also for other processes. The superhydrophobic dual-layer membrane #3S-N with nanofibrous support has a competitive permeation flux of 24.6 ± 1.2 kg m(-2) h(-1) in MD (feed and permeate temperate were set as 333 and 293 K, respectively) due to the higher porosity of the nanofibrous scaffold. Meanwhile, the membranes with the nonwoven support exhibit greater mechanical strength due to this support combined with better long-term performance because of the thicker 3D superhydrophobic layers. The morphology, pore size, porosity, mechanical properties, and liquid enter pressure of water of these superhydrophobic composite membranes with two different structures are reported and compared with commercial polyvinylidene fluoride membranes.

  7. Predicting hydrocarbon release from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppendieck, D.; Loehr, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' The remediation of hazardous chemicals from soils can be a lengthy and costly process. As a result, recent regulatory initiatives have focused on risk-based corrective action (RBCA) approaches. Such approaches attempt to identify the amount of chemical that can be left at a site with contaminated soil and still be protective of human health and the environment. For hydrocarbons in soils to pose risk to human heath and the environment, the hydrocarbons must be released from the soil and accessible to microorganisms, earthworms, or other higher level organisms. The sorption of hydrocarbons to soil can reduce the availability of the hydrocarbon to receptors. Typically in soils and sediments, there is an initial fast release of a hydrocarbon from the soil to the aqueous phase followed by a slower release of the remaining hydrocarbon to the aqueous phase. The rate and extent of slow release can influence aqueous hydrocarbon concentrations and the fate and transport of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. Once the fast fraction of the chemical has been removed from the soil, the remaining fraction of a chemical may desorb at a rate that natural mechanisms can attenuate the released hydrocarbon. Hence, active remediation may be needed only until the fast fraction has been removed. However, the fast fraction is a soil and chemical specific parameter. This presentation will present a tier I type protocol that has been developed to quickly estimate the fraction of hydrocarbons that are readily released from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Previous research in our laboratory and elsewhere has used long-term desorption (four months) studies to determine the readily released fraction. This research shows that a single short-term (less than two weeks) batch extraction procedure provides a good estimate of the fast released fraction derived from long-term experiments. This procedure can be used as a tool to rapidly evaluate the release and bioavailability of

  8. alpha-difluoromethylornithine modifies gonadotropin-releasing hormone release and follicle-stimulating hormone secretion in the immature female rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, S M; Becú-Villalobos, D; Lacau-Mengido, I M; Libertun, C

    1997-06-01

    Polyamines play an essential role in tissue growth and differentiation, in body weight increment, in brain organization, and in the molecular mechanisms of hormonal action, intracellular signaling, and cell-to-cell communication. In a previous study, inhibition of their synthesis by alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a specific and irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, during development in female rats, was followed by prolonged high follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) serum level and a delayed puberty onset. Those changes were relatively independent of body mass and did not impair posterior fertility. The present work studies the mechanisms and site of action of polyamine participation in FSH secretion during development. DFMO was injected in female rats between Days 1 and 9 on alternate days. At 10 days of age, hypothalami from control and DFMO rats were perifused in vitro, and basal and potassium-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release were measured. The response to membrane depolarization was altered in DFMO hypothalami. Increased GnRH release in response to a low K+ concentration was evidenced. Adenohypophyses of the same treated prepubertal rats were perifused in vitro and the response to GnRH pulses was checked. In DFMO-treated rats, higher FSH release was observed, with no changes in LH or PRL secretion. Finally, pituitary GnRH receptor number in adenohypophyseal membranes from treated and control groups was quantified. A significant reduction in specific binding was evident in hypophyses from DFMO-treated rats when compared with binding in the control group. In summary, DFMO treatment in a critical developmental period in the female rat impacts the immature GnRH neuronal network and immature gonadotropes. A delay in maturation is evidenced by a higher sensitivity to secretagogs in both pituitary glands and hypothalamic explants. These events could explain the prolonged high FSH serum levels and delayed puberty onset seen in

  9. Estimation of the use of fibrin and collagen membranes as carriers for platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) in the presence of amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Marta; Kozakiewicz, Marcin; Bodek, Andrzej; Bodek, Kazimiera Henryka

    2015-04-01

    The effect of homogeneous fibrin (Fb), collagen (Coll) and composite fibrin-heparin (Fb-Hp), fibrin-collagen (Fb-Coll) membranes on in vitro release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) was evaluated in the presence or absence of amoxicillin using of the ELISA immunoassay test. Amoxicillin concentration was determined spectrophotometrically at 272 nm. The process of the PDGF-BB growth factor and amoxicillin release from the studied membranes was of a two-phase nature in the majority of the systems analysed. The PDGF-BB was released in the highest amount from the Coll membrane (M7) without the presence of amoxicillin--546.2 ± 7.47 pg, t0.5 = 0.88 h and 202.5 ± 6.83 pg, t0.5 = 26.65 h during the first phase and second phase, respectively. The lowest PDGF-BB release was observed from composite M4 (Fb-Hp) membrane--5.88 ± 0.81 pg, t0.5 = 1.69 h; and 110.2 ± 6.48 pg, t0.5 = 855.6 h during first and second phase respectively. An optimal release of amoxicillin was observed in the case of the composite M6 (Fb-Coll) membrane--only in the second phase: 64.2 ± 7.8 μg, t0.5 = 83.5 h. The lowest and delayed amoxicillin release was achieved for M4 membrane (approx. 17.1 ± 1.12 μg, t0.5 = 46.5 h). The results of the PDGF-BB release and amoxicillin from membranes indicated a correlation between the level of release and composition of the film. Our results suggested that fibrin and collagen membranes may be beneficial to enhance periodontal bone regeneration.

  10. GEWEX SRB Shortwave Release 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. J.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Mikovitz, J. C.; Zhang, T.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The new Release 4 uses the newly processed ISCCP HXS product as its primary input for cloud and radiance data. The ninefold increase in pixel number compared to the previous ISCCP DX allows finer gradations in cloud fraction in each grid box. It will also allow higher spatial resolutions (0.5 degree) in future releases. In addition to the input data improvements, several important algorithm improvements have been made since Release 3. These include recalculated atmospheric transmissivities and reflectivities yielding a less transmissive atmosphere. The calculations also include variable aerosol composition, allowing for the use of a detailed aerosol history from the Max Planck Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC). Ocean albedo and snow/ice albedo are also improved from Release 3. Total solar irradiance is now variable, averaging 1361 Wm-2. Water vapor is taken from ISCCP's nnHIRS product. Results from GSW Release 4 are presented and analyzed. Early comparison to surface measurements show improved agreement.

  11. Universal Behavior of Membranes with Sterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Rowat, Amy C.; Brief, E.

    2006-01-01

    ) is obtained from deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance. We compare these results, along with data for membrane-bending rigidity, to explore the relationship between membrane hydrophobic thickness and elastic properties. Together, such diverse approaches demonstrate that membrane properties are affected...

  12. Membrane species mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shu-Kai; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2016-08-17

    Processing and managing cell membrane proteins for characterization while maintaining their intact structure is challenging. Hydrodynamic flow has been used to transport membrane species in supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) where the hydrophobic cores of the membrane species can be protected during processing. However, the forced convection mechanism of species embedded in lipid bilayers is still unclear. Developing a controlled SLB platform with a practical model to predict the membrane species mobility in the platform under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is imperative to ensure the practical applicability of SLBs in processing and managing membrane species with various geometrical properties. The mobility of membrane species is affected by the driving force from the aqueous environment in addition to the frictions from the lipid bilayer, in which both lipid leaflets may exhibit different speeds relative to that of the moving species. In this study, we developed a model, based on the applied driving force and the possible frictional resistances that the membrane species encounter, to predict how the mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is influenced by the sizes of the species' hydrophilic portion in the aqueous environment and the hydrophobic portion embedded in the membrane. In addition, we used a microfluidic device for controlling the flow to arrange the lipid membrane and the tested membrane species in the desirable locations in order to obtain a SLB platform which can provide clear mobility responses of the species without disturbance from the species dispersion effect. The model predictions were consistent with the experimental observations, with the sliding friction coefficient between the upper leaflet and the hydrophilic portion of the species as the only regressed parameter. The result suggests that not only the lateral drag frictions from the lipid layers but also the sliding frictions between the species and the lipid layer planes

  13. Artificial membranes for membrane protein purification, functionality and structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Mayuriben J; Lousa, Carine De Marcos; Muench, Stephen P; Goldman, Adrian; Postis, Vincent L G

    2016-06-15

    Membrane proteins represent one of the most important targets for pharmaceutical companies. Unfortunately, technical limitations have long been a major hindrance in our understanding of the function and structure of such proteins. Recent years have seen the refinement of classical approaches and the emergence of new technologies that have resulted in a significant step forward in the field of membrane protein research. This review summarizes some of the current techniques used for studying membrane proteins, with overall advantages and drawbacks for each method. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Polymer nanocomposite membranes with hierarchically structured catalysts for high throughput dehalogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crock, Christopher A.

    Halogenated organics are categorized as primary pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency. Trichloroethylene (TCE), which had broad industrial use in the past, shows persistence in the environment because of its chemical stability. The large scale use and poor control of TCE resulted in its prolonged release into the environment before the carcinogenic risk associated with TCE was fully understood. TCE pollution stemmed from industrial effluents and improper disposal of solvent waste. Membrane reactors are promising technology for treating TCE polluted groundwater because of the high throughput, relatively low cost of membrane fabrication and facile retrofitting of existing membrane based water treatment facilities with catalytic membrane reactors. Compared to catalytic fluidized or fixed bed reactors, catalytic membrane reactors feature minimal diffusional limitation. Additionally, embedding catalyst within the membrane avoids the need for catalyst recovery and can prevent aggregation of catalytic nanoparticles. In this work, Pd/xGnP, Pd-Au/xGnP, and commercial Pd/Al2O3 nanoparticles were employed in batch and flow-through membrane reactors to catalyze the dehalogenation of TCE in the presence of dissolved H2. Bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts were shown to be more active than monometallic Pd/xGnP or commercial Pd/Al 2O3 catalysts. In addition to synthesizing nanocomposite membranes for high-throughput TCE dehalogenation, the membrane based dehalogenation process was designed to minimize the detrimental impact of common catalyst poisons (S2-, HS-, and H2S -) by concurrent oxidation of sulfide species to gypsum in the presence of Ca2+ and removal of gypsum through membrane filtration. The engineered membrane dehalogenation process demonstrated that bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts resisted deactivation by residual sulfide species after oxidation, and showed complete removal of gypsum during membrane filtration.

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  16. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  17. Training Materials for Release 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wake, Jo Dugstad; Hansen, Cecilie; Debus, Kolja

    This document, D7.4 – training materials for release 3, provides an overview of the training material for version 3 of the NEXT-TELL tools and methods. Previous documents submitted as part of work package 7, which is about teacher training, are D7.1 – Training Concept, D7.2 – Training Materials...... for Release 1 and D7.3 – Training Materials for Release 2. D7.4 builds on D7.1 and D7.2 and D7.3. D7.4 contains further development of previous work within WP7, essentially a revised theoretical approach to the teacher training, and expansion of the notion of tool training. The media in use have been expanded...

  18. Cell invasion through basement membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Sherwood, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is an essential part of normal development and physiology, and occurs during the pathological progression of human inflammatory diseases and cancer. F-actin-rich membrane protrusions, called invadopodia, have been hypothesized to be the “drill bits” of invasive cells, mediating invasion through the dense, highly cross-linked basement membrane matrix. Though studied in vitro for over 30 y, invadopodia function in vivo has remained elusive. We have recently discovered that invadopodia breach basement membrane during anchor cell invasion in C. elegans, a genetically and visually tractable in vivo invasion event. Further, we found that the netrin receptor DCC localizes to the initial site of basement membrane breach and directs invasion through a single gap in the matrix. In this commentary, we examine how the dynamics and structure of AC-invadopodia compare with in vitro invadopodia and how the netrin receptor guides invasion through a single basement membrane breach. We end with a discussion of our surprising result that the anchor cell pushes the basement membrane aside, instead of completely dissolving it through proteolysis, and provide some ideas for how proteases and physical displacement may work together to ensure efficient and robust invasion. PMID:24778942

  19. Membrane bioreactors: present and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H N; Furusaki, S

    1991-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors have a very handy in-situ separation capability lacking in other types of bioreactors. Combining various functions of membrane separations and biocatalyst characteristics of enzymes, microbial cells, organelles, animal and plant tissues can generate quite a number of membrane bioreactor systems. The cell retaining property of membranes and selective removal of inhibitory byproducts makes high cell density culture possible and utilizes enzyme catalytic activity better, which leads to high productivity of bioreactors. Enzyme reactions utilizing cofactors and hydrolysis of macromolecules are advantageous in membrane bioreactors. Anaerobic cell culture may be efficiently carried out in membrane cell recycle systems, while aerobic cultures work well in dual hollow fiber reactors. Animal and plant cells have much a better chance of success in membrane reactors because of the protective environment of the reactor and the small oxygen uptake rate of these cells. Industrial use of these reactors are still in its infancy and limited to enzyme and animal tissue culture, but applications will expand as existing problems are resolved.

  20. Membrane manufacture for peptide separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2016-06-07

    Nanostructured polymeric membranes are key tools in biomedical applications such as hemodialysis, protein separations, in the food industry, and drinking water supply from seawater. Despite of the success in different separation processes, membrane manufacture itself is at risk, since the most used solvents are about to be banned in many countries due to environmental and health issues. We propose for the first time the preparation of polyethersulfone membranes based on dissolution in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DEP). We obtained a series of membranes tailored for separation of solutes with molecular weight of 30, 5, 1.3, and 1.25 kg mol-1 with respective water permeances of 140, 65, 30 and 20 Lm-2h-1bar-1. We demonstrate their superior efficiency in the separation of complex mixtures of peptides with molecular weights in the range of 800 to 3500 gmol-1. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation leading to the pore formation in the membranes were investigated. The rheology of the solutions and the morphology of the prepared membranes were examed and compared to those of polyethersulfone in organic solvents currently used for membrane manufacture.