WorldWideScience

Sample records for membrane system modelling

  1. Detailed modelling and optimal design of membrane separation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Marriott, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    The search for alternatives to traditional energy intensive separation methods such as distillation has led to the introduction of processes based on membranes. In this research, the use of detailed mathematical models for the optimal design of membrane systems is investigated. Mathematical models of hollow-fibre and spiral-wound membrane modules are presented in this thesis. The models are developed from rigorous mass, momentum and energy balances and can be used to describ...

  2. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component......- and system models match experimental data from the literature. However, limited data were available for verification so further work is necessary to confirm detailed aspects of the models. It is nonetheless expected that the developed models will be useful for system modeling and optimization of PEM fuel...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems...

  3. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  4. Modeling of Hollow-Fiber Membrane System During Ultrafiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI-Bialy, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the performance of hollow fiber membrane module during ultrafiltration of aqueous solutions. The model is represented by a set of differential equations for permeate and residue pressure drop and volumetric flow rates in the axial direction, beside the principle equations of both solvent and solute fluxes through the membrane, while osmotic pressure was neglected in model equations. The shell and tube module type was considered where feed pass in the shell and permeate in the bore side. Tortousily factor of membrane pores in addition to concentration polarization modulus were taken into account in calculations. The model was solved numerically with the help of suitable program in both co current and countercurrent flow pattern and comparison of results were carried out

  5. Limitations of membrane cultures as a model solid-state fermentation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahardjo, Y.S.P.; Korona, D.; Haemers, S.; Weber, F.J.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To examine the reliability of membrane cultures as a model solid-state fermentation (SSF) system. Methods and Results: In overcultures of Aspergillus oryzae on sterilized wheat flour discs overlaid with a polycarbonate membrane, we demonstrated that the presence of membrane filters reduced the

  6. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  7. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering—Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti’s RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti’s newly developed static (non-rotating Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level.

  8. Modeling and parametric analysis of hollow fiber membrane system for carbon capture from multicomponent flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Khalilpour, Rajab

    2011-08-12

    The modeling and optimal design/operation of gas membranes for postcombustion carbon capture (PCC) is presented. A systematic methodology is presented for analysis of membrane systems considering multicomponent flue gas with CO 2 as target component. Simplifying assumptions is avoided by namely multicomponent flue gas represented by CO 2/N 2 binary mixture or considering the co/countercurrent flow pattern of hollow-fiber membrane system as mixed flow. Optimal regions of flue gas pressures and membrane area were found within which a technoeconomical process system design could be carried out. High selectivity was found to not necessarily have notable impact on PCC membrane performance, rather, a medium selectivity combined with medium or high permeance could be more advantageous. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  9. Mathematical modelling of a flow-injection system with a membrane separation module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolev, S.D.; Kolev, Spas D.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model for a flow-injection system with a membrane separation module based on the axially dispersed plug flow model was developed. It takes into account the geometrical dimensions and dispersion properties of the main sections of the manifold, the mass transfer in the channels of the

  10. Development of a Comprehensive Fouling Model for a Rotating Membrane Bioreactor System Treating Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane bioreactors (MBRs are now main stream wastewater treatment technologies. In recent times, novel pressure driven rotating membrane disc modules have been specially developed that induce high shear on the membrane surface, thereby reducing fouling. Previous research has produced dead-end filtration fouling model which combines all three classical mechanisms that was later used by another researcher as a starting point for a greatly refined model of a cross flow side-stream MBR that incorporated both hydrodynamics and soluble microbial products’ (SMP effects. In this study, a comprehensive fouling model was created based on this earlier work that incorporated all three classical fouling mechanisms for a rotating MBR system. It was tested and validated for best fit using appropriate data sets. The initial model fit appeared good for all simulations, although it still needs to be calibrated using further appropriate data sets.

  11. Bisection method for accurate modeling and simulation of fouling in hollow fiber membrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Yubo; Zhang, Jian; Song, Lianfa

    2017-06-01

    Accurate description and modeling of fouling on hollow fibers imposes a serious challenge to more effective fouling mitigation and performance optimization of the membrane system. Although the governing equations for membrane fouling can be constructed based on the known theories from membrane filtration and fluid dynamics, they are unsolvable analytically due to the complex spatially and temporally varying nature of fouling on hollow fibers. The current available numerical solutions for the governing equations are either unreliable or inconvenient to use because of the uses of unfounded assumptions or cumbersome calculation methods. This work presented for the first time a rigorous numerical procedure to solve the governing equations for fouling development on hollow fibers. A critical step to achieve the goal is the use of bisection method to determine the transmembrane pressure at the dead end of the fibers. With this procedure, fouling behavior in the hollow fiber membrane system under a given condition can be simulated within a second. The model simulations were well calibrated and verified with the published experimental data from literature. Also presented in the paper were simulations for performances of the hollow fiber membrane system under various operation conditions. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Hollow-Fiber Membrane System in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian PENG

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A set of mathematical models were derived based on the bio-kinetics and material balance principles to describe the performance of membrane system in this research. A synthetic wastewater and a meat packing wastewater were processed through a lab-scale membrane bioreactor system to generate experimental data for calibration and verification of the derived models. For the synthetic wastewater treatment, a high and stable Total Organic Carbon (TOC removal was achieved with volumetric organic loading from 0.2 to 24.2 kg TOC/m3ƒ(d. It was found that the derived system models fit the experimental data well. The bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd in the models were found to be 0.16 d-1, 1.0 mg/L, 1.75 mg Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids (MLVSS/mg TOC and 0.11 d-1, respectively. For the meat packing wastewater treatment, the bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd were found to be 0.48 d-1, 56.3 mg/L, 0.53 mg MLVSS/mg COD and 0.04 d-1, respectively. F/M ratio of 0.08 was found to be the proper operating condition for the system. Based on the proposed system models, the optimum MLSS concentration and F/M ratio can be computed to yield minimum cost of a membrane bioreactor system without excess biomass production.

  13. Application of the mass-based UNIQUAC model to membrane systems: A critical revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chovau, S.; Van der Bruggen, B.; Luis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► UNIQUAC model in mass-based terms is considered for the description of sorption equilibria in membrane systems. ► Model validation of molar and mass-based model is performed on simple (vapor + liquid) equilibrium. ► Discrepancy is found between molar and mass-based model, which is attributed to an incorrect conversion. ► Novel model based on correct thermodynamics is provided for future research. - Abstract: The UNIQUAC model is very suitable in describing (liquid + liquid) as well as (vapor + liquid) equilibrium for a wide range of systems. It can be extended to (solvent + polymer) systems for describing sorption equilibria. The original model is expressed in molar-based terms, but requires knowledge of structural parameters and molar masses of all components. Since these cannot always be easily determined for membranes, a conversion to mass-based terms is often performed, which eliminates this issue. Many studies use this model to calculate sorption equilibria in (solvent + polymer) systems. Nevertheless, in this work the conversion from molar to mass-based parameters is postulated to be erroneous. This even leads to an incorrect description of simple (vapor + liquid) equilibrium of pure liquid mixtures and hence it is advised not to use this model for further modeling of sorption equilibrium in (solvent + polymer) systems. In this paper, the errors in the conversion are pinpointed, and the effects it can have on the description of (vapor + liquid) equilibrium, if used improvident, are demonstrated. Furthermore, it is shown that in fact a simple and straightforward conversion can be performed. Finally, in the case when polymers are involved, an adaption and simplification to the model was successfully applied.

  14. Modelling of Multi-Agent Systems: Experiences with Membrane Computing and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Kefalas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Formal modelling of Multi-Agent Systems (MAS is a challenging task due to high complexity, interaction, parallelism and continuous change of roles and organisation between agents. In this paper we record our research experience on formal modelling of MAS. We review our research throughout the last decade, by describing the problems we have encountered and the decisions we have made towards resolving them and providing solutions. Much of this work involved membrane computing and classes of P Systems, such as Tissue and Population P Systems, targeted to the modelling of MAS whose dynamic structure is a prominent characteristic. More particularly, social insects (such as colonies of ants, bees, etc., biology inspired swarms and systems with emergent behaviour are indicative examples for which we developed formal MAS models. Here, we aim to review our work and disseminate our findings to fellow researchers who might face similar challenges and, furthermore, to discuss important issues for advancing research on the application of membrane computing in MAS modelling.

  15. Modeling and operation optimization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system for maximum efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, In-Su; Park, Sang-Kyun; Chung, Chang-Bock

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system is operationally optimized. • A constrained optimization problem is formulated to maximize fuel cell efficiency. • Empirical and semi-empirical models for most system components are developed. • Sensitivity analysis is performed to elucidate the effects of major operating variables. • The optimization results are verified by comparison with actual operation data. - Abstract: This paper presents an operation optimization method and demonstrates its application to a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system. A constrained optimization problem was formulated to maximize the efficiency of a fuel cell system by incorporating practical models derived from actual operations of the system. Empirical and semi-empirical models for most of the system components were developed based on artificial neural networks and semi-empirical equations. Prior to system optimizations, the developed models were validated by comparing simulation results with the measured ones. Moreover, sensitivity analyses were performed to elucidate the effects of major operating variables on the system efficiency under practical operating constraints. Then, the optimal operating conditions were sought at various system power loads. The optimization results revealed that the efficiency gaps between the worst and best operation conditions of the system could reach 1.2–5.5% depending on the power output range. To verify the optimization results, the optimal operating conditions were applied to the fuel cell system, and the measured results were compared with the expected optimal values. The discrepancies between the measured and expected values were found to be trivial, indicating that the proposed operation optimization method was quite successful for a substantial increase in the efficiency of the fuel cell system.

  16. Diphytanoyl lipids as model systems for studying membrane-active peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Sezgin; Afonin, Sergii; Babii, Oleg; Tkachenko, Anton N; Komarov, Igor V; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-10-01

    The branched chains in diphytanoyl lipids provide membranes with unique properties, such as high chemical/physical stability, low water permeability, and no gel-to-fluid phase transition at ambient temperature. Synthetic diphytanoyl phospholipids are often used as model membranes for electrophysiological experiments. To evaluate whether these sturdy lipids are also suitable for solid-state NMR, we have examined their interactions with a typical amphiphilic peptide in comparison with straight-chain lipids. First, their phase properties were monitored using 31 P NMR, and the structural behaviour of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa was studied by 19 F NMR and circular dichroism in oriented membrane samples. Only lipids with choline headgroups (DPhPC) were found to form stable lipid bilayers in oriented samples, while DPhPG, DPhPE and DPhPS display non-lamellar structures. Hence, the experimental temperature and hydration are crucial factors when using supported diphytanoyl lipids, as both parameters must be maintained in an appropriate range to avoid the formation of non-bilayer structures. For the same reason, a high content of other diphytanoyl lipids besides DPhPC in mixed lipid systems is not favourable. Unlike the situation in straight-chain membranes, we found that the α-helical PGLa was not able to insert into the tightly packed fluid bilayer of DPhPC but remained in a surface-bound state even at very high peptide concentration. This behaviour can be explained by the high cohesivity and the negative spontaneous curvature of the diphytanoyl lipids. These characteristic features must therefore be taken into consideration, both, in electrophysiological studies, and when interpreting the structural behaviour of membrane-active peptides in such lipid environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Drug-model membrane interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Usha K.

    1994-01-01

    In the present day world, drugs play a very important role in medicine and it is necessary to understand their mode of action at the molecular level, in order to optimise their use. Studies of drug-biomembrane interactions are essential for gaining such as understanding. However, it would be prohibitively difficult to carry out such studies, since biomembranes are highly complex systems. Hence, model membranes (made up of these lipids which are important components of biomembranes) of varying degrees of complexity are used to investigate drug-membrane interactions. Bio- as well as model-membranes undergo a chain melting transition when heated, the chains being in a disordered state above the transition point, T CM . This transition is of physiological importance since biomembranes select their components such that T CM is less than the ambient temperature but not very much so, so that membrane flexibility is ensured and porosity, avoided. The influence of drugs on the transition gives valuable clues about various parameters such as the location of the drug in the membrane. Deep insights into drug-membrane interactions are obtained by observing the effect of drugs on membrane structure and the mobilities of the various groups in lipids, near T CM . Investigation of such changes have been carried out with several drugs, using techniques such as DSC, XRD and NMR. The results indicate that the drug-membrane interaction not only depends on the nature of drug and lipids but also on the form of the model membrane - stacked bilayer or vesicles. The light that these results shed on the nature of drug-membrane interactions is discussed. (author). 13 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  18. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations......, as model systems to understand the fundamental properties of biomembranes. The properties of lipid bilayers can be studied at different time and length scales. For some properties it is sufficient to envision a membrane as an elastic sheet, while for others it is important to take into account the details...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  19. Saponin Interactions with Model Membrane Systems - Langmuir Monolayer Studies, Hemolysis and Formation of ISCOMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Carolin; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2016-12-01

    Saponins are used in medicine due to their pharmacological and immunological effects. To better understand interactions of saponins with model membranes and natural membranes of, for example, erythrocytes, Langmuir film balance experiments are well established. For most saponins, a strong interaction with cholesterol was demonstrated in dependence of both the aglycone part and the sugar moieties and is suggested to be correlated with a strong hemolytic activity, high toxicity, and high surface activity, as was demonstrated for the steroid saponin digitonin. In general, changes in the sugar chain or in substituents of the aglycone result in a modification of the saponin properties. A promising saponin with regard to fairly low hemolytic activity and high adjuvant effect is α -tomatine, which still shows a high affinity for cholesterol. An interaction with cholesterol and lipids has also been proven for the Quillaja saponin from the bark of Quillaja saponaria Molina. This triterpene saponin was approved in marketed vaccines as an adjuvant due to the formation of immunostimulating complexes. Immunostimulating complexes consist of a Quillaja saponin, cholesterol, phospholipids, and a corresponding antigen. Recently, another saponin from Quillaja brasiliensis was successfully tested in immunostimulating complexes, too. Based on the results of interaction studies, the formation of drug delivery systems such as immunostimulating complexes or similar self-assembled colloids is postulated for a variety of saponins. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Mathematical Modelling of Nitrate Removal from Water Using a Submerged Membrane Adsorption Hybrid System with Four Adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahatheva Kalaruban

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive concentrations of nitrate in ground water are known to cause human health hazards. A submerged membrane adsorption hybrid system that includes a microfilter membrane and four different adsorbents (Dowex 21K XLT ion exchange resin (Dowex, Fe-coated Dowex, amine-grafted (AG corn cob and AG coconut copra operated at four different fluxes was used to continuously remove nitrate. The experimental data obtained in this study was simulated mathematically with a homogeneous surface diffusion model that incorporated membrane packing density and membrane correlation coefficient, and applied the concept of continuous flow stirred tank reactor. The model fit with experimental data was good. The surface diffusion coefficient was constant for all adsorbents and for all fluxes. The mass transfer coefficient increased with flux for all adsorbents and generally increased with the adsorption capacity of the adsorbents.

  1. Three-dimensional dynamic modelling of Polymer-Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cell-Systems; Dreidimensionale dynamische Modellierung und Berechnung von Polymer-Elektrolyt-Membran-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vath, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    This thesis deals with dynamic and multi-dimensional modelling of Polymer- Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cells (PEMFC). The developed models include all the different layers of the fuel cell e.g. flow field, gas diffusion layer, catalyst layer and membrane with their particular physical, chemical and electrical characteristics. The simulation results have been verified by detailed measurements performed at the research centre for hydrogen and solar energy in Ulm (ZSW Ulm). The developed three dimensional model describes the time- and spatial-dependent charge and mass transport in a fuel cell. Additionally, this model allows the analysis of critical operating conditions. For example, the current density distribution for different membranes is shown during insufficient humidification which results in local overstraining and degradation. The model also allows to analyse extreme critical operating conditions, e.g. short time breakdown of the humidification. Furthermore, the model shows the available potential of improvement opportunities in power density and efficiency of PEMFC due to optimisation of the gas diffusion layer, the catalyst and membrane. In the second part of the work the application of PEMFC systems for combined heat and power units is described by one-dimensional models for an electrical power range between 1 kW and 5 kW. This model contains the necessary components, e.g. gas processing, humidification, gas supply, fuel cell stack, heat storage, pumps, auxiliary burner, power inverter und additional aggregates. As a main result, it is possible to distinctly reduce the energy demand and the carbon dioxide exhaust for different load profiles. Today the costs for fuel cell systems are considerably higher than that of the conventional electrical energy supply. (orig.)

  2. Development of a Simulation Model for P Systems With Active Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    in the membrane computing area. The tool is user friendly, allowing the user to follow the evolution of a P system in a visual way. The simulator can...Mitrana, G. Paun, On the power of P systems with valuations, Computacion Sistemas 5 (2001) pp. 120-127.

  3. Development and Testing of a Fully Adaptable Membrane Bioreactor Fouling Model for a Sidestream Configuration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A dead-end filtration model that includes the three main fouling mechanisms mentioned in Hermia (i.e., cake build-up, complete pore blocking, and pore constriction and that was based on a constant trans-membrane pressure (TMP operation was extensively modified so it could be used for a sidestream configuration membrane bioreactor (MBR situation. Modifications and add-ons to this basic model included: alteration so that it could be used for varying flux and varying TMP operations; inclusion of a backwash mode; it described pore constriction (i.e., irreversible fouling in relation to the concentration of soluble microbial products (SMP in the liquor; and, it could be used in a cross flow scenario by the addition of scouring terms in the model formulation. The additional terms in this modified model were checked against an already published model to see if they made sense, physically speaking. Next this modified model was calibrated and validated in Matlab© using data collected by carrying out flux stepping tests on both a pilot sidestream MBR plant, and then a pilot membrane filtration unit. The model fit proved good, especially for the pilot filtration unit data. In conclusion, this model formulation is of the right level of complexity to be used for most practical MBR situations.

  4. Neutrons and model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragneto, G.

    2012-11-01

    Current research in membrane protein biophysics highlights the emerging role of lipids in shaping membrane protein function. Cells and organisms have developed sophisticated mechanisms for controlling the lipid composition and many diseases are related to the failure of these mechanisms. One of the recent advances in the field is the discovery of the existence of coexisting micro-domains within a single membrane, important for regulating some signaling pathways. Many important properties of these domains remain poorly characterized. The characterization and analysis of bio-interfaces represent a challenge. Performing measurements on these few nanometer thick, soft, visco-elastic and dynamic systems is close to the limits of the available tools and methods. Neutron scattering techniques including small angle scattering, diffraction, reflectometry as well as inelastic methods are rapidly developing for these studies and are attracting an increasing number of biologists and biophysicists at large facilities. This manuscript will review some recent progress in the field and provide perspectives for future developments. It aims at highlighting neutron reflectometry as a versatile method to tackle questions dealing with the understanding and function of biomembranes and their components. The other important scattering methods are only briefly introduced.

  5. Asymmetric bi-layer PFSA membranes as model systems for the study of water management in the PEMFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z; Peng, A Z; Morin, A; Huguet, P; Lanteri, Y; Deabate, S

    2014-10-14

    New bi-layer PFSA membranes made of Nafion® NRE212 and Aquivion™ E79-05s with different equivalent weights are prepared with the aim of managing water repartition in the PEMFC. The membrane water transport properties, i.e. back-diffusion and electroosmosis, as well as the electrochemical performances, are compared to those of state-of-art materials. The actual water content (the inner water concentration profile across the membrane thickness) is measured under operation in the fuel cell by in situ Raman microspectroscopy. The orientation of the equivalent weight gradient with respect to the water external gradient and to the proton flow direction affects the membrane water content, the water transport ability and, thus, the fuel cell performances. Higher power outputs, related to lower ohmic losses, are observed when the membrane is assembled with the lower equivalent weight layer (Aquivion™) at the anode side. This orientation, corresponding to enhanced water transport by back-flow while electroosmosis remains unaffected, results in the higher hydration of the membrane and of the anode active layer during operation. Also, polarization data suggest a different water repartition in the fuel cell along the on-plane direction. Even if the interest in multi-layer PFSA membranes as perspective electrolytes for PEMFCs is not definitively attested, these materials appear to be excellent model systems to establish relationships between the membrane transport properties, the water distribution in the fuel cell and the electrochemical performances. Thanks to the micrometric resolution, in situ Raman microspectroscopy proves to be a unique tool to measure the actual hydration of the membrane at the surface swept by the hydrated feed gases during operation, so that it can be used as a local probe of the water concentration evolution along the gas distribution channels according to changing working conditions.

  6. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  7. On "spinning" membrane models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Several alternative actions for a bosonic membrane have recently been proposed. We show that a linearly realized locally world-volume-supersymmetric (spinning membrane) extension of any of these actions implies an analogous extension of the standard Dirac membrane action. We further show that a

  8. A microelectromechanical system artificial basilar membrane based on a piezoelectric cantilever array and its characterization using an animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Jongmoon Jang; JangWoo Lee; Seongyong Woo; David J. Sly; Luke J. Campbell; Jin-Ho Cho; Stephen J. O’Leary; Min-Hyun Park; Sungmin Han; Ji-Wong Choi; Jeong Hun Jang; Hongsoo Choi

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a piezoelectric artificial basilar membrane (ABM) composed of a microelectromechanical system cantilever array. The ABM mimics the tonotopy of the cochlea: frequency selectivity and mechanoelectric transduction. The fabricated ABM exhibits a clear tonotopy in an audible frequency range (2.92?12.6?kHz). Also, an animal model was used to verify the characteristics of the ABM as a front end for potential cochlear implant applications. For this, a signal processor was used to convert ...

  9. In vivo areal modulus of elasticity estimation of the human tympanic membrane system: modelling of middle ear mechanical function in normal young and aged ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaihede, Michael Lyhne; Donghua, Liao; Gregersen, H.

    2007-01-01

    ), though not significantly (2p = 0.10 and 0.11, respectively). Based on the model the areal modulus was established describing the summated elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system. Future model improvements include exact determination of the tympanic membrane area accounting for its shape via 3D...

  10. Mathematical modelling of membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank

    This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate mathemat......This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate...... mathematical models, each with a different approach to membrane separation. The first model is a statistical model investigating the interplay between solute shape and the probability of entering the membrane. More specific the transition of solute particles from being spherical to becoming more elongated...... and the rejection coefficient. The second model is a stationary model for the flux of solvent and solute in a hollow fibre membrane. In the model we solve the time independent equations for transport of solvent and solute within the hollow fibre. Furthermore, the flux of solute and solvent through the membrane...

  11. Pulse radiolysis studies of model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijman, M.G.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis the influence of the structure of membranes on the processes in cell membranes were examined. Different models of the membranes were evaluated. Pulse radiolysis was used as the technique to examine the membranes. (R.B.)

  12. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...

  13. On controllability and system constraints of the linear models of proton exchange membrane and solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisavljevic, Verica

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we first show that the linear models of proton exchange membrane (polymer electrolyte membrane, PEM) and solid oxide (SO) fuel cells, commonly used in power and energy literature, are not controllable. The source of uncontrollability is the equation for pressure of the water vapor that is only affected by the fuel cell current, which in fact is a disturbance in this system and cannot be controlled by the given model inputs: inlet molar flow rates of hydrogen and oxygen. Being uncontrollable these models are not good candidates for studying control of dynamic processes in PEM and SO fuel cells. However, due to their simplicity, they can be used in hybrid configurations with other energy producing devices such as photovoltaic (solar) cells, wind turbine, micro gas turbine, battery (ultra capacitor) to demonstrate some other phenomena, but not for control purposes unless the hybrid models formed in such hybrid configurations are controllable. Testing controllability of such hybrid models is mandatory. Secondly, we introduce some algebraic constraints that follow from the model dynamics and the Nernst open-loop fuel cell voltage formula. These constraints must be satisfied in simulation of considered fuel cell modes, for example, via MATLAB/Simulink or any other computer software package.

  14. Sulfamethoxazole removal in membrane-photocatalytic reactor system - experimentation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Raju C; Yadav, M S Priyanka; Kumar, Mathava

    2018-01-29

    In this study, the efficacy of membrane-photocatalytic reactor (MPR) in sulfamethoxazole (SMX) removal was explored at a fixed initial SMX concentration, i.e. 100 mg/L. A supported catalyst, i.e. TiO 2 on granular activated carbon (GAC-TiO 2 ), was used for MPR experiments. The SMX removal efficiency of the MPR was investigated under a range of hydraulic retention time (i.e. HRT from 51 to 152.5 min) and TiO 2 catalyst dosage (55-50 mg/L). A maximum SMX removal efficiency of 83.6% was observed under 220 mg/L catalyst dosage and 80 min HRT. The increase in catalyst dosage from 55 to 550 mg/L has increased the transmembrane pressure of the reactor from 9.8 to 22.2 kPa. A multiple non-linear regression model was developed based on the experimental data and its significance was analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Based on the model, the optimal HRT and catalyst dosage for complete SMX removal (100%) were found out. The comparison of photocatalytic degradation experiments with sorption experiments conducted earlier revealed that SMX removal in the MPR was mainly by photocatalytic degradation and not by adsorption onto GAC-TiO 2 catalyst. However, the performance of MPR in removing other emerging pollutants from real-time wastewaters could be explored before its field-scale application.

  15. Artificial membranes as models in penetration investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krulikowska, M; Arct, J; Lucova, M; Cetner, B; Majewski, S

    2013-02-01

    In vitro methods used in the research of transepidermal transport of active substances generally rely on the penetration rate of test compounds through standard membranes. Models typically used in penetration experiments are specially prepared human or animal skin samples or synthetic membranes. The objective of this study was to establish if the test results for an artificial liposome membrane can be extrapolated to determine the actual bioavailability of active substances. Tests were conducted in a side-by-side diffusion cell. As model membranes, a liquid-crystal lipid membrane (LM), phospholipid membrane (PM) and pig skin sample were used. The test compounds were eight synthetic dyes used in hair colouring products. Research findings reveal that membranes composed of lipids, identical to those present in the epidermis and forming analogical liquid-crystal structures provide a close approximation of the actual bioavailability of active substances (correlation between the results obtained for pig skin and LM was significant: R = 0.95 and R = 0.93 in the presence of a 1% Sodium dodecyl sulphate in donor system). Unlike biological membranes, intercellular cement does not contain phospholipids. The observed correlation between penetration coefficients through the PM and pig skin was not significant (R = 0.82). The experiments confirm that the PM constitutes a less credible model for the studies of transepidermal transport in real life conditions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  17. Mathematical modeling of continuous ethanol fermentation in a membrane bioreactor by pervaporation compared to conventional system: Genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahanian, Mehri; Shokuhi Rad, Ali; Khoshhal, Saeed; Najafpour, Ghasem; Asghari, Behnam

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, genetic algorithm was used to investigate mathematical modeling of ethanol fermentation in a continuous conventional bioreactor (CCBR) and a continuous membrane bioreactor (CMBR) by ethanol permselective polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane. A lab scale CMBR with medium glucose concentration of 100gL(-1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae microorganism was designed and fabricated. At dilution rate of 0.14h(-1), maximum specific cell growth rate and productivity of 0.27h(-1) and 6.49gL(-1)h(-1) were respectively found in CMBR. However, at very high dilution rate, the performance of CMBR was quite similar to conventional fermentation on account of insufficient incubation time. In both systems, genetic algorithm modeling of cell growth, ethanol production and glucose concentration were conducted based on Monod and Moser kinetic models during each retention time at unsteady condition. The results showed that Moser kinetic model was more satisfactory and desirable than Monod model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Drug screening model acting on out-membrane protein OprM in pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Rui; Yu, Li-yan; Xiao, Chun-ling; Zuo, Lian; Yao, Tian-jue; Yang, Li-xia

    2004-08-01

    To establish an efflux pump inhibitor screening model with the out-membrane protein OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump system as the target point. Efflux pump out-membrane protein gene oprM was obtained from standard Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 strain. Expression of OprM protein was induced in E. coli strain HS151 with T-easy vector as the cloning vector, and pMMB67EH as the expression vector. In order to evaluate the function of OprM protein, we measured intracellular tetracycline concentrations with liquid scintillation counter, measured the diameters of bacteriostatic circles with paper disc, and then established a screening model accordingly. OprM protein was highly expressed. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the main detecting bacteria, we established a drug screening model acting on OprM. A total of 1 600 microbial fermentation samples were screened with this model, among which 56 positive strains were found, with a positive rate of 3.5%. OprM plays an important role in drug efflux. The established model has good specificity and maneuverability.

  19. Modeling efficiency and water balance in PEM fuel cell systems with liquid fuel processing and hydrogen membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Joshua B.; Bhargav, Atul; Shields, Eric B.; Jackson, Gregory S.; Hearn, Patrick L.

    Integrating PEM fuel cells effectively with liquid hydrocarbon reforming requires careful system analysis to assess trade-offs associated with H 2 production, purification, and overall water balance. To this end, a model of a PEM fuel cell system integrated with an autothermal reformer for liquid hydrocarbon fuels (modeled as C 12H 23) and with H 2 purification in a water-gas-shift/membrane reactor is developed to do iterative calculations for mass, species, and energy balances at a component and system level. The model evaluates system efficiency with parasitic loads (from compressors, pumps, and cooling fans), system water balance, and component operating temperatures/pressures. Model results for a 5-kW fuel cell generator show that with state-of-the-art PEM fuel cell polarization curves, thermal efficiencies >30% can be achieved when power densities are low enough for operating voltages >0.72 V per cell. Efficiency can be increased by operating the reformer at steam-to-carbon ratios as high as constraints related to stable reactor temperatures allow. Decreasing ambient temperature improves system water balance and increases efficiency through parasitic load reduction. The baseline configuration studied herein sustained water balance for ambient temperatures ≤35 °C at full power and ≤44 °C at half power with efficiencies approaching ∼27 and ∼30%, respectively.

  20. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  1. A yeast-based model system for cloning secreted and membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELO J. SURPILI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The targeting of proteins to cell organelles and membranes, or of proteins destined to secretion, is coordinated by signal sequences located at the 5´-end of their respective genes. A signal sequence trap system was envisaged in which a truncated version of the yeast acid phosphatase pho5 gene lacking the start codon and signal sequence could serve as a reporter gene. A fraction enriched in 5´-end fragments obtained by PCR from a potato guard-cell cDNA library was cloned in frame to the acid phosphatase gene and the acid phosphatase activity was assayed directly in yeast colonies grown on selective medium. Putative signal sequences targeting the acid phosphatase to the membrane or to the outside of the cell were used to screen the cDNA bank in order to recover the original full-size sequence which gave rise to the signal sequence. Two unknown sequences displaying marked tissue-specific expression were retrieved, one of them (YE139 with a higher expression level in green buds and stem cells, and the other one (YE290 with a higher expression level in androceum, gyneceum, and roots. The limitations of the system are further analyzed using other sequences as control.O direcionamento de proteínas a organelas e à membrana celular, ou de proteínas a serem secretadas, é coordenado por seqüências sinalizadoras localizadas na extremidade 5´ de seus respectivos genes que codificam peptídeos-sinal. Este trabalho analisa um sistema para seleção de seqüências sinalizadoras utilizando uma fosfatase ácida de levedura, enzima reconhecidamente secretada por estes organismos, desprovida de seu códon de iniciação e de sua seqüência sinalizadora, como gene repórter. Uma fração enriquecida em fragmentos provenientes da região 5´ de uma biblioteca de cDNA de células-guarda de batata foi inserida in frame ao gene truncado da fosfatase ácida em vetores apropriados. Após a transformação em leveduras, a atividade da fosfatase ácida foi

  2. Model-based diagnosis through Structural Analysis and Causal Computation for automotive Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverino, Pierpaolo; Frisk, Erik; Jung, Daniel; Krysander, Mattias; Pianese, Cesare

    2017-07-01

    The present paper proposes an advanced approach for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) systems fault detection and isolation through a model-based diagnostic algorithm. The considered algorithm is developed upon a lumped parameter model simulating a whole PEMFC system oriented towards automotive applications. This model is inspired by other models available in the literature, with further attention to stack thermal dynamics and water management. The developed model is analysed by means of Structural Analysis, to identify the correlations among involved physical variables, defined equations and a set of faults which may occur in the system (related to both auxiliary components malfunctions and stack degradation phenomena). Residual generators are designed by means of Causal Computation analysis and the maximum theoretical fault isolability, achievable with a minimal number of installed sensors, is investigated. The achieved results proved the capability of the algorithm to theoretically detect and isolate almost all faults with the only use of stack voltage and temperature sensors, with significant advantages from an industrial point of view. The effective fault isolability is proved through fault simulations at a specific fault magnitude with an advanced residual evaluation technique, to consider quantitative residual deviations from normal conditions and achieve univocal fault isolation.

  3. Modeling electrically active viscoelastic membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Roy

    Full Text Available The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism.

  4. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy of bacterial photosynthetic systems: A new model for Native Membrane Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahatyrova, S.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to investigate the supramolecular architecture of a photosynthetic membrane from Rhodobacter sphaeroides purple bacteria cells. This is extremely timely, since we now know all of the structures of photosynthetic pigment-protein LH and RC complexes, ATP-synthase and

  6. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pathogenesis of Candida albicans infections in the alternative chorio-allantoic membrane chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse D Jacobsen

    Full Text Available Alternative models of microbial infections are increasingly used to screen virulence determinants of pathogens. In this study, we investigated the pathogenesis of Candida albicans and C. glabrata infections in chicken embryos infected via the chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM and analyzed the virulence of deletion mutants. The developing immune system of the host significantly influenced susceptibility: With increasing age, embryos became more resistant and mounted a more balanced immune response, characterized by lower induction of proinflammatory cytokines and increased transcription of regulatory cytokines, suggesting that immunopathology contributes to pathogenesis. While many aspects of the chicken embryo response resembled murine infections, we also observed significant differences: In contrast to systemic infections in mice, IL-10 had a beneficial effect in chicken embryos. IL-22 and IL-17A were only upregulated after the peak mortality in the chicken embryo model occurred; thus, the role of the Th17 response in this model remains unclear. Abscess formation occurs frequently in murine models, whereas the avian response was dominated by granuloma formation. Pathogenicity of the majority of 15 tested C. albicans deletion strains was comparable to the virulence in mouse models and reduced virulence was associated with significantly lower transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. However, fungal burden did not correlate with virulence and for few mutants like bcr1Δ and tec1Δ different outcomes in survival compared to murine infections were observed. C. albicans strains locked in the yeast stage disseminated significantly more often from the CAM into the embryo, supporting the hypothesis that the yeast morphology is responsible for dissemination in systemic infections. These data suggest that the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections in the chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections but also differs in some aspects. Despite

  8. In vivo areal modulus of elasticity estimation of the human tympanic membrane system: modelling of middle ear mechanical function in normal young and aged ears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaihede, Michael; Liao Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2007-01-01

    The quasi-static elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system can be described by the areal modulus of elasticity determined by a middle ear model. The response of the tympanic membrane to quasi-static pressure changes is determined by its elastic properties. Several clinical problems are related to these, but studies are few and mostly not comparable. The elastic properties of membranes can be described by the areal modulus, and these may also be susceptible to age-related changes reflected by changes in the areal modulus. The areal modulus is determined by the relationship between membrane tension and change of the surface area relative to the undeformed surface area. A middle ear model determined the tension-strain relationship in vivo based on data from experimental pressure-volume deformations of the human tympanic membrane system. The areal modulus was determined in both a younger (n = 10) and an older (n = 10) group of normal subjects. The areal modulus for lateral and medial displacement of the tympanic membrane system was smaller in the older group (mean = 0.686 and 0.828 kN m -1 , respectively) compared to the younger group (mean = 1.066 and 1.206 kN m -1 , respectively), though not significantly (2p = 0.10 and 0.11, respectively). Based on the model the areal modulus was established describing the summated elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system. Future model improvements include exact determination of the tympanic membrane area accounting for its shape via 3D finite element analyses. In vivo estimates of Young's modulus in this study were a factor 2-3 smaller than previously found in vitro. No significant age-related differences were found in the elastic properties as expressed by the areal modulus

  9. Interaction of a biguanide compound with membrane model interface systems: probing the properties of antimalaria and antidiabetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samart, Nuttaporn; Beuning, Cheryle N; Haller, Kenneth J; Rithner, Chris D; Crans, Debbie C

    2014-07-29

    Since membrane penetration is important for drug efficacy, how antimalarial precursor material 1-phenylbiguanide (PBG) interacts with an interface was characterized using a reverse micelle (RM) model system. (1)H NMR studies show that PBG partitions across the membrane interface. Specifically, the (1)H NMR studies showed that the 1-phenylbiguanide compound in an aqueous environment changed when placed near an interface. PBG is known to affect hydrogen bonding in water, and as the size of the RMs changes, the water organization in the water pool is changed. The NOESY spectrum of PBG in AOT RM contains cross-peak signals between the PBG protons and AOT protons, which is consistent with the penetration of the PBG into the interface. At the same time, there is a cross peak between the biguanide moiety and the HOD signal. This shows that these NH protons are near the HOD protons, placing the biguanide functional group in the water pool. Preliminary differential FTIR spectroscopic studies confirmed this location. In summary, we found that PBG interacts with different regions of the interface, with the phenyl group penetrating the hydrophobic interface while the biguanide remains in the water pool.

  10. Xenopus laevis Oocytes as a Model System for Studying the Interaction Between Asbestos Fibres and Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernareggi, Annalisa; Ren, Elisa; Borelli, Violetta; Vita, Francesca; Constanti, Andrew; Zabucchi, Giuliano

    2015-06-01

    The mode of interaction of asbestos fibres with cell membranes is still debatable. One reason is the lack of a suitable and convenient cellular model to investigate the causes of asbestos toxicity. We studied the interaction of asbestos fibres with Xenopus laevis oocytes, using electrophysiological and morphological methods. Oocytes are large single cells, with a limited ability to endocytose molecular ligands; we therefore considered these cells to be a good model for investigating the nature of asbestos/membrane interactions. Electrophysiological recordings were performed to compare the passive electrical membrane properties, and those induced by applying positive or negative voltage steps, in untreated oocytes and those exposed to asbestos fibre suspensions. Ultrastructural analysis visualized in detail, any morphological changes of the surface membrane caused by the fibre treatment. Our results demonstrate that Amosite and Crocidolite-type asbestos fibres significantly modify the properties of the membrane, starting soon after exposure. Cells were routinely depolarized, their input resistance decreased, and the slow outward currents evoked by step depolarizations were dramatically enhanced. Reducing the availability of surface iron contained in the structure of the fibres with cation chelators, abolished these effects. Ultrastructural analysis of the fibre-exposed oocytes showed no evidence of phagocytic events. Our results demonstrate that asbestos fibres modify the oocyte membrane, and we propose that these cells represent a viable model for studying the asbestos/cell membrane interaction. Our findings also open the possibly for finding specific competitors capable of hindering the asbestos-cell membrane interaction as a means of tackling the long-standing asbestos toxicity problem. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Identification of immunogenic outer membrane proteins of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the infant rat model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, E.J.; Frisch, C.F.; McDade, R.L. Jr.; Johnston, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Haemophilus influenzae type b which are immunogenic in infant rats were identified by a radioimmunoprecipitation method. Intact cells of H. influenzae type b were radioiodinated by a lactoperoxidase-catalyzed procedure, and an outer membrane-containing fraction was prepared from these cells. These radioiodinated outer membranes were mixed with sera obtained from rats convalescing from systemic H. influenzae type b disease induced at 6 days of age, and the resultant (antibody-outer membrane protein antigen) complexes were extracted from these membranes by treatment with nonionic detergent and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. These soluble antibody-antigen complexes were isolated by means of adsorption to protein A-bearing staphylococci, and the radioiodinated protein antigens were identified by gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. Infant rats were shown to mount a readily detectable antibody response to several different proteins present in the outer membrane of H. influenzae type b. Individual infant rats were found to vary both qualitatively and quantitatively in their immune response to these immunogenic outer membrane proteins

  12. Identification of immunogenic outer membrane proteins of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the infant rat model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.J.; Frisch, C.F.; McDade, R.L. Jr.; Johnston, K.H.

    1981-06-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Haemophilus influenzae type b which are immunogenic in infant rats were identified by a radioimmunoprecipitation method. Intact cells of H. influenzae type b were radioiodinated by a lactoperoxidase-catalyzed procedure, and an outer membrane-containing fraction was prepared from these cells. These radioiodinated outer membranes were mixed with sera obtained from rats convalescing from systemic H. influenzae type b disease induced at 6 days of age, and the resultant (antibody-outer membrane protein antigen) complexes were extracted from these membranes by treatment with nonionic detergent and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. These soluble antibody-antigen complexes were isolated by means of adsorption to protein A-bearing staphylococci, and the radioiodinated protein antigens were identified by gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. Infant rats were shown to mount a readily detectable antibody response to several different proteins present in the outer membrane of H. influenzae type b. Individual infant rats were found to vary both qualitatively and quantitatively in their immune response to these immunogenic outer membrane proteins.

  13. Critical Review of Membrane Bioreactor Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessens, W.; Maere, T.; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios

    2012-01-01

    modelling. In this paper, the vast literature on hydrodynamic and integrated modelling in MBR is critically reviewed. Hydrodynamic models are used at different scales and focus mainly on fouling and only little on system design/optimisation. Integrated models also focus on fouling although the ones......Membrane bioreactor technology exists for a couple of decades, but has not yet overwhelmed the market due to some serious drawbacks of which operational cost due to fouling is the major contributor. Knowledge buildup and optimisation for such complex systems can heavily benefit from mathematical...

  14. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to

  15. Membrane fusion activity of Semliki forest virus in a liposomal model system : Specific inhibition by Zn2+ ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corver, J; Snippe, H; Kraaijeveld, C; Wilschut, J

    1997-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) has been shown previously to fuse efficiently with cholesterol-and sphingolipid-containing liposomal model membranes in a low-pH-dependent manner. Several steps can be distinguished in this process, including low-pH-induced irreversible binding of the virus to the

  16. Modelling Of Manufacturing Processes With Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciunean, Daniel Cristian; Crăciunean, Vasile

    2015-07-01

    The current objectives to increase the standards of quality and efficiency in manufacturing processes can be achieved only through the best combination of inputs, independent of spatial distance between them. This paper proposes modelling production processes based on membrane structures introduced in [4]. Inspired from biochemistry, membrane computation [4] is based on the concept of membrane represented in its formalism by the mathematical concept of multiset. The manufacturing process is the evolution of a super cell system from its initial state according to the given actions of aggregation. In this paper we consider that the atomic production unit of the process is the action. The actions and the resources on which the actions are produced, are distributed in a virtual network of companies working together. The destination of the output resources is specified by corresponding output events.

  17. A general model for membrane-based separation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Vipasha; Abildskov, Jens; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2009-01-01

    behaviour will play an important role. In this paper, modelling of membrane-based processes for separation of gas and liquid mixtures are considered. Two general models, one for membrane-based liquid separation processes (with phase change) and another for membrane-based gas separation are presented....... The separation processes covered are: membrane-based gas separation processes, pervaporation and various types of membrane distillation processes. The specific model for each type of membrane-based process is generated from the two general models by applying the specific system descriptions and the corresponding......A separation process could be defined as a process that transforms a given mixture of chemicals into two or more compositionally distinct end-use products. One way to design these separation processes is to employ a model-based approach, where mathematical models that reliably predict the process...

  18. A microelectromechanical system artificial basilar membrane based on a piezoelectric cantilever array and its characterization using an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jongmoon; Lee, JangWoo; Woo, Seongyong; Sly, David J.; Campbell, Luke J.; Cho, Jin-Ho; O’Leary, Stephen J.; Park, Min-Hyun; Han, Sungmin; Choi, Ji-Wong; Hun Jang, Jeong; Choi, Hongsoo

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a piezoelectric artificial basilar membrane (ABM) composed of a microelectromechanical system cantilever array. The ABM mimics the tonotopy of the cochlea: frequency selectivity and mechanoelectric transduction. The fabricated ABM exhibits a clear tonotopy in an audible frequency range (2.92–12.6 kHz). Also, an animal model was used to verify the characteristics of the ABM as a front end for potential cochlear implant applications. For this, a signal processor was used to convert the piezoelectric output from the ABM to an electrical stimulus for auditory neurons. The electrical stimulus for auditory neurons was delivered through an implanted intra-cochlear electrode array. The amplitude of the electrical stimulus was modulated in the range of 0.15 to 3.5 V with incoming sound pressure levels (SPL) of 70.1 to 94.8 dB SPL. The electrical stimulus was used to elicit an electrically evoked auditory brainstem response (EABR) from deafened guinea pigs. EABRs were successfully measured and their magnitude increased upon application of acoustic stimuli from 75 to 95 dB SPL. The frequency selectivity of the ABM was estimated by measuring the magnitude of EABRs while applying sound pressure at the resonance and off-resonance frequencies of the corresponding cantilever of the selected channel. In this study, we demonstrated a novel piezoelectric ABM and verified its characteristics by measuring EABRs. PMID:26227924

  19. In vivo areal modulus of elasticity estimation of the human tympanic membrane system: modelling of middle ear mechanical function in normal young and aged ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaihede, Michael Lyhne; Donghua, Liao; Gregersen, H.

    2007-01-01

    The quasi-static elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system can be described by the areal modulus of elasticity determined by a middle ear model. The response of the tympanic membrane to quasi-static pressure changes is determined by its elastic properties. Several clinical problems are r...... finite element analyses. In vivo estimates of Young's modulus in this study were a factor 2-3 smaller than previously found in vitro. No significant age-related differences were found in the elastic properties as expressed by the areal modulus.......The quasi-static elastic properties of the tympanic membrane system can be described by the areal modulus of elasticity determined by a middle ear model. The response of the tympanic membrane to quasi-static pressure changes is determined by its elastic properties. Several clinical problems...... are related to these, but studies are few and mostly not comparable. The elastic properties of membranes can be described by the areal modulus, and these may also be susceptible to age-related changes reflected by changes in the areal modulus. The areal modulus is determined by the relationship between...

  20. Applications of membrane computing in systems and synthetic biology

    CERN Document Server

    Gheorghe, Marian; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Membrane Computing was introduced as a computational paradigm in Natural Computing. The models introduced, called Membrane (or P) Systems, provide a coherent platform to describe and study living cells as computational systems. Membrane Systems have been investigated for their computational aspects and employed to model problems in other fields, like: Computer Science, Linguistics, Biology, Economy, Computer Graphics, Robotics, etc. Their inherent parallelism, heterogeneity and intrinsic versatility allow them to model a broad range of processes and phenomena, being also an efficient means to solve and analyze problems in a novel way. Membrane Computing has been used to model biological systems, becoming with time a thorough modeling paradigm comparable, in its modeling and predicting capabilities, to more established models in this area. This book is the result of the need to collect, in an organic way, different facets of this paradigm. The chapters of this book, together with the web pages accompanying th...

  1. Biofouling of spiral wound membrane systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouwenvelder, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Biofouling of spiral wound membrane systems High quality drinking water can be produced with membrane filtration processes like reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Because the global demand for fresh clean water is increasing, these membrane technologies will increase in importance in the

  2. Membranes and theoretical modeling of membrane distillation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayet, Mohamed

    2011-05-11

    Membrane distillation (MD) is one of the non-isothermal membrane separation processes used in various applications such desalination, environmental/waste cleanup, food, etc. It is known since 1963 and is still being developed at laboratory stage for different purposes and not fully implemented in industry. An abrupt increase in the number of papers on MD membrane engineering (i.e. design, fabrication and testing in MD) is seen since only 6 years ago. The present paper offers a comprehensive MD state-of-the-art review covering a wide range of commercial membranes, MD membrane engineering, their MD performance, transport mechanisms, experimental and theoretical modeling of different MD configurations as well as recent developments in MD. Improved MD membranes with specific morphology, micro- and nano-structures are highly demanded. Membranes with different pore sizes, porosities, thicknesses and materials as well as novel structures are required in order to carry out systematic MD studies for better understanding mass transport in different MD configurations, thereby improving the MD performance and looking for MD industrialization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Liquid immiscibility in model bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah L.

    There is growing evidence that cell plasma membranes are laterally organized into "raft" regions in which particular lipids and proteins are concentrated. These domains have sub-micron dimensions and have been implicated in vital cell functions. Similar liquid domains are observed in model bilayer membrane mixtures that mimick cellular lipid compositions. In model membranes, domains can be large (microns) and can readily form in the absence of proteins. This thesis presents studies of liquid immiscibility in model membrane systems using two experimental methods. By fluorescence microscopy, this thesis documents that miscibility transitions occur in a wide variety of ternary lipid mixtures containing high melting temperature (saturated) lipids, low melting temperature (usually unsaturated) lipids, and cholesterol. I have constructed detailed miscibility phase diagrams for three separate ternary lipid mixtures (DOPC/DPPC/Chol, DOPC/PSM/Chol, and POPC/PSM/Chol). Phase separation is also observed in membranes of lipids extracted from human erythrocytes. NMR experiments probe lipid order and verify the coexistence of a saturated lipid and cholesterol rich liquid ordered (Lo) phase with a more disordered, unsaturated lipid rich liquid crystalline (Lalpha) phase at low temperatures. These experiments also find multiple thermodynamic transitions and lipid organization on different length-scales. This complexity is revealed because fluorescence microscopy and NMR probe lipid order at different length-scales (>1mum vs. ˜100nm). NMR detects small domains (˜80nm) at temperatures just below the miscibility transition, even though micron-scale domains are observed by fluorescent microscopy. NMR does detect large-scale ("100nm) demixing, but at a lower temperature. In addition, it has long been known that >10nm length-scale structure is present in many lipid mixtures containing cholesterol and at least one additional lipid species, though it is shown here that only a subset of

  4. Molecular Modeling of Nafion Permselective Membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey M; Neimark, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    .... We developed molecular models for Nafion and nerve agent simulant DMMP and explored microphase segregation and mechanisms of DMMP sorption and transport in hydrated membranes with K+ counterion...

  5. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Liquid crystal model of membrane flexoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D

    2006-07-01

    An interfacial liquid crystal model is formulated and used to derive a membrane shape equation that takes into account pressure, tension, bending, torsion, and flexoelectric forces. Flexoelectricity introduces electric field-induced curvature and is of relevance to the study and characterization of biological membranes. It is shown that flexoelectricity renormalizes the membrane mechanical tension, shear, and bending effects, and hence it offers diverse pathways to manipulate the membrane's shape. The derived electroelastic shape equation provides systematic guidance on how to use electric fields in membrane studies.

  7. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  8. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  9. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  10. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  11. Model Answers to Lipid Membrane Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, O. G.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since it was discovered that biological membranes have a core of a bimolecular sheet of lipid molecules, lipid bilayers have been a model laboratory for investigating physicochemical and functional properties of biological membranes. Experimental and theoretical models help the experimental ...... to pursue. Here we review some membrane models for lipid self-assembly, monolayers, bilayers, liposomes, and lipid-protein interactions and illustrate how such models can help answering questions in modern lipid cell biology....... scientist to plan experiments and interpret data. Theoretical models are the theoretical scientist's preferred toys to make contact between membrane theory and experiments. Most importantly, models serve to shape our intuition about which membrane questions are the more fundamental and relevant ones...

  12. Development and Validation of a Simple Analytical Model of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (Pemfc) in a Fork-Lift Truck Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a general proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) model has been developed in order to investigate the balance of plant of a fork-lift truck thermodynamically. The model takes into account the effects of pressure losses, water crossovers, humidity aspects, and voltage...... management, system sensitivity to coolant inlet temperature, air and fuel stoichiometry, anode inlet pressure, stack operating conditions, etc. System efficiency and electrical power at different operating conditions are also discussed. The results show that 12–30% of stack power is allocated...

  13. Macroscopic Modeling of Polymer-Electrolyte Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, A.Z.; Newman, J.

    2007-04-01

    In this chapter, the various approaches for the macroscopic modeling of transport phenomena in polymer-electrolyte membranes are discussed. This includes general background and modeling methodologies, as well as exploration of the governing equations and some membrane-related topic of interest.

  14. Spatiotemporal Organization of Spin-Coated Supported Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    All cells of living organisms are separated from their surroundings and organized internally by means of flexible lipid membranes. In fact, there is consensus that the minimal requirements for self-replicating life processes include the following three features: (1) information carriers (DNA, RNA), (2) a metabolic system, and (3) encapsulation in a container structure [1]. Therefore, encapsulation can be regarded as an essential part of life itself. In nature, membranes are highly diverse interfacial structures that compartmentalize cells [2]. While prokaryotic cells only have an outer plasma membrane and a less-well-developed internal membrane structure, eukaryotic cells have a number of internal membranes associated with the organelles and the nucleus. Many of these membrane structures, including the plasma membrane, are complex layered systems, but with the basic structure of a lipid bilayer. Biomembranes contain hundreds of different lipid species in addition to embedded or peripherally associated membrane proteins and connections to scaffolds such as the cytoskeleton. In vitro, lipid bilayers are spontaneously self-organized structures formed by a large group of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous suspensions. Bilayer formation is driven by the entropic properties of the hydrogen bond network in water in combination with the amphiphilic nature of the lipids. The molecular shapes of the lipid constituents play a crucial role in bilayer formation, and only lipids with approximately cylindrical shapes are able to form extended bilayers. The bilayer structure of biomembranes was discovered by Gorter and Grendel in 1925 [3] using monolayer studies of lipid extracts from red blood cells. Later, a number of conceptual models were developed to rationalize the organization of lipids and proteins in biological membranes. One of the most celebrated is the fluid-mosaic model by Singer and Nicolson (1972) [4]. According to this model, the lipid bilayer component of

  15. Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-08-01

    This factsheet describes a project that developed and demonstrated a new hybrid system for industrial wastewater treatment that synergistically combines a forward osmosis system with a membrane distillation technology and is powered by waste heat.

  16. Systems biology of cellular membranes: a convergence with biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabanon, Morgan; Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Rangamani, Padmini

    2017-09-01

    Systems biology and systems medicine have played an important role in the last two decades in shaping our understanding of biological processes. While systems biology is synonymous with network maps and '-omics' approaches, it is not often associated with mechanical processes. Here, we make the case for considering the mechanical and geometrical aspects of biological membranes as a key step in pushing the frontiers of systems biology of cellular membranes forward. We begin by introducing the basic components of cellular membranes, and highlight their dynamical aspects. We then survey the functions of the plasma membrane and the endomembrane system in signaling, and discuss the role and origin of membrane curvature in these diverse cellular processes. We further give an overview of the experimental and modeling approaches to study membrane phenomena. We close with a perspective on the converging futures of systems biology and membrane biophysics, invoking the need to include physical variables such as location and geometry in the study of cellular membranes. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1386. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1386 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dynamic solar-powered multi-stage direct contact membrane distillation system: Concept design, modeling and simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Gil

    2017-04-26

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the monthly average daily and hourly performances of a solar-powered multi-stage direct contact membrane distillation (SMDCMD) system with an energy recovery scheme and dynamic operating system. Mid-latitude meteorological data from Busan, Korea is employed, featuring large climate variation over the course of one year. The number of module stages used by the dynamic operating scheme changes dynamically based on the inlet feed temperature of the successive modules, which results in an improvement of the water production and thermal efficiency. The simulations of the SMDCMD system are carried out to investigate the spatial and temporal variations in the feed and permeate temperatures and permeate flux. The monthly average daily water production increases from 0.37m3/day to 0.4m3/day and thermal efficiency increases from 31% to 45% when comparing systems both without and with dynamic operation in December. The water production with respect to collector area ranged from 350m2 to 550m2 and the seawater storage tank volume ranged from 16m3 to 28.8m3, and the solar fraction at various desired feed temperatures from 50°C to 80°C have been investigated in October and December.

  18. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  19. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  20. Membrane tethering complexes in the endosomal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eSpang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vesicles that are generated by endocytic events at the plasma membrane are destined to early endosomes. A prerequisite for proper fusion is the tethering of two membrane entities. Tethering of vesicles to early endosomes is mediated by the CORVET complex, while fusion of late endosomes with lysosomes depends on the HOPS complex. Recycling through the TGN and to the plasma membrane is facilitated by the GARP and EARP complexes, respectively. However, there are other tethering functions in the endosomal system as there are multiple pathways through which proteins can be delivered from endosomes to either the TGN or the plasma membrane. Furthermore, complexes that may be part of novel tethering complexes have been recently identified. Thus it is likely that more tethering factors exist. In this review, I will provide an overview of different tethering complexes of the endosomal system and discuss how they may provide specificity in membrane traffic.

  1. Interaction of elaiophylin with model bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, J.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Elaiophylin is a new macrodiolide antibiotic, which is produced by the Streptomyces strains [1]. It displays biological activities against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The mode of action of this antibiotic has been attributed to an alteration of the membrane permeability. When this antibiotic is inserted into the bilayer membranes destabilization of the membrane and formation of ion-penetrable channels is observed. The macrodiolide antibiotic forms stable cation selective ion channels in synthetic lipid bilayer membranes. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Elaiophylin with model bilayer membranes and to get information on the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers in presence of this antibiotic. Patch-clamp technique [2] were used in the study

  2. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane.

  3. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane. (paper)

  4. Multi-scale First-Principles Modeling of Three-Phase System of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunello, Giuseppe; Choi, Ji; Harvey, David; Jang, Seung

    2012-07-01

    The three-phase system consisting of Nafion, graphite and platinum in the presence of water is studied using molecule dynamics simulation. The force fields describing the molecular interaction between the components in the system are developed to reproduce the energies calculated from density functional theory modeling. The configuration of such complicated three-phase system is predicted through MD simulations. The nanophase-segregation and transport properties are investigated from the equilibrium state. The coverage of the electrolyte on the platinum surface and the dissolution of oxygen are analyzed.

  5. Modeling of a Membrane-Based Absorption Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, J.; Pellegrino, J.; Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.; Burch, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a membrane heat pump is proposed and analyzed. Fundamentally, the proposed heat pump consists of an aqueous CaCl{sub 2} solution flow separated from a water flow by a vapor-permeable membrane. The low activity of the solution results in a net flux of water vapor across the membrane, which heats the solution stream and cools the water stream. This mechanism upgrades water-side low-temperature heat to solution-side high-temperature heat, creating a 'temperature lift.' The modeling results show that using two membranes and an air gap instead of a single membrane increases the temperature lift by 185%. The model predicts temperature lifts for the air-gap design of 24, 16, and 6 C for inlet temperatures of 55, 35, and 15 C, respectively. Membranes with lower thermal conductivities and higher porosities improve the performance of single-membrane designs while thinner membranes improve the performance of air-gap designs. This device can be used with a solar heating system which already uses concentrated salt solutions for liquid-desiccant cooling.

  6. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baul, Upayan, E-mail: upayanb@imsc.res.in; Vemparala, Satyavani, E-mail: vani@imsc.res.in [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C.I.T. Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India); Kuroda, Kenichi, E-mail: kkuroda@umich.edu [Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  7. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  8. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Enachescu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences.

  9. Nanotechnology convergence and modeling paradigm of sustainable energy system using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell as a benchmark example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Pil Seung; So, Dae Sup; Biegler, Lorenz T.; Jhon, Myung S., E-mail: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Developments in nanotechnology have led to innovative progress and converging technologies in engineering and science. These demand novel methodologies that enable efficient communications from the nanoscale all the way to decision-making criteria for actual production systems. In this paper, we discuss the convergence of nanotechnology and novel multi-scale modeling paradigms by using the fuel cell system as a benchmark example. This approach includes complex multi-phenomena at different time and length scales along with the introduction of an optimization framework for application-driven nanotechnology research trends. The modeling paradigm introduced here covers the novel holistic integration from atomistic/molecular phenomena to meso/continuum scales. System optimization is also discussed with respect to the reduced order parameters for a coarse-graining procedure in multi-scale model integration as well as system design. The development of a hierarchical multi-scale paradigm consolidates the theoretical analysis and enables large-scale decision-making of process level design, based on first-principles, and therefore promotes the convergence of nanotechnology to sustainable energy technologies.

  10. Nanotechnology convergence and modeling paradigm of sustainable energy system using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell as a benchmark example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pil Seung; So, Dae Sup; Biegler, Lorenz T.; Jhon, Myung S.

    2012-08-01

    Developments in nanotechnology have led to innovative progress and converging technologies in engineering and science. These demand novel methodologies that enable efficient communications from the nanoscale all the way to decision-making criteria for actual production systems. In this paper, we discuss the convergence of nanotechnology and novel multi-scale modeling paradigms by using the fuel cell system as a benchmark example. This approach includes complex multi-phenomena at different time and length scales along with the introduction of an optimization framework for application-driven nanotechnology research trends. The modeling paradigm introduced here covers the novel holistic integration from atomistic/molecular phenomena to meso/continuum scales. System optimization is also discussed with respect to the reduced order parameters for a coarse-graining procedure in multi-scale model integration as well as system design. The development of a hierarchical multi-scale paradigm consolidates the theoretical analysis and enables large-scale decision-making of process level design, based on first-principles, and therefore promotes the convergence of nanotechnology to sustainable energy technologies.

  11. Nanotechnology convergence and modeling paradigm of sustainable energy system using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell as a benchmark example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Pil Seung; So, Dae Sup; Biegler, Lorenz T.; Jhon, Myung S.

    2012-01-01

    Developments in nanotechnology have led to innovative progress and converging technologies in engineering and science. These demand novel methodologies that enable efficient communications from the nanoscale all the way to decision-making criteria for actual production systems. In this paper, we discuss the convergence of nanotechnology and novel multi-scale modeling paradigms by using the fuel cell system as a benchmark example. This approach includes complex multi-phenomena at different time and length scales along with the introduction of an optimization framework for application-driven nanotechnology research trends. The modeling paradigm introduced here covers the novel holistic integration from atomistic/molecular phenomena to meso/continuum scales. System optimization is also discussed with respect to the reduced order parameters for a coarse-graining procedure in multi-scale model integration as well as system design. The development of a hierarchical multi-scale paradigm consolidates the theoretical analysis and enables large-scale decision-making of process level design, based on first-principles, and therefore promotes the convergence of nanotechnology to sustainable energy technologies.

  12. Development of solid supports for electrochemical study of biomimetic membrane systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mech-Dorosz, Agnieszka

    Biomimetic membranes are model membrane systems used as an experimental tool to study fundamental cellular membrane physics and functionality of reconstituted membrane proteins. By exploiting the properties of biomimetic membranes resembling the functions of biological membranes, it is possible...... to construct biosensors for high-throughput screening of potential drug candidates. Among a variety of membrane model systems used for biomimetic approach, lipid bilayers in the form of black lipid membranes (BLMs) and lipo-polymersomes (vesicle structures composed of lipids and polymers), both...... with reconstituted membrane spanning proteins, are attractive tools. However, BLMs suffer from intrinsic fragility, therefore, requiring techniques to increase their robustness and stability. This PhD thesis presents strategies to construct solid supports for electrochemical studies of two biomimetic membrane...

  13. Model-based automatic tuning of a filtration control system for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR)

    OpenAIRE

    Robles Martínez, Ángel; Ruano García, María Victoria; Ribes Bertomeu, José; SECO TORRECILLAS, AURORA; FERRER, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a model-based method to optimise filtration in submerged AnMBRs. The method is applied to an advanced knowledge-based control system and considers three statistical methods: (1) sensitivity analysis (Morris screening method) to identify an input subset for the advanced controller; (2) Monte Carlo method (trajectory-based random sampling) to find suitable initial values for the control inputs; and (3) optimisation algorithm (performing as a supervisory controller) to re-ca...

  14. Rapid cooling of the amniotic membrane as a model system for the vitrification of posterior corneal lamellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabcova, Ivana; Jirsova, Katerina; Bednar, Jan

    2014-03-01

    To vitrify human amniotic membrane specimens so that the maximum of epithelial cells survives in order to develop a procedure for the eventual vitrification of posterior corneal lamellae without using cryoprotective agents. To assess different methods of tissue sample preparation preceding vitrification. In group 1, the amniotic membrane specimens were stretched on nitrocellulose support. In group 2, mechanical pressure was used to remove the excess culture medium between the support and the membrane. The samples were frozen in liquid ethane (-183 °C) and stored in liquid nitrogen. The specimens in the control group were not vitrified. Re-warming was performed at 40 °C. The epithelial cell survival rate was assessed after 1, 3 and 7 days of storage following re-warming using calcein and ethidium homodimer-1 fluorescence. A wide range of values was observed among the different groups and among individual specimens within the groups. Resulting average survival rate was 41 % for group 1 and 53 % for group 2; in several samples the cell survival rate exceeded 70 %. The storage period did not significantly affect the survival rates. The results of the rapid cooling of amniotic membranes in liquid ethane indicate that significant percentage of epithelial cells remain viable after the re-warming.

  15. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  16. Simulation Model of Membrane Gas Separator Using Aspen Custom Modeler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong-keun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Gahui; Yun, Jinwon; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Membranes are used to separate pure gas from gas mixtures. In this study, three different types of mass transport through a membrane were developed in order to investigate the gas separation capabilities of a membrane. The three different models typically used are a lumped model, a multi-cell model, and a discretization model. Despite the multi-cell model producing similar results to a discretization model, the discretization model was selected for this investigation, due to the cell number dependence of a multi-cell model. The mass transport model was then used to investigate the effects of pressure difference, flow rate, total exposed area, and permeability. The results showed that the pressure difference increased with the stage cut, but the selectivity was a trade-off for the increasing pressure difference. Additionally, even though permeability is an important parameter, the selectivity and stage cut of the membrane converged as permeability increased.

  17. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  18. Fundamentals of membrane bioreactors materials, systems and membrane fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical, carefully researched, up-to-date summary of membranes for membrane bioreactors. It presents a comprehensive and self-contained outline of the fundamentals of membrane bioreactors, especially their relevance as an advanced water treatment technology. This outline helps to bring the technology to the readers’ attention, and positions the critical topic of membrane fouling as one of the key impediments to its more widescale adoption. The target readership includes researchers and industrial practitioners with an interest in membrane bioreactors.

  19. Modeling the Cell Muscle Membrane from Normal and Desmin- or Dystrophin-null Mice as an Elastic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Santamaría-Holek, Ivan; Bloch, Robert J.; Ortega, Alicia; González-Serratos, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    Two of the most important proteins linking the contractile apparatus and costameres at the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers are dystrophin and desmin. We have developed an elastic model of the proteins that link the sarcolemma to the myofibrils. This is a distributed model, with an elastic constant, k, that includes the main protein components of the costameres. The distributed spring model is composed of parallel units attached in series. To test the model, we performed experiments in which we applied negative pressure, generated by an elastimeter, to a small area of the sarcolemma from single myofiber. The negative pressure formed a bleb of variable height, dependent on the pressure applied. We normalized our measurements of k in dystrophin-null (mdx) and desmin-null (des-/-) mice to the value we obtained for wild type (WT) mice, which was set at 1.0. The relative experimental value for the stiffness of myofibers from mice lacking dystrophin or desmin was 0.5 and 0.7, respectively. The theoretical k values of the individual elements were obtained using neural networks (NN), in which the input was the k value for each parallel spring component and the output was the solution of each resulting parallel system. We compare the experimental values of k in control and mutant muscles to the theoretical values obtained by NN for each protein. Computed theoretical values were 0.4 and 0.8 for dystrophin- and desmin-null muscles, respectively, and 0.9 for WT, in reasonable agreement with our experimental results. This suggests that, although it is a simplified spring model solved by NN, it provides a good approximation of the distribution of spring elements and the elastic constants of the proteins that form the costameres. Our results show that dystrophin is the protein that contributes more than any other to the strength of the connections between the sarcolemma and the contractile apparatus, the costameres.

  20. 46 CFR 154.427 - Membrane tank system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Membrane tank system design. 154.427 Section 154.427... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Membrane Tanks § 154.427 Membrane tank system design. A membrane tank system must be designed for: (a) Any...

  1. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  2. Membrane Modeling, Simulation and Optimization for Propylene/Propane Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Alshehri, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Energy efficiency is critical for sustainable industrial growth and the reduction of environmental impacts. Energy consumption by the industrial sector accounts for more than half of the total global energy usage and, therefore, greater attention is focused on enhancing this sector’s energy efficiency. It is predicted that by 2020, more than 20% of today’s energy consumption can be avoided in countries that have effectively implemented an action plan towards efficient energy utilization. Breakthroughs in material synthesis of high selective membranes have enabled the technology to be more energy efficient. Hence, high selective membranes are increasingly replacing conventional energy intensive separation processes, such as distillation and adsorption units. Moreover, the technology offers more special features (which are essential for special applications) and its small footprint makes membrane technology suitable for platform operations (e.g., nitrogen enrichment for oil and gas offshore sites). In addition, its low maintenance characteristics allow the technology to be applied to remote operations. For these reasons, amongst other, the membrane technology market is forecast to reach $16 billion by 2017. This thesis is concerned with the engineering aspects of membrane technology and covers modeling, simulation and optimization of membranes as a stand-alone process or as a unit operation within a hybrid system. Incorporating the membrane model into a process modeling software simplifies the simulation and optimization of the different membrane processes and hybrid configurations, since all other unit operations are pre-configured. Various parametric analyses demonstrated that only the membrane selectivity and transmembrane pressure ratio parameters define a membrane’s ability to accomplish a certain separation task. Moreover, it was found that both membrane selectivity and pressure ratio exhibit a minimum value that is only defined by the feed composition

  3. Modeling CO2-facilitated transport across a diethanolamine liquid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihong Bao; Michael C. Trachtenberg [Carbozyme Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We compared experimental and model data for the facilitated transport of CO2 from a CO2-air mixture across an aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) via a hollow fiber, contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) permeator. A two-step carbamate formation model was devised to analyze the data instead of the one-step mechanism used by previous investigators. The effects of DEA concentration, liquid membrane thickness and feed CO2 concentration were also studied. With a 20% (wt) DEA liquid membrane and feed of 15% CO2 in CO2-air mixture at atmosphere pressure, the permeance reached 1.51E-8 mol/m{sup 2} s Pa with a CO2/N2 selectivity of 115. Model predictions compared well with the experimental results at CO2 concentrations of industrial importance. Short-term stability of the HFCLM permeator performance was examined. The system was stable during 5-days of testing.

  4. Analysis of hollow fibre membrane systems for multicomponent gas separation

    KAUST Repository

    Khalilpour, Rajab

    2013-02-01

    This paper analysed the performance of a membrane system over key design/operation parameters. A computation methodology is developed to solve the model of hollow fibre membrane systems for multicomponent gas feeds. The model represented by a nonlinear differential algebraic equation system is solved via a combination of backward differentiation and Gauss-Seidel methods. Natural gas sweetening problem is investigated as a case study. Model parametric analyses of variables, namely feed gas quality, pressure, area, selectivity and permeance, resulted in better understanding of operating and design optima. Particularly, high selectivities and/or permeabilities are shown not to be necessary targets for optimal operation. Rather, a medium selectivity (<60 in the given example) combined with medium permeance (∼300-500×10-10mol/sm2Pa in the given case study) is more advantageous. This model-based membrane systems engineering approach is proposed for the synthesis of efficient and cost-effective multi-stage membrane networks. © 2012 The Institution of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Membrane fouling mechanism of biofilm-membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR): Pore blocking model and membrane cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Wenxiang; Tang, Bing; Ding, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zhien

    2018-02-01

    Biofilm membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR) is considered as an important wastewater treatment technology that incorporates advantages of both biofilm and MBR process, as well as can alleviate membrane fouling, with respect to the conventional activated sludge MBR. But, to be efficient, it necessitates the establishment of proper methods for the assessment of membrane fouling. Four Hermia membrane blocking models were adopted to quantify and evaluate the membrane fouling of BF-MBR. The experiments were conducted with various operational conditions, including membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure (TMP). Good agreement between cake formation model and experimental data was found, confirming the validity of the Hermia models for assessing the membrane fouling of BF-MBR and that cake layer deposits on membrane. Moreover, the influences of membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure on the Hermia pore blocking coefficient of cake layer were investigated. In addition, the permeability recovery after membrane cleaning at various operational conditions was studied. This work confirms that, unlike conventional activated sludge MBR, BF-MBR possesses a low degree of membrane fouling and a higher membrane permeability recovery after cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical model for membrane protrusions during spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamaraux, F; Ali, O; Fourcade, B; Keller, S; Bruckert, F

    2008-01-01

    During cell spreading onto a substrate, the kinetics of the contact area is an observable quantity. This paper is concerned with a physical approach to modeling this process in the case of ameboid motility where the membrane detaches itself from the underlying cytoskeleton at the leading edge. The physical model we propose is based on previous reports which highlight that membrane tension regulates cell spreading. Using a phenomenological feedback loop to mimic stress-dependent biochemistry, we show that the actin polymerization rate can be coupled to the stress which builds up at the margin of the contact area between the cell and the substrate. In the limit of small variation of membrane tension, we show that the actin polymerization rate can be written in a closed form. Our analysis defines characteristic lengths which depend on elastic properties of the membrane–cytoskeleton complex, such as the membrane–cytoskeleton interaction, and on molecular parameters, the rate of actin polymerization. We discuss our model in the case of axi-symmetric and non-axi-symmetric spreading and we compute the characteristic time scales as a function of fundamental elastic constants such as the strength of membrane–cytoskeleton adherence

  7. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of flow and concentration polarization in forward osmosis membrane systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, M.F.; Johnson, C.J.; Tang, C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Forward osmosis is an osmotically driven membrane separation process that relies on the utilization of a large osmotic pressure differential generated across a semi-permeable membrane. In recent years forward osmosis has shown great promise in the areas of wastewater treatment, seawater...... the understanding of membrane systems, models that can accurately encapsulate all significant physical processes occurring in the systems are required. The present study demonstrates a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model capable of simulating forward osmosis systems with asymmetric membranes. The model...

  8. Computer-aided modeling framework – a generic modeling template for catalytic membrane fixed bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on development of computer-aided modeling framework. The framework is a knowledge-based system that is built on a generic modeling language and structured based on workflows for different general modeling tasks. The overall objective of this work is to support the model develope...... membrane fixed bed models is developed. The application of the modeling template is highlighted with a case study related to the modeling of a catalytic membrane reactor coupling dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with hydrogenation of nitrobenzene....

  9. The Coupling Study for Solar Heating System and Membrane Distillation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Suying; Zhang, Tao; Professor, Rui Tian; WeiZhang, Wei

    In this paper, it was simplified that the heating system of thermal mass in solar membrane distillation and it was established that the physical model of heat transfer installed the guide plate in the all-glass thermal solar membrane distillation system. The model included the all-glass solar heat collector system and the hot chamber of membrane distillation system. In this paper, it was constructed that the coupling integration points between the two parts and reached setting methods for coupled boundary conditions and unsteady-state flow. It was established that an unsteady three-dimensional CFD model for solar membrane distillation system and drawn solution and ideas and reached the variation law of fluid temperature and flow rate in outlet of fluid connection changes in solar collector system. It was calculated that the coupling model of hot chamber in membrane distillation and obtained the variation law between non-steady-state flux and solar radiation intensity and laid the foundation for coupling utilization of solar energy with membrane distillation.

  10. Mathematical model of a PEMFC using a PBI membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheddie, Denver; Munroe, Norman

    2006-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) operating with Nafion[reg] membranes have encountered numerous problems associated with water management and CO poisoning because of their low temperature of operation. Alternative high temperature membranes have been investigated, one such membrane being polybenzimidazole (PBI). This paper presents a one dimensional mathematical model, which predicts the polarization performance of a PEMFC using a PBI membrane. Peak power densities in the same order as Nafion[reg] are predicted. Results indicate that the greatest scope for improving PBI PEMFC performance is increasing the membrane conductivity and improving the catalyst performance as it interfaces with the PBI membrane

  11. Modelling membrane hydration and water balance of a pem fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    propose a novel mathematical zero-dimensional model for water mass balance of a polymer electrolyte membrane. Physical and electrochemical processes occurring in the membrane electrolyte are included; water adsorption/desorption phenomena are also considered. The effect of diffusivity, surface roughness...... of water transport when membrane absorption/desorption is considered in the model. The model becomes useful when studying fuel cell systems in dynamic conditions....

  12. Efficient preparation and analysis of membrane and membrane protein systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Martinez-Seara, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1858, č. 10 (2016), s. 2468-2482 ISSN 0005-2736 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : tools and software * membrane building * protein insertion * molecular dynamics * lipid bilayer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of large integral membrane proteins with an implicit membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Feig, Michael

    2006-01-12

    The heterogeneous dielectric generalized Born (HDGB) methodology is an the extension of the GBMV model for the simulation of integral membrane proteins with an implicit membrane environment. Three large integral membrane proteins, the bacteriorhodopsin monomer and trimer and the BtuCD protein, were simulated with the HDGB model in order to evaluate how well thermodynamic and dynamic properties are reproduced. Effects of the truncation of electrostatic interactions were examined. For all proteins, the HDGB model was able to generate stable trajectories that remained close to the starting experimental structures, in excellent agreement with explicit membrane simulations. Dynamic properties evaluated through a comparison of B-factors are also in good agreement with experiment and explicit membrane simulations. However, overall flexibility was slightly underestimated with the HDGB model unless a very large electrostatic cutoff is employed. Results with the HDGB model are further compared with equivalent simulations in implicit aqueous solvent, demonstrating that the membrane environment leads to more realistic simulations.

  14. MFI-molecular sieve membranes:synthesis, characterization and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Jareman, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    This work concerns evaluation by permeation measurements and modeling of thin (<2µm) MFI molecular sieve membranes and, to a smaller extent, synthesis of such materials. The membranes have been synthesized on graded a-alumina microfiltration filters using The seed film method. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used for characterization in addition to permeation measurements. Mathematical models describing membrane flux for real membranes and defect distributions were ...

  15. Interaction of Cytotoxic and Cytoprotective Bile Acids with Model Membranes: Influence of the Membrane Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, M; Ferreira, M J; Kozica, A; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves da Silva, A; Saramago, B

    2015-08-18

    To understand the role of bile acids (BAs) in cell function, many authors have investigated their effect on biomembrane models which are less complex systems, but there are still many open questions. The present study aims to contribute for the deepening of the knowledge of the interaction between BAs and model membranes, in particular, focusing on the effect of BA mixtures. The cytotoxic deoxycholic acid (DCA), the cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and the equimolar mixture (DCA + UDCA) were investigated. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol)) traditionally associated with the formation of lipid rafts and an equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The obtained results showed that DCA causes the fluidization of monolayers and bilayers, leading to the eventual rupture of POPC/SM liposomes at high concentration. UDCA may provide a stabilization of POPC/SM membranes but has a negligible effect on the Chol-containing liposomes. In the case of equimolar mixture DCA/UDCA, the interactions depend not only on the lipid composition but also on the design of the experiment. The BA mixture has a greater impact on the monolayers than do pure BAs, suggesting a cooperative DCA-UDCA interaction that enhances the penetration of UDCA in both POPC/SM and POPC/SM/Chol monolayers. For the bilayers, the presence of UDCA in the mixture decreases the disturbing effect of DCA.

  16. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become more attractive and feasible, due to advantages provided by the combination with regard to developments for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. The major drawbacks of MBR technology are related w...

  17. Key factors regulating the mass delivery of macromolecules to model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Richard A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Jagalski, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for sl...... of the aggregates to activate endocytosis pathways on specific cell types is discussed in the context of targeted drug delivery applications.......We show that both gravity and electrostatics are key factors regulating interactions between model cell membranes and self-assembled liquid crystalline aggregates of dendrimers and phospholipids. The system is a proxy for the trafficking of reservoirs of therapeutic drugs to cell membranes for slow...

  18. Liposome Model Systems to Study the Endosomal Escape of Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Transport across Phospholipid Membranes Induced by a Proton Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Madani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detergent-mediated reconstitution of bacteriorhodopsin (BR into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated, and the effects were carefully characterized for every step of the procedure. LUVs were prepared by the extrusion method, and their size and stability were examined by dynamic light scattering. BR was incorporated into the LUVs using the detergent-mediated reconstitution method and octyl glucoside (OG as detergent. The result of measuring pH outside the LUVs suggested that in the presence of light, BR pumps protons from the outside to the inside of the LUVs, creating acidic pH inside the vesicles. LUVs with 20% negatively charged headgroups were used to model endosomes with BR incorporated into the membrane. The fluorescein-labeled cell-penetrating peptide penetratin was entrapped inside these BR-containing LUVs. The light-induced proton pumping activity of BR has allowed us to observe the translocation of fluorescein-labeled penetratin across the vesicle membrane.

  19. Zeolite Membranes: Ozone Detemplation, Modeling, and Performance Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, J.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane technology plays an increasingly important role in developing a more sustainable process industry. Zeolites are a novel class of membrane materials with unique properties enabling molecular sieving and affinity based separations. This thesis proposes some new concepts in zeolite membrane synthesis, application, and modeling. The influence of zeolite polarity is assessed and the use of a hydrophobic zeolite membrane for water separation is explored. Ozonication, a novel method for zeo...

  20. Automatic design of deterministic and non-halting membrane systems by tuning syntactical ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gexiang; Rong, Haina; Ou, Zhu; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Gheorghe, Marian

    2014-09-01

    To solve the programmability issue of membrane computing models, the automatic design of membrane systems is a newly initiated and promising research direction. In this paper, we propose an automatic design method, Permutation Penalty Genetic Algorithm (PPGA), for a deterministic and non-halting membrane system by tuning membrane structures, initial objects and evolution rules. The main ideas of PPGA are the introduction of the permutation encoding technique for a membrane system, a penalty function evaluation approach for a candidate membrane system and a genetic algorithm for evolving a population of membrane systems toward a successful one fulfilling a given computational task. Experimental results show that PPGA can successfully accomplish the automatic design of a cell-like membrane system for computing the square of n ( n ≥ 1 is a natural number) and can find the minimal membrane systems with respect to their membrane structures, alphabet, initial objects, and evolution rules for fulfilling the given task. We also provide the guidelines on how to set the parameters of PPGA.

  1. Outer membrane phospholipase A in phospholipid bilayers: a model system for concerted computational and experimental investigations of amino acid side chain partitioning into lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Patrick J; Freites, J Alfredo; Moon, C Preston; Tobias, Douglas J; Fleming, Karen G

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the forces that stabilize membrane proteins in their native states is one of the contemporary challenges of biophysics. To date, estimates of side chain partitioning free energies from water to the lipid environment show disparate values between experimental and computational measures. Resolving the disparities is particularly important for understanding the energetic contributions of polar and charged side chains to membrane protein function because of the roles these residue types play in many cellular functions. In general, computational free energy estimates of charged side chain partitioning into bilayers are much larger than experimental measurements. However, the lack of a protein-based experimental system that uses bilayers against which to vet these computational predictions has traditionally been a significant drawback. Moon & Fleming recently published a novel hydrophobicity scale that was derived experimentally by using a host-guest strategy to measure the side chain energetic perturbation due to mutation in the context of a native membrane protein inserted into a phospholipid bilayer. These values are still approximately an order of magnitude smaller than computational estimates derived from molecular dynamics calculations from several independent groups. Here we address this discrepancy by showing that the free energy differences between experiment and computation become much smaller if the appropriate comparisons are drawn, which suggests that the two fields may in fact be converging. In addition, we present an initial computational characterization of the Moon & Fleming experimental system used for the hydrophobicity scale: OmpLA in DLPC bilayers. The hydrophobicity scale used OmpLA position 210 as the guest site, and our preliminary results demonstrate that this position is buried in the center of the DLPC membrane, validating its usage in the experimental studies. We further showed that the introduction of charged Arg at position 210

  2. Biofouling Control in Spiral-Wound Membrane Systems: Impact of Feed Spacer Modification and Biocides

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqui, Amber

    2016-12-01

    High-quality drinking water can be produced with membrane-based filtration processes like reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. One of the major problems in these membrane systems is biofouling that reduces the membrane performance, increasing operational costs. Current biofouling control strategies such as pre-treatment, membrane modification, and chemical cleaning are not sufficient in all cases. Feed spacers are thin (0.8 mm), complex geometry meshes that separate membranes in a module. The main objective of this research was to evaluate whether feed spacer modification is a suitable strategy to control biofouling. Membrane fouling simulator studies with six feed spacers showed differences in biofouled spacer performance, concluding that (i) spacer geometry influences biofouling impact and (ii) biofouling studies are essential for evaluation of spacer biofouling impact. Computed tomography (CT) was found as a suitable technique to obtain three-dimensional (3D) measurements of spacers, enabling more representative mathematical modeling of hydraulic behavior of spacers in membrane systems. A strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of spacers by numerical modeling, 3D printing of spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator studies was developed. The combination of modeling and experimental testing of 3D printed spacers is a promising strategy to develop advanced spacers aiming to reduce the impact of biofilm formation on membrane performance and to improve the cleanability of spiral-wound membrane systems.

  3. The chloroplast thylakoid membrane system is a molecular conveyor belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, C

    1988-10-01

    Light drives photosynthesis, but paradoxically light is also the most variable environmental factor influencing photosynthesis both qualitatively and quantitatively. The photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is adaptable in the extreme, as exemplified by its capacity for acclimation to very bright sunny or deeply shaded conditions. It can also respond to rapid changes in light such as sunflecks. In this paper I offer a model that i) explains the thylakoid membrane organisation into grana stacks and stroma lamellae, ii) proposes a role for rapid D1 protein turnover and LHCII phosphorylation, and iii) suggests a mechanism for photoinhibition. I argue that the photosynthetic membrane system is dynamic in three dimensions, so much so that, in the light, it is in constant motion and operates in a manner somewhat analogous to a conveyor belt. D1 protein degradation is proposed to be the motor that drives this system. Photoinhibition is suggested to be due to the arrest of D1 protein turnover.

  4. [Investigation of the methods of extension of useful life of nanofiltration membranes in washing water regenerating system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilina, I V; Krivobok, S M; Maksimov, E D

    2000-01-01

    Transport and selective characteristics of Russian nanofiltration membranes OPMN-K were investigated in order to find approaches to extend useful life of the membranes and, therefore, of the nanofiltration assembly and the washing water regenerating system at large. Hygienic cleansing agents as washing water ingredients pollute but not irreversibly impair the membranes. Flushing of membranes after regeneration of various model detergents was shown to recover the membrane permeability virtually up to original level.

  5. Continuous Membrane-Based Screening System for Biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Kraume

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of membrane reactors for enzymatic and co-factor regenerating reactions offers versatile advantages such as higher conversion rates and space-time-yields and is therefore often applied in industry. However, currently available screening and kinetics characterization systems are based on batch and fed-batch operated reactors and were developed for whole cell biotransformations rather than for enzymatic catalysis. Therefore, the data obtained from such systems has only limited transferability for continuous membrane reactors. The aim of this study is to evaluate and to improve a novel screening and characterization system based on the membrane reactor concept using the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose as a model reaction. Important aspects for the applicability of the developed system such as long-term stability and reproducibility of continuous experiments were very high. The concept used for flow control and fouling suppression allowed control of the residence time with a high degree of precision (±1% accuracy in a long-term study (>100 h.

  6. Validation of kinetic modeling of progesterone release from polymeric membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia Irma Romero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling in drug release systems is fundamental in development and optimization of these systems, since it allows to predict drug release rates and to elucidate the physical transport mechanisms involved. In this paper we validate a novel mathematical model that describes progesterone (Prg controlled release from poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB membranes. A statistical analysis was conducted to compare the fitting of our model with six different models and the Akaike information criterion (AIC was used to find the equation with best-fit. A simple relation between mass and drug released rate was found, which allows predicting the effect of Prg loads on the release behavior. Our proposed model was the one with minimum AIC value, and therefore it was the one that statistically fitted better the experimental data obtained for all the Prg loads tested. Furthermore, the initial release rate was calculated and therefore, the interface mass transfer coefficient estimated and the equilibrium distribution constant of Prg between the PHB and the release medium was also determined. The results lead us to conclude that our proposed model is the one which best fits the experimental data and can be successfully used to describe Prg drug release in PHB membranes.

  7. Simulations of simple linoleic acid-containing lipid membranes and models for the soybean plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaohong; Ou, Anna; Klauda, Jeffery B.

    2017-06-01

    The all-atom CHARMM36 lipid force field (C36FF) has been tested with saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated lipids; however, it has not been validated against the 18:2 linoleoyl lipids with an unsaturated sn-1 chain. The linoleoyl lipids are common in plants and the main component of the soybean membrane. The lipid composition of soybean plasma membranes has been thoroughly characterized with experimental studies. However, there is comparatively less work done with computational modeling. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results show that the pure linoleoyl lipids, 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0/18:2) and 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (di-18:2), agree very well with the experiments, which demonstrates the accuracy of the C36FF for the computational study of soybean membranes. Based on the experimental composition, the soybean hypocotyl and root plasma membrane models are developed with each containing seven or eight types of linoleoyl phospholipids and two types of sterols (sitosterol and stigmasterol). MD simulations are performed to characterize soybean membranes, and the hydrogen bonds and clustering results demonstrate that the lipids prefer to interact with the lipids of the same/similar tail unsaturation. All the results suggest that these two soybean membrane models can be used as a basis for further research in soybean and higher plant membranes involving membrane-associated proteins.

  8. High anisotropy of flow-aligned bicellar membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kogan, Maxim

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, multi-lipid bicellar systems have emerged as promising membrane models. The fast orientational diffusion and magnetic alignability made these systems very attractive for NMR investigations. However, their alignment was so far achieved with a strong magnetic field, which limited their use with other methods that require macroscopic orientation. Recently, it was shown that bicelles could be aligned also by shear flow in a Couette flow cell, making it applicable to structural and biophysical studies by polarized light spectroscopy. Considering the sensitivity of this lipid system to small variations in composition and physicochemical parameters, efficient use of such a flow-cell method with coupled techniques will critically depend on the detailed understanding of how the lipid systems behave under flow conditions. In the present study we have characterized the flow alignment behavior of the commonly used dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/dicaproyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC/DHPC) bicelle system, for various temperatures, lipid compositions, and lipid concentrations. We conclude that at optimal flow conditions the selected bicellar systems can produce the most efficient flow alignment out of any lipid systems used so far. The highest degree of orientation of DMPC/DHPC samples is noticed in a narrow temperature interval, at a practical temperature around 25 C, most likely in the phase transition region characterized by maximum sample viscosity. The change of macroscopic orientation factor as function of the above conditions is now described in detail. The increase in macroscopic alignment observed for bicelles will most likely allow recording of higher resolution spectra on membrane systems, which provide deeper structural insight and analysis into properties of biomolecules interacting with solution phase lipid membranes. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Polyether sulfone membrane modeling and construction for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyether sulfone membrane modeling and construction for the removal of nitrate from water using ion interference sulfate and iron nano-particle. ... The aim of this study was constructed the polyether sulfone membrane and modelling it, and for checking impact pressure, the amount of iron nanoparticles and sulfate iron ...

  10. Models of dynamic extraction of lipid tethers from cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Sarah A; Chou, Tom

    2010-01-01

    When a ligand that is bound to an integral membrane receptor is pulled, the membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton can deform before either the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton or the ligand detaches from the receptor. If the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton, it may be further extruded and form a membrane tether. We develop a phenomenological model for this process by assuming that deformations obey Hooke's law up to a critical force at which the cell membrane locally detaches from the cytoskeleton and a membrane tether forms. We compute the probability of tether formation and show that tethers can be extruded only within an intermediate range of force loading rates and pulling velocities. The mean tether length that arises at the moment of ligand detachment is computed as are the force loading rates and pulling velocities that yield the longest tethers

  11. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness.

  12. Attainability and minimum energy of multiple-stage cascade membrane Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alshehri, Ali

    2015-08-12

    Process design and simulation of multi-stage membrane systems have been widely studied in many gas separation systems. However, general guidelines have not been developed yet for the attainability and the minimum energy consumption of a multi-stage membrane system. Such information is important for conceptual process design and thus it is the topic of this work. Using a well-mixed membrane model, it was determined that the attainability curve of multi-stage systems is defined by the pressure ratio and membrane selectivity. Using the constant recycle ratio scheme, the recycle ratio can shift the attainability behavior between single-stage and multi-stage membrane systems. When the recycle ratio is zero, all of the multi-stage membrane processes will decay to a single-stage membrane process. When the recycle ratio approaches infinity, the required selectivity and pressure ratio reach their absolute minimum values, which have a simple relationship with that of a single-stage membrane process, as follows: View the MathML sourceSn=S1, View the MathML sourceγn=γ1, where n is the number of stages. The minimum energy consumption of a multi-stage membrane process is primarily determined by the membrane selectivity and recycle ratio. A low recycle ratio can significantly reduce the required membrane selectivity without substantial energy penalty. The energy envelope curve can provide a guideline from an energy perspective to determine the minimum required membrane selectivity in membrane process designs to compete with conventional separation processes, such as distillation.

  13. Application of reverse osmosis membrane system for treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The membrane selection process was theoretically designed using well known design software, like KOCH and ROSA. To design the treatment plant system based on the analytical report and software membrane, reverse osmosis (RO) system was used. To compare the experimental and theoretical (KOCH and ROSA ...

  14. Flexoelectric effects in model and native membranes containing ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A G; Miller, B A; Hristova, K; Usherwood, P N

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of flexoelectricity in model membranes containing ion pores and native membranes containing ion channels has been undertaken with the objective of determining the relationship, if any, between flexoelectricity and ion transport. Model membrane patches containing ion pores induced by a blue-green algal toxin, microcystin-LR, and locust muscle membrane patches containing potassium channels were studied using patch-clamp techniques. A correspondence was established between the presence of open channels and pores and the amplitude of the 1st harmonic of the total membrane current when the membranes or patches were subjected to pressure oscillations. The 2nd harmonic of the membrane current provided a measure of the amplitude of a membrane curvature induced by pressure, thus making it possible to determine the membrane flexoelectric coefficient. This study shows that flexoelectricity could be an effective driving force for ion transport through membrane pores and channels, thus further highlighting the possible biological significance of this mechano-electric phenomenon.

  15. Playing with partial knowledge in membrane systems: A logical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaliere, Matteo; Mardare, Radu Iulian

    2006-01-01

    M. Cavaliere, R. Mardare. Playing with partial knowledge in membrane systems: A logical approach. In Proc. of the seventh Workshop on Membrane Computing - At the Crossroads of Cell Biology and Computation (WMC2006), Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4361:279-297, Springer, 2006......M. Cavaliere, R. Mardare. Playing with partial knowledge in membrane systems: A logical approach. In Proc. of the seventh Workshop on Membrane Computing - At the Crossroads of Cell Biology and Computation (WMC2006), Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4361:279-297, Springer, 2006...

  16. Utilization of membranes for H2O recycle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, H.; Oguchi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual studies of closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) carried out at NAL in Japan for a water recycle system using membranes are reviewed. The system will treat water from shower room, urine, impure condensation from gas recycle system, and so on. The H2O recycle system is composed of prefilter, ultrafiltration membrane, reverse osmosis membrane, and distillator. Some results are shown for a bullet train of toilet-flushing water recycle equipment with an ultraviltration membrane module. The constant value of the permeation rate with a 4.7 square meters of module is about 70 1/h after 500th of operation. Thermovaporization with porous polytetrafluorocarbon membrane is also proposed to replce the distillator.

  17. Novel thermal efficiency-based model for determination of thermal conductivity of membrane distillation membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanneste, Johan; Bush, John A.; Hickenbottom, Kerri L.; Marks, Christopher A.; Jassby, David

    2017-01-01

    Development and selection of membranes for membrane distillation (MD) could be accelerated if all performance-determining characteristics of the membrane could be obtained during MD operation without the need to recur to specialized or cumbersome porosity or thermal conductivity measurement techniques. By redefining the thermal efficiency, the Schofield method could be adapted to describe the flux without prior knowledge of membrane porosity, thickness, or thermal conductivity. A total of 17 commercially available membranes were analyzed in terms of flux and thermal efficiency to assess their suitability for application in MD. The thermal-efficiency based model described the flux with an average %RMSE of 4.5%, which was in the same range as the standard deviation on the measured flux. The redefinition of the thermal efficiency also enabled MD to be used as a novel thermal conductivity measurement device for thin porous hydrophobic films that cannot be measured with the conventional laser flash diffusivity technique.

  18. Performance modeling of direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) seawater desalination process using a commercial composite membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Junggil

    2015-01-10

    This paper presents the development of a rigorous theoretical model to predict the transmembrane flux of a flat sheet hydrophobic composite membrane, comprising both an active layer of polytetrafluoroethylene and a scrim-backing support layer of polypropylene, in the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process. An integrated model includes the mass, momentum, species and energy balances for both retentate and permeate flows, coupled with the mass transfer of water vapor through the composite membrane and the heat transfer across the membrane and through the boundary layers adjacent to the membrane surfaces. Experimental results and model predictions for permeate flux and performance ratio are compared and shown to be in good agreement. The permeate flux through the composite layer can be ignored in the consideration of mass transfer pathways at the composite membrane. The effect of the surface porosity and the thickness of active and support layers on the process performance of composite membrane has also been studied. Among these parameters, surface porosity is identified to be the main factor significantly influencing the permeate flux and performance ratio, while the relative influence of the surface porosity on the performance ratio is less than that on flux.

  19. Binding equilibrium and kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands in cell adhesion: Insights from computational model systems and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Thomas R.; Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adhesion of cell membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. In this article, we review recent results from simulations and theory that lead to novel insights on how the binding equilibrium and kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring and molecular properties of the proteins. Simulations and theory both indicate that the binding equilibrium constant K2D and the on- and off-rate constants of anchored receptors and ligands in their 2-dimensional (2D) membrane environment strongly depend on the membrane roughness from thermally excited shape fluctuations on nanoscales. Recent theory corroborated by simulations provides a general relation between K2D and the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in 3 dimensions (3D). PMID:27294442

  20. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca F Alford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1 prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2 high-resolution structural refinement; (3 protein-protein docking; and (4 assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design.

  1. Robust membrane systems for actinide separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Bluhm, Elizabeth A.; Abney, Kent D.; Ehler, Deborah S.; Bauer, Eve; Le, Quyen T.; Young, Jennifer S.; Ford, Doris K.; Pesiri, David R.; Dye, Robert C.; Robison, Thomas W.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Redondo, Antonio; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Rempe, Susan L.

    2000-01-01

    Our objective in this project is to develop very stable thin membrane structures containing ionic recognition sites that facilitate the selective transport of target metal ions, especially the actinides

  2. Investigations concerning the use of membrane bioreactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenger-Oehn, H.; Universitaet fuer Bodenkulturen, Wien; Braun, R.; Universitaet fuer Bodenkulturen, Wien

    1994-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor systems are increasingly being used to clean leachates from landfills. Besides being compact they can, especially, be easily combined with further cleaning techniques. The paper first of all gives an overview on landfill leachate cleaning standards in Austria. A combination of processes is applied where the membrane bioreactor forms a preferred element. Finally, results are presented which should help with the dimensioning of membrane bioreactors. (orig.) [de

  3. Membrane-Organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, James K.

    2014-09-18

    This project has three interrelated goals relevant to solar water photolysis, which are to develop: (1) vesicle-organized assemblies for H2 photoproduction that utilize pyrylium and structurally related compounds as combined photosensitizers and cyclic electroneutral transmembrane electron carriers; (2) transmembrane redox systems whose reaction rates can be modulated by light; and (3) homogeneous catalysts for water oxidation. . In area (1), initial efforts to photogenerate H2 from vectorially-organized vesicles containing occluded colloidal Pt and commonly available pyrylium ions as transmembrane redox mediators were unsuccessful. New pyrylium compounds with significantly lower reduction potentials have been synthesized to address this problem, their apparent redox potentials in functioning systems have been now evaluated by using a series of occluded viologens, and H2 photoproduction has been demonstrated in continuous illumination experiments. In area (2), spirooxazine-quinone dyads have been synthesized and their capacity to function as redox mediators across bilayer membranes has been evaluated through continuous photolysis and transient spectrophotometric measurements. Photoisomerization of the spiro moiety to the ring-open mero form caused net quantum yields to decrease significantly, providing a basis for photoregulation of transmembrane redox. Research on water oxidation (area 3) has been directed at understanding mechanisms of catalysis by cis,cis-[(bpy)2Ru(OH2)]2O4+ and related polyimine complexes. Using a variety of physical techniques, we have: (i) identified the redox state of the complex ion that is catalytically active; (ii) shown using 18O isotopic labeling that there are two reaction pathways, both of which involve participation of solvent H2O; and (iii) detected and characterized by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopies new species which may be key intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  4. Ice formation in model biological membranes in the presence of cryoprotectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, M.A. E-mail: kiselev@nf.jinr.ru; Lesieur, P.; Kisselev, A.M.; Ollivon, M

    2000-06-21

    Ice formation in model biological membranes is studied by SAXS and WAXS in the presence of cryoprotectors: dimethyl sulfoxide and glycerol. Three types of phospholipid membranes: DPPC, DMPC, DSPC are chosen for the investigation as well-studied model biological membranes. A special cryostat is used for sample cooling from 14.1 deg. C to -55.4 deg. C. The ice formation is detected only by WAXS in binary phospholipid/water and ternary phospholipid/cryoprotector/water systems in the condition of excess solvent. Ice formation in a binary phospholipid/water system creates an abrupt decrease of the membrane repeat distance by {delta}d, the so-called ice-induced dehydration of intermembrane space. The value of {delta}d decreases as the cryoprotector concentration increases. The formation of ice does not influence the membrane structure ({delta}d=0) for cryoprotector mole fractions higher than 0.05.

  5. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la serna, J. B.; Schütz, G.; Eggeling, Ch.; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, SEP 2016 (2016), 106 ISSN 2296-634X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-06989S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : plasma membrane * membrane organization models * heterogeneous distribution Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  6. Mechanics and dynamics of triglyceride-phospholipid model membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Duelund, Lars; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here that triolein alters the mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes and induces extraordinary conformational dynamics. Triolein containing membranes exhibit fluctuations up to size range of 100µm and with the help of these are e.g. able to squeeze through narrow passages...... with larger lamellar distances observed in the TOPOPC membranes. These findings suggest repulsion between adjacent membranes. We provide a comprehensive discussion on the possible explanations for the observed mechanics and dynamics in the TOPOPC system and on their potential cellular implications....

  7. Turing Incompleteness of Asynchronous P Systems with Active Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Leporati, Alberto; Manzoni, Luca; Porreca, Antonio E.

    2013-01-01

    We prove that asynchronous P systems with active membranes without divi- sion rules can be simulated by place/transition Petri nets, and hence are computationally weaker than Turing machines. This result holds even if the synchronisation mechanisms provided by electrical charges and membrane dissolution are exploited.

  8. Biogenesis of the demarcation membrane system (DMS) in megakaryocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckly, A.; Heijnen, H.F.G.; Pertuy, F.; Geerts, W.J.C.; Proamer, F.; Rinckel, J.Y.; Leon, C.; Lanza, F; Gachet, C.

    2014-01-01

    The demarcation membrane system (DMS) in megakaryocytes forms the plasma membrane (PM) of future platelets. Using confocal microscopy, electron tomography, and large volume focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), we determined the sequential steps of DMS formation. We identified a

  9. Particle-based membrane model for mesoscopic simulation of cellular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mohsen; Weikl, Thomas R.; Noé, Frank

    2018-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient coarse-grained and solvent-free model for simulating lipid bilayer membranes. In order to be used in concert with particle-based reaction-diffusion simulations, the model is purely based on interacting and reacting particles, each representing a coarse patch of a lipid monolayer. Particle interactions include nearest-neighbor bond-stretching and angle-bending and are parameterized so as to reproduce the local membrane mechanics given by the Helfrich energy density over a range of relevant curvatures. In-plane fluidity is implemented with Monte Carlo bond-flipping moves. The physical accuracy of the model is verified by five tests: (i) Power spectrum analysis of equilibrium thermal undulations is used to verify that the particle-based representation correctly captures the dynamics predicted by the continuum model of fluid membranes. (ii) It is verified that the input bending stiffness, against which the potential parameters are optimized, is accurately recovered. (iii) Isothermal area compressibility modulus of the membrane is calculated and is shown to be tunable to reproduce available values for different lipid bilayers, independent of the bending rigidity. (iv) Simulation of two-dimensional shear flow under a gravity force is employed to measure the effective in-plane viscosity of the membrane model and show the possibility of modeling membranes with specified viscosities. (v) Interaction of the bilayer membrane with a spherical nanoparticle is modeled as a test case for large membrane deformations and budding involved in cellular processes such as endocytosis. The results are shown to coincide well with the predicted behavior of continuum models, and the membrane model successfully mimics the expected budding behavior. We expect our model to be of high practical usability for ultra coarse-grained molecular dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion simulations of biological systems.

  10. Development of compact tritium confinement system using gas separation membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takumi; Okuno, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop more compact and cost-effective tritium confinement system for fusion reactor, a new system using gas separation membranes has been studied at the Tritium Process Laboratory in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The preliminary result showed that the gas separation membrane system could reduce processing volume of tritium contaminated gas to more than one order of magnitude compared with the conventional system, and that most of tritiated water vapor (humidity) could be directly recovered by water condenser before passing through dryer such as molecular sieves. More detail investigations of gas separation characteristics of membrane were started to design ITER Atmospheric Detritiation System (ADS). Furthermore, a scaled polyimide membrane module (hollow-filament type) loop was just installed to investigate the actual tritium confinement performance under various ITER-ADS conditions. (author)

  11. There Is No Simple Model of the Plasma Membrane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Schütz, Gerhard J.; Eggeling, Christian; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ever since technologies enabled the characterization of eukaryotic plasma membranes, heterogeneities in the distributions of its constituents were observed. Over the years this led to the proposal of various models describing the plasma membrane organization such as lipid shells, picket-and-fences, lipid rafts, or protein islands, as addressed in numerous publications and reviews. Instead of emphasizing on one model we in this review give a brief overview over current models and highlight how current experimental work in one or the other way do not support the existence of a single overarching model. Instead, we highlight the vast variety of membrane properties and components, their influences and impacts. We believe that highlighting such controversial discoveries will stimulate unbiased research on plasma membrane organization and functionality, leading to a better understanding of this essential cellular structure. PMID:27747212

  12. A theoretical model for gas permeability in a composite membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, D. A

    2009-01-01

    We present in this work an analytical expression for permeability in a two-layer composite membrane, which was derived assuming the same hypothesis as those of Adzumi model for permeability in a homogeneous membrane. Whereas in Adzumi model permeability shows a linear dependence on the mean pressure, our model for a composite membrane related permeability to pressure through a rather complex expression, which covers the whole range of flow, from molecular-Knudsen to viscous-Poiseuille regimes. The expression obtained for permeability contained information of membrane structural properties as pore size, porosity and thickness of each layer, as well as gas nature and operational conditions. Our two-layer-model expression turns into Adzumi formula when the structure of the layers approach to each other. [es

  13. Membrane Systems Engineering for Post-combustion Carbon Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Alshehri, Ali

    2013-08-05

    This study proposes a strategy for optimal design of hollow fiber membrane networks for post combustion carbon capture from power plant multicomponent flue gas. A mathematical model describing multicomponent gas permeation through a separation membrane was customized into the flowsheet modeling package ASPEN PLUS. An N-stage membrane network superstructure was defined considering all possible flowsheeting configurations. An optimization formulation was then developed and solved using an objective function that minimizes the costs associated with operating and capital expenses. For a case study of flue gas feed flow rate of 298 m3/s with 13% CO2 and under defined economic parameters, the optimization resulted in the synthesis of a membrane network structure consisting of two stages in series. This optimal design was found while also considering feed and permeate pressures as well as recycle ratios between stages. The cost of carbon capture for this optimal membrane network is estimated to be $28 per tonne of CO2 captured, considering a membrane permeance of 1000 GPU and membrane selectivity of 50. Following this approach, a reduction in capture cost to less than $20 per tonne CO2 captured is possible if membranes with permeance of 2000 GPU and selectivity higher than 70 materialize.

  14. Dynamic modeling of ultrafiltration membranes for whey separation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltık, M.B.; Özkan, Leyla; Jacobs, Marc; Padt, van der Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a control relevant rigorous dynamic model for an ultrafiltration membrane unit in a whey separation process. The model consists of a set of differential algebraic equations and is developed for online model based applications such as model based control and process

  15. Transient response simulation of gas separation membrane module for an atmosphere detritiation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Takahiko, E-mail: t-sugiyama@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, Masahiro [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki-shi, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Munakata, Kenzo [Akita University, Tegata Gakuen-cho 1-1, Akita-shi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ichiro [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Transient response of a gas separation membrane module for the atmosphere detritiation system was numerically simulated with a mass transfer model. The module contains thousands of hollow fiber type polyimide membranes. The simulation model took into account permeation of water vapor through the dense layer of the membrane, diffusive transfer through the porous support layer and adsorption/desorption of water vapor into the matrix of the porous layer. The slow responses of the water vapor concentration in the retentate and the permeation rate were well reproduced by the present simulation, and transient changes in a follow fiber membrane were investigated in detail. The inventory and the mean residence time of water vapor at 303 K were estimated for the commercial membrane module (UMS-B2, Ube industries, Ltd.) as 5.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mol and 380 s, respectively.

  16. Model-based fault detection for proton exchange membrane fuel cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, an intelligent model-based fault detection (FD) is developed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) dynamic systems using an independent radial basis function (RBF) networks. The novelty is that this RBF networks is used to model the PEMFC dynamic systems and residuals are generated based ...

  17. Modeling and Design Optimization of Multifunctional Membrane Reactors for Direct Methane Aromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouty, Nicholas J; Carrasco, Juan C; Lima, Fernando V

    2017-08-29

    Due to the recent increase of natural gas production in the U.S., utilizing natural gas for higher-value chemicals has become imperative. Direct methane aromatization (DMA) is a promising process used to convert methane to benzene, but it is limited by low conversion of methane and rapid catalyst deactivation by coking. Past work has shown that membrane separation of the hydrogen produced in the DMA reactions can dramatically increase the methane conversion by shifting the equilibrium toward the products, but it also increases coke production. Oxygen introduction into the system has been shown to inhibit this coke production while not inhibiting the benzene production. This paper introduces a novel mathematical model and design to employ both methods in a multifunctional membrane reactor to push the DMA process into further viability. Multifunctional membrane reactors, in this case, are reactors where two different separations occur using two differently selective membranes, on which no systems studies have been found. The proposed multifunctional membrane design incorporates a hydrogen-selective membrane on the outer wall of the reaction zone, and an inner tube filled with airflow surrounded by an oxygen-selective membrane in the middle of the reactor. The design is shown to increase conversion via hydrogen removal by around 100%, and decrease coke production via oxygen addition by 10% when compared to a tubular reactor without any membranes. Optimization studies are performed to determine the best reactor design based on methane conversion, along with coke and benzene production. The obtained optimal design considers a small reactor (length = 25 cm, diameter of reaction tube = 0.7 cm) to subvert coke production and consumption of the product benzene as well as a high permeance (0.01 mol/s·m²·atm 1/4 ) through the hydrogen-permeable membrane. This modeling and design approach sets the stage for guiding further development of multifunctional membrane reactor

  18. Estimation of membrane hydration status for standby proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems by impedance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Rugholt, Mark; Nielsen, Morten Busk

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells are getting growing interest in both backup systems and electric vehicles. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of inactivity, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. However, the membrane of which PEMFCs are made tends to dry out when not in...

  19. Microfluidic systems with ion-selective membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouka, Zdenek; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2014-01-01

    When integrated into microfluidic chips, ion-selective nanoporous polymer and solid-state membranes can be used for on-chip pumping, pH actuation, analyte concentration, molecular separation, reactive mixing, and molecular sensing. They offer numerous functionalities and are hence superior to paper-based devices for point-of-care biochips, with only slightly more investment in fabrication and material costs required. In this review, we first discuss the fundamentals of several nonequilibrium ion current phenomena associated with ion-selective membranes, many of them revealed by studies with fabricated single nanochannels/nanopores. We then focus on how the plethora of phenomena has been applied for transport, separation, concentration, and detection of biomolecules on biochips.

  20. Phase-field theories for mathematical modeling of biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Guillermo R; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Hernández-Machado, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex structures whose mechanics are usually described at a mesoscopic level, such as the Helfrich bending theory. In this article, we present the phase-field methods, a useful tool for studying complex membrane problems which can be applied to very different phenomena. We start with an overview of the general theory of elasticity, paying special attention to its derivation from a molecular scale. We then study the particular case of membrane elasticity, explicitly obtaining the Helfrich bending energy. Within the framework of this theory, we derive a phase-field model for biological membranes and explore its physical basis and interpretation in terms of membrane elasticity. We finally explain three examples of applications of these methods to membrane related problems. First, the case of vesicle pearling and tubulation, when lipidic vesicles are exposed to the presence of hydrophobic polymers that anchor to the membrane, inducing a shape instability. Finally, we study the behavior of red blood cells while flowing in narrow microchannels, focusing on the importance of membrane elasticity to the cell flow capabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrochemistry Modeling of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Water Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Ni; Michael KH Leung; Dennis YC Leung

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemistry model was developed to analyse the J-V characteristics of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolyzer for hydrogen production. The Butler-Volmer equation and water transport characteristics through electrolyte membrane were employed to simulate the electrode activation over-potential and membrane ohmic over-potential, respectively. The modeling results are found to agree reasonably well with experimental data published in the literature. The parametric simulations show that the ohmic over-potential is relatively small with typical water content in the membrane. Compared with the cathode over-potential, the anode over-potential is more significant and constitutes the major source of voltage loss. The high anode over-potential is due to the relatively slow oxidation kinetics, which is related to anode material property and microstructure. This model can be integrated with a photovoltaic or wind turbine model to predict the performance of sustainable hydrogen production systems and optimise their designs. (authors)

  2. Membrane separation systems---A research and development needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W. (Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Cussler, E.L. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science); Eykamp, W. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Koros, W.J. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA)); Riley, R.L. (Separation Systems Technology, San Diego, CA (USA)); Strathmann, H. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Grenzflaech

    1990-04-01

    Industrial separation processes consume a significant portion of the energy used in the United States. A 1986 survey by the Office of Industrial Programs estimated that about 4.2 quads of energy are expended annually on distillation, drying and evaporation operations. This survey also concluded that over 0.8 quads of energy could be saved in the chemical, petroleum and food industries alone if these industries adopted membrane separation systems more widely. Membrane separation systems offer significant advantages over existing separation processes. In addition to consuming less energy than conventional processes, membrane systems are compact and modular, enabling easy retrofit to existing industrial processes. The present study was commissioned by the Department of Energy, Office of Program Analysis, to identify and prioritize membrane research needs in light of DOE's mission. Each report will be individually cataloged.

  3. Design and simulation of the surface shape control system for membrane mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gengsheng; Tang, Minxue

    2009-11-01

    The surface shape control is one of the key technologies for the manufacture of membrane mirror. This paper presents a design of membrane mirror's surface shape control system on the basis of fuzzy logic control. The system contains such function modules as surface shape design, surface shape control, surface shape analysis, and etc. The system functions are realized by using hybrid programming technology of Visual C# and MATLAB. The finite element method is adopted to simulate the surface shape control of membrane mirror. The finite element analysis model is established through ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL). ANSYS software kernel is called by the system in background running mode when doing the simulation. The controller is designed by means of controlling the sag of the mirror's central crosssection. The surface shape of the membrane mirror and its optical aberration are obtained by applying Zernike polynomial fitting. The analysis of surface shape control and the simulation of disturbance response are performed for a membrane mirror with 300mm aperture and F/2.7. The result of the simulation shows that by using the designed control system, the RMS wavefront error of the mirror can reach to 142λ (λ=632.8nm), which is consistent to the surface accuracy of the membrane mirror obtained by the large deformation theory of membrane under the same condition.

  4. [Modelling of pattern formation and oscillations in pH and transmembrane potential near the cell membrane of Chara corallina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliusnina, T Iu; Lavrova, A I; Riznichenko, G Iu; Rubin, A B

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model of potencial-dependent proton transfer across the membrane of Chara corallina cells is considered. To construct the model, partial differential equations describing the system dynamics in time and in space were used. The variables of the model are the proton concentration and membrane potential. The model describes the experimentally observed inhomogeneous distribution of transmembrane potential and pH along the membrane and oscillations of the potential and pH in time. A mechanism of the distribution of pH and membrane potential along the Chara corallina cell is suggested.

  5. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  6. Membrane separation systems---A research and development needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W. (Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Cussler, E.L. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science); Eykamp, W. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Koros, W.J. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA)); Riley, R.L. (Separation Systems Technology, San Diego, CA (USA)); Strathmann, H. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Grenzflaech

    1990-03-01

    Membrane based separation technology, a relative newcomer on the separations scene, has demonstrated the potential of saving enormous amounts of energy in the processing industries if substituted for conventional separation systems. Over 1 quad annually, out of 2.6, can possibly be saved in liquid-to-gas separations, alone, if membrane separation systems gain wider acceptance, according to a recent DOE/OIP (DOE/NBM-80027730 (1986)) study. In recent years great strides have been made in the field and offer even greater energy savings in the future when substituted for other conventional separation techniques such as distillation, evaporation, filtration, sedimentation, and absorption. An assessment was conducted by a group of six internationally known membrane separations experts who examined the worldwide status of research in the seven major membrane areas. This encompassed four mature technology areas: reverse osmosis, micorfiltration, ultrafiltration, and electrodialysis; two developing areas: gas separation and and pervaporation; and one emerging technology: facilitated transport. Particular attention was paid to identifying the innovative processes currently emerging, and even further improvements which could gain wider acceptance for the more mature membrane technology. The topics that were pointed out as having the greatest research emphasis are pervaporation for organic-organic separations; gas separation; micorfiltration; an oxidant-resistant reverse osmosis membrane; and a fouling-resistant ultrafiltration membrane. 35 refs., 6 figs., 22 tabs.

  7. Atomistic simulations of anionic Au-144(SR)(60) nanoparticles interacting with asymmetric model lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observations indicate that the interaction between nanoparticles and lipid membranes varies according to the nanoparticle charge and the chemical nature of their protecting side groups. We report atomistic simulations of an anionic Au nanoparticle (AuNP-) interacting with membranes...... whose lipid composition and transmembrane distribution are to a large extent consistent with real plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells. To this end, we use a model system which comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The simulations...... clearly show that AuNP- attaches to the extracellular membrane surface within a few tens of nanoseconds, while it avoids contact with the membrane on the cytosolic side. This behavior stems from several factors. In essence, when the nanoparticle interacts with lipids in the extracellular compartment...

  8. Comparison of the Modeling Approach between Membrane Bioreactor and Conventional Activated Sludge Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Tao; Sin, Gürkan; Spanjers, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Activated sludge models (ASM) have been developed and largely applied in conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems. The applicability of ASM to model membrane bioreactors (MBR) and the differences in modeling approaches have not been studied in detail. A laboratory-scale MBR was modeled using ASM......2d. It was found that the ASM2d model structure can still be used for MBR modeling. There are significant differences related to ASM modeling. First, a lower maximum specific growth rate for MBR nitrifiers was estimated. Independent experiments demonstrated that this might be attributed...... to the inhibition effect of soluble microbial products (SMP) at elevated concentration. Second, a greater biomass affinity to oxygen and ammonium was found, which was probably related to smaller MBR sludge flocs. Finally, the membrane throughput during membrane backwashing/relaxation can be normalized...

  9. Expansion of thermodynamic model of solute permeation through reverse osmosis membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimaki, Kenzo; Koyama, Akio

    1994-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on permeation mechanism of solute and solvent in membrane separation process like reverse osmosis or ultrafiltration, and several models of solute/solvent permeation through membrane are proposed. Among these models, Kedem and Katchalsky, based on the theory of thermodynamics of irreversible processes, formulated the one-solute permeation process in their mathematical model, which treats membrane as a black box, not giving consideration to membrane structure and to interaction between membrane material and permeates, viz. solute and solvent. According to this theory, the driving force of solute/solvent permeation through membrane is the difference of their chemical potential between both sides of membrane, and the linear phenomenological equation is applied to describing the relation between driving force and flux of solute/solvent. This equation can be applied to the irreversible process only when the process is almost in equilibrium. This condition is supposed to be satisfied in the solute/solvent permeation process through compact membrane with fine pores like reverse osmosis membrane. When reverse osmosis is applied to treatment process for liquid waste, which usually contains a lot of solutes as contaminants, we can not predict the behavior of contaminants by the above one-solute process model. In the case of multi-solutes permeation process for liquid waste, the number of parameter in thermodynamic model increases rapidly with the number of solute, because of coupling phenomenon among solutes. In this study, we expanded the above thermodynamic model to multi-solute process applying operational calculus to the differential equations which describe the irreversible process of the system, and expressed concisely solute concentration vector as a matrix product. In this way, we predict the behavior of solutes in multi-solutes process, using values of parameters obtained in two-solutes process. (author)

  10. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  11. Interactions of sugar-based bolaamphiphiles with biomimetic systems of plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Crowet, Jean-Marc; Lins, Laurence; Obounou Akong, Firmin; Haudrechy, Arnaud; Bouquillon, Sandrine; Deleu, Magali

    2016-11-01

    Glycolipids constitute a class of molecules with various biological activities. Among them, sugar-based bolaamphiphiles characterized by their biocompatibility, biodegradability and lower toxicity, became interesting for the development of efficient and low cost lipid-based drug delivery systems. Their activity seems to be closely related to their interactions with the lipid components of the plasma membrane of target cells. Despite many works devoted to the chemical synthesis and characterization of sugar-based bolaamphiphiles, their interactions with plasma membrane have not been completely elucidated. In this work, two sugar-based bolaamphiphiles differing only at the level of their sugar residues were chemically synthetized. Their interactions with membranes have been investigated using model membranes containing or not sterol and with in silico approaches. Our findings indicate that the nature of sugar residues has no significant influence for their membrane interacting properties, while the presence of sterol attenuates the interactions of both bolaamphiphiles with the membrane systems. The understanding of this distinct behavior of bolaamphiphiles towards sterol-containing membrane systems could be useful for their applications as drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Membrane morphology and topology for fouling control in Reverse Osmosis filtration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bowen; Battiato, Ilenia

    2017-11-01

    Reverse Osmosis Membrane (ROM) filtration systems are widely utilized in waste-water recovery, seawater desalination, landfill water treatment, etc. During filtration, the system performance is dramatically affected by membrane fouling which causes a significant decrease in permeate flux as well as an increase in the energy input required to operate the system. Design and optimization of ROM filtration systems aim at reducing membrane fouling by studying the coupling between membrane structure, local flow field and foulant adsorption patterns. Yet, current studies focus exclusively on oversimplified steady-state models that ignore any dynamic coupling between fluid flow and transport through the membrane. In this work, we develop a customized solver (SUMembraneFoam) under OpenFOAM to solve the transient equations. The simulation results not only predict macroscopic quantities (e.g. permeate flux, pressure drop, etc.) but also show an excellent agreement with the fouling patterns observed in experiments. It is observed that foulant deposition is strongly controlled by the local shear stress on the membrane, and channel morphology or membrane topology can be modified to control the shear stress distribution and reduce fouling. Finally, we identify optimal regimes for design.

  13. Biogenesis of the demarcation membrane system (DMS) in megakaryocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckly, Anita; Heijnen, Harry; Pertuy, Fabien; Geerts, Willie; Proamer, Fabienne; Rinckel, Jean-Yves; Léon, Catherine; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian

    2014-02-06

    The demarcation membrane system (DMS) in megakaryocytes forms the plasma membrane (PM) of future platelets. Using confocal microscopy, electron tomography, and large volume focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), we determined the sequential steps of DMS formation. We identified a pre-DMS that initiated at the cell periphery and was precisely located between the nuclear lobes. At all developmental stages, the DMS remained continuous with the cell surface. The number of these connections correlated well with the nuclear lobulation, suggesting a relationship with cleavage furrow formation and abortive cytokinesis. On DMS expansion, Golgi complexes assembled around the pre-DMS, and fusion profiles between trans-golgi network-derived vesicles and the DMS were observed. Brefeldin-A reduced DMS expansion, indicating that the exocytic pathway is essential for DMS biogenesis. Close contacts between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the DMS were detected, suggesting physical interaction between the 2 membrane systems. FIB/SEM revealed that the DMS forms an intertwined tubular membrane network resembling the platelet open canalicular system. We thus propose the following steps in DMS biogenesis: (1) focal membrane assembly at the cell periphery; (2) PM invagination and formation of a perinuclear pre-DMS; (3) expansion through membrane delivery from Golgi complexes; and (4) ER-mediated lipid transfer.

  14. Electrical Thermal Network for Direct Contact Membrane Distillation Modeling and Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2015-02-04

    Membrane distillation is an emerging water distillation technology that offers several advantages compared to conventional water desalination processes. Although progress has been made to model and understand the physics of the process, many studies are based on steady-state assumptions or are computationally not appropriate for real time control. This paper presents the derivation of a novel dynamical model, based on analogy between electrical and thermal systems, for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The proposed model captures the dynamics of temperature distribution and distilled water flux. To demonstrate the adequacy of the proposed model, validation with transient and steady-state experimental data is presented.

  15. Describing the sorption characteristics of a ternary system of benzene (1) and alcohol (2) in a nonporous polymer membrane (3) by the Flory-Huggins model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hovorka, Š.; Randová, A.; Sysel, P.; Brožová, Libuše; Žitka, Jan; Drašar, P.; Bartovská, L.; Storch, Jan; Červenková Šťastná, Lucie; Izák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 5 (2015), s. 1187-1195 ISSN 0032-3888 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0569 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : membrane * separation * polymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering (UCHP-M) Impact factor: 1.719, year: 2015

  16. Thermo-osmosis in Membrane Systems: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán, V. María; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2017-06-01

    We give a first review of experimental results for a phenomenon little explored in the literature, namely thermal osmosis or thermo-osmosis. Such systems are now getting increased attention because of their ability to use waste heat for separation purposes. We show that this volume transport of a solution or a pure liquid caused by a temperature difference across a membrane can be understood as a property of the membrane system, i. e. the membrane with its adjacent solutions. We present experimental values found in the literature of thermo-osmotic coefficients of neutral and hydrophobic as well as charged and hydrophilic membranes, with water and other permeant fluids as well as electrolyte solutions. We propose that the coefficient can be qualitatively explained by a formula that contains the entropy of adsorption of permeant into the membrane, the hydraulic permeability, and a factor that depends on the interface resistance to heat transfer. A variation in the entropy of adsorption with hydrophobic/hydrophilic membranes and structure breaking/structure making cations could then explain the sign of the permeant flux. Systematic experiments in the field are lacking and we propose an experimental program to mend this situation.

  17. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified in these membrane systems, and a comprehensive catalog of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared to the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared to a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Overall, the protein composition of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane is quite similar to the E.coli plasma membrane and Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a gram-negative bacterium that has an additional internal membrane system that fulfils the energetic requirements of the cell.

  18. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M.; Nguyen, Amelia Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2016-04-07

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highlydifferentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  19. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  20. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  1. Model predictive control for ethanol steam reformers with membrane separation

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Maria; Ocampo-Martínez, Carlos; Li, Mingming; Llorca Piqué, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ This paper focuses on the dynamic modelling and the predictive control of an ethanol steam reformer (ESR) with Pdsingle bondAg membrane separation stage for the generation of pure hydrogen. Hydrogen purity necessary to feed a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is required. A non-linear dynamic model of the ESR is developed together with a procedure f...

  2. Soft sensing of system parameters in membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-03-23

    Various examples of methods and systems are provided for soft sensing of system parameters in membrane distillation (MD). In one example, a system includes a MD module comprising a feed side and a permeate side separated by a membrane boundary layer; and processing circuitry configured to estimate feed solution temperatures and permeate solution temperatures of the MD module using monitored outlet temperatures of the feed side and the permeate side. In another example, a method includes monitoring outlet temperatures of a feed side and a permeate side of a MD module to determine a current feed outlet temperature and a current permeate outlet temperature; and determining a plurality of estimated temperature states of a membrane boundary layer separating the feed side and the permeate side of the MD module using the current feed outlet temperature and the current permeate outlet temperature.

  3. Flexoelectricity of model and living membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Alexander G

    2002-03-19

    The theory and experiments on model and biomembrane flexoelectricity are reviewed. Biological implications of flexoelectricity are underlined. Molecular machinery and molecular electronics applications are pointed out.

  4. A layer model of ethanol partitioning into lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizza, David T; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    The effect of membrane composition on ethanol partitioning into lipid bilayers was assessed by headspace gas chromatography. A series of model membranes with different compositions have been investigated. Membranes were exposed to a physiological ethanol concentration of 20 mmol/l. The concentration of membranes was 20 wt% which roughly corresponds to values found in tissue. Partitioning depended on the chemical nature of polar groups at the lipid/water interface. Compared to phosphatidylcholine, lipids with headgroups containing phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin showed enhanced partitioning while headgroups containing phosphatidylethanolamine resulted in a lower partition coefficient. The molar partition coefficient was independent of a membrane's hydrophobic volume. This observation is in agreement with our previously published NMR results which showed that ethanol resides almost exclusively within the membrane/water interface. At an ethanol concentration of 20 mmol/l in water, ethanol concentrations at the lipid/water interface are in the range from 30-15 mmol/l, corresponding to one ethanol molecule per 100-200 lipids.

  5. Biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal in membrane bioreactors: model development and parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosenza, Alida; Mannina, Giorgio; Neumann, Marc B; Viviani, Gaspare; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are being increasingly used for wastewater treatment. Mathematical modeling of MBR systems plays a key role in order to better explain their characteristics. Several MBR models have been presented in the literature focusing on different aspects: biological models, models which include soluble microbial products (SMP), physical models able to describe the membrane fouling and integrated models which couple the SMP models with the physical models. However, only a few integrated models have been developed which take into account the relationships between membrane fouling and biological processes. With respect to biological phosphorus removal in MBR systems, due to the complexity of the process, practical use of the models is still limited. There is a vast knowledge (and consequently vast amount of data) on nutrient removal for conventional-activated sludge systems but only limited information on phosphorus removal for MBRs. Calibration of these complex integrated models still remains the main bottleneck to their employment. The paper presents an integrated mathematical model able to simultaneously describe biological phosphorus removal, SMP formation/degradation and physical processes which also include the removal of organic matter. The model has been calibrated with data collected in a UCT-MBR pilot plant, located at the Palermo wastewater treatment plant, applying a modified version of a recently developed calibration protocol. The calibrated model provides acceptable correspondence with experimental data and can be considered a useful tool for MBR design and operation.

  6. Fast and efficient protein purification using membrane adsorber systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suck, Kirstin; Walter, Johanna; Menzel, Frauke; Tappe, Alexander; Kasper, Cornelia; Naumann, Claudia; Zeidler, Robert; Scheper, Thomas

    2006-02-10

    The purification of proteins from complex cell culture samples is an essential step in proteomic research. Traditional chromatographic methods often require several steps resulting in time consuming and costly procedures. In contrast, protein purification via membrane adsorbers offers the advantage of fast and gentle but still effective isolation. In this work, we present a new method for purification of proteins from crude cell extracts via membrane adsorber based devices. This isolation procedure utilises the membranes favourable pore structure allowing high flow rates without causing high back pressure. Therefore, shear stress to fragile structures is avoided. In addition, mass transfer takes place through convection rather than diffusion, thus allowing very rapid separation processes. Based on this membrane adsorber technology the separation of two model proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and immungluboline G (IgG) is shown. The isolation of human growth hormone (hGH) from chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant was performed using a cation exchange membrane. The isolation of the enzyme penicillin acylase from the crude Escherichia coli supernatant was achieved using an anion exchange spin column within one step at a considerable purity. In summary, the membrane adsorber devices have proven to be suitable tools for the purification of proteins from different complex cell culture samples.

  7. New membrane preconcentration devices for trace vapor detection systems phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D.; Baker, R. W.; Mohr, J.

    This report describes the results of a six month feasibility program to develop a membrane vapor concentration device. The device would be used to concentrate trace organic vapors in air prior to introduction to a detector instrument. In this way the complexity and cost of the instrumentation required to detect vapors emitted from hidden explosives could be reduced. The membrane concentrator involves the use of ultrathin silicone rubber composite membranes contained in a novel separation cell. Toluene was used as a model organic vapor for explosive vapors. The membrane system was able to obtain enrichments of as much as 50-fold with toluene at pressure ratios of less than 10 across the cell. However, the time to reach this degree of concentration was excessively long at 200 minutes. It appears that large amounts of the organic vapor are sorbed onto and into the membrane and adhesives of the membrane cell. It was not possible to overcome this sorption effect and reduce the system's lag time to a more useful value. Thus, this membrane concentration device does not appear to be a practical preconcentrator for a trace vapor detection instrument.

  8. Optimization Study of Small-Scale Solar Membrane Distillation Desalination Systems (s-SMDDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation (MD, which can utilize low-grade thermal energy, has been extensively studied for desalination. By incorporating solar thermal energy, the solar membrane distillation desalination system (SMDDS is a potential technology for resolving energy and water resource problems. Small-scale SMDDS (s-SMDDS is an attractive and viable option for the production of fresh water for small communities in remote arid areas. The minimum cost design and operation of s-SMDDS are determined by a systematic method, which involves a pseudo-steady-state approach for equipment sizing and dynamic optimization using overall system mathematical models. Two s-SMDDS employing an air gap membrane distillation module with membrane areas of 11.5 m2 and 23 m2 are analyzed. The lowest water production costs are $5.92/m3 and $5.16/m3 for water production rates of 500 kg/day and 1000 kg/day, respectively. For these two optimal cases, the performance ratios are 0.85 and 0.91; the recovery ratios are 4.07% and 4.57%. The effect of membrane characteristics on the production cost is investigated. For the commercial membrane employed in this study, the increase of the membrane mass transfer coefficient up to two times is beneficial for cost reduction.

  9. Optimization study of small-scale solar membrane distillation desalination systems (s-SMDDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsuan; Chang, Cheng-Liang; Hung, Chen-Yu; Cheng, Tung-Wen; Ho, Chii-Dong

    2014-11-24

    Membrane distillation (MD), which can utilize low-grade thermal energy, has been extensively studied for desalination. By incorporating solar thermal energy, the solar membrane distillation desalination system (SMDDS) is a potential technology for resolving energy and water resource problems. Small-scale SMDDS (s-SMDDS) is an attractive and viable option for the production of fresh water for small communities in remote arid areas. The minimum cost design and operation of s-SMDDS are determined by a systematic method, which involves a pseudo-steady-state approach for equipment sizing and dynamic optimization using overall system mathematical models. Two s-SMDDS employing an air gap membrane distillation module with membrane areas of 11.5 m(2) and 23 m(2) are analyzed. The lowest water production costs are $5.92/m(3) and $5.16/m(3) for water production rates of 500 kg/day and 1000 kg/day, respectively. For these two optimal cases, the performance ratios are 0.85 and 0.91; the recovery ratios are 4.07% and 4.57%. The effect of membrane characteristics on the production cost is investigated. For the commercial membrane employed in this study, the increase of the membrane mass transfer coefficient up to two times is beneficial for cost reduction.

  10. Optimization Study of Small-Scale Solar Membrane Distillation Desalination Systems (s-SMDDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsuan; Chang, Cheng-Liang; Hung, Chen-Yu; Cheng, Tung-Wen; Ho, Chii-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD), which can utilize low-grade thermal energy, has been extensively studied for desalination. By incorporating solar thermal energy, the solar membrane distillation desalination system (SMDDS) is a potential technology for resolving energy and water resource problems. Small-scale SMDDS (s-SMDDS) is an attractive and viable option for the production of fresh water for small communities in remote arid areas. The minimum cost design and operation of s-SMDDS are determined by a systematic method, which involves a pseudo-steady-state approach for equipment sizing and dynamic optimization using overall system mathematical models. Two s-SMDDS employing an air gap membrane distillation module with membrane areas of 11.5 m2 and 23 m2 are analyzed. The lowest water production costs are $5.92/m3 and $5.16/m3 for water production rates of 500 kg/day and 1000 kg/day, respectively. For these two optimal cases, the performance ratios are 0.85 and 0.91; the recovery ratios are 4.07% and 4.57%. The effect of membrane characteristics on the production cost is investigated. For the commercial membrane employed in this study, the increase of the membrane mass transfer coefficient up to two times is beneficial for cost reduction. PMID:25421065

  11. Compartmentalized system with membrane-bound glycerol kinase. Activity and product distribution versus asymmetrical substrate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, A; Merchie, B; Maïsterrena, B

    1991-03-15

    An artificial-membrane-bound glycerokinase chosen as a membrane-bound two-substrate-enzyme model has been used to separate two unequal compartments of a specially designed diffusion cell. An interesting feature is the asymmetry of compartments and the existence of a diffusion layer adjacent to only one face of the enzymic membrane. In such a situation the apparent enzyme activity and the product distribution in the system have been studied versus all the possibilities of combination of ATP and glycerol supply. Our approach has lead us to differentiate two different roles played by a diffusion layer adjacent to a permeable enzymic membrane. Depending on the spatial origin of the enzymic substrates (i.e. from which compartment they derive), the diffusion layer can play either the role of a passive additional resistance to that of the membrane or the role of a third compartment in which the reaction product can partially accumulate before splitting on both parts of the membrane. Our results mainly demonstrate that a membrane-bound enzyme activity and the resulting product distribution occurring in a compartmentalized system may be regulated by the cumulative effect due to the asymmetry in volumes of the compartments, the presence of a diffusion layer and the different possibilities of substrate supply. With the topography studied, which is close to that reported for many 'in vivo' situations, the product may be diffused lead to vectorial metabolism processes.

  12. Fouling in a MBR system with rotating membrane discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are an attractive alternative solution for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment. The MBR, which is a combination of a bioreactor for sludge degradation and a membrane for separation, has the advantages of a low footprint, ability to handle high sludge...... to conventionally activated sludge systems. Therefore, it is essential to understand the impact of enhanced shear on filtration performance. The influence of shear and sludge concentration on the limiting flux is investigated using the limiting flux as a measure of the degree of fouling. The utilized MBR system...

  13. Renewable energy powered membrane technology. 1. Development and characterization of a photovoltaic hybrid membrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, A I; Broeckmann, A; Richards, B S

    2007-02-01

    In isolated communities where potable water sources as well as energy grids are limited or nonexistent, treating brackish groundwater aquifers with small-scale desalination systems can be a viable alternative to existing water infrastructures. Given the unavailability of power in many such situations, renewable energy is an obvious solution to power such systems. However, renewable energy is an intermittent power supply and with regards to the performance of intermittently operated desalination systems, only very limited experience exists, both with regards to efficiency as well as water quality. In this paper, this lack of knowledge is addressed by evaluating a system operated with varying parameters (pressure and flow) with constant power as a step toward defining a safe operating window, and they provide a basis for interpreting future data obtained with a renewable energy source. Field trials were performed on a brackish (5300 mg/L TDS; 8290 microS/cm) bore in Central Australia with a photovoltaic-powered membrane filtration (PV-membrane) system. Four nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes (BW30, ESPA4, NF90, TFC-S) and a number of operation parameter combinations (transmembrane pressure, feed flow, TFC-S) and operating parameters transmembrane pressure and feed flow were investigated to find the best operating conditions for maximum drinking water production and minimum specific energy consumption (SEC). The ESPA4 membrane performed best for this brackish source, producing 250 L/h of excellent drinking water (257 mg/L TDS; 400 microS/ cm) at an SEC of 1.2 kWh/m3. The issue of brine disposal or reuse is also discussed and the article compares the salinity of the produced brine with livestock water. Since the feedwater is disinfected physically using ultrafiltration (UF), the brine is free from bacteria and most viruses and hence can be seen more as a reusable product stream than a waste stream with a disposal problem.

  14. Modeling and Simulation for Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established methods to evaluate key properties that are needed to commercialize polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell electric vehicles such as water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. These methods are based on coarse-graining models. For calculating water diffusion and gas permeability through the membranes, the dissipative particle dynamics–Monte Carlo approach was applied, while mechanical strength of the hydrated membrane was simulated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics. As a result of our systematic search and analysis, we can now grasp the direction necessary to improve water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. For water diffusion, a map that reveals the relationship between many kinds of molecular structures and diffusion constants was obtained, in which the direction to enhance the diffusivity by improving membrane structure can be clearly seen. In order to achieve high mechanical strength, the molecular structure should be such that the hydrated membrane contains narrow water channels, but these might decrease the proton conductivity. Therefore, an optimal design of the polymer structure is needed, and the developed models reviewed here make it possible to optimize these molecular structures.

  15. A novel osmosis membrane bioreactor-membrane distillation hybrid system for wastewater treatment and reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Nguyen, Hau Thi; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Chan, Wen Hao; Ray, Saikat Sinha; Li, Chi-Wang; Hsu, Hung-Te

    2016-06-01

    A novel approach was designed to simultaneously enhance nutrient removal and reduce membrane fouling for wastewater treatment using an attached growth biofilm (AGB) integrated with an osmosis membrane bioreactor (OsMBR) system for the first time. In this study, a highly charged organic compound (HEDTA(3-)) was employed as a novel draw solution in the AGB-OsMBR system to obtain a low reverse salt flux, maintain a healthy environment for the microorganisms. The AGB-OsMBR system achieved a stable water flux of 3.62L/m(2)h, high nutrient removal of 99% and less fouling during a 60-day operation. Furthermore, the high salinity of diluted draw solution could be effectively recovered by membrane distillation (MD) process with salt rejection of 99.7%. The diluted draw solution was re-concentrated to its initial status (56.1mS/cm) at recovery of 9.8% after 6h. The work demonstrated that novel multi-barrier systems could produce high quality potable water from impaired streams. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: A lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, David A.; Chapman, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure—area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T0, which locates the gel—fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a “smooth” homogeneous surface (“cholesterol-like”) and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T0 can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken “annulus” of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T0 does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10-7 sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed. PMID:286996

  17. Enhancement of the Computational Efficiency of Membrane Computing Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Information Retrieval, SPIRE 2000, La Coruna, Spain, 64-74. [9] S.N. Krishna, R. Rama: P Systems with Replicated Rewriting. Journal of Automata Languages...Paraschiv. Membrane software. A P system simulator. Fundamental Informaticae , 49(13):61-66, 2002. [25] P. Fitzgibbons, D. Das, and T. Renz, “Bio...systems with worm-objects, IEEE 7th International Conference on String Processing and Information Retrieval, SPIRE, La Coruna, Spain, 2000, pp. 64

  18. Coarctation induces alterations in basement membranes in the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipke, D W; McCarthy, K J; Elton, T S

    1993-01-01

    A coarctation hypertensive rat model was used to examine the effects of elevated blood pressure on basement membrane component synthesis by cardiac myocytes and aorta using immunohistochemistry and Northern blot analysis. Carotid arterial pressure increased immediately on coarctation, and left ve...

  19. Modelling of biohydrogen production and recovery by membrane gas separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Búcsú, D.; Nemestóthy, N.; Pientka, Zbyněk; Gubicza, L.; Bélafi-Bakó, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 240, 1-3 (2009), s. 306-310 ISSN 0011-9164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : integrated system * Escherichia coli * PES-PI membrane Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.034, year: 2009

  20. Modelling Protein-induced Membrane Deformation using Monte Carlo and Langevin Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Agrawal, N.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Liu, J.

    2010-11-01

    In eukaryotic cells, internalization of extracellular cargo via the cellular process of endocytosis is orchestrated by a variety of proteins, many of which are implicated in membrane deformation/bending. We model the energetics of deformations membranes by using the Helfrich Hamiltonian using two different formalisms: (i) Cartesian or Monge Gauge using Langevin dynamics; (ii) Curvilinear coordinate system using Monte Carlo (MC). Monge gauge approach which has been extensively studied is limited to small deformations of the membrane and cannot describe extreme deformations. Curvilinear coordinate approach can handle large deformation limits as well as finite-temperature membrane fluctuations; here we employ an unstructured triangular mesh to compute the local curvature tensor, and we evolve the membrane surface using a MC method. In our application, we compare the two approaches (i and ii above) to study how the spatial assembly of curvature inducing proteins leads to vesicle budding from a planar membrane. We also quantify how the curvature field of the membrane impacts the spatial segregation of proteins.

  1. Self-Stabilization in Membrane Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study a notion of self-stabilization, inspired from biology and engineering. Multiple variants of formalization of this notion are considered, and we discuss how such properties affect the computational power of multiset rewriting systems.

  2. Emergency membrane contactor based absorption system for ammonia leaks in water treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiahui; Fang, Xuliang; He, Yiliang; Jin, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Because of the suspected health risks of trihalomethanes (THMs), more and more water treatment plants have replaced traditional chlorine disinfection process with chloramines but often without the proper absorption system installed in the case of ammonia leaks in the storage room. A pilot plant membrane absorption system was developed and installed in a water treatment plant for this purpose. Experimentally determined contact angle, surface tension, and corrosion tests indicated that the sulfuric acid was the proper choice as the absorbent for leaking ammonia using polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor. Effects of several operating conditions on the mass transfer coefficient, ammonia absorption, and removal efficiency were examined, including the liquid concentration, liquid velocity, and feed gas concentration. Under the operation conditions investigated, the gas absorption efficiency over 99.9% was achieved. This indicated that the designed pilot plant membrane absorption system was effective to absorb the leaking ammonia in the model storage room. The removal rate of the ammonia in the model storage room was also experimentally and theoretically found to be primarily determined by the ammonia suction flow rate from the ammonia storage room to the membrane contactor. The ammonia removal rate of 99.9% was expected to be achieved within 1.3 h at the ammonia gas flow rate of 500 m3/h. The success of the pilot plant membrane absorption system developed in this study illustrated the potential of this technology for ammonia leaks in water treatment plant, also paved the way towards a larger scale application.

  3. Mathematical modelling of dextran filtration through hollow fibre membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of an ultrafiltration process. The results of the model are produced using standard numerical techniques with Comsol Multiphysics. The model describes the fluid flow and separation in hollow fibre membranes. The flow of solute and solvent within...... dependent viscosity. The model shows that both the observed and intrinsic rejection increase when the inlet velocity increases. Moreover, the intrinsic rejection increases as a function of transmembrane pressure, but the observed rejection has a characteristic maximum. Therefore, the observed rejection can...... either increase or decrease as a function of pressure. The influence of a concentration dependent viscosity is to increase the concentration on the membrane surface. This leads to a decrease in both the observed and the intrinsic rejection, when compared to a constant viscosity. For small values...

  4. Bioinspired model of mechanical energy harvesting based on flexoelectric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Alejandro D; Servio, P; Herrera-Valencia, E E

    2013-02-01

    Membrane flexoelectricity is an electromechanical coupling process that describes membrane electrical polarization due to bending and membrane bending under electric fields. In this paper we propose, formulate, and characterize a mechanical energy harvesting system consisting of a deformable soft flexoelectric thin membrane subjected to harmonic forcing from contacting bulk fluids. The key elements of the energy harvester are formulated and characterized, including (i) the mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency, (ii) the electromechanical shape equation connecting fluid forces with membrane curvature and electric displacement, and (iii) the electric power generation and efficiency. The energy conversion efficiency is cast as the ratio of flexoelectric coupling to the product of electric and bending elasticity. The device is described by a second-order curvature dynamics coupled to the electric displacement equation and as such results in mechanical power absorption with a resonant peak whose amplitude decreases with bending viscosity. The electric power generation is proportional to the conversion factor and the power efficiency decreases with frequency. Under high bending viscosity, the power efficiency increases with the conversion factor and under low viscosities it decreases with the conversion factor. The theoretical results presented contribute to the ongoing experimental efforts to develop mechanical energy harvesting from fluid flow energy through solid-fluid interactions and electromechanical transduction.

  5. Enhancement of the Computational Efficiency of Membrane Computing Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Das, Digendra K

    2007-01-01

    .... Membrane computing consists of cell-like membranes placed inside a unique skin membrane. In regions delimited by a membrane structure, cells are placed in multisets of objects which evolve according to evolution rules associated with the regions...

  6. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Minford, Eric [Laurys Station, PA; Waldron, William Emil [Whitehall, PA

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  7. Stochastic lattice model of synaptic membrane protein domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2017-05-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor molecules, concentrated in synaptic membrane domains along with scaffolds and other kinds of proteins, are crucial for signal transmission across chemical synapses. In common with other membrane protein domains, synaptic domains are characterized by low protein copy numbers and protein crowding, with rapid stochastic turnover of individual molecules. We study here in detail a stochastic lattice model of the receptor-scaffold reaction-diffusion dynamics at synaptic domains that was found previously to capture, at the mean-field level, the self-assembly, stability, and characteristic size of synaptic domains observed in experiments. We show that our stochastic lattice model yields quantitative agreement with mean-field models of nonlinear diffusion in crowded membranes. Through a combination of analytic and numerical solutions of the master equation governing the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains, together with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find substantial discrepancies between mean-field and stochastic models for the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains. Based on the reaction and diffusion properties of synaptic receptors and scaffolds suggested by previous experiments and mean-field calculations, we show that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic receptors and scaffolds provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the observed single-molecule trajectories, and spatial heterogeneity in the effective rates at which receptors and scaffolds are recycled at the cell membrane. Our work sheds light on the physical mechanisms and principles linking the collective properties of membrane protein domains to the stochastic dynamics that rule their molecular components.

  8. Stochastic lattice model of synaptic membrane protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2017-05-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor molecules, concentrated in synaptic membrane domains along with scaffolds and other kinds of proteins, are crucial for signal transmission across chemical synapses. In common with other membrane protein domains, synaptic domains are characterized by low protein copy numbers and protein crowding, with rapid stochastic turnover of individual molecules. We study here in detail a stochastic lattice model of the receptor-scaffold reaction-diffusion dynamics at synaptic domains that was found previously to capture, at the mean-field level, the self-assembly, stability, and characteristic size of synaptic domains observed in experiments. We show that our stochastic lattice model yields quantitative agreement with mean-field models of nonlinear diffusion in crowded membranes. Through a combination of analytic and numerical solutions of the master equation governing the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains, together with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find substantial discrepancies between mean-field and stochastic models for the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains. Based on the reaction and diffusion properties of synaptic receptors and scaffolds suggested by previous experiments and mean-field calculations, we show that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic receptors and scaffolds provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the observed single-molecule trajectories, and spatial heterogeneity in the effective rates at which receptors and scaffolds are recycled at the cell membrane. Our work sheds light on the physical mechanisms and principles linking the collective properties of membrane protein domains to the stochastic dynamics that rule their molecular components.

  9. The problem of fouling in submerged membrane bioreactors - Model validation and experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibranska, Irene; Vlaev, Serafim; Tylkowski, Bartosz

    2018-01-01

    Integrating biological treatment with membrane separation has found a broad area of applications and industrial attention. Submerged membrane bioreactors (SMBRs), based on membrane modules immersed in the bioreactor, or side stream ones connected in recycle have been employed in different biotechnological processes for separation of thermally unstable products. Fouling is one of the most important challenges in the integrated SMBRs. A number of works are devoted to fouling analysis and its treatment, especially exploring the opportunity for enhanced fouling control in SMBRs. The main goal of the review is to provide a comprehensive yet concise overview of modeling the fouling in SMBRs in view of the problematics of model validation, either by real system measurements at different scales or by analysis of the obtained theoretical results. The review is focused on the current state of research applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling techniques.

  10. Mathematical models of membrane fouling in cross-flow micro-filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Jimena Ortíz Jerez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The greatest difficulty arising during cross-flow micro-filtration is the formation of a cake layer on the membrane sur-face (also called fouling, thereby affecting system performance. Fouling has been related to permeate flux decay re-sulting from changes in operating variables. Many articles have been published in an attempt to explain this phe-nomenon but it has not yet been fully understood because it depends on specific solution/membrane interactions and differing parameters. This work was aimed at presenting an analytical review of recently published mathematical models to explain fouling. Although the reviewed models can be adjusted to any type of application, a simple “con-centration polarisation” model is advisable in the particular case of tropical fruit juices for describing the insoluble solids being deposited on membrane surface.

  11. New approaches to characterizing and understanding biofouling of spiral wound membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.

    2012-06-01

    Historically, biofouling research on spiral wound membrane systems is typically problem solving oriented. Membrane modules are studied as black box systems, investigated by autopsies. Biofouling is not a simple process. Many factors influence each other in a non-linear fashion. These features make biofouling a subject which is not easy to study using a fundamental scientific approach. Nevertheless to solve or minimize the negative impacts of biofouling, a clear understanding of the interacting basic principles is needed. Recent research into microbiological characterizing of biofouling, small scale test units, application of in situ visualization methods, and model approaches allow such an integrated study of biofouling. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  12. The membrane attack complex of the complement system is essential for rapid wallerian degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaglia, Valeria; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Nourallah, Michelle; Wolterman, Ruud; de Jonge, Rosalein; Ramkema, Marja; Vigar, Miriam Ann; van der Wetering, Sandra; Morgan, Brian Paul; Troost, Dirk; Baas, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The complement (C) system plays an important role in myelin breakdown during Wallerian degeneration (WD). The pathway and mechanism involved are, however, not clear. In a crush injury model of the sciatic nerve, we show that C6, necessary for the assembly of the membrane attack complex (MAC), is

  13. Membrane-organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, R. David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The key photoredox process in photosynthesis is the accumulation of oxidizing equivalents on a tetranuclear manganese cluster that then liberates electrons and protons from water and forms oxygen gas. Our primary goal in this project is to characterize inorganic systems that can perform this same water-splitting chemistry. One such species is the dinuclear ruthenium complex known as the blue dimer. Starting at the Ru(III,III) oxidation state, the blue dimer is oxidized up to a putative Ru(V,V) level prior to O-O bond formation. We employ electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize each step in this reaction cycle to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of water oxidation.

  14. Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kahveci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells.

  15. System identification and robust control of a portable proton exchange membrane full-cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fu-Cheng; Yang, Yee-Pien; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Tsung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang, Hsin-Ping [Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST), Armaments Bureau, M.N.D (Taiwan)

    2007-02-10

    This paper will discuss the application of system identification techniques and robust control strategies to a proton exchange membrane fuel-cell system. The fuel-cell system's dynamic behaviour is influenced by many factors, such as the reaction mechanism, pressure, flow-rate, composition and temperature change, and is inherently non-linear and time varying. From a system point of view, however, the system can be modelled as a two-input, two-output linear time-invariant system whose inputs are hydrogen and air flow rates, and whose outputs are cell voltage and current. On the other hand, the system's non-linearities and time-varying characteristics can be regarded as system uncertainties and disturbances that are treated by the designed robust controllers. This paper is comprised of three parts. First, system identification techniques were adopted to model the system's transfer functions. Second, the H{sub {infinity}} robust control strategies were applied to stabilise the system. Finally, the system's stability and performance were compromised by introducing weighting functions to the controller's design. From the experimental results, the designed H{sub {infinity}} robust controllers were deemed effective. (author)

  16. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  17. Spontaneous formation of complex structures made from elastic membranes in an aluminum-hydroxide-carbonate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, Micah; Kaminker, Vitaliy; Pantaleone, James; Nowak, Piotr; Dyonizy, Agnieszka; Maselko, Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    A popular playground for studying chemo-hydrodynamic patterns and instabilities is chemical gardens, also known as silicate gardens. In these systems, complex structures spontaneously form, driven by buoyant forces and either osmotic or mechanical pumps. Here, we report on systems that differ somewhat from classical chemical gardens in that the membranes are much more deformable and soluble. These properties lead to structures that self-construct and evolve in new ways. For example, they exhibit the formation of chemical balloons, a new growth mechanism for tubes, and also the homologous shrinking of these tubes. The stretching mechanism for the membranes is probably different than for other systems by involving membrane "self-healing." Other unusual properties are osmosis that sometimes occurs out of the structure and also small plumes that flow away from the structure, sometimes upwards, and sometimes downwards. Mathematical models are given that explain some of the observed phenomena.

  18. Water-Permeable Dialysis Membranes for Multi-Layered Micro Dialysis System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya eTo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of water-permeable dialysis membranes that are suitable for an implantable microdialysis system that does not use dialysis fluid. We developed a microdialysis system integrating microfluidic channels and nanoporous filtering membranes made of polyethersulfone (PES, aiming at a fully implantable system that drastically improves the quality of life of patients. Simplicity of the total system is crucial for the implantable dialysis system, where the pumps and storage tanks for the dialysis fluid pose problems. Hence, we focus on hemofiltration, which does not require the dialysis fluid but water-permeable membranes. We investigated the water-permeability of the PES membrane with respect to the concentrations of the PES, the additives, and the solvents in the casting solution. Sufficiently water-permeable membranes were found through in vitro experiments using whole bovine blood. The filtrate was verified to have the concentrations of low-molecular-weight molecules, such as sodium, potassium, urea, and creatinine, while proteins, such as albumin, were successfully blocked by the membrane. We conducted in vivo experiments using rats, where the system was connected to the femoral artery and jugular vein. The filtrate was successfully collected without any leakage of blood inside the system and it did not contain albumin but low-molecular-weight molecules whose concentrations were identical to those of the blood. The rat model with renal failure showed 100% increase of creatinine in 5 h, while rats connected to the system showed only a 7.4% increase, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed microdialysis system.

  19. Experimental investigation and modeling of industrial oily wastewater treatment using modified polyethersulfone ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahi, Abdolhamid; Mohammadi, Toraj; Behbahani, Reza Mosayebi; Hemmati, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Hollow fiber membranes were prepared from polyethersulfone/additives/NMP and DMSO system via phase inversion induced by precipitation in non-solvent coagulation bath. The interaction effects of polyethylene-glycol (PEG), propionic-acid (PA), Tween-20, PEG molecular weight and polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP) on morphology and performance of synthesized membranes were investigated. Taguchi method (L 16 orthogonal array) was used initially to plan a minimum number of experiments. 32 membranes were synthesized (with two replications) and their permeation flux and TOC rejection properties to oily wastewater treatment were studied. The obtained results indicated that addition of PA to spinning dope decreases flux while it increases TOC rejection of prepared membranes. Also, the result shows that addition of PVP, Tween-20 and PEG content in spinning dope enhances permeation flux while reducing TOC rejection. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized membranes was effective and suitable for treatment of the oily wastewater to achieve up to 92.6, 98.2, and 98.5% removal of TOC, TSS, and OGC, respectively with a flux of 247.19 L/(m 2 h). Moreover, Hermia's models were used for permeation flux decline prediction. Experimental data and models predictions were compared. The results showed that there is reasonable agreement between experimental data and the cake layer model followed by the intermediate blocking model

  20. Experimental investigation and modeling of industrial oily wastewater treatment using modified polyethersulfone ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahi, Abdolhamid; Mohammadi, Toraj [Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behbahani, Reza Mosayebi [Petroleum University of Technology (PUT), Ahwaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hemmati, Mahmood [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Hollow fiber membranes were prepared from polyethersulfone/additives/NMP and DMSO system via phase inversion induced by precipitation in non-solvent coagulation bath. The interaction effects of polyethylene-glycol (PEG), propionic-acid (PA), Tween-20, PEG molecular weight and polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP) on morphology and performance of synthesized membranes were investigated. Taguchi method (L{sub 16} orthogonal array) was used initially to plan a minimum number of experiments. 32 membranes were synthesized (with two replications) and their permeation flux and TOC rejection properties to oily wastewater treatment were studied. The obtained results indicated that addition of PA to spinning dope decreases flux while it increases TOC rejection of prepared membranes. Also, the result shows that addition of PVP, Tween-20 and PEG content in spinning dope enhances permeation flux while reducing TOC rejection. The obtained results indicated that the synthesized membranes was effective and suitable for treatment of the oily wastewater to achieve up to 92.6, 98.2, and 98.5% removal of TOC, TSS, and OGC, respectively with a flux of 247.19 L/(m{sup 2}h). Moreover, Hermia's models were used for permeation flux decline prediction. Experimental data and models predictions were compared. The results showed that there is reasonable agreement between experimental data and the cake layer model followed by the intermediate blocking model.

  1. NMR spectroscopic studies of membrane-bound biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlweg, W.

    2013-01-01

    In the course of this thesis, biological NMR spectroscopy was employed in studying membrane-bound peptides and proteins, for which structural information is still comparatively hard to obtain. Initial work focused on various model peptides bound to membrane-mimicking micelles, studying the protonation state of arginine in a membrane environment. Strong evidence for a cation-π complex was found in TM7, a peptide which forms the seventh transmembrane helix of subunit a of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). V-ATPase is a physiologically highly relevant proton pump, which is present in intracellular membranes of all eukaryotic organisms, as well as the plasma membrane of several specialized cells. Loss of functional V-ATPase is associated with human diseases such as osteopetrosis, distal renal tubular acidosis or the spreading of cancer. V-ATPase is considered a potential drug target in the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer, or in the development of novel contraceptives. Results from NMR solution structure determination, NMR titration experiments, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy confirm the existence of a buried cation-? complex formed between arginine residue R735, which is essential for proton transport, and neighbouring tryptophan and tyrosine residues. In vivo experiments in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using selective growth tests and fluorescence microscopy showed that formation of the cation-π complex is essential for V-ATPase function. Deletion of both aromatic residues, as well as only the one tryptophan residue leads to growth defects and inability to maintain vacuolar pH homeostasis. These findings shine new light on the still elusive mechanism of proton transport in V-ATPase, and show that arginine R735 may be directly involved in proton transfer across the membrane. (author) [de

  2. Membranes for bioelectrochemical systems: challenges and research advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2013-01-01

    Increasing energy demand has been a big challenge for current society, as the fossil fuel sources are gradually decreasing. Hence, development of renewable and sustainable energy sources for the future is considered one of the top priorities in national strategic plans. Bioenergy can meet future energy requirements - renewability, sustainability, and even carbon-neutrality. Bioenergy production from wastes and wastewaters is especially attractive because of dual benefits of energy generation and contaminant stabilization. There are several bioenergy technologies using wastes and wastewaters as electron donor, which include anaerobic digestion, dark biohydrogen fermentation, biohydrogen production using photosynthetic microorganisms, and bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Among them BES seems to be very promising as we can produce a variety of value-added products from wastes and wastewaters, such as electric power, hydrogen gas, hydrogen peroxide, acetate, ethanol etc. Most ofthe traditional BES uses a membrane to separate the anode and cathode chamber, which is essential for improving microbial metabolism on the anode and the recovery of value-added products on the cathode. Performance of BES lacking a membrane can be seriously deteriorated, due to oxygen diffusion or substantial loss of synthesized products. For this reason, usage of a membrane seems essential to facilitate BES performance. However, a membrane can bring several technical challenges to BES application compared to membrane-less BES. These challenges include poor proton permeability, substrate loss, oxygen back diffusion, pH gradient, internal resistance, biofouling, etc. This paper aims to review the major technical barriers associated with membranes and future research directions for their application in BESs.

  3. Pilot testing of a membrane system for postcombustion CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, Tim [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Kniep, Jay [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Wei, Xiaotong [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Carlisle, Trevor [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); White, Steve [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Pande, Saurabh [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Fulton, Don [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Watson, Robert [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Hoffman, Thomas [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Freeman, Brice [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Baker, Richard [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This final report summarizes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) to scale up an efficient post-combustion CO2 capture membrane process to the small pilot test stage (award number DE-FE0005795). The primary goal of this research program was to design, fabricate, and operate a membrane CO2 capture system to treat coal-derived flue gas containing 20 tonnes CO2/day (20 TPD). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Babcock and Wilcox (B&W), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), WorleyParsons (WP), the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), Enerkem (EK), and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). In addition to the small pilot design, build and slipstream testing at NCCC, other project efforts included laboratory membrane and module development at MTR, validation field testing on a 1 TPD membrane system at NCCC, boiler modeling and testing at B&W, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) by EPRI/WP, a case study of the membrane technology applied to a ~20 MWe power plant by ISTC, and an industrial CO2 capture test at an Enerkem waste-to-biofuel facility. The 20 TPD small pilot membrane system built in this project successfully completed over 1,000 hours of operation treating flue gas at NCCC. The Polaris™ membranes used on this system demonstrated stable performance, and when combined with over 10,000 hours of operation at NCCC on a 1 TPD system, the risk associated with uncertainty in the durability of postcombustion capture membranes has been greatly reduced. Moreover, next-generation Polaris membranes with higher performance and lower cost were validation tested on the 1 TPD system. The 20 TPD system also demonstrated successful operation of a new low-pressure-drop sweep module that will reduce parasitic energy losses at full scale by as much as 10 MWe. In modeling and pilot boiler testing, B&W confirmed the

  4. Modeling and optimization of a heat-pump-assisted high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell micro-combined-heat-and-power system for residential applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arsalis, Alexandros; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    -CHP system assumes heat-led operation, to avoid dumping of heat and the use of complicated thermal energy storage. The overall system is grid-interconnected to allow importing and exporting of electricity as necessary. In this study emphasis is given on the operational characterization of the system......In this study a micro-combined-heat-and-power (micro-CHP) system is coupled to a vapor-compression heat pump to fulfill the residential needs for heating (space heating and water heating) and electricity in detached single-family households in Denmark. Such a combination is assumed to be attractive...... for application, since both fuel cell technology and electric heat pumps are found to be two of the most efficient technologies for generation/conversion of useful energy. The micro-CHP system is fueled with natural gas and includes a fuel cell stack, a fuel processor and other auxiliary components. The micro...

  5. Continuous Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Lignocellulosic Biomass in a Membrane-Reactor System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickel, Jonathan J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sievers, David A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Adhikari, Birendra [University of Colorado; Pellegrino, John [University of Colorado

    2018-02-21

    Converting abundant lignocellulosic biomass to sugars as fungible precursors to fuels and chemicals has the potential to diversify the supply chain for those products, but further process improvements are needed to achieve economic viability. In the current work, process intensification of the key enzymatic hydrolysis unit operation is demonstrated by means of a membrane reactor system that was operated continuously. Lignocellulosic biomass (pretreated corn stover) and buffered enzyme solution were fed to a continuously stirred-tank reactor, and clarified sugar solution was withdrawn via a commercial tubular ultrafiltration membrane. The membrane permeance decline and membrane cleaning efficacy were studied and did not vary significantly when increasing fraction insoluble solids (FIS) from 2.5% to 5%. Continuous enzymatic hydrolysis was successfully operated for more than 80 h. A model for the reactor system was able to predict dynamic behavior that was in reasonable agreement with experimental results. The modeled technical performance of anticipated commercial batch and continuous enzymatic hydrolysis processes were compared and showed that continuous operation would provide at least twice the volumetric productivity for the conditions studied. Further improvements are anticipated by better membrane selection and by increasing FIS.

  6. Experimental Validation of a Permeability Model for Enrichment Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellano, Pablo; Brasnarof, Daniel; Florido Pablo

    2003-01-01

    An experimental loop with a real scale diffuser, in a single enrichment-stage configuration, was operated with air at different process conditions, in order to characterize the membrane permeability.Using these experimental data, an analytical geometric-and-morphologic-based model was validated.It is conclude that a new set of independent measurements, i.e. enrichment, is necessary in order to fully characterize diffusers, because of its internal parameters are not univocally determinated with permeability experimental data only

  7. A generalized Born formalism for heterogeneous dielectric environments: application to the implicit modeling of biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Feig, Michael

    2005-03-22

    Reliable computer simulations of complex biological environments such as integral membrane proteins with explicit water and lipid molecules remain a challenging task. We propose a modification of the standard generalized Born theory of homogeneous solvent for modeling the heterogeneous dielectric environments such as lipid/water interfaces. Our model allows the representation of biological membranes in the form of multiple layered dielectric regions with dielectric constants that are different from the solute cavity. The proposed new formalism is shown to predict the electrostatic component of solvation free energy with a relative error of 0.17% compared to exact finite-difference solutions of the Poisson equation for a transmembrane helix test system. Molecular dynamics simulations of melittin and bacteriorhodopsin are carried out and performed over 10 ns and 7 ns of simulation time, respectively. The center of melittin along the membrane normal in these stable simulations is in excellent agreement with the relevant experimental data. Simulations of bacteriorhodopsin started from the experimental structure remained stable and in close agreement with experiment. We also examined the free energy profiles of water and amino acid side chain analogs upon membrane insertion. The results with our implicit membrane model agree well with the experimental transfer free energy data from cyclohexane to water as well as explicit solvent simulations of water and selected side chain analogs.

  8. Artificial plasma membrane models based on lipidomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, Donia; Rosilio, Véronique; Daghildjian, Katia; Solgadi, Audrey; Vergnaud, Juliette; Kasselouri, Athena; Chaminade, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Phospholipid monolayers are often described as membrane models for analyzing drug-lipid interactions. In many works, a single phosphatidylcholine is chosen, sometimes with one or two additional components. Drug penetration is studied at 30mN/m, a surface pressure considered as corresponding to the pressure in bilayers, independently of the density of lipid molecular packing. In this work, we have extracted, identified, and quantified the major lipids constituting the lipidome of plasma and mitochondrial membranes of retinoblastoma (Y79) and retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19), using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The results obtained from this lipidomic analysis were used in an attempt to build an artificial lipid monolayer with a composition mimicking that of the plasma membrane of Y79 cells, better than a single phospholipid. The variety and number of lipid classes and species in cell extracts monolayers exceeding by far those of the phospholipids chosen to mimic them, the π-A isotherms of model monolayers differed from those of lipid extracts in shape and apparent packing density. We propose a model monolayer based on the most abundant species identified in the extracts, with a surface compressional modulus at 30mN/m close to the one of the lipid extracts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling and optimization of membrane lifetime in dead-end ultra filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, Edwin; Roffel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a membrane lifetime model is developed and experimentally validated. The lifetime model is based on the Weibull probability density function. The lifetime model can be used to determine an unambiguous characteristic membrane lifetime. Experimental results showed that membrane lifetime

  10. Modelling a full scale membrane bioreactor using Activated Sludge Model No.1: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, F; Choubert, J M; Stricker, A E; Spérandio, M; Mietton-Peuchot, M; Racault, Y

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale membrane bioreactor (1,600 m(3) d(-1)) was monitored for modelling purposes during the summer of 2006. A complete calibration of the ASM1 model is presented, in which the key points were the wastewater characterisation, the oxygen transfer and the biomass kinetics. Total BOD tests were not able to correctly estimate the biodegradable fraction of the wastewater. Therefore the wastewater fractionation was identified by adjusting the simulated sludge production rate to the measured value. MLVSS and MLSS were accurately predicted during both calibration and validation periods (20 and 30 days). Because the membranes were immerged in the aeration tank, the coarse bubble and fine bubble diffusion systems coexisted in the same tank. This allowed five different aeration combinations, depending whether the 2 systems were operating separately or simultaneously, and at low speed or high speed. The aeration control maintained low DO concentrations, allowing simultaneous nitrification and denitrification. This made it difficult to calibrate the oxygen transfer. The nitrogen removal kinetics were determined using maximum nitrification rate tests and an 8-hour intensive sampling campaign. Despite the challenges encountered, a calibrated set of parameters was identified for ASM1 that gave very satisfactory results for the calibration period. Matching simulated and measured data became more difficult during the validation period, mainly because the dominant aeration configuration had changed. However, the merit of this study is to be the first effort to simulate a full-scale MBR plant.

  11. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toy, Lora [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Choi, Young Chul [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hendren, Zachary [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kim, Gyu Dong [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2017-03-31

    , numerical modeling was performed on the FO and MD processes to estimate engineering parameters for a larger-scale pilot unit. Based on the experimental studies and modeling results, a pilot-scale, integrated FO-MD prototype unit was designed and built for trailer-mounted operation. This prototype system was fed real industrial wastewater, which could not be further treated by conventional technologies, from an oil production facility and was successfully operated for over 15 weeks without major stoppage. About 90% water recovery was possible, while concentrating the TDS from 12,000 ppm up to 190,500 ppm. The FO-MD prototype rejected most wastewater contaminants while producing water with <300 ppm TDS, even when the feed TDS was higher than 150,000 ppm. No chemical cleaning was necessary during the pilot testing period. Flushing the system with dechlorinated tap water was sufficient to reset the membranes for the next set of test conditions. Pilot performance and membrane autopsy showed that, even though the feed was concentrated more than 10 times, membrane fouling was unnoticeable and no defects were detected on the FO and MD membrane surfaces. This project demonstrated the technical feasibility of the hybrid FO-MD process by taking water already treated to the limit with the highest level of current technologies and further concentrating it 10-fold by using mostly low-cost materials. Because no membranes suitable for full-scale plant applications are available at present, economical feasibility of the hybrid technology is still uncertain, but it is expected that broader industry participation can further reduce FO-MD process costs.

  12. Dimer-based model for heptaspanning membrane receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antonio; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2005-07-01

    The existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions for heptaspanning membrane receptors is now fully accepted, but a model considering dimers as the basic unit that binds to two ligand molecules is lacking. Here, we propose a two-state-dimer model in which the ligand-induced conformational changes from one component of the dimer are communicated to the other. Our model predicts cooperativity in binding, which is relevant because the other current models fail to address this phenomenon satisfactorily. Our two-state-dimer model also predicts the variety of responses elicited by full or partial agonists, neutral antagonists and inverse agonists. This model can aid our understanding of the operation of heptaspanning receptors and receptor channels, and, potentially, be important for improving the treatment of cardiovascular, neurological and neuropsychyatric diseases.

  13. Silver nanoparticles delivery system based on natural rubber latex membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, Eder Jose, E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo/FFCLRP-DF (Brazil); Kinoshita, Angela [Universidade do Sagrado Coracao (Brazil); Ramos, Ana Paula [Universidade de Sao Paulo/FFCLRP-DQ (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo [Universidade de Sao Paulo/FFCLRP-DF (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    The search for new materials for biomedical applications is extremely important. Here, we present results on the performance of a silver nanoparticles delivery system using natural rubber latex (NRL) as the polymeric matrix. Our aim was to obtain an optimized wound dressing by combining materials with potential healing action. The synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are depicted. The NRL membranes are good matrix for silver nanoparticles and allow for their gradual release. The release of 30 nm silver nanoparticles by the NRL membranes depends on their mass percentage in NRL membranes. The total concentration of AgNP released by the NRL membranes was calculated. The AgNP attached to the cis-isoprene molecules in the NRL matrix remain attached to the membrane ({approx}0.1 % w/w). So, only the AgNP bound to the non-rubber molecules are released. FTIR spectra suggest that non-rubber molecules, like aminoacids and proteins, associated with the serum fraction of the NRL may be attached to the surfaces of the released nanoparticles, thereby increasing the release of such molecules. The released silver nanoparticles are sterically stabilized, more stable and well dispersed. Because the serum fraction of the NRL is responsible for the angiogenic properties of the matrix, the silver nanoparticles could increment the angiogenic properties of NRL. This biomaterial has desirable properties for the fabrication of a wound dressing with potential healing action, since it combines the angiogenic and antibacterial properties of the silver nanoparticles with the increased angiogenic properties of the NRL.Graphical AbstractThe AgNP attached to the cis-isoprene molecules remain in the NRL matrix and only the AgNP bound to the non-rubber molecules (NRL serum fraction) are released. The released AgNP are

  14. Silver nanoparticles delivery system based on natural rubber latex membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelli, Éder José; Kinoshita, Angela; Ramos, Ana Paula; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2013-04-01

    The search for new materials for biomedical applications is extremely important. Here, we present results on the performance of a silver nanoparticles delivery system using natural rubber latex (NRL) as the polymeric matrix. Our aim was to obtain an optimized wound dressing by combining materials with potential healing action. The synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are depicted. The NRL membranes are good matrix for silver nanoparticles and allow for their gradual release. The release of 30 nm silver nanoparticles by the NRL membranes depends on their mass percentage in NRL membranes. The total concentration of AgNP released by the NRL membranes was calculated. The AgNP attached to the cis-isoprene molecules in the NRL matrix remain attached to the membrane ( 0.1 % w/w). So, only the AgNP bound to the non-rubber molecules are released. FTIR spectra suggest that non-rubber molecules, like aminoacids and proteins, associated with the serum fraction of the NRL may be attached to the surfaces of the released nanoparticles, thereby increasing the release of such molecules. The released silver nanoparticles are sterically stabilized, more stable and well dispersed. Because the serum fraction of the NRL is responsible for the angiogenic properties of the matrix, the silver nanoparticles could increment the angiogenic properties of NRL. This biomaterial has desirable properties for the fabrication of a wound dressing with potential healing action, since it combines the angiogenic and antibacterial properties of the silver nanoparticles with the increased angiogenic properties of the NRL.

  15. Ultra-thin and strong formvar-based membranes with controlled porosity for micro- and nano-scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchter, Eric; Marquez, Justin; Stevens, Garrison; Silva, Rebecca; Mcculloch, Quinn; Guengerich, Quintessa; Blair, Andrew; Litchfield, Sebastian; Li, Nan; Sheehan, Chris; Chamberlin, Rebecca; Yarbro, Stephen L.; Dervishi, Enkeleda

    2018-05-01

    We present a methodology for developing ultra-thin and strong formvar-based membranes with controlled morphologies. Formvar is a thin hydrophilic and oleophilic polymer inert to most chemicals and resistant to radiation. The formvar-based membranes are viable materials as support structures in micro- and macro-scale systems depending on thinness and porosity control. Tunable sub-micron thick porous membranes with 20%–65% porosity were synthesized by controlling the ratios of formvar, glycerol, and chloroform. This synthesis process does not require complex separation or handling methods and allows for the production of strong, thin, and porous formvar-based membranes. An expansive array of these membrane characterizations including chemical compatibility, mechanical responses, wettability, as well as the mathematical simulations as a function of porosity has been presented. The wide range of chemical compatibility allows for membrane applications in various environments, where other polymers would not be suitable. Our formvar-based membranes were found to have an elastic modulus of 7.8 GPa, a surface free energy of 50 mN m‑1 and an average thickness of 125 nm. Stochastic model simulations indicate that formvar with the porosity of ∼50% is the optimal membrane formulation, allowing the most material transfer across the membrane while also withstanding the highest simulated pressure loadings before tearing. Development of novel, resilient and versatile membranes with controlled porosity offers a wide range of exciting applications in the fields of nanoscience, microfluidics, and MEMS.

  16. Interaction of antimicrobial biomimetics with bacterial and cytoplasmic membrane models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidalevitz, David

    2010-03-01

    Non-natural mimics of antimicrobial peptides are excellent candidates for anti-infectious agents due to their stability towards enzymatic degradation and broad adjustability of physicochemical properties. This study examines how structural rigidity affects interactions of the AMP analogs with model Langmuir monolayers of phospholipids at the air-liquid interface mimicking bacterial and mammalian lipid membrane surfaces. Flexible acyl-lysine olygomer was more efficient in disrupting Gram-negative rather than Gram-positive bacterial model membrane. Electron density profiles across the film, derived from XR data, demonstrate that following OAK and arylamide insertion into bacterial membrane mimics their hydrophobic cores were located within the lipid acyl chains, inducing opposite local curvatures. Moreover, flexible OAK molecules were found to penetrate the six acyl chains lipid A better than two chain DPPG, while conformationally restrained arylamide molecules, as well as previously characterized natural antimicrobial peptides LL-37, protegrin-1 and SMAP-29, insert into DPPG monolayer with almost identical or better efficiency.

  17. Multiset-based Tree Model for Membrane Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new paradigm - multiset-based tree model. We show that trees can be represented in the form of wellfounded multisets. We also show that the conventional approach for this representation is not injective from a set of trees to the class of multisets representing such trees. We establish a one-to-one correspondence between trees and suitable permutations of a wellfounded multiset, which we call \\textit{tree structures}. We give formal definitions of a \\textit{tree structure} and a \\textit{subtree structure} of a tree structure. Finally, we represent membrane structures in the form of tree structures - a form in which membrane structures can suitably be represented at programming level.

  18. Scaling and particulate fouling in membrane filtration systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlage, S.F.E.

    2001-01-01

    Membrane filtration technologies have emerged as cost competitive and viable techniques in drinking and industrial water production. Despite advancements in membrane manufacturing and technology, membrane scaling and fouling remain major problems and may limit future growth in the industry. Scaling

  19. Neutron scattering to study membrane systems: from lipid vesicles to living cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, Jonathan D. [ORNL; Chatterjee, Sneha [ORNL; Stanley, Christopher B. [ORNL; Qian, Shuo [ORNL; Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F. [ORNL; Elkins, James G. [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2017-03-01

    The existence and role of lateral lipid organization in biological membranes has been studied and contested for more than 30 years. Lipid domains, or rafts, are hypothesized as scalable compartments in biological membranes, providing appropriate physical environments to their resident membrane proteins. This implies that lateral lipid organization is associated with a range of biological functions, such as protein co-localization, membrane trafficking, and cell signaling, to name just a few. Neutron scattering techniques have proven to be an excellent tool to investigate these structural features in model lipids, and more recently, in living cells. I will discuss our recent work using neutrons to probe the structure and mechanical properties in model lipid systems and our current efforts in using neutrons to probe the structure and organization of the bilayer in a living cell. These efforts in living cells have used genetic and biochemical strategies to generate a large neutron scattering contrast, making the membrane visible. I will present our results showing in vivo bilayer structure and discuss the outlook for this approach.

  20. Cyto-Sim: a formal language model and stochastic simulator of membrane-enclosed biochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedwards, Sean; Mazza, Tommaso

    2007-10-15

    Compartments and membranes are the basis of cell topology and more than 30% of the human genome codes for membrane proteins. While it is possible to represent compartments and membrane proteins in a nominal way with many mathematical formalisms used in systems biology, few, if any, explicitly model the topology of the membranes themselves. Discrete stochastic simulation potentially offers the most accurate representation of cell dynamics. Since the details of every molecular interaction in a pathway are often not known, the relationship between chemical species in not necessarily best described at the lowest level, i.e. by mass action. Simulation is a form of computer-aided analysis, relying on human interpretation to derive meaning. To improve efficiency and gain meaning in an automatic way, it is necessary to have a formalism based on a model which has decidable properties. We present Cyto-Sim, a stochastic simulator of membrane-enclosed hierarchies of biochemical processes, where the membranes comprise an inner, outer and integral layer. The underlying model is based on formal language theory and has been shown to have decidable properties (Cavaliere and Sedwards, 2006), allowing formal analysis in addition to simulation. The simulator provides variable levels of abstraction via arbitrary chemical kinetics which link to ordinary differential equations. In addition to its compact native syntax, Cyto-Sim currently supports models described as Petri nets, can import all versions of SBML and can export SBML and MATLAB m-files. Cyto-Sim is available free, either as an applet or a stand-alone Java program via the web page (http://www.cosbi.eu/Rpty_Soft_CytoSim.php). Other versions can be made available upon request.

  1. Validation of computational non-Newtonian fluid model for membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Skov, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems are often considered as the wastewater treatment method of the future due to its high effluent quality. One of the main problems with such systems is a relative large energy consumption, which has led to research in this specific area. A powerful tool for optimiz......Membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems are often considered as the wastewater treatment method of the future due to its high effluent quality. One of the main problems with such systems is a relative large energy consumption, which has led to research in this specific area. A powerful tool...... for optimizing MBR-systems is computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling, giving the ability to describe the flow in the systems. A parameter which is often neglected in such models is the non-Newtonian properties of active sludge, which is of great importance for MBR systems since they operate at sludge...... are measured with a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA). The CFD model is found capable of modelling the correct velocities in a range of setups, making CFD models a powerful tool for optimisation of MBR systems....

  2. Modeling of gadolinium recovery from nitrate medium with 8-hydroxyquinoline by emulsion liquid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.A.; Aglan, R.F.; El-Reefy, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium of Gd(III) from nitrate medium by 8-hydroxyquinoline (HOX) in toluene was studied. Liquid-liquid investigations were first carried out. Based on the equilibrium results, the extraction of Gd(III) from aqueous nitrate medium into an emulsion liquid membrane system (ELM) containing 8-hydroxyquinoline in toluene as extractant, HNO 3 as stripping solution, Span-80 as surfactant was studied. The stability of the prepared ELM was studied in terms of the degree of membrane breakage. The different parameters affecting the permeation of gadolinium (III) were also studied. A general permeation model for the recovery of Gd(III) by the selected membrane is presented. The internal mass transfer in the water in oil (W/O) emulsion drop, the external mass transfer around the drop, the rates of formation and decomposition of the complex at the external aqueous-organic interface were considered.

  3. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stock, Roberto; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Wagner, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model...... membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy...... and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing...

  4. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiqui, Amber

    2016-01-02

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydraulic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydraulics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydraulic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydraulic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of biofilm formation on

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    UM,SUKKEE; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-02-11

    A transient, multi-dimensional model has been developed to simulate proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The model accounts simultaneously for electrochemical kinetics, current distribution, hydrodynamics and multi-component transport. A single set of conservation equations valid for flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane region are developed and numerically solved using a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The numerical model is validated against published experimental data with good agreement. Subsequently, the model is applied to explore hydrogen dilution effects in the anode feed. The predicted polarization cubes under hydrogen dilution conditions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent experiments reported in the literature. The detailed two-dimensional electrochemical and flow/transport simulations further reveal that in the presence of hydrogen dilution in the fuel stream, hydrogen is depleted at the reaction surface resulting in substantial kinetic polarization and hence a lower current density that is limited by hydrogen transport from the fuel stream to the reaction site.

  6. Exponential Decay of Covariances for the Supercritical Membrane Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolthausen, Erwin; Cipriani, Alessandra; Kurt, Noemi

    2017-08-01

    We consider the membrane model, that is the centered Gaussian field on {\\mathbb{Z}^d} whose covariance matrix is given by the inverse of the discrete Bilaplacian. We impose a {δ}-pinning condition, giving a reward of strength {\\varepsilon} for the field to be 0 at any site of the lattice. In this paper we prove that in dimensions {d≥ 5} covariances of the pinned field decay at least exponentially, as opposed to the field without pinning, where the decay is polynomial. The proof is based on estimates for certain discrete weighted norms, a percolation argument and on a Bernoulli domination result.

  7. Phenol separation from phenol-laden saline wastewater by membrane aromatic recovery system-like membrane contactor using superhydrophobic/organophilic electrospun PDMS/PMMA membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Long-Fei; Adeel, Mister; Li, Jun; Xu, Cong; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaofan; Shao, Jiahui; He, Yiliang

    2018-02-10

    Phenol recovery from phenol-laden saline wastewater plays an important role in the waste reclamation and pollution control. A membrane aromatic recovery system-like membrane contactor (MARS-like membrane contactor) was set up in this study using electrospun polydimethylsiloxane/polymethyl methacrylate (PDMS/PMMA) membrane with 0.0048 m 2 effective area to separate phenol from saline wastewater. Phenol and water contact angles of 0° and 162° were achieved on this membrane surface simultaneously, indicating its potential in the separation of phenol and water-soluble salt. Feed solution (500 mL) of 0.90 L/h and receiving solution (500 mL) of 1.26 L/h were investigated to be the optimum conditions for phenol separation, which corresponds to the employed Reynolds number of 14.6 and 20.5. During 108-h continuous separation for feed solution (2.0 g/L phenol, 10.0 g/L NaCl) under room temperature (20 °C), 42.6% of phenol was recycled in receiving solution with a salt rejection of 99.95%. Meanwhile, the mean phenol mass transfer coefficient (K ov ) was 6.7 × 10 -7  m s -1 . As a membrane-based process, though the permeated phenol increased with the increase of phenol concentration in feed solution, the phenol recovery ratio was determined by the membrane properties rather than the pollutant concentrations. Phenol was found to permeate this membrane via adsorption, diffusion and desorption, and therefore, the membrane fouling generated from pore blockage in other membrane separation processes was totally avoided. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Analytical solutions for a single vertical drain with time-dependent vacuum combined surcharge preloading in membrane and membraneless systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, X Y; Indraratna, B; Rujikiatkamjorn, C

    2010-01-01

    Vertical drains combined with vacuum pressure and surcharge preloading are widely used to accelerate the consolidation process of soft clay in order to decrease the pore pressure as well as to increase the effective stress. Currently there are two types of vacuum preloading systems commercially available; (a) membrane system with an airtight membrane over the drainage layer and, (b) membraneless system where a vacuum system is connected to individual drain. Their effectiveness varies from site to site depending on the type of soil treated and the characteristics of the drain-vacuum system. This study presents the analytical solutions of vertical drains with vacuum preloading for both membrane and membraneless systems. According to the field and laboratory observations, the vacuum in both of the membraneless and membrane system was assumed to be decreasing along the drain whereas in the membrane system, it was maintained at a constant level. This model was verified by using the measured settlements and excess pore pressures obtained from large-scale laboratory testing and case studies in Australia. The analytical solutions improved the accuracy of predicting the dissipation of pore water pressure and the associated settlement. The effects of the permeability of the sand blanket in a membrane system and the possible loss of vacuum were also discussed.

  9. The interactions of squalene, alkanes and other mineral oils with model membranes; effects on membrane heterogeneity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Mather, Melissa L; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) offer many favourable facets as an artificial membrane system but the influence of any residual oil that remains in the bilayer following preparation is ill-defined. In this study the fluorescent membrane probes di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (Di-8-ANEPPS) and Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) were used to help understand the nature of the phospholipid-oil interaction and to examine any structural and functional consequences of such interactions on membrane bilayer properties. Concentration-dependent modifications of the membrane dipole potential were found to occur in phospholipid vesicles exposed to a variety of different oils. Incorporation of oil into the lipid bilayer was shown to have no significant effect on the movement of fatty acids across the lipid bilayer. Changes in membrane heterogeneity were, however, demonstrated with increased microdomain formation being visible in the bilayer following exposure to mineral oil, pentadecane and squalene. As it is important that artificial systems provide an accurate representation of the membrane environment, careful consideration should be taken prior to the application of DIBs in studies of membrane structure and organisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimal design and control of solar driven air gap membrane distillation desalination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yih-Hang; Li, Yu-Wei; Chang, Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Air gap membrane distillation unit was used in the desalination plants. ► Aspen Custom Molder was used to simulate each unit of desalination plants. ► Design parameters were investigated to obtain the minimum total annual cost. ► The control structure was proposed to operate desalination plants all day long. -- Abstract: A solar heated membrane distillation desalination system is constructed of solar collectors and membrane distillation devices for increasing pure water productivity. This technically and economically feasible system is designed to use indirect solar heat to drive membrane distillation processes to overcome the unstable supply of solar radiation from sunrise to sunset. The solar heated membrane distillation desalination system in the present study consisted of hot water storage devices, heat exchangers, air gap membrane distillation units, and solar collectors. Aspen Custom Molder (ACM) software was used to model and simulate each unit and establish the cost function of a desalination plant. From Design degree of freedom (DOF) analysis, ten design parameters were investigated to obtain the minimum total annual cost (TAC) with fixed pure water production rate. For a given solar energy density profile of typical summer weather, the minimal TAC per 1 m 3 pure water production can be found at 500 W/m 2 by varying the solar energy intensity. Therefore, we proposed two modes for controlling the optimal design condition of the desalination plant; day and night. In order to widen the operability range of the plant, the sensitivity analysis was used to retrofit the original design point to lower the effluent temperature from the solar collector by increasing the hot water recycled stream. The simulation results show that the pure water production can be maintained at a very stable level whether in sunny or cloudy weather.

  11. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto P Stock

    Full Text Available The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1 ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2 the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3 in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  12. Sphingomyelinase D activity in model membranes: structural effects of in situ generation of ceramide-1-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Roberto P; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes.

  13. Analytical model describes ion conduction in fuel cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Daniel; Tse, Steve; Witten, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Many fuel cell designs employ polyelectrolyte membranes, but little is known about how to tune the parameters (water level, morphology, etc.) to maximize ion conductivity. We came up with a simple model based on a random, discrete water distribution and ion confinement due to neighboring polymer. The results quantitatively agree with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and explain experimental observations. We find that when the ratio of water volume to polymer volume, Vw /Vp , is small, the predicted ion self-diffusion coefficient scales roughly as Dw T√{Vw /Vp } exp(- ⋯Vp /Vw) , where Dw T is the limiting value in pure water at temperature T . At high water levels the model also agrees with MD simulation, plateauing to Dw T . The model predicts a maximum conductivity at a water level higher than is typically used, and that it would be beneficial to increase water retention even at the expense of lower ion concentration. Also, membranes would conduct better if they phase-separated into water-rich and polymer-rich regions. US ARMY MURI #W911NF-10-1-0520.

  14. Hybrid membrane--PSA system for separating oxygen from air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Chad L [Albuquerque, NM; Vaughn, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM; Miller, A Keith [Albuquerque, NM; Cornelius, Christopher J [Blackburg, VA

    2011-01-25

    A portable, non-cryogenic, oxygen generation system capable of delivering oxygen gas at purities greater than 98% and flow rates of 15 L/min or more is described. The system consists of two major components. The first component is a high efficiency membrane capable of separating argon and a portion of the nitrogen content from air, yielding an oxygen-enriched permeate flow. This is then fed to the second component, a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit utilizing a commercially available, but specifically formulated zeolite compound to remove the remainder of the nitrogen from the flow. The system is a unique gas separation system that can operate at ambient temperatures, for producing high purity oxygen for various applications (medical, refining, chemical production, enhanced combustion, fuel cells, etc . . . ) and represents a significant advance compared to current technologies.

  15. Analysis of direct contact membrane distillation based on a lumped-parameter dynamic predictive model

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2016-10-03

    Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology that has a great potential for sustainable water desalination. In order to pave the way for successful commercialization of MD-based water desalination techniques, adequate and accurate dynamical models of the process are essential. This paper presents the predictive capabilities of a lumped-parameter dynamic model for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) and discusses the results under wide range of steady-state and dynamic conditions. Unlike previous studies, the proposed model captures the time response of the spacial temperature distribution along the flow direction. It also directly solves for the local temperatures at the membrane interfaces, which allows to accurately model and calculate local flux values along with other intrinsic variables of great influence on the process, like the temperature polarization coefficient (TPC). The proposed model is based on energy and mass conservation principles and analogy between thermal and electrical systems. Experimental data was collected to validated the steady-state and dynamic responses of the model. The obtained results shows great agreement with the experimental data. The paper discusses the results of several simulations under various conditions to optimize the DCMD process efficiency and analyze its response. This demonstrates some potential applications of the proposed model to carry out scale up and design studies. © 2016

  16. Electricity and mechanics of biomembrane systems: Flexoelectricity in living membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Alexander G.

    2006-01-01

    Flexoelectricity provides a reciprocal relationship between electricity and mechanics in membranes, i.e., between membrane curvature and polarization. Experimental evidence of biomembrane flexoelectricity (including direct and converse flexoelectric effect) is reviewed. Biological implications of flexoelectricity in membrane transport, membrane contact, mechanosensitivity, electromotility and hearing are underlined. Flexoelectricity enables membrane structures to function like soft micro- and nano-machines, sensors and actuators, thus providing important input to molecular electronics applications

  17. Electricity and mechanics of biomembrane systems: Flexoelectricity in living membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Alexander G. [Biomolecular Layers Department, Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: director@issp.bas.bg

    2006-05-24

    Flexoelectricity provides a reciprocal relationship between electricity and mechanics in membranes, i.e., between membrane curvature and polarization. Experimental evidence of biomembrane flexoelectricity (including direct and converse flexoelectric effect) is reviewed. Biological implications of flexoelectricity in membrane transport, membrane contact, mechanosensitivity, electromotility and hearing are underlined. Flexoelectricity enables membrane structures to function like soft micro- and nano-machines, sensors and actuators, thus providing important input to molecular electronics applications.

  18. Electricity and mechanics of biomembrane systems: flexoelectricity in living membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Alexander G

    2006-05-24

    Flexoelectricity provides a reciprocal relationship between electricity and mechanics in membranes, i.e., between membrane curvature and polarization. Experimental evidence of biomembrane flexoelectricity (including direct and converse flexoelectric effect) is reviewed. Biological implications of flexoelectricity in membrane transport, membrane contact, mechanosensitivity, electromotility and hearing are underlined. Flexoelectricity enables membrane structures to function like soft micro- and nano-machines, sensors and actuators, thus providing important input to molecular electronics applications.

  19. Coarctation induces alterations in basement membranes in the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipke, D W; McCarthy, K J; Elton, T S

    1993-01-01

    A coarctation hypertensive rat model was used to examine the effects of elevated blood pressure on basement membrane component synthesis by cardiac myocytes and aorta using immunohistochemistry and Northern blot analysis. Carotid arterial pressure increased immediately on coarctation, and left...... with regard to protein and tissue type affected as well as intensity of the changes. However, changes in mRNA levels (but not protein deposition) for perlecan and type IV collagen were also observed in aortas from hypertensive rats compared with controls. Increases in steady-state mRNA levels for all basement...

  20. Continual Energy Management System of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current research status in energy management of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell hybrid power electric vehicles are first described in this paper, and then build the PEMFC/ lithium-ion battery/ ultra-capacitor hybrid system model. The paper analysis the key factors of the continuous power available in PEM fuel cell hybrid power electric vehicle and hybrid power system working status under different driving modes. In the end this paper gives the working flow chart of the hybrid power system and concludes the three items of the system performance analysis.

  1. Comparison between moving bed-membrane bioreactor (MB-MBR) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems: influence of wastewater salinity variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Trapani, Daniele; Di Bella, Gaetano; Mannina, Giorgio; Torregrossa, Michele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2014-06-01

    Two pilot plant systems were investigated for the treatment of wastewater subject to a gradual increase of salinity. In particular, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a moving bed biofilm membrane bioreactor (MB-MBR) were analyzed. Carbon and ammonium removal, kinetic constants and membranes fouling rates have been assessed. Both plants showed very high efficiency in terms of carbon and ammonium removal and the gradual salinity increase led to a good acclimation of the biomass, as confirmed by the respirometric tests. Significant biofilm detachments from carriers were experienced, which contributed to increase the irreversible superficial cake deposition. However, this aspect prevented the pore fouling tendency in the membrane module of MB-MBR system. On the contrary, the MBR pilot, even showing a lower irreversible cake deposition, was characterized by a higher pore fouling tendency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative measurement and visualization of biofilm O 2 consumption rates in membrane filtration systems

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, Emmanuelle I E C

    2012-03-01

    There is a strong need for techniques enabling direct assessment of biological activity of biofouling in membrane filtration systems. Here we present a new quantitative and non-destructive method for mapping O 2 dynamics in biofilms during biofouling studies in membrane fouling simulators (MFS). Transparent planar O 2 optodes in combination with a luminescence lifetime imaging system were used to map the two-dimensional distribution of O 2 concentrations and consumption rates inside the MFS. The O 2 distribution was indicative for biofilm development. Biofilm activity was characterized by imaging of O 2 consumption rates, where low and high activity areas could be clearly distinguished. The spatial development of O 2 consumption rates, flow channels and stagnant areas could be determined. This can be used for studies on concentration polarization, i.e. salt accumulation at the membrane surface resulting in increased salt passage and reduced water flux. The new optode-based O 2 imaging technique applied to MFS allows non-destructive and spatially resolved quantitative biological activity measurements (BAM) for on-site biofouling diagnosis and laboratory studies. The following set of complementary tools is now available to study development and control of biofouling in membrane systems: (i) MFS, (ii) sensitive pressure drop measurement, (iii) magnetic resonance imaging, (iv) numerical modelling, and (v) biological activity measurement based on O 2 imaging methodology. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Solution Approach for a Mathematical Model Developed for Membrane Separation of a Gas Hydrocarbon Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Mahdi K.; Goodarzi, F.

    2011-09-01

    In present study, a special mathematical model for membrane separation processes was studied. Mathematical model was developed for propylene/propane system and was solved using finite difference solution approach. In this study, membrane length is shared into a number of nodes and required equations are written for each node, separately. Also, golden section method was used for suitable step size selection. It is prescience that the results accuracy and calculation time, depend on number of meshes. Therefore 20 meshes were obtained as an optimum number. The effect of pressure drop equation on solution procedure of the model was also investigated and it was found that the pressure drop equation has a negligible effect on it.

  4. Conceptual energy and water recovery system for self-sustained nano membrane toilet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Dawid P; Kolios, Athanasios J; Onabanjo, Tosin; Wagland, Stuart T; Patchigolla, Kumar; Fidalgo, Beatriz; Manovic, Vasilije; McAdam, Ewan; Parker, Alison; Williams, Leon; Tyrrel, Sean; Cartmell, Elise

    2016-10-15

    With about 2.4 billion people worldwide without access to improved sanitation facilities, there is a strong incentive for development of novel sanitation systems to improve the quality of life and reduce mortality. The Nano Membrane Toilet is expected to provide a unique household-scale system that would produce electricity and recover water from human excrement and urine. This study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of the conceptual energy and water recovery system for the Nano Membrane Toilet designed for a household of ten people and to assess its self-sustainability. A process model of the entire system, including the thermochemical conversion island, a Stirling engine and a water recovery system was developed in Aspen Plus®. The energy and water recovery system for the Nano Membrane Toilet was characterised with the specific net power output of 23.1 Wh/kg settledsolids and water recovery rate of 13.4 dm 3 /day in the nominal operating mode. Additionally, if no supernatant was processed, the specific net power output was increased to 69.2 Wh/kg settledsolids . Such household-scale system would deliver the net power output (1.9-5.8 W). This was found to be enough to charge mobile phones or power clock radios, or provide light for the household using low-voltage LED bulbs.

  5. Catalytic membrane reactor for tritium extraction system from He purge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santucci, Alessia; Incelli, Marco; Sansovini, Mirko; Tosti, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • In the HCBB blanket, the produced tritium is recovered by purging with helium; membrane technologies are able to separate tritium from helium. • The paper presents the results of two experimental campaigns. • In the first, a Pd–Ag diffuser for hydrogen separation is tested at several operating conditions. • In the second, the ability of a Pd–Ag membrane reactor for water decontamination is assessed by performing isotopic swamping and water gas shift reactions. - Abstract: In the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket concept, the produced tritium is recovered purging the breeder with helium at low pressure, thus a tritium extraction system (TES) is foreseen to separate the produced tritium (which contains impurities like water) from the helium gas purge. Several R&D activities are running in parallel to experimentally identify most promising TES technologies: particularly, Pd-based membrane reactors (MR) are under investigation because of their large hydrogen selectivity, continuous operation capability, reliability and compactness. The construction and operation under DEMO relevant conditions (that presently foresee a He purge flow rate of about 10,000 Nm 3 /h and a H 2 /He ratio of 0.1%) of a medium scale MR is scheduled for next year, while presently preliminary experiments on a small scale reactor are performed to identify most suitable operative conditions and catalyst materials. This work presents the results of an experimental campaign carried out on a Pd-based membrane aimed at measuring the capability of this device in separating hydrogen from the helium. Many operative conditions have been investigated by considering different He/H 2 feed flow ratios, several lumen pressures and reactor temperatures. Moreover, the performances of a membrane reactor (composed of a Pd–Ag tube having a wall thickness of about 113 μm, length 500 mm and diameter 10 mm) in processing the water contained in the purge gas have been measured by using

  6. Catalytic membrane reactor for tritium extraction system from He purge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santucci, Alessia, E-mail: alessia.santucci@enea.it [ENEA for EUROfusion, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Incelli, Marco [ENEA for EUROfusion, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); DEIM, University of Tuscia, Via del Paradiso 47, 01100 Viterbo (Italy); Sansovini, Mirko; Tosti, Silvano [ENEA for EUROfusion, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • In the HCBB blanket, the produced tritium is recovered by purging with helium; membrane technologies are able to separate tritium from helium. • The paper presents the results of two experimental campaigns. • In the first, a Pd–Ag diffuser for hydrogen separation is tested at several operating conditions. • In the second, the ability of a Pd–Ag membrane reactor for water decontamination is assessed by performing isotopic swamping and water gas shift reactions. - Abstract: In the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket concept, the produced tritium is recovered purging the breeder with helium at low pressure, thus a tritium extraction system (TES) is foreseen to separate the produced tritium (which contains impurities like water) from the helium gas purge. Several R&D activities are running in parallel to experimentally identify most promising TES technologies: particularly, Pd-based membrane reactors (MR) are under investigation because of their large hydrogen selectivity, continuous operation capability, reliability and compactness. The construction and operation under DEMO relevant conditions (that presently foresee a He purge flow rate of about 10,000 Nm{sup 3}/h and a H{sub 2}/He ratio of 0.1%) of a medium scale MR is scheduled for next year, while presently preliminary experiments on a small scale reactor are performed to identify most suitable operative conditions and catalyst materials. This work presents the results of an experimental campaign carried out on a Pd-based membrane aimed at measuring the capability of this device in separating hydrogen from the helium. Many operative conditions have been investigated by considering different He/H{sub 2} feed flow ratios, several lumen pressures and reactor temperatures. Moreover, the performances of a membrane reactor (composed of a Pd–Ag tube having a wall thickness of about 113 μm, length 500 mm and diameter 10 mm) in processing the water contained in the purge gas have been

  7. Investigation of biological and fouling characteristics of submerged membrane bioreactor process for wastewater treatment by model sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J W; Ahn, K H; Lee, Y H; Lim, B R; Kim, J Y

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a mathematical model for the submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) was developed. The activated sludge model No. 1 (ASM1) was modified to be suitable for describing the characteristics of the SMBR, and the resistance-in-series model was integrated into the ASM1 to describe membrane fouling. Using the newly developed model, the biological and fouling characteristics of the submerged membrane bioreactor process for wastewater treatment was investigated by sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity of effluent COD and nitrogen, TSS in the reactor and membrane flux with respect to each parameter (K(h), mu(H), K(S), K(NHH), K(NOH), b(H), Y(H), mu(A), K(NHA), b(A), Y(A), K(m) and alpha) was investigated by model simulation. As a result, the most important factors affecting membrane fouling were hydrolysis rate constant (K(h)) and cross-flow effect coefficient (K(m)). Heterotrophic yield coefficient (Y(H)) had a great influence on effluent quality. Effluent quality was also somewhat sensitive to K(h). Peculiar operating conditions of the SMBR such as long solids retention time (SRT), absolute retention of solids by membrane and high biomass concentration in bioreactor could explain these model simulation results. The model developed in this study would be very helpful to optimize operating conditions as well as design parameters for a SMBR system.

  8. Microbial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Microfiltration Membranes: A Detailed Characterization Using Model Organisms with Increasing Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vanysacker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since many years, membrane biofouling has been described as the Achilles heel of membrane fouling. In the present study, an ecological assay was performed using model systems with increasing complexity: a monospecies assay using Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli separately, a duospecies assay using both microorganisms, and a multispecies assay using activated sludge with or without spiked P. aeruginosa. The microbial adhesion and biofilm formation were evaluated in terms of bacterial cell densities, species richness, and bacterial community composition on polyvinyldifluoride, polyethylene, and polysulfone membranes. The data show that biofouling formation was strongly influenced by the kind of microorganism, the interactions between the organisms, and the changes in environmental conditions whereas the membrane effect was less important. The findings obtained in this study suggest that more knowledge in species composition and microbial interactions is needed in order to understand the complex biofouling process. This is the first report describing the microbial interactions with a membrane during the biofouling development.

  9. Microbial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Microfiltration Membranes: A Detailed Characterization Using Model Organisms with Increasing Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanysacker, L.; Denis, C.; Declerck, P.; Piasecka, A.; Vankelecom, I. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Since many years, membrane biofouling has been described as the Achilles heel of membrane fouling. In the present study, an ecological assay was performed using model systems with increasing complexity: a monospecies assay using Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli separately, a duospecies assay using both microorganisms, and a multispecies assay using activated sludge with or without spiked P. aeruginosa. The microbial adhesion and biofilm formation were evaluated in terms of bacterial cell densities, species richness, and bacterial community composition on polyvinyldifluoride, polyethylene, and polysulfone membranes. The data show that biofouling formation was strongly influenced by the kind of microorganism, the interactions between the organisms, and the changes in environmental conditions whereas the membrane effect was less important. The findings obtained in this study suggest that more knowledge in species composition and microbial interactions is needed in order to understand the complex biofouling process. This is the first report describing the microbial interactions with a membrane during the biofouling development. PMID:23986906

  10. Modeling flow in nanoporous, membrane reservoirs and interpretation of coupled fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geren, Filiz

    The average pore size in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this pore size, Darcy flow is no longer the dominating flow mechanism and a combination of diffusive flows determines the flow characteristics. Concentration driven self-diffusion has been well known and included in the flow and transport models in porous media. However, when the sizes of the pores and pore-throats decrease down to the size of the hydrocarbon molecules, the porous medium acts like a semi-permeable membrane, and the size of the pore openings dictates the direction of transport between adjacent pores. Accordingly, characterization of flow and transport in tight unconventional plays requires understanding of their membrane properties. This Master of Science thesis first highlights the membrane properties of nanoporous, unconventional reservoirs and then discusses how filtration effects can be incorporated into the models of transport in nanoporous media within the coupled flux concept. The effect of filtration on fluid composition and its impact on black-oil fluid properties like bubble point pressure is also demonstrated. To define filtration and filtration pressure in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs, analogy to chemical osmosis is applied two pore systems connected with a pore throat, which shows membrane properties. Because the pore throat selectivity permits the passage of fluid molecules by their sizes, given a filtration pressure difference between the two pore systems, the concentration difference between the systems is determined by flash calculations. The results are expressed in the form of filtration (membrane) efficiency, which is essential parameter to define coupled fluxes for porous media flow.

  11. Hybrid membrane contactor system for creating semi-breathing air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, D. V.

    2012-02-01

    Typically, the equipment to create an artificial climate does not involve changing the composition of the respiratory air. In particular in medical institutions assumes the existence of plant of artificial climate and disinfection in operating rooms and intensive care wards. The use of a hybrid membrane-absorption systems for the generation of artificial atmospheres are improving the respiratory system, blood is enriched or depleted of various gases, resulting in increased stamina, there is a better, faster or slower metabolism, improves concentration and memory. Application of the system contributes to easy and rapid recovery after the operation. By adding a special component, with drug activity, air ionization, and adjust its composition, you can create a special, more favorable for patients with the atmosphere. These factors allow for the treatment and rehabilitation of patients and reduce mortality of heavy patients.

  12. Reactivation System for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs have been the focus of very intensive researches. Manufacturers of these alternative power sources propose a rejuvenation sequence after the FC has been operating at high power for a certain period of time. These rejuvenation methods could be not appropriate for the reactivation of the FC when it has been out of operation for a long period of time or after it has been repaired. Since the developed reactivation system monitors temperature, current, and the cell voltages of the stack, it could be also useful for the diagnostic and repairing processes. The limited number of published contributions suggests that systems developing reactivation techniques are an open research field. In this paper, an automated system for reactivating PEMFCs and results of experimental testing are presented.

  13. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  14. Magnetic characterization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles pulled through model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Allison L; Wassel, Ronald A; Mondalek, Fadee; Chen, Kejian; Dormer, Kenneth J; Kopke, Richard D

    2007-01-04

    To quantitatively compare in-vitro and in vivo membrane transport studies of targeted delivery, one needs characterization of the magnetically-induced mobility of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). Flux densities, gradients, and nanoparticle properties were measured in order to quantify the magnetic force on the SPION in both an artificial cochlear round window membrane (RWM) model and the guinea pig RWM. Three-dimensional maps were created for flux density and magnetic gradient produced by a 24-well casing of 4.1 kilo-Gauss neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) disc magnets. The casing was used to pull SPION through a three-layer cell culture RWM model. Similar maps were created for a 4 inch (10.16 cm) cube 48 MGOe NdFeB magnet used to pull polymeric-nanoparticles through the RWM of anesthetized guinea pigs. Other parameters needed to compute magnetic force were nanoparticle and polymer properties, including average radius, density, magnetic susceptibility, and volume fraction of magnetite. A minimum force of 5.04 x 10(-16) N was determined to adequately pull nanoparticles through the in-vitro model. For the guinea pig RWM, the magnetic force on the polymeric nanoparticles was 9.69 x 10-20 N. Electron microscopy confirmed the movement of the particles through both RWM models. As prospective carriers of therapeutic substances, polymers containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were succesfully pulled through the live RWM. The force required to achieve in vivo transport was significantly lower than that required to pull nanoparticles through the in-vitro RWM model. Indeed very little force was required to accomplish measurable delivery of polymeric-SPION composite nanoparticles across the RWM, suggesting that therapeutic delivery to the inner ear by SPION is feasible.

  15. Aroma Stripping under various Forms of Membrane Distillation Processes: Experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    such as volatility, activity coefficient and vapor pressure, it is important to know how these aroma compounds will eventually pass through the membrane. Experiments have been made on an aroma model solution and on black currant juice in a lab scale membrane distillation set up which can be operated in various types...... of MD configurations: Vacuum Membrane Distillation , Sweeping Gas Membrane Distillation , Direct Contact Membrane Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation. The influence of feed temperature and feed flow rate on the permeate flux and concentration factor for different types of aroma compounds have...

  16. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  17. In an in-vitro model using human fetal membranes, 17-α hydroxyprogesterone caproate is not an optimal progestogen for inhibition of fetal membrane weakening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Moore, Robert M; Mercer, Brian M; Mansour, Joseph M; Mesiano, Sam; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J; Moore, John J

    2017-12-01

    The progestogen 17-α hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC) is 1 of only 2 agents recommended for clinical use in the prevention of spontaneous preterm delivery, and studies of its efficacy have been conflicting. We have developed an in-vitro model to study the fetal membrane weakening process that leads to rupture in preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes (pPROM). Inflammation/infection associated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induction and decidual bleeding/abruption associated thrombin release are leading causes of preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes. Both agents (TNF-α and thrombin) cause fetal membrane weakening in the model system. Furthermore, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a critical intermediate for both TNF-α and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening. In a previous report, we demonstrated that 3 progestogens, progesterone, 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), each inhibit both TNF-α- and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening at 2 distinct points of the fetal membrane weakening pathway. Each block both the production of and the downstream action of the critical intermediate granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The objective of the study was to characterize the inhibitory effects of 17-OHPC on TNF-α- and thrombin-induced fetal membrane weakening in vitro. Full-thickness human fetal membrane fragments from uncomplicated term repeat cesarean deliveries were mounted in 2.5 cm Transwell inserts and cultured with/without 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate (10 -9 to 10 -7 M). After 24 hours, medium (supernatant) was removed and replaced with/without the addition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (20 ng/mL) or thrombin (10 U/mL) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (200 ng/mL). After 48 hours of culture, medium from the maternal side compartment of the model was assayed for granulocyte-macrophage colony

  18. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP. Results show that curcumin significantly (p<0.01 downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects.

  19. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system....... The temperature is predicted in these three parts, where they also are measured. The heat balance of the system involves a fuel cell model to describe the heat added by the fuel cells when a current is drawn. Furthermore the model also predicts the temperatures when heating the stack with external heating...... elements for start-up, heat conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection, and heating of the inlet gases in the manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....

  20. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Modelling Using Moving Least Squares Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Tirnovan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cell, with low polluting emissions, is a great alternative to replace the traditional electrical power sources for automotive applications or for small stationary consumers. This paper presents a numerical method, for the fuel cell modelling, based on moving least squares (MLS. Experimental data have been used for developing an approximated model of the PEMFC function of the current density, air inlet pressure and operating temperature of the fuel cell. The method can be applied for modelling others fuel cell sub-systems, such as the compressor. The method can be used for off-line or on-line identification of the PEMFC stack.

  1. Pervaporation : membranes and models for the dehydration of ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitzen, Johannes Wilhelmus Franciscus

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the dehydration of ethanol/water mixtures by pervaporation using homogeneous membranes is studied. Both the general transport mechanism as well as the development of highly selective membranes for ethanol/water separation are investigated.

  2. Zeolite Membranes : Ozone Detemplation, Modeling, and Performance Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, J.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane technology plays an increasingly important role in developing a more sustainable process industry. Zeolites are a novel class of membrane materials with unique properties enabling molecular sieving and affinity based separations. This thesis proposes some new concepts in zeolite membrane

  3. Membrane Trafficking in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Feyder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best characterized eukaryotic models. The secretory pathway was the first trafficking pathway clearly understood mainly thanks to the work done in the laboratory of Randy Schekman in the 1980s. They have isolated yeast sec mutants unable to secrete an extracellular enzyme and these SEC genes were identified as encoding key effectors of the secretory machinery. For this work, the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine has been awarded to Randy Schekman; the prize is shared with James Rothman and Thomas Südhof. Here, we present the different trafficking pathways of yeast S. cerevisiae. At the Golgi apparatus newly synthesized proteins are sorted between those transported to the plasma membrane (PM, or the external medium, via the exocytosis or secretory pathway (SEC, and those targeted to the vacuole either through endosomes (vacuolar protein sorting or VPS pathway or directly (alkaline phosphatase or ALP pathway. Plasma membrane proteins can be internalized by endocytosis (END and transported to endosomes where they are sorted between those targeted for vacuolar degradation and those redirected to the Golgi (recycling or RCY pathway. Studies in yeast S. cerevisiae allowed the identification of most of the known effectors, protein complexes, and trafficking pathways in eukaryotic cells, and most of them are conserved among eukaryotes.

  4. Defective membrane remodeling in neuromuscular diseases: insights from animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Cowling

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1, and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1 a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2 tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches.

  5. Detection of inhomogeneities in membrane ohmic resistance in geometrically complex systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svirskis, G; Hounsgaard, J; Gutman, A

    2000-01-01

    DC field-evoked transients in arbitrarily shaped neurons and syncytia were analyzed theoretically. In systems with homogeneous passive membrane properties, the transients develop much faster than the membrane discharges. Conductance of the proximal membrane could be larger due to the injury impos...

  6. Effects of Bloom-Forming Algae on Fouling of Integrated Membrane Systems in Seawater Desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, David Allen

    2009-01-01

    Combining low- and high-pressure membranes into an integrated membrane system is an effective treatment strategy for seawater desalination. Low-pressure microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes remove particulate material, colloids, and high-molecular-weight organics leaving a relatively foulant-free salt solution for treatment by…

  7. Redistribution of Cholesterol in Model Lipid Membranes in Response to the Membrane-Active Peptide Alamethicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    The cellular membrane is a heterogeneous, dynamic mixture of molecules and macromolecules that self-assemble into a tightly-regulated functional unit that provides a semipermeable barrier between the cell and its environment. Among the many compositional differences between mammalian and bacterial cell membranes that impact its physical properties, one key difference is cholesterol content, which is more prevalent in mammals. Cholesterol is an amphiphile that associates with membranes and serves to maintain its fluidity and permeability. Membrane-active peptides, such as the alpha-helical peptide alamethicin, interact with membranes in a concentration- and composition-dependent manner to form transmembrane pores that are responsible for the lytic action of the peptide. Through the use of small-angle neutron scattering and deuterium labeling, it was possible to observe a redistribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles in response to the presence of alamethicin at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1/200. The results demonstrate that the membrane remodeling powers of alamethicin reach beyond the membrane thinning effect to altering the localization of specific components in the bilayer, complementing the accepted two-state mechanism of pore formation. Research was supported by U. S. DOE-OBER (CSMB; FWP ERKP291) and the U. S. DOE-BES Scientific User Facilities Division (ORNL's SNS and HFIR).

  8. Computational molecular modeling and structural rationalization for the design of a drug-loaded PLLA/PVA biopolymeric membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibeko, B; Pillay, V; Choonara, Y E; Khan, R A; Danckwerts, M P; Modi, G; Iyuke, S E; Naidoo, D

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design, characterize and assess the influence of triethanolamine (TEA) on the physicomechanical properties and release of methotrexate (MTX) from a composite biopolymeric membrane. Conjugated poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes were prepared by immersion precipitation with and without the addition of TEA. Drug entrapment efficiency (DEE) and release studies were performed in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4, 37 deg. C). Scanning electron microscopy elucidated the membrane surface morphology. Computational and structural molecular modeling rationalized the potential mechanisms of membrane formation and MTX release. Bi-axial force-distance (F-D) extensibility profiles were generated to determine the membrane toughness, elasticity and fracturability. Membranes were significantly toughened by the addition of TEA as a discrete rubbery phase within the co-polymer matrix. MTX-TEA-PLLA-PVA membranes were tougher (F = 89 N) and more extensible (D = 8.79 mm) compared to MTX-PLLA-PVA (F = 35 N, D = 3.7 mm) membranes as a greater force of extension and fracture distance were required (N = 10). DEE values were relatively high (>80%, N = 5) for both formulations. Photomicrographs revealed distinct crystalline layered morphologies with macro-pores. MTX was released by tri-phasic kinetics with a lower fractional release of MTX from MTX-TEA-PLLA-PVA membranes compared to MTX-PLLA-PVA. TEA provided a synergistic approach to improving the membrane physicomechanical properties and modulation of MTX release. The composite biopolymeric membrane may therefore be suitable for the novel delivery of MTX in the treatment of chronic primary central nervous system lymphoma.

  9. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...

  10. Proton-sensing transistor systems for detecting ion leakage from plasma membranes under chemical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Goda, Tatsuro; Schaffhauser, Daniel F; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Matsumoto, Akira; Miyahara, Yuji

    2017-03-01

    The membrane integrity of live cells is routinely evaluated for cytotoxicity induced by chemical or physical stimuli. Recent progress in bioengineering means that high-quality toxicity validation is required. Here, we report a pH-sensitive transistor system developed for the continuous monitoring of ion leakage from cell membranes upon challenge by toxic compounds. Temporal changes in pH were generated with high reproducibility via periodic flushing of HepG2 cells on a gate insulator of a proton-sensitive field-effect transistor with isotonic buffer solutions with/without NH 4 Cl. The pH transients at the point of NH 4 Cl addition/withdrawal originated from the free permeation of NH 3 across the semi-permeable plasma membranes, and the proton sponge effect produced by the ammonia equilibrium. Irreversible attenuation of the pH transient was observed when the cells were subjected to a membrane-toxic reagent. Experiments and simulations proved that the decrease in the pH transient was proportional to the area of the ion-permeable pores on the damaged plasma membranes. The pH signal was correlated with the degree of hemolysis produced by the model reagents. The pH assay was sensitive to the formation of molecularly sized pores that were otherwise not measurable via detection of the leakage of hemoglobin, because the hydrodynamic radius of hemoglobin was greater than 3.1nm in the hemolysis assay. The pH transient was not disturbed by inherent ion-transporter activity. The ISFET assay was applied to a wide variety of cell types. The system presented here is fast, sensitive, practical and scalable, and will be useful for validating cytotoxins and nanomaterials. The plasma membrane toxicity and hemolysis are widely and routinely evaluated in biomaterials science and biomedical engineering. Despite the recent development of a variety of methods/materials for efficient gene/drug delivery systems to the cytosol, the methodologies for safety validation remain unchanged in

  11. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; pacids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Comparing and Contrasting Traditional Membrane Bioreactor Models with Novel Ones Based on Time Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parneet Paul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The computer modelling and simulation of wastewater treatment plant and their specific technologies, such as membrane bioreactors (MBRs, are becoming increasingly useful to consultant engineers when designing, upgrading, retrofitting, operating and controlling these plant. This research uses traditional phenomenological mechanistic models based on MBR filtration and biochemical processes to measure the effectiveness of alternative and novel time series models based upon input–output system identification methods. Both model types are calibrated and validated using similar plant layouts and data sets derived for this purpose. Results prove that although both approaches have their advantages, they also have specific disadvantages as well. In conclusion, the MBR plant designer and/or operator who wishes to use good quality, calibrated models to gain a better understanding of their process, should carefully consider which model type is selected based upon on what their initial modelling objectives are. Each situation usually proves unique.

  13. The Tat System for Membrane Translocation of Folded Proteins Recruits the Membrane-stabilizing Psp Machinery in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehner, Denise; Osadnik, Hendrik; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Brüser, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tat systems transport folded proteins across energized membranes of bacteria, archaea, and plant plastids. In Escherichia coli, TatBC complexes recognize the transported proteins, and TatA complexes are recruited to facilitate transport. We achieved an abstraction of TatA from membranes without use of detergents and observed a co-purification of PspA, a membrane-stress response protein. The N-terminal transmembrane domain of TatA was required for the interaction. Electron microscopy displayed TatA complexes in direct contact with PspA. PspB and PspC were important for the TatA-PspA contact. The activator protein PspF was not involved in the PspA-TatA interaction, demonstrating that basal levels of PspA already interact with TatA. Elevated TatA levels caused membrane stress that induced a strictly PspBC- and PspF-dependent up-regulation of PspA. TatA complexes were found to destabilize membranes under these conditions. At native TatA levels, PspA deficiency clearly affected anaerobic TMAO respiratory growth, suggesting that energetic costs for transport of large Tat substrates such as TMAO reductase can become growth limiting in the absence of PspA. The physiological role of PspA recruitment to TatA may therefore be the control of membrane stress at active translocons. PMID:22689583

  14. Modeling and simulation of the dynamic behavior of portable proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, C.

    2005-07-01

    In order to analyze the operational behavior, a mathematical model of planar self-breathing fuel cells is developed and validated in Chapter 3 of this thesis. The multicomponent transport of the species is considered as well as the couplings between the transport processes of heat, charge, and mass and the electrochemical reactions. Furthermore, to explain the oxygen mass transport limitation in the porous electrode of the cathode side an agglomerate model for the oxygen reduction reaction is developed. In Chapter 4 the important issue of liquid water generation and transport in PEMFCs is addressed. One of the major tasks when operating this type of fuel cell is avoiding the complete flooding of the PEMFC during operation. A one-dimensional and isothermal model is developed that is based on a coupled system of partial differential equations. The model contains a dynamic and two-phase description of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The mass transport in the gas phase and in the liquid phase is considered as well as the phase transition between liquid water and water vapor. The transport of charges and the electrochemical reactions are part of the model. Flooding effects that are caused by liquid water accumulation are described by this model. Moreover, the model contains a time-dependent description of the membrane that accounts for Schroeder's paradox. The model is applied to simulate cyclic voltammograms. Chapter 5 is focused on the dynamic investigation of PEMFC stacks. Understanding the dynamic behavior of fuel cell stacks is important for the operation and control of fuel cell stacks. Using the single cell model of Chapter 3 and the dynamic model of Chapter 4 as basis, a mathematical model of a PEMFC stack is developed. However, due to the complexity of a fuel cell stack, the spatial resolution and dynamic description of the liquid water transport are not accounted for. These restrictions allow for direct comparison between the solution variables of

  15. Measuring H+ pumping and membrane potential formation in sealed membrane vesicle systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielandt, Alex Green; Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe

    2016-01-01

    is not converted into a product and only moves a few nanometers in space. Here, we describe two methods for the measurement of active proton pumping across lipid bilayers and the concomitant formation of a membrane potential, applying the dyes 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine (ACMA) and oxonol VI. The methods...... are exemplified by assaying transport of the Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (proton pump), which after heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and subsequent purification has been reconstituted in proteoliposomes....

  16. Photochemical solar energy conversion utilizing semiconductors localized in membrane-mimetic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendler, J.H.

    1991-08-31

    Extending the frontiers of colloidal photochemistry and colloidal electrochemistry to solar photochemistry research had been the main objective of this research. More specific objectives of this proposal include the examination of semiconductor-particle-mediated photoelectron transfer and photoelectric effects in different membrane mimetic systems. Emphasis had been placed on developing bilayer lipid membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett films as new membrane-mimetic systems, as well as on the characterization and utilization of these systems.

  17. Estimation of Membrane Hydration Status for Standby Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems by Impedance Measurement: First Results on Stack Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    Fuel cells have started replacing traditional lead-acid battery banks in backup systems. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of standby, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. In the case of low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems...... fed with air whose temperature and relative humidity were controlled, and its complex impedance was measured at different frequencies and for different values of relative humidity. After showing that the experiment was repeatable, the fuel cell stack was characterized, a power regression model...... was applied, and the relationship between module of impedance and relative humidity was found. The results showed that measuring the impedance of a fuel cell during standby can be a viable way for estimating the hydration status of its membrane....

  18. Electrical equivalent thermal network for direct contact membrane distillation modeling and analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2016-09-19

    Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging water desalination technology that offers several advantages compared to conventional desalination methods. Although progress has been made to model the physics of the process, there are two common limitations of existing models. Firstly, many of the models are based on the steady-state analysis of the process and secondly, some of the models are based on partial differential equations, which when discretized introduce many states which are not accessible in practice. This paper presents the derivation of a novel dynamic model, based on the analogy between electrical and thermal systems, for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). An analogous electrical thermal network is constructed and its elements are parameterized such that the response of the network models the DCMD process. The proposed model captures the spatial and temporal responses of the temperature distribution along the flow direction and is able to accurately predict the distilled water flux output. To demonstrate the adequacy of the proposed model, validation with time varying and steady-state experimental data is presented. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling and validation of Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, A. K. M.; Basran, N.; Khan, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the outcome of a small scale fuel cell project. Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts energy from chemical reaction to electrical work. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the different types of fuel cell, which is more efficient, having low operational temperature and fast start up capability results in high energy density. In this study, a mathematical model of 1.2 W PEMFC is developed and simulated using MATLAB software. This model describes the PEMFC behaviour under steady-state condition. This mathematical modeling of PEMFC determines the polarization curve, power generated, and the efficiency of the fuel cell. Simulation results were validated by comparing with experimental results obtained from the test of a single PEMFC with a 3 V motor. The performance of experimental PEMFC is little lower compared to simulated PEMFC, however both results were found in good agreement. Experiments on hydrogen flow rate also been conducted to obtain the amount of hydrogen consumed to produce electrical work on PEMFC.

  20. The spectrin-based membrane skeleton stabilizes mouse megakaryocyte membrane systems and is essential for proplatelet and platelet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Hett, Sunita; Wang, Hongbei; Begonja, Antonija J.; Thon, Jonathan N.; Alden, Eva C.; Wandersee, Nancy J.; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Hartwig, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Megakaryocytes generate platelets by remodeling their cytoplasm first into proplatelets and then into preplatelets, which undergo fission to generate platelets. Although the functions of microtubules and actin during platelet biogenesis have been defined, the role of the spectrin cytoskeleton is unknown. We investigated the function of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton in proplatelet and platelet production in murine megakaryocytes. Electron microscopy revealed that, like circulating platelets, proplatelets have a dense membrane skeleton, the main fibrous component of which is spectrin. Unlike other cells, megakaryocytes and their progeny express both erythroid and nonerythroid spectrins. Assembly of spectrin into tetramers is required for invaginated membrane system maturation and proplatelet extension, because expression of a spectrin tetramer–disrupting construct in megakaryocytes inhibits both processes. Incorporation of this spectrin-disrupting fragment into a novel permeabilized proplatelet system rapidly destabilizes proplatelets, causing blebbing and swelling. Spectrin tetramers also stabilize the “barbell shapes” of the penultimate stage in platelet production, because addition of the tetramer-disrupting construct converts these barbell shapes to spheres, demonstrating that membrane skeletal continuity maintains the elongated, pre-fission shape. The results of this study provide evidence for a role for spectrin in different steps of megakaryocyte development through its participation in the formation of invaginated membranes and in the maintenance of proplatelet structure. PMID:21566095

  1. Improving dynamic performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cell system using time delay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Bae

    Transient behaviour is a key parameter for the vehicular application of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The goal of this presentation is to construct better control technology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell. The PEM fuel cell model comprises a compressor, an injection pump, a humidifier, a cooler, inlet and outlet manifolds, and a membrane-electrode assembly. The model includes the dynamic states of current, voltage, relative humidity, stoichiometry of air and hydrogen, cathode and anode pressures, cathode and anode mass flow rates, and power. Anode recirculation is also included with the injection pump, as well as anode purging, for preventing anode flooding. A steady-state, isothermal analytical fuel cell model is constructed to analyze the mass transfer and water transportation in the membrane. In order to prevent the starvation of air and flooding in a PEM fuel cell, time delay control is suggested to regulate the optimum stoichiometry of oxygen and hydrogen, even when there are dynamical fluctuations of the required PEM fuel cell power. To prove the dynamical performance improvement of the present method, feed-forward control and Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control with a state estimator are compared. Matlab/Simulink simulation is performed to validate the proposed methodology to increase the dynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system.

  2. Advances in biotreatment of acid mine drainage and biorecovery of metals: 2. Membrane bioreactor system for sulfate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Henry H; Govind, Rakesh

    2003-12-01

    Several biotreatmemt techniques for sulfate conversion by the sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have been proposed in the past, however few of them have been practically applied to treat sulfate containing acid mine drainage (AMD). This research deals with development of an innovative polypropylene hollow fiber membrane bioreactor system for the treatment of acid mine water from the Berkeley Pit, Butte, MT, using hydrogen consuming SRB biofilms. The advantages of using the membrane bioreactor over the conventional tall liquid phase sparged gas bioreactor systems are: large microporous membrane surface to the liquid phase; formation of hydrogen sulfide outside the membrane, preventing the mixing with the pressurized hydrogen gas inside the membrane; no requirement of gas recycle compressor; membrane surface is suitable for immobilization of active SRB, resulting in the formation of biofilms, thus preventing washout problems associated with suspended culture reactors; and lower operating costs in membrane bioreactors, eliminating gas recompression and gas recycle costs. Information is provided on sulfate reduction rate studies and on biokinetic tests with suspended SRB in anaerobic digester sludge and sediment master culture reactors and with SRB biofilms in bench-scale SRB membrane bioreactors. Biokinetic parameters have been determined using biokinetic models for the master culture and membrane bioreactor systems. Data are presented on the effect of acid mine water sulfate loading at 25, 50, 75 and 100 ml/min in scale-up SRB membrane units, under varied temperatures (25, 35 and 40 degrees C) to determine and optimize sulfate conversions for an effective AMD biotreatment. Pilot-scale studies have generated data on the effect of flow rates of acid mine water (MGD) and varied inlet sulfate concentrations in the influents on the resultant outlet sulfate concentration in the effluents and on the number of SRB membrane modules needed for the desired sulfate conversion in

  3. Natural Organic Matter Removal and Fouling in a Low Pressure Hybrid Membrane Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Uyak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate powdered activated carbon (PAC contribution to natural organic matter (NOM removal by a submerged MF and UF hybrid systems. It was found that filtration of surface waters by a bare MF and UF membranes removed negligible TOC; by contrast, significant amounts of TOC were removed when daily added PAC particles were predeposited on the membrane surfaces. These results support the assumption that the membranes surface properties and PAC layer structure might have considerably influential factor on NOM removal. Moreover, it was concluded that the dominant removal mechanism of hybrid membrane system is adsorption of NOM within PAC layer rather than size exclusion of NOM by both of membrane pores. Transmembrane pressure (TMP increases with PAC membrane systems support the view that PAC adsorption pretreatment will not prevent the development of membrane pressure; on the contrary, PAC particles themselves caused membrane fouling by blocking the entrance of pores of MF and UF membranes. Although all three source waters have similar HPI content, it appears that the PAC interaction with the entrance of membrane pores was responsible for offsetting the NOM fractional effects on membrane fouling for these source waters.

  4. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The practical use of resistance modelling to interpret the gas separation properties of hollow fiber membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Fauzi Ismail; Shilton, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    A simple resistance modelling methodology is presented for gas transport through asymmetric polymeric membranes. The methodology allows fine structural properties such as active layer thickness and surface porosity, to be determined from experimental gas permeation data. This paper, which could be regarded as a practical guide, shows that resistance modeling, if accompanied by realistic working assumptions, need not be difficult and can provide a valuable insight into the relationships between the membrane fabrication conditions and performance of gas separation membranes. (Author)

  6. Modeling and off-design performance of a 1 kWe HT-PEMFC (high temperature-proton exchange membrane fuel cell)-based residential micro-CHP (combined-heat-and-power) system for Danish single-family households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arsalis, Alexandros; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    temperatures, as compared to Nafion-based PEMFCs and therefore can be a significant candidate for cogeneration residential systems. The proposed system can provide electric power, hot water, and space heating for a typical Danish single-family household. A complete fuel processing subsystem, with all necessary......A novel proposal for the modeling and operation of a micro-CHP (combined-heat-and-power) residential system based on HT-PEMFC (High Temperature-Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell) technology is described and analyzed to investigate its commercialization prospects. An HT-PEMFC operates at elevated...

  7. An advanced simulation model for membrane bioreactors: development, calibration and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, T; Gaida, D; Keysers, C; Pinnekamp, J; Bongards, M; Kern, P; Wolf, C; Sousa Brito, A L

    2012-01-01

    Membrane wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have several advantages compared with conventionally designed WWTPs with classical purification techniques. The filtration process is the key to their commercial success in Germany with respect to energy consumption and effectiveness, enabled by the optimization of filtration using a dynamic simulation model. This work is focused on the development of a robust, flexible and practically applicable membrane simulation model for submerged hollow-fibre and flat-sheet membrane modules. The model is based on standard parameters usually measured on membrane WWTPs. The performance of the model is demonstrated by successful calibration and validation for three different full-scale membrane WWTPs achieving good results. Furthermore, the model is combinable with Activated Sludge Models.

  8. System and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M

    2016-09-27

    A system and method for air temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  9. System and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.

    2017-02-21

    A system and method for temperature control in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor is provided. The system and method involves introducing a specific quantity of cooling air or trim air in between stages in a multistage oxygen transport membrane based reactor or furnace to maintain generally consistent surface temperatures of the oxygen transport membrane elements and associated reactors. The associated reactors may include reforming reactors, boilers or process gas heaters.

  10. Parametric linear modeling of circular cMUT membranes in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köymen, Hayrettin; Senlik, Muhammed N; Atalar, Abdullah; Olcum, Selim

    2007-06-01

    We present a lumped element parametric model for the clamped circular membrane of a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT). The model incorporates an electrical port and two sets of acoustic ports, through which the cMUT couples to the medium. The modeling approach is based on matching a lumped element model and the mechanical impedance of the cMUT membrane at the resonance frequencies in vacuum. Very good agreement between finite element simulation results and model impedance is obtained. Equivalent circuit model parameters can be found from material properties and membrane dimensions without a need for finite element simulation.

  11. Assessment of Passive Intestinal Permeability Using an Artificial Membrane Insert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berben, Philippe; Brouwers, Joachim; Augustijns, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Despite reasonable predictive power of current cell-based and cell-free absorption models for the assessment of intestinal drug permeability, high costs and lengthy preparation steps hamper their use. The use of a simple artificial membrane (without any lipids present) as intestinal barrier substitute would overcome these hurdles. In the present study, a set of 14 poorly water-soluble drugs, dissolved in 2 different media (fasted state simulated/human intestinal fluids [FaSSIF/FaHIF]), were applied to the donor compartment of an artificial membrane insert system (AMI-system) containing a regenerated cellulose membrane. Furthermore, to investigate the predictive capacity of the AMI-system as substitute for the well-established Caco-2 system to assess intestinal permeability, the same set of 14 drugs dissolved in FaHIF were applied to the donor compartment of a Caco-2 system. For 14 drugs, covering a broad range of physicochemical parameters, a reasonable correlation between both absorption systems was observed, characterized by a Pearson correlation coefficient r of 0.95 (FaHIF). Using the AMI-system, an excellent predictive capacity of FaSSIF as surrogate medium for FaHIF was demonstrated (r = 0.96). Based on the acquired data, the AMI-system appears to be a time- and cost-effective tool for the early-stage estimation of passive intestinal permeability for poorly water-soluble drugs. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An averaged polarizable potential for multiscale modeling in phospholipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzke, Sarah; List, Nanna Holmgaard; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2017-01-01

    is underlined for the description of larger assemblies of lipids, that is, membranes. In conclusion, we find that specially developed polarizable parameters are needed for embedding calculations in membranes, while common non-polarizable point-charge force fields usually perform well enough for structural...

  13. Structure and orientation study of Ebola fusion peptide inserted in lipid membrane models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, Audrey; Castano, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The fusion peptide of Ebola virus comprises a highly hydrophobic sequence located downstream from the N-terminus of the glycoprotein GP2 responsible for virus-host membrane fusion. The internal fusion peptide of GP2 inserts into membranes of infected cell to mediate the viral and the host cell membrane fusion. Since the sequence length of Ebola fusion peptide is still not clear, we study in the present work the behavior of two fusion peptides of different lengths which were named EBO17 and EBO24 referring to their amino acid length. The secondary structure and orientation of both peptides in lipid model systems made of DMPC:DMPG:cholesterol:DMPE (6:2:5:3) were investigated using PMIRRAS and polarized ATR spectroscopy coupled with Brewster angle microscopy. The infrared results showed a structural flexibility of both fusion peptides which are able to transit reversibly from an α-helix to antiparallel β-sheets. Ellipsometry results corroborate together with isotherm measurements that EBO peptides interacting with lipid monolayer highly affected the lipid organization. When interacting with a single lipid bilayer, at low peptide content, EBO peptides insert as mostly α-helices mainly perpendicular into the lipid membrane thus tend to organize the lipid acyl chains. Inserted in multilamellar vesicles at higher peptide content, EBO peptides are mostly in β-sheet structures and induce a disorganization of the lipid chain order. In this paper, we show that the secondary structure of the Ebola fusion peptide is reversibly flexible between α-helical and β-sheet conformations, this feature being dependent on its concentration in lipids, eventually inducing membrane fusion. © 2013.

  14. Interaction of a peptide derived from C-terminus of human TRPA1 channel with model membranes mimicking the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witschas, Katja; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Korkut, Dursun Nizam; Vladan, Maria Magdalena; Salgado, Gilmar; Lecomte, Sophie; Vlachova, Viktorie; Alves, Isabel D

    2015-05-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1) belongs to the TRP cation channel superfamily that responds to a panoply of stimuli such as changes in temperature, calcium levels, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and lipid mediators among others. The TRP superfamily has been implicated in diverse pathological states including neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, inflammation, pain and cancer. The intracellular C-terminus is an important regulator of TRP channel activity. Studies with this and other TRP superfamily members have shown that the C-terminus association with lipid bilayer alters channel sensitivity and activation, especially interactions occurring through basic residues. Nevertheless, it is not yet clear how this process takes place and which regions in the C-terminus would be responsible for such membrane recognition. With that in mind, herein the first putative membrane interacting region of the C-terminus of human TRPA1, (corresponding to a 29 residue peptide, IAEVQKHASLKRIAMQVELHTSLEKKLPL) named H1 due to its potential helical character was chosen for studies of membrane interaction. The affinity of H1 to lipid membranes, H1 structural changes occurring upon this interaction as well as effects of this interaction in lipid organization and integrity were investigated using a biophysical approach. Lipid models systems composed of zwitterionic and anionic lipids, namely those present in the lipid membrane inner leaflet, where H1 is prone to interact, where used. The study reveals a strong interaction and affinity of H1 as well as peptide structuration especially with membranes containing anionic lipids. Moreover, the interactions and peptide structure adoption are headgroup specific. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation, feed channel pressure drop increase and permeate flux decline in membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2014-12-01

    The influence of organic nutrient load on biomass accumulation (biofouling) and pressure drop development in membrane filtration systems was investigated. Nutrient load is the product of nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity. Biofouling - excessive growth of microbial biomass in membrane systems - hampers membrane performance. The influence of biodegradable organic nutrient load on biofouling was investigated at varying (i) crossflow velocity, (ii) nutrient concentration, (iii) shear, and (iv) feed spacer thickness. Experimental studies were performed with membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) containing a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane and a 31 mil thick feed spacer, commonly applied in practice in RO and nanofiltration (NF) spiral-wound membrane modules. Numerical modeling studies were done with identical feed spacer geometry differing in thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil). Additionally, experiments were done applying a forward osmosis (FO) membrane with varying spacer thickness (28, 31 and 34 mil), addressing the permeate flux decline and biofilm development. Assessed were the development of feed channel pressure drop (MFS studies), permeate flux (FO studies) and accumulated biomass amount measured by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total organic carbon (TOC).Our studies showed that the organic nutrient load determined the accumulated amount of biomass. The same amount of accumulated biomass was found at constant nutrient load irrespective of linear flow velocity, shear, and/or feed spacer thickness. The impact of the same amount of accumulated biomass on feed channel pressure drop and permeate flux was influenced by membrane process design and operational conditions. Reducing the nutrient load by pretreatment slowed-down the biofilm formation. The impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance was reduced by applying a lower crossflow velocity and/or a thicker and/or a modified geometry feed spacer. The results indicate that cleanings can be delayed

  16. A large-signal model for CMUT arrays with arbitrary membrane geometry operating in non-collapsed mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satir, Sarp; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F Levent

    2013-11-01

    A large-signal, transient model has been developed to predict the output characteristics of a CMUT array operated in the non-collapse mode. The model is based on separation of the nonlinear electrostatic voltage-to-force relation and the linear acoustic array response. For modeling of linear acoustic radiation and crosstalk effects, the boundary element method is used. The stiffness matrix in the vibroacoustics calculations is obtained using static finite element analysis of a single membrane which can have arbitrary geometry and boundary conditions. A lumped modeling approach is used to reduce the order of the system for modeling the transient nonlinear electrostatic actuation. To accurately capture the dynamics of the non-uniform electrostatic force distribution over the CMUT electrode during large deflections, the membrane electrode is divided into patches shaped to match higher order membrane modes, each introducing a variable to the system model. This reduced order nonlinear lumped model is solved in the time domain using commercial software. The model has two linear blocks to calculate the displacement profile of the electrode patches and the output pressure for a given force distribution over the array. The force-to-array-displacement block uses the linear acoustic model, and the Rayleigh integral is evaluated to calculate the pressure at any field point. Using the model, the time-domain transmitted pressure can be simulated for different large drive signal configurations. The acoustic model is verified by comparison to harmonic FEA in vacuum and fluid for high- and low-aspect-ratio membranes as well as mass-loaded membranes. The overall software model is verified by comparison to transient 3-D finite element analysis and experimental results for different large drive signals, and an example for a phased array simulation is given.

  17. Aroma Stripping under various Forms of Membrane Distillation Processes: Experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    Concentration of fruit juices by membrane distillation is an interesting process as it can be done at low temperature giving a gentle concentration process with little deterioration of the juices. Since the juices contains many different aroma compounds with a wide range of chemical properties...... such as volatility, activity coefficient and vapor pressure, it is important to know how these aroma compounds will eventually pass through the membrane. Experiments have been made on an aroma model solution and on black currant juice in a lab scale membrane distillation set up which can be operated in various types...... of MD configurations: Vacuum Membrane Distillation , Sweeping Gas Membrane Distillation , Direct Contact Membrane Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation. The influence of feed temperature and feed flow rate on the permeate flux and concentration factor for different types of aroma compounds have...

  18. An Analytical Model for CMUTs with Square Multilayer Membranes Using the Ritz Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT multilayer membrane plays an important role in the performance metrics including the transmitting efficiency and the receiving sensitivity. However, there are few studies of the multilayer membranes. Some analytical models simplify the multilayer membrane as monolayer, which results in inaccuracies. This paper presents a new analytical model for CMUTs with multilayer membranes, which can rapidly and accurately predict static deflection and response frequency of the multilayer membrane under external pressures. The derivation is based on the Ritz method and Hamilton’s principle. The mathematical relationships between the external pressure, static deflection, and response frequency are obtained. Relevant residual stress compensation method is derived. The model has been verified for three-layer and double-layer CMUT membranes by comparing its results with finite element method (FEM simulations, experimental data, and other monolayer models that treat CMUTs as monolayer plates/membranes. For three-layer CMUT membranes, the relative errors are ranging from 0.71%–3.51% for the static deflection profiles, and 0.35%–4.96% for the response frequencies, respectively. For the double-layer CMUT membrane, the relative error with residual stress compensation is 4.14% for the central deflection, and −1.17% for the response frequencies, respectively. This proposed analytical model can serve as a reliable reference and an accurate tool for CMUT design and optimization.

  19. A new numerical approach for a detailed multicomponent gas separation membrane model and AspenPlus simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murad Chowdhury, M.H.; Feng, X.; Douglas, P.; Croiset, E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    A new numerical solution approach for a widely accepted model developed earlier by Pan [1] for multicomponent gas separation by high-flux asymmetric membranes is presented. The advantage of the new technique is that it can easily be incorporated into commercial process simulators such as AspenPlus trademark [2] as a user-model for an overall membrane process study and for the design and simulation of hybrid processes (i.e., membrane plus chemical absorption or membrane plus physical absorption). The proposed technique does not require initial estimates of the pressure, flow and concentration profiles inside the fiber as does in Pan's original approach, thus allowing faster execution of the model equations. The numerical solution was formulated as an initial value problem (IVP). Either Adams-Moulton's or Gear's backward differentiation formulas (BDF) method was used for solving the non-linear differential equations, and a modified Powell hybrid algorithm with a finite-difference approximation of the Jacobian was used to solve the non-linear algebraic equations. The model predictions were validated with experimental data reported in the literature for different types of membrane gas separation systems with or without purge streams. The robustness of the new numerical technique was also tested by simulating the stiff type of problems such as air dehydration. This demonstrates the potential of the new solution technique to handle different membrane systems conveniently. As an illustration, a multi-stage membrane plant with recycle and purge streams has been designed and simulated for CO{sub 2} capture from a 500 MW power plant flue gas as a first step to build hybrid processes and also to make an economic comparison among different existing separation technologies available for CO{sub 2} separation from flue gas. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. A Pilot-Scale System for Carbon Molecular Sieve Hollow Fiber Membrane Manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Karvan, O.

    2012-12-21

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes offer advantages over traditional polymeric membrane materials, but scale-up of manufacturing systems has not received much attention. In the recent decade, there has been a dramatic increase in fundamental research on these materials with a variety of applications being studied. The results from a pilot-scale CMS production system are presented. This system was designed based on extensive laboratory research, and hollow fiber membranes produced in this system show similar performance compared to membranes produced using a smaller bench-scale system. After optimizing the system design, a 93% recovery of the precursor fibers for use in membrane module preparation were obtained. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Understanding Detergent Effects on Lipid Membranes: A Model Study of Lysolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær

    2010-01-01

    in terms of a phenomenological model based on continuum elastic theory, which yields information about the curvature-inducing properties of the LPC molecule. The results reveal: 1), an increase in the partition coefficient with increasing LPC acyl-chain length; and 2), that the degree of acyl-chain...... mismatch between LPC and POPC determines the magnitude of the membrane mechanical perturbation per LPC molecule in the membrane. Finally, the three-stage model describing detergent membrane interaction has been extended by a parameter D-MCI, which governs the membrane curvature stability in the detergent...... concentration range below the cmc-value of the LPC molecule....

  2. Mass and Heat Transfer Analysis of Membrane Humidifier with a Simple Lumped Mass Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Duk; Bae, Ho June; Ahn, Kook Young; Yu, Sang Seok; Hwang, Joon Young

    2009-01-01

    The performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is seriously changed by the humidification condition which is intrinsic characteristics of the PEMFC. Typically, the humidification of fuel cell is carried out with internal or external humidifier. A membrane humidifier is applied to the external humidification of residential power generation fuel cell due to its convenience and high performance. In this study, a simple static model is constructed to understand the physical phenomena of the membrane humidifier in terms of geometric parameters and operating parameters. The model utilizes the concept of shell and tube heat exchanger but the model is also able to estimate the mass transport through the membrane. Model is constructed with FORTRAN under Matlab/Simulink □ environment to keep consistency with other components model which we already developed. Results shows that the humidity of wet gas and membrane thickness are critical parameters to improve the performance of the humidifier

  3. Replica Ornstein-Zernike Theory Applied for Studying the Equilibrium Distribution of Electrolytes across Model Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Lukšič, Miha

    2018-01-24

    By means of replica Ornstein-Zernike theory (supplemented in a few cases by Monte Carlo simulations) we examined the distribution of an annealed primitive model +1:-1 electrolyte in a mixture with uncharged hard spheres, or another model +1:-1 or +2:-1 electrolyte inside and outside the quenched vesicles, decorated by a model membrane, and across the membrane phase. We explored the influence of the size and charge of the annealed fluid on the partition equilibrium, as well as the effect of the vesicle size and membrane interaction parameters (repulsive barrier height, attractive depth, and membrane width). A hydrophobic cation, present in the mixture with NaCl, slightly enhanced the concentration of sodium ions inside the model vesicle, compared to pure NaCl solution. The replica theory was in good agreement with computer simulations and as such adequate for studying partitioning of small and hydrophobic ions or hydrophobic solutes across model membranes.

  4. A Large Signal Model for CMUT Arrays with Arbitrary Membrane Geometries Operating in Non-Collapsed Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satir, Sarp; Zahorian, Jaime; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    A large signal, transient model has been developed to predict the output characteristics of a CMUT array operated in the non-collapse mode. The model is based on separation of the nonlinear electrostatic voltage-to-force relation and the linear acoustic array response. For linear acoustic radiation and crosstalk effects, the boundary element method is used. The stiffness matrix in the vibroacoustics calculations is obtained using static finite element analysis of a single membrane which can have arbitrary geometry and boundary conditions. A lumped modeling approach is used to reduce the order of the system for modeling the transient nonlinear electrostatic actuation. To accurately capture the dynamics of the non-uniform electrostatic force distribution over the CMUT electrode during large deflections, the membrane electrode is divided into patches shaped to match higher order membrane modes, each introducing a variable to the system model. This reduced order nonlinear lumped model is solved in the time domain using Simulink. The model has two linear blocks to calculate the displacement profile of the electrode patches and the output pressure for a given force distribution over the array, respectively. The force to array displacement block uses the linear acoustic model, and the Rayleigh integral is evaluated to calculate the pressure at any field point. Using the model, the transient transmitted pressure can be simulated for different large signal drive signal configurations. The acoustic model is verified by comparison to harmonic FEA in vacuum and fluid for high and low aspect ratio membranes as well as mass-loaded membranes. The overall Simulink model is verified by comparison to transient 3D FEA and experimental results for different large drive signals; and an example for a phased array simulation is given. PMID:24158297

  5. The binary eutectic of NSAIDS and two-phase liquid system for enhanced membrane permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xudong; Capomacchia, A C

    2005-01-01

    The eutectic properties of binary mixtures of some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with ibuprofen were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and phase equilibrium diagrams. The melting points of selected NSAIDs were significantly depressed due to binary eutectic formation with ibuprofen. Ketoprofen and ibuprofen were selected to study the effect of eutectic formation on membrane permeation using Franz diffusion cells and snake skin as the model membrane. The presence of aqueous isopropyl alcohol (IPA) was necessary to completely transform the solid drugs into an oily state at ambient temperature. As much as the 99.6% of ibuprofen and the 88.8% of ketoprofen added were found in the oily phase of the two-phase liquid system formed when aqueous IPA was added to the eutectic mixture. Due to the high drug concentration in the oily phase, and maximum thermodynamic activity, the two-phase liquid system showed enhanced membrane permeation rates of ibuprofen (37.5 microg/cm2/hr) and ketoprofen (33.4 microg/cm2/hr) compared to other reference preparations used.

  6. Data supporting the validation of a simulation model for multi-component gas separation in polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Lorena; Roizard, Denis; Bounaceur, Roda; Favre, Eric

    2016-12-01

    The article describes data concerning the separation performances of polymeric hollow-fiber membranes. The data were obtained using a model for simulating gas separation, described in the research article entitled "Interplay of inlet temperature and humidity on energy penalty for CO 2 post-combustion capture: rigorous analysis and simulation of a single stage gas permeation process" (L. Giordano, D. Roizard, R. Bounaceur, E. Favre, 2016) [1]. The data were used to validate the model by comparison with literature results. Considering a membrane system based on feed compression only, data from the model proposed and that from literature were compared with respect to the molar composition of permeate stream, the membrane area and specific energy requirement, varying the feed pressure and the CO 2 separation degree.

  7. Root cause analysis of pump valve failures of three membrane pump systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, L.J.; Eijk, A.; Hooft, L. van

    2014-01-01

    This paper will present the root cause analysis and the solution of fatigue failures of the pump valves of three membrane pump systems installed on a chemical plant of Momentive in Pernis, the Netherlands. The membrane pumps were installed approximately 30 years ago. Each system has encountered

  8. Chemo-mechanical model of biological membranes for actuation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-05-01

    Plants have the ability to develop large mechanical force from chemical energy available with bio-fuels. The energy released by ATP hydrolysis assists the transport of ions and fluids to achieve volumetric expansion and homeostasis. Materials that develop pressure and hence strain similar to bio-materials are classified as nastic materials. Recent calculations for controlled actuation of an active material inspired by biological transport mechanism demonstrated the feasibility of developing such a material with actuation energy densities on the order of 100 kJ/m3. Our initial investigation was based on capsules that generate pressure thus causing strain in the surrounding matrix material. Our present work focuses on our efforts to fabricate a representative actuation structure and describes the chemo-mechanical constitutive equation for such a material. The actuator considered in this work is a laminated arrangement of a hydraulic actuator plate with microscopic barrels and a fluid reservoir kept separated by a semi-permeable membrane dispersed with biological transporters. We present here our initial design and a mathematical model to predict the fluid flux and strain developed in such an actuator.

  9. Estimation of Membrane Hydration Status for Standby Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems by Impedance Measurement: First Results on Variable Temperature Stack Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    Fuel cells are getting growing interest in both backup systems and electric vehicles. Although these systems are characterized by periods of standby, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest possible time. However, the membranes of which proton exchange membrane fuel cells are made...... way for estimating the hydration status and the temperature of its membrane before the system is started up. A summarizing table with the complete characterization of the fuel cell stack is included in this article....

  10. Theoretical modeling and experimental validation of transport and separation properties of carbon nanotube electrospun membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Gil

    2016-12-27

    Developing a high flux and selective membrane is required to make membrane distillation (MD) a more attractive desalination process. Amongst other characteristics membrane hydrophobicity is significantly important to get high vapor transport and low wettability. In this study, a laboratory fabricated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite electrospun (E-CNT) membrane was tested and has showed a higher permeate flux compared to poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PH) electrospun membrane (E-PH membrane) in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Only 1% and 2% of CNTs incorporation resulted in an enhanced permeate flux with lower sensitivity to feed salinity while treating a 35 and 70 g/L NaCl solutions. Experimental results and the mechanisms of E-CNT membrane were validated by a proposed new step-modeling approach. The increased vapor transport in E-CNT membranes could not be elucidated by an enhancement of mass transfer only at a given physico-chemical properties. However, the theoretical modeling approach considering the heat and mass transfers simultaneously enabled to explain successfully the enhanced flux in the DCMD process using E-CNT membranes. This indicates that both mass and heat transfers improved by CNTs are attributed to the enhanced vapor transport in the E-CNT membrane.

  11. Dimensional analysis of membrane distillation flux through fibrous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauter, Meagan

    We developed a dimensional-analysis-based empirical modeling method for membrane distillation (MD) flux that is adaptable for novel membrane structures. The method makes fewer simplifying assumptions about membrane pore geometry than existing theoretical (i.e. mechanistic) models, and allows selection of simple, easily-measureable membrane characteristics as structural parameters. Furthermore, the model does not require estimation of membrane surface temperatures; it accounts for convective heat transfer to the membrane surface without iterative fitting of mass and heat transfer equations. The Buckingham-Pi dimensional analysis method is tested for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) using non-woven/fibrous structures as the model membrane material. Twelve easily-measured variables to describe DCMD operating conditions, fluid properties, membrane structures, and flux were identified and combined into eight dimensionless parameters. These parameters were regressed using experimentally-collected data for multiple electrospun membrane types and DCMD system conditions, achieving R2 values >95%. We found that vapor flux through isotropic fibrous membranes can be estimated using only membrane thickness, solid fraction, and fiber diameter as structural parameters. Buckingham-Pi model DCMD flux predictions compare favorably with previously-developed empirical and theoretical models, and suggest this simple yet theoretically-grounded empirical modeling method can be used practically for predicting MD vapor flux from membrane structural parameters.

  12. Viability in the production of a drug extracted from Ananas comosus by a flat membrane system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Luiz Gumes Lopes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the production of e bromelain from the Ananas comosus L. Merril, by determining the process conditions using flat membranes. The production system modeling generated a hyperbolical curve and the optimization by response surfaces showed an influence of the transmembrane pressure higher than the pH influence. The cost of the production of bromelain from A. comosus was estimated 9 to 13 times lower than Sigma's retail sales price and 6.5 to 8.5 times lower than when this enzyme was obtained through a liquid-liquid extraction, which showed the economical feasibility of the process.

  13. Pore-scale modeling and simulation of flow, transport, and adsorptive or osmotic effects in membranes: the influence of membrane microstructure

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2015-07-17

    The selection of an appropriate membrane for a particular application is a complex and expensive process. Computational modeling can significantly aid membrane researchers and manufacturers in this process. The membrane morphology is highly influential on its efficiency within several applications, but is often overlooked in simulation. Two such applications which are very important in the provision of clean water are forward osmosis and filtration using functionalized micro/ultra/nano-filtration membranes. Herein, we investigate the effect of the membrane morphology in these two applications. First we present results of the separation process using resolved finger- and sponge-like support layers. Second, we represent the functionalization of a typical microfiltration membrane using absorptive pore walls, and illustrate the effect of different microstructures on the reactive process. Such numerical modeling will aid manufacturers in optimizing operating conditions and designing efficient membranes.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Polymer Membranes for Soldiers Protective Clothing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andzelm, Jan; Sloan, James; Napadensky, Eugene; Beyer, Rick; Snyder, James; McKnight, Steven; Chung, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    .... These simulations lead to the prediction of the architecture and morphology of the membrane. We have also studied mesoscale morphology of the copolymer constrained by a surface or the nanopore...

  15. Fouling and long-term durability of an integrated forward osmosis and membrane distillation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husnain, T; Mi, B; Riffat, R

    2015-01-01

    An integrated forward osmosis (FO) and membrane distillation (MD) system has great potential for sustainable wastewater reuse. However, the fouling and long-term durability of the system remains largely unknown. This study investigates the fouling behaviour and efficiency of cleaning procedures of FO and MD membranes used for treating domestic wastewater. Results showed that a significant decline in flux of both FO and MD membranes were observed during treatment of wastewater with organic foulants. However, shear force generated by the increased cross-flow physically removed the loosely attached foulants from the FO membrane surface and resulted in 86-88% recovery of flux by cleaning with tap water. For the MD membrane, almost no flux recovery was achieved due to adsorption of organic foulants on the hydrophobic membrane surface, thus indicating significant irreversible fouling/wetting, which may not be effectively cleaned even with chemical reagents. Long-term (10 d) tests showed consistent performance of the FO membrane by rejecting the contaminants. However, organic foulants reduced the hydrophobicity of the MD membrane, caused wetting problems and allowed contaminants to pass through. The results demonstrate that combination of the FO and MD processes can effectively reduce irreversible membrane fouling and solve the wetting problem of the MD membrane.

  16. Hydrogen selective membrane for the natural gas system. Development of CO{sub 2}-selective biogas membrane. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestboe, A.P.

    2012-02-15

    The project started as a literature study and technology development project for a hydrogen selective membrane for the natural gas system. The introduction of hydrogen (for example produced from wind turbines by surplus electricity) in the gas system makes it possible to store energy which can be selectively used with high energy conversion in fuel cells directly located at the end users. In order to make this possible, it is necessary to have a separating unit that can selectively remove hydrogen from the gas mixture and deliver it as fuel to the electrical generator (a fuel cell). In the project, several existing technologies were evaluated with regard to the application in view. It was concluded that while other technologies are ripe, they are costly in energy and unsuitable for the relatively low capacity application that are in question close to the end users. Membrane technology was evaluated to be the most suitable, although the technology is still under development in many cases. In the project it was found that metallic membranes in the form of palladium coated stainless discs would answer the needs for the high purity needed. Laboratory development yielded discs that could separate hydrogen from natural gas, however, the flux was low compared to the needs of the application. It was found that at least 2 bar pressure difference of hydrogen would be needed to get a high enough flux. The way to achieve this pressure would necessitate a compressor which would consume an energy amount high enough to invalidate the concept. When concluding on the results and the study it was found that the direction of the project could be changed towards developing CO{sub 2}-selective membranes with the goal of developing membrane technology that could upgrade biogas by removing CO{sub 2}. The laboratory equipment and setup that were developed in the first part of the project could be used directly in this second part of the project. In this second part of the project it was

  17. A Sound Processor for Cochlear Implant Using a Simple Dual Path Nonlinear Model of Basilar Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new active nonlinear model of the frequency response of the basilar membrane in biological cochlea called the simple dual path nonlinear (SDPN) model and a novel sound processing strategy for cochlear implants (CIs) based upon this model. The SDPN model was developed to utilize the advantages of the level-dependent frequency response characteristics of the basilar membrane for robust formant representation under noisy conditions. In comparison to the dual resonance nonlinear mode...

  18. Experimental Support for a Predictive Osmotic Model of Clay Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    Osmosis has been cited as a mechanism for explaining anomalously high fluid pressures in the subsurface. Clays and shales act as membranes, and osmotic flux across these units may result in pressures sufficiently high to explain these anomalies. The theoretical osmotic pressures as calculated solely from solution properties can be quite large; however, it is not yet resolved whether these geologic membranes are sufficiently ideal to generate such pressures

  19. Binding dynamics of hepatitis C virus' NS5A amphipathic peptide to cell and model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Cheong, Kwang Ho; Lee, ChoongHo; Frank, Curtis W; Glenn, Jeffrey S

    2007-06-01

    Membrane association of the hepatitis C virus NS5A protein is required for viral replication. This association is dependent on an N-terminal amphipathic helix (AH) within NS5A and is restricted to a subset of host cell intracellular membranes. The mechanism underlying this specificity is not known, but it may suggest a novel strategy for developing specific antiviral therapy. Here we have probed the mechanistic details of NS5A AH-mediated binding to both cell-derived and model membranes by use of biochemical membrane flotation and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with dissipation. With both assays, we observed AH-mediated binding to model lipid bilayers. When cell-derived membranes were coated on the quartz nanosensor, however, significantly more binding was detected, and the QCM-derived kinetic measurements suggested the existence of an interacting receptor in the target membranes. Biochemical flotation assays performed with trypsin-treated cell-derived membranes exhibited reduced AH-mediated membrane binding, while membrane binding of control cytochrome b5 remained unaffected. Similarly, trypsin treatment of the nanosensor coated with cellular membranes abolished AH peptide binding to the cellular membranes but did not affect the binding of a control lipid-binding peptide. These results therefore suggest that a protein plays a critical role in mediating and stabilizing the binding of NS5A's AH to its target membrane. These results also demonstrate the successful development of a new nanosensor technology ideal both for studying the interaction between a protein and its target membrane and for developing inhibitors of that interaction.

  20. A Model of Direct Contact Membrane Distillation of Black Currant Juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Busch; Christensen, Knud Villy; Andrésen, René

    2011-01-01

    A numerical model to describe a direct contact membrane distillation proces has been developed. Said model is based on the Dusty Gas model and shell mass and energy balances over a tubular membrane module.  "The solution is applicable to laminar, incompressible and continuous flow in shell......-side spacing of tubular-type unit."  Turtuosity and porosity are characteristics of the membrane in use and have been estimated base don eksperimental studies on destillation of pure water. The fitted model shows a good fit to experimental data obtained by destillation of black currant juice....

  1. Pervaporation separation of n-heptane/thiophene mixtures by polyethylene glycol membranes: Modeling and experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ligang; Zhang, Yuzhong; Kong, Ying

    2009-11-01

    Gasoline desulfurization by membrane processes is a newly emerged technology, which has provided an efficient new approach for sulfur removal and gained increasing attention of the membrane and petrochemical field. A deep understanding of the solution/diffusion of gasoline molecules on/in the membrane can provide helpful information in improving or optimizing membrane performance. In this study, a desulfurization mechanism of polyethylene glycol (PEG) membranes has been investigated by the study of sorption and diffusion behavior of typical sulfur and hydrocarbon species through PEG membranes. A solution-diffusion model based on UNIFAC and free volume theory has been established. Pervaporation (PV) and sorption experiments were conducted to compare with the model calculation results and to analyze the mass transport behavior. The dynamic sorption curves for pure components and the sorption experiments for binary mixtures showed that thiophene, which had a higher solubility coefficient than n-heptane, was the preferential sorption component, which is key in the separation of thiophene/hydrocarbon mixtures. In all cases, the model calculation results fit well the experimental data. The UNIFAC model was a sound way to predict the solubility of solvents in membranes. The established model can predict the removal of thiophene species from hydrocarbon compounds by PEG membranes effectively.

  2. Modeling and Optimization of NLDH/PVDF Ultrafiltration Nanocomposite Membrane Using Artificial Neural Network-Genetic Algorithm Hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefi-Oskoui, Samira; Khataee, Alireza; Vatanpour, Vahid

    2017-07-10

    In this research, MgAl-CO 3 2- nanolayered double hydroxide (NLDH) was synthesized through a facile coprecipitation method, followed by a hydrothermal treatment. The prepared NLDHs were used as a hydrophilic nanofiller for improving the performance of the PVDF-based ultrafiltration membranes. The main objective of this research was to obtain the optimized formula of NLDH/PVDF nanocomposite membrane presenting the best performance using computational techniques as a cost-effective method. For this aim, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for modeling and expressing the relationship between the performance of the nanocomposite membrane (pure water flux, protein flux and flux recovery ratio) and the affecting parameters including the NLDH, PVP 29000 and polymer concentrations. The effects of the mentioned parameters and the interaction between the parameters were investigated using the contour plot predicted with the developed model. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and water contact angle techniques were applied to characterize the nanocomposite membranes and to interpret the predictions of the ANN model. The developed ANN model was introduced to genetic algorithm (GA) as a bioinspired optimizer to determine the optimum values of input parameters leading to high pure water flux, protein flux, and flux recovery ratio. The optimum values for NLDH, PVP 29000 and the PVDF concentration were determined to be 0.54, 1, and 18 wt %, respectively. The performance of the nanocomposite membrane prepared using the optimum values proposed by GA was investigated experimentally, in which the results were in good agreement with the values predicted by ANN model with error lower than 6%. This good agreement confirmed that the nanocomposite membranes prformance could be successfully modeled and optimized by ANN-GA system.

  3. Effect of different commercial feed spacers on biofouling of reverse osmosis membrane systems: A numerical study

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2014-06-01

    Feed spacers and hydrodynamics have been found relevant for the impact of biofouling on performance in reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems.The objectives of this study on biofouling development were to determine the impact of (i) linear flow velocity and bacterial cell load, (ii) biomass location and (iii) various feed spacer geometries as applied in practice as well as a modified geometry spacer.A three-dimensional mathematical model for biofouling of feed spacer channels including hydrodynamics, solute mass transport and biofilm formation was developed in COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB software.Results of this study indicate that the feed channel pressure drop increase caused by biofilm formation can be reduced by using thicker and/or modified feed spacer geometry and/or a lower flow rate in the feed channel. The increase of feed channel pressure drop by biomass accumulation is shown to be strongly influenced by the location of biomass. Results of numerical simulations are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data, indicating that this micro-scale mechanistic model is representative for practice. The developed model can help to understand better the biofouling process of spiral-wound RO and NF membrane systems and to develop strategies to reduce and control biofouling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Scale-Up Design Analysis and Modelling of Cobalt Oxide Silica Membrane Module for Hydrogen Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozhao Ji

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the application of a validated mathematical model for gas permeation at high temperatures focusing on demonstrated scale-up design for H2 processing. The model considered the driving force variation with spatial coordinates and the mass transfer across the molecular sieve cobalt oxide silica membrane to predict the separation performance. The model was used to study the process of H2 separation at 500 °C in single and multi-tube membrane modules. Parameters of interest included the H2 purity in the permeate stream, H2 recovery and H2 yield as a function of the membrane length, number of tubes in a membrane module, space velocity and H2 feed molar fraction. For a single tubular membrane, increasing the length of a membrane tube led to higher H2 yield and H2 recovery, owing to the increase of the membrane area. However, the H2 purity decreased as H2 fraction was depleted, thus reducing the driving force for H2 permeation. By keeping the membrane length constant in a multi-tube arrangement, the H2 yield and H2 recovery increase was attributed to the higher membrane area, but the H2 purity was again compromised. Increasing the space velocity avoided the reduction of H2 purity and still delivered higher H2 yield and H2 recovery than in a single membrane arrangement. Essentially, if the membrane surface is too large, the driving force becomes lower at the expense of H2 purity. In this case, the membrane module is over designed. Hence, maintaining a driving force is of utmost importance to deliver the functionality of process separation.

  5. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  6. Retrieving Backbone String Neighbors Provides Insights Into Structural Modeling of Membrane Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiang-Ming; Li, Tong-Hua; Cong, Pei-Sheng; Tang, Sheng-Nan; Xiong, Wen-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Identification of protein structural neighbors to a query is fundamental in structure and function prediction. Here we present BS-align, a systematic method to retrieve backbone string neighbors from primary sequences as templates for protein modeling. The backbone conformation of a protein is represented by the backbone string, as defined in Ramachandran space. The backbone string of a query can be accurately predicted by two innovative technologies: a knowledge-driven sequence alignment and encoding of a backbone string element profile. Then, the predicted backbone string is employed to align against a backbone string database and retrieve a set of backbone string neighbors. The backbone string neighbors were shown to be close to native structures of query proteins. BS-align was successfully employed to predict models of 10 membrane proteins with lengths ranging between 229 and 595 residues, and whose high-resolution structural determinations were difficult to elucidate both by experiment and prediction. The obtained TM-scores and root mean square deviations of the models confirmed that the models based on the backbone string neighbors retrieved by the BS-align were very close to the native membrane structures although the query and the neighbor shared a very low sequence identity. The backbone string system represents a new road for the prediction of protein structure from sequence, and suggests that the similarity of the backbone string would be more informative than describing a protein as belonging to a fold. PMID:22415040

  7. Retrieving backbone string neighbors provides insights into structural modeling of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiang-Ming; Li, Tong-Hua; Cong, Pei-Sheng; Tang, Sheng-Nan; Xiong, Wen-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Identification of protein structural neighbors to a query is fundamental in structure and function prediction. Here we present BS-align, a systematic method to retrieve backbone string neighbors from primary sequences as templates for protein modeling. The backbone conformation of a protein is represented by the backbone string, as defined in Ramachandran space. The backbone string of a query can be accurately predicted by two innovative technologies: a knowledge-driven sequence alignment and encoding of a backbone string element profile. Then, the predicted backbone string is employed to align against a backbone string database and retrieve a set of backbone string neighbors. The backbone string neighbors were shown to be close to native structures of query proteins. BS-align was successfully employed to predict models of 10 membrane proteins with lengths ranging between 229 and 595 residues, and whose high-resolution structural determinations were difficult to elucidate both by experiment and prediction. The obtained TM-scores and root mean square deviations of the models confirmed that the models based on the backbone string neighbors retrieved by the BS-align were very close to the native membrane structures although the query and the neighbor shared a very low sequence identity. The backbone string system represents a new road for the prediction of protein structure from sequence, and suggests that the similarity of the backbone string would be more informative than describing a protein as belonging to a fold.

  8. Modeling of System Families

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feiler, Peter

    2007-01-01

    .... The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Architecture Analysis & Design Language (AADL) is an industry-standard, architecture-modeling notation specifically designed to support a component- based approach to modeling embedded systems...

  9. Modelling Railway Interlocking Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Morten Peter; Viuf, P.; Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth

    2000-01-01

    In this report we present a model of interlocking systems, and describe how the model may be validated by simulation. Station topologies are modelled by graphs in which the nodes denote track segments, and the edges denote connectivity for train traÆc. Points and signals are modelled by annotatio...

  10. (CryoTransmission Electron Microscopy of Phospholipid Model Membranes Interacting with Amphiphilic and Polyphilic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Meister

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid membranes can incorporate amphiphilic or polyphilic molecules leading to specific functionalities and to adaptable properties of the lipid bilayer host. The insertion of guest molecules into membranes frequently induces changes in the shape of the lipid matrix that can be visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques. Here, we review the use of stained and vitrified specimens in (cryoTEM to characterize the morphology of amphiphilic and polyphilic molecules upon insertion into phospholipid model membranes. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of novel synthetic amphiphilic and polyphilic bolalipids and polymers on membrane integrity and shape stability.

  11. Modeling of hydrodynamics in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor for mammalian cells cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Menshutina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling in CFD-packages are powerfull instrument for design and calculation of any engineering tasks. CFD-package contains the set of programs that allow to model the different objects behavior based on the mathematical lows. ANSYS Fluent are widely used for modelling of biotechnological and chemical-technological processes. This package is convenient to describe their hydrodynamics. As cell cultivation is one of the actual scientific direction in modern biotechnology ANSYS Fluent was used to create the model of hollow fiber membrane bioreactor. The fibers are hollow cylindrical membrane to be used for cell cultivation. The criterion of process effectiveness for cell growth is full filling of the membrane surface by cells in the bioreactor. While the cell growth the fiber permeability is decreased which effects to feed flow through membrane pores. The specific feature of this process is to ensure such feed flow to deliver the optimal nutrition for the cells on the external membrane surface. The velocity distribution inside the fiber and in all bioreactor as a whole has been calculated based on mass an impulse conservation equations taking into account the mathematical model assumptions. The hydrodynamics analysis in hollow fiber membrane bioreactor is described by the three-dimensional model created in ANSYS Fluent. The specific features of one membrane model are considered and for whole bioreactor too.

  12. Nutrient utilization and oxygen production by Chlorella Vulgaris in a hybrid membrane bioreactor and algal membrane photobioreactor system

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Yasmeen Hani Kamal

    2017-02-17

    This work studied oxygen production and nutrient utilization by Chlorella Vulgaris at different organic/inorganic carbon (OC/IC) and ammonium/nitrate (NH4+-N/NO3--N) ratios to design a hybrid aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and membrane photobioreactor (MPBR) system. Specific oxygen production by C. vulgaris was enough to support the MBR if high growth is accomplished. Nearly 100% removal (or utilization) of PO43--P and IC was achieved under all conditions tested. Optimal growth was achieved at mixotrophic carbon conditions (0.353 d-1) and the highest NH4+-N concentration (0.357 d-1), with preferable NH4+-N utilization rather than NO3--N. The results indicate the potential of alternative process designs to treat domestic wastewater by coupling the hybrid MBR - MPBR systems.

  13. Integration of Bioreactor and Membrane Separation Processes: A Model Based Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado Rubio, Oscar Andres

    test. Satisfactory results are obtained regulating the pH and managing the input constraints. The design and operability of the integrated bioreactor and REED module are investigated using the developed models and control structure. The study involves two different case studies: continuous lactic acid......This work is motivated by the need for tighter integration of industrial processes in an attempt to improve process sustainability. To this end, this work considers a interesting case study around which different systematic approaches are used or developed to achieve the above goal. The thesis...... is concerned with the understanding of an integrated bioreactor and electrically driven membrane separation processes for lactic acid fermentation. This is achieved through a model based investigation of the individual units and the integrated system. Development of system understanding is the key to reveal...

  14. Modeling bidirectional transport of quantum dot nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2011-08-01

    This paper develops a model of transport of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes (MNTs). It is assumed that QDs are transported inside intracellular organelles (called here nanoparticle-loaded vesicles, NLVs) that are propelled by either kinesin or dynein molecular motors while moving on microtubules (MTs). A vesicle may have both types of motors attached to it, but the motors are assumed to work in a cooperative fashion, meaning that at a given time the vesicle is moved by either kinesin or dynein motors. The motors are assumed not to work against each other, when one type of motors is pulling the vesicle, the other type is inactive. From time to time the motors may switch their roles: passive motors can become active motors and vice versa, resulting in the change of the vesicle's direction of motion. It is further assumed that QDs can escape NLVs and become free QDs, which are then transported by diffusion. Free QDs can be internalized by NLVs. The effects of two possible types of MT orientation in MNTs are investigated: when all MTs have a uniform polarity orientation, with their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells connected by an MNT, and when MTs have a mixed polarity orientation, with half of MTs having their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells and the other half having their plus-ends directed toward the other cell. Computational results are presented for three cases. The first case is when organelles are as likely to be transported by kinesin motors as by dynein motors. The second case is when organelles are more likely to be transported by kinesin motors than by dynein motors, and the third case is when NLVs do not associate with dynein motors at all. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of novel resorbable membranes for bone augmentation in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, N.; van Leeuwen, A.C.; Yuan, Huipin; Bos, R.R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our study compared two novel, biodegradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) barrier membranes to clinically applied barrier membranes in maintaining volume of block autologous bone grafts in a rat mandible model. Material and methods Two hundred and forty rats were included in this

  16. Evaluation of novel resorbable membranes for bone augmentation in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Yuan, Huipin; Bos, Ruud R M; Grijpma, Dirk W; Kuijer, Roelof

    ObjectivesOur study compared two novel, biodegradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) barrier membranes to clinically applied barrier membranes in maintaining volume of block autologous bone grafts in a rat mandible model. Material and methodsTwo hundred and forty rats were included in this

  17. Air gap membrane distillation. 2. Model validation and hollow fibre module performance analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, C.M.; Meindersma, G.W.; Reith, T.; de Haan, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the experimental results of counter current flow air gap membrane distillation experiments are presented and compared with predictive model calculations. Measurements were carried out with a cylindrical test module containing a single hollow fibre membrane in the centre and a

  18. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed

  19. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jimin, E-mail: jimin.wang@yale.edu; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo, E-mail: yorgo.modis@yale.edu

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  20. Interaction pathways between soft lipid nanodiscs and plasma membranes: A molecular modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shixin; Luo, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Ren, Hao; Deng, Li; Zhang, Xianren; Huang, Fang; Yue, Tongtao

    2017-10-01

    Lipid nanodisc, a model membrane platform originally synthesized for study of membrane proteins, has recently been used as the carrier to deliver amphiphilic drugs into target tumor cells. However, the central question of how cells interact with such emerging nanomaterials remains unclear and deserves our research for both improving the delivery efficiency and reducing the side effect. In this work, a binary lipid nanodisc is designed as the minimum model to investigate its interactions with plasma membranes by using the dissipative particle dynamics method. Three typical interaction pathways, including the membrane attachment with lipid domain exchange of nanodiscs, the partial membrane wrapping with nanodisc vesiculation, and the receptor-mediated endocytosis, are discovered. For the first pathway, the boundary normal lipids acting as ligands diffuse along the nanodisc rim to gather at the membrane interface, repelling the central bola lipids to reach a stable membrane attachment. If bola lipids are positioned at the periphery and act as ligands, they diffuse to form a large aggregate being wrapped by the membrane, leaving the normal lipids exposed on the membrane exterior by assembling into a vesicle. Finally, by setting both central normal lipids and boundary bola lipids as ligands, the receptor-mediated endocytosis occurs via both deformation and self-rotation of the nanodiscs. All above pathways for soft lipid nanodiscs are quite different from those for rigid nanoparticles, which may provide useful guidelines for design of soft lipid nanodiscs in widespread biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental performance of indirect air–liquid membrane contactors for liquid desiccant cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Rajat Subhra; Jain, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the stringent indoor air quality (IAQ) requirements and high cost of desiccants, one of the major concerns in liquid desiccant technology has been the carryover, which can be eliminated through indirect contact between desiccant and air. Membrane contactors using microporous semipermeable hydrophobic membranes have a great potential in this regard. This communication investigates the performance of semipermeable membrane based indirect contactors as dehumidifiers in liquid desiccant cooling applications. Experiments on different types of membrane contactors are carried out using lithium chloride (LiCl) solution as desiccant. The membrane contactors consist of alternate channels of air and liquid desiccant flowing in cross-flow direction. Hydrophobic membranes form a liquid tight, vapor permeable porous barrier between hygroscopic solution and moist air, thus eliminating carryover of desiccant droplets. In order to provide maximum contact area for air–desiccant interaction, a wicking material is sandwiched between two membranes in the liquid channel. It is observed that vapor flux upto 1300 g/m 2 h can be achieved in a membrane contactor with polypropylene (PP) membranes, although the dehumidification effectiveness remains low. The effect of key parameters on the transmembrane vapor transport is presented in the paper. - Highlights: • Indirect membrane contactors developed to avoid carryover in liquid desiccant system. • Dehumidification effectiveness and vapor flux reported under varying conditions. • Vapor flux upto 1295 g/m 2 h in polypropylene contactor with high area density. • Dehumidification effectiveness with LiCl solution varies within 23% to 45%

  2. Mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system: A central player in membrane shaping and crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollweber, Florian; von der Malsburg, Karina; van der Laan, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional metabolic factories and integrative signaling organelles of eukaryotic cells. The structural basis for their numerous functions is a complex and dynamic double-membrane architecture. The outer membrane connects mitochondria to the cytosol and other organelles. The inner membrane is composed of a boundary region and highly folded cristae membranes. The evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) connects the two inner membrane domains via formation and stabilization of crista junction structures. Moreover, MICOS establishes contact sites between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes by interacting with outer membrane protein complexes. MICOS deficiency leads to a grossly altered inner membrane architecture resulting in far-reaching functional perturbations in mitochondria. Consequently, mutations affecting the function of MICOS are responsible for a diverse spectrum of human diseases. In this article, we summarize recent insights and concepts on the role of MICOS in the organization of mitochondrial membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Contact Sites edited by Christian Ungermann and Benoit Kornmann. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduced-Order Dynamic Modeling, Fouling Detection, and Optimal Control of Solar-Powered Direct Contact Membrane Distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Karam, Ayman M.

    2016-12-01

    Membrane Distillation (MD) is an emerging sustainable desalination technique. While MD has many advantages and can be powered by solar thermal energy, its main drawback is the low water production rate. However, the MD process has not been fully optimized in terms of its manipulated and controlled variables. This is largely due to the lack of adequate dynamic models to study and simulate the process. In addition, MD is prone to membrane fouling, which is a fault that degrades the performance of the MD process. This work has three contributions to address these challenges. First, we derive a mathematical model of Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD), which is the building block for the next parts. Then, the proposed model is extended to account for membrane fouling and an observer-based fouling detection method is developed. Finally, various control strategies are implemented to optimize the performance of the DCMD solar-powered process. In part one, a reduced-order dynamic model of DCMD is developed based on lumped capacitance method and electrical analogy to thermal systems. The result is an electrical equivalent thermal network to the DCMD process, which is modeled by a system of nonlinear differential algebraic equations (DAEs). This model predicts the water-vapor flux and the temperature distribution along the module length. Experimental data is collected to validate the steady-state and dynamic responses of the proposed model, with great agreement demonstrated in both. The second part proposes an extension of the model to account for membrane fouling. An adaptive observer for DAE systems is developed and convergence proof is presented. A method for membrane fouling detection is then proposed based on adaptive observers. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the membrane fouling detection method. Finally, an optimization problem is formulated to maximize the process efficiency of a solar-powered DCMD. The adapted method is known as Extremum

  4. Vectorial product concentration obtained with a permeable immobilized enzyme membrane. A new approach to the analysis of biological transport systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïsterrena, B; Blum, L J; Bardeletti, G; Coulet, P R

    1986-05-01

    The theoretical analysis of the distribution on both sides of a flat porous membrane of the product generated by an enzyme covalently bound only on to one side of the membrane separating two compartments of widely different volumes is presented. Contrary to what occurs with heterogeneous symmetric systems, the diffusional limitations at the enzyme level play a prominent role, not only on the apparent enzyme activity, but also on product flux-splitting. The mathematical model developed shows that it is possible to concentrate the reaction product in the compartment opposite to that where the reaction occurs. The influence of the parameters and of the physical characteristics of an asymmetrical system on product distribution is analysed. This theoretical analysis is in excellent agreement with experimental data obtained with glucose oxidase immobilized on a porous collagen membrane.

  5. Spatial heterogeneity of biofouling under different cross-flow velocities in reverse osmosis membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Nadia

    2016-09-06

    The spatially heterogeneous distribution of biofouling in spiral wound membrane systems restricts (i) the water distribution over the membrane surface and therefore (ii) the membrane-based water treatment. The objective of the study was to assess the spatial heterogeneity of biofilm development over the membrane fouling simulator (MFS) length (inlet and outlet part) at three different cross-flow velocities (0.08, 0.12 and 0.16 m/s). The MFS contained sheets of membrane and feed spacer and simulated the first 0.20 m of spiral-wound membrane modules where biofouling accumulates the most in practice. In-situ non-destructive oxygen imaging using planar optodes was applied to determine the biofilm spatially resolved activity and heterogeneity.

  6. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity.

  7. Scale-Up Design Analysis and Modelling of Cobalt Oxide Silica Membrane Module for Hydrogen Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Guozhao Ji; Guoxiong Wang; Kamel Hooman; Suresh K. Bhatia; João C. Diniz da Costa

    2013-01-01

    This work shows the application of a validated mathematical model for gas permeation at high temperatures focusing on demonstrated scale-up design for H2 processing. The model considered the driving force variation with spatial coordinates and the mass transfer across the molecular sieve cobalt oxide silica membrane to predict the separation performance. The model was used to study the process of H2 separation at 500 °C in single and multi-tube membrane modules. Parameters of interest include...

  8. Effects of different IR laser systems on the tympanic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmaier, Benedikt W.; Bloedow, Alexander; Jovanovic, Sergije; Nagli, Lev; Eberle, Hans-Georg

    1997-05-01

    Lasers suitable for myringotomy are the erbium:YAG laser (2940 nm) and the carbon-dioxide laser (10600 nm). The study examines the laser-tissue interaction with tympanic membranes of guinea-pigs, horses and formalin-fixed human tympanic membranes and the effects demonstrated by light-microscopy and scanning-electron-microscopy. The minimum energy densities for a perforation with the erbium:YAG laser in guinea-pig ear drums and formalin-fixed human tympanic membranes are 8 J/cm2 and 16 J/cm2 respectively. There are no thermic side effects. With the carbon-dioxide laser thermic side effects only occur with energy transmission via silver halide polycrystalline fiber. The minimum power density for perforation is 400 W/cm2 (pulse duration 50 ms). With the microslad 719 micromanipulator (Sharplan, Israel, Tel Aviv), the minimum power densities for perforation of guinea-pig and horse eardrums and for formalin-fixed human tympanic membranes are 150 W/cm2, 300 W/cm2 and 600 W/cm2 (pulse duration: 50 ms) respectively. The minimum power density to achieve a perforation with the SwiftLaseTM 757 scanner (Sharplan, Israel, Tel Aviv), is 250 W/cm2 in guinea-pig eardrums (pulse duration: 100 ms). A prototype of a hand-held carbon-dioxide laser otoscope is suitable for performing laser myringotomies in formalin-fixed human tympanic membranes.

  9. Identification of types of membrane injuries and cell death using whole cell-based proton-sensitive field-effect transistor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Goda, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Akira; Miyahara, Yuji

    2017-09-08

    An NH 4 Cl-superfused system for a cell-cultured pH-sensing transistor was developed for detecting ion leakage across the plasma membranes of model HepG2 cells. The screening of chemical species by the method developed and conventional membrane-leakage assays identified the types of membrane injuries: structural membrane disruption and pore formation. Apoptosis-mediated membrane disordering was detected by continuously monitoring the ion-barrier breakdown of the membranes using the transistor system for an extended period. Comparisons of the ISFET assay with conventional cytotoxicity assays distinguished the cell death by direct membrane injury from that by other organelle damage. Our cell-based transistor system is fast and sensitive to ion leakage of the plasma membrane due to the small hydrodynamic size of the proton and ammonium ions as the indicators. The combination of the ion leakage assay with the existing cytotoxicity assays is a new way of classifying membrane injury and cell death induced by external chemical stimuli.

  10. Interactions of a Photochromic Spiropyran with Liposome Model Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Jonsson, Fabian

    2013-02-19

    The interactions between anionic or zwitterionic liposomes and a water-soluble, DNA-binding photochromic spiropyran are studied using UV/vis absorption and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. The spectral characteristics as well as the kinetics of the thermal isomerization process in the absence and presence of the two different liposome types provide information about the environment and whether or not the spiropyran resides in the liposome membrane. By measuring LD on liposomes deformed and aligned by shear flow, further insight is obtained about interaction and binding geometry of the spiropyran at the lipid membranes. We show that the membrane interactions differ between the two types of liposomes used as well as the isomeric forms of the spiropyran photoswitch. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Intramolecular energy transfer at donor-acceptor interactions in model and biological membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umarova, Fatima T.

    2011-01-01

    Intramolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer between molecules of sensibilisator and photochrome for registration of protein interactions in the membrane preparation of Na,K-ATPase was investigated. Erythrosinithiocyanate (ERITC) was used as the triplet label of sensibilisator, and 4-acetoamido-4 -isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2 disullfonic acid (SITS) was used as the photochrome label. Na,K-ATPase preparations were covalently bound with ERITC in active centre of enzyme, and SITS molecules were covalently bound by NH2-groups. In model system, in chymotrypsinogene molecule, SITS and ERITC labels were used also. The cis-trans-isomerization of SITS was initiated by triplet-triplet energy transfer from light excited ERITC molecule to photochrome. The kinetics of isomerization was recorded by the SITS fluorescence measurements. The constant of rate of triplet-triplet energy transfer from ERITC to cis-isomers of SITS in Na,K-ATPase was determined as (3-7)x10 3 M -1 s -1 , and in model system it equals 1x 10 7 M 1 s -1 . The value of energy transfer between loos molecules of erythrosine and SITS in buffer solution equaled to 7x10 7 M -1 s -1 . This drop of R m y in the membrane preparation of Na,K-ATPase at 10 4 reflected the decrease in the frequency of label collisions caused by the increase in the media viscosity and steric hindrances. (author)

  12. Analysis of mass transfer characteristics in a tubular membrane using CFD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jixiang; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Spanjers, Henri; Nopens, Ingmar; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to the large amount of research into aerobic membrane bioreactors, little work has been reported on anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AMBRs). As to the application of membrane bioreactors, membrane fouling is a key issue. Membrane fouling generally occurs more seriously in AMBRs than in aerobic membrane bioreactors. However, membrane fouling could be managed through the application of suitable shear stress that can be introduced by the application of a two-phase flow. When the two-phase flow is applied in AMBRs, little is known about the mass transfer characteristics, which is of particular importance, in tubular membranes of AMBRs. In our present work, we have employed fluid dynamic modeling to analyze the mass transfer characteristics in the tubular membrane of a side stream AMBR in which, gas-lift two-phase flow was applied. The modeling indicated that the mass transfer capacity at the membrane surface at the noses of gas bubbles was higher than the mass transfer capacity at the tails of the bubbles, which is in contrast to the results when water instead of sludge is applied. At the given mass transfer rate, the filterability of the sludge was found to have a strong influence on the transmembrane pressure at a steady flux. In addition, the model also showed that the shear stress in the internal space of the tubular membrane was mainly around 20 Pa but could be as high as about 40 Pa due to gas bubble movements. Nonetheless, at these shear stresses a stable particle size distribution was found for sludge particles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. In a membrane reactor process, the thermal energy needed for the endothermic hydrocarbon reforming may be provided by combustion of the membrane reject gas. The energy efficiency of the overall hydrogen generation is maximized by controlling the hydrogen product yield such that the heat value of the membrane reject gas is sufficient to provide all of the heat necessary for the integrated process. Optimization of the system temperature, pressure and operating parameters such as net hydrogen recovery is necessary to realize an efficient integrated membrane reformer suitable for compact portable hydrogen generation. This paper presents results of theoretical model simulations of the integrated membrane reformer concept elucidating the effect of operating parameters on the extent of fuel conversion to hydrogen and hydrogen product yield. Model simulations indicate that the net possible hydrogen product yield is strongly influenced by the efficiency of heat recovery from the combustion of membrane reject gas and from the hot exhaust gases. When butane is used as a fuel, a net hydrogen recovery of 68% of that stoichiometrically possible may be achieved with membrane reformer operation at 600 °C (873 K) temperature and 100 psig (0.791 MPa) pressure provided 90% of available combustion and exhaust gas heat is recovered. Operation at a greater pressure or temperature provides a marginal improvement in the performance whereas operation at a significantly lower temperature or pressure will not be able to achieve the optimal hydrogen yield. Slightly higher, up to 76%, net hydrogen recovery is possible when methanol is used as a fuel due to the lower heat

  14. The ELBA force field for coarse-grain modeling of lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Orsi

    Full Text Available A new coarse-grain model for molecular dynamics simulation of lipid membranes is presented. Following a simple and conventional approach, lipid molecules are modeled by spherical sites, each representing a group of several atoms. In contrast to common coarse-grain methods, two original (interdependent features are here adopted. First, the main electrostatics are modeled explicitly by charges and dipoles, which interact realistically through a relative dielectric constant of unity (ε(r = 1. Second, water molecules are represented individually through a new parametrization of the simple Stockmayer potential for polar fluids; each water molecule is therefore described by a single spherical site embedded with a point dipole. The force field is shown to accurately reproduce the main physical properties of single-species phospholipid bilayers comprising dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE in the liquid crystal phase, as well as distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC in the liquid crystal and gel phases. Insights are presented into fundamental properties and phenomena that can be difficult or impossible to study with alternative computational or experimental methods. For example, we investigate the internal pressure distribution, dipole potential, lipid diffusion, and spontaneous self-assembly. Simulations lasting up to 1.5 microseconds were conducted for systems of different sizes (128, 512 and 1058 lipids; this also allowed us to identify size-dependent artifacts that are expected to affect membrane simulations in general. Future extensions and applications are discussed, particularly in relation to the methodology's inherent multiscale capabilities.

  15. Effect of amniotic membrane to reduce postlaminectomy epidural adhesion on a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyu Jin; Kim, Kyoung Beom; Kwon, Young-Min

    2011-06-01

    Epidural fibrosis and adhesion are the main reasons for post-laminectomy sustained pain and functional disability. In this study, the authors investigate the effect of irradiated freeze-dried human amniotic membrane on reducing epidural adhesion after laminectomy on a rat model. A total of 20 rats were divided into two groups. The group A did not receive human amniotic membrane implantation after laminectomy and group B underwent human amniotic membrane implantation after laminectomy. Gross and microscopic findings were evaluated and compared at postoperative 1, 3 and 8 weeks. The amount of scar tissue and tenacity were reduced grossly in group of rats with human amniotic membrane implantation (group B). On a microscopic evaluation, there were less inflammatory cell infiltration and fibroblast proliferation in group B. This experimental study shows that implantation of irradiated freeze-dried human amniotic membrane reduce epidural fibrosis and adhesion after spinal laminectomy in a rat model.

  16. Ion transport membrane reactor systems and methods for producing synthesis gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the present invention provide cost-effective systems and methods for producing a synthesis gas product using a steam reformer system and an ion transport membrane (ITM) reactor having multiple stages, without requiring inter-stage reactant injections. Embodiments of the present invention also provide techniques for compensating for membrane performance degradation and other changes in system operating conditions that negatively affect synthesis gas production.

  17. The TatA component of the twin-arginine translocation system locally weakens the cytoplasmic membrane ofEscherichia coliupon protein substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bo; Heidrich, Eyleen S; Mehner-Breitfeld, Denise; Brüser, Thomas

    2018-03-13

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system that comprises the TatA, TatB, and TatC components transports folded proteins across energized membranes of prokaryotes and plant plastids. It is not known, however, how the transport of this protein cargo is achieved. Favored models suggest that the TatA component supports transport by weakening the membrane upon full translocon assembly. Using Escherichia coli as model organism, we now demonstrate in vivo that the N-terminus of TatA can indeed destabilize the membrane, resulting in a lowered membrane energization in growing cells. We found that in full-length TatA, this effect is counterbalanced by its amphipathic helix. Consistent with these observations, the TatA N-terminus induced proton leakage in vitro , indicating membrane destabilization. Fluorescence quenching data revealed that substrate binding causes the TatA hinge region and the N-terminal part of the TatA amphipathic helix to move toward the membrane surface. In the presence of TatBC, substrate binding also reduced the exposure of a specific region in the amphipathic helix, indicating a participation of TatBC. Of note, the substrate-induced reorientation of the TatA amphipathic helix correlated with detectable membrane weakening. We therefore propose a two-state model in which membrane-destabilizing effects of the short TatA membrane anchor are compensated by the membrane-immersed N-terminal part of the amphipathic helix in a resting state. We conclude that substrate binding to TatABC complexes switches the position of the amphipathic helix, which locally weakens the membrane on demand to allow substrate translocation across the membrane. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead’s thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  19. Protein modeling of apical membrane antigen-1(AMA-1) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apical membrane Antigen-1(AMA-1), an asexual blood stage antigen of Plasmodium cynomolgi, is an important candidate for testing as a component of malarial vaccine. The degree of conservation of. AMA-1 sequences implies a conserved function for this molecule across different species of Plasmodium. Since the AMA-1 ...

  20. α-Synuclein oligomers distinctively permeabilize complex model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefanovic, Anja N D; Stöckl, Martin T; Claessens, Mireille M A E; Subramaniam, Vinod

    α-Synuclein oligomers are increasingly considered to be responsible for the death of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. The toxicity mechanism of α-synuclein oligomers likely involves membrane permeabilization. Even though it is well established that α-synuclein oligomers bind and

  1. Anode partial flooding modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Model development and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Lei; Du, Shangfeng; Chen, Rui; Mamlouk, Mohamed; Scott, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional along-the-channel CFD (computational fluid dynamic) model, coupled with a two-phase flow model of liquid water and gas transport for a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell is described. The model considers non-isothermal operation and thus the non-uniform temperature distribution in the cell structure. Water phase-transfer between the vapour, liquid water and dissolved phase is modelled with the combinational transport mechanism through the membrane. Liquid water saturation is simulated inside the electrodes and channels at both the anode and cathode sides. Three types of models are compared for the HOR (hydrogen oxidation reaction) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) in catalyst layers, including Butler–Volmer (B–V), liquid water saturation corrected B–V and agglomerate mechanisms. Temperature changes in MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and channels due to electrochemical reaction, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer are analysed as a function of current density. Nonlinear relations of liquid water saturations with respect to current densities at both the anode and cathode are regressed. At low and high current densities, liquid water saturation at the anode linearly increases as a consequence of the linear increase of liquid water saturation at the cathode. In contrast, exponential relation is found to be more accurate at medium current densities. - Highlights: • A fully coupled 2D, along-the-channel, two-phase flow, non-isothermal, CFD model is developed. • Temperature rise due to electrochemical reactions, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer is analysed. • Mathematical expressions of liquid water saturation against current density at anode and cathode are regressed. • Relationship between the liquid water saturation at anode and cathode is built.

  2. Development of taste sensing system using inorganic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yohichiro; Hasegawa, Yuki

    2011-09-01

    We developed a novel taste sensor for liquid and verified its effectiveness using coffee. We fabricated an inorganic metal oxide membrane liquid sensor using the laser ablation method. The sensor shows a sufficient sensitivity for electrolyte solutions, while it shows a relatively low response for non-electrolyte solutions. We differentiated and identified five brands of commercially available coffee using the sensor.

  3. Scaling and particulate fouling in membrane filtration systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlage, S.F.E.

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, pressure driven membrane filtration processes; reverse osmosis, nano, ultra and micro-filtration have undergone steady growth. Drivers for this growth include desalination to combat water scarcity and the removal of various material from water to comply with increasingly

  4. Activated sludge model (ASM) based modelling of membrane bioreactor (MBR) processes: a critical review with special regard to MBR specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenu, A; Guglielmi, G; Jimenez, J; Spèrandio, M; Saroj, D; Lesjean, B; Brepols, C; Thoeye, C; Nopens, I

    2010-08-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) have been increasingly employed for municipal and industrial wastewater treatment in the last decade. The efforts for modelling of such wastewater treatment systems have always targeted either the biological processes (treatment quality target) as well as the various aspects of engineering (cost effective design and operation). The development of Activated Sludge Models (ASM) was an important evolution in the modelling of Conventional Activated Sludge (CAS) processes and their use is now very well established. However, although they were initially developed to describe CAS processes, they have simply been transferred and applied to MBR processes. Recent studies on MBR biological processes have reported several crucial specificities: medium to very high sludge retention times, high mixed liquor concentration, accumulation of soluble microbial products (SMP) rejected by the membrane filtration step, and high aeration rates for scouring purposes. These aspects raise the question as to what extent the ASM framework is applicable to MBR processes. Several studies highlighting some of the aforementioned issues are scattered through the literature. Hence, through a concise and structured overview of the past developments and current state-of-the-art in biological modelling of MBR, this review explores ASM-based modelling applied to MBR processes. The work aims to synthesize previous studies and differentiates between unmodified and modified applications of ASM to MBR. Particular emphasis is placed on influent fractionation, biokinetics, and soluble microbial products (SMPs)/exo-polymeric substances (EPS) modelling, and suggestions are put forward as to good modelling practice with regard to MBR modelling both for end-users and academia. A last section highlights shortcomings and future needs for improved biological modelling of MBR processes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis and optimization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using modeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre Valdés, Ing. Raciel de la; García Parra, MSc. Lázaro Roger; González Rodríguez, MSc. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional, non-isothermal and steady-state model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell using Computational Fluid Dynamic techniques, specifically ANSYS FLUENT 14.5. It's considered multicomponent diffusion and two-phasic flow. The model was compared with experimental published data and with another model. The operation parameters: reactants pressure and temperature, gases flow direction, gas diffusion layer and catalyst layer porosity, reactants humidification and oxygen concentration are analyzed. The model allows the fuel cell design optimization taking in consideration the channels dimensions, the channels length and the membrane thickness. Furthermore, fuel cell performance is analyzed working with SPEEK membrane, an alternative electrolyte to Nafion. In order to carry on membrane material study, it's necessary to modify the expression that describes the electrolyte ionic conductivity. It's found that the device performance has got a great sensibility to pressure, temperature, reactant humidification and oxygen concentration variations. (author)

  6. Exploring large-scale phenomena in composite membranes through an efficient implicit-solvent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Spangler, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    Several microscopic and mesoscale models have been introduced in the past to investigate various phenomena in lipid membranes. Most of these models account for the solvent explicitly. Since in a typical molecular dynamics simulation, the majority of particles belong to the solvent, much of the computational effort in these simulations is devoted for calculating forces between solvent particles. To overcome this problem, several implicit-solvent mesoscale models for lipid membranes have been proposed during the last few years. In the present article, we review an efficient coarse-grained implicit-solvent model we introduced earlier for studies of lipid membranes. In this model, lipid molecules are coarse-grained into short semi-flexible chains of beads with soft interactions. Through molecular dynamics simulations, the model is used to investigate the thermal, structural and elastic properties of lipid membranes. We will also review here few studies, based on this model, of the phase behavior of nanoscale liposomes, cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes, as well as nanoparticles wrapping and endocytosis by tensionless lipid membranes. Topical Review article submitted to the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, May 9, 2016

  7. Exploring large-scale phenomena in composite membranes through an efficient implicit-solvent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Sunil Kumar, P B; Spangler, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Several microscopic and mesoscale models have been introduced in the past to investigate various phenomena in lipid membranes. Most of these models account for the solvent explicitly. Since in a typical molecular dynamics simulation, the majority of particles belong to the solvent, much of the computational effort in these simulations is devoted for calculating forces between solvent particles. To overcome this problem, several implicit-solvent mesoscale models for lipid membranes have been proposed during the last few years. In the present article, we review an efficient coarse-grained implicit-solvent model we introduced earlier for studies of lipid membranes. In this model, lipid molecules are coarse-grained into short semi-flexible chains of beads with soft interactions. Through molecular dynamics simulations, the model is used to investigate the thermal, structural and elastic properties of lipid membranes. We will also review here few studies, based on this model, of the phase behavior of nanoscale liposomes, cytoskeleton-induced blebbing in lipid membranes, as well as nanoparticles wrapping and endocytosis by tensionless lipid membranes. (topical review)

  8. RSMASS system model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Gallup, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    RSMASS system mass models have been used for more than a decade to make rapid estimates of space reactor power system masses. This paper reviews the evolution of the RSMASS models and summarizes present capabilities. RSMASS has evolved from a simple model used to make rough estimates of space reactor and shield masses to a versatile space reactor power system model. RSMASS uses unique reactor and shield models that permit rapid mass optimization calculations for a variety of space reactor power and propulsion systems. The RSMASS-D upgrade of the original model includes algorithms for the balance of the power system, a number of reactor and shield modeling improvements, and an automatic mass optimization scheme. The RSMASS-D suite of codes cover a very broad range of reactor and power conversion system options as well as propulsion and bimodal reactor systems. Reactor choices include in-core and ex-core thermionic reactors, liquid metal cooled reactors, particle bed reactors, and prismatic configuration reactors. Power conversion options include thermoelectric, thermionic, Stirling, Brayton, and Rankine approaches. Program output includes all major component masses and dimensions, efficiencies, and a description of the design parameters for a mass optimized system. In the past, RSMASS has been used as an aid to identify and select promising concepts for space power applications. The RSMASS modeling approach has been demonstrated to be a valuable tool for guiding optimization of the power system design; consequently, the model is useful during system design and development as well as during the selection process. An improved in-core thermionic reactor system model RSMASS-T is now under development. The current development of the RSMASS-T code represents the next evolutionary stage of the RSMASS models. RSMASS-T includes many modeling improvements and is planned to be more user-friendly. RSMASS-T will be released as a fully documented, certified code at the end of

  9. A macroscopic model of proton transport through the membrane-ionomer interface of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Milan; Edwards, Brian J.; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    The membrane-ionomer interface is the critical interlink of the electrodes and catalyst to the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM); together forming the membrane electrode assembly in current state-of-the-art PEM fuel cells. In this paper, proton conduction through the interface is investigated to understand its effect on the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The water containing domains at this interface were modeled as cylindrical pores/channels with the anionic groups (i.e., -SO3-) assumed to be fixed on the pore wall. The interactions of each species with all other species and an applied external field were examined. Molecular-based interaction potential energies were computed in a small test element of the pore and were scaled up in terms of macroscopic variables. Evolution equations of the density and momentum of the species (water molecules and hydronium ions) were derived within a framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The resulting evolution equations for the species were solved analytically using an order-of-magnitude analysis to obtain an expression for the proton conductivity. Results show that the conductivity increases with increasing water content and pore radius, and strongly depends on the separation distance between the sulfonate groups and their distribution on the pore wall. It was also determined that the conductivity of two similar pores of different radii in series is limited by the pore with the smaller radius.

  10. Monitoring and modeling of nitrogen conversions in membrane-aerated biofilm reactors: Effects of intermittent aeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yunjie

    relevant biological N2O production pathways. Sensitive kinetic parameters were estimated with long-term bulk performance data. With the calibrated model, roles of HB and AnAOB were discussed and evaluated in mitigating N2O emissions in auto-trophic nitrogen removal MABRs. Moreover, I developed a 1-D...... process. On the other hand, the presence of multiple simultaneous chemical gradients complicates the performance opti-mization. Mathematical modeling offers a way to describe and analyze multi-ple processes that occur simultaneously in time and space in biofilm systems. This PhD project investigated NH4...... the membrane, whilst NH4+ is provid-ed from the bulk liquid phase. The counter substrate supply not only offers flexible aeration control, but also supports the development of a unique mi-crobial community and spatial structure inside the biofilm. In this study, lab-scale MABRs were operated under two types...

  11. Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Kathyayani

    2011-10-04

    Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

  12. An efficient analytical model for baffled, multi-celled membrane-type acoustic metamaterial panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfeldt, F.; Gleine, W.; von Estorff, O.

    2018-03-01

    A new analytical model for the oblique incidence sound transmission loss prediction of baffled panels with multiple subwavelength sized membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) unit cells is proposed. The model employs a novel approach via the concept of the effective surface mass density and approximates the unit cell vibrations in the form of piston-like displacements. This yields a coupled system of linear equations that can be solved efficiently using well-known solution procedures. A comparison with results from finite element model simulations for both normal and diffuse field incidence shows that the analytical model delivers accurate results as long as the edge length of the MAM unit cells is smaller than half the acoustic wavelength. The computation times for the analytical calculations are 100 times smaller than for the numerical simulations. In addition to that, the effect of flexible MAM unit cell edges compared to the fixed edges assumed in the analytical model is studied numerically. It is shown that the compliance of the edges has only a small impact on the transmission loss of the panel, except at very low frequencies in the stiffness-controlled regime. The proposed analytical model is applied to investigate the effect of variations of the membrane prestress, added mass, and mass eccentricity on the diffuse transmission loss of a MAM panel with 120 unit cells. Unlike most previous investigations of MAMs, these results provide a better understanding of the acoustic performance of MAMs under more realistic conditions. For example, it is shown that by varying these parameters deliberately in a checkerboard pattern, a new anti-resonance with large transmission loss values can be introduced. A random variation of these parameters, on the other hand, is shown to have only little influence on the diffuse transmission loss, as long as the standard deviation is not too large. For very large random variations, it is shown that the peak transmission loss

  13. A biochemo-mechano coupled, computational model combining membrane transport and pericellular proteolysis in tissue mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, A-T; Rauch, A D; Wall, W A

    2017-03-01

    We present a computational model for the interaction of surface- and volume-bound scalar transport and reaction processes with a deformable porous medium. The application in mind is pericellular proteolysis, i.e. the dissolution of the solid phase of the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a response to the activation of certain chemical species at the cell membrane and in the vicinity of the cell. A poroelastic medium model represents the extra cellular scaffold and the interstitial fluid flow, while a surface-bound transport model accounts for the diffusion and reaction of membrane-bound chemical species. By further modelling the volume-bound transport, we consider the advection, diffusion and reaction of sequestered chemical species within the extracellular scaffold. The chemo-mechanical coupling is established by introducing a continuum formulation for the interplay of reaction rates and the mechanical state of the ECM. It is based on known experimental insights and theoretical work on the thermodynamics of porous media and degradation kinetics of collagen fibres on the one hand and a damage-like effect of the fibre dissolution on the mechanical integrity of the ECM on the other hand. The resulting system of partial differential equations is solved via the finite-element method. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first computational model including contemporaneously the coupling between (i) advection-diffusion-reaction processes, (ii) interstitial flow and deformation of a porous medium, and (iii) the chemo-mechanical interaction impelled by the dissolution of the ECM. Our numerical examples show good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, we outline the capability of the methodology to extend existing numerical approaches towards a more comprehensive model for cellular biochemo-mechanics.

  14. X-ray diffraction and NMR data for the study of the location of idebenone and idebenol in model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gómez-Murcia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we present some of our data about the interaction of idebenone and idebenol with dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC. In particular, we include data of small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD and wide angle X-ray diffraction experiments, obtention of electronic profiles of the membranes, 2H-NMR and 31P-NMR, as part of the research article: “Both idebenone and idebenol are localized near the lipid-water interface of the membrane and increase its fluidity” (Gomez-Murcia et al., 2016 [1]. These data were obtained from model membranes that included different proportions of idebenone and idebenol, at temperatures both above and below of the gel to fluid phase. The X-ray experiments were carried out by using a modified Kratky compact camera (MBraun-Graz-Optical Systems, Graz Austria, incorporating two coupled linear position sensitive detectors. The NMR data were collected from a a Bruker Avance 600 instrument.

  15. Fluidity evaluation of cell membrane model formed on graphene oxide with single particle tracking using quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Motegi, Toshinori; Iwasa, Seiji; Sandhu, Adarsh; Tero, Ryugo

    2015-04-01

    The lipid bilayer is the fundamental structure of plasma membranes, and artificial lipid bilayer membranes are used as model systems of cell membranes. Recently we reported the formation of a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on graphene oxide (GO) by the vesicle fusion method. In this study, we conjugated a quantum dot (Qdot) on the SLB surface as a fluorescence probe brighter than dye-labeled lipid molecules, to qualitatively evaluate the fluidity of the SLB on GO by the single particle tracking method. We obtained the diffusion coefficient of the Qdot-conjugated lipids in the SLB on GO. We also performed the Qdot conjugation on the SLB containing a lipid conjugated with polyethylene glycol, to prevent the nonspecific adsorption of Qdots. The difference in the diffusion coefficients between the SLBs on the GO and the bare SiO2 regions was evaluated from the trajectory of single Qdot-conjugated lipid diffusing between the two regions.

  16. Applications of type I antifreeze proteins: studies with model membranes & cryoprotectant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Steven R; Turner, Jennifer J; Harding, Margaret M

    2006-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), found in the body fluids of many species of polar fish allow them to survive in waters colder than the equilibrium freezing point of their blood and other internal fluids. Despite their structural diversity, all AF(G)Ps kinetically depress the temperature at which ice grows in a non-colligative manner and hence exhibit thermal hysteresis. AF(G)Ps also share the ability to interact with and protect mammalian cells and tissues from hypothermic damage (e.g., improved storage of human blood platelets at low temperatures), and are able to stabilize or disrupt membrane composition during low temperature and freezing stress (e.g., cryoprotectant properties in stabilization of sperm and oocytes). This review will summarize studies of AFPs with phospholipids and plant lipids, proposed mechanisms for inhibition of leakage from membranes, and cryoprotectant studies with biological samples. The major focus will be on the alpha-helical type I antifreeze proteins, and synthetic mutants, that have been most widely studied. For completeness, data on glycoproteins will also be presented. While a number of models to explain stabilization and destabilization of different lipid systems have been proposed, it is currently not possible to predict whether a particular AFP will stabilize or destabilize a given lipid system. Furthermore the relationship between the antifreeze property of thermal hysteresis and membrane stabilization is unknown. This lack of detailed knowledge about how AFPs function in the presence of different types of materials has hampered progress toward the development of antifreezes for cold storage of cells, tissues, and organs.

  17. Systemic resilience model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, Jonas; Johansson, Björn JE

    2015-01-01

    It has been realized that resilience as a concept involves several contradictory definitions, both for instance resilience as agile adjustment and as robust resistance to situations. Our analysis of resilience concepts and models suggest that beyond simplistic definitions, it is possible to draw up a systemic resilience model (SyRes) that maintains these opposing characteristics without contradiction. We outline six functions in a systemic model, drawing primarily on resilience engineering, and disaster response: anticipation, monitoring, response, recovery, learning, and self-monitoring. The model consists of four areas: Event-based constraints, Functional Dependencies, Adaptive Capacity and Strategy. The paper describes dependencies between constraints, functions and strategies. We argue that models such as SyRes should be useful both for envisioning new resilience methods and metrics, as well as for engineering and evaluating resilient systems. - Highlights: • The SyRes model resolves contradictions between previous resilience definitions. • SyRes is a core model for envisioning and evaluating resilience metrics and models. • SyRes describes six functions in a systemic model. • They are anticipation, monitoring, response, recovery, learning, self-monitoring. • The model describes dependencies between constraints, functions and strategies

  18. Domestic wastewater treatment by forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) integrated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Hou, Deyin; Li, Kuiling; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiwang

    2018-03-01

    In this study, real domestic wastewater treatment by forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) integrated system was investigated in laboratory scale. The integrated membrane system presented a good separation performance and the removal efficiency of most contaminants in the domestic wastewater was higher than 90%. High molecular weight contaminants were completely removed, while a few low molecular weight contaminants permeated through the membrane. The FO membrane fouling layer mainly consisted of organic substances like polysaccharides and proteins, and was very loose and could be effectively removed by rinsing the membrane surface with tap water. By comparison, the MD membrane fouling was mainly induced by inorganic salts and was not as severe as that of the FO membrane. During 120 h continuous operation, the FO-MD integrated system exhibited satisfying performance stability and maintained a high water yield and high product water quality. The results indicated the potential of the FO-MD integrated system for municipal wastewater treatment in coastal cities, water purification and desalination.

  19. The studies on the toxicity mechanism of environmentally hazardous natural (IAA) and synthetic (NAA) auxin--The experiments on model Arabidopsis thaliana and rat liver plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał

    2015-06-01

    This paper concerns the studies towards membrane-damage effect of two auxins: indole-3-acetic acid - IAA and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid - NAA on plant (Arabidopsis thaliana) and animal (rat liver) model membranes. The foregoing auxins are plant growth regulators widely used in agriculture to control the quality of the crop. However, their accumulation in the environment makes them hazardous for the living organisms. The aim of our investigations was to compare the effect of natural (IAA) vs. synthetic (NAA) auxin on the organization of plant and animal model membranes and find a possible correlation between membrane-disturbing effect of these compounds and their toxicity. The collected data evidenced that auxins cause destabilization of membranes, decrease their condensation and weakens interactions of molecules. The alterations in the morphology of model systems were also noticed. The foregoing effects of auxins are concentration-dependent and additionally NAA was found to act on animal vs. plant membranes more selectively than IAA. Interestingly, both IAA and NAA induce the strongest disordering in model lipid system at the concentration, which is frequently reported as toxic to animal and plants. Based on the above findings it was proposed that membrane-damage effect induced by IAA and NAA may be important from the point of view of the mechanism of toxicity of these compounds and cannot be ignored in further investigations in this area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Selected System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Eisenlohr, F.; Puñal, O.; Klagges, K.; Kirsche, M.

    Apart from the general issue of modeling the channel, the PHY and the MAC of wireless networks, there are specific modeling assumptions that are considered for different systems. In this chapter we consider three specific wireless standards and highlight modeling options for them. These are IEEE 802.11 (as example for wireless local area networks), IEEE 802.16 (as example for wireless metropolitan networks) and IEEE 802.15 (as example for body area networks). Each section on these three systems discusses also at the end a set of model implementations that are available today.

  1. Biotransformation of diazepam in a clinically relevant flat membrane bioreactor model using primary porcine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maringka, Michael; Giri, Shibashish; Nieber, Karen; Acikgöz, Ali; Bader, Augustinus

    2011-06-01

    In vitro biotransformation of drug using commercial culture medium with serum may not be the ideal culture medium for clinical application in extracorporeal bioartificial liver support (BAL) systems. In these systems, patient's blood or plasma is plumbed to primary hepatocytes within a seeded bioreactor, creating interaction between plasma and seeded hepatocytes. To address this situation, we investigated the biotransformation potential of diazepam in primary porcine hepatocytes with a flat membrane bioreactor (FMB); we used human plasma exposure and serum-free media in organotypical double gel culture model for long-term culture. We investigated diazepam clearance and all major metabolites of diazepam, such as oxazepam, temazepam, and desmethyldiazepam, in conventional single gel and organotypical sandwich models and compared them to the FMB model. Diazepam elimination was higher in double gel cultures with exposure to both SF 3 medium conditions and plasma, when compared to the single gel model in a Petri dish. It was observed that in the FMB, diazepam elimination was stable at about 3 pg/h/cell in plasma and SF 3 exposure. Oxazepam synthesis in the bioreactor was approximately one quarter less than in the Petri dish, but there were no differences between N-desmethyldiazepam and temazepam synthesis in double gel culture. In the flat membrane bioreactor, there was no decrease in the biotransformation of diazepam in plasma exposure compared with the control group. Our results suggest that this plasma exposure bioreactor may offer a useful approach in clinical use of extracorporeal BAL, as well as for drug metabolite investigation into toxicological research. © 2010 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  2. Experimental measurement of tympanic membrane response for finite element model validation of a human middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Tae-Soo; Baek, Moo-Jin; Lee, Dooho

    2013-01-01

    The middle ear consists of a tympanic membrane, ligaments, tendons, and three ossicles. An important function of the tympanic membrane is to deliver exterior sound stimulus to the ossicles and inner ear. In this study, the responses of the tympanic membrane in a human ear were measured and compared with those of a finite element model of the middle ear. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of the tympanic membrane, which had the measurement point on the cone of light of the tympanic membrane. The measured subjects were five Korean male adults and a cadaver. The tympanic membranes were stimulated using pure-tone sine waves at 18 center frequencies of one-third octave band over a frequency range of 200 Hz ~10 kHz with 60 and 80 dB sound pressure levels. The measured responses were converted into the umbo displacement transfer function (UDTF) with a linearity assumption. The measured UDTFs were compared with the calculated UDTFs using a finite element model for the Korean human middle ear. The finite element model of the middle ear consists of three ossicles, a tympanic membrane, ligaments, and tendons. In the finite element model, the umbo displacements were calculated under a unit sound pressure on the tympanic membrane. The UDTF of the finite element model exhibited good agreement with that of the experimental one in low frequency range, whereas in higher frequency band, the two response functions deviated from each other, which demonstrates that the finite element model should be updated with more accurate material properties and/or a frequency dependent material model.

  3. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport

  4. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  5. Biofouling investigation in membrane filtration systems using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca

    2017-10-01

    Biofouling represents the main problem in membrane filtration systems. Biofouling arises when the biomass growth negatively impacts the membrane performance parameters (i.e. flux decrease and feed channel pressure drop). Most of the available techniques for characterization of biofouling involve membrane autopsies, providing information ex-situ destructively at the end of the process. OCT, is non-invasive imaging technique, able to acquire scans in-situ and non-destructively. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of OCT as in-situ and non-destructive tool to gain a better understanding of biofouling behavior in membrane filtration systems. The OCT was employed to study the fouling behavior in two different membrane configurations: (i) submerged flat sheet membrane and (ii) spacer filled channel. Through the on-line acquisition of OCT scans and the study of the biomass morphology, it was possible to relate the impact of the fouling on the membrane performance. The on-line monitoring of biofilm formation on a flat sheet membrane was conducted in a gravity-driven submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) for 43 d. Four different phases were observed linking the variations in permeate flux with changes in biofilm morphology. Furthermore, the biofilm morphology was used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to better understand the role of biofilm structure on the filtration mechanisms. The time-resolved OCT analysis was employed to study the biofouling development at the early stage. Membrane coverage and average biofouling layer thickness were found to be linearly correlated with the permeate flux pattern. An integrated characterization methodology was employed to characterize the fouling on a flat sheet membrane, involving the use of OCT as first step followed by membrane autopsies, revealing the presence of a homogeneous layer on the surface. In a spacer filled channel a 3D OCT time series analysis of biomass development under

  6. Modelling the biological performance of a side-stream membrane bioreactor using ASM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ke-Jun; Liu, Xin-Ai; Jiang, Tao; Kennedy, M D; Schippers, J C; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2004-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are attracting global interest but the mathematical modeling of the biological performance of MBRs remains very limited. This study focuses on the modelling of a side-stream MBR system using Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1), and comparing the results with the modelling of traditional activated sludge processes. ASM1 parameters relevant for the long-term biological behaviour in MBR systems were calibrated (i.e. Y(H) = 0.72gCOD/gCOD, Y(A) = 0.25gCOD/gN, b(H) = 0.25 d(-1), b(A) = 0.080 d(-1) and f(P) = 0.06), and generally agreed with the parameters in traditional activated sludge processes, with the exception that a higher autotrophic biomass decay rate was observed in the MBR. A sensitivity analysis for steady state operation and DO dynamics suggested that the biological performance of the MBR system (the sludge concentration, effluent quality and the DO dynamics) are very sensitive to the parameters(i.e. Y(H), Y(A), b(H), b(A), micro(maxH) and micro(maxA)), and influent wastewater components(X(I), S(S), X(S), S(NH)).

  7. The artificial membrane insert system as predictive tool for formulation performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berben, Philippe; Brouwers, Joachim; Augustijns, Patrick

    2018-02-15

    In view of the increasing interest of pharmaceutical companies for cell- and tissue-free models to implement permeation into formulation testing, this study explored the capability of an artificial membrane insert system (AMI-system) as predictive tool to evaluate the performance of absorption-enabling formulations. Firstly, to explore the usefulness of the AMI-system in supersaturation assessment, permeation was monitored after induction of different degrees of loviride supersaturation. Secondly, to explore the usefulness of the AMI-system in formulation evaluation, a two-stage dissolution test was performed prior to permeation assessment. Different case examples were selected based on the availability of in vivo (intraluminal and systemic) data: (i) a suspension of posaconazole (Noxafil ® ), (ii) a cyclodextrin-based formulation of itraconazole (Sporanox ® ), and (iii) a micronized (Lipanthyl ® ) and nanosized (Lipanthylnano ® ) formulation of fenofibrate. The obtained results demonstrate that the AMI-system is able to capture the impact of loviride supersaturation on permeation. Furthermore, the AMI-system correctly predicted the effects of (i) formulation pH on posaconazole absorption, (ii) dilution on cyclodextrin-based itraconazole absorption, and (iii) food intake on fenofibrate absorption. Based on the applied in vivo/in vitro approach, the AMI-system combined with simple dissolution testing appears to be a time- and cost-effective tool for the early-stage evaluation of absorption-enabling formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary study on application of Pd composite membrane in helium purification system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianhua; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie; Yu Suyuan

    2008-01-01

    Helium purification system (HPS) is the main part of the helium auxiliary system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR), also in fusion reactors. Some exploratory work was carried out on the application of Pd composite membrane in the separation of He and H 2 . A typical single stripper permeator with recycle (SSP) system was designed, based on the design parameters of a small scale He purification test system CIGNE in CADARACHE, CEA, France, and finite element analysis method was used to solve the model. The total length of membrane module is fixed to 0.5 m. The results show that the concentration of H 2 is found to reduce from 1 000 μL/L in feed gas to 5 μL/L in the product He (the upper limitation of HPS in HTGR). And the molar ratio of product He to feed gas is 96.18% with the optimized ratio of sweep gas to retentive gas 0. 3970. It's an exponential distribution of H 2 concentration along the membrane module. The results were also compared with the other two popular designs, two stripper in series permeator (TSSP) and continuous membrane column (CMC). (authors)

  9. Parameter estimation in neuronal stochastic differential equation models from intracellular recordings of membrane potentials in single neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Samson, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the membrane potential in a single neuron can be studied by estimating biophysical parameters from intracellular recordings. Diffusion processes, given as continuous solutions to stochastic differential equations, are widely applied as models for the neuronal membrane potential evolut...

  10. A Generic Model for Prediction of Separation Performance of Olefin/Paraffin Mixture by Glassy Polymer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Ghoreyshi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The separation of olefin/paraffin mixtures is an important process in petrochemical industries, which is traditionally performed by low temperature distillation with a high-energy consumption, or complex extractive distillationand adsorption techniques. Membrane separation process is emerging as an alternative for traditional separation processes with respect to low energy and simple operation. Investigations made by various researchers on polymeric membranes it is found that special glassy polymers render them as suitable materials for olefin/paraffin mixture separation. In this regard, having some knowledge on the possible transport mechanism of these processes would play a significant role in their design and applications. In this study, separation behavior of olefin/paraffin mixtures through glassy polymers was modeled by three different approaches: the so-called dual transport model, the basic adsorption-diffusion theory and the general Maxwell-Stefan formulation. The systems chosen to validate the developed transport models are separation of ethane-ethylene mixture by 6FDA-6FpDA polyimide membrane and propane-propylene mixture by 6FDA-TrMPD polyimide membrane for which the individual sorption and permeation data are available in the literature. Acritical examination of dual transport model shows that this model fails clearly to predict even the proper trend for selectivities. The adjustment of pemeabilities by accounting for the contribution of non-selective bulk flow in the transport model introduced no improvement in the predictability of the model. The modeling results based on the basic adsorption-diffusion theory revealed that in this approach only using mixed permeability data, an acceptable result is attainable which fades out the advantages of predictibility of multicomponent separation performance from pure component data. Finally, the results obtained from the model developed based on Maxwell-Stefan formulation approach show a

  11. Testing the limits of model membrane simulations-bilayer composition and pressure scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Nikoleta; Ivanova, Anela

    2018-03-30

    Studying transfer of bioactive compounds across cell membranes by simulations attracts growing attention. To perform such calculations accurately, it is necessary to verify the validity of computational protocols established for description of unperturbed lipid bilayers also with translocating substances present. The current work reports the results from 1 μs long atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two types of model plasma membranes-one built of a single phospholipid (DPPC) and one constructed of four types of phospholipids-in the presence of a drug-peptide complex experimentally known to cross cell membranes. The influence of membrane composition and of applied pressure scaling algorithm on the simulations outcome is analyzed with particular focus on membrane structure and on complex-lipid interactions during the initial penetration stage. It is found that the mixed composition of the membrane is important for correct assessment of the interactions with the complex both from purely structural perspective and because of the uneven charge distribution. The structure of the mixed lipid bilayer is affected more markedly by the pressure scaling algorithm. When the pressure is isotropically scaled, lipids are distributed almost homogeneously along the membrane in liquid ordered state. On semi-isotropic scaling, the lipid tails undergo significant rearrangement and a long-range ordered state is established. This results in "freezing" of the membrane and expulsion of the complex. The statistical analysis of the MD data points to the conclusion that a mixed-lipid membrane model with isotropic pressure scaling would be more suitable for describing the process of complex translocation across neoplastic membranes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A study of the isobutane dehydrogenation in a porous membrane catalytic reactor: design, use and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casanave, D.

    1996-01-26

    The aim of this study was to set up and model a catalytic fixed-bed membrane reactor for the isobutane dehydrogenation. The catalyst, developed at Catalysis Research Institute (IRC), was a silicalite-supported Pt-based catalyst. Their catalytic performances (activity, selectivity, stability) where found better adapted to the membrane reactor, when compared with commercial Pt or Cr based catalysts. The kinetic study of the reaction has been performed in a differential reactor and led to the determination of a kinetic law, suitable when the catalyst is used near thermodynamic equilibrium. The mass transfer mechanisms were determined in meso-porous and microporous membranes through both permeability and gas mixtures (iC{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) separation measurements. For the meso-porous {gamma}-alumina, the mass transfer is ensured by a Knudsen diffusion mechanism which can compete with surface diffusion for condensable gas like isobutane. The resulting permselectivity H{sub 2}/iC4 of this membrane is low ({approx} 4). For the microporous zeolite membrane, molecular sieving occurs due to steric hindrance, leading to higher permselectivity {approx}14. Catalyst/membrane associations were compared in terms of isobutane dehydrogenation performances, for both types of membranes (meso-porous and microporous) and for two different reactor configurations (co-current and counter-current sweep gas flow). The best experimental results were obtained with the zeolite membrane, when sweeping the outer compartment in a co-current flow. The equilibrium displacement observed with the {gamma}-alumina membrane was lower and mainly due to a dilution effect of the reaction mixture by the sweep gas. A mathematical model was developed, which correctly describes all the experimental results obtained with the zeolite membrane, when the co-current mode is used. (Abstract Truncated)

  13. Entropy and biological systems: experimentally-investigated entropy-driven stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Husen; Liggins, John R; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-02-24

    According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, an overall increase of entropy contributes to the driving force for any physicochemical process, but entropy has seldom been investigated in biological systems. Here, for the first time, we apply Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the Mg(2+)-induced spontaneous stacking of photosynthetic membranes isolated from spinach leaves. After subtracting a large endothermic interaction of MgCl₂ with membranes, unrelated to stacking, we demonstrate that the enthalpy change (heat change at constant pressure) is zero or marginally positive or negative. This first direct experimental evidence strongly suggests that an entropy increase significantly drives membrane stacking in this ordered biological structure. Possible mechanisms for the entropy increase include: (i) the attraction between discrete oppositely-charged areas, releasing counterions; (ii) the release of loosely-bound water molecules from the inter-membrane gap; (iii) the increased orientational freedom of previously-aligned water dipoles; and (iv) the lateral rearrangement of membrane components.

  14. Modeling cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matthäus, Franziska; Pahle, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume comprises research articles and reviews on topics connected to the mathematical modeling of cellular systems. These contributions cover signaling pathways, stochastic effects, cell motility and mechanics, pattern formation processes, as well as multi-scale approaches. All authors attended the workshop on "Modeling Cellular Systems" which took place in Heidelberg in October 2014. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  15. Investigation of membrane mechanics using spring networks: application to red-blood-cell modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingzhu; Boyle, Fergal J

    2014-10-01

    In recent years a number of red-blood-cell (RBC) models have been proposed using spring networks to represent the RBC membrane. Some results predicted by these models agree well with experimental measurements. However, the suitability of these membrane models has been questioned. The RBC membrane, like a continuum membrane, is mechanically isotropic throughout its surface, but the mechanical properties of a spring network vary on the network surface and change with deformation. In this work spring-network mechanics are investigated in large deformation for the first time via an assessment of the effect of network parameters, i.e. network mesh, spring type and surface constraint. It is found that a spring network is conditionally equivalent to a continuum membrane. In addition, spring networks are employed for RBC modelling to replicate the optical tweezers test. It is found that a spring network is sufficient for modelling the RBC membrane but strain-hardening springs are required. Moreover, the deformation profile of a spring network is presented for the first time via the degree of shear. It is found that spring-network deformation approaches continuous as the mesh density increases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling of membrane bioreactor treating hypersaline oily wastewater by artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendashteh, Ali Reza; Fakhru'l-Razi, A.; Chaibakhsh, Naz; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Madaeni, Sayed Siavash; Abidin, Zurina Zainal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Hypersaline oily wastewater was treated in a membrane bioreactor. → The effects of salinity and organic loading rate were evaluated. → The system was modeled by neural network and optimized by genetic algorithm. → The model prediction agrees well with experimental values. → The model can be used to obtain effluent characteristics less than discharge limits. - Abstract: A membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) treating hypersaline oily wastewater was modeled by artificial neural network (ANN). The MSBR operated at different total dissolved solids (TDSs) (35,000; 50,000; 100,000; 150,000; 200,000; 250,000 mg/L), various organic loading rates (OLRs) (0.281, 0.563, 1.124, 2.248, and 3.372 kg COD/(m 3 day)) and cyclic time (12, 24, and 48 h). A feed-forward neural network trained by batch back propagation algorithm was employed to model the MSBR. A set of 193 operational data from the wastewater treatment with the MSBR was used to train the network. The training, validating and testing procedures for the effluent COD, total organic carbon (TOC) and oil and grease (O and G) concentrations were successful and a good correlation was observed between the measured and predicted values. The results showed that at OLR of 2.44 kg COD/(m 3 day), TDS of 78,000 mg/L and reaction time (RT) of 40 h, the average removal rate of COD was 98%. In these conditions, the average effluent COD concentration was less than 100 mg/L and met the discharge limits.

  17. Mini-review: novel non-destructivein situbiofilm characterization techniques in membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2016-05-12

    Membrane systems are commonly used in the water industry to produce potable water and for advanced wastewater treatment. One of the major drawbacks of membrane systems is biofilm formation (biofouling), which results in an unacceptable decline in membrane performance. Three novel in situ biofouling characterization techniques were assessed: (i) optical coherence tomography (OCT), (ii) planar optodes, and (iii) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The first two techniques were assessed using a biofilm grown on the surface of nanofiltration (NF) membranes using a transparent membrane fouling simulator that accurately simulates spiral wound modules, modified for in situ biofilm imaging. For the NMR study, a spiral wound reverse osmosis membrane module was used. Results show that these techniques can provide information to reconstruct the biofilm accurately, either with 2-D (OCT, planar optodes and NMR), or 3-D (OCT and NMR) scans. These non-destructive tools can elucidate the interaction of hydrodynamics and mass transport on biofilm accumulation in membrane systems. Oxygen distribution in the biofilm can be mapped and linked to water flow and substrate characteristics; insights on the effect of crossflow velocity, flow stagnation, and feed spacer presence can be obtained, and in situ information on biofilm structure, thickness, and spatial distribution can be quantitatively assessed. The combination of these novel non-destructive in situ biofilm characterization techniques can provide real-time observation of biofilm formation at the mesoscale. The information obtained with these tools could potentially be used for further improvement in the design of membrane systems and operational parameters to reduce impact of biofouling on membrane performance. © 2016 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  18. Blood feeding of Ornithodoros turicata larvae using an artificial membrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H J; Filatov, S; Lopez, J E; Pérez DE León, A A; Teel, P D

    2017-06-01

    An artificial membrane system was adapted to feed Ornithodoros turicata (Ixodida: Argasidae) larvae from a laboratory colony using defibrinated swine blood. Aspects related to larval feeding and moulting to the first nymphal instar were evaluated. A total of 55.6% of all larvae exposed to the artificial membrane in two experimental groups fed to repletion and 98.0% of all fed larvae moulted. Mortality rates of first instar nymphs differed significantly depending on the sorting tools used to handle engorged larvae (χ 2  = 35.578, P artificial membrane feeding system. Applications of the artificial membrane feeding system to fill gaps in current knowledge of soft tick biology and the study of soft tick-pathogen interactions are discussed. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  19. Low-temperature bonded glass-membrane microfluidic device for in vitro organ-on-a-chip cell culture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Kyall J.; Gao, Xiaofang; Wang, Chenxi; Priest, Craig; Prestidge, Clive A.; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The integration of microfluidics with living biological systems has paved the way to the exciting concept of "organson- a-chip", which aims at the development of advanced in vitro models that replicate the key features of human organs. Glass based devices have long been utilised in the field of microfluidics but the integration of alternative functional elements within multi-layered glass microdevices, such as polymeric membranes, remains a challenge. To this end, we have extended a previously reported approach for the low-temperature bonding of glass devices that enables the integration of a functional polycarbonate porous membrane. The process was initially developed and optimised on specialty low-temperature bonding equipment (μTAS2001, Bondtech, Japan) and subsequently adapted to more widely accessible hot embosser units (EVG520HE Hot Embosser, EVG, Austria). The key aspect of this method is the use of low temperatures compatible with polymeric membranes. Compared to borosilicate glass bonding (650 °C) and quartz/fused silica bonding (1050 °C) processes, this method maintains the integrity and functionality of the membrane (Tg 150 °C for polycarbonate). Leak tests performed showed no damage or loss of integrity of the membrane for up to 150 hours, indicating sufficient bond strength for long term cell culture. A feasibility study confirmed the growth of dense and functional monolayers of Caco-2 cells within 5 days.

  20. Design study of fuel circulating system using Pd-alloy membrane isotope separation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Aizawa, T.; Kasahara, T.; Nishikawa, M.; Asami, N.

    1980-01-01

    Design study on the fuel circulating system (FCS) for a tokamak experimental fusion reactor (JXFR) has been carried out to establish the system concept, to plan the development program, and to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion system. The FCS consists of main vacuum system, fuel gas refiners, isotope separators, fuel feeders, and auxiliary systems. In the system design, Pd-alloy membrane permeation method is adopted for fuel refining and isotope separating. All impurities are effectively removed and hydrogen isotopes are sufficiently separated by Pd-alloy membrane. The isotope separation system consists of 1st (47 separators) and 2nd (46 separators) cascades for removing protium and separating deuterium, respectively. In the FCS, while cryogenic distillation method appears to be practicable, Pd-alloy membrane diffusion method is attractive for isotope separation and refining of fuel gas. The choice will have to be based on reliability, economic, and safety analyses

  1. A mathematical model for predicting the life of polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes subjected to hydration cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlatsky, S. F.; Gummalla, M.; O'Neill, J.; Atrazhev, V. V.; Varyukhin, A. N.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Erikhman, N. S.

    2012-10-01

    Under typical Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) fuel cell operating conditions, part of the membrane electrode assembly is subjected to humidity cycling due to variation of inlet gas RH and/or flow rate. Cyclic membrane hydration/dehydration would cause cyclic swelling/shrinking of the unconstrained membrane. In a constrained membrane, it causes cyclic stress resulting in mechanical failure in the area adjacent to the gas inlet. A mathematical modeling framework for prediction of the lifetime of a PEMFC membrane subjected to hydration cycling is developed in this paper. The model predicts membrane lifetime as a function of RH cycling amplitude and membrane mechanical properties. The modeling framework consists of three model components: a fuel cell RH distribution model, a hydration/dehydration induced stress model that predicts stress distribution in the membrane, and a damage accrual model that predicts membrane lifetime. Short descriptions of the model components along with overall framework are presented in the paper. The model was used for lifetime prediction of a GORE-SELECT membrane.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  3. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2010-01-20

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such 'spring-pots' exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress-strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues.

  4. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such 'spring-pots' exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress–strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues. (perspective)

  5. Cholesterol as a factor regulating the influence of natural (PAF and lysoPAF) vs synthetic (ED) ether lipids on model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have performed a comparative study on the effect of antineoplastic ether lipid-edelfosine (ED), its natural analogs - Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) and its precursor (lyso-PAF), both lacking anticancer properties, on cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine (Chol/PC) monolayers, serving as model membranes. Since all the above ether lipids are membrane active, it can be expected that their effect on membranes may differentiate their biological activity. Our investigations were aimed at studying potential relationship of the effect of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF on model membranes, differing in condensation. We have modified molecular packing of Chol/PC model systems either by increasing the level of sterol in the system or changing the structure of PC, while keeping the same sterol content. Additionally, we have performed a detailed comparison of the miscibility of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF with various membrane lipids. The collected data evidenced that all the investigated ether lipids influence Chol/PC films in the same way; however, in a different magnitude. Moreover, the interactions of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF with model membranes were the strongest at the highest level of sterol in the system. A thorough analysis of the obtained results has proved that the effect of the investigated ether lipids on membranes is not dependent on the condensation of the system, but it is strongly determined by the concentration of cholesterol. Since ED was found to interact with model membranes stronger than PAF and lyso-PAF, we have suggested that this fact may contribute to differences in cytotoxicity of these compounds. © 2013.

  6. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  7. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun, E-mail: xiaoyunxu88@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  8. Development of a dynamic model for cleaning ultra filtration membranes fouled by surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, E.; Betlem, Bernardus H.L.; Roffel, B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a dynamic model for cleaning ultra filtration membranes fouled by surface water is proposed. A model that captures the dynamics well is valuable for the optimization of the cleaning process. The proposed model is based on component balances and contains three parameters that can be

  9. Model studies of lipid flip-flop in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisio, Giulia; Ferrarini, Alberta; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    , and growth heavily depend. Such transverse motion—commonly called flip-flop—has been studied both experimentally and computationally. Experimental investigations face difficulties related to time-scales and probe-induced membrane perturbation issues. Molecular dynamics simulations play an important role...... for the molecular-level understanding of flip-flop. In this review we present a summary of the state of the art of computational studies of spontaneous flip-flop of phospholipids, sterols and fatty acids. Also, we highlight critical issues and strategies that have been developed to solve them, and what remains...

  10. Modeling of air-gap membrane distillation process: A theoretical and experimental study

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem

    2013-06-03

    A one dimensional (1-D) air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) model for flat sheet type modules has been developed. This model is based on mathematical equations that describe the heat and mass transfer mechanisms of a single-stage AGMD process. It can simulate AGMD modules in both co-current and counter-current flow regimes. The theoretical model was validated using AGMD experimental data obtained under different operating conditions and parameters. The predicted water vapor flux was compared to the flux measured at five different feed water temperatures, two different feed water salinities, three different air gap widths and two MD membranes with different average pore sizes. This comparison showed that the model flux predictions are strongly correlated with the experimental data, with model predictions being within +10% of the experimentally determined values. The model was then used to study and analyze the parameters that have significant effect on scaling-up the AGMD process such as the effect of increasing the membrane length, and feed and coolant flow rates. The model was also used to analyze the maximum thermal efficiency of the AGMD process by tracing changes in water production rate and the heat input to the process along the membrane length. This was used to understand the gain in both process production and thermal efficiency for different membrane surface areas and the resultant increases in process capital and water unit cost. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. A new laboratory model using bull and boar spermatozoa and fluorescent beads to assess a membrane's occlusive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szellö, M; Janett, F; Ewald, C; Music, M; Sener, B; Attin, T; Schmidlin, P R

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the potential of bull and boar spermatozoa and fluorescent beads to be used as a surrogate cell model to determine the cell occlusive potential in vitro using membranes of standardized porosities. A two-chamber model system consisting of upper and lower chambers, which could be separated by membranes, was constructed. Isopore polycarbonate membranes with different standardized pore diameters were used to assess the mobile cellular penetration behavior of spermatozoa or the more passive non-cellular permeability of fluorescent particles (beads) of different diameter and color. In a first experiment, spermatozoa were placed in the lower chamber, whereas semen extender only was placed in the upper chamber. After 10 min of incubation at 37 °C, the sperm number was assessed in the latter. In a second experiment, a bead solution was drawn through resorbable collagen membranes from the upper into the lower chamber by vacuum using a syringe and bead number and size was analyzed by flow cytometry. All experiments were carried out in triplicates. A non-porous polyester membrane was used as negative control to assess the overall tightness of the setup. Boar and bull spermatozoa had average cell body lengths and widths of 9 × 5 μm and were unable to pass through pores ≤2 μm, whereas they were detectable at pore sizes ≥3 μm. Their number increased with increasing pore diameters, i.e., from minimal concentrations of 0.1 × 10 6 /ml for boar and 0.5 × 10 6 /ml for bull spermatozoa at 3 μm to maximal concentrations of 2.1 × 10 6 /ml for boar and 13.1 × 10 6 /ml for bull spermatozoa at 8 μm. The fluorescent beads followed the expected pattern of permeability reliably correlating bead and pore diameter. Within the limitations of this laboratory study and the xenogeneic cell surrogate material, the model allows to easily assess cell and particle penetration through porous structures like

  12. Modelling carbon membranes for gas and isotope separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Du, Aijun; Hankel, Marlies; Smith, Sean C

    2013-04-14

    Molecular modelling has become a useful and widely applied tool to investigate separation and diffusion behavior of gas molecules through nano-porous low dimensional carbon materials, including quasi-1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene-like carbon allotropes. These simulations provide detailed, molecular level information about the carbon framework structure as well as dynamics and mechanistic insights, i.e. size sieving, quantum sieving, and chemical affinity sieving. In this perspective, we revisit recent advances in this field and summarize separation mechanisms for multicomponent systems from kinetic and equilibrium molecular simulations, elucidating also anomalous diffusion effects induced by the confining pore structure and outlining perspectives for future directions in this field.

  13. Modelling and sequential simulation of multi-tubular metallic membrane and techno-economics of a hydrogen production process employing thin-layer membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Shafiee, Alireza

    2016-09-24

    A theoretical model for multi-tubular palladium-based membrane is proposed in this paper and validated against experimental data for two different sized membrane modules that operate at high temperatures. The model is used in a sequential simulation format to describe and analyse pure hydrogen and hydrogen binary mixture separations, and then extended to simulate an industrial scale membrane unit. This model is used as a sub-routine within an ASPEN Plus model to simulate a membrane reactor in a steam reforming hydrogen production plant. A techno-economic analysis is then conducted using the validated model for a plant producing 300 TPD of hydrogen. The plant utilises a thin (2.5 μm) defect-free and selective layer (Pd75Ag25 alloy) membrane reactor. The economic sensitivity analysis results show usefulness in finding the optimum operating condition that achieves minimum hydrogen production cost at break-even point. A hydrogen production cost of 1.98 $/kg is estimated while the cost of the thin-layer selective membrane is found to constitute 29% of total process capital cost. These results indicate the competiveness of this thin-layer membrane process against conventional methods of hydrogen production. © 2016 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC

  14. Modelling of wastewater systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Henrik

    Oxygen Demand) flux and SS flux in the inlet to the WWTP. COD is measured by means of a UV absorption sensor while SS is measured by a turbidity sensor. These models include a description of the deposit of COD and SS amounts, respectively, in the sewer system, and the models can thus be used to quantify......In this thesis, models of pollution fluxes in the inlet to 2 Danish wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as well as of suspended solids (SS) concentrations in the aeration tanks of an alternating WWTP and in the effluent from the aeration tanks are developed. The latter model is furthermore used...... to analyze and quantify the effect of the Aeration Tank Settling (ATS) operating mode, which is used during rain events. Furthermore, the model is used to propose a control algorithm for the phase lengths during ATS operation. The models are mainly formulated as state space model in continuous time...

  15. Review on strategies for biofouling mitigation in spiral wound membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2018-02-01

    Because of the uneven distribution of fresh water in time and space, a large number of regions are experiencing water scarcity and stress. Membrane based desalination technologies have the potential to solve the fresh water crisis in coastal areas. However, in many cases membrane performance is restricted by biofouling. The objective of this review is to provide an overview on the state of the art strategies to control biofouling in spiral wound reverse osmosis membrane systems and point to possible future research directions. A critical review on biofouling control strategies such as feed water pre-treatment, membrane surface modification, feed spacer geometry optimization and hydrodynamics in spiral wound membrane systems is presented. In conclusion, biofouling cannot be avoided in the long run, and thus biofouling control strategies should focus on delaying the biofilm formation, reducing its impact on membrane performance and enhancing biofilm removal by advanced cleaning strategies. Therefore, future studies should aim on: (i) biofilm structural characterization; (ii) understanding to what extent biofilm properties affect membrane filtration performance, and (iii) developing methods to engineer biofilm properties such that biofouling would have only a low or delayed impact on the filtration process and accumulated biomass can be easily removed.

  16. Data supporting the validation of a simulation model for multi-component gas separation in polymeric membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Giordano

    2016-12-01

    The data were obtained using a model for simulating gas separation, described in the research article entitled “Interplay of inlet temperature and humidity on energy penalty for CO2 post-combustion capture: rigorous analysis and simulation of a single stage gas permeation process” (L. Giordano, D. Roizard, R. Bounaceur, E. Favre, 2016 [1]. The data were used to validate the model by comparison with literature results. Considering a membrane system based on feed compression only, data from the model proposed and that from literature were compared with respect to the molar composition of permeate stream, the membrane area and specific energy requirement, varying the feed pressure and the CO2 separation degree.

  17. Cost effectiveness analysis of the SEAMIST trademark membrane system technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, A.D.; Booth, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the cost and performance characteristics of SEAMIST trademark, an innovative technology that facilitates measurements of contaminants in both vertical and horizontal vadose zone boreholes. This new technology consists of an airtight membrane linear that is pneumatically emplaced inside the borehole structure. Sampling ports with attached tubing, absorbent collectors, or various in situ measuring devices can be fabricated into the linear and used for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), pesticides, herbicides, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, or radioactive substances. In addition, small instruments can be guided through the lined borehole and measurements taken inside at specified intervals

  18. Development of membrane moisture separator for BWR off-gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, H.; Kawamura, S.; Kumasaka, M.; Nishikubo, M.

    2001-01-01

    In BWR plant off-gas treatment systems, dehumidifiers are used to maintain noble gas adsorption efficiency in the first half of the charcoal hold-up units. From the perspective of simplifying and reducing the cost of such a dehumidification system, Japanese BWR utilities and plant fabricators have been developing a dehumidification system employing moisture separation membrane of the type already proven in fields such as medical instrumentation and precision measuring apparatus. The first part of this development involved laboratory testing to simulate the conditions found in an actual off-gas system, the results of which demonstrated satisfactory results in terms of moisture separation capability and membrane durability, and suggested favorable prospects for application in actual off-gas systems. Further, in-plant testing to verify moisture separation capability and membrane durability in the presence of actual gases is currently underway, with results so far suggesting that the system is capable of obtaining good moisture separation capability. (author)

  19. Open-source FCPEM-Performance & Durability Model Consideration of Membrane Properties on Cathode Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knights, Shanna [Ballard Fuel Cell Systems, Bend, OR (United States); Harvey, David [Ballard Fuel Cell Systems, Bend, OR (United States)

    2017-01-20

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a primary requirement for large scale commercialization of these power systems in transportation and stationary market applications which target operational lifetimes of 5,000 hours and 60,000 hours by 2020, respectively. Key degradation modes contributing to fuel cell lifetime limitations have been largely associated with the platinum-based cathode catalyst layer. Furthermore, as fuel cells are driven to low cost materials and lower catalyst loadings in order to meet the cost targets for commercialization, the catalyst durability has become even more important. While over the past few years significant progress has been made in identifying the underlying causes of fuel cell degradation and key parameters that greatly influence the degradation rates, many gaps with respect to knowledge of the driving mechanisms still exist; in particular, the acceleration of the mechanisms due to different membrane compositions remains an area not well understood. The focus of this project extension was to enhance the predictive capability of the PEM Fuel Cell Performance & Durability Model called FC-APOLLO (Application Package for Open-source Long Life Operation) by including interaction effects of membrane transport properties such as water transport, changes in proton conductivity, and overall water uptake/adsorption and the state of the catalyst layer local conditions to further understand the driving forces for platinum dissolution.

  20. Polyamide Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Potential Raw Biogas Purification: Experiments and Modelling.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek; Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Vejražka, Jiří; Veselý, M.; Čapek, P.; Friess, K.; Izák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, JUL 14 (2016), s. 163-173 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018; GA MŠk LH14006 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thin film composite membrane * biogas membrane separation * transport model ing Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  1. Polyamide Thin-Film Composite Membranes for Potential Raw Biogas Purification: Experiments and Modelling.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek; Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Vejražka, Jiří; Veselý, M.; Čapek, P.; Friess, K.; Izák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 167, JUL 14 (2016), s. 163-173 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018; GA MŠk LH14006 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thin film composite membrane * biogas membrane separation * transport modeling Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2016

  2. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  3. Function and failure of the fetal membrane: Modelling the mechanics of the chorion and amnion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaan W Verbruggen

    Full Text Available The fetal membrane surrounds the fetus during pregnancy and is a thin tissue composed of two layers, the chorion and the amnion. While rupture of this membrane normally occurs at term, preterm rupture can result in increased risk of fetal mortality and morbidity, as well as danger of infection in the mother. Although structural changes have been observed in the membrane in such cases, the mechanical behaviour of the human fetal membrane in vivo remains poorly understood and is challenging to investigate experimentally. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop simplified finite element models to investigate the mechanical behaviour and rupture of the fetal membrane, particularly its constituent layers, under various physiological conditions. It was found that modelling the chorion and amnion as a single layer predicts remarkably different behaviour compared with a more anatomically-accurate bilayer, significantly underestimating stress in the amnion and under-predicting the risk of membrane rupture. Additionally, reductions in chorion-amnion interface lubrication and chorion thickness (reported in cases of preterm rupture both resulted in increased membrane stress. Interestingly, the inclusion of a weak zone in the fetal membrane that has been observed to develop overlying the cervix would likely cause it to fail at term, during labour. Finally, these findings support the theory that the amnion is the dominant structural component of the fetal membrane and is required to maintain its integrity. The results provide a novel insight into the mechanical effect of structural changes in the chorion and amnion, in cases of both normal and preterm rupture.

  4. In-situ Non-destructive Studies on Biofouling Processes in Reverse Osmosis Membrane Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Nadia

    2016-12-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems are high-pressure membrane filtration processes that can produce high quality drinking water. Biofouling, biofilm formation that exceeds a certain threshold, is a major problem in spiral wound RO and NF membrane systems resulting in a decline in membrane performance, produced water quality, and quantity. In practice, detection of biofouling is typically done indirectly through measurements of performance decline. Existing direct biofouling detection methods are mainly destructive, such as membrane autopsies, where biofilm samples can be contaminated, damaged and resulting in biofilm structural changes. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar oxygen sensing optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for in-situ, non-destructive biofouling characterization. Aspects of the study were early detection of biofouling, biofilm spatial patterning in spacer filled channels, and the effect of feed cross-flow velocity, and feed flow temperature. Oxygen sensing optode imaging was found suitable for studying biofilm processes and gave detailed spatial and quantitative biofilm development information enabling better understanding of the biofouling development process. The outcome of this study attests the importance of in-situ, non-destructive imaging in acquiring detailed knowledge on biofilm development in membrane systems contributing to the development of effective biofouling control strategies.

  5. Laccase grafted membranes for advanced water filtration systems: a green approach to water purification technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagdeep; Saharan, Vicky; Kumar, Sanjay; Gulati, Pooja; Kapoor, Rajeev Kumar

    2017-12-27

    Conventional wastewater treatment technologies are not good enough to completely remove all endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from the water. Membrane separation systems have emerged as an attractive alternative to conventional clarification processes for waste and drinking water. Coupling of a membrane separation process with an enzymatic reaction has opened up new avenues to further enhance the quality of water. This review article deliberates the feasibility of implementing enzymatic membrane reactors has been deliberated. A comprehensive study of conventional water treatment technologies was carried out and their shortcomings were pointed out. Research findings from the leading groups working on enzyme grafted membrane based water purification were summarized. This review also comprehends the patent documents pertinent to the technology of enzyme grafted membranes for water purification. Immobilization of an enzyme on a membrane improves the performance of membrane filtration, and processes for the treatment of polluted water. Research has started exploring the potential for laccase enzymes because it can catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of substrates, structurally comparable to EDCs, by a radical-catalyzed reaction mechanism, with corresponding reduction of oxygen to water in an electron transfer process. Further, in the presence of certain mediators, the substrate range of laccases can be further enhanced to non-aromatic substrates. Removal of EDCs by laccase cross-linked enzyme aggregates in fixed-bed reactors or fluidized-bed reactors and laccase immobilized ultrafiltration (LIUF) membranes are proving their worth in water purification technology. The major operational issues with the use of LIUF membranes are enzyme instability in real wastewater and membrane fouling. In view of the above-stated characteristics, laccases are considered as the most promising enzyme for a greener and less expensive water purification technology.

  6. The extraction of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid using a liquid surfactant membrane system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, N.; Davies, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid membrane extraction process is examined for the extraction of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid. Uranium is present in the acid in concentrations up to 100 ppm which in principle makes it ideal for treatment with a membrane process. The membrane system studied is based on extraction using DEHPA-TOPO reagents which are contained within the organic phase of a water in oil emulsion. Formulations of the emulsion membrane system have been studied, the limitations of acid temperature, P 2 O 5 concentration and solid dispersed impurities in the acid have been studied in laboratory batch experiments and in a continuous pilot plant unit capable of treating 5l of concentrated acid per minute. Data from the pilot plant work has been used to develop a flowsheet for a commercial unit based on this process. (author)

  7. Low power proton exchange membrane fuel cell system identification and adaptive control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yee-Pien; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Ma, Ying-Wei [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang, Hsin-Ping; Weng, Biing-Jyh [Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST), Armaments Bureau, M.N.D. (Taiwan)

    2007-02-10

    This paper proposes a systematic method of system identification and control of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. This fuel cell can be used for low-power communication devices involving complex electrochemical reactions of nonlinear and time-varying dynamic properties. From a system point of view, the dynamic model of PEM fuel cell is reduced to a configuration of two inputs, hydrogen and air flow rates, and two outputs, cell voltage and current. The corresponding transfer functions describe linearized subsystem dynamics with finite orders and time-varying parameters, which are expressed as discrete-time auto-regression moving-average with auxiliary input models for system identification by the recursive least square algorithm. In the experiments, a pseudo-random binary sequence of hydrogen or air flow rate is fed to a single fuel cell device to excite its dynamics. By measuring the corresponding output signals, each subsystem transfer function of reduced order is identified, while the unmodeled, higher-order dynamics and disturbances are described by the auxiliary input term. This provides a basis of adaptive control strategy to improve the fuel cell performance in terms of efficiency, as well as transient and steady state specifications. Simulation shows that adaptive controller is robust to the variation of fuel cell system dynamics, and it has proved promising from the experimental results. (author)

  8. Modeling of the axon membrane skeleton structure and implications for its mechanical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihao Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that, unlike the soma and dendrites, the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under tension. Currently, the structure-function relationship of the axonal structure is unclear. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM to show that the stiffness of the axon plasma membrane is significantly higher than the stiffnesses of dendrites and somata. To examine whether the structure of the axon plasma membrane determines its overall stiffness, we introduced a coarse-grain molecular dynamics model of the axon membrane skeleton that reproduces the structure identified by super-resolution microscopy. Our proposed computational model accurately simulates the median value of the Young's modulus of the axon plasma membrane determined by atomic force microscopy. It also predicts that because the spectrin filaments are under entropic tension, the thermal random motion of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav, which are bound to ankyrin particles, a critical axonal protein, is reduced compared to the thermal motion when spectrin filaments are held at equilibrium. Lastly, our model predicts that because spectrin filaments are under tension, any axonal injuries that lacerate spectrin filaments will likely lead to a permanent disruption of the membrane skeleton due to the inability of spectrin filaments to spontaneously form their initial under-tension configuration.

  9. Stochastic approach to model fouling in membrane filters with complex pore morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Gu, Binan; Kondic, Lou; Cummings, Linda J.

    2017-11-01

    Membrane filters are widely used in industrial applications to remove contaminants and undesired impurities (particles) from a solvent. During the filtration process the membrane internal void area becomes fouled with impurities and as a consequence the filter performance deteriorates, a process that depends on filter internal structure, particle concentration and flow dynamics. The complexity of membrane internal morphology and the random nature of the particle dynamics in the flow make the filtration and fouling challenging to predict; nonetheless, mathematical modeling can play a key role in investigating filter fouling, and in suggesting design modifications for more efficient filtration. To date, many models have been proposed to describe the effects of complexity of membrane structure, and the stochasticity of particle dynamics individually but very few studies focus on both together. In this work, we present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores. Pores decrease in size as the membrane is traversed and particles are removed from the feed by adsorption within pores (which shrinks them) and stochastic sieving (pore blocking by large particles). NSF DMS 1615719.

  10. Membrane systems and their use in nuclear power plants. Treatment of primary coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kus, Pavel; Bartova, Sarka; Skala, Martin; Vonkova, Katerina [Research Centre Rez, Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic). Technological Circuits Innovation Dept.; Zach, Vaclav; Kopa, Roman [CEZ a.s., Temelin (Czech Republic). Nuclear Power Plant Temelin

    2016-03-15

    In nuclear power plants, drained primary coolant containing boric acid is currently treated in the system of evaporators and by ion exchangers. Replacement of the system of evaporators by membrane system (MS) will result in lower operating cost mainly due to lower operation temperature. In membrane systems the feed primary coolant is separated into two output streams: retentate and permeate. Retentate stream consists of the concentrated boric acid solution together with other components, while permeate stream consists of purified water. Results are presented achieved by testing a pilot-plant unit of reverse osmosis in nuclear power plant (NPP) Temelin.

  11. Optical Biosensor with Multienzyme System Immobilized onto Hybrid Membrane for Pesticides Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Lyubov Yotova; Nourelhoda Medhat

    2011-01-01

    A construction of optical biosensor based on simultaneous immobilization of acetylcholinesterase and choline oxidase enzymes for the detection of pesticides residues is described. Different kinds of novel SiO2 hybrid membranes were synthesized to be suitable for optical biosensors using sol-gel techniques. The bioactive component of the sensor consists of a multi-enzyme system including acetylcholinesterase and choline oxidase covalently immobilized on new hybrid membranes. The sensor exhibit...

  12. Fluid transportation mechanisms by a coupled system of elastic membranes and magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Sugiura, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The basic properties of the fluid transportation mechanism that is produced by the coupled waves propagating along a thin elastic membrane covering a magnetic fluid layer in a shallow and long rectangular vessel are investigated. It is shown that the progressive magnetic field induced by the rectangular pulses generates sinusoidal vibration of the displacement of elastic membrane and makes the system work more efficiently than the magnetic field induced by the pulse-width-modulation method

  13. Modeling Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boccara, Nino

    2010-01-01

    Modeling Complex Systems, 2nd Edition, explores the process of modeling complex systems, providing examples from such diverse fields as ecology, epidemiology, sociology, seismology, and economics. It illustrates how models of complex systems are built and provides indispensable mathematical tools for studying their dynamics. This vital introductory text is useful for advanced undergraduate students in various scientific disciplines, and serves as an important reference book for graduate students and young researchers. This enhanced second edition includes: . -recent research results and bibliographic references -extra footnotes which provide biographical information on cited scientists who have made significant contributions to the field -new and improved worked-out examples to aid a student’s comprehension of the content -exercises to challenge the reader and complement the material Nino Boccara is also the author of Essentials of Mathematica: With Applications to Mathematics and Physics (Springer, 2007).

  14. Modeling Complex Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreckenberg, M

    2004-01-01

    This book by Nino Boccara presents a compilation of model systems commonly termed as 'complex'. It starts with a definition of the systems under consideration and how to build up a model to describe the complex dynamics. The subsequent chapters are devoted to various categories of mean-field type models (differential and recurrence equations, chaos) and of agent-based models (cellular automata, networks and power-law distributions). Each chapter is supplemented by a number of exercises and their solutions. The table of contents looks a little arbitrary but the author took the most prominent model systems investigated over the years (and up until now there has been no unified theory covering the various aspects of complex dynamics). The model systems are explained by looking at a number of applications in various fields. The book is written as a textbook for interested students as well as serving as a comprehensive reference for experts. It is an ideal source for topics to be presented in a lecture on dynamics of complex systems. This is the first book on this 'wide' topic and I have long awaited such a book (in fact I planned to write it myself but this is much better than I could ever have written it!). Only section 6 on cellular automata is a little too limited to the author's point of view and one would have expected more about the famous Domany-Kinzel model (and more accurate citation!). In my opinion this is one of the best textbooks published during the last decade and even experts can learn a lot from it. Hopefully there will be an actualization after, say, five years since this field is growing so quickly. The price is too high for students but this, unfortunately, is the normal case today. Nevertheless I think it will be a great success! (book review)

  15. Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumí-Audenis, Berta; Costa, Luca; Carlá, Francesco; Comin, Fabio; Sanz, Fausto; Giannotti, Marina I

    2016-12-19

    Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol) plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR) techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information.

  16. Modeling the earth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  17. Separation of Cd and Ni from multicomponent aqueous solutions by nanofiltration and characterization of membrane using IT model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, Latesh B.; Murthy, Z.V.P.

    2010-01-01

    Removal of heavy metals from wastewater is of critical importance due to their high toxicity and tendency to accumulate in living organisms. In the present work, performance of a nanofiltration (NF) membrane has been studied to separate cadmium and nickel ions from multicomponent aqueous solutions at different operating conditions. It is observed that the separation of cadmium and nickel ions increases with increase in applied pressure and decreases with increase in feed concentration at a constant feed flow rate. The maximum observed solutes rejection of cadmium and nickel ions are 80.57% and 85.27% for CdCl 2 -NiCl 2 -water system and 97.26% and 98.90% for CdSO 4 -NiSO 4 -water system, respectively, for an initial feed concentration of 0.005 g/L. This difference in rejection is due to the charge density of the anions. It is also observed that the order of solute rejection sequence is inversely proportional to the diffusion coefficient. The NF membrane is characterized by an irreversible thermodynamics (IT) based Spiegler-Kedem model, coupled with film theory. Boundary-layer thickness and membrane transport parameters are estimated using Levenberg-Marquadt method. The estimated parameters are used to predict the membrane performance and found that the predicted values are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Light radiation pressure upon a wrinkled membrane – parametrization of an optically orthotropic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerovny, N. A.; Zimin, V. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the problem of representing the light pressure force upon the surface of a thin wrinkled film is discussed. The common source of wrinkles is the shear deformation of the membrane sample. The optical model of such a membrane is assumed to be optically orthotropic and an analytic equation for infinitesimal light pressure force is written. A linear regression model in the case of wrinkle geometry, where a surface element can have different optical parameters, is constructed and the Bayesian approach is used to calculate the parameters of this model.

  19. Brackish groundwater membrane system design for sustainable irrigation: Optimal configuration selection using analytic hierarchy process and multi-dimension scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beni eLew

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent high demands for reuse of salty water for irrigation affected membrane producers to assess new potential technologies for undesirable physical, chemical and biological contaminants removal. This paper studies the assembly options by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP model and the multi-dimension scaling (MDS techniques. A specialized form of MDS (CoPlot software enables presentation of the AHP outcomes in a two dimensional space and the optimal model can be visualized clearly. Four types of 8 membranes were selected: (i Nanofiltration low rejection and high flux (ESNA1-LF-LD, 86% rejection, 10,500gpd; (ii Nanofiltration medium rejection and medium flux (ESNA1-LF2-LD, 91% rejection, 8,200gpd; (iii Reverse Osmosis high rejection and high flux (CPA5-MAX, 99.7 rejection, 12,000gpd ; and (iv Reverse Osmosis medium rejection and extreme high flux (ESPA4-MAX, 99.2 rejection, 13,200gpd. The results indicate that: (i Nanofiltration membrane (High flux and Low rejection can produce water for irrigation with valuable levels of nutrient ions and a reduction in the sodium absorption ratio (SAR, minimizing soil salinity; this is an attractive option for agricultural irrigation and is the optimal solution; and (ii implementing the MDS approach with reference to the variables is consequently useful to characterize membrane system design.

  20. Model of fission yeast cell shape driven by membrane-bound growth factors and the cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Drake

    Full Text Available Fission yeast serves as a model for how cellular polarization machinery consisting of signaling molecules and the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton regulates cell shape. In this work, we develop mathematical models to investigate how these cells maintain a tubular shape of approximately constant diameter. Many studies identify active Cdc42, found in a cap at the inner membrane of growing cell tips, as an important regulator of local cell wall remodeling, likely through control of exocyst tethering and the targeting of other polarity-enhancing structures. First, we show that a computational model with Cdc42-dependent local cell wall remodeling under turgor pressure predicts a relationship between spatial extent of growth signal and cell diameter that is in agreement with prior experiments. Second, we model the consequences of feedback between cell shape and distribution of Cdc42 growth signal at cell tips. We show that stability of cell diameter over successive cell divisions places restrictions on their mutual dependence. We argue that simple models where the spatial extent of the tip growth signal relies solely on geometrical alignment of confined microtubules might lead to unstable width regulation. Third, we study a computational model that combines a growth signal distributed over a characteristic length scale (as, for example, by a reaction-diffusion mechanism with an axis-sensing microtubules system that places landmarks at positions where microtubule tips touch the cortex. A two-dimensional implementation of this model leads to stable cell diameter for a wide range of parameters. Changes to the parameters of this model reproduce straight, bent, and bulged cell shapes, and we discuss how this model is consistent with other observed cell shapes in mutants. Our work provides an initial quantitative framework for understanding the regulation of cell shape in fission yeast, and a scaffold for understanding this process on a more molecular

  1. Modelling of a tubular membrane contactor for pre-combustion CO2 capture using ionic liquids: Influence of the membrane configuration, absorbent properties and operation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongde Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A membrane contactor using ionic liquids (ILs as solvent for pre-combustion capture CO2 at elevated temperature (303–393 K and pressure (20 bar has been studied using mathematic model in the present work. A comprehensive two-dimensional (2D mass-transfer model was developed based on finite element method. The effects of liquid properties, membrane configurations, as well as operation parameters on the CO2 removal efficiency were systematically studied. The simulation results show that CO2 can be effectively removed in this process. In addition, it is found that the liquid phase mass transfer dominated the overall mass transfer. Membranes with high porosity and small thickness could apparently reduce the membrane resistance and thus increase the separation efficiency. On the other hand, the membrane diameter and membrane length have a relatively small influence on separation performance within the operation range. Keywords: CO2 capture, Pre-combustion, Membrane contactor, Ionic liquids, Modelling

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  3. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A

    2008-01-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property

  4. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Technische Mikrobiologie, Weihenstephaner Steig 16, 85350 Freising (Germany)], E-mail: rudi.vogel@wzw.tum.de

    2008-07-15

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  5. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  6. Analysis of Shear Stress and Energy Consumption in a Tubular Airlift Membrane System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Chan, C.C.V.; Berube, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    Application of a two-phase slug flow in side-stream membrane bioreactors (MBRs) has proven to increase the permeate flux and decrease fouling through a better control of the cake layer. Past literature has shown that the hydrodynamics near the membrane surface have an impact on the degree...... of fouling by imposing high shear stress near the surface of the membrane. Previously, shear stress histograms (SSH) have been introduced to summarize results from an experimental setup developed to investigate the shear stress imposed on the surface of a membrane under different two-phase flow conditions...... (gas and liquid) by varying the flow of each phase. Bimodal SSHs were observed, with peaks corresponding to the shear induced by the liquid and gas flow respectively. In this contribution, SSHs are modelled using simple empirical relationships. These are used to identify the two-phase flow conditions...

  7. Calibrating a side-stream membrane bioreactor using Activated Sludge Model No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, T; Liu, X; Kennedy, M D; Schippers, J C; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2005-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are attracting global interest but the mathematical modeling of the biological performance of MBRs remains very limited. This study focuses on the modeling of a side-stream MBR system using the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1), and compares the results with the modeling of traditional activated sludge processes. ASM1 parameters relevant for the long-term biological behaviour in MBR systems were calibrated (i.e. Y(H) = 0.72 gCOD/gCOD, Y(A) = 0.25 gCOD/gN, b(H) = 0.25 d(-1), b(A) = 0.080 d(-1) and f(p) = 0.06), and generally agreed with the parameters in traditional activated sludge processes, with the exception that a higher autotrophic biomass decay rate was observed in the MBR. Influent wastewater characterization was proven to be a critical step in model calibration, and special care should be taken in characterizing the inert particulate COD (X(I)) concentration in the MBR influent. It appeared that the chemical-biological method was superior to the physical-chemical method. A sensitivity analysis for steady-state operation and DO dynamics suggested that the biological performance of the MBR system (the sludge concentration, effluent quality and the DO dynamics) are very sensitive to the parameters (i.e. Y(H), Y(A), b(H), b(A) micro(maxH) and micro(maxA), and influent wastewater components (X(I), S(s), X(s) and S(NH)).

  8. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  9. Modelling Ser129 phosphorylation inhibits membrane binding of pore-forming alpha-synuclein oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Sebastian Nübling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In several neurodegenerative diseases, hyperphosphorylation at position Ser129 is found in fibrillar deposits of alpha-synuclein (asyn, implying a pathophysiological role of asyn phosphorylation in neurodegeneration. However, recent animal models applying asyn phosphorylation mimics demonstrated a protective effect of phosphorylation. Since metal-ion induced asyn oligomers were identified as a potential neurotoxic aggregate species with membrane pore-forming abilities, the current study was undertaken to determine effects of asyn phosphorylation on oligomer membrane binding. METHODS: We investigated the influence of S129 phosphorylation on interactions of metal-ion induced asyn oligomers with small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUV composed of POPC and DPPC applying the phosphorylation mimic asyn129E. Confocal single-particle fluorescence techniques were used to monitor membrane binding at the single-particle level. RESULTS: Binding of asyn129E monomers to gel-state membranes (DPPC-SUV is slightly reduced compared to wild-type asyn, while no interactions with membranes in the liquid-crystalline state (POPC-SUV are seen for both asyn and asyn129E. Conversely, metal-ion induced oligomer formation is markedly increased in asyn129E. Surprisingly, membrane binding to POPC-SUV is nearly absent in Fe(3+ induced asyn129E oligomers and markedly reduced in Al(3+ induced oligomers. CONCLUSION: The protective effect of pseudophosphorylation seen in animal models may be due to impeded oligomer membrane binding. Phosphorylation at Ser129 may thus have a protective effect against neurotoxic asyn oligomers by preventing oligomer membrane binding and disruption of the cellular electrophysiological equilibrium. Importantly, these findings put a new complexion on experimental pharmaceutical interventions against POLO-2 kinase.

  10. On the study of catalytic membrane reactor for water detritiation: Modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liger, Karine, E-mail: karine.liger@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Mascarade, Jérémy [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Joulia, Xavier; Meyer, Xuan-Mi [Université de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, Toulouse F-31030 (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Toulouse F-31030 (France); Troulay, Michèle; Perrais, Christophe [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental results for the conversion of tritiated water (using deuterium as a simulant of tritium) by means of a catalytic membrane reactor in view of tritium recovery. • Phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior including the determination of the compositions of gaseous effluents. • Good agreement between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on the dedicated facility. • Explanation of the unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor by the modeling results and in particular the gas composition estimation. - Abstract: In the framework of tritium recovery from tritiated water, efficiency of packed bed membrane reactors have been successfully demonstrated. Thanks to protium isotope swamping, tritium bonded water can be recovered under the valuable Q{sub 2} form (Q = H, D or T) by means of isotope exchange reactions occurring on catalyst surface. The use of permselective Pd-based membrane allows withdrawal of reactions products all along the reactor, and thus limits reverse reaction rate to the benefit of the direct one (shift effect). The reactions kinetics, which are still little known or unknown, are generally assumed to be largely greater than the permeation ones so that thermodynamic equilibriums of isotope exchange reactions are generally assumed. This paper proposes a new phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior with the determination of gas effluents compositions. A good agreement was obtained between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on a dedicated facility. Furthermore, the gas composition estimation permits to interpret unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor. In the next future, further sensitivity analysis will be performed to determine the limits of the model and a kinetics study will be conducted to assess the thermodynamic equilibrium of reactions.

  11. Nuclide separation modeling through reverse osmosis membranes in radioactive liquid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Sik Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the transport mechanism of radioactive nuclides through the reverse osmosis (RO membrane and to estimate its effectiveness for nuclide separation from radioactive liquid waste. An analytical model is developed to simulate the RO separation, and a series of experiments are set up to confirm its estimated separation behavior. The model is based on the extended Nernst–Plank equation, which handles the convective flux, diffusive flux, and electromigration flux under electroneutrality and zero electric current conditions. The distribution coefficient which arises due to ion interactions with the membrane material and the electric potential jump at the membrane interface are included as boundary conditions in solving the equation. A high Peclet approximation is adopted to simplify the calculation, but the effect of concentration polarization is included for a more accurate prediction of separation. Cobalt and cesium are specifically selected for the experiments in order to check the separation mechanism from liquid waste composed of various radioactive nuclides and nonradioactive substances, and the results are compared with the estimated cobalt and cesium rejections of the RO membrane using the model. Experimental and calculated results are shown to be in excellent agreement. The proposed model will be very useful for the prediction of separation behavior of various radioactive nuclides by the RO membrane.

  12. Development of a stealth carrier system for structural studies of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma

    Structural studies of membrane proteins remain a great experimental challenge. Functional reconstitution into artificial carriers that mimic the native bilayer environment allows for the handling of membrane proteins in solution and enables the use of small-angle scattering techniques for fast...... which can be used for SANS structural analysis of membrane proteins in solution. In combination with the D2O/H2O-based contrast variation method it is demonstrated that it is possible to prepare specifically deuterated analogues of the nanodisc, which give minimal contribution to the neutron scattering...... data when used in 100% D2O. An important challenge in the project was obtaining selective partial deuteration of the nanodisc system necessary for the total matching at 100% D2O. This was achieved through an E. coli based biosynthesis for both deuterated phosphatidylcholines as well as membrane...

  13. Essential Role of the ESX-5 Secretion System in Outer Membrane Permeability of Pathogenic Mycobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Ates, Louis S.

    2015-05-04

    Mycobacteria possess different type VII secretion (T7S) systems to secrete proteins across their unusual cell envelope. One of these systems, ESX-5, is only present in slow-growing mycobacteria and responsible for the secretion of multiple substrates. However, the role of ESX-5 substrates in growth and/or virulence is largely unknown. In this study, we show that esx-5 is essential for growth of both Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium bovis. Remarkably, this essentiality can be rescued by increasing the permeability of the outer membrane, either by altering its lipid composition or by the introduction of the heterologous porin MspA. Mutagenesis of the first nucleotide-binding domain of the membrane ATPase EccC5 prevented both ESX-5-dependent secretion and bacterial growth, but did not affect ESX-5 complex assembly. This suggests that the rescuing effect is not due to pores formed by the ESX-5 membrane complex, but caused by ESX-5 activity. Subsequent proteomic analysis to identify crucial ESX-5 substrates confirmed that all detectable PE and PPE proteins in the cell surface and cell envelope fractions were routed through ESX-5. Additionally, saturated transposon-directed insertion-site sequencing (TraDIS) was applied to both wild-type M. marinum cells and cells expressing mspA to identify genes that are not essential anymore in the presence of MspA. This analysis confirmed the importance of esx-5, but we could not identify essential ESX-5 substrates, indicating that multiple of these substrates are together responsible for the essentiality. Finally, examination of phenotypes on defined carbon sources revealed that an esx-5 mutant is strongly impaired in the uptake and utilization of hydrophobic carbon sources. Based on these data, we propose a model in which the ESX-5 system is responsible for the transport of cell envelope proteins that are required for nutrient uptake. These proteins might in this way compensate for the lack of MspA-like porins in slow

  14. Economic Assessment of an Integrated Membrane System for Secondary Effluent Polishing for Unrestricted Reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Oron

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Extra treatment stages are required to polish the secondary effluent for unrestricted reuse, primarily for agricultural irrigation. Improved technology for the removal of particles, turbidity, bacteria and cysts, without the use of disinfectants is based on MicroFiltration (MF and UltraFiltration (UF membrane technology and in series with Reverse Osmosis (RO for dissolved solids removal. Field experiments were conducted using a mobile UF and RO membrane pilot unit at a capacity of around 1.0 m3/hr. A management model was defined and tested towards optimal polishing of secondary effluent. The two major purposes of the management model are: (i to delineate a methodology for economic assessment of optimal membrane technology implementation for secondary effluent upgrading for unrestricted use, and; (ii to provide guidelines for optimal RO membrane selection in regards to the pretreatment stage. The defined linear model takes into account the costs of the feed secondary effluent, the UF pretreatment and the RO process. Technological constraints refer primarily to the longevity of the membrane and their performance. Final treatment cost (the objective function includes investment, operation and maintenance expenses, UF pretreatment, RO treatment, post treatment and incentive for low salinity permeate use. The cost range of water for irrigation according to the model is between 15 and 42 US cents per m3.

  15. Borders as membranes :metaphors and models for improved policy in border regions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malczynski, Leonard A.; Passell, Howard David; Forster, Craig B. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockerill Consulting, Boone, NC)

    2005-10-01

    Political borders are controversial and contested spaces. In an attempt to better understand movement along and through political borders, this project applied the metaphor of a membrane to look at how people, ideas, and things ''move'' through a border. More specifically, the research team employed this metaphor in a system dynamics framework to construct a computer model to assess legal and illegal migration on the US-Mexico border. Employing a metaphor can be helpful, as it was in this project, to gain different perspectives on a complex system. In addition to the metaphor, the multidisciplinary team utilized an array of methods to gather data including traditional literature searches, an experts workshop, a focus group, interviews, and culling expertise from the individuals on the research team. Results from the qualitative efforts revealed strong social as well as economic drivers that motivate individuals to cross the border legally. Based on the information gathered, the team concluded that legal migration dynamics were of a scope we did not want to consider hence, available demographic models sufficiently capture migration at the local level. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative data searches were used to modify a 1977 border model to demonstrate the dynamic nature of illegal migration. Model runs reveal that current US-policies based on neo-classic economic theory have proven ineffective in curbing illegal migration, and that proposed enforcement policies are also likely to be ineffective. We suggest, based on model results, that improvement in economic conditions within Mexico may have the biggest impact on illegal migration to the U.S. The modeling also supports the views expressed in the current literature suggesting that demographic and economic changes within Mexico are likely to slow illegal migration by 2060 with no special interventions made by either government.

  16. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Zhu; Junsheng Liu; Meng Li

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was foun...

  17. Assessing the removal of organic micropollutants by a novel baffled osmotic membrane bioreactor-microfiltration hybrid system

    KAUST Repository

    Pathak, Nirenkumar

    2018-04-14

    A novel approach was employed to study removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) in a baffled osmotic membrane bioreactor-microfiltration (OMBR-MF) hybrid system under oxic–anoxic conditions. The performance of OMBR-MF system was examined employing three different draw solutes (DS), and three model OMPs. The highest forward osmosis (FO) membrane rejection was attained with atenolol (100 %) due to its higher molar mass and positive charge. With inorganic DS caffeine (94-100 %) revealed highest removal followed by atenolol (89-96 %) and atrazine (16-40 %) respectively. All three OMPs exhibited higher removal with organic DS as compared to inorganic DS. Significant anoxic removal was observed for atrazine under very different redox conditions with extended anoxic cycle time. This can be linked with possible development of different microbial consortia responsible for diverse enzymes secretion. Overall, the OMBR-MF process showed effective removal of total organic carbon (98%) and nutrients (phosphate 97% and total nitrogen 85%), respectively.

  18. [Relationship between the changes in ischemia/reperfusion cerebro-microvessel basement membrane injury and gelatinase system in senile rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-sheng; Liu, Ke; Liu, Jing-xia; Wang, Ming-hang; Zhao, Yue-wu; Liu, Zheng-guo

    2008-11-01

    To study the relationship of cerebro-microvessel basement membrane injury and gelatinase system after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in aged rats. Cerebral I/R injury model was reproduced by intraluminal silk ligature thrombosis of the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Rats were divided randomly into sham control and I/R groups in young rats [ischemia 3 hours (I 3 h) and reperfusion 6 hours (I/R 6 h), 12 hours (I/R 12 h), 24 hours (I/R 24 h), 3 days (I/R 3 d), 6 days (I/R 6 d)], and sham control group and I/R group in aged rats (I 3 h and I/R 6 h, I/R 12 h, I/R 24 h , I/R 3 d, I/R 6 d). The change in cerebro-cortex microvessel basement membrane structure, basement membrane type IV collagen (Col IV) and laminin (LN) contents, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) expression in every group were determined with immunohistochemical method and zymogram analysis. With the increase in age, Col IV and LN contents of the microvessel basement membrane were increased, and MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions were stronger. With prolongation of I/R, the degradation of microvessel basement membrane components (Col IV and LN) was positively correlated with the duration of cerebral I/R. MMP-2 expression was increased gradually, and MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression increased at the beginning and decreased subsequently. Col IV(I 3 h, I/R 6 h , I/R 12 h), LN (I 3 h, I/R 6-24 h), MMP-2 (I 3 h, I/R 6 h-6 d) and MMP-9 (I 3 h, I/R 6-24 h) expression level in aged rats with I/R injury were higher, and TIMP-1 (I/R 24 h) expression was lower than those in young rats (Pcerebro-microvessel basement membrane in rats is related with MMPs and TIMP. Cerebro-microvessel basement membrane injury is more serious in aged rats than that of young rats. Changes in cerebro-microvessel basement membrane injury in aged rats is related with gelatinase system change.

  19. A split ubiquitin system to reveal topology and released peptides of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-Ping; Wang, Shuai; Gou, Jin-Ying

    2017-09-02

    Membrane proteins define biological functions of membranes in cells. Extracellular peptides of transmembrane proteins receive signals from pathogens or environments, and are the major targets of drug developments. Despite of their essential roles, membrane proteins remain elusive in topological studies due to technique difficulties in their expressions and purifications. First, the target gene is cloned into a destination vector to fuse with C terminal ubiquitin at the N or C terminus. Then, Cub vector with target gene and Nub WT or Nub G vectors are transformed into AP4 or AP5 yeast cells, respectively. After mating, the diploid cells are dipped onto selection medium to check the growth. Topology of the target protein is determined according to Table 1. We present a split ubiquitin topology (SUT) analysis system to study the topology and truncation peptide of membrane proteins in a simple yeast experiment. In the SUT system, transcription activator (TA) fused with a nucleo-cytoplasmic protein shows strong auto-activation with both positive and negative control vectors. TA fused with the cytoplasmic end of membrane proteins activates reporter genes only with positive control vector with a wild type N terminal ubiquitin (Nub WT ). However, TA fused with the extracellular termini of membrane proteins can't activate reporter genes even with Nub WT . Interestingly,TA fused with the released peptide of a membrane protein shows autoactivation in the SUT system. The SUT system is a simple and fast experimental procedure complementary to computational predictions and large scale proteomic techniques. The preliminary data from SUT are valuable for pathogen recognitions and new drug developments.

  20. MEMBRANE SYSTEM FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM REMEDIATION OFF-GASES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijmans, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    In situ vacuum extraction, air or steam sparging, and vitrification are widely used to remediate soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All of these processes produce a VOC-laden air stream from which the VOC must be removed before the air can be discharged or recycled to the generating process. Treatment of these off-gases is often a major portion of the cost of the remediation project. Currently, carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration are the most common methods of treating these gas streams. Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) proposed an alternative treatment technology based on selective membranes that separate the organic components from the gas stream, producing a VOC-free air stream. This technology can be applied to off-gases produced by various remediation activities and the systems can be skid-mounted and automated for easy transportation and unattended operation. The target performance for the membrane systems is to produce clean air (less than 10 ppmv VOC) for discharge or recycle, dischargeable water (less than 1 ppmw VOC), and a concentrated liquid VOC phase. This report contains the results obtained during Phase II of a two-phase project. In Phase I, laboratory experiments were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. In the subsequent Phase II project, a demonstration system was built and operated at the McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, California. The membrane system was fed with off-gas from a Soil Vacuum Extraction (SVE) system. The work performed in Phase II demonstrated that the membrane system can reduce the VOC concentration in remediation off-gas to 10 ppmv, while producing a concentrated VOC phase and dischargeable water containing less than 1 ppmw VOC. However, the tests showed that the presence of 1 to 3% carbon dioxide in the SVE off-gas reduced the treatment capacity of the system by a factor of three to four. In an economic analysis, treatment costs of the membrane

  1. Induced mitochondrial membrane potential for modeling solitonic conduction of electrotonic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Poznanski

    Full Text Available A cable model that includes polarization-induced capacitive current is derived for modeling the solitonic conduction of electrotonic potentials in neuronal branchlets with microstructure containing endoplasmic membranes. A solution of the nonlinear cable equation modified for fissured intracellular medium with a source term representing charge 'soakage' is used to show how intracellular capacitive effects of bound electrical charges within mitochondrial membranes can influence electrotonic signals expressed as solitary waves. The elastic collision resulting from a head-on collision of two solitary waves results in localized and non-dispersing electrical solitons created by the nonlinearity of the source term. It has been shown that solitons in neurons with mitochondrial membrane and quasi-electrostatic interactions of charges held by the microstructure (i.e., charge 'soakage' have a slower velocity of propagation compared with solitons in neurons with microstructure, but without endoplasmic membranes. When the equilibrium potential is a small deviation from rest, the nonohmic conductance acts as a leaky channel and the solitons are small compared when the equilibrium potential is large and the outer mitochondrial membrane acts as an amplifier, boosting the amplitude of the endogenously generated solitons. These findings demonstrate a functional role of quasi-electrostatic interactions of bound electrical charges held by microstructure for sustaining solitons with robust self-regulation in their amplitude through changes in the mitochondrial membrane equilibrium potential. The implication of our results indicate that a phenomenological description of ionic current can be successfully modeled with displacement current in Maxwell's equations as a conduction process involving quasi-electrostatic interactions without the inclusion of diffusive current. This is the first study in which solitonic conduction of electrotonic potentials are generated by

  2. Global sensitivity analysis of a filtration model for submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, A; Ruano, M V; Ribes, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2014-04-01

    The results of a global sensitivity analysis of a filtration model for submerged anaerobic MBRs (AnMBRs) are assessed in this paper. This study aimed to (1) identify the less- (or non-) influential factors of the model in order to facilitate model calibration and (2) validate the modelling approach (i.e. to determine the need for each of the proposed factors to be included in the model). The sensitivity analysis was conducted using a revised version of the Morris screening method. The dynamic simulations were conducted using long-term data obtained from an AnMBR plant fitted with industrial-scale hollow-fibre membranes. Of the 14 factors in the model, six were identified as influential, i.e. those calibrated using off-line protocols. A dynamic calibration (based on optimisation algorithms) of these influential factors was conducted. The resulting estimated model factors accurately predicted membrane performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solving Problem of Graph Isomorphism by Membrane-Quantum Hybrid Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiom Alhazov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the application of new parallelization methods based on membrane-quantum hybrid computing to graph isomorphism problem solving. Applied membrane-quantum hybrid computational model was developed by authors. Massive parallelism of unconventional computing is used to implement classic brute force algorithm efficiently. This approach does not suppose any restrictions of considered graphs types. The estimated performance of the model is less then quadratic that makes a very good result for the problem of \\textbf{NP} complexity.

  4. Ions transfer modeling through monopolar and bipolar membranes: Treatment of wastewater containing ammonium nitrate by electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Amine Ben Ali

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a mathematical model was proposed to illustrate the different transport modes contributing in transfer of all involved species through anion, cation and bipolar membranes. This study was led on a wastewater containing ammonium nitrate treated by bipolar membrane electrodialysis (BPMED. In this electrodialysis, different species are involved, in particular, ammonium ions NH4+, nitrates NO3-, ammoniac NH3, water H2O and protons H+. Calculations led from the material balance sheets equations obtained in bath mode, allowed to validate the proposed transfer model and to check balance sheets material on all involved species during electrodialysis.

  5. Contaminant Permeation in the Ionomer-Membrane Water Processor (IWP) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Laura K.; Finger, Barry W.; Pasadilla, Patrick; Perry, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The Ionomer-membrane Water Processor (IWP) is a patented membrane-distillation based urine brine water recovery system. The unique properties of the IWP membrane pair limit contaminant permeation from the brine to the recovered water and purge gas. A paper study was conducted to predict volatile trace contaminant permeation in the IWP system. Testing of a large-scale IWP Engineering Development Unit (EDU) with urine brine pretreated with the International Space Station (ISS) pretreatment formulation was then conducted to collect air and water samples for quality analysis. Distillate water quality and purge air GC-MS results are presented and compared to predictions, along with implications for the IWP brine processing system.

  6. Continuous biodiesel production using in situ glycerol separation by membrane bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Myung Joo; Park, Hyun June; Hong, So Yeon; Yoo, Young Je

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel is one of the most promising renewable fuel sources. Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) has been used for biodiesel production because of its high activity and stability. However, CalB can only be utilized in industrial biodiesel production if the enzyme deactivation by methanol and the negative effects of glycerol can be mitigated. Methanol inhibition can be avoided by utilizing a stepwise addition of methanol, but there is no suitable method to reduce the glycerol effect. This study aims to use a membrane bioreactor system to remove glycerol during biodiesel production. In addition, methanol inhibition can be reduced by continuously feeding methanol through the membrane system. This continuous membrane bioreactor system can be used for efficient biodiesel production.

  7. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pe