WorldWideScience

Sample records for membrane potential fluorescence

  1. Two photon fluorescence imaging of lipid membrane domains and potentials using advanced fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Darwich, Zeinab; Richert, Ludovic; Didier, Pascal; Klymchenko, Andrey; Mély, Yves

    2013-02-01

    Biomembranes are ordered and dynamic nanoscale structures critical for cell functions. The biological functions of the membranes strongly depend on their physicochemical properties, such as electrostatics, phase state, viscosity, polarity and hydration. These properties are essential for the membrane structure and the proper folding and function of membrane proteins. To monitor these properties, fluorescence techniques and notably, two-photon microscopy appear highly suited due to their exquisite sensitivity and their capability to operate in complex biological systems, such as living cells and tissues. In this context, we have developed multiparametric environment-sensitive fluorescent probes tailored for precise location in the membrane bilayer. We notably developed probes of the 3-hydroxychromone family, characterized by an excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction, which generates two tautomeric emissive species with well-separated emission bands. As a consequence, the response of these probes to changes in their environment could be monitored through changes in the ratios of the two bands, as well as through changes in the fluorescence lifetimes. Using two-photon ratiometric imaging and FLIM, these probes were used to monitor the surface membrane potential, and were applied to detect apoptotic cells and image membrane domains.

  2. Imaging Membrane Potential with Two Types of Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungmoo; Piao, Hong Hua; Sepheri-Rad, Masoud; Jung, Arong; Sung, Uhna; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-02-04

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) have improved to the point where they are beginning to be useful for in vivo recordings. While the ultimate goal is to image neuronal activity in vivo, one must be able to image activity of a single cell to ensure successful in vivo preparations. This procedure will describe how to image membrane potential in a single cell to provide a foundation to eventually image in vivo. Here we describe methods for imaging GEVIs consisting of a voltage-sensing domain fused to either a single fluorescent protein (FP) or two fluorescent proteins capable of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in vitro. Using an image splitter enables the projection of images created by two different wavelengths onto the same charge-coupled device (CCD) camera simultaneously. The image splitter positions a second filter cube in the light path. This second filter cube consists of a dichroic and two emission filters to separate the donor and acceptor fluorescent wavelengths depending on the FPs of the GEVI. This setup enables the simultaneous recording of both the acceptor and donor fluorescent partners while the membrane potential is manipulated via whole cell patch clamp configuration. When using a GEVI consisting of a single FP, the second filter cube can be removed allowing the mirrors in the image splitter to project a single image onto the CCD camera.

  3. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  4. Combinatorial mutagenesis of the voltage-sensing domain enables the optical resolution of action potentials firing at 60 Hz by a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor of membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Hong Hua; Rajakumar, Dhanarajan; Kang, Bok Eum; Kim, Eun Ha; Baker, Bradley J

    2015-01-07

    ArcLight is a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage sensor using the voltage-sensing domain of the voltage-sensing phosphatase from Ciona intestinalis that gives a large but slow-responding optical signal in response to changes in membrane potential (Jin et al., 2012). Fluorescent voltage sensors using the voltage-sensing domain from other species give faster yet weaker optical signals (Baker et al., 2012; Han et al., 2013). Sequence alignment of voltage-sensing phosphatases from different species revealed conserved polar and charged residues at 7 aa intervals in the S1-S3 transmembrane segments of the voltage-sensing domain, suggesting potential coil-coil interactions. The contribution of these residues to the voltage-induced optical signal was tested using a cassette mutagenesis screen by flanking each transmembrane segment with unique restriction sites to allow for the testing of individual mutations in each transmembrane segment, as well as combinations in all four transmembrane segments. Addition of a counter charge in S2 improved the kinetics of the optical response. A double mutation in the S4 domain dramatically reduced the slow component of the optical signal seen in ArcLight. Combining that double S4 mutant with the mutation in the S2 domain yielded a probe with kinetics voltage-sensing domain could potentially lead to fluorescent sensors capable of optically resolving neuronal inhibition and subthreshold synaptic activity.

  5. Fluorescence analysis of NOM degradation by photocatalytic oxidation and its potential to mitigate membrane fouling in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerger, Bryan A; Peiris, Ramila H; Moresoli, Christine

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the photocatalytic oxidation of natural organic matter (NOM) as a method to mitigate membrane fouling in drinking water treatment. ZnO and TiO2 photocatalysts were tested in concentrations ranging from 0.05 g L(-1) to 0.5 g L(-1). Fluorescence peaks were used as the primary method to characterize the degradation of three specific NOM components - fulvic acid-like humic substances, humic acid-like humic substances, and protein-like substances during photocatalytic oxidation. Fluorescence peaks and Liquid Chromatography-Organic Carbon Detection (LC-OCD) analysis indicated that higher NOM degradation was obtained by photocatalytic oxidation with ZnO than with TiO2. Treatment of the feed water by ZnO photocatalytic oxidation was successful in reducing considerably the extent of hydraulically reversible and irreversible membrane fouling during ultrafiltration (UF) compared to feed water treatment with TiO2. Fouling during UF of water subjected to photocatalytic oxidation appeared to be caused by low molecular weight constituents of NOM generated during photocatalytic oxidation.

  6. Introduction to fluorescence probing of biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P; Duportail, Guy; Oncul, Sule; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful and commonly used tools in biophysical studies of biomembrane structure and dynamics that can be applied on different levels, from lipid monolayers and bilayers to living cells, tissues, and whole animals. Successful application of this method relies on proper design of fluorescence probes with optimized photophysical properties. These probes are efficient for studying the microscopic analogs of viscosity, polarity, and hydration, as well as the molecular order, environment relaxation, and electrostatic potentials at the sites of their location. Being smaller than the membrane width they can sense the gradients of these parameters across the membrane. We present examples of novel dyes that achieve increased spatial resolution and information content of the probe responses. In this respect, multiparametric environment-sensitive probes feature considerable promise.

  7. Pharmacological characterization of human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2004-01-01

    We have expressed the human excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3 stably in HEK293 cells and characterized the transporters pharmacologically in a conventional [(3) H]-d-aspartate uptake assay and in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay, the FLIPR Membrane Potential...... presently available is limited, and that almost all of these are characterized by low potency and a low degree of subtype selectivity, future screening of compound libraries at the EAAT-cell lines in the FMP assay could help identify structurally and pharmacologically novel ligands for the transporters....... of the cell lines in the FMP assay were in good agreement with previous findings in electrophysiology studies of the transporters. The FMP assay was capable of distinguishing between substrates and non-substrate inhibitors and to discriminate between "full" and "partial" substrates at the transporters. Taking...

  8. Quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by hypocrellin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, J; Pang, S

    1997-04-01

    The hypocrellin B (HB) was used as a fluorescence quencher to study the basic physical charactcristics of HB in membrane systems, including the diffusion speed of quencher from aqueous phase into membrane phase, the partition coefficient (P) of quenchtr between membrane and water, and the fluorescence quenching constant of protein (K(sv); K(q),). The experimental results show that the quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by HB can be determined by the principle of dynamic quenching. The experimental process of fluorescence quenching was observed in detail by using the ESR technique. The signal of HB- was found to arise from an electron transfer from excited trytophan to HB.

  9. Quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by hypocrellin B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乐加昌; 庞素珍

    1997-01-01

    The hypocrellin B (HB) was used as a fluorescence quencher to study the basic physical characteris-tics of HB in membrane systems, including the diffusion speed of quencher from aqueous phase into membrane phase, the partition coefficient (P) of quencher between membrane and water, and the fluorescence quenching constant of protein (Ksv; Kq). The experimental results show that the quenching of fluorescence in membrane protein by HB can be determined by the principle of dynamic quenching. The experimental process of fluorescence quenching was ob-served in detail by using the ESR technique. The signal of HB" was found to arise from an electron transfer from ex-cited trytophan to HB.

  10. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    , were used to study membrane lateral structure and associated dynamics. Once incorporated into membranes, the (nanosecond) fluorescent decay of these probes is strongly affected by changes in the local polarity and relaxation dynamics of restricted water molecules existing at the membrane....../water interface. For instance, when glycerophospholipid containing membranes undertake a solid ordered (gel) to liquid disordered phase transition the fluorescence emission maximum of these probes shift ~ 50 nm with a significant change in their fluorescence lifetime. Furthermore, the fluorescence parameters...... of LAURDAN and PRODAN are exquisitely sensitive to cholesterol effects, allowing interpretations that correlate changes in membrane packing with membrane hydration. Different membrane model systems as well as innate biological membranes have been studied with this family of probes allowing interesting...

  11. Probing glycolytic and membrane potential oscillations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Allan K.; Andersen, Ann Zahle; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    , while mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using the fluorescent dye DiOC(2)(3). The results show that, as opposed to NADH and other intermediates in glycolysis, intracellular glucose is not oscillating. Furthermore, oscillations in NADH and membrane potential are inhibited by the ATP...

  12. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    A family of polarity sensitive fluorescent probes (2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes, i.e. LAURDAN, PRODAN, ACDAN) was introduced by Gregorio Weber in 1979, with the aim to monitor solvent relaxation phenomena on protein matrices. In the following years, however, PRODAN and particularly LAURDAN......, were used to study membrane lateral structure and associated dynamics. Once incorporated into membranes, the (nanosecond) fluorescent decay of these probes is strongly affected by changes in the local polarity and relaxation dynamics of restricted water molecules existing at the membrane/water...

  13. Laurdan fluorescence senses mechanical strain in the lipid bilayer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Liang; Frangos, John A; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2006-09-01

    The precise molecular mechanisms by which cells transduce a mechanical stimulus into an intracellular biochemical response have not yet been established. Here, we show for the first time that the fluorescence emission of an environment-sensitive membrane probe Laurdan is modulated by mechanical strain of the lipid bilayer membrane. We have measured fluorescence emission of Laurdan in phospholipid vesicles of 30, 50, and 100 nm diameter to show that osmotically induced membrane tension leads to an increase in polarity (hydration depth) of the phospholipid bilayer interior. Our data indicate that the general polarization of Laurdan emission is linearly dependent on membrane tension. We also show that higher membrane curvature leads to higher hydration levels. We anticipate that the proposed method will facilitate future studies of mechanically induced changes in physical properties of lipid bilayer environment both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  15. Measuring cell viability with membrane impermeable zinc fluorescent indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Christian J; Li, Yang V

    2006-09-15

    Recent findings suggest that the accumulation of cytoplasmic zinc [Zn2+]i is a ubiquitous component in the cell death cascade. Zn2+ can be liberated from intracellular stores following oxidative stress and contribute to cell death processes. Here we show that the membrane/cell impermeable Zn2+ fluorescent indicator Newport Green (NG), which is non-toxic and impermeable to the membranes of healthy cells, can label unhealthy cells in tissue slices in a manner comparable to the traditional viability indicator propidium iodide (PI). Using confocal microscopy, we detected PI labeled nuclei colocalized with NG fluorescence. Our results indicate that cells which absorbed PI into their nuclei also allowed cell-impermeable Zn2+ dye to penetrate their plasma membranes, subsequently exhibiting cytosolic and nuclear fluorescence. As in PI staining, we observed marked increases in NG fluorescence in damaged/dead cells of tissue slices. Two other cell impermeable fluorescent Zn2+ dyes, Fluozin-3 and Zinpyr-4, also stained cytosolic Zn2+ in PI labeled cells. Our data indicates that the application of a Zn2+ fluorescent indicator is a fast, simple, non-toxic and reliable method for visualizing cell viability within in vitro tissue preparations. Accordingly, we demonstrate that intracellular accumulation of Zn2+ correlates with neuronal death.

  16. Monitoring changes in membrane polarity, membrane integrity, and intracellular ion concentrations in Streptococcus pneumoniae using fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Emily A; Marks, Laura R; Roche-Håkansson, Hazeline; Håkansson, Anders P

    2014-02-17

    Membrane depolarization and ion fluxes are events that have been studied extensively in biological systems due to their ability to profoundly impact cellular functions, including energetics and signal transductions. While both fluorescent and electrophysiological methods, including electrode usage and patch-clamping, have been well developed for measuring these events in eukaryotic cells, methodology for measuring similar events in microorganisms have proven more challenging to develop given their small size in combination with the more complex outer surface of bacteria shielding the membrane. During our studies of death-initiation in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), we wanted to elucidate the role of membrane events, including changes in polarity, integrity, and intracellular ion concentrations. Searching the literature, we found that very few studies exist. Other investigators had monitored radioisotope uptake or equilibrium to measure ion fluxes and membrane potential and a limited number of studies, mostly in Gram-negative organisms, had seen some success using carbocyanine or oxonol fluorescent dyes to measure membrane potential, or loading bacteria with cell-permeant acetoxymethyl (AM) ester versions of ion-sensitive fluorescent indicator dyes. We therefore established and optimized protocols for measuring membrane potential, rupture, and ion-transport in the Gram-positive organism S. pneumoniae. We developed protocols using the bis-oxonol dye DiBAC4(3) and the cell-impermeant dye propidium iodide to measure membrane depolarization and rupture, respectively, as well as methods to optimally load the pneumococci with the AM esters of the ratiometric dyes Fura-2, PBFI, and BCECF to detect changes in intracellular concentrations of Ca(2+), K(+), and H(+), respectively, using a fluorescence-detection plate reader. These protocols are the first of their kind for the pneumococcus and the majority of these dyes have not been used in any other bacterial

  17. Non-toxic fluorescent phosphonium probes to detect mitochondrial potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarić, Ana; Crnolatac, Ivo; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Sobočanec, Sandra; Mikecin, Ana-Matea; Mačak Šafranko, Željka; Delgeorgiev, Todor; Piantanida, Ivo; Balog, Tihomir; Petit, Patrice X.

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated our phosphonium-based fluorescent probes for selective staining of mitochondria. Currently used probes for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential show varying degrees of interference with cell metabolism, photo-induced damage and probe binding. Here presented probes are characterised by highly efficient cellular uptake and specific accumulation in mitochondria. Fluorescent detection of the probes was accomplished using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy imaging of yeast and mammalian cells. Toxicity analysis (impedimetry—xCELLigence for the cellular proliferation and Seahorse technology for respiratory properties) confirms that these dyes exhibit no-toxicity on mitochondrial or cellular functioning even for long time incubation. The excellent chemical and photophysical stability of the dyes makes them promising leads toward improved fluorescent probes. Therefore, the probes described here offer to circumvent the problems associated with existing-probe’s limitations.

  18. Near-membrane refractometry using supercritical angle fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Brunstein, Maia; Oheim, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and its variants are key technologies for visualizing the dynamics of single molecules or organelles in live cells. Yet, truely quantitative TIRF remains problematic. One unknown hampering the interpretation of evanescent-wave excited fluorescence intensities is the undetermined cell refractive index (RI). Here, we use a combination of TIRF excitation and supercritical angle fluorescence emission detection to directly mea-sure the average RI in the 'footprint' region of the cell, during imaging. Our RI measurement is based on the determination on a back-focal plane image of the critical angle separating supercritical and undercritial fluorescence emission components. We validate our method by imaging mouse embryonic fibroblasts. By targeting various dyes and fluorescent-protein chimerae to vesicles, the plasma membrane as well as mitochondria and the ER, we demonstrate local RI measurements with subcellular resolution on a standard TIRF microscope with ...

  19. Photosynthetic membrane development studied using picosecond fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karukstis, K.K.; Sauer, K.

    1983-01-01

    Using measurements of the kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission, the development of the photosynthetic membrane during etioplast-to-chloroplast differentiation was investigated. Tthe chlorophyll fluorescence decay kinetics of pea chloroplasts from plants grown under intermittent (2 min light-118 min dark) and continuous light regimes were monitored with a single-proton timing system with picosecond resolution. The changes in the fluorescence yields and decay kinetics were associated with known structural and organizational developmental phenomena in the chloroplast. This correlation provides a more detailed assignment of the origins of the fluorescence decay components than has been previously obtained by studying only mature chloroplasts. In particular, the analysis of the variable kinetics and multiexponential character of the fluorescence emission during thylakoid development focuses on the organization of photosynthetic units and the degree of communication between reaction centers in the same photosystem. These results further demonstrate that the age of etiolated tissue is critical to plastid development.

  20. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  1. Detecting Nanodomains in Living Cell Membrane by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hai-Tao; Marguet, Didier

    2011-05-01

    Cell membranes actively participate in numerous cellular functions. Inasmuch as bioactivities of cell membranes are known to depend crucially on their lateral organization, much effort has been focused on deciphering this organization on different length scales. Within this context, the concept of lipid rafts has been intensively discussed over recent years. In line with its ability to measure diffusion parameters with great precision, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements have been made in association with innovative experimental strategies to monitor modes of molecular lateral diffusion within the plasma membrane of living cells. These investigations have allowed significant progress in the characterization of the cell membrane lateral organization at the suboptical level and have provided compelling evidence for the in vivo existence of raft nanodomains. We review these FCS-based studies and the characteristic structural features of raft nanodomains. We also discuss the findings in regards to the current view of lipid rafts as a general membrane-organizing principle.

  2. [Fluorescence used to investigate the sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Gang; Yang, Yun-Jing; Lu, Hong

    2009-07-01

    A system for studying biological effect of radio frequency electromagnetic field was developed. The system can form an area where electromagnetic wave with large frequency range is well distributed. The strength of electromagnetic wave was measured easily. Electromagnetic wave in the system did not have effect on environment. The sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation of 300 MHz under power density of 5 mW x cm(-2) was studied by the spectral analysis method of fluorescence of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS) and the changes in chlorophyll a (Chla) fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane. The result showed that the position of spectrum of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane did not change, but the intensity of ANS fluorescence was obviously increased under the action of electromagnetic radiation with power density of 1-5 mW x cm(-2). There was an increase in the intensity of ANS fluorescence with the increase in electromagnetic radiation. The increase of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane showed that low level electromagnetic field induced the decrease in fluidity of chloroplast membrane compared with control experiment. The cause of the change in the fluidity could be related to the polarization of chloroplast membrane under the electromagnetic field. The analysis of Chla fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane indicated that low level electromagnetic field of 300 MHz made the fluorescence parameters F0 and F(VI/)F(V) decrease, and F(V)/Fo, Fv/F(m) and deltaF(V)/T increase. It was showed that low level electromagnetic field caused the change of non-active center of photosystem II of spinach chloroplast membrane to active center and the increase in potential active and photochemical efficiency of PSII, and promoted the transmit process of electron in photosynthesis of chloroplast membrane of photosynthesis cell in spinach leaf. The study confirmed

  3. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy in planar membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Wagner, Kerstin; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2010-07-01

    The feasibility of applying multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-related techniques in planar membrane systems, such as lipid monolayers at the air-water interface (named Langmuir films), is presented and discussed in this paper. The non-linear fluorescence microscopy approach, allows obtaining spatially and temporally resolved information by exploiting the fluorescent properties of particular fluorescence probes. For instance, the use of environmental sensitive probes, such as LAURDAN, allows performing measurements using the LAURDAN generalized polarization function that in turn is sensitive to the local lipid packing in the membrane. The fact that LAURDAN exhibit homogeneous distribution in monolayers, particularly in systems displaying domain coexistence, overcomes a general problem observed when "classical" fluorescence probes are used to label Langmuir films, i.e. the inability to obtain simultaneous information from the two coexisting membrane regions. Also, the well described photoselection effect caused by excitation light on LAURDAN allows: (i) to qualitative infer tilting information of the monolayer when liquid condensed phases are present and (ii) to provide high contrast to visualize 3D membranous structures at the film's collapse pressure. In the last case, computation of the LAURDAN GP function provides information about lipid packing in these 3D structures. Additionally, LAURDAN GP values upon compression in monolayers were compared with those obtained in compositionally similar planar bilayer systems. At similar GP values we found, for both DOPC and DPPC, a correspondence between the molecular areas reported in monolayers and bilayers. This correspondence occurs when the lateral pressure of the monolayer is 26+/-2 mN/m and 28+/-3 mN/m for DOPC and DPPC, respectively.

  4. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  5. Purinergically induced membrane fluidization in ciliary cells: characterization and control by calcium and membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfahel, E; Korngreen, A; Parola, A H; Priel, Z

    1996-02-01

    To examine the role of membrane dynamics in transmembrane signal transduction, we studied changes in membrane fluidity in mucociliary tissues from frog palate and esophagus epithelia stimulated by extracellular ATP. Micromolar concentrations of ATP induced strong changes in fluorescence polarization, possibly indicating membrane fluidization. This effect was dosage dependent, reaching a maximum at 10-microM ATP. It was dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (or Mg2+), though it was insensitive to inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels. It was inhibited by thapsigargin and by ionomycin (at low extracellular Ca2+ concentration), both of which deplete Ca2+ stores. It was inhibited by the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors quinidine, charybdotoxin, and apamine and was reduced considerably by replacement of extracellular Na+ with K+. Hyperpolarization, or depolarization, of the mucociliary membrane induced membrane fluidization. The degree of membrane fluidization depended on the degree of hyperpolarization or depolarization of the ciliary membrane potential and was considerably lower than the effect induced by extracellular ATP. These results indicate that appreciable membrane fluidization induced by extracellular ATP depends both on an increase in intracellular Ca2+, mainly from its internal stores, and on hyperpolarization of the membrane. Calcium-dependent potassium channels couple the two effects. In light of recent results on the enhancement of ciliary beat frequency, it would appear that extracellular ATP-induced changes both in ciliary beat frequency and in membrane fluidity are triggered by similar signal transduction pathways.

  6. Red emitting neutral fluorescent glycoconjugates for membrane optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Sébastien; Massin, Julien; Pouvreau, Sandrine; De Meulenaere, Evelien; Clays, Koen; Queneau, Yves; Andraud, Chantal; Girard-Egrot, Agnès; Bretonnière, Yann; Chambert, Stéphane

    2014-04-16

    A family of neutral fluorescent probes was developed, mimicking the overall structure of natural glycolipids in order to optimize their membrane affinity. Nonreducing commercially available di- or trisaccharidic structures were connected to a push-pull chromophore based on dicyanoisophorone electron-accepting group, which proved to fluoresce in the red region with a very large Stokes shift. This straightforward synthetic strategy brought structural variations to a series of probes, which were studied for their optical, biophysical, and biological properties. The insertion properties of the different probes into membranes were evaluated on a model system using the Langmuir monolayer balance technique. Confocal fluorescence microscopy performed on muscle cells showed completely different localizations and loading efficiencies depending on the structure of the probes. When compared to the commercially available ANEPPS, a family of commonly used membrane imaging dyes, the most efficient probes showed a similar brightness, but a sharper pattern was observed. According to this study, compounds bearing one chromophore, a limited size of the carbohydrate moiety, and an overall rod-like shape gave the best results.

  7. Near-Membrane Refractometry Using Supercritical Angle Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstein, Maia; Roy, Lopamudra; Oheim, Martin

    2017-05-09

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and its variants are key technologies for visualizing the dynamics of single molecules or organelles in live cells. Yet truly quantitative TIRF remains problematic. One unknown hampering the interpretation of evanescent-wave excited fluorescence intensities is the undetermined cell refractive index (RI). Here, we use a combination of TIRF excitation and supercritical angle fluorescence emission detection to directly measure the average RI in the "footprint" region of the cell during image acquisition. Our RI measurement is based on the determination on a back-focal plane image of the critical angle separating evanescent and far-field fluorescence emission components. We validate our method by imaging mouse embryonic fibroblasts and BON cells. By targeting various dyes and fluorescent-protein chimeras to vesicles, the plasma membrane, as well as mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, we demonstrate local RI measurements with subcellular resolution on a standard TIRF microscope, with a removable Bertrand lens as the only modification. Our technique has important applications for imaging axial vesicle dynamics and the mitochondrial energy state or detecting metabolically more active cancer cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Targeting Membrane Lipid a Potential Cancer Cure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Wai-Leng; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer mortality and morbidity is projected to increase significantly over the next few decades. Current chemotherapeutic strategies have significant limitations, and there is great interest in seeking novel therapies which are capable of specifically targeting cancer cells. Given that fundamental differences exist between the cellular membranes of healthy cells and tumor cells, novel therapies based on targeting membrane lipids in cancer cells is a promising approach that deserves attention in the field of anticancer drug development. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a lipid membrane component which exists only in the inner leaflet of cell membrane under normal circumstances, has increased surface representation on the outer membrane of tumor cells with disrupted membrane asymmetry. PE thus represents a potential chemotherapeutic target as the higher exposure of PE on the membrane surface of cancer cells. This feature as well as a high degree of expression of PE on endothelial cells in tumor vasculature, makes PE an attractive molecular target for future cancer interventions. There have already been several small molecules and membrane-active peptides identified which bind specifically to the PE molecules on the cancer cell membrane, subsequently inducing membrane disruption leading to cell lysis. This approach opens up a new front in the battle against cancer, and is of particular interest as it may be a strategy that may be prove effective against tumors that respond poorly to current chemotherapeutic agents. We aim to highlight the evidence suggesting that PE is a strong candidate to be explored as a potential molecular target for membrane targeted novel anticancer therapy. PMID:28167913

  9. Chromium(VI)-induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species, Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane Potential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is generated, and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cell lines exposed to Cr (VI). Methods CHL cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L, 2.5 μmol/L, 0.65 μmol/L for 3 and 6 hours, respectively. The production of ROS was performed by using 2,7_dichlorofluorescin diacetate; The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4; And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123. Results The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group (P<0.01); The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours (P<0.01), at 2.5 μmol/L for 6 hours (P<0.01 or 0.05). Conclusion Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cell cultures, and Cr(VI)_induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  10. Chemotaxis of Spirochaeta aurantia: involvement of membrane potential in chemosensory signal transduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Goulbourne, E A; Greenberg, E P

    1981-01-01

    The effects of valinomycin and nigericin on sugar chemotaxis in Spirochaeta aurantia were investigated by using a quantitative capillary assay, and the fluorescent cation, 3,3'-dipropyl-2,2'-thiodicarbocyanine iodide was used as a probe to study effects of chemoattractants on membrane potential. Addition of a chemoattractant, D-xylose, to cells in either potassium or sodium phosphate buffer resulted in a transient membrane depolarization. In the presence of valinomycin, the membrane potential...

  11. Rapid novel test for the determination of biofouling potential on reverse osmosis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Cervinia V; Ohno, Masaki; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Nishijima, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    A novel method was proposed to determine biofouling potential by direct analysis of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane through fluorescence intensity analysis of biofilm formed on the membrane surface, thereby incorporating fouling tendencies of both feedwater and membrane. Evaluation of the biofouling potential on the RO membrane was done by accelerated biofilm formation through soaking of membranes in high biofouling potential waters obtained by adding microorganisms and glucose in test waters. The biofilm formed on the soaked membrane was quantified by fluorescence intensity microplate analysis. The soaking method's capability in detecting biofilm formation was confirmed when percentage coverage obtained through fluorescence microscopy and intensity values exhibited a linear correlation (R(2) = 0.96). Continuous cross-flow experiments confirmed the ability and reliability of the soaking method in giving biofouling potential on RO membranes when a good correlation (R(2) = 0.87) between intensity values of biofilms formed on the membrane during soaking and filtration conditions was obtained. Applicability of the test developed was shown when three commercially available polyamide (PA) RO membranes were assessed for biofouling potential. This new method can also be applied for the determination of biofouling potential in water with more than 3.6 mg L(-1) easily degradable organic carbon.

  12. Fluorescence response of hypocrellin B to the environmental changes in a mimic biological membrane--liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xuanye; ZHAO Yuewei; XIE Jie; ZHAO Jingquan

    2004-01-01

    Liposome is well known as not only a drug-delivery system but also a simple model for biological membranes. It was reported that fluorescence properties of hypocrellins were changeable over some extreme pH values. In the current work, the effects of the microenvironments on the fluorescence properties of HB in liposome, including approximately physiological range of pH values pH = 6.0-8.0, concentration of cholesterols and ionic strength of the solution, were studied. It was found that the fluorescence intensity of HB was sensitive to and also regulated by the microenvironments. When concentration of cholesterols and ionic strength keep invariable in PBS solution, there exists the maximum for the fluorescence of HB-liposome at pH 7.4 while the minimum for that of HB at pH 7.0. In addition, when pH value keeps constant (7.2), there exists the maximum at the ionic strength of 0.12 mol/kg while that at the concentration of 6x10-4 mol/L for cholesterols. On the other hand, in PBS solution, the lower the ionic strength is, the higher the fluorescence intensity is. The environment-sensitive fluorescence may be potentially applicable to probe some specific environmental features in cells or tissues.

  13. Fluorescent mannosides serve as acceptor substrates for glycosyltransferase and sugar-1-phosphate transferase activities in Euglena gracilis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Irina M; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Saalbach, Gerhard; O'Neill, Ellis C; Urbaniak, Michael D; Ferguson, Michael A J; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Besra, Gurdyal S; Field, Robert A

    2017-01-13

    Synthetic hexynyl α-D-mannopyranoside and its α-1,6-linked disaccharide counterpart were fluorescently labelled through CuAAC click chemistry with 3-azido-7-hydroxycoumarin. The resulting triazolyl-coumarin adducts, which were amenable to analysis by TLC, HPLC and mass spectrometry, proved to be acceptor substrates for α-1,6-ManT activities in mycobacterial membranes, as well as α- and β-GalT activities in trypanosomal membranes, benchmarking the potential of the fluorescent acceptor approach against earlier radiochemical assays. Following on to explore the glycobiology of the benign protozoan alga Euglena gracilis, α-1,3- and α-1,2-ManT activities were detected in membrane preparations, along with GlcT, Glc-P-T and GlcNAc-P-T activities. These studies serve to demonstrate the potential of readily accessible fluorescent glycans as substrates for exploring carbohydrate active enzymes.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of membrane lipid order with a ratiometric fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Glushonkov, Oleksandr; Herdly, Lucas; Klymchenko, Andrey; Richert, Ludovic; Mely, Yves

    2015-05-19

    To monitor the lateral segregation of lipids into liquid-ordered (Lo) and -disordered (Ld) phases in lipid membranes, environment-sensitive dyes that partition in both phases but stain them differently have been developed. Of particular interest is the dual-color F2N12S probe, which can discriminate the two phases through the ratio of its two emission bands. These bands are associated with the normal (N(∗)) and tautomer (T(∗)) excited-state species that result from an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer. In this work, we investigated the potency of the time-resolved fluorescence parameters of F2N12S to discriminate lipid phases in model and cell membranes. Both the long and mean lifetime values of the T(∗) form of F2N12S were found to differ by twofold between Ld and Lo phases as a result of the restriction in the relative motions of the two aromatic moieties of F2N12S imposed by the highly packed Lo phase. This differed from the changes in the ratio of the two emission bands between the two phases, which mainly resulted from the decreased hydration of the N(∗) form in the Lo phase. Importantly, the strong difference in lifetimes between the two phases was preserved when cholesterol was added to the Ld phase. The two phases could be imaged with high contrast by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) on giant unilamellar vesicles. FLIM images of F2N12S-labeled live HeLa cells confirmed that the plasma membrane was mainly in the Lo-like phase. Furthermore, the two phases were found to be homogeneously distributed all over the plasma membrane, indicating that they are highly mixed at the spatiotemporal resolution of the FLIM setup. Finally, FLIM could also be used to sensitively monitor the change in lipid phase upon cholesterol depletion and apoptosis.

  15. Relating membrane potential to impedance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Gheorghiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive, label-free assessment of membrane potential of living cells is still a challenging task. The theory linking membrane potential to the low frequency α dispersion exhibited by suspensions of spherical shelled particles (presenting a net charge distribution on the inner side of the shell has been pioneered in our previous studies with emphasis on the permittivity spectra. Whereas α dispersion is related to a rather large variation exhibited by the permittivity spectrum, we report that the related decrement presented by the impedance magnitude spectrum is either extremely small, or occurs (for large cells at very small frequencies (~mHz explaining the lack of experimental bioimpedance data on the matter. We stress that appropriate choice of the parameters (as revealed by the microscopic model may enable access to membrane potential as well as to other relevant parameters when investigating living cells and charged lipid vesicles. We analyse the effect on the low frequency of the permittivity and impedance spectra of: I. Parameters pertaining to cell membrane i.e. (i membrane potential (through the amount of the net charge on the inner side of the membrane, (ii size of the cells/vesicles, (iii conductivity of the membrane; II. Parameters of the extra cellular medium (viscosity and conductivity. The applicability of the study has far reaching implications for basic (life sciences (providing non-invasive access to the dynamics of relevant cell parameters as well as for biosensing applications, e.g. assessment of cytotoxicity of a wide range of stimuli. doi:10.5617/jeb.214 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 93-97, 2011

  16. Applying fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate peptide-induced membrane disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2017-01-01

    to quantify leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles, thereby providing a tool for estimating the size of peptide-induced membrane disruptions. If fluorescently labeled lipids are incorporated into the membranes of the vesicles, FCS can also be used to obtain...

  17. Phospholipid diffusion coefficients of cushioned model membranes determined via z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Sarah M; Allgeyer, Edward S; Fick, Jörg; Prudovsky, Igor; Mason, Michael D; Neivandt, David J

    2013-06-25

    Model cellular membranes enable the study of biological processes in a controlled environment and reduce the traditional challenges associated with live or fixed cell studies. However, model membrane systems based on the air/water or oil/solution interface do not allow for incorporation of transmembrane proteins or for the study of protein transport mechanisms. Conversely, a phospholipid bilayer deposited via the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir-Schaefer method on a hydrogel layer is potentially an effective mimic of the cross section of a biological membrane and facilitates both protein incorporation and transport studies. Prior to application, however, such membranes must be fully characterized, particularly with respect to the phospholipid bilayer phase transition temperature. Here we present a detailed characterization of the phase transition temperature of the inner and outer leaflets of a chitosan supported model membrane system. Specifically, the lateral diffusion coefficient of each individual leaflet has been determined as a function of temperature. Measurements were performed utilizing z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a technique that yields calibration-free diffusion information. Analysis via the method of Wawrezinieck and co-workers revealed that phospholipid diffusion changes from raftlike to free diffusion as the temperature is increased-an insight into the dynamic behavior of hydrogel supported membranes not previously reported.

  18. Chromium(VI)—induces Production of Reactive Oxygen Species,Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane otential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEYI; ZHUANGZHI-XIONG

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species(ROS) is generated,and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochnodrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung(CHL)cell lines exposed to Cr(VI),Methods:CHL Cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 umol/L,2.5umol/L,0.65umol/L for 3 and 6 hours,respectively.The rpoduction of ROS was performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin discetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin discetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were performed by using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate;The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4;And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123,Results:The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group(P<0.01);The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10umol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours(P<0.01),at 2.5umol/L for 6 hours(P<0.01 or 0.05),Conclusion:Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochnodrial membrane otential in CHL cell cultrues,and Cr(VI)-induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  19. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants.

  20. A novel, post-column micro-membrane reactor for fluorescent analysis of protein in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Zhang, Lingyi; Qian, Junhong; Ren, Jun; Gao, Fangyuan; Zhang, Weibing

    2013-11-07

    Based on the semipermeability of hollow fiber membranes, a post-column membrane reactor was developed for capillary electrophoresis (CE)-laser induced fluorescence (LIF) analysis of proteins by using a hollow fiber membrane to connect the separation and detection capillaries. The membrane length between the separation and detection capillaries was 1 mm. Driven by the chemical potential difference between the separation buffer inside the membrane and the fluorescence derivatization solution outside the membrane, the derivatization reagent can be easily drawn into hollow fiber membrane to react with proteins. Also, the separation buffer can be adjusted by the derivatization solution to match the conditions of derivatization without sample loss. The effect of the separation buffer on the derivatization reaction was investigated and the results showed that even a strong acidic solution and multiple additives can be adopted in the separation buffer without destroying the post-column derivatization of proteins. Under the optimized conditions, the highly sensitive detection of BSA was achieved with a detection limit of 3.3 nmol L(-1) and a linear calibration range from 0.007 to 0.1 mg mL(-1). The proposed CE-LIF system with a post-column membrane reactor was also successfully applied to the separation and detection of proteins in rat liver and loach muscle.

  1. Z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution of cytosolic and membrane-associated protein populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth M; Hennen, Jared; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D

    2015-07-01

    This study introduces a technique that characterizes the spatial distribution of peripheral membrane proteins that associate reversibly with the plasma membrane. An axial scan through the cell generates a z-scan intensity profile of a fluorescently labeled peripheral membrane protein. This profile is analytically separated into membrane and cytoplasmic components by accounting for both the cell geometry and the point spread function. We experimentally validated the technique and characterized both the resolvability and stability of z-scan measurements. Furthermore, using the cellular brightness of green fluorescent protein, we were able to convert the fluorescence intensities into concentrations at the membrane and in the cytoplasm. We applied the technique to study the translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C delta 1 labeled with green fluorescent protein on ionomycin treatment. Analysis of the z-scan fluorescence profiles revealed protein-specific cell height changes and allowed for comparison between the observed fluorescence changes and predictions based on the cellular surface area-to-volume ratio. The quantitative capability of z-scan fluorescence profile deconvolution offers opportunities for investigating peripheral membrane proteins in the living cell that were previously not accessible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Free-cholesterol loading does not trigger phase separation of the fluorescent sterol dehydroergosterol in the plasma membrane of macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    membrane distribution of the fluorescent cholesterol-mimicking sterol dehydroergosterol (DHE) was investigated in FC-loaded J774 macrophages. Wide field fluorescence and deconvolution microscopy were combined with quantitative assessment of sterol distribution in straightened plasma membrane image segments...... with increased membrane cholesterol content, sterols do not form a separate phase in the plasma membrane....

  3. QM/MM Studies of Contemporary and Novel Membrane Raft Fluorescent Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L. Blake

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have studied a number of contemporary and novel membrane probes, selected for their structural similarity to membrane raft components, in order to properly anchor themselves within a sphingolipid/cholesterol rich region. A QM/MM approach was adopted in order to understand the structural and electrostatic influences of fluorescence emission shifts of the probes in different lipid and solvation environments. The proposed modifications to the membrane probes have shown encouraging data relating not only to emission shifts within the membrane, but also their ability to anchor within a membrane raft domain and the stability to internalization within a membrane system.

  4. Decreased magnesium level and membrane potential of glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnkennedy Nnodim

    2016-08-01

    The result probably suggests, that decrease in magnesium aggravates glaucoma while decrease in membrane potential could cause poor energy transmission and hence affect ocular blood flow. Hence, decreased magnesium and membrane potential levels contributes greatly to glaucoma.

  5. Integrity of the plasma membrane, the acrosomal membrane, and the mitochondrial membrane potential of sperm in Nelore bulls from puberty to sexual maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S.L.S. Reis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of Nelore bull sperm from early puberty to early sexual maturity and their associations with sperm motility and vigor, the mass motility of the spermatozoa (wave motion, scrotal circumference, and testosterone. Sixty Nelore bulls aged 18 to 19 months were divided into four lots (n=15 bulls/lot and evaluated over 280 days. Semen samples, collected every 56 days by electroejaculation, were evaluated soon after collection for motility, vigor and wave motion under an optical microscope. Sperm membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial activity were evaluated under a fluorescent microscope using probe association (FITC-PSA, PI, JC-1, H342. The sperm were classified into eight integrity categories depending on whether they exhibited intact or damaged membranes, an intact or damaged acrosomal membrane, and high or low mitochondrial potential. The results show that bulls have a low amount of sperm with intact membranes at puberty, and the sperm show low motility, vigor, and wave motion; however, in bulls at early sexual maturity, the integrity of the sperm membrane increased significantly. The rate of sperm membrane damage was negatively correlated with motility, vigor, wave motion, and testosterone in the bulls, and a positive correlation existed between sperm plasma membrane integrity and scrotal circumference. The integrity of the acrosomal membrane was not influenced by puberty. During puberty and into early sexual maturity, bulls show low sperm mitochondrial potential, but when bulls reached sexual maturity, high membrane integrity with high mitochondrial potential was evident.

  6. Fluorescence detection of trace PCB101 based on PITC immobilized on porous AAO membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meiling; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Li, Mingtao; Li, Zhongbo; Tang, Chaolong

    2011-01-21

    A sensitive and selective fluorescent membrane for rapid detection of trace 2,2',4,5,5'-pentachlorinated biphenyl (PCB101) has been achieved by immobilizing the fluorophore phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) onto porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membrane (denoted as PITC@AAO). The fluorescence of the PITC@AAO membrane is obviously enhanced after titrating the analyte PCB101 into the membrane, being ascribed to the halogen-bonding interaction between the fluorophore PITC and the analyte PCB101. The fluorescence intensity increases with the PCB101 concentration in the low range below 1 ppm, and there exists an approximate linear relationship between the relative fluorescence intensity and the PCB101 concentration in the low range of 1-6 ppb. Moreover, the PITC@AAO membrane shows good selectivity; for example, it is insensitive to common structural analogs (polychlorinated aromatics). The mechanisms of the fluorescence enhancement and the better sensitivity and selectivity of the PITC@AAO membrane to PCB101 than that of PITC/n-hexane solution are also discussed. This work demonstrates that trace (in ppb range) PCBs can be detected by simple fluorescence measurement.

  7. Fluorescence imaging of local membrane electric fields during the excitation of single neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogan, P; Schmiedel-Jakob, I; Chitti, Y; Tyc-Dumont, S

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution of depolarized patches of membrane during the excitation of single neurons in culture has been recorded with a high spatial resolution (1 micron2/pixel) imaging system based on a liquid-nitrogen-cooled astronomical camera mounted on an inverted microscope. Images were captured from rat nodose neurons stained with the voltage-sensitive dye RH237. Conventional intracellular microelectrode recordings were made in synchrony with the images. During an action potential the fluorescence changes occurred in localized, unevenly distributed membrane areas, which formed clusters of depolarized sites of different sizes and intensities. When fast conductances were blocked by the addition of tetrodotoxin, a reduction in the number and the intensities of the depolarized sites was observed. The blockade by tetrodotoxin of voltage-clamped neurons also reduced the number of depolarized sites, although the same depolarizing voltage step was applied. Similarly, when a voltage-clamped neuron was depolarized by a constant-amplitude voltage step, the number of depolarized sites varied according to the degree of activation of the voltage-sensitive channels, which was modified by changing the holding potential. These results suggest that the spatial patterns of depolarization observed during excitation are related to the operations of ionic channels in the membrane. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:8527643

  8. On-line measurements of oscillating mitochondrial membrane potential in glucose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Poulsen, Allan K; Olsen, Lars Folke

    2007-01-01

    We employed the fluorescent cyanine dye DiOC(2)(3) to measure membrane potential in semi-anaerobic yeast cells under conditions where glycolysis was oscillating. Oscillations in glycolysis were studied by means of the naturally abundant nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). We found that the ...

  9. Orientation and dynamics of melittin in membranes of varying composition utilizing NBD fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, H; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-02-15

    Melittin is a cationic hemolytic peptide isolated from the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. The organization of membrane-bound melittin has earlier been shown to be dependent on the physical state and composition of membranes. In this study, we covalently labeled the N-terminal (Gly-1) and Lys-7 of melittin with an environment-sensitive fluorescent probe, the NBD group, to monitor the influence of negatively charged lipids and cholesterol on the organization and dynamics of membrane-bound melittin. Our results show that the NBD group of melittin labeled at its N-terminal end does not exhibit red edge excitation shift in DOPC and DOPC/DOPG membranes, whereas the NBD group of melittin labeled at Lys-7 exhibits REES of approximately 8 nm. This could be attributed to difference in membrane microenvironment experienced by the NBD groups in these analogs. Interestingly, the membrane environment of the NBD groups is sensitive to the presence of cholesterol, which is supported by time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Importantly, the orientation of melittin is found to be parallel to the membrane surface as determined by membrane penetration depth analysis using the parallax method in all cases. Our results constitute the first report to our knowledge describing the orientation of melittin in cholesterol-containing membranes. These results assume significance in the overall context of the role of membrane lipids in the orientation and function of membrane proteins and peptides.

  10. Membrane potential measurements of isolated neurons using a voltage-sensitive dye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Fairless

    Full Text Available The ability to monitor changes in membrane potential is a useful tool for studying neuronal function, but there are only limited options available at present. Here, we have investigated the potential of a commercially available FLIPR membrane potential (FMP dye, developed originally for high throughput screening using a plate reader, for imaging the membrane potential of cultured cells using an epifluorescence-based single cell imaging system. We found that the properties of the FMP dye make it highly suitable for such imaging since 1 its fluorescence displayed a high signal-to-noise ratio, 2 robust signals meant only minimal exposure times of around 5 ms were necessary, and 3 bidirectional changes in fluorescence were detectable resulting from hyper- or depolarising conditions, reaching equilibrium with a time constant of 4-8 s. Measurements were possible independently of whether membrane potential changes were induced by voltage clamping, or manipulating the ionic distribution of either Na(+ or K(+. Since FMP behaves as a charged molecule which accumulates in the cytosol, equations based on the Boltzmann distribution were developed determining that the apparent charge of FMP which represents a measure of the voltage sensitivity of the dye, is between -0.62 and -0.72. Finally, we demonstrated that FMP is suitable for use in a variety of neuronal cell types and detects membrane potential changes arising from spontaneous firing of action potentials and through stimulation with a variety of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters.

  11. Benzothiophen-pyrazine scaffold as a potential membrane targeting drug carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazuryk, Olga [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Niemiec, Elżbieta [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Institute of Organic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Orléans, UMR-CNRS 7311, rue de Chartres, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Stochel, Grażyna [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Gillaizeau, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.gillaizeau@univ-orleans.fr [Institute of Organic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Orléans, UMR-CNRS 7311, rue de Chartres, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Brindell, Małgorzata, E-mail: brindell@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland)

    2013-08-15

    The fluorescent properties of 2,5-di(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrazine as a potential membrane targeting drug carrier were characterized and it was shown that its fluorescence intensity was much higher in organic solvent than in water. The embedding of studied compound by liposomes leads to ca. 2 orders of magnitude increase in its fluorescence intensity, suggesting its preferential accumulation in membranes. Preliminary biological studies showed its ability to accumulate in cells, and the concentration of 10 μM was sufficient for homogeneous staining of cells. The treatment of mouse carcinoma CT26 cells with studied compound up to 200 μM resulted in decreasing of viable cells by ca. 30%. Its reactivity towards albumin was found to be moderate with an association constant of 6×10{sup 4} M{sup −1}, while no interaction with DNA was observed. Our findings encourage for further studies on functionalization of this molecule to obtain a new class of anticancer drugs targeting membrane. Highlights: ► The fluorescence of 2,5-di(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrazine is solvent dependent. ► Weak fluorescence is found in water while high in organic solvents (DMSO, chloroform). ► Embedding of compound in liposomes remarkably increased its fluorescence. ► No interaction with DNA is observed but moderate reactivity towards albumin is found. ► Homogeneous staining of cells is feasible using nontoxic dose of compound.

  12. Interactions of egg yolk lipoprotein fraction with boar spermatozoa assessed with a fluorescent membrane probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Zasiadczyk

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of a fluorescent membrane probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (1,8-ANS, with boar spermatozoa were followed through the use of lipoprotein fraction of ostrich egg yolk (LPFo. Semen samples, extended in Kortowo 3 (K3 extender, were supplemented with 2% or 5% LPFo and stored for 3h at 16 degrees C. Additionally, cold shock-treated spermatozoa (1h at 4 degrees C were stored in K3 extender supplemented with LPFo for 3h at 16 degrees C. In each boar, the fluorescent enhancement of ANS was observed in K3-extended semen supplemented with LPFo, prior to storage. Following storage, there was a significant increase in LPFo-ANS fluorescence, particularly in the sperm membrane overlying the head and midpiece regions. There were significant differences among the boars with respect to the sperm populations defined by the LPFo-ANS fluorescence. Sperm viability was not significantly affected during the storage period. Furthermore, the proportions of spermatozoa defined by the different patterns of LPFo-ANS fluorescence were low and remained unchanged after storage of cold shock-treated spermatozoa with 2% or 5% LPFo, suggesting irreversible damage to the sperm membrane architecture. These findings indicate that the ANS fluorescent probe could be used to shed more light on the nature of the interactions between LPFo and sperm membrane following semen preservation. Such valuable information could contribute to the development of an optimal protocol for cryopreservation of boar semen.

  13. Seeing the electroporative uptake of cell-membrane impermeable fluorescent molecules and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kisoo; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Soon-Geul; Lee, Won Gu

    2012-08-21

    This paper presents direct visualization of uptake directionality for cell-membrane impermeant fluorescent molecules and fluorescence-doped nanoparticles at a single-cell level during electroporation. To observe directly the uptake direction, we used microchannel-type electroporation that can generate a relatively symmetric and uniform electric field. For all the image frames during electroporation, fluorescence intensities that occurred at cell membranes in both uptake directions toward the electrodes have been sequentially recorded and quantitatively analyzed pixel by pixel. In our experiments, we found that fluorescent molecules, even not labeled to target biomolecules, had their own uptake direction with different intensities. It is also observed that the uptake intensity toward the cell membrane had a maximal value at a certain electric voltage, not at the highest value of voltages applied. The results also imply that the uptake direction of fluorescence-doped nanoparticles can be determined by a net surface charge of uptake materials and sizes in the electroporative environments. In summary, we performed a quantitative screening and direct visualization of uptake directionality for a set of fluorescent molecules and fluorescence-doped nanoparticles using electric-pulsation. Taking a closer look at the uptake direction of exogenous materials will help researchers to understand an unknown uptake phenomenon in which way foreign materials are inclined to move, and furthermore to design functional nanoparticles for electroporative gene delivery.

  14. Single particle fluorescence burst analysis of epsin induced membrane fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Arielle; Shoup, Daniel; Kustigian, Lauren; Puchalla, Jason; Carr, Chavela M; Rye, Hays S

    2015-01-01

    Vital cellular processes, from cell growth to synaptic transmission, rely on membrane-bounded carriers and vesicles to transport molecular cargo to and from specific intracellular compartments throughout the cell. Compartment-specific proteins are required for the final step, membrane fission, which releases the transport carrier from the intracellular compartment. The role of fission proteins, especially at intracellular locations and in non-neuronal cells, while informed by the dynamin-1 paradigm, remains to be resolved. In this study, we introduce a highly sensitive approach for the identification and analysis of membrane fission machinery, called burst analysis spectroscopy (BAS). BAS is a single particle, free-solution approach, well suited for quantitative measurements of membrane dynamics. Here, we use BAS to analyze membrane fission induced by the potent, fission-active ENTH domain of epsin. Using this method, we obtained temperature-dependent, time-resolved measurements of liposome size and concentration changes, even at sub-micromolar concentration of the epsin ENTH domain. We also uncovered, at 37°C, fission activity for the full-length epsin protein, supporting the argument that the membrane-fission activity observed with the ENTH domain represents a native function of the full-length epsin protein.

  15. Recent Developments in Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Diffusion Measurements in Planar Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hof

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS is a single molecule technique used mainly for determination of mobility and local concentration of molecules. This review describes the specific problems of FCS in planar systems and reviews the state of the art experimental approaches such as 2-focus, Z-scan or scanning FCS, which overcome most of the artefacts and limitations of standard FCS. We focus on diffusion measurements of lipids and proteins in planar lipid membranes and review the contributions of FCS to elucidating membrane dynamics and the factors influencing it, such as membrane composition, ionic strength, presence of membrane proteins or frictional coupling with solid support.

  16. Osmotic Stressing, Membrane Leakage, and Fluorescence: An Introductory Biochemistry Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, Kalani J.

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence demonstration is described that incorporates several fundamental aspects of an introductory biochemistry course. A variation of a known leakage assay is utilized to prepare vesicles containing a quenched fluorophore. The vesicles are exposed to several osmotic environments ranging from isotonic to hypotonic. The degree of vesicle…

  17. Osmotic Stressing, Membrane Leakage, and Fluorescence: An Introductory Biochemistry Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, Kalani J.

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence demonstration is described that incorporates several fundamental aspects of an introductory biochemistry course. A variation of a known leakage assay is utilized to prepare vesicles containing a quenched fluorophore. The vesicles are exposed to several osmotic environments ranging from isotonic to hypotonic. The degree of vesicle…

  18. Wavelength-selective fluorescence in ion channels formed by gramicidin A in membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabha Chattopadhyay; Satinder S Rawat

    2007-03-01

    Gramicidins are linear peptides that form ion channels that are specific for monovalent cations in membranes. The tryptophan residues in the gramicidin channel play a crucial role in the organization and function of the channel. The natural mixture of gramicidins, denoted as gramicidin A', consists of mostly gramicidin A, but also contains gramicidins B, C and D as minor components. We have previously shown that the tryptophan residues in ion channels formed by the naturally occurring peptide, gramicidin A', display wavelength-dependent fluorescence characteristics due to the motionally restricted environment in which they are localized. In order to check the influence of ground-state heterogeneity in the observed wavelength-selective fluorescence of gramicidin A' in membranes, we performed similar experiments with pure gramicidin A in model membranes. Our results show that the observed wavelength-selective fluorescence characteristics of naturally occurring gramicidin A' are not due to groundstate heterogeneity.

  19. Influence of cholesterol and ergosterol on membrane dynamics: a fluorescence approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ajuna; Raghuraman, H; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2004-06-11

    Sterols are essential membrane components of eukaryotic cells and are important for membrane organization and function. Cholesterol is the most representative sterol present in higher eukaryotes. It is often found distributed non-randomly in domains or pools in biological and model membranes. Cholesterol-rich functional microdomains (lipid rafts) are often implicated in cell signaling and membrane traffic. Interestingly, lipid rafts have also recently been isolated from organisms such as yeast and Drosophila, which have ergosterol as their major sterol component. Although detailed biophysical characterization of the effect of cholesterol on membranes is well documented, the effect of ergosterol on the organization and dynamics of membranes is not very clear. We have monitored the effect of cholesterol and ergosterol on the dynamic properties of both fluid (POPC) and gel (DPPC) phase membranes utilizing the environment-sensitive fluorescent membrane probe DPH. Our results from steady state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements show, for the first time, differential effects of ergosterol and cholesterol toward membrane organization. These novel results are relevant in the context of lipid rafts in ergosterol-containing organisms such as Drosophila which maintain a low level of sterol compared to higher eukaryotes.

  20. Versatile membrane deformation potential of activated pacsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Lin Goh

    Full Text Available Endocytosis is a fundamental process in signaling and membrane trafficking. The formation of vesicles at the plasma membrane is mediated by the G protein dynamin that catalyzes the final fission step, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteins that sense or induce membrane curvature. One such protein, the F-BAR domain-containing protein pacsin, contributes to this process and has been shown to induce a spectrum of membrane morphologies, including tubules and tube constrictions in vitro. Full-length pacsin isoform 1 (pacsin-1 has reduced activity compared to its isolated F-BAR domain, implicating an inhibitory role for its C-terminal Src homology 3 (SH3 domain. Here we show that the autoinhibitory, intramolecular interactions in pacsin-1 can be released upon binding to the entire proline-rich domain (PRD of dynamin-1, resulting in potent membrane deformation activity that is distinct from the isolated F-BAR domain. Most strikingly, we observe the generation of small, homogenous vesicles with the activated protein complex under certain experimental conditions. In addition, liposomes prepared with different methods yield distinct membrane deformation morphologies of BAR domain proteins and apparent activation barriers to pacsin-1's activity. Theoretical free energy calculations suggest bimodality of the protein-membrane system as a possible source for the different outcomes, which could account for the coexistence of energetically equivalent membrane structures induced by BAR domain-containing proteins in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest a versatile role for pacsin-1 in sculpting cellular membranes that is likely dependent both on protein structure and membrane properties.

  1. Lipid composition affects the rate of photosensitized dissipation of cross-membrane diffusion potential on liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytzhak, Shany; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Loew, Leslie M.; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Hydrophobic or amphiphilic tetrapyrrole sensitizers are taken up by cells and are usually located in cellular lipid membranes. Singlet oxygen is photogenerated by the sensitizer and it diffuses in the membrane and causes oxidative damage to membrane components. This damage can occur to membrane lipids and to membrane-localized proteins. Depolarization of the Nernst electric potential on cells’ membranes has been observed in cellular photosensitization, but it was not established whether lipid oxidation is a relevant factor leading to abolishing the resting potential of cells’ membranes and to their death. In this work we studied the effect of liposomes’ lipid composition on the kinetics of hematoporphyrin-photosensitized dissipation of K+-diffusion electric potential that was generated across the membranes. We employed an electrochromic voltage-sensitive spectroscopic probe that possesses a high fluorescence signal response to the potential. We found a correlation between the structure and unsaturation of lipids and the leakage of the membrane, following photosensitization. As the extent of non-conjugated unsaturation of the lipids is increased from 1 to 6 double bonds, the kinetics of depolarization become faster. We also found that the kinetics of depolarization is affected by the percentage of the unsaturated lipids in the liposome: as the fraction of the unsaturated lipids increases the leakage trough the membrane is enhanced. When liposomes are composed of a lipid mixture similar to that of natural membranes and photosensitization is being carried out under usual photodynamic therapy (PDT) conditions, photodamage to the lipids is not likely to cause enhanced permeability of ions through the membrane, which would have been a mechanism that leads to cell death. PMID:20536150

  2. Fluorescence energy transfer in quantum dot/azo dye complexes in polymer track membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, Yulia A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in complexes of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with molecules of heterocyclic azo dyes, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol, formed at high quantum dot concentration in the polymer pore track membranes were studied by steady-state and transient PL spectroscopy. The effect of interaction between the complexes and free quantum dots on the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer and quantum dot luminescence quenching was found and discussed.

  3. Visualization of sterol-rich membrane domains with fluorescently-labeled theonellamides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Nishimura

    Full Text Available Cholesterol plays important roles in biological membranes. The cellular location where cholesterol molecules work is prerequisite information for understanding their dynamic action. Bioimaging probes for cholesterol molecules would be the most powerful means for unraveling the complex nature of lipid membranes. However, only a limited number of chemical or protein probes have been developed so far for cytological analysis. Here we show that fluorescently-labeled derivatives of theonellamides act as new sterol probes in mammalian cultured cells. The fluorescent probes recognized cholesterol molecules and bound to liposomes in a cholesterol-concentration dependent manner. The probes showed patchy distribution in the plasma membrane, while they stained specific organelle in the cytoplasm. These data suggest that fTNMs will be valuable sterol probes for studies on the role of sterols in the biological membrane under a variety of experimental conditions.

  4. Invertase-nanogold clusters decorated plant membranes for fluorescence-based sucrose sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagal-Kestwal, Dipali; Kestwal, Rakesh Mohan; Chiang, Been-Huang

    2015-04-12

    In the present study, invertase-mediated nanogold clusters were synthesized on onion membranes, and their application for sucrose biosensor fabrication was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy revealed free nanoparticles of various sizes (diameter ~5 to 50 nm) along with clusters of nanogold (~95 to 200 nm) on the surface of inner epidermal membranes of onions (Allium cepa L.). Most of the polydispersed nanoparticles were spherical, although some were square shaped, triangular, hexagonal or rod-shaped. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometric observations showed the characteristic peak for nanoparticles decorated invertase-onion membrane at approximately 301 nm. When excited at 320 nm in the presence of sucrose, the membranes exhibited a photoemission peak at 348 nm. The fluorescence lifetime of this nanogold modified onion membrane was 6.20 ns, compared to 2.47 ns for invertase-onion membrane without nanogold. Therefore, a sucrose detection scheme comprised of an invertase/nanogold decorated onion membrane was successfully developed. This fluorescent nanogold-embedded onion membrane drop-test sensor exhibited wide acidic to neutral working pH range (4.0-7.0) with a response time 30 seconds (sucrose. A microplate designed with an enzyme-nanomaterial-based sensor platform exhibited a high compliance, with acceptable percentage error for the detection of sucrose in green tea samples in comparison to a traditional method. With some further, modifications, this fabricated enzyme-nanogold onion membrane sensor probe could be used to estimate glucose concentrations for a variety of analytical samples. Graphical abstract Synthesis and characterization of invertase assisted nanogold clusters on onion membranes and their application for fluorescence-based sucrose sensor.

  5. Measuring the diffusion coefficient of ganglioside on cell membrane by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shiqing; You, Minghai; Chen, Jianling; Zhou, Jie; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2017-06-01

    The fluidity of proteins and lipids on cell membrane plays an important role in cell’s physiological functions. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an effective technique to detect the rapid dynamic behaviors of proteins and/or lipids in living cells. In this study, we used the rhodamine6G solution to optimize the FCS system. And, cholera toxin B subunit (CT-B) was used to label ganglioside on living Hela cell membranes. The diffusion time and coefficients of ganglioside can be obtained through fitting the autocorrelation curve based on the model of two-dimensional cell membrane. The results showed that the diffusion coefficients of ganglioside distributed within a wide range. It revealed the lateral diffusion of lipids on cell membrane was inhomogeneous, which was due to different microstructures of cytoplasmic membrane. The study provides a helpful method for further studying the dynamic characteristics of proteins and lipids molecules on living cell membrane.

  6. Behavior of plant plasma membranes under hydrostatic pressure as monitored by fluorescent environment-sensitive probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Yann; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Gervais, Patrick; Mély, Yves; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    We monitored the behavior of plasma membrane (PM) isolated from tobacco cells (BY-2) under hydrostatic pressures up to 3.5kbar at 30 degrees C, by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy using the newly introduced environment-sensitive probe F2N12S and also Laurdan and di-4-ANEPPDHQ. The consequences of sterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin were also studied. We found that application of hydrostatic pressure led to a marked decrease of hydration as probed by F2N12S and to an increase of the generalized polarization excitation (GPex) of Laurdan. We observed that the hydration effect of sterol depletion was maximal between 1 and 1.5 kbar but was much less important at higher pressures (above 2 kbar) where both parameters reached a plateau value. The presence of a highly dehydrated gel state, insensitive to the sterol content, was thus proposed above 2.5 kbar. However, the F2N12S polarity parameter and the di-4-ANEPPDHQ intensity ratio showed strong effect on sterol depletion, even at very high pressures (2.5-3.5 kbar), and supported the ability of sterols to modify the electrostatic properties of membrane, notably its dipole potential, in a highly dehydrated gel phase. We thus suggested that BY-2 PM undergoes a complex phase behavior in response to the hydrostatic pressure and we also emphasized the role of phytosterols to regulate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on plant PM.

  7. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes and the proton gradient: a practical usage guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Seth W; Norman, John P; Barbieri, Justin; Brown, Edward B; Gelbard, Harris A

    2011-02-01

    Fluorescent probes for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential are frequently used for assessing mitochondrial function, particularly in the context of cell fate determination in biological and biomedical research. However, valid interpretation of results obtained with such probes requires careful consideration of numerous controls, as well as possible effects of non-protonic charges on dye behavior. In this context, we provide an overview of some of the important technical considerations, controls, and parallel complementary assays that can be employed to help ensure appropriate interpretation of results, thus providing a practical usage guide for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potentials with cationic probes. In total, this review will help illustrate both the strengths and potential pitfalls of common mitochondrial membrane potential dyes, and highlight best-usage approaches for their efficacious application in life sciences research.

  8. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  9. Wuweizisu C from Schisandra chinensis decreases membrane potential in C6 glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young-whan CHOI; Kyeok KIM; Ji-yeong JO; Hyo-lim KIM; You-jin LEE; Woo-jung SHIN; Santosh J SACKET; Mijin HAN; Dong-soon IM

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To study the effects of dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans isolated from Schi-sandra chinensis, such as wuweizisu C, gomisin N, gomisin A, and schisandrin, on the membrane potential in C6 glioma cells. Methods: The membrane po-tential was estimated by measuring the fluorescence change in DiBAC-loaded glioma cells. Results: Wuweizisu C decreased the membrane potential in a concentration-dependent manner. Gomisin N and gomisin A, however, showed differential modulation and no change was induced by schisandrin or dimethyl-4,4'-dimethoxy-5,6,5',6'-dimethylene dioxybiphenyl-2,2'-dicarboxylate, a syn-thetic drug derived from dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans. We found no involve-ment of Gi/o proteins, phospholipase C, and extracellular Na+ on the wuweizisu C-indueed decrease of the membrane potential. Wuweizisu C by itself did not change the intracellular Ca2+ [Ca2+]I concentration, but decreased the ATP-indu-ted Ca2+ increase in C6 glioma cells. The 4 lignans at all concentrations used in this study did not induce any effect on cell viability. Furthermore, we found a similar decrease of the membrane potential by wuweizisu C in PC12 neuronal cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the decrease in the membrane poten-tial and the modulation of [Ca2+]I concentration by wuweizisu C could be impor-tant action mechanisms ofwuweizisu C.

  10. Hyposmotic membrane stretch potentiated muscarinic receptor agonist-induced depolarization of membrane potential in guinea-pig gastric myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Nan-Ge Jin; Lin Piao; Ming-Yu Hong; Zheng-Yuan Jin; Ying Li; Wen-Xie Xu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship betweenhyposmotic membrane stretch and muscarinic receptoragonist-induced depolarization of membrane potentialin antral gastric circular myocytes of guinea-pig.METHODS: Using whole cell patch-clamp techniquerecorded membrane potential and current in singlegastric myocytes isolated by collagena se.RESULTS: Hyposmotic membrane stretch hyperpolarizedmembrane potential from -60.0mV±1.0mV to -67.9mV±1.0mV. TEA (10mmol/L), a nonselective potassiumchannel blocker significantly inhibited hyposmoticmembrane stretch-induced hyperpolarization. After KCIin the pipette and NaCI in the external solution werereplaced by CsCI to block the potassium current,hyposmotic membrane stretch depolarized the membranepotential from -60.0 mV±-1.0mV to -44.8 mV±2.3mV(P<0.05), and atropine (1 pmol/L) inhibited thedepolarization of the membrane potential. Muscarinicreceptor agonist Carbachol depolarized membranepotential from -60.0mV±1.0mV to -50.3 mV±0.3mV(P<0.05) and hyposmotic membrane stretchpotentiated the depolarization. Carbachol inducedmuscarinic current (Icch) was greatly increased byhyposmotic membrane stretch.CONCLUSION: Hyposmotic membrane stretchpotentiated muscarinic receptor agonist-induceddepolarization of membrane potential, which is relatedto hyposmotic membrane stretch-induced increase ofmuscarinic current.

  11. Dynamic quenchers in fluorescently labeled membranes. Theory for quenching in a three-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omann, G M; Glaser, M

    1985-05-01

    The theory for quenching of fluorescently labeled membranes by dynamic quenchers is described for a three-phase system: a fluorescently labeled membrane, a nonlabeled membrane, and an aqueous phase. Two different experimental protocols are possible to determine quenching parameters. Using the first protocol, partition coefficients and bimolecular quenching constants were determined for a hydrophobic quencher in carbazole-labeled membranes in the presence of an unlabeled reference membrane. These parameters determined for 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) using this three-phase analysis were in good agreement with values determined by a two-phase analysis without the reference lipid. Hence, the theory was verified. In the second protocol, the quencher partition coefficient was determined for unlabeled membranes in the presence of a carbazole-labeled reference membrane. Partition coefficients for DDE determined by this method were the same as partition coefficients determined for carbazole-labeled membranes using the two-phase analysis. The greater ease in determining partition coefficients and bimolecular quenching constants by the three-phase analysis and, in particular, the ability to determine the partition coefficient in unlabeled membranes make the three-phase analysis especially useful. This method was used to study the effect varying the membrane lipid composition has on the partition coefficient. The data indicate that partition coefficients of DDE in fluid membranes are not dramatically dependent upon polar head group composition, fatty acid composition, or cholesterol content. However, partitioning into gel-phase lipids is at least 100-fold less than fluid-phase lipids.

  12. Recent Applications of Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP to Membrane Bio-Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Rayan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This review examines some recent applications of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP to biopolymers, while mainly focusing on membrane protein studies. Initially, we discuss the lateral diffusion of membrane proteins, as measured by FRAP. Then, we talk about the use of FRAP to probe interactions between membrane proteins by obtaining fundamental information such as geometry and stoichiometry of the interacting complex. Afterwards, we discuss some applications of FRAP at the cellular level as well as the level of organisms. We conclude by comparing diffusion coefficients obtained by FRAP and several other alternative methods.

  13. Cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride complex as a fluorescent label of surface membranes in living ciliates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E; Bottiroli, G; Giordano, P

    1981-12-01

    Labelling of surface membrane of living ciliates: Paramecium aurelia and Tetrahymena pyriformis with fluorescent compound--cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride complex (CDC) has been achieved. Fluorescence micrographs of the dried samples showed specific localization of CDC on the cell membrane without any intracellular penetration. On the contrary the ciliates which have been dead during labelling revealed a non-specific fluorescence of their whole bodies. Microspectrofluorimetric analysis of labelled Paramecium cells was performed with Leitz microspectrograph. Spectrum of fluorescence emission measured over the cell membrane level had maximum at 450 nm. Strikingly, the emission maximum of the cells dead at the moment of labelling was shifted 10 nm to a longer wavelength. The rate of photofading measured in this case was almost 3-fold higher than for the ciliates labelled as living ones. Fluorescence excitation spectra did not show any difference in the peak position. Thus CDC staining appears to be an useful method of supravital labelling of cell surface enabling also to distinguish--on the basis of spectral characteristics--the ciliates being alive from those dead at the moment of fluorochrome binding.

  14. LAURDAN fluorescence properties in membranes: a journey from the fluorometer to the microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2012-01-01

    After 32 years since its introduction, the particular fluorescence properties of 6-lauroyl-2-(dimethylamino)-naphtalene (LAURDAN) in model and biological membranes are revisited. This review includes a historical perspective about the design, synthesis and initial description of the probe’s fluor...

  15. Confocal supercritical angle fluorescence microscopy for cell membrane imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Sivankutty, Siddharth; Mayet, Céline; Dupuis, Guillaume; Fort, Emmanuel; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate sub-wavelength sectioning on biological samples with a conventional confocal microscope. This optical sectioning is achieved by the phenomenon of supercritical angle fuorescence, wherein only a fluorophore next to the interface of a refractive index discontinuity can emit propagating components of radiation into the so-called forbidden angles. The simplicity of this technique allows it to be integrated with a high numerical aperture confocal scanning microscope by only a simple modi?cation on the detection channel. Confocal-SAF microscopy would be a powerful tool to achieve high resolution surface imaging, especially for membrane imaging in biological samples

  16. Mitochondrial membrane potential changes in osteoblasts treated with parathyroid hormone and estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyan, M B; Gilman, V R; Gay, C V

    1997-06-15

    This study assessed mitochondrial membrane potential changes in cultured osteoblasts treated with hormones known to regulate osteoblasts. A fluorescent carbocyanine dye, 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolocarbocyanine++ + iodide, also called JC-1, was used as a probe. JC-1 emits photons at 585 nm (orange-red) when the membrane potential in mitochondria is highly negative, but when the potential becomes reduced emission occurs at 527 nm (green). Osteoblasts were rinsed in serum-free medium for 5 min, then loaded with 1 x 10(-6) M JC-1 for 10 min. The distribution and intensity of JC-1 fluorescence were evaluated with a laser-scanning confocal microscope system. Hormone treatments included parathyroid hormone (PTH; 10(-8) M), 17beta-estradiol (10(-8) M), and thyroxine (T4; 10(-8) M). The potassium ionophore valinomycin (10(-6) M) was used as a control since it is known to disrupt the electrochemical gradient of mitochondria without interfering with the pH gradient. Valinomycin caused a profound, rapid increase (22.5% above untreated values) in the green/red ratio, which indicated a lowering of the mitochondrial membrane potential in all samples evaluated. PTH caused a less pronounced, but significant (7-14%), reduction in membrane potential in all cells examined. PTH is known to affect osteoblasts in a number of ways and is inhibitory to mitochondrial respiration; the results confirm this effect. For estradiol, half of the cells responded at a significant level, with a membrane potential reduction of 6 to 13% being recorded; the other half did not respond. Thyroxine did not alter mitochondrial membrane potential. Responses were detectable within 20 s for valinomycin, but occurred at a slower rate, over 200 to 300 s, following PTH and estradiol treatment. Responses to PTH and estradiol could be due to mitochondrial uptake of cytosolic Ca2+.

  17. Anacardic acid-mediated changes in membrane potential and pH gradient across liposomal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyomizu, Masaaki; Okamoto, Katsuyuki; Akiba, Yukio; Nakatsu, Tetsuo; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that anacardic acid has an uncoupling effect on oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria using succinate as a substrate (Life Sci. 66 (2000) 229-234). In the present study, for clarification of the physicochemical characteristics of anacardic acid, we used a cyanine dye (DiS-C3(5)) and 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) to determine changes of membrane potential (DeltaPsi) and pH difference (DeltapH), respectively, in a liposome suspension in response to the addition of anacardic acid to the suspension. The anacardic acid quenched DiS-C3(5) fluorescence at concentrations higher than 300 nM, with the degree of quenching being dependent on the log concentration of the acid. Furthermore, the K(+) diffusion potential generated by the addition of valinomycin to the suspension decreased for each increase in anacardic acid concentration used over 300 nM, but the sum of the anacardic acid- and valinomycin-mediated quenching was additively increasing. This indicates that the anacardic acid-mediated quenching was not due simply to increments in the K(+) permeability of the membrane. Addition of anacardic acid in the micromolar range to the liposomes with DeltaPsi formed by valinomycin-K(+) did not significantly alter 9-AA fluorescence, but unexpectedly dissipated DeltaPsi. The DeltaPsi preformed by valinomycin-K(+) decreased gradually following the addition of increasing concentrations of anacardic acid. The DeltaPsi dissipation rate was dependent on the pre-existing magnitude of DeltaPsi, and was correlated with the logarithmic concentration of anacardic acid. Furthermore, the initial rate of DeltapH dissipation increased with logarithmic increases in anacardic acid concentration. These results provide the evidence for a unique function of anacardic acid, dissimilar to carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone or valinomycin, in that anacardic acid behaves as both an electrogenic (negative) charge carrier driven by DeltaPsi, and a 'proton

  18. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography: Principles and Potential for Pharmaceutical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Stuker

    2011-04-01

    processes non-invasively in the intact organism is highly attractive from a diagnostic point of view but even more so for the drug developer, who can use the techniques for proof-of-mechanism and proof-of-efficacy studies. This review shall elucidate the current status and potential of fluorescence tomography including recent advances in multimodality imaging approaches for preclinical and clinical drug development.

  19. Imaging lipid domains in cell membranes: the advent of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Myers Owen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lipid bilayer of model membranes, liposomes reconstituted from cell lipids, and plasma membrane vesicles and spheres can separate into two distinct liquid phases to yield lipid domains with liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered properties. These observations are the basis of the lipid raft hypothesis that postulates the existence of cholesterol-enriched ordered-phase lipid domains in cell membranes that could regulate protein mobility, localization and interaction. Here we review the evidence that nano-scaled lipid complexes and meso-scaled lipid domains exist in cell membranes and how new fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction limit provide new insights into lipid organization in cell membranes.

  20. Monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides by two-color fluorescent label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupalenko, V Y; Shvadchak, V V; Duportail, G; Pivovarenko, V G; Klymchenko, A S; Mély, Y

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we developed an approach for monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides using a fluorescent environment-sensitive label of the 3-hydroxyflavone family. For this purpose, we labeled the N-terminus of three synthetic peptides, melittin, magainin 2 and poly-l-lysine capable to interact with lipid membranes. Binding of these peptides to lipid vesicles induced a strong fluorescence increase, which enabled to quantify the peptide-membrane interaction. Moreover, the dual emission of the label in these peptides correlated well with the depth of its insertion measured by the parallax quenching method. Thus, in melittin and magainin 2, which show deep insertion of their N-terminus, the label presented a dual emission corresponding to a low polar environment, while the environment of the poly-l-lysine N-terminus was rather polar, consistent with its location close to the bilayer surface. Using spectral deconvolution to distinguish the non-hydrated label species from the hydrated ones and two photon fluorescence microscopy to determine the probe orientation in giant vesicles, we found that the non-hydrated species were vertically oriented in the bilayer and constituted the best indicators for evaluating the depth of the peptide N-terminus in membranes. Thus, this label constitutes an interesting new tool for monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides.

  1. Tris buffer improves fluorescence yield of ram spermatozoa when evaluating membrane integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yániz, Jesús Luis; Mateos, José Angel; Santolaria, Pilar

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of various buffers on the fluorescence signal intensity of two fluorochromes (IP and CFDA) when used to assess the membrane integrity of ram sperm. Second ejaculates (18) from nine adult males were collected using an artificial vagina and diluted in either MOPS, TRIS, TES, HEPES, citrate, or phosphate-based extenders. Semen samples were stored at 15°C and the membrane integrity was assessed within the first 24 h of storage. Mean fluorescence intensity (FI) of PI- and CDFA-labeled sperm heads and fluorescence background noise (FBN) were determined quantitatively using Image J software. Fluorescence contrast (FC) was expressed as the difference between FI and FBN. Significantly, higher FI and FC were recorded when TRIS diluent was used, rather than the other diluents, both in the propidium- and fluorescein-labeled cells. The citrate and phosphate-based extenders showed intermediate results of FC between those of TRIS and zwitterionic (MOPS, TES and HEPES) groups for the PI-labeled sperm. However, in the CFDA-labeled sperm, the lower values of FC were obtained in the citrate and phosphate groups due to increased levels of FBN. For the membrane-damaged sperm, fluorescent labeling was limited to the sperm heads when TRIS-buffer was used, whereas in the other groups, the sperm tail was also frequently observed. It was concluded that TRIS buffer solution markedly increases the fluorescence yield of IP/CFDA-labeled sperm cells in the ram and that this should be considered when evaluating their membrane integrity.

  2. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes and the proton gradient: a practical usage guide

    OpenAIRE

    Seth W Perry; Norman, John P.; Barbieri, Justin; Brown, Edward B.; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent probes for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential are frequently used for assessing mitochondrial function, particularly in the context of cell fate determination in biological and biomedical research. However, valid interpretation of results obtained with such probes requires careful consideration of numerous controls, as well as possible effects of non-protonic charges on dye behavior. In this context, we provide an overview of some of the important technical considerations...

  3. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - fluorescent biomolecules and potential interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlker, C.; Huffman, J. A.; Pöschl, U.

    2012-01-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) are an important subset of air particulate matter with a substantial contribution to the organic aerosol fraction and potentially strong effects on public health and climate. Recent progress has been made in PBAP quantification by utilizing real-time bioaerosol detectors based on the principle that specific organic molecules of biological origin such as proteins, coenzymes, cell wall compounds and pigments exhibit intrinsic fluorescence. The properties of many fluorophores have been well documented, but it is unclear which are most relevant for detection of atmospheric PBAP. The present study provides a systematic synthesis of literature data on potentially relevant biological fluorophores. We analyze and discuss their relative importance for the detection of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) by online instrumentation for atmospheric measurements such as the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) or the wide issue bioaerosol sensor (WIBS). In addition, we provide new laboratory measurement data for selected compounds using bench-top fluorescence spectroscopy. Relevant biological materials were chosen for comparison with existing literature data and to fill in gaps of understanding. The excitation-emission matrices (EEM) exhibit pronounced peaks at excitation wavelengths of ~280 nm and ~360 nm, confirming the suitability of light sources used for online detection of FBAP. They also show, however, that valuable information is missed by instruments that do not record full emission spectra at multiple wavelengths of excitation, and co-occurrence of multiple fluorophores within a detected sample will likely confound detailed molecular analysis. Selected non-biological materials were also analyzed to assess their possible influence on FBAP detection and generally exhibit only low levels of background-corrected fluorescent emission. This study strengthens the hypothesis that ambient supermicron particle

  4. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols – fluorescent biomolecules and potential interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pöhlker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP are an important subset of air particulate matter with a substantial contribution to the organic aerosol fraction and potentially strong effects on public health and climate. Recent progress has been made in PBAP quantification by utilizing real-time bioaerosol detectors based on the principle that specific organic molecules of biological origin such as proteins, coenzymes, cell wall compounds and pigments exhibit intrinsic fluorescence. The properties of many fluorophores have been well documented, but it is unclear which are most relevant for detection of atmospheric PBAP. The present study provides a systematic synthesis of literature data on potentially relevant biological fluorophores. We analyze and discuss their relative importance for the detection of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP by online instrumentation for atmospheric measurements such as the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS or the wide issue bioaerosol sensor (WIBS.

    In addition, we provide new laboratory measurement data for selected compounds using bench-top fluorescence spectroscopy. Relevant biological materials were chosen for comparison with existing literature data and to fill in gaps of understanding. The excitation-emission matrices (EEM exhibit pronounced peaks at excitation wavelengths of ~280 nm and ~360 nm, confirming the suitability of light sources used for online detection of FBAP. They also show, however, that valuable information is missed by instruments that do not record full emission spectra at multiple wavelengths of excitation, and co-occurrence of multiple fluorophores within a detected sample will likely confound detailed molecular analysis. Selected non-biological materials were also analyzed to assess their possible influence on FBAP detection and generally exhibit only low levels of background-corrected fluorescent emission. This study strengthens the hypothesis that ambient

  5. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols – fluorescent biomolecules and potential interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pöhlker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP are an important subset of air particulate matter with a substantial contribution to the organic aerosol fraction and potentially strong effects on public health and climate. Recent progress has been made in PBAP quantification by utilizing real-time bioaerosol detectors based on the principle that specific organic molecules of biological origin such as proteins, coenzymes, cell wall compounds and pigments exhibit intrinsic fluorescence. The properties of many fluorophores have been well documented, but it is unclear which are most relevant for detection of atmospheric PBAP. The present study provides a systematic synthesis of literature data on potentially relevant biological fluorophores. We analyze and discuss their relative importance for the detection of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP by online instrumentation for atmospheric measurements such as the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS or the wide issue bioaerosol sensor (WIBS.

    In addition, we provide new laboratory measurement data for selected compounds using bench-top fluorescence spectroscopy. Relevant biological materials were chosen for comparison with existing literature data and to fill in gaps of understanding. The excitation-emission matrices (EEM exhibit pronounced peaks at excitation wavelengths of ~280 nm and ~360 nm, confirming the suitability of light sources used for online detection of FBAP. They also show, however, that valuable information is missed by instruments that do not record full emission spectra at multiple wavelengths of excitation, and co-occurrence of multiple fluorophores within a detected sample will likely confound detailed molecular analysis. Selected non-biological materials were also analyzed to assess their possible influence on FBAP detection and generally exhibit only low levels of background-corrected fluorescent emission. This study strengthens the hypothesis that ambient

  6. Combined ion conductance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for biological cell membrane transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, A. I.; Novak, P.; Velazquez, M. A.; Fleming, T. P.; Korchev, Y. E.

    2013-09-01

    Optical visualization of nanoscale morphological changes taking place in living biological cells during such important processes as endo- and exocytosis is challenging due to the low refractive index of lipid membranes. In this paper we summarize and discuss advances in the powerful combination of two complementary live imaging techniques, ion conductance and fluorescence confocal microscopy, that allows cell membrane topography to be related with molecular-specific fluorescence at high spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the feasibility of the use of ion conductance microscopy to image apical plasma membrane of mouse embryo trophoblast outgrowth cells at a resolution sufficient to depict single endocytic pits. This opens the possibility to study individual endocytic events in embryo trophoblast outgrowth cells where endocytosis plays a crucial role during early stages of embryo development.

  7. Investigation of polymer electrolyte membrane chemical degradation and degradation mitigation using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2012-01-24

    A fluorescent molecular probe, 6-carboxy fluorescein, was used in conjunction with in situ fluorescence spectroscopy to facilitate real-time monitoring of degradation inducing reactive oxygen species within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating PEM fuel cell. The key requirements of suitable molecular probes for in situ monitoring of ROS are presented. The utility of using free radical scavengers such as CeO(2) nanoparticles to mitigate reactive oxygen species induced PEM degradation was demonstrated. The addition of CeO(2) to uncatalyzed membranes resulted in close to 100% capture of ROS generated in situ within the PEM for a period of about 7 h and the incorporation of CeO(2) into the catalyzed membrane provided an eightfold reduction in ROS generation rate.

  8. Fluorescence interference contrast based approach to study real time interaction of melittin with plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Gui, Dong; Zandi, Roya; Gill, Sarjeet; Mohideen, Umar

    2014-03-01

    Melittin is an anti-bacterial and hemolytic toxic peptide found in bee venom. Cell lysis behavior of peptides has been widely investigated, but the exact interaction mechanism of lytic peptides with lipid membranes and its constituents has not been understood completely. In this paper we study the melittin interaction with lipid plasma membranes in real time using non-invasive and non-contact fluorescence interference contrast microscopy (FLIC). Particularly the interaction of melittin with plasma membranes was studied in a controlled molecular environment, where these plasma membrane were composed of saturated lipid, 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) and unsaturated lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine(DOPC) with and without cholesterol. We found out that melittin starts to form nanometer size pores in the plasma membranes shortly after interacting with membranes. But the addition of cholesterol in plasma membrane slows down the pore formation process. Our results show that inclusion of cholesterol to the plasma membranes make them more resilient towards pore formation and lysis of membrane.

  9. Fluorescence studies on radiation oxidative damage to membranes with implications to cellular radiosensitivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Mishra

    2002-12-01

    Radiation oxidative damage to plasma membrane and its consequences to cellular radiosensitivity have received increasing attention in the past few years. This review gives a brief account of radiation oxidative damage in model and cellular membranes with particular emphasis on results from our laboratory. Fluorescence and ESR spin probes have been employed to investigate the structural and functional alterations in membranes after g-irradiation. Changes in the lipid bilayer in irradiated unilamellar liposomes prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL) were measured by using diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a probe. The observed increase in DPH polarization and decrease in fluorescence intensity after g-irradiation of liposomes imply radiationinduced decrease in bilayer fluidity. Inclusion of cholesterol in liposome was found to protect lipids against radiation damage, possibly by modulation of bilayer organization e.g. lipid packing. Measurements on dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes loaded with 6-carboxyfluorescein (CF) showed radiation dose-dependent release of the probe indicating radiation-induced increased permeability. Changes in plasma membrane permeability of thymocytes were monitored by fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by 2,7-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCH-FDA). Results suggest a correlation between ROS generation and membrane permeability changes induced by radiation within therapeutic doses (0-10 Gy). It is concluded that increase in membrane permeability was the result of ROS-mediated oxidative reactions, which might trigger processes leading to apoptotic cell death after radiation exposure.

  10. Pentavalent antimony uptake pathway through erythrocyte membranes: molecular and atomic fluorescence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Camila; López, Silvana; Aguilar, Luis; Mercado, Luis; Bravo, Manuel; Quiroz, Waldo

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies by our group have shown that Sb(V) is able to enter red blood cells in a dynamic process and is reduced to Sb(III) by glutathione. The present study aims to investigate a possible entry pathway for Sb(V) through the erythrocyte membrane. Applying fluorescence spectroscopy studies with Laurdan and diphenylhexatriene (DPH) probes, it was found that there was no interaction between Sb(V) and membrane lipids. By comparing the Sb(V) entry percentages through lipid vesicles and sealed erythrocyte membranes, it was found that Sb(V) required protein channels to pass through the membrane. The competitive inhibition results using HCO3 (-) and Cl(-) showed that the Sb(V) uptake rate through the membrane fell approximately 50-70 % until full inhibition was reached, which was possibly due to the inhibition of the anion exchanger 1 (AE1) channel. Finally, the fluorescence measurements with the 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein (5-IAF) probe showed that Sb(V) interacted with membrane protein SH groups during this process.

  11. Zeta-potential of fouled thin film composite membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, K.; Hachisuka, H.; Nakamura, T. [Nitto denko Corp., Ibaraki, (Japan); Kimura, S. [Kogakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Environ. Chemical Engineering; Ueyama, K. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-10-01

    The surface zeta-potential of a cross-linked polyamide thin film composite reverse osmosis membrane was measured using an electrophoresis method. It was confirmed that this method could be effectively applied to analyze the fouling of such membranes. It is known that the water flux of membranes drastically decreases as a result of fouling by surfactants. Although the surfactants adsorbed on reverse osmosis membranes could not be detected by conventional methods such as SEM, EDX and FT-IR, their presence could be clarified by the profile measurements of the surface zeta-potential. The profiles of the membrane surface zeta-potentials changed to more positive values in the measured pH range as a result of fouling by cationic or amphoteric surfactants. This measuring method of surface zeta-potentials allowed us to analyze a very small amount of fouling of a thin film composite reverse osmosis membrane. This method could be used to analyze the fouled surface of the thin film composite reverse osmosis membrane which is used for production of ultrapure water and shows a remarkable decrease in flux. It also became clear that this method is easy and effective for the reverse osmosis membrane surface analysis of adsorbed materials such as surfactants. (author)

  12. Effects of tetrandrine on calcium transport, protein fluorescences and membrane fluidity of sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L Y; Chen, X; Tian, X L; Yu, X H

    2000-10-01

    To understand whether the molecular mechanism of Tetrandrine (Tet)'s pharmacological effects is concerned with sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium transport so as to be involved in myocardial contractility, we observed the effects of Tet on calcium transport and membrane structure of rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (SR) and rat cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (CSR). Calcium uptake was monitored with a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer. Protein conformation and fluorescence polarization were measured by fluospectrophotometric method and membrane lipids labelled with fluorescence probes for SR, respectively. 128 micromol l(-1) Tet reduced the initial rate of calcium uptake to 59% of control 6 min after reaction. Tet un-competitively inhibited SR Ca(2+), Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, causing the stoichiometric ratio of SR Ca(2+)/ATP to decrease to 1.43 from 2.0 of control. Inhibitory rates on SR Ca(2+),Mg(2+)-ATPase by Tet were reduced from 60% in the absence of phosphate to 50% in the presence of phosphate and reduced from 92% in 1 mmol l(-1) ATP to 60% in 5 mmol l(-1) ATP. Tet markedly reduced SR intrinsic protein fluorescence, while it slightly decreased the thiol(SH)-modified protein fluorescence of SR labelled with N-(3-pyrene)-maleimide. Tet slightly increased fluorescence polarization in the middle and deep layers of SR membrane lipids labelled with 7- or 12-(9-anthroyloxy) stearic acid (AS) probes, whereas it did not change that of SR labelled with 1, 6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatrine (DPH). These results revealed that prevention of SR calcium uptake by Tet was due to inhibition of the SR calcium pump Ca(2+),Mg(2+)-ATPase, changes in spatial conformation of the pumps protein molecules and a decrease in the extent of motion of membrane lipid molecules, thus altering the regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) and myocardial contractility.

  13. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Geise, Geoffrey M.

    2014-08-26

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The

  14. Membrane potential governs lateral segregation of plasma membrane proteins and lipids in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Guido; Opekarová, Miroslava; Malinsky, Jan; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Tanner, Widmar

    2007-01-10

    The plasma membrane potential is mainly considered as the driving force for ion and nutrient translocation. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we have discovered a novel role of the membrane potential in the organization of the plasma membrane. Within the yeast plasma membrane, two non-overlapping sub-compartments can be visualized. The first one, represented by a network-like structure, is occupied by the proton ATPase, Pma1, and the second one, forming 300-nm patches, houses a number of proton symporters (Can1, Fur4, Tat2 and HUP1) and Sur7, a component of the recently described eisosomes. Evidence is presented that sterols, the main lipid constituent of the plasma membrane, also accumulate within the patchy compartment. It is documented that this compartmentation is highly dependent on the energization of the membrane. Plasma membrane depolarization causes reversible dispersion of the H(+)-symporters, not however of the Sur7 protein. Mitochondrial mutants, affected in plasma membrane energization, show a significantly lower degree of membrane protein segregation. In accordance with these observations, depolarized membranes also considerably change their physical properties (detergent sensitivity).

  15. Real time measures of prestin charge and fluorescence during plasma membrane trafficking reveal sub-tetrameric activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumin Bian

    Full Text Available Prestin (SLC26a5 is the outer hair cell integral membrane motor protein that drives cochlear amplification, and has been described as an obligate tetramer. We studied in real time the delivery of YFP-prestin to the plasma membrane of cells from a tetracycline-inducible cell line. Following the release of temperature block to reinstate trans Golgi network delivery of the integral membrane protein, we measured nonlinear capacitance (NLC and membrane fluorescence during voltage clamp. Prestin was delivered exponentially to the plasma membrane with a time constant of less than 10 minutes, with both electrical and fluorescence methods showing high temporal correlation. However, based on disparity between estimates of prestin density derived from either fluorescence or NLC, we conclude that sub-tetrameric forms of prestin contribute to our electrical and fluorescence measures. Thus, in agreement with previous observations we find that functional prestin is not an obligate tetramer.

  16. Hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in cardiomyocyte tissue slices by the synchronization modulation electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Fang, Zhihui; Chen, Wei

    2012-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown that a specially designed, so-called synchronization modulation electric field can entrain active transporter Na/K pumps in the cell membrane. This approach was previously developed in a study of single cells using a voltage clamp to monitor the pump currents. We are now expanding our study from isolated single cells to aggregated cells in a 3-dimensional cell matrix, through the use of a tissue slice from the rat heart. The slice is about 150 μm in thickness, meaning the slices contain many cell layers, resulting in a simplified 3-dimensional system. A fluorescent probe was used to identify the membrane potential and the ionic concentration gradients across the cell membrane. In spite of intrinsic cell-to-cell interactions and the difficulty in stimulating cell aggregation in the tissue slice, the oscillating electric field increased the intracellular fluorescent intensity, indicating elevation of the cell ionic concentration and hyperpolarization of the cell membrane. Blockage of these changes by ouabain confirmed that the results are directly related to Na/K pumps. These results along with the backward modulation indicate that the synchronization modulation electric field can influence the Na/K pumps in tissue cells of a 3-dimensional matrix and therefore hyperpolarize the cell membrane.

  17. Stabilizing effects of coenzyme Q10 on potassium ion release, membrane potential and fluidity of rabbit red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinozawa,Shinya

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of coenzyme Q10 (Co Q10 on potassium ion release, membrane potential and fluidity of rabbit red blood cells were studied. Co Q10 inhibited the increased potassium ion release induced by cetylamine or lysolecithin from the cells. Co Q10 slightly decreased the membrane potential monitored by changes in fluorescence intensity of cyanine dye, 3,3'-dipropyl-2,2'-thiodicarbocyanine iodide [diS-C3-(5], and also slightly decreased the membrane fluidity measured by using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH. These effects of Co Q10 on the membrane are considered to be due to its membrane stabilizing activity by interaction with lipid bilayers of the membrane.

  18. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezanilla, F; Rojas, E; Taylor, R E

    1970-12-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 musec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential.2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential.3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current-voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939).4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations.5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential.

  19. Pharmacological exploration of the resting membrane potential reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Jespersen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to this potential, minor changes in the membrane potential have a relatively large impact on the atrial Na(+) current. The atrial resting membrane potential is established following ionic currents through the inwardly rectifying K(+) currents IK1, IK,ACh and IK,Ca and to a lesser extent by other ion channels......The cardiac action potential arises and spreads throughout the myocardium as a consequence of highly organized spatial and temporal expression of ion channels conducting Na(+), Ca(2+) or K(+) currents. The cardiac Na(+) current is responsible for the initiation and progression of the action...... potential. Altered Na(+) current has been found implicated in a number of different arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation. In the atrium, the resting membrane potential is more depolarized than in the ventricles, and as cardiac Na(+) channels undergo voltage-dependent inactivation close...

  20. Membrane potential hyperpolarization in Mammalian cardiac cells by synchronization modulation of Na/K pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Dando, Robin

    2008-02-01

    In previously reported work, we developed a new technique, synchronization modulation, to electrically activate Na/K pump molecules. The fundamental mechanism involved in this technique is a dynamic entrainment procedure of the pump molecules, carried out in a stepwise pattern. The entrainment procedure consists of two steps: synchronization and modulation. We theoretically predicted that the pump functions can be activated exponentially as a function of the membrane potential. We have experimentally demonstrated synchronization of the Na/K pump molecules and acceleration of their pumping rates by many fold through use of voltage-clamp techniques, directly monitoring the pump currents. We further applied this technique to intact skeletal muscle fibers from amphibians and found significant effects on the membrane resting potential. Here, we extend our study to intact mammalian cardiomyocytes. We employed a noninvasive confocal microscopic fluorescent imaging technique to monitor electric field-induced changes in ionic concentration gradient and membrane resting potential. Our results further confirm that the well-designed synchronization modulation electric field can effectively accelerate the Na/K pumping rate, increasing the ionic concentration gradient across the cell membrane and hyperpolarizing the membrane resting potential.

  1. Recovery of real dye bath wastewater using integrated membrane process: considering water recovery, membrane fouling and reuse potential of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcik-Canbolat, Cigdem; Sengezer, Cisel; Sakar, Hacer; Karagunduz, Ahmet; Keskinler, Bulent

    2016-12-30

    It has been recognized by the whole world that textile industry which produce large amounts of wastewater with strong color and toxic organic compounds is a major problematical industry requiring effective treatment solutions. In this study, reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were tested on biologically treated real dye bath wastewater with and without pretreatment by nanofiltration (NF) membrane to recovery. Also membrane fouling and reuse potential of membranes were investigated by multiple filtrations. Obtained results showed that only NF is not suitable to produce enough quality to reuse the wastewater in a textile industry as process water while RO provide successfully enough permeate quality. The results recommend that integrated NF/RO membrane process is able to reduce membrane fouling and allow long-term operation for real dye bath wastewater.

  2. Enhanced membrane fluorescence of CDC-labelled paramecium subsequent to removal of surface components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E; Bottiroli, G; Giordano, P

    1983-01-01

    Cytofluorimetric analysis of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride (CDC) labelled Paramecium indicates that after mild trypsin removal of surface components the localization of CDC on the outer surface of living cells was not modified by the treatment. After such treatment the intensity of fluorescence emission was found about 3-fold higher in treated single cell than in the untreated one. These findings indicate that CDC labelling can be used to follow alteration occurred on the membrane of the living cell prior to labelling.

  3. Chemico-osmosis in geologic membranes: Role of membrane potential gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guanchu; Jim Hendry, M.

    2014-09-01

    Chemico-osmosis is conventionally regarded to occur in the positive direction, i.e., from low to high concentration reservoirs. However, experiments have shown that chemico-osmosis in clay membranes can occur in the opposite direction, i.e., from high to low concentration reservoirs. Conceptual interpretations of this negative osmosis suggest that the diffused electrolytes exert “drag” on water molecules, thus driving the entire solution toward the low concentration reservoir. This paper proposes a quantitative interpretation of this phenomenon considering the role of the induced membrane potential gradient. To this end, a model, which involves the expansion of pore-scale electrokinetics to continuum-scale chemico-osmosis behaviors, is developed for quantification of this membrane potential gradient. The numerical investigation based on the model shows that the membrane potential gradient (1) is caused by the requirement of electroneutrality in the solutions on either side of the membrane; (2) is directly proportional to the difference in effective diffusivity for cations and anions; and (3) contributes to retarding cation migration, enhancing anion migration, and driving the solution flux from low to high concentration reservoirs. These three observations thus suggest that a likely cause of negative osmosis is a decreasing tendency for the solution flux from low to high concentration reservoirs caused by a decreasing membrane potential gradient. Using these findings, previous experiments are discussed and interpreted with success from the electrodynamic perspective of the membrane potential gradient.

  4. Exploring the potential of commercial polyethylene membranes for desalination by membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Zuo, Jian

    2015-09-26

    The potential of utilizing polyethylene (PE) membranes in membrane distillation (MD) for sea water desalination has been explored in this study. The advantages of using PE membranes are (1) their intrinsic hydrophobicity with low surface energy of 28-33×10N/m, (2) good chemical stability and low thermal conductivity and (3) their commercial availability that may expedite the MD commercialization process. Several commercial PE membranes with different physicochemical properties are employed to study the capability and feasibility of PE membrane application in an MD process. The effect of membrane pore size, porosity, thickness and wetting resistance on MD performance and energy efficiency have been investigated. The PE membranes demonstrate impressive separation performance with permeation fluxes reaching 123.0L/mh for a 3.5wt% sodium chloride (NaCl) feed solution at 80°C. This superior performance surpasses most of the prior commercial and lab-made flat sheet and hollow fiber membranes. A long term MD testing of 100h is also performed to evaluate the durability of PE membranes, and a relatively stable performance is observed during the entire experiment. This long term stability signifies the suitability of PE membranes for MD applications.

  5. Cyclosporin A-induced oxidative stress is not the consequence of an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Toorn, Marco; Kauffman, Henk F.; van der Deen, Margaretha; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Koeter, Gerard H.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclosporin A induces closure of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. We aimed to investigate whether this closure results in concomitant increases in mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta Psi(m)) and the production of reactive oxygen species. Fluorescent probes were used to assess Delt

  6. Cyclosporin A-induced oxidative stress is not the consequence of an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Toorn, Marco; Kauffman, Henk F.; van der Deen, Margaretha; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Koeter, Gerard H.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclosporin A induces closure of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. We aimed to investigate whether this closure results in concomitant increases in mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta Psi(m)) and the production of reactive oxygen species. Fluorescent probes were used to assess Delt

  7. A new fluorescent squaraine probe for the measurement of membrane polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioffe, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Domanov, Yegor A; Tatarets, Anatoliy L; Patsenker, Leonid D; Terpetsching, Ewald A; Dyubko, Tatyana S

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity of newly synthesized squaraine dye 1 to the changes in lipid bilayer physical properties and compared it with the well-known dye 2. Partitioning of the dye 1 into lipid bilayer was found to be followed by significant increase of its fluorescence intensity and red-shift of emission maximum, while intensity of the dye 2 fluorescence increased only slightly on going from aqueous to lipidic environment. This suggests that dye 1 is more sensitive to the changes in membrane properties as compared to dye 2. Partition coefficients of the dye 1 have been determined for the model membranes composed of zwitterionic phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with positively charged detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), anionic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL), and sterol (Chol). The spectral responses of the dye 1 in different liposome media proved to correlate with the increase of bilayer polarity induced by Chol and CL or its decrease caused by CTAB. It was concluded that dye 1 can be used as fluorescent probe for examining membrane-related processes.

  8. A fluorescent sensing membrane for iodine based on intramolecular excitation energy transfer of anthryl appended porphyrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A single anthryl appended meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) dyad has been synthesized and applied in fluorescence sensing of iodine based on the intramolecular excitation energy transfer. The molecular recognition of the sensor is based on the interaction of iodine with inner anthracene moiety of the dyad, while the signal reporter for the recognition process is the TPP fluorescence quenching. Because the emission spectrum of anthracene is largely overlapped with the Soret band absorption of TPP, intramolecular excitation energy transfer interaction occurs between the donor, anthracene and acceptor, TPP. This energy transfer leads to TPP fluorescence emission by excitation of anthracene. The sensor was constructed by immobilizing the dyad in a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane. The sensing membrane shows higher sensitivity compared to the sensors by using anthracene, TPP, or a mixture of anthracene and TPP as sensing materials. Under the optimum conditions, iodine in a sample solution can be determined from 2.04 to 23.6 mmol·L-1 with a detection limit of 33 nmol·L-1. The sensing membrane shows satisfactory response characteristics including good reproducibility, reversibility and stability, as well as the short response time of less than 60 s. Except for Cr2O72- and MnO4-, other common metal ions and anions in foodstuff do not interfere with iodine determination. The proposed method was applied in the determination of iodine in table salt samples. The results agree well with those obtained by other methods.

  9. A fluorescent sensing membrane for iodine based on intramolecular excitation energy transfer of anthryl appended porphyrin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG LiPing; YOU MingXu; WANG Hao; WANG YongXiang; YANG RongHua

    2009-01-01

    A single anthryl appended meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) dyed has been synthesized and applied in fluorescence sensing of iodine based on the intramolecular excitation energy transfer. The molecular recognition of the sensor is based on the interaction of iodine with inner anthracene moiety of the dyad, while the signal reporter for the recognition process is the TPP fluorescence quenching. Because the emission spectrum of anthracene is largely overlapped with the Soret band absorption of TPP, in-tremolecular excitation energy transfer interaction occurs between the donor, anthracene and acceptor, TPP. This energy transfer leads to TPP fluorescence emission by excitation of anthracene. The sensor was constructed by immobilizing the dyad in a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane. The sensing membrane shows higher sensitivity compared to the sensors by using anthracene, TPP, or a mixture of anthracene and TPP as sensing materials. Under the optimum conditions, iodine in a sample membrane shows satisfactory response characteristics including good reproducibility, reversibility end stability, as well as the short response time of less than 60 s. Except for Cr2O2-7 and MnO-4, other common metal ions and anions in foodstuff do not interfere with iodine determination. The proposed method was applied in the determination of iodine in table salt samples. The results agree well with those obtained by other methods.

  10. Analysis of plasma membrane integrity by fluorescent detection of Tl(+) uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Angela M; Nesin, Olena M; Pakhomova, Olga N; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2010-07-01

    The exclusion of polar dyes by healthy cells is widely employed as a simple and reliable test for cell membrane integrity. However, commonly used dyes (propidium, Yo-Pro-1, trypan blue) cannot detect membrane defects which are smaller than the dye molecule itself, such as nanopores that form by exposure to ultrashort electric pulses (USEPs). Instead, here we demonstrate that opening of nanopores can be efficiently detected and studied by fluorescent measurement of Tl(+) uptake. Various mammalian cells (CHO, GH3, NG108), loaded with a Tl(+)-sensitive fluorophore FluxOR and subjected to USEPs in a Tl(+)-containing bath buffer, displayed an immediate (within Tl(+) by 600-ns USEP was at 1-2 kV/cm, and the rate of Tl(+) uptake increased linearly with increasing the electric field. The lack of concurrent entry of larger dye molecules suggested that the size of nanopores is less than 1-1.5 nm. Tested ion channel inhibitors as well as removal of the extracellular Ca(2+) did not block the USEP effect. Addition of a Tl(+)-containing buffer within less than 10 min after USEP also caused a fluorescence surge, which confirms the minutes-long lifetime of nanopores. Overall, the technique of fluorescent detection of Tl(+) uptake proved highly effective, noninvasive and sensitive for visualization and analysis of membrane defects which are too small for conventional dye uptake detection methods.

  11. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  12. Temperature-Induced Protein Conformational Changes in Barley Root Plasma Membrane-Enriched Microsomes: II. Intrinsic Protein Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, C R

    1987-07-01

    The membrane-bound proteins of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Conquest) root plasma membrane-enriched microsomes displayed fluorescence typical of protein-associated trytophan residues. The protein fluorescence intensity was sensitive to variations in sample temperature. The temperature-induced decline in protein fluorescence intensity was nonlinear with slope discontinuities at about 12 and 32 degrees C. Detergents at levels above their critical micelle concentration enhanced protein fluorescence. Glutaraldehyde reduced protein fluorescence. Protein fluorescence polarization increased at temperatures above 30 degrees C. Both the rate of tryptophan photoionization and the fluorescence intensity of the photoionization products suggested alterations in membrane protein conformation between 12 and 32 degrees C. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence by acrylamide and potassium iodide indicated changes in accessibility of the extrinsic agents to the protein tryptophan residues beginning at about 14 degrees C. The results indicate thermally induced changes in the dynamics of the membrane proteins over the temperature range of 12 to 32 degrees C which could account for the complex temperature dependence of the barley root plasma membrane ATPase.

  13. Quantification of free cysteines in membrane and soluble proteins using a fluorescent dye and thermal unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branigan, Emma; Pliotas, Christos; Hagelueken, Gregor; Naismith, James H

    2013-11-01

    Cysteine is an extremely useful site for selective attachment of labels to proteins for many applications, including the study of protein structure in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence spectroscopy and medical imaging. The demand for quantitative data for these applications means that it is important to determine the extent of the cysteine labeling. The efficiency of labeling is sensitive to the 3D context of cysteine within the protein. Where the label or modification is not directly measurable by optical or magnetic spectroscopy, for example, in cysteine modification to dehydroalanine, assessing labeling efficiency is difficult. We describe a simple assay for determining the efficiency of modification of cysteine residues, which is based on an approach previously used to determine membrane protein stability. The assay involves a reaction between the thermally unfolded protein and a thiol-specific coumarin fluorophore that is only fluorescent upon conjugation with thiols. Monitoring fluorescence during thermal denaturation of the protein in the presence of the dye identifies the temperature at which the maximum fluorescence occurs; this temperature differs among proteins. Comparison of the fluorescence intensity at the identified temperature between modified, unmodified (positive control) and cysteine-less protein (negative control) allows for the quantification of free cysteine. We have quantified both site-directed spin labeling and dehydroalanine formation. The method relies on a commonly available fluorescence 96-well plate reader, which rapidly screens numerous samples within 1.5 h and uses <100 μg of material. The approach is robust for both soluble and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins.

  14. Quantification of free cysteines in membrane and soluble proteins using a fluorescent dye and thermal unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Naismith, James H

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine is an extremely useful site for selective attachment of labels to proteins for many applications, including the study of protein structure in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence spectroscopy and medical imaging. The demand for quantitative data for these applications means that it is important to determine the extent of the cysteine labeling. The efficiency of labeling is sensitive to the 3D context of cysteine within the protein. Where the label or modification is not directly measurable by optical or magnetic spectroscopy, for example, in cysteine modification to dehydroalanine, assessing labeling efficiency is difficult. We describe a simple assay for determining the efficiency of modification of cysteine residues, which is based on an approach previously used to determine membrane protein stability. The assay involves a reaction between the thermally unfolded protein and a thiol-specific coumarin fluorophore that is only fluorescent upon conjugation with thiols. Monitoring fluorescence during thermal denaturation of the protein in the presence of the dye identifies the temperature at which the maximum fluorescence occurs; this temperature differs among proteins. Comparison of the fluorescence intensity at the identified temperature between modified, unmodified (positive control) and cysteine-less protein (negative control) allows for the quantification of free cysteine. We have quantified both site-directed spin labeling and dehydroalanine formation. The method relies on a commonly available fluorescence 96-well plate reader, which rapidly screens numerous samples within 1.5 h and uses <100 μg of material. The approach is robust for both soluble and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. PMID:24091556

  15. Highly sensitive fluorescence optode based on polymer inclusion membranes for determination of Al(III) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suah, F B M; Ahmad, M; Heng, L Y

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports the use of a polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) for direct determination of Al(III) ions in natural water by using a fluorescence based optode. The best composition of the PIMs consisted of 60 wt.% (m/m) poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) as the base polymer, 20 wt.% (m/m) triton X-100 as an extractant, 20 wt.% (m/m) dioctyl phthalate (DOP) as plasticizer and morin as the reagent, was used in this study. The inclusion of triton X-100 was used for enhancing the sorption of Al(III) ions from liquid phase into the membrane phase, thus increasing the optode fluorescence intensity. The optimized optode was characterized by a linear calibration curve in the range from 7.41 × 10(-7) to 1.00 × 10(-4) molL(-1) of Al(III), with a detection limit of 5.19 × 10(-7) molL(-1). The response of the optode was 4 min and reproducible results were obtained for eight different membranes demonstrated good membrane stability. The optode was applied to the determination of Al(III) in natural water samples. The result obtained is comparable to atomic absorption spectrometry method.

  16. Temperature-dependent conformations of a membrane supported zinc porphyrin tweezer by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, Julia R; Lee, Wonbae; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Molinski, Tadeusz F; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H

    2013-07-25

    We studied the equilibrium conformations of a zinc porphyrin tweezer composed of two carboxylphenyl-functionalized zinc tetraphenyl porphyrin subunits connected by a 1,4-butyndiol spacer, which was suspended inside the amphiphilic regions of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) liposomes. By combining phase-modulation two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) with linear absorbance and fluorimetry, we determined that the zinc porphyrin tweezer adopts a mixture of folded and extended conformations in the membrane. By fitting an exciton-coupling model to a series of data sets recorded over a range of temperatures (17-85 °C) and at different laser center wavelengths, we determined that the folded form of the tweezer is stabilized by a favorable change in the entropy of the local membrane environment. Our results provide insights toward understanding the balance of thermodynamic factors that govern molecular assembly in membranes.

  17. Quantitative Imaging of Molecular Order in Lipid Membranes Using Two-Photon Fluorescence Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasecka, Alicja; Han, Tsai-Jung; Favard, Cyril; Cho, Bong Rae; Brasselet, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We present a polarimetric two-photon microscopy technique to quantitatively image the local static molecular orientational behavior in lipid and cell membranes. This approach, based on a tunable excitation polarization state complemented by a polarized readout, is easily implementable and does not require hypotheses on the molecular angular distribution such as its mean orientation, which is a main limitation in traditional fluorescence anisotropy measurements. The method is applied to the investigation of the molecular angular distribution in giant unilamellar vesicles formed by liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered micro-domains, and in COS-7 cell membranes. The highest order contrast between ordered and disordered domains is obtained for dyes locating within the membrane acyl chains. PMID:19917241

  18. Toward Better Genetically Encoded Sensors of Membrane Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storace, Douglas; Sepehri Rad, Masoud; Kang, BokEum; Cohen, Lawrence B; Hughes, Thom; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-05-01

    Genetically encoded optical sensors of cell activity are powerful tools that can be targeted to specific cell types. This is especially important in neuroscience because individual brain regions can include a multitude of different cell types. Optical imaging allows for simultaneous recording from numerous neurons or brain regions. Optical signals of membrane potential are useful because membrane potential changes are a direct sign of both synaptic and action potentials. Here we describe recent improvements in the in vitro and in vivo signal size and kinetics of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) and discuss their relationship to alternative sensors of neural activity.

  19. THE COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL OF NEW DAIRY PRODUCTS FROM MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Lalor, Alejandro; Siebert, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Membrane filtration technologies are capable of creating entirely new, more functional food products. In this regard, potential new dairy products include high-protein, low-lactose fluid milk, high-protein, low-lactose ice cream, and non-far yogurt made with fewer stabilizers. An initial survey of membrane manufacturing companies determined the added cost to produce such functional food products to be two to six percent of the existing retail price for similar standard dairy products. A subse...

  20. Utilizing biomarker techniques: Cellular membrane potential as a biomarker of subchronic toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, D.J.; Stover, E.L.; Burks, S.L.; Atherton, R.A. [The Stover Group, Stillwater, OK (United States); Blankmeyer, J.T. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A biomarker assay designed to monitor the health of Daphnia sp. as well as evaluate sites of toxicant action was used to study the toxic effects of copper, diazinon, and polyacrylamide. The assay used the uptake of a fluorescent cellular membrane-bound dye and corresponding fluorescence measurement as an early potential is an indicator of potential cellular stress. Following short-term exposure to the electrochromic dye, di-4-ANEPPS, and the toxicants, fluorescence readings were collected, stored in a database management system, and output for graphical display and statistical analysis. Median inhibitory concentrations (IC50), No Observed Effect Concentrations (NOEC), and Lowest Observed Effect Concentrations (LOEC) values for copper were approximately 52.6, 35.0, and 50.0 {micro}g/L. The approximate IC50, NOEC, LOEC values for diazinon and polyacrylamide were 0.45, 0.25, and 0.50 {micro}g/L; and 350.0, 300.0, and 500.0 {micro}g/L, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy indicated that copper primarily affected the mouth parts (orofacial) and digestive tract. Diazinon, however, primarily caused an effect on the anterior portion of the nervous system. Polyacrylamide appeared to induce toxicity throughout the entire epithelial layer of the Daphnia. These results suggested this assay may be effectively used to monitor for organism stress or toxicity as well as evaluate potential sites of toxic action.

  1. MEMBRANE MOBILITY AND MICRODOMAIN LOCALIZATION OF THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER STUDIED BY CONFOCAL FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (FCS) AND FRAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erica; (Vægter), Christian Bjerggaard; van Deurs, Bo;

    FCS measurements in transiently transfected N2A neuroblastoma cells were impaired by photobleachning suggesting immobilization of the transporter in the membrane. This was confirmed by the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which showed clear recovery of YFP-DAT fluorescence...

  2. Analysis of Cell Movement by Simultaneous Quantification of Local Membrane Displacement and Fluorescent Intensities Using Quimp2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgraaf, Leonard; van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Bretschneider, Till

    The use of fluorescent markers in living cells has increased dramatically in the recent years. The quantitative analysis of the images requires specific analysis software. Previously, the program Quimp was launched for quantitating fluorescent intensities at the membrane or the cortex of the cell.

  3. Examining the conformational dynamics of membrane proteins in situ with site-directed fluorescence labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ryan; Dempski, Robert E

    2011-05-29

    Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology (TEVC) is a powerful tool to investigate the mechanism of ion transport1 for a wide variety of membrane proteins including ion channels, ion pumps, and transporters. Recent developments have combined site-specific fluorophore labeling alongside TEVC to concurrently examine the conformational dynamics at specific residues and function of these proteins on the surface of single cells. We will describe a method to study the conformational dynamics of membrane proteins by simultaneously monitoring fluorescence and current changes using voltage-clamp fluorometry. This approach can be used to examine the molecular motion of membrane proteins site-specifically following cysteine replacement and site-directed fluorophore labeling. Furthermore, this method provides an approach to determine distance constraints between specific residues. This is achieved by selectively attaching donor and acceptor fluorophores to two mutated cysteine residues of interest. In brief, these experiments are performed following functional expression of the desired protein on the surface of Xenopus leavis oocytes. The large surface area of these oocytes enables facile functional measurements and a robust fluorescence signal. It is also possible to readily change the extracellular conditions such as pH, ligand or cations/anions, which can provide further information on the mechanism of membrane proteins. Finally, recent developments have also enabled the manipulation of select internal ions following co-expression with a second protein. Our protocol is described in multiple parts. First, cysteine scanning mutagenesis proceeded by fluorophore labeling is completed at residues located at the interface of the transmembrane and extracellular domains. Subsequent experiments are designed to identify residues which demonstrate large changes in fluorescence intensity (<5%) upon a conformational change of the protein. Second, these changes in fluorescence

  4. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study diffusion in the presence of a hierarchy of membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalay, Ziya

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a commonly used experimental technique to study molecular transport, especially in biological systems. FCS is particularly useful in two-dimensional systems such as the cell membrane, where molecules approximately move in a plane over several hundreds of nanometers, and the signal to noise ratio is high. Recent observations showed that proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane (the outermost membrane of a cell) can become temporarily confined in a hierarchy of membrane domains, induced by actin filaments and dynamic clusters formed by lipids and proteins (rafts). There has been considerable interest in measuring the characteristic size and lifetime of these domains via microscopy techniques, including FCS. Even though FCS is widely applicable, interpretation of the results is often indirect, as data has to be fit to model predictions in order to extract transport coefficients. In this talk, I will present our recent theoretical and computational findings on how FCS measurements would reflect diffusion in the simultaneous presence of cytoskeleton induced membrane compartments, and raft-like domains.

  5. The effect of lipid composition on the permeability of fluorescent markers from photosensitized membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytzhak, Shany; Weitman, Hana; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence indicating that the cellular locus of PDT action by amphiphilic sensitizers are the cellular membranes. The photosensitization process causes oxidative damage to membrane components that can result in the cell's death. However, it was not yet established whether lipid oxidation can cause free passage of molecules through the membrane and, as a result, be the primary cause of the cell's death. In this work, we studied the effect of liposomes' lipid composition on the kinetics of the leakage of three fluorescent dyes, calcein, carboxyfluorescein and DTAF, which were trapped in the intraliposomal aqueous phase, after photosensitization with the photosensitizer deuteroporphyrin. We found that as the degree of fatty acid unsaturation increased, the photosensitized passage of these molecules through the lipid bilayer increased. We also found that the rate of leakage of these molecules was affected by their size and bulkiness as well as by their net electric charge. In liposomes that are composed of a lipid mixture similar to that of natural membranes, the observed passage of molecules through the membrane is slow. Thus, the photodynamic damage to lipids does not appear to be severe enough to be an immediate, primary cause of cell death in biological photosensitization.

  6. Z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as a tool for diffusion measurements in planar lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Tomáš; Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Studies of lateral diffusion are used for the characterization of the dynamics of biological membranes. One of the techniques that can be used for this purpose is fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which belongs to the single-molecule techniques. Unfortunately, FCS measurements, when performed in planar lipid systems, are associated with a few sources of inaccuracy in the determination of the lateral diffusion coefficient. The main problems are related to the imperfect positioning of the laser focus relative to the plane of the sample. Another source of inaccuracy is the requirement for external calibration of the detection volume size. This protocol introduces a calibration-free method called Z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (Z-scan FCS), which is based on the determination of the diffusion time and particle number in steps along the optical (z-) axis by sequential FCS measurements. Z-scan FCS could be employed for diffusion measurements in planar membrane model systems-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and also in biological membranes. A result from measurements in SPBs is also presented in the protocol as a principle example of the Z-scan technique.

  7. Mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential after low-flow ischemia are not affected by ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Dodoni, Giuliano; Konietzka, Ina; Di Lisa, Fabio; Heusch, Gerd; Schulz, Rainer

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondrial function following prolonged ischemia and subsequent reperfusion is better preserved by ischemic preconditioning (IP). In the present study, we analyzed whether or not IP has an impact on mitochondrial function at the end of a sustained ischemic period. Göttinger minipigs were subjected to 90-min low-flow ischemia without (n=5) and with (n=5) a preconditioning cycle of 10-min ischemia and 15-min reperfusion. Mitochondria were isolated from the ischemic or preconditioned anterior wall (AW) and the control posterior wall (PW) at the end of ischemia. Basal mitochondrial respiration was not different between AW and PW. The ADP-stimulated (state 3) respiration in AW mitochondria compared to PW mitochondria was equally decreased in non-preconditioned and preconditioned pigs. The uncoupled respiration as well as the membrane potential (rhodamine 123 fluorescence) were not significantly different between groups. However, the recovery of the membrane potential (Delta rhodamine 123 fluorescence/s) after the addition of ADP was delayed in mitochondria obtained from AW compared to PW, both in non-preconditioned and in preconditioned pig hearts. Neither the amount of marker proteins for complexes of the electron transport chain nor the level of reactive oxygen species were affected by ischemia without or with IP. State 3 respiration and recovery of membrane potential were impaired in pig mitochondria after 90 min of low-flow ischemia. IP did not improve mitochondrial function during ischemia. Therefore, the preservation of mitochondrial function by IP may occur during reperfusion rather than during the sustained ischemic period.

  8. Monitoring the fractionation of a whey protein isolate during dead-end membrane filtration using fluorescence and chemometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshereef, Rand; Budman, Hector; Moresoli, Christine; Legge, Raymond L

    2010-01-01

    During membrane-based separation of proteins, changes in protein concentration of the permeate and retentate streams occurs over time. The current work proposes a new approach for monitoring the changes in concentrations of proteins in both permeate and retentate by making use of data collected using fluorescence spectroscopy and intrinsic protein fluorescence analyzed by multivariate statistical techniques. Whey protein isolate consists mainly of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and small proportion of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and was used as a model system in this study. A fiber optic probe (FOP) was used to acquire multiwavelength fluorescence spectra for permeate and retentate streams at different times during UF-based separation of the components from a multicomponent solution. Multivariate regression models were developed for predicting the concentrations of alpha-LA, beta-LG, and BSA by establishing a calibration model between data acquired using the FOP and the corresponding protein concentration levels measured by size-exclusion chromatography. The model was validated using FOP data that were not previously used for calibration of the regression models. This comparison showed that concentrations of alpha-LA, beta-LG, and BSA could be predicted directly from FOP data within reasonable accuracy by making use of multivariate calibration tools. This approach has several attractive features including that it is nondestructive, fast, and relatively simple to perform. This technique has potential practical applications as it could offer the opportunity for in situ monitoring of membrane filtration processes by tracking individual protein transmission and selectivity of fractionation.

  9. Indole prevents Escherichia coli cell division by modulating membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimerel, Catalin; Field, Christopher M; Piñero-Fernandez, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F; Summers, David K

    2012-07-01

    Indole is a bacterial signalling molecule that blocks E. coli cell division at concentrations of 3-5 mM. We have shown that indole is a proton ionophore and that this activity is key to the inhibition of division. By reducing the electrochemical potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, indole deactivates MinCD oscillation and prevents formation of the FtsZ ring that is a prerequisite for division. This is the first example of a natural ionophore regulating a key biological process. Our findings have implications for our understanding of membrane biology, bacterial cell cycle control and potentially for the design of antibiotics that target the cell membrane.

  10. Potential of ultraviolet widefield imaging and multiphoton microscopy for analysis of dehydroergosterol in cellular membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Dehydroergosterol (DHE) is an intrinsically fluorescent sterol with absorption/emission in the ultraviolet (UV) region and biophysical properties similar to those of cholesterol. We compared the potential of UV-sensitive low-light-level wide-field (UV-WF) imaging with that of multiphoton (MP...... found that the lateral resolution of MP microscopy is ∼1.5-fold higher than that of UV-WF deconvolution microscopy, allowing for improved spatiotemporal analysis of plasma membrane sterol distribution. Surface intensity patterns of DHE with a diameter of 0.2 μm persisting over several minutes could...

  11. Use of fluorescent probes to follow membrane traffic in nerve terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guatimosim C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical tracers in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy have become widely used to follow the movement of synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals. The present review discusses the use of these optical methods to understand the regulation of exocytosis and endocytosis of synaptic vesicles. The maintenance of neurotransmission depends on the constant recycling of synaptic vesicles and important insights have been gained by visualization of vesicles with the vital dye FM1-43. A number of questions related to the control of recycling of synaptic vesicles by prolonged stimulation and the role of calcium to control membrane internalization are now being addressed. It is expected that optical monitoring of presynaptic activity coupled to appropriate genetic models will contribute to the understanding of membrane traffic in synaptic terminals.

  12. Spatiotemporal analysis of endocytosis and membrane distribution of fluorescent sterols in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Faergeman, Nils J

    2008-01-01

    Distribution and dynamics of cholesterol in the plasma membrane as well as internalization pathways for sterol from the cell surface are of great cell biological interest. Here, UV-sensitive wide field microscopy of the intrinsically fluorescent sterols, dehydroergosterol (DHE) and cholestatrienol...... (CTL) combined with advanced image analysis were used to study spatiotemporal sterol distribution in living macrophages, adipocytes and fibroblasts. Sterol endocytosis was directly visualized by time-lapse imaging and noise-robust tracking revealing confined motion of DHE containing vesicles in close...... proximity to the cell membrane. Spatial surface intensity patterns of DHE as well as that of the lipid marker DiIC12 being assessed by statistical image analysis persisted over several minutes in cells having a constant overall curvature. Sites of sterol endocytosis appeared indistinguishable from other...

  13. High-temperature membrane reactors: potential and problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saracco, G.; Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The most recent literature in the field of membrane reactors is reviewed, four years after an analogous effort of ours (Saracco et al., 1994), describing shortly the potentials of these reactors, which now seem to be well established, and focusing mostly on problems towards practical exploitation. S

  14. High-temperature membrane reactors : potential and problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saracco, G.; Neomagus, H.W.J.P.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1999-01-01

    The most recent literature in the field of membrane reactors is reviewed, four years after an analogous effort of ours, describing shortly the potentials of these reactors, which now seem to be well established, and focusing mostly on problems towards practical exploitation. Since then, progress has

  15. Potential applications of electron emission membranes in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilevych, Yevgen [Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration (IZM), Berlin (Germany); University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Brunner, Stefan E. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Chan, Hong Wah; Charbon, Edoardo [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Graaf, Harry van der, E-mail: vdgraaf@nikhef.nl [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hagen, Cornelis W. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nützel, Gert; Pinto, Serge D. [Photonis, Roden (Netherlands); Prodanović, Violeta [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Rotman, Daan [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Santagata, Fabio [State Key Lab for Solid State Lighti Changzhou base, F7 R& D HUB 1, Science and Education Town, Changzhou 213161, Jangsu Province (China); Sarro, Lina; Schaart, Dennis R. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Sinsheimer, John; Smedley, John [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Tao, Shuxia; Theulings, Anne M.M.G. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-11

    With a miniaturised stack of transmission dynodes, a noise free amplifier is being developed for the detection of single free electrons, with excellent time- and 2D spatial resolution and efficiency. With this generic technology, a new family of detectors for individual elementary particles may become possible. Potential applications of such electron emission membranes in medicine are discussed.

  16. Membrane order parameters for interdigitated lipid bilayers measured via polarized total-internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, An T; Jakubek, Zygmunt J; Lu, Zhengfang; Joós, Béla; Morris, Catherine E; Johnston, Linda J

    2014-11-01

    Incorporating ethanol in lipid membranes leads to changes in bilayer structure, including the formation of an interdigitated phase. We have used polarized total-internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy (pTIRFM) to measure the order parameter for Texas Red DHPE incorporated in the ethanol-induced interdigitated phase (LβI) formed from ternary lipid mixtures comprising dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and egg sphingomyelin or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. These lipid mixtures have 3 co-existing phases in the presence of ethanol: liquid-ordered, liquid-disordered and LβI. pTIRFM using Texas Red DHPE shows a reversal in fluorescence contrast between the LβI phase and the surrounding disordered phase with changes in the polarization angle. The contrast reversal is due to changes in the orientation of the dye, and provides a rapid method to identify the LβI phase. The measured order parameters for the LβI phase are consistent with a highly ordered membrane environment, similar to a gel phase. An acyl-chain labeled BODIPY-FL-PC was also tested for pTIRFM studies of ethanol-treated bilayers; however, this probe is less useful since the order parameters of the interdigitated phase are consistent with orientations that are close to random, either due to local membrane disorder or to a mixture of extended and looping conformations in which the fluorophore is localized in the polar headgroup region of the bilayer. In summary, we demonstrate that order parameter measurements via pTIRFM using Texas Red-DHPE can rapidly identify the interdigitated phase in supported bilayers. We anticipate that this technique will aid further research in the effects of alcohols and other additives on membranes.

  17. Biochemical characterization and cellular imaging of a novel, membrane permeable fluorescent cAMP analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaccolo Manuela

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel fluorescent cAMP analog (8-[Pharos-575]- adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate was characterized with respect to its spectral properties, its ability to bind to and activate three main isoenzymes of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA-Iα, PKA-IIα, PKA-IIβ in vitro, its stability towards phosphodiesterase and its ability to permeate into cultured eukaryotic cells using resonance energy transfer based indicators, and conventional fluorescence imaging. Results The Pharos fluorophore is characterized by a Stokes shift of 42 nm with an absorption maximum at 575 nm and the emission peaking at 617 nm. The quantum yield is 30%. Incubation of the compound to RIIα and RIIβ subunits increases the amplitude of excitation and absorption maxima significantly; no major change was observed with RIα. In vitro binding of the compound to RIα subunit and activation of the PKA-Iα holoenzyme was essentially equivalent to cAMP; RII subunits bound the fluorescent analog up to ten times less efficiently, resulting in about two times reduced apparent activation constants of the holoenzymes compared to cAMP. The cellular uptake of the fluorescent analog was investigated by cAMP indicators. It was estimated that about 7 μM of the fluorescent cAMP analog is available to the indicator after one hour of incubation and that about 600 μM of the compound had to be added to intact cells to half-maximally dissociate a PKA type IIα sensor. Conclusion The novel analog combines good membrane permeability- comparable to 8-Br-cAMP – with superior spectral properties of a modern, red-shifted fluorophore. GFP-tagged regulatory subunits of PKA and the analog co-localized. Furthermore, it is a potent, PDE-resistant activator of PKA-I and -II, suitable for in vitro applications and spatial distribution evaluations in living cells.

  18. Potential Applications of Zeolite Membranes in Reaction Coupling Separation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunde V. Ojumu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Future production of chemicals (e.g., fine and specialty chemicals in industry is faced with the challenge of limited material and energy resources. However, process intensification might play a significant role in alleviating this problem. A vision of process intensification through multifunctional reactors has stimulated research on membrane-based reactive separation processes, in which membrane separation and catalytic reaction occur simultaneously in one unit. These processes are rather attractive applications because they are potentially compact, less capital intensive, and have lower processing costs than traditional processes. Therefore this review discusses the progress and potential applications that have occurred in the field of zeolite membrane reactors during the last few years. The aim of this article is to update researchers in the field of process intensification and also provoke their thoughts on further research efforts to explore and exploit the potential applications of zeolite membrane reactors in industry. Further evaluation of this technology for industrial acceptability is essential in this regard. Therefore, studies such as techno-economical feasibility, optimization and scale-up are of the utmost importance.

  19. Potential Applications of Zeolite Membranes in Reaction Coupling Separation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daramola, Michael O.; Aransiola, Elizabeth F.; Ojumu, Tunde V.

    2012-01-01

    Future production of chemicals (e.g., fine and specialty chemicals) in industry is faced with the challenge of limited material and energy resources. However, process intensification might play a significant role in alleviating this problem. A vision of process intensification through multifunctional reactors has stimulated research on membrane-based reactive separation processes, in which membrane separation and catalytic reaction occur simultaneously in one unit. These processes are rather attractive applications because they are potentially compact, less capital intensive, and have lower processing costs than traditional processes. Therefore this review discusses the progress and potential applications that have occurred in the field of zeolite membrane reactors during the last few years. The aim of this article is to update researchers in the field of process intensification and also provoke their thoughts on further research efforts to explore and exploit the potential applications of zeolite membrane reactors in industry. Further evaluation of this technology for industrial acceptability is essential in this regard. Therefore, studies such as techno-economical feasibility, optimization and scale-up are of the utmost importance.

  20. Determination of cadmium in tobacco by solid surface fluorescence using nylon membranes coated with carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolina Talio, María; Alesso, Magdalena; Acosta, Mariano; Olsina, Roberto; Fernández, Liliana P

    2013-03-30

    A new methodology based on fluorescent signal enhancement of o-cresolphthalein (o-CPT) for traces of cadmium determination is proposed. The dye was retained on membrane filters in the presence of a micellar surfactant solution of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). All the experimental variables that influence both the preconcentration procedure and the fluorimetric sensitivity were carefully optimized. The calibration graph using zeroth order regression was linear from 6.5 ng L(-1) to 5.65×10(5) ng L(-1), with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.999. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection and quantification were of 2 ng L(-1) and 6.5 ng L(-1). respectively. The proposed method showed good sensitivity and selectivity, with good tolerance to foreign ions, and it was applied to the determination of trace amounts of cadmium in leachate from cigarettes' tobacco samples with satisfactory results. The trueness of the recommended procedure was assessed through parallel analysis of the samples with electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. This methodology represents an innovative and attractive application of membrane filters that enables metal traces determination by solid surface fluorescence.

  1. Conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps in India and Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, A.; Martino Jannuzzi, G. de (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia)

    1989-07-01

    We evaluate the conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) for managing the rapidly increasing electrical energy and peak demand in India and Brazil. Using very conservative assumptions, we find that the cost of conserved energy using 16 W CFLs is 4 and 6 times less than the long range marginal cost of electricity for the two countries. The cost of avoided peak installed capacity is 6 and 9.5 times less than the cost of new installed capacity for India and Brazil. The analysis is undertaken from the three separate perspectives of the national economies, the consumers, and the utilities. We find that because residential electricity is subsidized, the consumers have little or no incentive to purchase and install the CFLs, unless they too are subsidized. However, the benefits of CFL installation to the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility in almost all cases. As an illustration of a gradual introduction strategy for CFLs, we calculate a scenario where national savings of the order of US $1.2 million per day for India and US $2.5 million per day for Brazil are reached in 10 years by a small and gradual transfer of subsidy from residential electricity to CFLs. We then explore the barriers to immediate large scale introduction of these lamps in the two countries. Specific technical and marketing problems are identified and discussed, which would require solution before such an introduction can be attempted. Lastly, we discuss the range of policy instruments, in addition to a subsidy scheme, that can be used for promoting the diffusion of these lamps in the domestic and commercial sector. 47 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Interactions of a non-fluorescent fluoroquinolone with biological membrane models: A multi-technique approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Carla F; Ferreira, Mariana; Abreu, Bárbara; Medforth, Craig J; Gameiro, Paula

    2015-11-30

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics which act by penetrating into bacterial cells and inhibiting enzymes related to DNA replication, and metal complexes of these drugs have recently been investigated as one approach to counteracting bacterial resistance. In this work, we apply a multi-technique approach to studying the partition coefficient (Kp) for the non-fluorescent third-generation fluoroquinolone sparfloxacin or its copper-complex with lipid membrane models of Gram-negative bacteria. The techniques investigated are UV-vis absorption and (19)F NMR spectroscopies together with quenching of a fluorescent probe present in the lipids (using steady-state and time-resolved methods). (19)F NMR spectroscopy has previously been used to determine the Kp values of fluorinated drugs but in the case of sparfloxacin did not yield useful data. However, similar Kp values for sparfloxacin or its copper-complex were obtained for the absorption and fluorescence quenching methods confirming the usefulness of a multi-technique approach. The Kp values measured for sparfloxacin were significantly higher than those found for other fluoroquinolones. In addition, similar Kp values were found for sparfloxacin and copper-complex suggesting that in contrast to other fluoroquinolones hydrophobic diffusion occurs readily for both of these molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Adsorbed Protein on the Hydraulic Permeability, Membrane and Streaming Potential Values Measured across a Microporous Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1998-01-01

    different experimental conditions may be attributed to different mechanisms for the adsorption of proteins in the membrane: (i) a protein deposition on the membrane pores; () an adsorbed layer of protein on the membrane surface. In this latter case, the whole membrane system can be considered......The effect of the adsorption of a protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), on the membrane potential, flux reduction and streaming potential measured across a microporous polysulphone membrane with different NaCl solutions and pH values is studied. From electrokinetic phenomena, information about...

  4. Control of a redox reaction on lipid bilayer surfaces by membrane dipole potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakoskela, J I; Kinnunen, P K

    2001-01-01

    Nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD) group is a widely used, environment-sensitive fluorescent probe. The negatively charged dithionite rapidly reduces the accessible NBD-labeled lipids in liposomes to their corresponding nonfluorescent derivatives. In this study both the phospholipid headgroup and acyl chain NBD-labeled L-alpha-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-[N-(4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole)-ethanolamine] (DPPN) and 1-acyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-PC), respectively, were employed. The correlation of both the rate coefficient k(1) of the redox reaction and the fluorescence properties of the two probes with the membrane dipole potential Psi in fluid dipalmitoylglycerophosphocholine (DPPC) liposomes is demonstrated. When Psi of the bilayer was varied (decreased by phloretin or increased by 6-ketocholestanol), the value for k1 decreased for both DPPN and NBD-PC with increasing Psi. For both fluorophores a positive correlation to Psi was evident for the relative fluorescence emission intensity (RFI, normalized to the emission of the fluorophore in a DPPC matrix). The relative changes in emission intensity as a function of Psi were approximately equal for both NBD derivatives. Changes similar to those caused by phloretin were seen when dihexadecylglycerophosphocholine (DHPC) was added to DPPC liposomes, in keeping with the lower dipole potential for the former lipid compound compared with DPPC. These effects of Psi on NBD fluorescence should be taken into account when interpreting data acquired using NBD-labeled lipids as fluorescent probes.

  5. Measurement of individual intracellular pH and membrane potential values in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavik, Jan; Lanz, Edvard; Cimprich, Petr

    1999-07-01

    It was assumed that each cell is a homogeneous suspension may have a slightly different pH and membrane potential. A wide range of pH-sensitive fluorescent dyes BCECF, SNARF, FITC, carboxyfluorescein, fluorescein and pyranine have been carefully tested for the accuracy and reliability of their pH-response inside living cells. The intracellular milieu was simulated by a series of mineral buffers with addition of proteins. The pH values have been determined from the excitation ratios 490/435 nm for BCECF, FITC, carboxyfluorescein and fluorescein, and 450/400 nm for pyranine, emission ratios 518/529 nm for BCECF and 635/590 nm for SNARF. The spectrally determined values were then compared with the pH values of buffers measured by a glass electrode. Using the data from the calibration procedure, we evaluated individual intracellular pH values of a large number of cells within one cell population. The confocal ratio fluorescence microscopy revealed pH maps from which both cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH values could be determine, flow cytometry gave enormous amount of average intracellular pH values of individual cells of a whole cell population. Each cell population exhibited significant differences in both cytoplasmic pH values among individual cells. The pH distribution of a typical cell population appeared to fit a Gaussian curve. In yeast it was a Gaussian curve with half- width values around 0.4 pH unit. The men pH values depended on the growth phase, H-ATPase activity and external pH values. The preliminary result with the new membrane potential dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester indicated that similarly to pH values, there is a heterogeneity in membrane potential values among cell sin one cell population. The data presented above suggest that each ell behaves as an individual with an individual set up of its metabolism. This 'fine tuning' of the metabolism result in slightly higher or lower pH or membrane potential values that can be detected by fluorescence

  6. Fluorescent enhancement of bio-synthesized X-Zn-ferrite-bismuth ferrite (X = Mg, Mn or Ni) membranes: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liang; Li, Hai-long; Dong, Hai-liang; Dong, Fa-qin; Song, Mian-xin; Wang, Li-sheng; Zhou, Tian-liang; Li, Wei-min; Hou, Wen-ping; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Lu, Xi-rui; Li, Xin-Xi; Xie, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Large areas of high-photostability fluorescent X-Zn-ferrite (XZn)Fe2O4 (X = Mg, Mn or Ni) nanoparticles embedded in a bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) membrane were successfully fabricated via a facile bio-approach using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The results revealed that the perovskite BiFeO3 enhances the fluorescent intensity (at 635 and 795 nm) and surface potential difference (14 meV and -40 meV) of the embedded spinel (XZn)Fe2O4. This mechanism is attributed to the interfacial coupling of the Fesbnd Osbnd Osbnd Bi and Fesbnd Osbnd Fe interfaces. Such a system could open up new ideas in the design of environmentally friendly fluorescent sensors for water environments.

  7. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  8. Presence of Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticles in Baked Lamb: Their Properties and Potential Application for Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Xie, Yisha; Liu, Shan; Cong, Shuang; Song, Yukun; Xu, Xianbing; Tan, Mingqian

    2017-08-30

    The presence of nanoparticles in food has drawn much attention in recent years. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles are a new class of nanostructures; however, the distribution and physicochemical properties of such nanoparticles in food remain unclear. Herein, the presence of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles in baked lamb was confirmed, and their physicochemical properties were investigated. The fluorescent carbon nanoparticles from baked lamb emit strong blue fluorescence under ultraviolet light with a 10% fluorescent quantum yield. The nanoparticles are roughly spherical in appearance with a diameter of around 2.0 nm. Hydroxyl, amino, and carboxyl groups exist on the surface of nanoparticles. In addition, the nanoparticles could serve as a fluorescence sensor for glucose detection through an oxidation-reduction reaction. This work is the first report on fluorescent carbon nanoparticles present in baked lamb, which provides valuable insight into the physicochemical properties of such nanoparticles and their potential application in sensors.

  9. Absorption and fluorescence lineshape theory for polynomial potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anda, Andre; De Vico, Luca; Hansen, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    and fluorescence spectra. The first method, which constructs vibrational wave functions as linear combinations of the harmonic oscillator wave functions, is shown to be extremely robust and can handle large anharmonicities. The second method uses the cumulant expansion, which is readily solved, even at high orders...

  10. Monitoring Biophysical Properties of Lipid Membranes by Environment-Sensitive Fluorescent Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Demchenko, Alexander P.; Mély, Yves; Duportail, Guy; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2009-01-01

    We review the main trends in the development of fluorescence probes to obtain information about the structure, dynamics, and interactions in biomembranes. These probes are efficient for studying the microscopic analogs of viscosity, polarity, and hydration, as well as the molecular order, environment relaxation, and electrostatic potentials at the sites of their location. Progress is being made in increasing the information content and spatial resolution of the probe responses. Multichannel e...

  11. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M.; Richens, Joanna L.; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G.; Winlove, C. Peter; O’Shea, Paul

    2015-01-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent memb...

  12. Fluorescent probes sensitive to changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posokhov, Yevgen

    2016-09-01

    Environment-sensitive fluorescent probes were used for the spectroscopic visualization of pathological changes in human platelet membranes during cerebral atherosclerosis. It has been estimated that the ratiometric probes 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole and 2-phenyl-phenanthr[9,10]oxazole can detect changes in the cholesterol-to-phospholipids molar ratio in human platelet membranes during the disease.

  13. Assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential in proximal tubules after hypoxia-reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldkamp, Thorsten; Kribben, Andreas; Weinberg, Joel M

    2005-06-01

    Proximal tubules develop a severe energetic deficit during hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) that previous studies using fluorescent potentiometric probes have suggested is characterized by sustained, partial mitochondrial deenergization. To validate the primary occurrence of mitochondrial deenergization in the process, optimize approaches for estimating changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) in the system, and clarify the mechanisms for the defect, we further investigated the behavior of 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazocarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) in these cells and introduce a more dynamic and quantitative approach employing safranin O for use with the tubule system. Although use of JC-1 can be complicated by decreases in the plasma membrane potential that limit cellular uptake of JC-1 and such behavior was demonstrated in ouabain-treated tubules, changes in DeltaPsim entirely accounted for the decreases in the formation of red fluorescent JC-1 aggregates and in the ratio of red/green fluorescence observed after H/R. The red JC-1 aggregates did not readily dissociate when tubules were deenergized after JC-1 uptake, making it unsuitable for dynamic studies of energization. Safranin O uptake by digitonin-permeabilized tubules required very small numbers of tubules, permitted measurements of DeltaPsim for relatively prolonged periods after the end of the experimental maneuvers, was rapidly reversible during deenergization, and allowed for direct assessment of both substrate-dependent, electron transport-mediated DeltaPsim, and ATP hydrolysis-supported DeltaPsim. Both types of energization measured using safranin O in tubules permeabilized after H/R were impaired, but combining substrates and ATP substantially restored DeltaPsim.

  14. The Amniotic Membrane: Development and Potential Applications - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaron, P O; Carvalho, R C; Borghesi, J; Anunciação, A R A; Miglino, M A

    2015-12-01

    Foetal membranes are essential tissues for embryonic development, playing important roles related to protection, breathing, nutrition and excretion. The amnion is the innermost extraembryonic membrane, which surrounds the foetus, forming an amniotic sac that contains the amniotic fluid (AF). In recent years, the amniotic membrane has emerged as a potential tool for clinical applications and has been primarily used in medicine in order to stimulate the healing of skin and corneal diseases. It has also been used in vaginal reconstructive surgery, repair of abdominal hernia, prevention of surgical adhesions and pericardium closure. More recently, it has been used in regenerative medicine because the amniotic-derived stem cells as well as AF-derived cells exhibit cellular plasticity, angiogenic, cytoprotective, immunosuppressive properties, antitumoural potential and the ability to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. These features make them a promising source of stem cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering. In this review, we discussed the development of the amnion, AF and amniotic cavity in different species, as well as the applicability of stem cells from the amnion and AF in cellular therapy.

  15. Imaging cellular membrane potential through ionization of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J.; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J.; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A.; Erickson, Jeffrey S.; Efros, Alexander L.; Huston, Alan L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in quantum dots (QDs) stems from the plethora of potential applications that arises from their tunable absorption and emission profiles, high absorption cross sections, resistance to photobleaching, functionalizable surfaces, and physical robustness. The emergent use of QDs in biological imaging exploits these and other intrinsic properties. For example, quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), which describes changes in the photoluminescence (PL) of QDs driven by the application of an electric field, provides an inherent means of detecting changes in electric fields by monitoring QD emission and thus points to a ready mean of imaging membrane potential (and action potentials) in electrically active cells. Here we examine the changing PL of various QDs subjected to electric fields comparable to those found across a cellular membrane. By pairing static and timeresolved PL measurements, we attempt to understand the mechanism driving electric-field-induced PL quenching and ultimately conclude that ionization plays a substantial role in initiating PL changes in systems where QCSE has traditionally been credited. Expanding on these findings, we explore the rapidity of response of the QD PL to applied electric fields and demonstrate changes amply able to capture the millisecond timescale of cellular action potentials.

  16. A theory for the membrane potential of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Endresen, L P; Endresen, Lars Petter; Hall, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    We give an explicit formula for the membrane potential of cells in terms of the intracellular and extracellular ionic concentrations, and derive equations for the ionic currents that flow through channels, exchangers and electrogenic pumps based on simple energy considerations and conservation laws. We demonstrate that the work done by the pump is equal to the potential energy of the cell plus the energy loss due to the downhill ionic fluxes through the channels and the exchanger. Our equations predict osmotic pressure variations. The theory is illustrated in a simple model of spontaneously active cells in the cardiac pacemaker. The simulated action potential and the five currents in the model are in excellent agreement with experiments. The model predicts the experimental observed intracellular ionic concentration of potassium, calcium and sodium. We do not see any drift of the values for the concentrations in a long time simulation, instead we can obtain the same asymptotic values starting with equal intrac...

  17. Polymeric membrane systems of potential use for battery separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Two membrane systems were investigated that may have potential use as alkaline battery separators. One system comprises two miscible polymers: a support polymer (e.g., polyvinyl formal) and an ion conductor such as polyacrylic acid. The other system involves a film composed of two immiscible polymers: a conducting polymer (e.g., calcium polyacrylate) suspended in an inert polymer support matrix, polyphenylene oxide. Resistivities in 45-percent potassium hydroxide and qualitative mechanical properties are presented for films comprising various proportions of conducting and support polymers. In terms of these parameters, the results are encouraging for optimum ratios of conducting to support polymers.

  18. Indole prevents Escherichia coli cell division by modulating membrane potential

    OpenAIRE

    Chimerel, Catalin; Field, Christopher M.; Piñero-Fernandez, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Summers, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Indole is a bacterial signalling molecule that blocks E. coli cell division at concentrations of 3–5 mM. We have shown that indole is a proton ionophore and that this activity is key to the inhibition of division. By reducing the electrochemical potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, indole deactivates MinCD oscillation and prevents formation of the FtsZ ring that is a prerequisite for division. This is the first example of a natural ionophore regulating a key biological proces...

  19. Polyethylenimine-mediated impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Karina; Malinska, Dominika; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    The 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI) is a highly efficient synthetic polycation used in transfection protocols, but also triggers mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic cell death processes where the mechanistic issues are poorly understood. We now demonstrate that PEI in a concentration- and time......-dependent manner can affect functions (membrane potential, swelling and respiration) and ultrastructural integrity of freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria. The threshold concentration for detection of PEI-mediated impairment of rat liver mitochondrial functions is 3 µg/mL, however, lower PEI levels still exert...... some effects on mitochondrial morphology and respiration, and these may be related to the inherent membrane perturbing properties of this polycation. The PEI-mediated mitochondrial swelling phase is biphasic, with a fast decaying initial period (most prominent from 4 µg/mL PEI) followed by a slower...

  20. Longitudinal diffusion behavior of hemicyanine dyes across phospholipid vesicle membranes as studied by second-harmonic generation and fluorescence spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Nakano, Masaki; Nochi, Kimihisa; Yamashita, Tomohisa; Morita, Kotaro; Teramae, Norio

    2006-10-01

    The adsorption and longitudinal diffusion behaviors of a series of hemicyanine dyes to phospholipid vesicle membranes were studied by second-harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence spectroscopies. It was observed that the longitudinal diffusion of cationic hemicyanine dyes takes place immediately after the initial adsorption of these dyes to the outer surface of the vesicle membrane. In contrast, hardly any amount of a zwitterionic hemicyanine dye with a sulfonate group diffused across the vesicle membrane within the measurement time (<2000 s). Based on the difference in the time-course responses of SHG and fluorescence spectroscopies for all of the hemicyanine dyes tested, we propose that hydration of the sulfonate group is mainly responsible for the low diffusivity of the zwitterionic hemicyanine dye.

  1. Potential of protoporphyrin IX and metal derivatives for single molecule fluorescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Yi; Geissinger, Peter [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3210 N. Cramer Street, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Woehl, Joerg C., E-mail: woehl@uwm.ed [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3210 N. Cramer Street, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Metalloporphyrins are cofactors of a variety of proteins, and are often used as spectroscopic probes of the active site. Many high resolution techniques, such as single molecule spectroscopy, are based on fluorescence contrast and require the replacement of the native metalloporphyrin by a fluorescent analog. We have investigated the potential of several fluorescent analogs of heme, namely free-base protoporphyrin IX and its metal derivatives containing Zn, Sn, and Mg, for single molecule fluorescence studies by determining their room-temperature molecular absorption cross sections and fluorescence quantum yields. According to these data, free-base protoporphyrin IX and its Zn derivative, which have the highest fluorescence quantum yields, are the most suitable heme analogs for single molecule fluorescence studies. - Research highlights: Protoporphyrin IX and fluorescent metal derivatives for single molecule detection. Measurement of room temperature absorption cross sections for Q bands. Measurement of room temperature fluorescence quantum yields for Q bands. PPIX and Zn derivative have highest quantum yields for lowest-energy transition.

  2. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-02-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  3. B-Spline potential function for maximum a-posteriori image reconstruction in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Dilipkumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An iterative image reconstruction technique employing B-Spline potential function in a Bayesian framework is proposed for fluorescence microscopy images. B-splines are piecewise polynomials with smooth transition, compact support and are the shortest polynomial splines. Incorporation of the B-spline potential function in the maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction technique resulted in improved contrast, enhanced resolution and substantial background reduction. The proposed technique is validated on simulated data as well as on the images acquired from fluorescence microscopes (widefield, confocal laser scanning fluorescence and super-resolution 4Pi microscopy. A comparative study of the proposed technique with the state-of-art maximum likelihood (ML and maximum-a-posteriori (MAP with quadratic potential function shows its superiority over the others. B-Spline MAP technique can find applications in several imaging modalities of fluorescence microscopy like selective plane illumination microscopy, localization microscopy and STED.

  4. STED microscopy detects and quantifies liquid phase separation in lipid membranes using a new far-red emitting fluorescent phosphoglycerolipid analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Hell, Stefan W; Eggeling, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a bright, photostable, and far-red emitting fluorescent phosphoglycerolipid analogue to probe diffusion characteristics of lipids in membranes. The lipid analogue consists of a saturated (C18) phosphoethanolamine and a hydrophilic far-red emitting fluorescent dye (KK114) that is tethered to the head group by a long polyethylenglycol linker. In contrast to reported far-red emitting fluorescent lipid analogues, this one partitions predominantly into liquid ordered domains of phase-separated ternary bilayers. We performed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with a super-resolution STED microscope (STED-FCS) to measure the lateral diffusion of the new lipid analogue in the liquid ordered (Lo) and disordered (Ld) phase. On a mica support, we observed micrometer large phases and found that the lipid analogue diffuses freely on all tested spatial scales (40-250 nm) in both the Ld and Lo phase with diffusion coefficients of 1.8 microm2 s(-1) and 0.7 microm2 s(-1) respectively. This indicates that the tight molecular packing of the Lo phase mainly slows down the diffusion rather than causing anomalous sub-diffusion. The same ternary mixture deposited on acid-cleaned glass forms Lo nanodomains of analogue into the nano-domains, where diffusion is slowed down. Our results suggest that STED-FCS in combination with a Lo-partitioning fluorescent lipid analogue can directly probe the presence of Lo nano-domains, which in the future should allow the study of potential lipid rafts in live-cell membranes.

  5. Application of fluorescently labelled lectins for the study of polysaccharides in biofilms with a focus on biofouling of nanofiltration membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Di Martino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The biofilm state is the dominant microbial lifestyle in nature. A biofilm can be defined as cells organised as microcolonies embedded in an organic polymer matrix of microbial origin living at an interface between two different liquids, air and liquid, or solid and liquid. The biofilm matrix is made of extracellular polymeric substances, polysaccharides being considered as the major structural components of the matrix. Fluorescently labelled lectins have been widely used to stain microbial extracellular glycoconjugates in natural and artificial environments, and to study specific bacterial species or highly complex environments. Biofilm development at the membrane surface conducting to biofouling is one of the major problems encountered during drinking water production by filtration. Biofouling affects the durability and effectiveness of filtration membranes. Biofouling can be reduced by pretreatments in order to control two key parameters of water, the bioavailable organic matter concentration and the concentration of live bacteria. Nanofiltration (NF is a high technology process particularly suited to the treatment of surface waters to produce drinking water that is highly sensitive to biofouling. The development of strategies for fouling prevention and control requires characterizing the fouling material composition and organisation before and after NF membrane cleaning. The aim of this review is to present basics of biofilm analyses after staining with fluorescently labelled lectins and to focus on the use of fluorescent lectins and confocal laser scanning microscopy to analyse NF membrane biofouling.

  6. The association of defensin HNP-2 with negatively charged membranes: A combined fluorescence and linear dichroism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridmore, Catherine J; Rodger, Alison; Sanderson, John M

    2016-04-01

    The association of defensin HNP-2 with negatively charged membranes has been studied using a new approach that combines fluorescence and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopies with simulated LD spectra in order to characterise the binding kinetics and bound configurations of the peptide. Binding to membranes composed of mixtures of diacylglycerophosphocholines (PC) with either diacylglycerophosphoglycerol (PG) or diacylglycerophosphoserine (PS) was conducted at lipid:peptide ratios that yielded binding, but not membrane fusion. HNP-2 association with membranes under these conditions was a 2 stage-process, with both stages exhibiting first order kinetics. The fast initial step, with a half-life of 3 min. Conversion between the states was estimated to have an enthalpy of activation of approximately 10 kJ mol(-1) and an entropy of activation of -0.2 kJ K mol(-1). LD spectra corresponding to each of the membrane bound states were generated by non-linear regression using a standard kinetic model. These spectra are interpreted in comparison with spectra calculated using the program Dichrocalc and reveal that the peptide associates with membranes in a small number of stable configurations. All of these configurations have a significant proportion of β-sheet structure residing in the plane of the membrane. Two configurations support structures previously proposed for defensins in membranes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Potential of α-Spinasterol to Mimic the Membrane Properties of Natural Cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralampiev, Ivan; Scheidt, Holger A; Huster, Daniel; Müller, Peter

    2017-08-22

    Sterols play a unique role for the structural and dynamical organization of membranes. The current study reports data on the membrane properties of the phytosterol (3β,5α,22E)-stigmasta-7,22-dien-3-β-ol (α-spinasterol), which represents an important component of argan oil and have not been investigated so far in molecular detail. In particular, the impact of α-spinasterol on the structure and organization of lipid membranes was investigated and compared with those of cholesterol. Various membrane parameters such as the molecular packing of the phospholipid fatty acyl chains, the membrane permeability toward polar molecules, and the formation of lateral membrane domains were studied. The experiments were performed on lipid vesicles using methods of NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. The results show that α-spinasterol resembles the membrane behavior of cholesterol to some degree.

  8. Synchronization modulation of Na/K pump molecules can hyperpolarize the membrane resting potential in intact fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Dando, Robin

    2007-02-01

    Previously, we have theoretically studied the possibility of electrical rhythmic entrainment of carrier-mediated ion transporters, and experimentally realized synchronization and acceleration of the Na/K pumping rate in the cell membrane of skeletal muscle fibers by a specially designed synchronization modulation electric field. In these studies we either used cut fibers under a voltage clamp or intact fibers, but in the presence of ion channels blockers. A question remained as to whether the field-induced activation observed in the pump molecules could effectively increase the intracellular ionic concentration and the membrane potential at physiological conditions. In this paper, we studied the effects of the field on intact fibers without any channel blockers. We monitored the field-induced changes in the ionic concentration gradient across the cell membrane and the membrane potential non-invasively by using a fluorescent probe and confocal microscopic imaging techniques. The results clearly show that the entrainment of the pump molecules by the synchronization modulation electric field can effectively increase the ionic concentration gradient, and hence, hyperpolarize the membrane potential.

  9. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  10. Fluorescence response of hypocrellin B to the environmental changes in a mimic biological membrane--liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Xuanye; ZHAO; Yuewei; XIE; Jie; ZHAO; Jingquan

    2004-01-01

    [1]Diwu, Z. J., Novel therapeutic and diagnostic application of hypocrellins and hypericins Photochem, Photobiol., 1995, 61(6):529-539.[2]Zhang, Z. Y., Wang, N. H., EPR studies of singlet oxygen and free radicals generated during photosensitization of hypocrellin B,Free Radical Biol. Med., 1993 14: 1-9.[3]Chowdhury, P. K., Das, K., Datta, A. et al., A comparison of the excited-state processes of nearly symmetrical perylene quinones:hypocrellin A and hypomycin B, J. Photochem. Photobiol. A:Chem., 2002, 154: 107-116.[4]Hudson, J. B., Zhou, J., Chen, J. et al., Hypocrellin, from Hypocrella bambusae, is phototoxic to human immunodeficiency virus, Photochem. Photobiol., 1994, 60: 253-255.[5]Xu, S. J., Chen, S., Zhang, M. H. et al., First synthesis of methylated Hypocrellin and its fluorescent excited state: A cautionary tale, J. Org. Chem., 2003, 68: 2048-2050.[6]Zhang, K. H., Zhang, Z. Y., Molecular thermodynamics of the configuration of perylenequinonoid pigments, Sci. Sin. (B), 1997,27: 357-360.[7]Kawakami, M., Koya, K., Ukai, T. et al., Structure-activity of novel rhodacyanine dyes as antitumor agents, J. Med. Chem.,1998, 41(1): 130-142.[8]Vaupel, P., Kallinowski, F., Okunieff, P., Blood flow, oxygen and nutrient supply, and metabolic microenvironment of human tumors: A review, Cancer Res., 1989, 49: 6449-6465.[9]Patel, A. A., Gawlinski, E. T., Lemieux, S. K. et al., A cellular automaton model of early tumor growth and invasion, J. Theor.Biol., 2001, 213(3): 315-331.[10]Vorpai, E. S., Samtso, M. P., Chalov, V. N. et al., Fluorescence of the polymethine dyes, TIKS and diagnostics of cancer, J. Appl.Spectrosc., 2001, 68(3): 468-472.[11]Zadnia, A., Campbell, R., Sharma, M., The scope of dansyl vs.fluorescein label in fluorescence postlabeling assay for DNA damage, Anal. Biochem., 1994, 218: 444-448.[12]Yu, C. L., Chen, S., Zhang, M. H. et al., Spectroscopic studies and photodynamic actions of hypocrellin B in liposome

  11. Peripheral and integral membrane binding of peptides characterized by time-dependent fluorescence shifts: focus on antimicrobial peptide LAH₄.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháň, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Olšinová, Marie; Cebecauer, Marek; Marquette, Arnaud; Bechinger, Burkhard; Hof, Martin

    2014-06-03

    Positioning of peptides with respect to membranes is an important parameter for biological and biophysical studies using model systems. Our experiments using five different membrane peptides suggest that the time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan can help when distinguishing between peripheral and integral membrane binding and can be a useful, novel tool for studying the impact of transmembrane peptides (TMP) on membrane organization under near-physiological conditions. This article focuses on LAH4, a model α-helical peptide with high antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection efficiencies. The predominantly helical peptide has been shown to orient in supported model membranes parallel to the membrane surface at acidic and, in a transmembrane manner, at basic pH. Here we investigate its interaction with fully hydrated large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) by TDFS and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). TDFS shows that at acidic pH LAH4 does not influence the glycerol region while at basic pH it makes acyl groups at the glycerol level of the membrane less mobile. TDFS experiments with antimicrobial peptides alamethicin and magainin 2, which are known to assume transmembrane and peripheral orientations, respectively, prove that changes in acyl group mobility at the glycerol level correlate with the orientation of membrane-associated peptide molecules. Analogous experiments with the TMPs LW21 and LAT show similar effects on the mobility of those acyl groups as alamethicin and LAH4 at basic pH. FCS, on the same neutral lipid bilayer vesicles, shows that the peripheral binding mode of LAH4 is more efficient in bilayer permeation than the transmembrane mode. In both cases, the addition of LAH4 does not lead to vesicle disintegration. The influence of negatively charged lipids on the bilayer permeation is also addressed.

  12. Membrane dipole potentials, hydration forces, and the ordering of water at membrane surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrisch, K; Ruston, D; Zimmerberg, J; Parsegian, V A; Rand, R P; Fuller, N

    1992-01-01

    We have compared hydration forces, electrical dipole potentials, and structural parameters of dispersions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) to evaluate the influence of fatty acid carbonyl groups on phospholipid bilayers. NMR and x-ray investigations performed over a wide range of water concentrations in the samples show, that in the liquid crystalline lamellar phase, the presence of carbonyl groups is not essential for lipid structure and hydration. Within experimental error, the two lipids have identical repulsive hydration forces between their bilayers. The higher transport rate of the negatively charged tetraphenylboron over the positively charged tetraphenylarsonium indicates that the dipole potential is positive inside the membranes of both lipids. However, the lack of fatty acid carbonyl groups in the ether lipid DHPC decreased the potential by (118 +/- 15) mV. By considering the sign of the potential and the orientation of carbonyl groups and headgroups, we conclude that the first layer of water molecules at the lipid water interface makes a major contribution to the dipole potential. PMID:1600081

  13. Membrane assisted fluidized bed reactors: Potentials and hurdles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, S.A.R.K.; Heinrich, S.; Mörl, L.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of more stable membranes with increased permeance have significantly enhanced the possibilities for integrating membranes into catalytic reactors in order to achieve a major increase in reactor performance by process integration and process intensification. Several

  14. Effects of La3+ on H+ Transmembrane Gradient and Membrane Potential in Rice Seedling Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海雷; 张春光; 赵中秋; 马建华; 李利

    2002-01-01

    The effects of LaCl3 on membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient for rice (Oryza sativa) seedling roots were studied. Highly purified plasma membrane was isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning method. Both the gradient of transmembrane proton and membrane potential were stimulated by certain low concentration of LaCl3 and depressed by high concentration of LaCl3. The optimal concentration of La3+ is around 40~60 μmolL-1 for transmembrane proton gradient and membrane potential. It shows that La3+ can influence the generations and maintenances of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in rice seedling roots.

  15. Effect of adsorption of charged macromolecules on streaming and membrane potential values measured with a microporous polysulfone membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, J.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1997-01-01

    Changes in streaming and membrane potentials measured across a commercial microporous polysulfone membrane as a result of the adsorption of differently charged macromolecules were studied. Measurements were carried out with different NaCl solutions (10(-3) M to 5 x 10(-2) M) and their mixtures...

  16. Probing lipid mobility of raft-exhibiting model membranes by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahya, N; Scherfeld, D; Bacia, K; Poolman, B; Schwille, P

    2003-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) have been employed to investigate the lipid spatial and dynamic organization in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) prepared from ternary mixtures of dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/ cholesterol. For a certain

  17. FLUORESCENCE OVERLAY ANTIGEN MAPPING OF THE EPIDERMAL BASEMENT-MEMBRANE ZONE .2. COLOR FIDELITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, S; DEJONG, MCJM; HEERES, K; WILKINSON, MHF; JONKMAN, MF; VANDERMEER, JB

    In this second report on the fluorescence overlay antigen mapping (FOAM) technique, we highlight some of the errors that may influence faithful color rendition of slide preparations using triple antigen immunofluorescence staining. Reliable interpretation of multicolor fluorescence images requires

  18. In situ observation of the growth of biofouling layer in osmotic membrane bioreactors by multiple fluorescence labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Wang, Xinhua; Tang, Chuyang; Li, Xiufen; Yu, Guanghui

    2015-05-15

    Since the concept of the osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) was introduced in 2008, it has attracted growing interests for its potential applications in wastewater treatment and reclamation; however, the fouling mechanisms of forward osmosis (FO) membrane especially the development of biofouling layer in the OMBR are not yet clear. Here, the fouled FO membranes were obtained from the OMBRs on days 3, 8 and 25 in sequence, and then the structure and growing rule of the biofouling layer formed on the FO membrane samples were in-situ characterized by multiple fluorescence labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM images indicated that the variations in abundance and distribution of polysaccharides, proteins and microorganisms in the biofouling layer during the operation of OMBRs were significantly different. Before the 8th day, their biovolume dramatically increased. Subsequently, the biovolumes of β-d-glucopyranose polysaccharides and proteins continued increasing and leveled off after 8 days, respectively, while the biovolumes of α-d-glucopyranose polysaccharides and microorganisms decreased. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) played a significant role in the formation and growth of biofouling layer, while the microorganisms were seldom detected on the upper fouling layer after 3 days. Based on the results obtained in this study, the growth of biofouling layer on the FO membrane surface in the OMBR could be divided into three stages. Initially, EPS was firstly deposited on the FO membrane surface, and then microorganisms associated with EPS located in the initial depositing layer to form clusters. After that, the dramatic increase of the clusters of EPS and microorganisms resulted in the quick growth of biofouling layer during the flux decline of the OMBR. However, when the water flux became stable in the OMBR, some microorganisms and EPS would be detached from the FO membrane surface.

  19. MitoLoc: A method for the simultaneous quantification of mitochondrial network morphology and membrane potential in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowinckel, Jakob; Hartl, Johannes; Butler, Richard; Ralser, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria assemble into flexible networks. Here we present a simple method for the simultaneous quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential and network morphology that is based on computational co-localisation analysis of differentially imported fluorescent marker proteins. Established in, but not restricted to, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MitoLoc reproducibly measures changes in membrane potential induced by the uncoupling agent CCCP, by oxidative stress, in respiratory deficient cells, and in ∆fzo1, ∆ref2, and ∆dnm1 mutants that possess fission and fusion defects. In combination with super-resolution images, MitoLoc uses 3D reconstruction to calculate six geometrical classifiers which differentiate network morphologies in ∆fzo1, ∆ref2, and ∆dnm1 mutants, under oxidative stress and in cells lacking mtDNA, even when the network is fragmented to a similar extent. We find that mitochondrial fission and a decline in membrane potential do regularly, but not necessarily, co-occur. MitoLoc hence simplifies the measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential in parallel to detect morphological changes in mitochondrial networks. Marker plasmid open-source software as well as the mathematical procedures are made openly available.

  20. [Fluorescence polarization used to investigate the cell membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by pulsed electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zeng, Xin-An; Wen, Qi-Biao; Li, Lin

    2008-01-01

    To know the lethal mechanism of microorganisms under pulsed electric field treatment, the relationship between the inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CICC1308) cell and the permeability and fluidity changes of its cell membrane treated by pulsed electric field (0-25 kV x cm(-1), 0-266 ms) was investigated. With 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) used as a probe, the cell membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by pulsed electric field was expressed by fluorescence polarization. Results showed that the cell membrane fluidity decreases when the electric flied strength is up to 5 kV x cm(-1), and decreases with the increase in electric field strength and treatment time. The plate counting method and ultraviolet spectrophotometer were used to determine the cell viability and to investigate the cell membrane permeability, respectively, treated by pulsed electric field. Results showed that the lethal ratio and the content of protein and nucleic acid leaked from intracellular plasma increased with the increase in the electric field strength and the extension of treatment time. Even in a quite lower electric field of 5 kV x cm(-1) with a tiny microorganism lethal level, the increase in UV absorption value and the decrease in fluidity were significant. It was demonstrated that the cell membrane fluidity decreases with the increase in lethal ratio and cell membrane permeability. The viscosity of cell membrane increases with the decrease in fluidity. These phenomena indicated that cell membrane is one of the most key sites during the pulsed electric field treatment, and the increased membrane permeability and the decreased cell membrane fluidity contribute to the cell death.

  1. Image processing for non-ratiometric measurement of membrane voltage using fluorescent reporters and pulsed laser illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silve, Aude; Rocke, Sarah; Frey, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of transmembrane voltages induced by pulsed electric field exposure can be achieved by using fluorescent dyes like ANNINE-6. Such approach requires a quantitative determination of the fluorescence intensity along the cell's membrane by image processing. When high temporal resolution is required, the illumination source is frequently a dye-laser which causes high fluctuations in the intensity of illumination which in turn affects the fluorescence intensity and thus the quality of the results. We propose an image processing technique that allows to overcome the fluctuations and to produce quantitative data. It uses the optical background noise as a correcting factor. Standard deviation in the fluctuations is thus efficiently reduced by at least a factor of 2.5. Additionally we draw attention to the fact that the parasitic component of the laser radiation (ASE) can also suppress fluctuations although it deteriorates wavelength precision.

  2. Structural features of membrane-bound glucocerebrosidase and α-synuclein probed by neutron reflectometry and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Thai Leong; Jiang, Zhiping; Heinrich, Frank; Gruschus, James M; Pfefferkorn, Candace M; Barros, Marilia; Curtis, Joseph E; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, are a common genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson disease and related disorders, implicating the role of this lysosomal hydrolase in the disease etiology. A specific physical interaction exists between the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (α-syn) and GCase both in solution and on the lipid membrane, resulting in efficient enzyme inhibition. Here, neutron reflectometry was employed as a first direct structural characterization of GCase and α-syn·GCase complex on a sparsely-tethered lipid bilayer, revealing the orientation of the membrane-bound GCase. GCase binds to and partially inserts into the bilayer with its active site most likely lying just above the membrane-water interface. The interaction was further characterized by intrinsic Trp fluorescence, circular dichroism, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Both Trp fluorescence and neutron reflectometry results suggest a rearrangement of loops surrounding the catalytic site, where they extend into the hydrocarbon chain region of the outer leaflet. Taking advantage of contrasting neutron scattering length densities, the use of deuterated α-syn versus protiated GCase showed a large change in the membrane-bound structure of α-syn in the complex. We propose a model of α-syn·GCase on the membrane, providing structural insights into inhibition of GCase by α-syn. The interaction displaces GCase away from the membrane, possibly impeding substrate access and perturbing the active site. GCase greatly alters membrane-bound α-syn, moving helical residues away from the bilayer, which could impact the degradation of α-syn in the lysosome where these two proteins interact.

  3. Structural Features of Membrane-bound Glucocerebrosidase and α-Synuclein Probed by Neutron Reflectometry and Fluorescence Spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Thai Leong; Jiang, Zhiping; Heinrich, Frank; Gruschus, James M.; Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Barros, Marilia; Curtis, Joseph E.; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, are a common genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson disease and related disorders, implicating the role of this lysosomal hydrolase in the disease etiology. A specific physical interaction exists between the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (α-syn) and GCase both in solution and on the lipid membrane, resulting in efficient enzyme inhibition. Here, neutron reflectometry was employed as a first direct structural characterization of GCase and α-syn·GCase complex on a sparsely-tethered lipid bilayer, revealing the orientation of the membrane-bound GCase. GCase binds to and partially inserts into the bilayer with its active site most likely lying just above the membrane-water interface. The interaction was further characterized by intrinsic Trp fluorescence, circular dichroism, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Both Trp fluorescence and neutron reflectometry results suggest a rearrangement of loops surrounding the catalytic site, where they extend into the hydrocarbon chain region of the outer leaflet. Taking advantage of contrasting neutron scattering length densities, the use of deuterated α-syn versus protiated GCase showed a large change in the membrane-bound structure of α-syn in the complex. We propose a model of α-syn·GCase on the membrane, providing structural insights into inhibition of GCase by α-syn. The interaction displaces GCase away from the membrane, possibly impeding substrate access and perturbing the active site. GCase greatly alters membrane-bound α-syn, moving helical residues away from the bilayer, which could impact the degradation of α-syn in the lysosome where these two proteins interact. PMID:25429104

  4. Potential mercury emissions from fluorescent lamps production and obsolescence in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Quanyin; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The use of fluorescent lamps has expanded rapidly all over the world in recent years, because of their energy-saving capability. Consequently, however, mercury emissions from production, breakage, and discard of the lamps are drawing increasing concern from the public. This article focuses on evaluating the amount of mercury used for fluorescent lamp production, as well as the potential mercury emissions during production and breakage, in mainland China. It is expected to provide a comprehensive understanding about the risks present in the mercury from fluorescent lamps, and to know about the impacts of the policies on fluorescent lamps after their implementation. It is estimated that, in 2020, mercury consumption will be about 11.30-15.69 tonnes, a significant reduction of 34.9%-37.4% from that used in 2013, owing to improvement in mercury dosing dosage technology and tighter limitations on mercury content in fluorescent lamps. With these improvements, the amount of mercury remaining in fluorescent lamps and released during production is estimated to be 10.71-14.86 and 0.59-0.83 tonnes, respectively; the mercury released from waste fluorescent lamps is estimated to be about 5.37-7.59 tonnes. Also, a significant reduction to the mercury emission can be expected when a collection and treatment system is well established and conducted in the future.

  5. Expanding the potential of standard flow cytometry by extracting fluorescence lifetimes from cytometric pulse shifts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, Ruofan; Naivar, Mark A; Wilder, Mark; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide information about the fluorescence relaxation, or intensity decay, of organic fluorophores, fluorescent proteins, and other inorganic molecules that fluoresce...

  6. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-12-01

    Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka=1.2×10(4)M(-1)) and binding capacity (n=1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2',7'-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow cytometry analysis of annexin V(-)/7-AAD(+) stained cells demonstrated substantial reduction in live population due to complete loss of cell membrane integrity. Overall the data suggested the formation of butachlor-DNA complex, as an initiating event in butachlor-induced DNA damage. The results elucidated the oxidative role of butachlor in intracellular ROS production, and

  7. Potential National Security Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-06-09

    The objective of this report is to document the initial investigation into the possible research issues related to the development of NRF-based national security applications. The report discusses several potential applications ranging from measuring uranium enrichment in UF6 canisters to characterization of gas samples. While these applications are varied, there are only a few research issues that need to be addressed to understand the limitation of NRF in solving these problems. These research issues range from source and detector development to measuring small samples. The next effort is to determine how best to answer the research issues, followed by a prioritization of those questions to ensure that the most important are addressed. These issues will be addressed through either analytical calculations, computer simulations, analysis of previous data or collection of new measurements. It will also be beneficial to conduct a thorough examination of a couple of the more promising applications in order to develop concrete examples of how NRF may be applied in specific situations. The goals are to develop an understanding of whether the application of NRF is limited by technology or physics in addressing national security applications, to gain a motivation to explore those possible applications, and to develop a research roadmap so that those possibilities may be made reality.

  8. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G; Winlove, C Peter; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent membrane probe, 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[β[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl]vinyl] pyridinium betaine, to investigate whether these effects are connected via influences on the membrane dipole potential (MDP), an intrinsic property of biological membranes previously demonstrated to modulate P-gp activity. α-Tocopherol and its non-free radical-scavenging succinate analog induced similar decreases in the MDP of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. α-Tocopherol succinate also reduced the MDP of T-lymphocytes, subsequently decreasing the binding affinity of saquinavir for P-gp. Additionally, α-tocopherol succinate demonstrated a preference for cholesterol-treated (membrane microdomain enriched) cells over membrane cholesterol-depleted cells. Microdomain disruption via cholesterol depletion decreased saquinavir's affinity for P-gp, potentially implicating these structures in the influence of α-tocopherol succinate on P-gp. This study provides evidence of a microdomain dipole potential-dependent mechanism by which α-tocopherol analogs influence P-gp activity. These findings have implications for the use of α-tocopherol derivatives for drug delivery across biological barriers.

  9. Circadian- and Light-Dependent Regulation of Resting Membrane Potential and Spontaneous Action Potential Firing of Drosophila Circadian Pacemaker Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeba, Vasu; Gu, Huaiyu; Sharma, Vijay K.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Holmes, Todd C

    2007-01-01

    The ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) of adult Drosophila brain express oscillating clock proteins and regulate circadian behavior. Whole cell current-clamp recordings of large LNvs in freshly dissected Drosophila whole brain preparations reveal two spontaneous activity patterns that correlate with two underlying patterns of oscillating membrane potential: tonic and burst firing of sodium-dependent action potentials. Resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing are rapidly ...

  10. Membrane Fouling Potential of Secondary Effluent Organic Matter (EfOM) from Conventional Activated Sludge Process

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Chunhai

    2012-01-01

    Secondary effluent organic matter (EfOM) from a conventional activated sludge process was filtered through constant-pressure dead-end filtration tests with a sequential ultrafiltration (UF, molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of 10k Dalton) and nanofiltration (NF, MWCO of 200 Dalton) array to investigate its membrane fouling potential. Advanced analytical methods including liquid chromatography with online carbon detection (LC-OCD) and fluorescent excitation-emission matrix (F-EEM) were employed for EfOM characterization. EfOM consisted of humic substances and building blocks, low molecular weight (LMW) neutrals, biopolymers (mainly proteins) and hydrophobic organics according to the sequence of their organic carbon fractions. The UF rejected only biopolymers and the NF rejected most humics and building blocks and a significant part of LMW neutrals. Simultaneous occurrence of cake layer and standard blocking during the filtration process of both UF and NF was identified according to constant-pressure filtration equations, which was possibly caused by the heterogeneous nature of EfOM with a wide MW distribution (several ten to several million Dalton). Thus the corresponding two fouling indices (kc for cake layer and ks for standard blocking) from UF and NF could characterize the fouling potential of macromolecular biopolymers and low to intermediate MW organics (including humics, building blocks, LMW neutrals), respectively. Compared with macromolecular biopolymers, low to intermediate MW organics exhibited a much higher fouling potential due to their lower molecular weight and higher concentration.

  11. On calculation of the electrostatic potential of a phosphatidylinositol phosphate-containing phosphatidylcholine lipid membrane accounting for membrane dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Fuller

    Full Text Available Many signaling events require the binding of cytoplasmic proteins to cell membranes by recognition of specific charged lipids, such as phosphoinositol-phosphates. As a model for a protein-membrane binding site, we consider one charged phosphoinositol phosphate (PtdIns(3P embedded in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. As the protein-membrane binding is driven by electrostatic interactions, continuum solvent models require an accurate representation of the electrostatic potential of the phosphoinositol phosphate-containing membrane. We computed and analyzed the electrostatic potentials of snapshots taken at regular intervals from molecular dynamics simulations of the bilayer. We observe considerable variation in the electrostatic potential of the bilayer both along a single simulation and between simulations performed with the GAFF or CHARMM c36 force fields. However, we find that the choice of GAFF or CHARMM c36 parameters has little effect on the electrostatic potential of a given configuration of the bilayer with a PtdIns(3P embedded in it. From our results, we propose a remedian averaging method for calculating the electrostatic potential of a membrane system that is suitable for simulations of protein-membrane binding with a continuum solvent model.

  12. On calculation of the electrostatic potential of a phosphatidylinositol phosphate-containing phosphatidylcholine lipid membrane accounting for membrane dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jonathan C; Martinez, Michael; Wade, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Many signaling events require the binding of cytoplasmic proteins to cell membranes by recognition of specific charged lipids, such as phosphoinositol-phosphates. As a model for a protein-membrane binding site, we consider one charged phosphoinositol phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) embedded in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. As the protein-membrane binding is driven by electrostatic interactions, continuum solvent models require an accurate representation of the electrostatic potential of the phosphoinositol phosphate-containing membrane. We computed and analyzed the electrostatic potentials of snapshots taken at regular intervals from molecular dynamics simulations of the bilayer. We observe considerable variation in the electrostatic potential of the bilayer both along a single simulation and between simulations performed with the GAFF or CHARMM c36 force fields. However, we find that the choice of GAFF or CHARMM c36 parameters has little effect on the electrostatic potential of a given configuration of the bilayer with a PtdIns(3)P embedded in it. From our results, we propose a remedian averaging method for calculating the electrostatic potential of a membrane system that is suitable for simulations of protein-membrane binding with a continuum solvent model.

  13. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a trait involved in organelle inheritance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    Which mitochondria are inherited across generations? Are transmitted mitochondria functionally silenced to preserve the integrity of their genetic information, or rather are those mitochondria with the highest levels of function (as indicated by membrane potential Δψm) preferentially transmitted? Based on observations of the unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria and of the common strictly maternal inheritance mode, I formulate a general hypothesis to explain which mitochondria reach the primordial germ cells (PGCs), and how this happens. Several studies indicate that mitochondrial movements are driven by microtubules and that mitochondria with high Δψm are preferentially transported. This can be applied also to the mitochondria that eventually populate embryonic PGCs, so I propose that Δψm may be a trait that allows for the preferential transmission of the most active (and healthy) mitochondria. The topics discussed here are fundamental in cell biology and genetics but remain controversial and a subject of heated debate; I propose an explanation for how a Δψm-dependent mechanism can cause the observed differences in mitochondrial transmission.

  14. Influence of ester and ether linkage in phospholipids on the environment and dynamics of the membrane interface: a wavelength-selective fluorescence approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumi; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2005-01-04

    We have monitored the environment and dynamics of the membrane interface formed by the ester-linked phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and the ether-linked phospholipid 1,2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) utilizing the wavelength-selective fluorescence approach and using the fluorescent membrane probe 2-(9-anthroyloxy)stearic acid (2-AS). This interfacially localized probe offers a number of advantages over those which lack a fixed location in the membrane. When incorporated in membranes formed by DPPC and DHPC, 2-AS exhibits red edge excitation shift (REES) of 14 and 8 nm, respectively. This implies that the rate of solvent reorientation, as sensed by the interfacial anthroyloxy probe, in ester-linked DPPC membranes is slow compared to the rate of solvent reorientation in ether-linked DHPC membranes. In addition, the fluorescence polarization values of 2-AS are found to be higher in DHPC membranes than in DPPC membranes. This is further supported by wavelength-dependent changes in fluorescence polarization and lifetime. Taken together, these results are useful in understanding the role of interfacial chemistry on membrane physical properties.

  15. Experimental investigation into the transmembrane electrical potential of the forward osmosis membrane process in electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lixia; Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-06-19

    The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP) in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which confirmed the effect of membrane asymmetry. The ion diffusion coefficients significantly affected the TMEP across the membrane, with different patterns for different electrolytes and concentrations.

  16. Experimental Investigation into the Transmembrane Electrical Potential of the Forward Osmosis Membrane Process in Electrolyte Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Bian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2, concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which confirmed the effect of membrane asymmetry. The ion diffusion coefficients significantly affected the TMEP across the membrane, with different patterns for different electrolytes and concentrations.

  17. Effects of nitrogen ion implantation on Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential of pollen cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential of lily (lilium davidii Duch) pollen cell have been studied. The results showed that the Ca2+ concentration was increased when pollen grain was implanted by nitrogen ion with energy 100keV and dose 1013 ions/cra2. However, the increase of Ca2+ concentration was partly inhibited by the addition of Ca2+channel inhibitor depending on dose. And nitrogen ion implantation caused depolarization of pollen cell membrane potential. In other words, membrane potential was increased,but the effect decreased by adding Ca2+ channel inhibitor.However, it was still significantly higher than the membrane potential of control cells. It was indicated that the depolarization of cell membrane potential opened the calcium channel on the membrane that caused the increasing of intraceilular calcium concentration. This might be an earlier step of the effect of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on pollen germination.

  18. Experimental Investigation into the Transmembrane Electrical Potential of the Forward Osmosis Membrane Process in Electrolyte Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Lixia Bian; Yanyan Fang; Xiaolin Wang

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP) in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which c...

  19. Membrane-Protein Crystallography and Potentiality for Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Atsuko

    Structure-based drug design for membrane proteins is far behind that for soluble proteins due to difficulty in crystallographic structure determination, despite the fact that about 60% of FDA-approved drugs target membrane proteins located at the cell surface. Stable homologs for a membrane protein of interest, such as prokaryotic neurotransmitter transporter homolog LeuT, might enable cooperative analyses by crystallography and functional assays, provide useful information for functional mechanisms, and thus serve as important probes for drug design based on mechanisms as well as structures.

  20. Membrane mobility and microdomain association of the dopamine transporter studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erika M; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Fog, Jacob U;

    2007-01-01

    the cytoskeleton-disrupting agent cytochalasin D and the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (mbetaCD) increased the lateral mobility of the YFP-DAT but not that of the EGFP-EGFR. The DAT associated in part with membrane raft markers both in the N2a cells and in rat striatal synaptosomes....... This was supported by FRAP measurements that revealed a lower D and a mobile fraction of the YFP-DAT in N2a cells compared to HEK293 cells. Comparison with the EGFP-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and the EGFP-beta2AR (beta2 adrenergic receptor) demonstrated that this observation was DAT specific. Both...

  1. Membrane mobility and microdomain association of the dopaminetransporter studied with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erika; Samuvel, Devadoss; Fog, Jacob;

    2007-01-01

    the cytoskeleton-disrupting agent cytochalasin D and the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (mbCD) increased the lateral mobility of the YFP-DAT but not that of the EGFP-EGFR. The DAT associated in part with membrane raft markers both in the N2a cells and in rat striatal synaptosomes as assessed....... This was supported by FRAP measurements that revealed a lower D and a mobile fraction of the YFP-DAT in N2a cells compared to HEK293 cells. Comparison with the EGFP-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and the EGFP-beta2AR (beta2 adrenergic receptor) demonstrated that this observation was DAT specific. Both...

  2. Human Amnion Membrane: Potential Applications in Oral and Periodontal Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ranjana; Bajaj, Aashima; Gundappa, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) is derived from the fetal membranes which consist of the inner amniotic membrane made of single layer of amnion cells fixed to collagen-rich mesenchyme attached to chorion. HAM has low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties and their cells can be isolated without the sacrifice of human embryos. Amniotic membrane has biological properties which are important for the experimental and clinical applications in managing patients of various medical specialties. Abundant, natural and wonderful biomembrane not only protects the foetus but also has various clinical applications in the field of dermatology, ophthalmology, ENT surgery, orthopedics and dental surgery. As it is discarded post-partum it may be useful for regenerative medicine and cell therapy to treat damaged or diseased tissues.

  3. Human Amnion Membrane: Potential Applications in Oral and Periodontal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ranjana; Bajaj, Aashima; Gundappa, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) is derived from the fetal membranes which consist of the inner amniotic membrane made of single layer of amnion cells fixed to collagen-rich mesenchyme attached to chorion. HAM has low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties and their cells can be isolated without the sacrifice of human embryos. Amniotic membrane has biological properties which are important for the experimental and clinical applications in managing patients of various medical specialties. Abundant, natural and wonderful biomembrane not only protects the foetus but also has various clinical applications in the field of dermatology, ophthalmology, ENT surgery, orthopedics and dental surgery. As it is discarded post-partum it may be useful for regenerative medicine and cell therapy to treat damaged or diseased tissues. PMID:28316944

  4. Methods of staining and visualization of sphingolipid enriched and non-enriched plasma membrane regions of Arabidopsis thaliana with fluorescent dyes and lipid analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blachutzik Jörg O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sterols and Sphingolipids form lipid clusters in the plasma membranes of cell types throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. These lipid domains provide a medium for protein signaling complexes at the plasma membrane and are also observed to be principal regions of membrane contact at the inception of infection. We visualized different specific fluorescent lipophilic stains of the both sphingolipid enriched and non-sphingolipid enriched regions in the plasma membranes of live protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Lipid staining protocols for several fluorescent lipid analogues in plants are presented. The most emphasis was placed on successful protocols for the single and dual staining of sphingolipid enriched regions and exclusion of sphingolipid enriched regions on the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. A secondary focus was placed to ensure that these staining protocols presented still maintain cell viability. Furthermore, the protocols were successfully tested with the spectrally sensitive dye Laurdan. Conclusion Almost all existing staining procedures of the plasma membrane with fluorescent lipid analogues are specified for animal cells and tissues. In order to develop lipid staining protocols for plants, procedures were established with critical steps for the plasma membrane staining of Arabidopsis leaf tissue and protoplasts. The success of the plasma membrane staining protocols was additionally verified by measurements of lipid dynamics by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique and by the observation of new phenomena such as time dependent lipid polarization events in living protoplasts, for which a putative physiological relevance is suggested.

  5. Characterizing fluorescent dissolved organic matter in a membrane bioreactor via excitation-emission matrix combined with parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Quang, Viet Ly; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we successfully tracked the dynamic changes in different constitutes of bound extracellular polymeric substances (bEPS), soluble microbial products (SMP), and permeate during the operation of bench scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Three fluorescent groups were identified, including two protein-like (tryptophan-like C1 and tyrosine-like C2) and one microbial humic-like components (C3). In bEPS, protein-like components were consistently more dominant than C3 during the MBR operation, while their relative abundance in SMP depended on aeration intensities. C1 of bEPS exhibited a linear correlation (R(2)=0.738; pbEPS amounts in sludge, and C2 was closely related to the stability of sludge. The protein-like components were more greatly responsible for membrane fouling. Our study suggests that EEM-PARAFAC can be a promising monitoring tool to provide further insight into process evaluation and membrane fouling during MBR operation.

  6. Protein adsorption through Chitosan–Alginate membranes for potential applications

    OpenAIRE

    Murguía Flores, Dennise A.; Bonilla Ríos, Jaime; Canales Fiscal, Martha R.; Sánchez Fernández, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Chitosan and Alginate were used as biopolymers to prepare membranes for protein adsorption. The network requires a cross-linker able to form bridges between polymeric chains. Viscopearl-mini® (VM) was used as a support to synthesize them. Six different types of membranes were prepared using the main compounds of the matrix: VM, Chitosan of low and medium molecular weight, and Alginate. Results Experiments were carried out to analyze the interactions within the matrix a...

  7. Vimentin is involved in regulation of mitochondrial motility and membrane potential by Rac1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Matveeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that binding of mitochondria to vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF is regulated by GTPase Rac1. The activation of Rac1 leads to a redoubling of mitochondrial motility in murine fibroblasts. Using double-mutants Rac1(G12V, F37L and Rac1(G12V, Y40H that are capable to activate different effectors of Rac1, we show that mitochondrial movements are regulated through PAK1 kinase. The involvement of PAK1 kinase is also confirmed by the fact that expression of its auto inhibitory domain (PID blocks the effect of activated Rac1 on mitochondrial motility. The observed effect of Rac1 and PAK1 kinase on mitochondria depends on phosphorylation of the Ser-55 of vimentin. Besides the effect on motility Rac1 activation also decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP which is detected by ∼20% drop of the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the potential sensitive dye TMRM. One of important consequences of the discovered regulation of MMP by Rac1 and PAK1 is a spatial differentiation of mitochondria in polarized fibroblasts: at the front of the cell they are less energized (by ∼25% than at the rear part.

  8. Fluorescence detection of lipid-induced oligomeric intermediates involved in lysozyme "amyloid-like" fiber formation driven by anionic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Ana M; Ricardo, Joana C; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel; Coutinho, Ana

    2013-03-14

    Recent findings implicate that "amyloid-like" fiber formation by several non-amyloidogenic proteins/peptides can be triggered by negatively charged lipid membranes. In order to elucidate the factors that govern the formation of these structures, the interaction of lysozyme with phosphatidylserine-containing lipid vesicles was studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Three consecutive stages in the interaction of Alexa488-fluorescently labeled lysozyme (Lz-A488) with acidic lipid vesicles were identified in ensemble average measurements. The variation of the mean fluorescence lifetime of Lz-A488 as a function of the surface coverage of the liposomes was quantitatively described by a cooperative partition model that assumes that monomeric lysozyme molecules partition into the bilayer surface and reversibly assemble into oligomers with k subunits (k ≥ 6). The global fit to the experimental data covering a wide range of experimental conditions was performed by taking into account electrostatic effects by means of the Gouy-Chapman theory using a single self-consistent pair of parameters (aggregation constant and stoichiometry). The lipid-protein supramolecular assemblies formed at a low lipid/protein molar ratio were further characterized by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy at the single-fiber level, which reported that quenched oligomers are the predominant species in these structures.

  9. Fluorescence of nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids in model membranes is connected not to lipid mobility but to probe location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Mariana; Filipe, Hugo A L; Prates Ramalho, J P; Hof, Martin; Loura, Luís M S

    2016-03-14

    Nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids are popular fluorescent membrane probes. However, the understanding of important aspects of the photophysics of NBD remains incomplete, including the observed shift in the emission spectrum of NBD-lipids to longer wavelengths following excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum (red-edge excitation shift or REES). REES of NBD-lipids in membrane environments has been previously interpreted as reflecting restricted mobility of solvent surrounding the fluorophore. However, this requires a large change in the dipole moment (Δμ) of NBD upon excitation. Previous calculations of the value of Δμ of NBD in the literature have been carried out using outdated semi-empirical methods, leading to conflicting values. Using up-to-date density functional theory methods, we recalculated the value of Δμ and verified that it is rather small (∼2 D). Fluorescence measurements confirmed that the value of REES is ∼16 nm for 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine-N-(NBD) (NBD-PS) in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles. However, the observed shift is independent of both the temperature and the presence of cholesterol and is therefore insensitive to the mobility and hydration of the membrane. Moreover, red-edge excitation leads to an increased contribution of the decay component with a shorter lifetime, whereas time-resolved emission spectra of NBD-PS displayed an atypical blue shift following excitation. This excludes restrictions to solvent relaxation as the cause of the measured REES and TRES of NBD, pointing instead to the heterogeneous transverse location of probes as the origin of these effects. The latter hypothesis was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, from which the calculated heterogeneity of the hydration and location of NBD correlated with the measured fluorescence lifetimes/REES. Globally, our combination of theoretical and experiment-based techniques has led to a considerably improved understanding of

  10. Fluorescence from the maillard reaction and its potential applications in food science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiacevich, Silvia B; Santagapita, Patricio R; Buera, M Pilar

    2005-01-01

    The chemistry of the Maillard reaction involves a complex set of steps, and its interpretation represents a challenge in basic and applied aspects of Food Science. Fluorescent compounds have been recognized as important early markers of the reaction in food products since 1942. However, the recent advances in the characterization of fluorophores' development were observed in biological and biomedical areas. The in vivo non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins produces biological effects, promoting health deterioration. The characteristic fluorescence of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) is similar to that of Maillard food products and represents an indicator of the level of AGE-modified proteins, but the structure of the fluorescent groups is, typically, unknown. Application of fluorescence measurement is considered a potential tool for addressing key problems of food deterioration as an early marker or index of the damage of biomolecules. Fluorophores may be precursors of the brown pigments and/or end products. A general scheme of the Maillard reaction is proposed in this article, incorporating the pool concept. A correct interpretation of the effect of environmental and compositional conditions and their influences on the reaction kinetics may help to define the meaning of fluorescence development for each particular system.

  11. Normal chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells with a depolarized plasma membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Vogelzang, Sake A.; Ypey, Dirk L.; Molen, Loek G. van der; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    We examined a possible role for the plasma membrane potential in signal transduction during cyclic AMP-induced chemotaxis in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Chemotaxis, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses in cells with a depolarized membrane potential were measured. Cells can be

  12. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for real-time imaging of nanoparticle-cell plasma membrane interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Moghimi, Seyed Moien

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticulate systems are widely used for site-specific drug and gene delivery as well as for medical imaging. The mode of nanoparticle-cell interaction may have a significant effect on the pathway of nanoparticle internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Total internal reflection...... fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy allows for real-time monitoring of nanoparticle-membrane interaction events, which can provide vital information in relation to design and surface engineering of therapeutic nanoparticles for cell-specific targeting. In contrast to other microscopy techniques, the bleaching...

  13. Application of split-green fluorescent protein for topology mapping membrane proteins in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toddo, Stephen; Soderstrom, Bill; Palombo, Isolde;

    2012-01-01

    A topology map of a membrane protein defines the location of transmembrane helices and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the membrane. In the absence of a high-resolution structure, a topology map is an essential guide for studying structurefunction relationships. Although these maps...

  14. Chlorophyll fluorescence varies more across seasons than leaf water potential in drought-prone plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNO H.P. ROSADO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Among the effects of environmental change, the intensification of drought events is noteworthy, and tropical vegetation is predicted to be highly vulnerable to it. However, it is not clear how tropical plants in drought-prone habitats will respond to this change. In a coastal sandy plain environment, we evaluated the response of six plant species to water deficits across seasons, the relationship between their morpho-physiological traits, and which traits would be the best descriptors of plants' response to drought. Regardless of leaf succulence and phenology, responses between seasons were most strongly related to chlorophyll fluorescence. In this study we have demonstrated that a better comprehension of how tropical species from drought-prone habitats cope with changes in water availability can be based on seasonal variation in leaf water potential and chlorophyll fluorescence. Temporal variation in leaf water potential and chlorophyll fluorescence was found useful for differentiating between groups of sandy soil species that are responsive or unresponsive to water availability. However, chlorophyll fluorescence appeared to be a more sensitive descriptor of their seasonal and short-term responses.

  15. Determination of the topology of endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins using redox-sensitive green-fluorescence protein fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsachaki, Maria; Birk, Julia; Egert, Aurélie; Odermatt, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are involved in a wide array of essential cellular functions. Identification of the topology of membrane proteins can provide significant insight into their mechanisms of action and biological roles. This is particularly important for membrane enzymes, since their topology determines the subcellular site where a biochemical reaction takes place and the dependence on luminal or cytosolic co-factor pools and substrates. The methods currently available for the determination of topology of proteins are rather laborious and require post-lysis or post-fixation manipulation of cells. In this work, we have developed a simple method for defining intracellular localization and topology of ER membrane proteins in living cells, based on the fusion of the respective protein with redox-sensitive green-fluorescent protein (roGFP). We validated the method and demonstrated that roGFP fusion proteins constitute a reliable tool for the study of ER membrane protein topology, using as control microsomal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) proteins whose topology has been resolved, and comparing with an independent approach. We then implemented this method to determine the membrane topology of six microsomal members of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) family. The results revealed a luminal orientation of the catalytic site for three enzymes, i.e. 17β-HSD6, 7 and 12. Knowledge of the intracellular location of the catalytic site of these enzymes will enable future studies on their biological functions and on the role of the luminal co-factor pool.

  16. Modulation of membrane potential by an acetylcholine-activated potassium current in trout atrial myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, C.E.; Gesser, Hans; Llach, A.

    2007-01-01

    mV from 4.3 pA/pF to 27 pA/pF with an EC50 of 45 nM in atrial myocytes. Moreover, 3 nM ACh increased the slope conductance of Im fourfold, shifted its reversal potential from -78 ± 3 to -84 ± 3 mV, and stabilized the resting membrane potential at -92 ± 4 mV. ACh also shortened the action potential...... hypothesized that this is at least partly due to a small slope conductance of Im around the resting membrane potential in atrial myocytes. In accordance with this hypothesis, the slope conductance of Im was about sevenfold smaller in atrial than in ventricular myocytes. Interestingly, ACh increased Im at -120...... of an inwardly rectifying K+ current can modulate the membrane potential in the trout atrial myocytes and stabilize the resting membrane potential. teleost heart; IK,ACh; cholinergic modulation; action potential...

  17. A Pathogenic Potential of Acinetobacter baumannii-Derived Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Suk Jin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs. A. baumannii OMVs deliver many virulence factors to host cells and then induce cytotoxicity and innate immune response. OMVs secreted from bacteria contribute directly to host pathology during A. baumannii infection.

  18. Rational design of fluorescent membrane probes for apoptosis based on 3-hydroxyflavone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, Zeinab; Kucherak, Oleksandr A.; Kreder, Rémy; Richert, Ludovic; Vauchelles, Romain; Mély, Yves; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2013-06-01

    Environment-sensitive probes constitute powerful tools for monitoring changes in the physico-chemical properties of cell plasma membranes. Among these probes, 3-hydroxyflavone probes are of great interest due to their dual emission and ratiometric response. Here, three probes derived from the parent F2N12S were designed, characterized and applied to monitor the membrane changes occurring during apoptosis. These three probes were designed to orient the dye vertically in the membrane. They differ by the length of their alkyl chains (from 4 to 8 carbons), which were included to optimize their affinity to the lipid membranes. Among these three probes, the one with medium chain length (hexyl) showed the best affinity to model and cell membranes, while the one with the longest alkyl chains (octyl) did not efficiently stain the membranes, probably due to aggregation. The new probes were found to be more sensitive than F2N12S to both the lipid phase and surface charge in lipid vesicles and to loss of lipid order in cell plasma membranes after cholesterol extraction. The one with the shortest (butyl) chains was found to be the most sensitive to apoptosis, while the one with medium-length (hexyl) chains was the brightest. Interestingly, apoptosis induced by different agents led to similar spectroscopic effects to those produced by the loss of lipid order and change in the surface charge, confirming that apoptosis decreases the lipid order and increases the negative surface charge in the outer leaflet of cell membranes. In conclusion, these studies report the relationship between the probe structures and their sensitivity to lipid order, surface charge and apoptosis and propose new probes for membrane research.

  19. Ocean acidification impacts on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential bring sperm swimming behaviour near its tipping point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Peter; Binet, Monique T; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Doyle, Christopher J; Williamson, Jane E

    2015-04-01

    Broadcast spawning marine invertebrates are susceptible to environmental stressors such as climate change, as their reproduction depends on the successful meeting and fertilization of gametes in the water column. Under near-future scenarios of ocean acidification, the swimming behaviour of marine invertebrate sperm is altered. We tested whether this was due to changes in sperm mitochondrial activity by investigating the effects of ocean acidification on sperm metabolism and swimming behaviour in the sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii. We used a fluorescent molecular probe (JC-1) and flow cytometry to visualize mitochondrial activity (measured as change in mitochondrial membrane potential, MMP). Sperm MMP was significantly reduced in ΔpH -0.3 (35% reduction) and ΔpH -0.5 (48% reduction) treatments, whereas sperm swimming behaviour was less sensitive with only slight changes (up to 11% decrease) observed overall. There was significant inter-individual variability in responses of sperm swimming behaviour and MMP to acidified seawater. We suggest it is likely that sperm exposed to these changes in pH are close to their tipping point in terms of physiological tolerance to acidity. Importantly, substantial inter-individual variation in responses of sperm swimming to ocean acidification may increase the scope for selection of resilient phenotypes, which, if heritable, could provide a basis for adaptation to future ocean acidification. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Viability and membrane potential analysis of Bacillus megaterium cells by impedance flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, F; Hebeisen, M; Schade, G; Franco-Lara, E; Di Berardino, M

    2012-02-01

    Single cell analysis is an important tool to gain deeper insights into microbial physiology for the characterization and optimization of bioprocesses. In this study a novel single cell analysis technique was applied for estimating viability and membrane potential (MP) of Bacillus megaterium cells cultured in minimal medium. Its measurement principle is based on the analysis of the electrical cell properties and is called impedance flow cytometry (IFC). Comparatively, state-of-the-art fluorescence-based flow cytometry (FCM) was used to verify the results obtained by IFC. Viability and MP analyses were performed with cells at different well-defined growth stages, focusing mainly on exponential and stationary phase cells, as well as on dead cells. This was done by PI and DiOC(2)(3) staining assays in FCM and by impedance measurements at 0.5 and 10 MHz in IFC. In addition, transition growth stages of long-term cultures and agar plate colonies were characterized with both methods. FCM and IFC analyses of all experiments gave comparable results, quantitatively and qualitatively, indicating that IFC is an equivalent technique to FCM for the study of physiological cell states of bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-23

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications.

  2. Imaging magnetic scalar potentials by laser-induced fluorescence from bright and dark atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Fescenko, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic method for mapping two-dimensional distributions of magnetic field strengths (magnetic scalar potential lines) using CCD recordings of the fluorescence patterns emitted by spin-polarized Cs vapor in a buffer gas exposed to inhomogeneous magnetic fields. The method relies on the position-selective destruction of spin polarization by magnetic resonances induced by multi-component oscillating magnetic fields, such that magnetic potential lines can directly be detected by the CCD camera. We also present a generic algebraic model allowing the calculation of the fluorescence patterns and find excellent agreement with the experimental observations for three distinct inhomogeneous field topologies. The spatial resolution obtained with these proof-of-principle experiments is on the order of 1 mm. A substantial increase of spatial and magnetic field resolution is expected by deploying the method in a magnetically shielded environment.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled cetuximab as a potential tool for fluorescence-guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomano, Mara; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Napp, Joanna

    2016-11-15

    The high rate of recurrence in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) could be reduced by supporting the surgeons in discriminating healthy from diseased tissues with intraoperative fluorescence-guidance. Here, we studied the suitability of Cetuximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled as a new tool for fluorescence-guided surgery. Distribution and binding of systemically injected Cetuximab Alexa Fluor 647 conjugate (Cetux-Alexa-647) and the co-injected control human IgG Alexa Fluor 750 conjugate (hIgG-Alexa-750) was studied over 48 h by NIR fluorescence imaging in mice bearing human orthotopic AsPC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 PDAC tumors. Cetux-Alexa-647, but not the control hIgG-Alexa-750 fluorescence, was specifically detected in vivo in both primary pancreatic tumors with maximum fluorescence intensities at 24 h, and in metastases of AsPC-1 tumors as small as 1 mm. Lifetime analysis and NIR fluorescence microscopy of tumor sections confirmed the binding specificity of Cetux-Alexa-647 to PDAC cells. Comparable results were obtained with Cetuximab conjugated to Alexa Fluor 750 dye (Cetux-Alexa-750). Fluorescence-guided dissection, performed 24 h after injection of Cetuximab conjugated to IRDye 800CW (Cetux-800CW), enabled a real-time delineation of AsPC-1 tumor margins, and small metastases. Odyssey scans revealed that only the vital part of the tumor, but not the necrotic part was stained with Cetux-800CW. NIR fluorescently labeled Cetuximab may be a promising tool that can be applied for fluorescence-guided surgery to visualize tumor margins and metastatic sites in order to allow a precise surgical resection.

  4. In Vitro Osteogenic Potential of Green Fluorescent Protein Labelled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Osteoprogenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intekhab Islam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy using stem cells in bone regeneration has gained increasing interest. Various studies suggest the clinical utility of osteoprogenitors-like mesenchymal stem cells in bone regeneration. However, limited availability of mesenchymal stem cells and conflicting evidence on their therapeutic efficacy limit their clinical application. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are potentially an unlimited source of healthy and functional osteoprogenitors (OPs that could be utilized for bone regenerative applications. However, limited ability to track hESC-derived progenies in vivo greatly hinders translational studies. Hence, in this study, we aimed to establish hESC-derived OPs (hESC-OPs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP and to investigate their osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro. We fluorescently labelled H9-hESCs using a plasmid vector encoding GFP. The GFP-expressing hESCs were differentiated into hESC-OPs. The hESC-OPsGFP+ stably expressed high levels of GFP, CD73, CD90, and CD105. They possessed osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro as demonstrated by increased expression of COL1A1, RUNX2, OSTERIX, and OPG transcripts and mineralized nodules positive for Alizarin Red and immunocytochemical expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagen-I. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs can maintain their GFP expression for the long term and their potential for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. In future, these fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs could be used for noninvasive assessment of bone regeneration, safety, and therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Modulation of nitrogen vacancy charge state and fluorescence in nanodiamonds using electrochemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaveli, Sinan; Gaathon, Ophir; Wolcott, Abraham; Sakakibara, Reyu; Shemesh, Or A.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Boyden, Edward S.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Yuste, Rafael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV-) center in diamond has attracted strong interest for a wide range of sensing and quantum information processing applications. To this end, recent work has focused on controlling the NV charge state, whose stability strongly depends on its electrostatic environment. Here, we demonstrate that the charge state and fluorescence dynamics of single NV centers in nanodiamonds with different surface terminations can be controlled by an externally applied potential difference in an electrochemical cell. The voltage dependence of the NV charge state can be used to stabilize the NV- state for spin-based sensing protocols and provides a method of charge state-dependent fluorescence sensing of electrochemical potentials. We detect clear NV fluorescence modulation for voltage changes down to 100 mV, with a single NV and down to 20 mV with multiple NV centers in a wide-field imaging mode. These results suggest that NV centers in nanodiamonds could enable parallel optical detection of biologically relevant electrochemical potentials.

  6. Modulation of nitrogen vacancy charge state and fluorescence in nanodiamonds using electrochemical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaveli, Sinan; Gaathon, Ophir; Wolcott, Abraham; Sakakibara, Reyu; Shemesh, Or A; Peterka, Darcy S; Boyden, Edward S; Owen, Jonathan S; Yuste, Rafael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-04-12

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV(-)) center in diamond has attracted strong interest for a wide range of sensing and quantum information processing applications. To this end, recent work has focused on controlling the NV charge state, whose stability strongly depends on its electrostatic environment. Here, we demonstrate that the charge state and fluorescence dynamics of single NV centers in nanodiamonds with different surface terminations can be controlled by an externally applied potential difference in an electrochemical cell. The voltage dependence of the NV charge state can be used to stabilize the NV(-) state for spin-based sensing protocols and provides a method of charge state-dependent fluorescence sensing of electrochemical potentials. We detect clear NV fluorescence modulation for voltage changes down to 100 mV, with a single NV and down to 20 mV with multiple NV centers in a wide-field imaging mode. These results suggest that NV centers in nanodiamonds could enable parallel optical detection of biologically relevant electrochemical potentials.

  7. The dispersed fluorescence spectrum of NaAr - Ground and excited state potential curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, J.; Ragone, A.; Kim, M. S.; Auerbach, D. J.; Smalley, R. E.; Wharton, L.; Levy, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Potential curves for the ground state and the first excited state of NaAr were determined. The van der Waals molecule NaAr was prepared by supersonic free jet expansion of a mixture of sodium, argon, and helium. The electronic transition from the ground state to the first excited state A2pi was excited by a tunable dye laser and the resulting fluorescence was studied. The dispersed fluorescence spectra show discrete and diffuse features, corresponding to transitions from excited vibrational levels of the A state to bound and unbound levels of the x state. The characteristic reflection structure in the bound-free spectra permits an unambiguous assignment of the vibrational numbering in the A state, and this assignment together with previously measured spectroscopic constants are used to calculate the potential curve of the A state. The discrete structure in the fluorescence spectra is used to determine the potential curve of the x state in the well region, and the repulsive part of the X curve is then deduced through trial-and-error simulation of the bound-free spectra.

  8. Sampling membrane potential, membrane resistance and electrode resistance with a glass electrode impaled into a single cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebe, M; Jaeger, U

    1980-04-01

    A method is demonstrated to measure membrane resistances and membrane potentials of single cells during impalement by a single glass microelectrode. The intention was to develop a procedure which would provide data almost continuously. Therefore, a frequency-dependent voltage divider network has been chosen to represent the basic electrical properties of the electrode and cell membrane, and used to explore its voltage response to a current stimulus, consisting of two rectangular pulses of different widths. It can be shown that the resolution of the method can be improved by inverting this stimulus so that each polarization becomes a relaxation and vice versa. In order to generate, analyze and display this signal continuously, a device has been designed which has been called 'Electrophysiological Monitor, (E1M2)'. E1M2 provides a current stimulus as input into a standard bridge network and can analyze the summed response of the electrode and cell by a set of sample-hold amplifiers. It then decodes and displays the data continuously, as membrane potential (Em), input resistance of the cell (Rinp) and the electrode resistance (Re) respectively. From Rinp the membrane resistance (Rm) can be deduced. The validity of the method has been examined by measuring these parameters in frog muscle cells. Technical design considerations, the accuracy and possible pitfalls with the suggested procedure are discussed.

  9. Exploring the potential of membrane bioreactors to enhance metals removal from wastewater: pilot experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatone, F; Eusebi, A L; Pavan, P; Battistoni, P

    2008-01-01

    The potential of membrane bioreactors to enhance the removal of selected metals from low loaded sewages has been explored. A 1400 litre pilot plant, equipped with an industrial submerged module of hollow fibre membranes, has been used in three different configurations: membrane bioreactor, operating in sequencing batch modality, for the treatment of real mixed municipal/industrial wastewater; membrane-assisted biosorption reactor, for the treatment of real leachate from municipal landfills; continuously fed membrane bioreactor, for the treatment of water charged with cadmium and nickel ions. The results show that: (a) in treating wastewaters with low levels of heavy metals (high sludge ages is not an effective strategy to significantly enhance the metals removal; (b) Hg and Cd are effectively removed already in conventional systems with gravitational final clarifiers, while Cu, Cr, Ni can rely on a additional performance in membrane bioreactors; (c) the further membrane effect is remarkable for Cu and Cr, while it is less significant for Ni. Basically, similar membrane effects recur in three different experimental applications that let us estimate the potential of membrane system to retain selected metal complexes. The future development of the research will investigate the relations between the membrane effect and the manipulable filtration parameters (i.e., permeate flux, solids content, filtration cycle).

  10. Observing a model ion channel gating action in model cell membranes in real time in situ: membrane potential change induced alamethicin orientation change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Li, Hongchun; Wei, Feng; Jasensky, Joshua; Boughton, Andrew P; Yang, Pei; Chen, Zhan

    2012-04-11

    Ion channels play crucial roles in transport and regulatory functions of living cells. Understanding the gating mechanisms of these channels is important to understanding and treating diseases that have been linked to ion channels. One potential model peptide for studying the mechanism of ion channel gating is alamethicin, which adopts a split α/3(10)-helix structure and responds to changes in electric potential. In this study, sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS), supplemented by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), has been applied to characterize interactions between alamethicin (a model for larger channel proteins) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid bilayers in the presence of an electric potential across the membrane. The membrane potential difference was controlled by changing the pH of the solution in contact with the bilayer and was measured using fluorescence spectroscopy. The orientation angle of alamethicin in POPC lipid bilayers was then determined at different pH values using polarized SFG amide I spectra. Assuming that all molecules adopt the same orientation (a δ distribution), at pH = 6.7 the α-helix at the N-terminus and the 3(10)-helix at the C-terminus tilt at about 72° (θ(1)) and 50° (θ(2)) versus the surface normal, respectively. When pH increases to 11.9, θ(1) and θ(2) decrease to 56.5° and 45°, respectively. The δ distribution assumption was verified using a combination of SFG and ATR-FTIR measurements, which showed a quite narrow distribution in the angle of θ(1) for both pH conditions. This indicates that all alamethicin molecules at the surface adopt a nearly identical orientation in POPC lipid bilayers. The localized pH change in proximity to the bilayer modulates the membrane potential and thus induces a decrease in both the tilt and the bend angles of the two helices in alamethicin. This is the first reported application of SFG

  11. Probe transfer with and without membrane fusion in a fluorescence fusion assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohki, S; Flanagan, TD; Hoekstra, D

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the R(18) fusion assay was made during the fusion of the Sendai virus with erythrocyte ghosts. The increase in R(18) fluorescence, reflecting the interaction process, was evaluated in terms of the different processes that in principle may contribute to this increase, that is, monomeri

  12. FLUORESCENCE OVERLAY ANTIGEN MAPPING OF THE EPIDERMAL BASEMENT-MEMBRANE ZONE .1. GEOMETRIC ERRORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, S; DEJONG, MCJM; HEERES, K; WILKINSON, MHF; JONKMAN, MF; VANDERMEER, JB

    To identify in tissue sections the relative positions of antigen distributions close to the resolving power of the microscope, we have developed the fluorescence overlay antigen mapping (FOAM) procedure. As this technique makes high demands on the geometric fidelity of the overlay image, it is

  13. FLUORESCENCE OVERLAY ANTIGEN MAPPING OF THE EPIDERMAL BASEMENT-MEMBRANE ZONE .1. GEOMETRIC ERRORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, S; DEJONG, MCJM; HEERES, K; WILKINSON, MHF; JONKMAN, MF; VANDERMEER, JB

    1994-01-01

    To identify in tissue sections the relative positions of antigen distributions close to the resolving power of the microscope, we have developed the fluorescence overlay antigen mapping (FOAM) procedure. As this technique makes high demands on the geometric fidelity of the overlay image, it is essen

  14. FLUORESCENCE OVERLAY ANTIGEN MAPPING OF THE EPIDERMAL BASEMENT-MEMBRANE ZONE .1. GEOMETRIC ERRORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, S; DEJONG, MCJM; HEERES, K; WILKINSON, MHF; JONKMAN, MF; VANDERMEER, JB

    1994-01-01

    To identify in tissue sections the relative positions of antigen distributions close to the resolving power of the microscope, we have developed the fluorescence overlay antigen mapping (FOAM) procedure. As this technique makes high demands on the geometric fidelity of the overlay image, it is essen

  15. Computer-assisted live cell analysis of mitochondrial membrane potential, morphology and calcium handling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, W.J.H.; Distelmaier, F.; Esseling, J.J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucial for many aspects of cellular homeostasis and a sufficiently negative membrane potential (Deltapsi) across the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM) is required to sustain most mitochondrial functions including ATP generation, MIM fusion, and calcium uptake and release. Here, we

  16. Ion Permeability of Artificial Membranes Evaluated by Diffusion Potential and Electrical Resistance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and "n"-decane. The electrical resistance and potential…

  17. Voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in rabbit ciliary epithelium regulates the membrane potential via coupling intracellular calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-feng; ZHUO Ye-hong; BI Wei-na; BAI Yu-jing; LI Yan-na; WANG Zhi-jian

    2008-01-01

    Background The cell layer of the ciliary epithelium is responsible for aqueous humor secretion and maintenance.Ion channels play an important role in these processes.The main aim of this study was to determine whether the well-characterized members of the Kvl family (Kv1.3) contribute to the Kv currents in ciliary epithelium.Methods New Zealand White rabbits were maintained in a 12 hours light/dark cycle.Ciliary epithelium samples were isolated from the rabbits.We used Western blotting and immunocytochemistry to identify the expression and location of a voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in ciliary body epithelium.Membrane potential change after adding of Kv1.3 inhibitor margatoxin (MgTX) was observed with a fluorescence method.Results Western blotting and immunocytochemical studies showed that the Kv1.3 protein expressed in pigment ciliary epithelium and nonpigment ciliary epithelium,however it seemed to express more in the apical membrane of the nonpigmented epithelial cells.One nmol/L margatoxin,a specific inhibitor of Kv1.3 channels caused depolarization of the cultured nonpigmented epithelium (NPE) membrane potential.The cytosotic calcium increased after NPE cell depolarization,this increase of cytosolic calcium was partially blocked by 12.5 μmol/L dantrolene and 10 μmol/L nifedipine.These observations suggest that Kv1.3 channels modulate ciliary epithelium potential and effect calcium dependent mechanisms.Conclusion Kv1.3 channels contribute to K+ efflux at the membrane of rabbit ciliary epithelium.

  18. Cell wall accumulation of fluorescent proteins derived from a trans-Golgi cisternal membrane marker and paramural bodies in interdigitated Arabidopsis leaf epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Kae; Kobayashi, Megumi; Sato, Mayuko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Ueda, Takashi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Nagata, Noriko; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Higaki, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    In most dicotyledonous plants, leaf epidermal pavement cells develop jigsaw puzzle-like shapes during cell expansion. The rapid growth and complicated cell shape of pavement cells is suggested to be achieved by targeted exocytosis that is coordinated with cytoskeletal rearrangement to provide plasma membrane and/or cell wall materials for lobe development during their morphogenesis. Therefore, visualization of membrane trafficking in leaf pavement cells should contribute an understanding of the mechanism of plant cell morphogenesis. To reveal membrane trafficking in pavement cells, we observed monomeric red fluorescent protein-tagged rat sialyl transferases, which are markers of trans-Golgi cisternal membranes, in the leaf epidermis of Arabidopsis thaliana. Quantitative fluorescence imaging techniques and immunoelectron microscopic observations revealed that accumulation of the red fluorescent protein occurred mostly in the curved regions of pavement cell borders and guard cell ends during leaf expansion. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that apoplastic vesicular membrane structures called paramural bodies were more frequent beneath the curved cell wall regions of interdigitated pavement cells and guard cell ends in young leaf epidermis. In addition, pharmacological studies showed that perturbations in membrane trafficking resulted in simple cell shapes. These results suggested possible heterogeneity of the curved regions of plasma membranes, implying a relationship with pavement cell morphogenesis.

  19. Cell membrane conformation at vertical nanowire array interface revealed by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthing, Trine; Bonde, Sara; Rostgaard, Katrine R.; Hannibal Madsen, Morten; Sørensen, Claus B.; Nygård, Jesper; Martinez, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    The perspectives offered by vertical arrays of nanowires for biosensing applications in living cells depend on the access of individual nanowires to the cell interior. Recent results on electrical access and molecular delivery suggest that direct access is not always obtained. Here, we present a generic approach to directly visualize the membrane conformation of living cells interfaced with nanowire arrays, with single nanowire resolution. The method combines confocal z-stack imaging with an optimized cell membrane labelling strategy which was applied to HEK293 cells interfaced with 2-11 μm long and 3-7 μm spaced nanowires with various surface coatings (bare, aminosilane-coated or polyethyleneimine-coated indium arsenide). We demonstrate that, for all commonly used nanowire lengths, spacings and surface coatings, nanowires generally remain enclosed in a membrane compartment, and are thereby not in direct contact with the cell interior.

  20. Fluorescent Nanoparticles from Several Commercial Beverages: Their Properties and Potential Application for Bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Han; Jiang, Chengkun; Liu, Wenqiang; Vera, Juan Manuel; Seni, Oscar David; Demera, Kevin; Yu, Chenxu; Tan, Mingqian

    2015-09-30

    The presence of nanoparticles in beverages has raised great concern in terms of potential impacts to consumer health. Herein, carbon dots in beverages kvass, pony malta, pilsner beer, Vivant Storm, and Profit were identified. They were shown to have a strong fluorescence under the excitation of ultraviolet light. The emission peaks shift to longer wavelengths accompanied by a remarkable fluorescence intensity decrease. The carbon dots are in the nanosized range and roughly spherical in appearance. Elemental analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated the composition of Kvass carbon dots to be C 83.17%, O 13.83%, and N 3.00%. No cytotoxicity was found at concentrations up to 20 mg/mL for human tongue squamous carcinoma cells, and they can be directly applied in both carcinoma and onion epidermal cell imaging. This work represents the first report of the carbon dots present in beverages, providing valuable insights into these nanoparticles for future biological imaging.

  1. Investigations of ion transport through nanoscale polymer membranes by fluorescence quenching of CdSe/CdS quantum dot/quantum rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkl, Jan-Philip; Wolter, Christopher; Flessau, Sandra; Schmidtke, Christian; Ostermann, Johannes; Feld, Artur; Mews, Alf; Weller, Horst

    2016-04-14

    Detailed steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements give deep insight into ion transport through nanometer thick diblock copolymer membranes, which were assembled as biocompatible shell material around CdSe/CdS quantum dot in quantum rods. We discuss the role of polymer chain length, intermolecular cross-linking and nanopore formation by analysing electron transfer processes from the photoexcited QDQRs to Cu(II) ions, which accumulate in the polymer membrane. Fluorescence investigations on single particle level additionally allow identifying ensemble inhomogeneities.

  2. A micropatterned cell array with an integrated oxygen-sensitive fluorescent membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Kevin; Komori, Kikuo; Yang, Fei; Tatsuma, Tetsu; Fujii, Teruo; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2009-11-01

    We propose a simple method for producing micropatterned cell spots by photocatalytic lithography on a Pt porphyrin-based oxygen-sensitive polystyrene membrane that enables real-time imaging of oxygen consumption of patterned cell spots with sub-millimetre resolution.

  3. Advanced Fluorescence Microscopy Approaches to Understand the Dynamic Organization of the Plasma Membrane in Eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziomkiewicz, Iwona

    The plasma membrane (PM) is a physical barrier that defines the boundaries of a cell. It not only isolates the cell interior from the environment, but also enables cell communication and a selective exchange of solutes. To serve those contrasting functions, the PM has a dynamic structure consisting...

  4. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies of Membrane Transporters Using Total Internal Reflection Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmits, Joris M H; van Oijen, Antoine M; Slotboom, Dirk J

    2017-01-01

    Cells are delineated by a lipid bilayer that physically separates the inside from the outer environment. Most polar, charged, or large molecules require proteins to reduce the energetic barrier for passage across the membrane and to achieve transport rates that are relevant for life. Here, we descri

  5. Effect of the dipole potential of a bilayer lipid membrane on gramicidin channel dissociation kinetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Rokitskaya, T I; Antonenko, Y N; Kotova, E A

    1997-01-01

    A technique of measuring of the light-induced transients of the gramicidin-mediated electric current across a membrane in the presence of a photosensitizer has been applied for the study of the effect of agents modifying the dipole potential of a bilayer lipid membrane (phloretin, 6-ketocholestanol, and RH421) on the processes of the gramicidin channel dissociation and formation. It is shown that phloretin, known to lower the dipole potential, decelerates the flash-induced decrease in the cur...

  6. Modeling the electrostatic potential of asymmetric lipopolysaccharide membranes: the MEMPOT algorithm implemented in DelPhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Roberta P; Li, Lin; Soares, Thereza A; Alexov, Emil

    2014-07-15

    Four chemotypes of the rough lipopolysaccharides (LPS) membrane from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated by a combined approach of explicit water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics with the goal to deliver the distribution of the electrostatic potential across the membrane. For the purpose of this investigation, a new tool for modeling the electrostatic potential profile along the axis normal to the membrane, MEMbrane POTential (MEMPOT), was developed and implemented in DelPhi. Applying MEMPOT on the snapshots obtained by MD simulations, two observations were made: (a) the average electrostatic potential has a complex profile but is mostly positive inside the membrane due to the presence of Ca(2+) ions, which overcompensate for the negative potential created by lipid phosphate groups; and (b) correct modeling of the electrostatic potential profile across the membrane requires taking into account the water phase, while neglecting it (vacuum calculations) results in dramatic changes including a reversal of the sign of the potential inside the membrane. Furthermore, using DelPhi to assign different dielectric constants for different regions of the LPS membranes, it was investigated whether a single frame structure before MD simulations with appropriate dielectric constants for the lipid tails, inner, and the external leaflet regions, can deliver the same average electrostatic potential distribution as obtained from the MD-generated ensemble of structures. Indeed, this can be attained by using smaller dielectric constant for the tail and inner leaflet regions (mostly hydrophobic) than for the external leaflet region (hydrophilic) and the optimal dielectric constant values are chemotype-specific.

  7. Thermal potential of ion-exchange membranes and its application to thermoelectric power generation

    OpenAIRE

    Jokinen, Miikka; Manzanares Andreu, Jose; Kontturi, Kyösti; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    The low efficiency and high price of thermoelectric semiconductors has generated interest in unconventional forms of thermoelectric materials. In this article, ionic thermoelectricity has been studied with commercial ion-exchange membranes for different aqueous 1:1 electrolytes. The theory of thermal membrane potential has been derived taking into account the ionic heats of transport, the non-isothermal Donnan potentials, the temperature polarization, and the thermally-induced concentration p...

  8. Study of the Combined Effect of Ibuprofen and Cholesterol on the Microviscosity and Ordering of Model Lipid Membranes by Timeresolved Measurement of Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefimova, S. L.; Tkacheva, T. N.; Kasian, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The timeresolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of perylene incorporated into the lipid Ladipalmitoylphosphatidylch oline (DPPC) membrane has been studied to evaluate the membranotropic action of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, ibuprofen, and the combined effect of ibuprofen and cholesterol. The rotation correlation times (φ) and limiting anisotropy (r∞ ) permit an independent estimation of the effects of these additives on the microviscosity and ordering of model lipid membranes in different phase states. Ibuprofen was shown to cause a significant decrease in the DPPC membrane microviscosity in the gel phase with hardly any effect on the liquidcrystal phase. However, in both phases, ibuprofen diminishes the ordering of the lipid hydrophobic chains. A marked additive effect is noted when ibuprofen is embedded in the liquid membrane enriched with cholesterol, which manifests itself in substantial fluidization and disordering or the liquid membrane by the action of the components on the lipid membrane. Ibuprofen in the liquidcrystal phase causes leveling of the fluidizing and ordering effects of cholesterol.

  9. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out......Cl saline solution and the PE leaflet is exposed to KCl, the outcome is that the effects of asymmetric lipid and salt ion distributions essentially cancel one another almost completely. Overall, our study highlights the complex nature of the intrinsic potential of cell membranes under physiological...

  10. Interactive, Computer-Assisted Tracking of Speckle Trajectories in Fluorescence Microscopy: Application to Actin Polymerization and Membrane Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew B.; Karatekin, Erdem; Gohlke, Andrea; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of particle trajectories in images obtained by fluorescence microscopy reveals biophysical properties such as diffusion coefficient or rates of association and dissociation. Particle tracking and lifetime measurement is often limited by noise, large mobilities, image inhomogeneities, and path crossings. We present Speckle TrackerJ, a tool that addresses some of these challenges using computer-assisted techniques for finding positions and tracking particles in different situations. A dynamic user interface assists in the creation, editing, and refining of particle tracks. The following are results from application of this program: 1), Tracking single molecule diffusion in simulated images. The shape of the diffusing marker on the image changes from speckle to cloud, depending on the relationship of the diffusion coefficient to the camera exposure time. We use these images to illustrate the range of diffusion coefficients that can be measured. 2), We used the program to measure the diffusion coefficient of capping proteins in the lamellipodium. We found values ∼0.5 μm2/s, suggesting capping protein association with protein complexes or the membrane. 3), We demonstrate efficient measuring of appearance and disappearance of EGFP-actin speckles within the lamellipodium of motile cells that indicate actin monomer incorporation into the actin filament network. 4), We marked appearance and disappearance events of fluorescently labeled vesicles to supported lipid bilayers and tracked single lipids from the fused vesicle on the bilayer. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that vesicle fusion has been detected with single molecule sensitivity and the program allowed us to perform a quantitative analysis. 5), By discriminating between undocking and fusion events, dwell times for vesicle fusion after vesicle docking to membranes can be measured. PMID:21961607

  11. A novel high-throughput screening assay for HCN channel blocker using membrane potential-sensitive dye and FLIPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Dmitry V; Shan, Qin J; Lee, Yan T; Soloveva, Veronica; Nawoschik, Stanley P; Kaftan, Edward J; Dunlop, John; Mayer, Scott C; Bowlby, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cation nonselective (HCN) channels represent an interesting group of targets for drug development. In this study, the authors report the development of a novel membrane potential-sensitive dye (MPSD) assay for HCN channel modulators that has been miniaturized into 384-well fluorescent imaging plate reader (FLIPR) high-throughput screening (HTS) format. When optimized (by cell plating density, plate type, cell recovery from cryopreservation), the well-to-well signal variability was low, with a Z' = 0.73 and coefficient of variation = 6.4%, whereas the MPSD fluorescence signal amplitude was -23,700 +/- 1500 FLIPR(3) relative fluorescence units (a linear relationship was found between HCN1 MPSD fluorescence signal and the cell plating density) and was completely blocked by 30 microM ZD7288. The assay tolerated up to 1% DMSO, inclusion of which did not significantly change the signal kinetics or amplitude. A single-concentration screening of an ion channel-focused library composed of 4855 compounds resulted in 89 HCN1 blocker hits, 51 of which were subsequently analyzed with an 8-point concentration-response analysis on the IonWorks HT electrophysiology platform. The correlation between MPSD and the electrophysiology assay was moderate, as shown by the linear regression analysis (r(2) = 0.56) between the respective IC(50)s obtained using these 2 assays. The reported HTS-compatible HCN channel blocker assay can serve as a tool in drug discovery in the pursuit of HCN channel isoform-selective small molecules that could be used in the development of clinically relevant compounds.

  12. A fluorescence detected magnetic resonance investigation of the carotenoid triplet states associated with Photosystem II of isolated spinach thylakoid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Santabarbara, S; Carbonera, D; Heathcote, P

    2005-01-01

    The carotenoid triplet populations associated with the fluorescence emission chlorophyll forms of Photosystem II have been investigated in isolated spinach thylakoid membranes by means of fluorescence detected magnetic resonance in zero field (FDMR). The spectra collected in the 680-690 nm emission range, have been fitted by a global analysis procedure. At least five different carotenoid triplet states coupled to the terminal emitting chlorophyll forms of PS II, peaking at 682 nm, 687 nm and 692 nm, have been characterised. The triplets associated with the outer antenna emission forms, at 682 nm, have zero field splitting parameters D = 0.0385 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00367 cm/sup -1/; D = 0.0404 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00379 cm/sup -1/ and D = 0.0386 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00406 cm/sup -1/ which are very similar to those previously reported for the xanthophylls of the isolated LHC II complex. Therefore the FDMR spectra recorded in this work provide insights into the organisation of the LHC II complex in the unperturbed enviro...

  13. Trace elements determination by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) in human placenta and membrane: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custodio, P.J.; Carvalho, M.L. [Centro Fisica Atomica, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003, Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, F. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Almada (Portugal)

    2003-04-01

    This work is an application of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) as an analytical technique for trace elemental determination in human membrane and placenta and elemental concentrations correlations in both tissues. Whole samples were collected during the delivery from healthy mothers and full-term pregnancies. The age of the mother was between 25 and 40 years old, and the weight of the infants ranged from 2.56 to 4.05 kg. Samples were lyophilised and analysed without any chemical treatment. No significant differences in elemental content of placenta and membrane samples were observed except for Ca. Very low levels of Se, As and Pb were observed in all the analysed samples. Zn, considered as one of the key elements in newborn health, was not significantly different in the analysed samples, all of which originated from healthy mothers and healthy babies. The obtained values agree with the literature except for Ca, which is much higher in the studied samples. (orig.)

  14. Formation of Gel-like Nanodomains in Cholesterol-Containing Sphingomyelin or Phosphatidylcholine Binary Membrane As Examined by Fluorescence Lifetimes and (2)H NMR Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Slotte, J Peter; Murata, Michio

    2015-12-29

    In this study, we measured the time-resolved fluorescence of trans-parinaric acid (tPA), steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene (DPH), and (2)H NMR of 10,10-d2-stearoyl lipids in stearoyl sphingomyelin with cholesterol (SSM/Chol) and l-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine with Chol (PSPC/Chol) binary membranes. The results suggest that the membrane order obtained from the fluorescence experiments shows a similar temperature dependency as those of the (2)H NMR data. More importantly, the time-resolved fluorescence data implied the presence of at least two types of domains, cholesterol-poor gel-like domains (CPGLD) and cholesterol-enriched liquid-ordered (Lo) domains. These domains appear on a nano-to-micro second time scale for both SSM-Chol and PSPC-Chol membranes. The relative size of the gel-like domain was also estimated from the temperature-dependent lifetime measurements and (2)H NMR spectral changes. The results imply that the size of the gel-like domains is very small, probably on the nanometer scale, and smaller in SSM-Chol membrane than those in PSPC-Chol bilayers, which could account for the higher thermal stability of SM-Chol membranes. The present study demonstrates that gel-like nanodomains occur in SM-Chol binary membrane even with Chol content of over 33 mol %, which has been thought to consist exclusively of Lo phase, implying that not only Lo domains but also gel-like nanodomains are important for formation of lipid-ordered phase in SM-Chol and PC-Chol membranes.

  15. Partitioning and localization of environment-sensitive 2-(2'-pyridyl)- and 2-(2'-pyrimidyl)-indoles in lipid membranes: a joint refinement using fluorescence measurements and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Wu, Feiyue; Thummel, Randolph P; Waluk, Jacek; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2010-10-28

    Fluorescence of environment-sensitive dyes is widely applied to monitor local structure and solvation dynamics of biomolecules. It has been shown that, in comparison with a parent indole fluorophore, fluorescence of 2-(2'-pyridyl)-5-methylindole (5M-PyIn-0) and 2-[2'-(4',6'-dimethylpyrimidyl)]-indole (DMPmIn-0) is remarkably sensitive to hydrogen bonding with protic partners. Strong fluorescence, observed for these compounds in nonpolar and polar aprotic solvents, is efficiently quenched in aqueous solution. This study demonstrates that 5M-PyIn-0 and DMPmIn-0, which are almost nonemitting in aqueous solution, become highly fluorescent upon titrating with phospholipid vesicles. The fluorescence enhancement is accompanied by a significant blue shift of emission maximum. The Gibbs free energy of membrane partitioning, measured by the increase in the steady-state fluorescence intensities during transfer from an aqueous environment to a lipid bilayer, is very favorable for both compounds, being in a range from -7.1 to -8.0 kcal/mol and depending only slightly on lipid composition of the membrane. The fluorescence enhancement upon membrane partitioning is indicative of the loss of the specific hydrogen-bonding interactions between the excited fluorophore and water molecules, causing efficient fluorescence quenching in bulk water. This conclusion is supported by atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, demonstrating that both 5M-PyIn-0 and DMPmIn-0 bind rapidly and partition deeply into a lipid bilayer. MD simulations also show a rapid, nanosecond-scale decrease in the probability of solute-solvent hydrogen bonding during passive diffusion of the probe molecules from bulk water into a lipid bilayer. At equilibrium conditions, both 5M-PyIn-0 and DMPmIn-0 prefer deep localization within the hydrophobic, water-free region of the bilayer. A free energy profile of penetration across a bilayer estimated using MD umbrella sampling shows that both indole derivatives favor

  16. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  17. Potential application of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy to determine benzo[a]pyrene in soil extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Guoxiong [School of Biology, Institute for Research on the Environment and Sustainability, Devonshire Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Killham, Ken [Department of Plant and Soil Science, Cruickshank Building, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UU (United Kingdom); Singleton, Ian [School of Biology, Institute for Research on the Environment and Sustainability, Devonshire Building, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ian.singleton@ncl.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a significant environmental pollutant and rapid, accurate methods to quantify this compound in soil for both research and environmental investigation purposes are required. In this work, solvent extracts from five contrasting soils spiked with four different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were rapidly analysed by using a synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) method. The SFS method was validated using HPLC with ultraviolet detection. A good correlation for the quantification of BaP in soil extracts by the two methods was observed. The detection limit of the SFS method was 1.6 x 10{sup -9} g/ml in CTAB micellar medium (7.8 mmol/l). The work demonstrates that SFS has potential as a sensitive, accurate, rapid, simple and economic methodology and an efficient alternative to HPLC for fast confirmation and quantification of BaP in complex soil extracts. - Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy has potential as a method for confirmation of benzo[a]pyrene in soil extracts.

  18. Amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid-derived cells: potential tools for regenerative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Ornella; Soncini, Maddalena; Evangelista, Marco; Schmidt, Dörthe

    2009-03-01

    Human amniotic membranes and amniotic fluid have attracted increasing attention in recent years as a possible reserve of stem cells that may be useful for clinical application in regenerative medicine. Many studies have been conducted to date in terms of the differentiation potential of these cells, with several reports demonstrating that cells from both the amniotic fluid and membrane display high plasticity. In addition, cells from the amniotic membrane have also been shown to display immunomodulatory characteristics both in vivo and in vitro, which could make them useful in an allotransplantation setting. Here, we provide an overview comparing the latest findings regarding the stem characteristics of cells from both the amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid, as well as on the potential utility of these cells for future clinical application in regenerative medicine.

  19. Diatomite reinforced chitosan composite membrane as potential scaffold for guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburaci, Sedef; Tihminlioglu, Funda

    2017-11-01

    In this study, natural silica source, diatomite, incorporated novel chitosan based composite membranes were fabricated and characterized for bone tissue engineering applications as possible bone regeneration membrane. The effect of diatomite loading on the mechanical, morphological, chemical, thermal and surface properties, wettability and in vitro cytotoxicity and cell proliferation on of composite membranes were investigated and observed by tensile test, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), protein adsorption assay, air/water contact angle analysis and WST-1 respectively. Swelling studies were also performed by water absorption capacity determination. Results showed that incorporation of diatomite to the chitosan matrix increased the surface roughness, swelling capacity and tensile modulus of membranes. An increase of about 52% in Young's modulus was achieved for 10wt% diatomite composite membranes compared with chitosan membranes. High cell viability results were obtained with indirect extraction method. Besides, in vitro cell proliferation and ALP activity results showed that diatom incorporation significantly increased the ALP activity of Saos-2 cells cultured on chitosan membranes. The novel composite membranes prepared in the present study with tunable properties can be considered as a potential candidate as a scaffold in view of its enhanced physical & chemical properties as well as biological activities for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Synaptic inhibition and excitation estimated via the time constant of membrane potential fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rune W.; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    and excitation and their confidence limits from single sweep trials. The estimates are based on the mean membrane potential, (V) , and the membrane time constant,τ. The time constant provides the total conductance (G = capacitance/τ) and is extracted from the autocorrelation of V. The synaptic conductances can....... The method gives best results if the synaptic input is large compared to other conductances, the intrinsic conductances have little or no time dependence or are comparably small, the ligand gated kinetics is faster than the membrane time constant, and the majority of synaptic contacts are electrotonically...

  1. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Kedige, Suresh D; Jain, Kanu

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics.

  2. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining and chorion (a layer next to it, have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics.

  3. On the potential usefulness of Fourier spectra of delayed fluorescence from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2014-12-09

    Delayed fluorescence (DF) from photosystem II (PSII) of plants can be potentially used as a biosensor for the detection of plant physiological status and environmental changes. It has been analyzed mainly in the time domain. Frequency-domain analysis through Fourier transform allows viewing a signal from another angle, but the usefulness of DF spectra has not been well studied. In this work, experiments were conducted to show the differences and similarities in DF spectra of different plants with short pulse excitation. The DF spectra show low-pass characteristics with first-order attenuation of high frequencies. The results also show that the low-frequency components differ while the high-frequency components are similar. These may imply the potential usefulness of Fourier spectra of DF to analyze photoelectron transport in plants and classify samples.

  4. On the Potential Usefulness of Fourier Spectra of Delayed Fluorescence from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Guo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Delayed fluorescence (DF from photosystem II (PSII of plants can be potentially used as a biosensor for the detection of plant physiological status and environmental changes. It has been analyzed mainly in the time domain. Frequency-domain analysis through Fourier transform allows viewing a signal from another angle, but the usefulness of DF spectra has not been well studied. In this work, experiments were conducted to show the differences and similarities in DF spectra of different plants with short pulse excitation. The DF spectra show low-pass characteristics with first-order attenuation of high frequencies. The results also show that the low-frequency components differ while the high-frequency components are similar. These may imply the potential usefulness of Fourier spectra of DF to analyze photoelectron transport in plants and classify samples.

  5. VDAC electronics: 2. A new, anaerobic mechanism of generation of the membrane potentials in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial hexokinase (HK) and creatine kinase (CK) known to form complexes with a voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) have been reported to increase cell death resistance under hypoxia/anoxia. In this work we propose a new, non-Mitchell mechanism of generation of the inner and outer membrane potentials at anaerobic conditions. The driving force is provided by the Gibbs free energy of the HK and CK reactions associated with the VDAC-HK and the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator)-CK-VDAC complexes, respectively, both functioning as voltage generators. In the absence of oxygen, the cytosolic creatine phosphate can be directly used by the ANT-CK-VDAC contact sites to produce ATP from ADP in the mitochondrial matrix. After that, ATP released through the fraction of unbound ANTs in exchange for ADP is used in the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the outer membrane VDAC-HK electrogenic complexes to convert cytosolic glucose into glucose-6-phosphate. A simple computational model based on the application of Ohm's law to an equivalent electrical circuit showed a possibility of generation of the inner membrane potential up to -160mV, under certain conditions, and of relatively high outer membrane potential without wasting of ATP that normally leads to cell death. The calculated membrane potentials depended on the restriction of ATP/ADP diffusion in narrow cristae and through the cristae junctions. We suggest that high inner membrane potential and calcium extrusion from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by generated positive outer membrane potential prevent mitochondrial permeability transition, thus allowing the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and cell survival in the absence of oxygen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Collagen and chitosan membranes from alternative sources: evaluation of their potential for Tissue Engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Natural polymers such as collagen and chitosan possess physical, chemical and biological characteristics that make them good candidates as extracellular matrix scaffolds with potential applications in Tissue Engineering. In the present work, collagen and chitosan biopolymer membranes made from waste material, were evaluated for dermal fibroblasts cell culture. Several membrane compositions were analyzed, including 100% collagen, 100% chitosan, 8:2, 2:8, 6:4, 4:6 collagen-chitosan, obtained fr...

  7. The potential of a fluorescent-based approach for bioassay of antifungal agents against chili anthracnose disease in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutrakul, Chanikul; Khaokhajorn, Pratoomporn; Auncharoen, Patchanee; Boonruengprapa, Tanapong; Mongkolporn, Orarat

    2013-01-01

    Severe chili anthracnose disease in Thailand is caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. capsici. To discover anti-anthracnose substances we developed an efficient dual-fluorescent labeling bioassay based on a microdilution approach. Indicator strains used in the assay were constructed by integrating synthetic green fluorescent protein (sGFP) and Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRedExp) genes into the genomes of C. gloeosporioides or C. capsici respectively. Survival of co-spore cultures in the presence of inhibitors was determined by the expression levels of these fluorescent proteins. This developed assay has high potential for utilization in the investigation of selective inhibition activity to either one of the pathogens as well as the broad-range inhibitory effect against both pathogens. The value of using the dual-fluorescent assay is rapid, reliable, and consistent identification of anti-anthracnose agents. Most of all, the assay enables the identification of specific inhibitors under the co-cultivation condition.

  8. Effect of Mentha x piperita essential oil and monoterpenes on cucumber root membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, M; Camusso, W; Sacco, S

    2001-11-01

    Peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) essential oil and its main components were assessed for their ability to interfere with plant plasma membrane potentials. Tests were conducted on root segments isolated from etiolated seedlings of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Increasing the concentration of peppermint essential oil from 5 to 50 ppm caused a decrease in membrane potential (Vm) hyperpolarization of 10-3 mV, whereas concentrations from 100 up to 900 ppm caused an increasing depolarization of Vm (from 5 to 110 mV). When tested at 300 ppm, (+)-menthyl acetate, (-)-limonene and 1,8-cineole did not exert any significant effect on V(m), whereas (+)-menthofuran (73 mV), (+)-pulegone (85 mV), (+)-neomenthol (96 mV), (-)-menthol (105 mV) and (-)-menthone (111 mV) showed increased ability to depolarize V(m). A plot of log of octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) against their depolarizing effect showed a significant negative correlation, suggesting that among all monoterpenoids increased membrane depolarization depends on lower K(ow). However, among monoterpene ketones, alcohols and furans, increased membrane depolarization is associated with a decline in water solubility. The possible effect of monoterpenoids on membrane ion fluxes is also discussed, since changes in the bioelectric potential of cells imply changes in the flux of ions across the plasma membrane

  9. Potential of ultraviolet widefield imaging and multiphoton microscopy for analysis of dehydroergosterol in cellular membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis;

    2011-01-01

    Dehydroergosterol (DHE) is an intrinsically fluorescent sterol with absorption/emission in the ultraviolet (UV) region and biophysical properties similar to those of cholesterol. We compared the potential of UV-sensitive low-light-level wide-field (UV-WF) imaging with that of multiphoton (MP) exc...

  10. Pancreatic acinar cells: effects of micro-ionophoretic polypeptide application on membrane potential and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, O H; Philpott, H G

    1979-05-01

    1. Acinar cell membrane potential and resistance were measured from superfused segments of mouse pancreas, in vitro, using intracellular glass micro-electrodes. One or two extracellular micropipettes containing caerulein, bombesin nonapeptide (Bn) or acetylcholine (ACh) were placed near to the surface of the impaled acinus. The secretagogues were ejected rapidly from the micropipettes by ionophoresis.2. Each secretagogue evoked a similar electrical response from the impaled acinar cell: membrane depolarization and a simultaneous reduction in input resistance. The duration of cell activation from caerulein ionophoresis was longer than that observed for ACh and Bn. The cell response to the peptide hormone applications could be repeated in the presence of atropine.3. The minimum interval before the onset of cell depolarization after caerulein ionophoresis was determined. Values ranged between 500 and 1000 msec. The minimum latencies after Bn ionophoresis were 500-1400 msec.4. With two electrodes inserted into electrically coupled acinar cells, direct measurements of the caerulein and Bn null potentials were made. At high negative membrane potentials an enhanced depolarization was evoked by caerulein ionophoresis. At low negative membrane potentials the caerulein stimulation produced a diminished depolarization, and at membrane potentials less than - 10 mV acinar cell hyperpolarizations were observed. A similar series of responses was obtained in experiments where Bn ionophoresis was used. The caerulein and the Bn null potentials were always contained within - 10 to - 15 mV.5. The results describe the almost identical electrical response of acinar cells to stimulation by ACh, caerulein and bombesin. All three secretagogues have similar null potentials and latencies of activation on acinar cells. The bombesin latency responses appear as short as those measured for caerulein and provide electro-physiological evidence that Bn acts directly on acinar cells. The findings

  11. Long-range correlation of the membrane potential in neocortical neurons during slow oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgushev, Maxim; Chauvette, Sylvain; Timofeev, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Large amplitude slow waves are characteristic for the summary brain activity, recorded as electroencephalogram (EEG) or local field potentials (LFP), during deep stages of sleep and some types of anesthesia. Slow rhythm of the synchronized EEG reflects an alternation of active (depolarized, UP) and silent (hyperpolarized, DOWN) states of neocortical neurons. In neurons, involvement in the generalized slow oscillation results in a long-range synchronization of changes of their membrane potential as well as their firing. Here, we aimed at intracellular analysis of details of this synchronization. We asked which components of neuronal activity exhibit long-range correlations during the synchronized EEG? To answer this question, we made simultaneous intracellular recordings from two to four neocortical neurons in cat neocortex. We studied how correlated is the occurrence of active and silent states, and how correlated are fluctuations of the membrane potential in pairs of neurons located close one to the other or separated by up to 13 mm. We show that strong long-range correlation of the membrane potential was observed only (i) during the slow oscillation but not during periods without the oscillation, (ii) during periods which included transitions between the states but not during within-the-state periods, and (iii) for the low-frequency (10 Hz). In contrast to the neurons located several millimeters one from the other, membrane potential fluctuations in neighboring neurons remain strongly correlated during periods without slow oscillation. We conclude that membrane potential correlation in distant neurons is brought about by synchronous transitions between the states, while activity within the states is largely uncorrelated. The lack of the generalized fine-scale synchronization of membrane potential changes in neurons during the active states of slow oscillation may allow individual neurons to selectively engage in short living episodes of correlated activity

  12. Herbicides affect fluorescence and electron transfer activity of spinach chloroplasts, thylakoid membranes and isolated Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrella, Andrea; Catucci, Lucia; Agostiano, Angela

    2010-08-01

    In this work, studies on the effects produced by atrazine, terbutryn or diuron onto spinach photosynthetic materials were performed by observing changes in fluorescence emission and in electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of such herbicides; chloroplasts, thylakoids, Photosystem II-enriched thylakoids (BBYs) and isolated Photosystem II (PSII) were employed. This approach evidenced differences in the herbicide-photosynthetic material interactions going up-down from chloroplasts to proteins. Rapid emission increments were detected for chloroplasts and thylakoids, in particular in the presence of terbutryn; no remarkable emission increment was recorded when BBYs or PSII were used for this assay. The dependences of the chloroplast and thylakoid emission intensities upon herbicide concentration were investigated with responses even at concentrations below 10(-7)M. The influence of lowering the temperature was also tested, and the stabilizing effects on the resistances of the bio-samples against herbicides were recorded. Furthermore, Hill Reaction-based colorimetric assays were performed to monitor the electron transfer activities of the bio-samples in the presence of herbicides, after brief incubations. As a result, chloroplasts and thylakoids resulted to be sensitive tools in responding to concentrations even lower than 10(-7)M of most herbicides; nevertheless, an interesting sensitivity to herbicides was also observed for PSII. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Chinese herbal monomers on oxidative phosphorylation and membrane potential in cerebral mitochondria isolated from hypoxia-exposed rats in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Yan; Junze Liu

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is the key pathogenic mechanism of cerebral injury induced by high-altitude hypoxia. Some Chinese herbal monomers may exert anti-hypoxic effects through enhancing the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, effects of 10 kinds of Chinese herbal monomers on mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential of cerebral mitochondria isolated from hypoxia-exposed rats in vitro were investigated to screen anti-hypoxic drugs. Rats were exposed to a low-pressure environment of 405.35 mm Hg (54.04 kPa) for 3 days to establish high-altitude hypoxic models. Cerebral mitochondria were isolated and treated with different concentrations of Chinese herbal monomers (sinomenine, silymarin, glycyrrhizic acid, baicalin, quercetin, ginkgolide B, saffron, piperine, ginsenoside Rg1 and oxymatrine) for 5 minutes in vitro. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential were measured using a Clark oxygen electrode and the rhodamine 123 fluorescence analysis method, respectively. Hypoxic exposure significantly decreased the state 3 respiratory rate, respiratory control rate and mitochondrial membrane potential, and significantly increased the state 4 respiratory rate. Treatment with saffron, ginsenoside Rg1 and oxymatrine increased the respiratory control rate in cerebral mitochondria isolated from hypoxia-exposed rats in dose-dependent manners in vitro, while ginsenoside Rg1, piperine and oxymatrine significantly increased the mitochondrial membrane potential in cerebral mitochondria from hypoxia-exposed rats. The Chinese herbal monomers saffron, ginsenoside Rg1, piperine and oxymatrine could thus improve cerebral mitochondrial disorders in oxidative phosphorylation induced by hypobaric hypoxia exposure in vitro.

  14. Mitochondrial membrane potential is a suitable candidate for assessing pollution toxicity in fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmini, Ekambaram, E-mail: dstpadmini@rediffmail.com; Usha Rani, Munuswamy, E-mail: musharani.2007@rediffmail.com

    2011-09-01

    Fish inhabiting polluted estuaries are highly exposed to severe stress characterized by an oxidant-antioxidant imbalance. The aim of the study was to explore the use of stress parameters such as adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{psi}m) and total protein expression patterns as biomarkers against oxidant exposures in hepatocytes of Mugil cephalus living in either a contaminated (Test; Ennore) or uncontaminated (Control; Kovalam) estuary. Earlier, the pollutant stress impact was determined through light and electron microscopy studies. The ATP/ADP ratio was measured using high performance liquid chromatography; {Delta}{psi}m by fluorescent probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethyl benzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) dye and total protein expression patterns by protein profiling. The preponderance of stress impact was confirmed through microscopy studies that featured cytological alterations, disturbances in the surface morphology and in the cell organelles at the ultrastructural levels. Hepatocytes of test fish demonstrated a decrease in ATP and an increase in ADP and thereby alteration in ATP/ADP ratio (p < 0.05; 20.75%). A significant disturbance (p < 0.05; 26.57%) in {Delta}{psi}m with a ratio of J-aggregates/JC-1 monomer of 1 was observed for test fish hepatocytes compared to control group with a J-aggregates/JC-1 monomer ratio of 1.5. Quantitative assessment of protein expression levels also revealed enhanced induction of both low and high molecular weight proteins in test fish hepatocytes. The findings highlight the use of these parameters as the highly sensitive biomarkers in response to contaminant exposure compared to the routinely used antioxidant and oxidant stress parameters in biomonitoring programs. Among the measured parameters, the determination of {Delta}{psi}m may be suggested as a novel candidate as a biomarker because of its greater specificity

  15. Voltage-gated K+ currents in mouse articular chondrocytes regulate membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert B; Hatano, Noriyuki; Kondo, Colleen; Belke, Darrell D; Brown, Barry S; Kumar, Sanjay; Votta, Bartholomew J; Giles, Wayne R

    2010-01-01

    Membrane currents and resting potential of isolated primary mouse articular chondrocytes maintained in monolayer cell culture for 1-9 days were recorded using patch clamp methods. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the most abundantly expressed transcript of voltage-gated K(+) channels was for K(V)1.6, and immunological methods confirmed the expression of K(V)1.6 α-subunit proteins. These chondrocytes expressed a large time- and potential-dependent, Ca(2+)-independent 'delayed rectifier' K(+) current. Steady-state activation was well-fit by a Boltzmann function with a threshold near -50 mV, and a half-activation potential of -34.5 mV. The current was 50% blocked by 1.48 mM tetraethylammonium, 0.66 mM 4-aminopyridine and 20.6 nM α-dendrotoxin. The current inactivated very slowly at membrane potentials in the range of the resting potential of the chondrocytes. Resting membrane potential of the chondrocytes at room temperature (19-21°C) and in 5 mM external K(+) was -46.4 ± 1.3 mV (mean ± s.e.m; n = 23), near the 'foot' of the activation curve of this K(+) current. Resting potential was depolarized by an average of 4.2 ± 0.8 mV by 25 mM TEA, which blocked about 95% of the K(+) current. At a membrane potential of -50 mV, the apparent time constant of inactivation (tau(in)) was 37.9 s, and the 'steady-state' current level was 19% of that at a holding potential of -90 mV; at -40 mV, tau(in) was 20.3 s, and 'steady-state' current was 5% of that at -90 mV. These results demonstrate that in these primary cultured, mouse articular chondrocytes steady-state activation of a voltage-gated K(+) current contributes to resting membrane potential. However, this current is also likely to have a significant physiological role in repolarizing the chondrocyte following depolarizing stimuli that might occur in conditions of membrane stretch. For example, activation of TRP('transient receptor potential') non-specific cation channels in these cells during cyclic loading and unloading

  16. Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bovine Cortical Bone: Its Potential for Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bovine pericardium collagen membrane (BPCM had been widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR whose manufacturing process usually required chemical cross-linking to prolong its biodegradation. However, cross-linking of collagen fibrils was associated with poorer tissue integration and delayed vascular invasion. Objective. This study evaluated the potential of bovine cortical bone collagen membrane for GBR by evaluating its antigenicity potential, cytotoxicity, immune and tissue response, and biodegradation behaviors. Material and Methods. Antigenicity potential of demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane (DFDBCBM was done with histology-based anticellularity evaluation, while cytotoxicity was analyzed using MTT Assay. Evaluation of immune response, tissue response, and biodegradation was done by randomly implanting DFDBCBM and BPCM in rat’s subcutaneous dorsum. Samples were collected at 2, 5, and 7 days and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days for biocompatibility and tissue response-biodegradation study, respectively. Result. DFDBCBM, histologically, showed no retained cells; however, it showed some level of in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo study exhibited increased immune response to DFDBCBM in early healing phase; however, normal tissue response and degradation rate were observed up to 4 weeks after DFDBCBM implantation. Conclusion. Demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane showed potential for clinical application; however, it needs to be optimized in its biocompatibility to fulfill all requirements for GBR membrane.

  17. Subthreshold membrane-potential oscillations in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarropoulou, C; Avoli, M

    1995-12-15

    Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) were recorded intracellularly in 31 of 43 (>70%) immature CA3 hippocampal neurones (from 3-17 days postnatally). MPOs (3-5 mV, 3-15 Hz) occurred at resting membrane potential (RMP) in 20 of 31 neurones, or following depolarization (11 of 31 neurones); with sufficient depolarization spontaneous action potentials (APs) were generated from the positive-going phase of MPOs. In all cells, MPOs were blocked by steady membrane hyperpolarization. Tetrodotoxin abolished MPOs (n = 4); Co(2+) markedly reduced them (n = 3), and tetraethylammonium, added in the presence of TTX, revealed lower frequency oscillatory activity (n = 2). We conclude that subthreshold MPOs in immature hippocampus, possibly linked to theta rhythm generation and memory acquisition, depend on voltage-dependent Na+ electrogenesis and they might be additionally controlled by Ca(2+) and K+ conductances.

  18. Research on the ultrafast fluorescence property of thylakoid membranes of the wild-type and mutant rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任兆玉; 许晓明; 王水才; 辛越勇; 贺俊芳; 侯洵

    2003-01-01

    A high yielding rice variety mutant (Oryza sativa L., Zhenhui 249) with low chlorophyll b (Chl b) has been discovered in natural fields. It has a quality character controlled by a pair of recessive genes (nuclear gene). The partial loss of Chl b in content affects the efficiency of light harvest in a light harvest complex (LHC), thus producing the difference of the exciting energy transfer and the efficiency of photochemistry conversion between the mutant and wild-type rice in photosynthetic unit. The efficiency of utilizing light energy is higher in the mutant than that in the wildtype rice relatively. For further discussion of the above-mentioned difference and learning about the mechanism of the increase in the photochemical efficiency of the mutant, the pico-second resolution fluorescence spectrum measurement with delay-frame-scanning single photon counting technique is adopted. Thylakoid membranes of the mutant and the wild-type rice are excited by an Ar+ laser with a pulse width of 120ps, repetition rate of 4MHz and wavelength of 514nm. Compared with the time and spectrum property of exciting fluorescence, conclusions of those ultrafast dynamic experiments are: 1) The speeds of the exciting energy transferred in photo-system I are faster than that in photo-system II in both samples. 2) The speeds of the exciting energy transfer of mutant sample are faster than those of the wildtype. This might be one of the major reasons why the efficiency of photosynthesis is higher in mutant than that in the wild-type rice.

  19. Validation of non-fluorescent methods to reliably detect acrosomal and plasma membrane integrity of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, R R; Valle, C M R; Nichi, M; Muniz, J A P C; Nayudu, P L; Guimarães, M A B V

    2008-07-01

    Simple, rapid and stable sperm evaluation methods which have been optimized for common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) are critical for studies involving collection and evaluation of sperm in the field. This is particularly important for new species groups such as Callitrichidae where the sperm have been little studied. Of this family, C. jacchus is the best known, and has been chosen as a model species for other members of the genus Callithrix. The fundamental evaluation parameters for sperm of any species are viability and acrosomal status. Semen samples were collected by penile vibratory stimulation. To evaluate sperm plasma membrane integrity, Eosin-Nigrosin was tested here for the common marmoset sperm to be used under field conditions. Further, a non-fluorescent stain for acrosome, the "Simple" stain, developed for domestic and wild cats, was tested on common marmoset sperm. This was compared with a fluorescent staining, Fluorescein isothiocyanate-Pisum sativum agglutinin (FITC-PSA), routinely used and validated for common marmoset at the German Primate Centre to evaluate acrosomal integrity. Results obtained with the "Simple" stain showed a marked differentiation between sperm with intact and non-intact acrosome both with and without ionophore treatment and closely correlated with results obtained with FITC-PSA. Temperature had no effect on the results with the "Simple" stain and the complete processing is simple enough to be carried out under field conditions. These findings indicated that the "Simple" stain and Eosin-Nigrosin provide rapid and accurate results for C. jacchus sperm and that those methods can be reliably used as field tools for sperm evaluation for this species.

  20. Surface Modification of Polypropylene Membrane Using Biopolymers with Potential Applications for Metal Ion Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alberto Hernández-Aguirre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to present the modification of polypropylene (PP membranes using three different biopolymers, chitosan (CHI, potato starch (PS, and cellulose (CEL, in order to obtain three new materials. The modified membranes may be degraded easier than polypropylene ones and could be used as selective membranes for metal ions removal, among other applications. For this purpose, the UV energy induced graft copolymerization reaction among polypropylene membrane, acrylic acid, benzophenone (as photoinitiator, and the biopolymer (CHI, PS, or CEL was conducted. The results of FT-IR-ATR, XRD, TGA, DSC, SEM, BET, and AFM analyses and mechanical properties clearly indicate the successful modification of the membrane surface. The change of surface wettability was monitored by contact angle. The grafting reaction depends on natural polymer, reaction time, and concentration. In order to prove the potential application of the modified membranes, a preliminary study of sorption of metal ion was carried out. For this purpose, the PP-CHI membrane was chosen because of the high hydrophilicity, proportionate to -OH and NH2; these groups could act as ligands of metal ions, provoking the interaction between PP-CHI and M+ (PP-CHI-M+ and therefore the metal ion removal from water.

  1. Probing the potential of apigenin liposomes in enhancing bacterial membrane perturbation and integrity loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kacoli; Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Das, Subhayan; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2015-09-01

    Along with discovery of new antibacterial agents, it is important to develop novel drug delivery systems to effectively deliver drugs within bacterial cells for enhanced therapeutic activity. Liposomes have been extensively investigated as pharmaceutical carriers for improvement of therapeutic index of antimicrobial agents. The aim of this present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of free and liposomal formulation of apigenin, a plant based isoflavone and elucidate the mode of action. Distearoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes were prepared having nano-range particle size (104.3±1.8 nm), narrow particle distribution (0.204) and high encapsulation efficiency of apigenin (89.9±2.31%). Antibacterial activity of apigenin and efficacy of liposome-mediated apigenin delivery were determined from minimum inhibitory concentration values. Interaction studies using electron microscopy revealed adherence and fusion of liposomal apigenin with the bacteria causing membrane perturbation through reactive oxygen species generation which was evaluated by epi-fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting. The interaction of apigenin liposomes with bacterial membrane increased intracellular drug concentration and thus, can be employed to deliver apigenin within cells to augment its antibacterial activity. Increased efficacy and hemocompatibility of this formulation paves way for future evaluation of underlying molecular mechanisms and in vivo testing for enhanced therapeutic effects.

  2. Differential effects of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide on myogenic signaling, membrane potential, and contractions of mouse renal afferent arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingli; Lai, En Yin; Wellstein, Anton; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    Myogenic contraction is the principal component of renal autoregulation that protects the kidney from hypertensive barotrauma. Contractions are initiated by a rise in perfusion pressure that signals a reduction in membrane potential (Em) of vascular smooth muscle cells to activate voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Since ROS have variable effects on myogenic tone, we investigated the hypothesis that superoxide (O2 (·-)) and H2O2 differentially impact myogenic contractions. The myogenic contractions of mouse isolated and perfused single afferent arterioles were assessed from changes in luminal diameter with increasing perfusion pressure (40-80 mmHg). O2 (·-), H2O2, and Em were assessed by fluorescence microscopy during incubation with paraquat to increase O2 (·-) or with H2O2 Paraquat enhanced O2 (·-) generation and myogenic contractions (-42 ± 4% vs. -19 ± 4%, P contractions (-10 ± 1% vs. -19 ± 2%, P contractions with paraquat without preventing the reduction in Em Myogenic contractions were independent of the endothelium and largely independent of nitric oxide. We conclude that O2 (·-) and H2O2 activate different signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells linked to discreet membrane channels with opposite effects on Em and voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels and therefore have opposite effects on myogenic contractions.

  3. Fundamental transport mechanisms, fabrication and potential applications of nanoporous atomically thin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael S. H.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Jang, Doojoon; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-06-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional materials offer a new approach to controlling mass transport at the nanoscale. These materials can sustain nanoscale pores in their rigid lattices and due to their minimum possible material thickness, high mechanical strength and chemical robustness, they could be used to address persistent challenges in membrane separations. Here we discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the emerging field of nanoporous atomically thin membranes, focusing on the fundamental mechanisms of gas- and liquid-phase transport, membrane fabrication techniques and advances towards practical application. We highlight potential functional characteristics of the membranes and discuss applications where they are expected to offer advantages. Finally, we outline the major scientific questions and technological challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap from theoretical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to real-world applications.

  4. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Modeling the local potential at Pt nanoparticles in polymer electrolyte membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamibidgoli, Mohammad Javad; Melchy, Pierre-Éric Alix; Eikerling, Michael H

    2015-04-21

    We present a physical-analytical model for the potential distribution at Pt nanodeposits in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM). Experimental studies have shown that solid deposits of Pt in PEM play a dual role in radical-initiated membrane degradation. Surface reactions at Pt particles could facilitate the formation as well as the scavenging of ionomer-attacking radical species. The net radical balance depends on local equilibrium conditions at Pt nanodeposits in the PEM, specifically, their equivalent local electrode potential. Our approach utilizes a continuum description of crossover fluxes of reactant gases, coupled with the kinetics of electrochemical surface reactions at Pt nanodeposits to calculate the potential distribution. The local potential is a function of the PEM structure and composition, which is determined by PEM thickness, concentrations of H2 and O2, as well as the size and density distribution of Pt particles. Model results compare well with experimental data for the potential distribution in PEMs.

  6. Quantitative analysis of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells using high-content imaging, machine learning, and morphological binning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Anthony P; Cameron, Robert B; Speiser, Jaime L; Wolf, Bethany J; Peterson, Yuri K; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beeson, Craig C; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the processes of mitochondrial dynamics (fission, fusion, biogenesis, and mitophagy) has been hampered by the lack of automated, deterministic methods to measure mitochondrial morphology from microscopic images. A method to quantify mitochondrial morphology and function is presented here using a commercially available automated high-content wide-field fluorescent microscopy platform and R programming-language-based semi-automated data analysis to achieve high throughput morphological categorization (puncta, rod, network, and large & round) and quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conjunction with cellular respirometry to measure mitochondrial respiratory capacity, this method detected that increasing concentrations of toxicants known to directly or indirectly affect mitochondria (t-butyl hydroperoxide [TBHP], rotenone, antimycin A, oligomycin, ouabain, and carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone [FCCP]), decreased mitochondrial networked areas in cultured 661w cells to 0.60-0.80 at concentrations that inhibited respiratory capacity to 0.20-0.70 (fold change compared to vehicle). Concomitantly, mitochondrial swelling was increased from 1.4- to 2.3-fold of vehicle as indicated by changes in large & round areas in response to TBHP, oligomycin, or ouabain. Finally, the automated identification of mitochondrial location enabled accurate quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential by measuring intramitochondrial tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) fluorescence intensity. Administration of FCCP depolarized and administration of oligomycin hyperpolarized mitochondria, as evidenced by changes in intramitochondrial TMRM fluorescence intensities to 0.33- or 5.25-fold of vehicle control values, respectively. In summary, this high-content imaging method accurately quantified mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in hundreds of thousands of cells on a per-cell basis, with sufficient throughput for pharmacological

  7. Assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential using an on-chip microelectrode in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Dávila, Antonio; Wallace, Douglas C; Burke, Peter

    2010-07-07

    The mitochondrial membrane potential is used to generate and regulate energy in living systems, driving the conversion of ADP to ATP, regulating ion homeostasis, and controlling apoptosis, all central to human health and disease. Therefore, there is a need for tools to study its regulation in a controlled environment for potential clinical and scientific applications. For this aim, an on-chip tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP(+)) selective microelectrode sensor was constructed in a microfluidic environment. The concentration of isolated mitochondria (Heb7A) used in a membrane potential measurement was 0.3 ng microL(-1), four orders of magnitude smaller than the concentration used in conventional assays (3 microg microL(-1)). In addition, the volume of the chamber (85 microL) is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than traditional experiments. As a demonstration, changes in the membrane potential are clearly measured in response to a barrage of well-known substrates and inhibitors of the electron transport chain. This general approach, which to date has not been demonstrated for study of mitochondrial function and bio-energetics in generally, can be instrumental in advancing the field of mitochondrial research and clinical applications by allowing high throughput studies of the regulation, dynamics, and statistical properties of the mitochondrial membrane potential in response to inhibitors and inducers of apoptosis in a controlled (microfluidic) chemical environment.

  8. Double Potential Pulse Chronocoulometry for Detection of Plasma Membrane Cholesterol Efflux at Disk Platinum Microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Richard H.; Lu, Hui; Shaw, Kendrick; Chiel, Hillel J.; Kelley, Thomas J.; Burgess, James D.

    2016-01-01

    A double potential pulse scheme is reported for observation of cholesterol efflux from the plasma membrane of a single neuron cell. Capillary Pt disk microelectrodes having a thin glass insulator allow the 10 μm diameter electrode and cell to be viewed under optical magnification. The electrode, covalently functionalized with cholesterol oxidase, is positioned in contact with the cell surface resulting in enzyme catalyzed cholesterol oxidation and efflux of cholesterol from the plasma membrane at the electrode contact site. Enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide accumulates at the electrode/cell interface during a 5 s hold-time and is oxidized during application of a potential pulse. A second, replicate potential pulse is applied 0.5 s after the first potential pulse to gauge background charge prior to significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. The difference in charge passed between the first and second potential pulse provides a measure of hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme and is an indication of the cholesterol efflux. Control experiments for bare Pt microelectrodes in contact with the cell plasma membrane show difference charge signals in the range of about 7–10 pC. Enzyme-modified electrodes in contact with the plasma membrane show signals in the range of 16–26 pC. PMID:27330196

  9. Theoretical foundations of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of neurons encode temporal information via phase-locked spikes. In the avian auditory brainstem, neurons in the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) send phase-locked synaptic inputs to coincidence detector neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) that mediate sound localization. Previous modeling studies suggested that converging phase-locked synaptic inputs may give rise to a periodic oscillation in the membrane potential of their target neuron. Recent physiological recordings in vivo revealed that owl NL neurons changed their spike rates almost linearly with the amplitude of this oscillatory potential. The oscillatory potential was termed the sound analog potential, because of its resemblance to the waveform of the stimulus tone. The amplitude of the sound analog potential recorded in NL varied systematically with the interaural time difference (ITD), which is one of the most important cues for sound localization. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying ITD computation in the NM-NL circuit, we provide detailed theoretical descriptions of how phase-locked inputs form oscillating membrane potentials. We derive analytical expressions that relate presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors to the signal and noise components of the oscillation in both the synaptic conductance and the membrane potential. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of the theoretical formulations for the entire frequency ranges tested (1-8 kHz) and potential effects of higher harmonics on NL neurons with low best frequencies (<2 kHz).

  10. Parameter estimation in neuronal stochastic differential equation models from intracellular recordings of membrane potentials in single neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Samson, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    evolution. One-dimensional models are the stochastic integrate-and-fire neuronal diffusion models. Biophysical neuronal models take into account the dynamics of ion channels or synaptic activity, leading to multidimensional diffusion models. Since only the membrane potential can be measured......Dynamics of the membrane potential in a single neuron can be studied by estimating biophysical parameters from intracellular recordings. Diffusion processes, given as continuous solutions to stochastic differential equations, are widely applied as models for the neuronal membrane potential...

  11. Fluctuation pressure on a bio-membrane confined within a parabolic potential well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. B. Freund

    2012-01-01

    A compliant bio-membrane with a nominally flat reference configuration is prone to random transverse deflections when placed in water,due primarily to the Brownian motion of the water molecules.On the average,these fluctuations result in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium between the entropic energy of the water and the total free energy of the membrane.When the membrane is in close proximity to a parallel surface,that surface restricts the fluctuations of the membrane which,in turn,results in an increase in its free energy.The amount of that increase depends on the degree of confinement,and the resulting gradient in free energy with degree of confinement implies the existence of a confining pressure.In the present study,we assume that the confinement is in the form of a continuous parabolic potential well resisting fluctuation.Analysis leads to a closed form expression for the mean pressure resulting from this confinement,and the results are discussed within the broader context of results in this area.In particular,the results provide insights into the roles of membrane stiffness,number of degrees of freedom in the model of the membrane and other system parameters.

  12. A Review on the Potential Role of Basement Membrane Laminin in the Pathogenesis of Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, J P; Kimber, I

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reviewed alterations to basement membrane laminin in psoriasis and how disruption of this layer could lead to at least some of the pathological changes observed. We here postulate that basement membrane laminin is the key antigen in driving psoriasis, inducing a T cell-mediated autoimmune response. For laminin to be considered as the key autoantigen in psoriasis, it would be reasonable to expect the following to be demonstrable: (1) that autoantigens are present in psoriatic inflammation; (2) that basement membrane laminin is perturbed in involved and uninvolved skin, and that some of the pathological changes associated with psoriasis could be predicted as a sequel to this; (3) that disruption of the basement membrane is among the earliest events in the evolution of psoriatic lesions; (4) that as streptococcal pharyngitis is the most clearly defined event to trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, then a T cell-mediated autoimmune response to laminin should be anticipated as a potential sequelae to streptococcal pharyngitis; (5) that T cells in psoriasis can be shown to react to peptides with homology to laminin; (6) that HLACw6, as the most closely related gene associated with psoriasis and which is involved in antigen expression, should be preferentially expressed within lesional psoriasis towards the basement membrane, together with other proximal associated immune activity; and (7) that there is some association between antilaminin pemphigoid, a humorally mediated autoimmune disease to skin basement membrane laminin, and psoriasis. We here review the data relevant to each of these requirements.

  13. Membrane distillation for wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate treatment with water reuse potential

    KAUST Repository

    Naidu, Gayathri

    2016-11-29

    Membrane distillation (MD) was evaluated as a treatment option of wastewater reverse osmosis concentrate (WWROC) discharged from wastewater reclamation plants (WRPs). A direct contact MD (DCMD), at obtaining 85% water recovery of WWROC showed only 13–15% flux decline and produced good quality permeate (10–15 µS/cm, 99% ion rejection) at moderate feed temperature of 55 °C. Prevalent calcium carbonate (CaCO3) deposition on the MD membrane occurred in treating WWROC at elevated concentrations. The combination of low salinity and loose CaCO3 adhesion on the membrane did not significantly contribute to DCMD flux decline. Meanwhile, high organic content in WWROC (58–60 mg/L) resulted in a significant membrane hydrophobicity reduction (70% lower water contact angle than virgin membrane) attributed to low molecular weight organic adhesion onto the MD membrane. Granular activated carbon (GAC) pretreatment helped in reducing organic contents of WWROC by 46–50%, and adsorbed a range of hydrophobic and hydrophilic micropollutants. This ensured high quality water production by MD (micropollutants-free) and enhanced its reuse potential. The MD concentrated WWROC was suitable for selective ion precipitation, promising a near zero liquid discharge in WRPs.

  14. FCCP depolarizes plasma membrane potential by activating proton and Na+ currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Jo, Inho; Pak, Kim; Bae, Sung-Won; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Park, Jin; Zhu, Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a protonophore and uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, on plasma membrane potential and ionic currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The membrane potential and ionic currents of BAECs were recorded using the patch-clamp technique in current-clamp and voltage-clamp modes, respectively. FCCP activated ionic currents and depolarized the plasma membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Neither the removal of extracellular Ca2+ nor pretreatment with BAPTA/AM affected the FCCP-induced currents, implying that the currents are not associated with the FCCP-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i increase. FCCP-induced currents were significantly influenced by the changes in extracellular or intracellular pH; the increased proton gradient produced by lowering the extracellular pH or intracellular alkalinization augmented the changes in membrane potential and ionic currents caused by FCCP. FCCP-induced currents were significantly reduced under extracellular Na+-free conditions. The reversal potentials of FCCP-induced currents under Na+-free conditions were well fitted to the calculated equilibrium potential for protons. Interestingly, FCCP-induced Na+ transport (subtracted currents, I(control)- I(Na+-free) was closely dependent on extracellular pH, whereas FCCP-induced H+transport was not significantly affected by the absence of Na+. These results suggest that the FCCP-induced ionic currents and depolarization, which are strongly dependent on the plasmalemmal proton gradient, are likely to be mediated by both H+ and Na+ currents across the plasma membrane. The relationship between H+ and Na+ transport still needs to be determined.

  15. Computation of surface electrical potentials of plant cell membranes . Correspondence To published zeta potentials from diverse plant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinraide; Yermiyahu; Rytwo

    1998-10-01

    A Gouy-Chapman-Stern model has been developed for the computation of surface electrical potential (psi0) of plant cell membranes in response to ionic solutes. The present model is a modification of an earlier version developed to compute the sorption of ions by wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Scout 66) root plasma membranes. A single set of model parameters generates values for psi0 that correlate highly with published zeta potentials of protoplasts and plasma membrane vesicles from diverse plant sources. The model assumes ion binding to a negatively charged site (R- = 0.3074 &mgr;mol m-2) and to a neutral site (P0 = 2.4 &mgr;mol m-2) according to the reactions R- + IZ &rlharr; RIZ-1 and P0 + IZ &rlharr; PIZ, where IZ represents an ion of charge Z. Binding constants for the negative site are 21, 500 M-1 for H+, 20,000 M-1 for Al3+, 2,200 M-1 for La3+, 30 M-1 for Ca2+ and Mg2+, and 1 M-1 for Na+ and K+. Binding constants for the neutral site are 1/180 the value for binding to the negative site. Ion activities at the membrane surface, computed on the basis of psi0, appear to determine many aspects of plant-mineral interactions, including mineral nutrition and the induction and alleviation of mineral toxicities, according to previous and ongoing studies. A computer program with instructions for the computation of psi0, ion binding, ion concentrations, and ion activities at membrane surfaces may be requested from the authors.

  16. Life cell quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential at the single organelle level.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Koopman, W.J.; Testa, E.R.; Jong, AS de; Swarts, H.G.P.; Mayatepek, E.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi) is key to mitochondrial function and cellular survival. Here, we aimed to develop an automated protocol allowing sensitive quantification of Deltapsi in living cells at the level of individual mitochondria. Human skin fibroblasts were stained with the fluo

  17. Membrane potential plays a dual role for chloride transport across toad skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Rasmussen, B E

    1983-01-01

    -dependent currents are not caused by a trivial Goldmand-type rectification and ion redistributions following transepithelial potential pertubations. Extended with a dynamic Cl- permeability in the apical membrane according to a Hodgkin-Huxley kinetic scheme, the model predicts voltage clamp data which closely...

  18. EFFECTS OF AMINO ACIDS ON THE MEMBRANE POTENTIAL OF TOAD OOCYTES AND THE MECHANISMS INVOLVED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYu-Feng; CHENGJiun; CHENGZhi-Ping

    1989-01-01

    The etTects of 23 amino acids on the membrane potential of toad ( Bufo bufo gargarizans ) oocytes and the mechanisms involved were investigated in vitro by means of microelectrode. At a concentration of I mmol/L-alanine, leucine and lyaine induced signfiant depolarization, and tryptophan provoked a marked hyperpolarization during

  19. Hyperthermic potentiation of cisplatin by magnetic nanoparticle heaters is correlated with an increase in cell membrane fluidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Berrios MP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Merlis P Alvarez-Berríos, Amalchi Castillo, Janet Mendéz, Orlando Soto, Carlos Rinaldi, Madeline Torres-LugoDepartment of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto RicoAbstract: Magnetic fluid hyperthermia as a cancer treatment method is an attractive alternative to other forms of hyperthermia. It is based on the heat released by magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field. Recent studies have shown that magnetic fluid hyperthermia-treated cells respond significantly better to chemotherapeutic treatment compared with cells treated with hot water hyperthermia under the same temperature conditions. We hypothesized that this synergistic effect is due to an additional stress on the cellular membrane, independent of the thermal heat dose effect that is induced by nanoparticles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. This would result in an increase in Cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II (cDDP, cisplatin uptake via passive transport. To test this hypothesis, we exposed cDDP-treated cells to extracellular copper in order to hinder the human cell copper transporter (hCTR1-mediated active transport of cDDP. This, in turn, can increase the passive transport of the drug through the cell membrane. Our results did not show statistically significant differences in surviving fractions for cells treated concomitantly with magnetic fluid hyperthermia and cDDP, in the presence or absence of copper. Nonetheless, significant copper-dependent variations in cell survival were observed for samples treated with combined cDDP and hot water hyperthermia. These results correlated with platinum uptake studies, which showed that cells treated with magnetic fluid hyperthermia had higher platinum uptake than cells treated with hot water hyperthermia. Changes in membrane fluidity were tested through fluorescence anisotropy measurements using trimethylamine-diphenylhexatriene. Additional uptake studies were conducted with

  20. Concentration of field and skim latex by microfiltration - membrane fouling and biochemical methane potential of serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongmak, Narumol; Sridang, Porntip; Puetpaiboon, Udomphon; Grasmick, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cross-flow microfiltration was used to concentrate field and skim latex suspensions and recover the smallest compounds (proteins, sugars, etc.) in permeate (serum solutions). The experiments were performed in a lab-scale microfiltration unit equipped with ceramic membranes. In continuous mode, the operations were performed at constant trans-membrane pressure (0.5 bars), constant cross-flow velocity (3 m/s) and constant temperature (28 ± 2°C). In retentate, the volumetric concentration factor was only close to 2 (about 54% of total solid content, TSC) when concentrating the field latex suspensions, and it reached 10 (close to 40% TSC) when concentrating skim latex suspensions. The quality of retentate suspensions let envisage a significant potential of industrial valorization. The membrane fouling rates appeared as an increasing function of dry rubber content suspension, and the main fouling origin (94%) was linked to a reversible accumulation of suspended compounds on the membrane surface. Permeate appeared as a clear yellow solution containing the smallest soluble organic fractions that show a high degree of biodegradability when using biochemical methane potential tests. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was then higher than 92% and the methane production yield was close to 0.29 NLCH4/gCODremoved. The association of a membrane separation step and anaerobic digestion appeared, then, as a relevant solution to recover rubber content from skim latex suspensions and energy from the anaerobic digestion of serum.

  1. Evaluation of the potential anti-adhesion effect of the PVA/Gelatin membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sang-Ho; Son, So-Ra; Kumar Sakar, Swapan; Nguyen, Thi-Hiep; Kim, Shin-Woo; Min, Young-Ki; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2014-05-01

    A common and prevailing complication for patients with abdominal surgery is the peritoneal adhesion that follows during the post-operative recovery period. Biodegradable polymers have been suggested as a barrier to prevent the peritoneal adhesion. In this work, as a preventive method, PVA/Gelatin hydrogel-based membrane was investigated with various combinations of PVA and gelatin (50/50, 30/70/, and 10/90). Membranes were made by casting method using hot PVA-gelatin solution and the gelatin was cross-linked by exposing UV irradiation for 5 days to render stability of the produced sheathed form in the physiological environment. Physical crosslinking was chosen to avoid the problems of potential cytotoxic effect of chemical crosslinking. Their materials characterization and mechanical properties were evaluated by SEM surface characterization, hydrophilicity, biodegradation rate, and so forth. Cytocompatibility was observed by in vitro experiments with cell proliferation using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the MTT assay by L-929 mouse fibroblast cells. The fabricated PVA/Gel membranes were implanted between artificially defected cecum and peritoneal wall in rats and were sacrificed after 1 and 2 weeks post-operative to compare their tissue adhesion extents with that of control group where the defected surface was not separated by PVA/Gel membrane. The PVA/Gel membrane (10/90) significantly reduced the adhesion extent and showed to be a potential candidate for the anti-adhesion application.

  2. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function.

  3. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions.

  4. Revealing membrane potential by advanced impedance spectroscopy: theoretical and experimental aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, M.; Bratu, D.; Olaru, A.; Polonschii, C.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    In spite of recent advancement of novel optical and electrical techniques, availability of non-invasive, label-free methods to assess membrane potential of living cells is still an open issue. The theory linking membrane potential to the low frequency α dispersion exhibited by suspensions of spherical shelled particles (presenting a net charge distribution on the inner side of the shell) has been pioneered in our previous studies with emphasis on the permittivity spectra. We now report on both theoretical and experimental aspects showing that whereas α dispersion is related to a rather large variation exhibited by the permittivity spectrum the decrement presented by impedance magnitude spectrum is either extremely small, or occurs (for large cells) at very low frequencies (~mHz) explaining the lack of experimental bioimpedance data on the matter. Based on the microscopic model we indicate that an appropriate design of the experiment may enable access to membrane potential as well as to other relevant parameters when investigating living cells and charged lipid vesicles. We discuss the effect on the low frequency of permittivity and impedance spectra of: I. Parameters pertaining to cell membrane i.e. (i) membrane potential, (ii) size of the cells/vesicles, (iii) conductivity; II. Conductivity of the outer medium. A novel measuring set-up has recently been developed within the International Centre of Biodynamics allowing for sensitive low frequency (~10mHz) four point (bio)impedance assays. Its capability to test theoretical predictions is reported as well. The far reaching implications of this study applicability for life sciences (noninvasive access to the dynamics of relevant cell parameters) as well as for biosensing applications, e.g. assess the cytotoxicity of a wide range of stimuli, will be outlined.

  5. Distributed computing for membrane-based modeling of action potential propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, D; Rogers, J M; Smith, W M; Pollard, A E

    2000-08-01

    Action potential propagation simulations with physiologic membrane currents and macroscopic tissue dimensions are computationally expensive. We, therefore, analyzed distributed computing schemes to reduce execution time in workstation clusters by parallelizing solutions with message passing. Four schemes were considered in two-dimensional monodomain simulations with the Beeler-Reuter membrane equations. Parallel speedups measured with each scheme were compared to theoretical speedups, recognizing the relationship between speedup and code portions that executed serially. A data decomposition scheme based on total ionic current provided the best performance. Analysis of communication latencies in that scheme led to a load-balancing algorithm in which measured speedups at 89 +/- 2% and 75 +/- 8% of theoretical speedups were achieved in homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters of workstations. Speedups in this scheme with the Luo-Rudy dynamic membrane equations exceeded 3.0 with eight distributed workstations. Cluster speedups were comparable to those measured during parallel execution on a shared memory machine.

  6. The insecticide DDT decreases membrane potential and cell input resistance of cultured human liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefczik, K; Buff, K

    1984-10-03

    The resting membrane potential, Em, and the cell input resistance, Rinp, of cultured human Chang liver cells were measured using the single electrode 'double-pulse' current clamp technique, following exposure of the cells to the insecticide DDT (20 microM). In control (unexposed) cells, the mean Em was -24 mV, and the mean Rinp was 30 M omega. Neither parameter was significantly impaired after 1 h of cell exposure to DDT. But after 7 and 48 h, the Em was depolarized by 15 and 25 mV, respectively, in parallel with a decrease of the cell input resistance. The strongly time-delayed effect of DDT on Chang liver cell membranes may indicate a mode of interaction different from excitable membranes.

  7. [Changes in the input resistance and membrane potential of a neuron developing a trace effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'iakonova, T L; Mikhal'tsev, I E

    1983-06-01

    Trace effects in the change of spike activity, input resistance (Rinp) and membrane potential of neurons of the mollusk brain were studied in 36 "silent" brain neurons of Limnaea stagnalis in conditions of 20-min intracellular application of sinusoidal current with the threshold frequency 0.1 Hz. Some neurons revealed the effect of facilitation: the rise of activity with membrane depolarization and an increase of Rinp. Other neurons revealed the fall of activity accompanied by hyperpolarization and a decrease of Rinp. The change of Rinp as a trace effect is at its maximum at the frequency of the current used in the intracellular application. This suggests that the neuronal plasticity in "learning" is just based on the Rinp trace effects. Some of the neurons revealed no change in Rinp, membrane polarization or electrical response to applied stimulation. Possible origin of the above effects is discussed.

  8. Electric field modulation of the membrane potential in solid-state ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Weihua; Reed, Mark A

    2012-12-12

    Biological ion channels are molecular devices that allow a rapid flow of ions across the cell membrane. Normal physiological functions, such as generating action potentials for cell-to-cell communication, are highly dependent on ion channels that can open and close in response to external stimuli for regulating ion permeation. Mimicking these biological functions using synthetic structures is a rapidly progressing yet challenging area. Here we report the electric field modulation of the membrane potential phenomena in mechanically and chemically robust solid-state ion channels, an abiotic analogue to the voltage-gated ion channels in living systems. To understand the complex physicochemical processes in the electric field regulated membrane potential behavior, both quasi-static and transient characteristics of converting transmembrane ion gradients into electric potential are investigated. It is found that the transmembrane potential can be adequately tuned by an external electrical stimulation, thanks to the unique properties of the voltage-regulated selective ion transport through a nanoscale channel.

  9. Monitoring of the proton electrochemical gradient in reconstituted vesicles: quantitative measurements of both transmembrane potential and intravesicular pH by ratiometric fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoubek, Ales; Vecer, Jaroslav; Sigler, Karel

    2007-03-01

    Proteoliposomes carrying reconstituted yeast plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in their lipid membrane or plasma membrane vesicles are model systems convenient for studying basic electrochemical processes involved in formation of the proton electrochemical gradient (Deltamicro(H) (+)) across the microbial or plant cell membrane. Deltapsi- and pH-sensitive fluorescent probes were used to monitor the gradients formed between inner and outer volume of the reconstituted vesicles. The Deltapsi-sensitive fluorescent ratiometric probe oxonol VI is suitable for quantitative measurements of inside-positive Deltapsi generated by the reconstituted H(+)-ATPase. Its Deltapsi response can be calibrated by the K(+)/valinomycin method and ratiometric mode of fluorescence measurements reduces undesirable artefacts. In situ pH-sensitive fluorescent probe pyranine was used for quantitative measurements of pH inside the proteoliposomes. Calibration of pH-sensitive fluorescence response of pyranine entrapped inside proteoliposomes was performed with several ionophores combined in order to deplete the gradients passively formed across the membrane. Presented model system offers a suitable tool for simultaneous monitoring of both components of the proton electrochemical gradient, Deltapsi and DeltapH. This approach should help in further understanding how their formation is interconnected on biomembranes and even how transport of other ions is combined to it.

  10. Interventional effect of phycocyanin on mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of PC12 cells after hypoxia/reoxygenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Jiang; Yunliang Guo; Hongbing Chen

    2006-01-01

    -hypoxia group were cultured with oxygen and were measured at 1 hour after hypoxia/reoxygenation. ③ Detecting items: At 1, 2and 3 hours after reoxygenation, absorbance (A value) of PC12 cells was measured with MTT technique so as to observe activity and quantity of cells. Fluorescence intensity of PC12 cells marked by rhodamine 123was measured with confocal microscope in order to observe changes of mitochondrial membrane potential.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparisons between quantity and activity of PC12 cells and mitochondrial membrane potential at 1, 2 and 3 hours after reoxygenation.RESULTS: ① Effect of phycocyanin on quantity and activity of PC12 cells: A value was 0.924±0.027 in adding phycocyanin group and 0.924±0.033 in non-adding phycocyanin group. A value was lower in model control group and phycocyanin group than that in non-hypoxia group at 1, 2 and 3 hours after reoxygenation (0.817±0.053, 0.838±0.037, 0.875±0.029; 0.842±0.029, 0.872±0.025, 0.906±0.023, P < 0.05). A value was higher in phycocyanin group than that in model control group at 1, 2 and 3 after culture (P < 0.05).With culture time being longer, A value was increased gradually in phycocyanin group and model control group after reoxygenation (P < 0.05). ② Effect of phycocyanin on mitochondrial membrane potential of PC12 cells: Fluorescence intensity was 2.967±0.253 in adding phycocyanin group and 2.962±0.294 in non-adding phycocyanin group. Fluorescence intensity was lower in model control group and phycocyanin group than that in non-hypoxia group at 1, 2 and 3 hours after hypoxia/reoxygenation (1.899±0.397, 2.119±0.414,2.287±0.402; 2.191±0.377, 2.264±0.359, 2.436±0.471, P < 0.05); but it was higher in phycocyanin group than that in model control group at 1, 2 and 3 after reoxygenation (P < 0.05). With culture time being longer, fluorescence intensity was increased gradually in phycocyanin group and model control group after reoxygenation (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Phycocyanin and

  11. Variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production by natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kichise, Yuki; Izumoto, Eiji; Nakayama, Shunichi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Research on the relationship between mitochondrial membrane potential and fermentation profile is being intensely pursued because of the potential for developing advanced fermentation technologies. In the present study, we isolated naturally occurring strains of yeast from sake mash that produce high levels of malic acid and demonstrate that variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production. To define the underlying biochemical mechanism, we determined the activities of enzymes required for malic acid synthesis and found that pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase activities in strains that produce high levels of malic acid were elevated compared with the standard sake strain K901. These results inspired us to hypothesize that decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was responsible for increased malic acid synthesis, and we present data supporting this hypothesis. Thus, the mitochondrial membrane potential of high malic acid producers was lower compared with standard strains. We conclude that mitochondrial membrane potential correlates with malic acid production.

  12. Impact of organic fractions identified by SEC and fluorescence EEM on the hydraulic reversibility of ultrafiltration membrane fouling by secondary effluents

    KAUST Repository

    Haberkampa, Jens

    2011-05-01

    Loss of membrane filtration performance due to organic fouling is still a significant drawback for the application of low-pressure membranes in tertiary wastewater treatment. The present study investigates the relevance of different organic fractions present in secondary effluents in terms of hydraulically reversible and irreversible fouling of hollow-fibre ultrafiltration membranes. A good correlation between the hydraulically reversible filtration resistance and the total organic biopolymer concentration according to size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was observed. Qualitatively biopolymers consist mainly of polysaccharides as well as proteins with high molecular weight. Polysaccharides are retained by the membrane pores, but can be removed by simple UF backwashing. On the other hand, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) analysis indicates that the extent of the hydraulically irreversible fouling correlates with the presence of protein-like substances. Removal of protein-like substances by biological slow sand filtration or chemical coagulation results in the significant reduction of the hydraulically irreversible fouling, which is presumably due to proteins in the molecular range of biopolymers. In contrast to the comparatively low sensitivity of colorimetric methods for the analysis of proteins and polysaccharides, the combined application of size exclusion chromatography and fluorescence EEM analysis is a promising tool for the determination of the organic fouling propensity of secondary effluents. ©2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-mediated cation entry depolarizes membrane potential and activates p38 MAP kinase in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiffler, Ina; Behnke, Jane; Ziesemer, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2016-09-01

    Membrane potential (Vm)-, Na(+)-, or Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dyes were used to analyze changes in Vm or intracellular ion concentrations in airway epithelial cells treated with Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin (Hla), a major virulence factor of pathogenic strains of these bacteria. Gramicidin, a channel-forming peptide causing membrane permeability to monovalent cations, a mutated form of Hla, rHla-H35L, which forms oligomers in the plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells but fails to form functional transmembrane pores, or the cyclodextrin-derivative IB201, a blocker of the Hla pore, were used to investigate the permeability of the pore. Na(+) as well as Ca(2+) ions were able to pass the Hla pore and accumulated in the cytosol. The pore-mediated influx of calcium ions was blocked by IB201. Treatment of cells with recombinant Hla resulted in plasma membrane depolarization as well as in increases in the phosphorylation levels of paxillin (signaling pathway mediating disruption of the actin cytoskeleton) and p38 MAP kinase (signaling pathway resulting in defensive actions). p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but not paxillin phosphorylation, was elicited by treatment of cells with gramicidin. Although treatment of cells with rHla-H35L resulted in the formation of membrane-associated heptamers, none of these cellular effects were observed in our experiments. This indicates that formation of functional Hla-transmembrane pores is required to induce the cell physiological changes mediated by α-toxin. Specifically, the changes in ion equilibria and plasma membrane potential are important activators of p38 MAP kinase, a signal transduction module involved in host cell defense.

  14. A new total antioxidant potential measurements using RP-HPLC assay with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głód, Bronisław K; Piszcz, Paweł; Czajka, Katarzyna; Zarzycki, Paweł K

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, an improved total antioxidant potential (TAP) estimation using high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay with fluorometric detection has been described. The principle of this method is based on the hydroxyl radicals generated in the Fenton-like reaction and subsequently detected using hydroxyterephthalic acid (HTPA), which is a reaction product of hydroxyl radicals and terephthalic acid (TPA), working as a sensing compound. HTPA quantity in the samples was measured by fluorescence detector working at excitation and emission wavelengths equal to 312 and 428 nm, respectively. A number of key experimental conditions including the influence of the reaction (incubation) time on the surface areas of HTPA peaks, concentration of Fe(II) ions as well as the influence of concentration of TPA on the surface area of the chromatographic peak of HTPA were optimized to the characteristic feature of TAP measurements. The elaborated assay has been used to evaluate TAP values of selected low-molecular mass compounds like pyrogallol, tryptamine, and n-alcohols (methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol) as well as chlorogenic and ascorbic acids and benzoic acid derivatives, which are commonly present in the food samples.

  15. Ling’s Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Tamagawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling’s adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling’s adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling’s adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology.

  16. Ling's Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Funatani, Makoto; Ikeda, Kota

    2016-01-26

    The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling's adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling's adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological) system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling's adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology.

  17. Synaptic inhibition and excitation estimated via the time constant of membrane potential fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rune W; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2013-08-01

    When recording the membrane potential, V, of a neuron it is desirable to be able to extract the synaptic input. Critically, the synaptic input is stochastic and nonreproducible so one is therefore often restricted to single-trial data. Here, we introduce means of estimating the inhibition and excitation and their confidence limits from single sweep trials. The estimates are based on the mean membrane potential, V, and the membrane time constant, τ. The time constant provides the total conductance (G = capacitance/τ) and is extracted from the autocorrelation of V. The synaptic conductances can then be inferred from V when approximating the neuron as a single compartment. We further employ a stochastic model to establish limits of confidence. The method is verified on models and experimental data, where the synaptic input is manipulated pharmacologically or estimated by an alternative method. The method gives best results if the synaptic input is large compared with other conductances, the intrinsic conductances have little or no time dependence or are comparably small, the ligand-gated kinetics is faster than the membrane time constant, and the majority of synaptic contacts are electrotonically close to soma (recording site). Although our data are in current clamp, the method also works in V-clamp recordings, with some minor adaptations. All custom made procedures are provided in Matlab.

  18. SIMULATION OF THE LIGHT-INDUCED OSCILLATIONS OF THE MEMBRANE-POTENTIAL IN POTAMOGETON LEAF-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIEDEMA, H; PRINS, HBA

    1993-01-01

    An attempt has been made to simulate the light-induced oscillations of the membrane potential of Potamogeton lucens leaf cells in relation to the apoplastic pH changes. Previously it was demonstrated that the membrane potential of these cells can be described in terms of proton movements only. It is

  19. Tension moderation and fluctuation spectrum in simulated lipid membranes under an applied electric potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loubet, Bastien; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of an applied electric potential on the mechanics of a coarse grained POPC bilayer under tension. The size and duration of our simulations allow for a detailed and accurate study of the fluctuations. Effects on the fluctuation spectrum, tension, bending rigidity, and bil......We investigate the effect of an applied electric potential on the mechanics of a coarse grained POPC bilayer under tension. The size and duration of our simulations allow for a detailed and accurate study of the fluctuations. Effects on the fluctuation spectrum, tension, bending rigidity......, and bilayer thickness are investigated in detail. In particular, the least square fitting technique is used to calculate the fluctuation spectra. The simulations confirm a recently proposed theory that the effect of an applied electric potential on the membrane will be moderated by the elastic properties...... fluctuations. The effect of the applied electric potential on the bending rigidity is non-existent within error bars. However, when the membrane is stretched there is a point where the bending rigidity is lowered due to a decrease of the thickness of the membrane. All these effects should prove important...

  20. Evaluation of potential emission spectra for the reliable classification of fluorescently coded materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2011-06-01

    The conservation and efficient use of natural and especially strategic resources like oil and water have become global issues, which increasingly initiate environmental and political activities for comprehensive recycling programs. To effectively reutilize oil-based materials necessary in many industrial fields (e.g. chemical and pharmaceutical industry, automotive, packaging), appropriate methods for a fast and highly reliable automated material identification are required. One non-contacting, color- and shape-independent new technique that eliminates the shortcomings of existing methods is to label materials like plastics with certain combinations of fluorescent markers ("optical codes", "optical fingerprints") incorporated during manufacture. Since time-resolved measurements are complex (and expensive), fluorescent markers must be designed that possess unique spectral signatures. The number of identifiable materials increases with the number of fluorescent markers that can be reliably distinguished within the limited wavelength band available. In this article we shall investigate the reliable detection and classification of fluorescent markers with specific fluorescence emission spectra. These simulated spectra are modeled based on realistic fluorescence spectra acquired from material samples using a modern VNIR spectral imaging system. In order to maximize the number of materials that can be reliably identified, we evaluate the performance of 8 classification algorithms based on different spectral similarity measures. The results help guide the design of appropriate fluorescent markers, optical sensors and the overall measurement system.

  1. Membrane Potential Dynamics of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons during Hippocampal Ripples in Awake Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Brad K; Moreaux, Laurent C; Lubenov, Evgueniy V; Siapas, Athanassios G

    2016-02-17

    Ripples are high-frequency oscillations associated with population bursts in area CA1 of the hippocampus that play a prominent role in theories of memory consolidation. While spiking during ripples has been extensively studied, our understanding of the subthreshold behavior of hippocampal neurons during these events remains incomplete. Here, we combine in vivo whole-cell and multisite extracellular recordings to characterize the membrane potential dynamics of identified CA1 pyramidal neurons during ripples. We find that the subthreshold depolarization during ripples is uncorrelated with the net excitatory input to CA1, while the post-ripple hyperpolarization varies proportionately. This clarifies the circuit mechanism keeping most neurons silent during ripples. On a finer timescale, the phase delay between intracellular and extracellular ripple oscillations varies systematically with membrane potential. Such smoothly varying delays are inconsistent with models of intracellular ripple generation involving perisomatic inhibition alone. Instead, they suggest that ripple-frequency excitation leading inhibition shapes intracellular ripple oscillations.

  2. Identifying potential selective fluorescent probes for cancer-associated protein carbonic anhydrase IX using a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Rhiannon L; Floriano, Wely B

    2014-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a biomarker for tumor hypoxia. Fluorescent inhibitors of CAIX have been used to study hypoxic tumor cell lines. However, these inhibitor-based fluorescent probes may have a therapeutic effect that is not appropriate for monitoring treatment efficacy. In the search for novel fluorescent probes that are not based on known inhibitors, a database of 20,860 fluorescent compounds was virtually screened against CAIX using hierarchical virtual ligand screening (HierVLS). The screening database contained 14,862 compounds tagged with the ATTO680 fluorophore plus an additional 5998 intrinsically fluorescent compounds. Overall ranking of compounds to identify hit molecular probe candidates utilized a principal component analysis (PCA) approach. Four potential binding sites, including the catalytic site, were identified within the structure of the protein and targeted for virtual screening. Available sequence information for 23 carbonic anhydrase isoforms was used to prioritize the four sites based on the estimated "uniqueness" of each site in CAIX relative to the other isoforms. A database of 32 known inhibitors and 478 decoy compounds was used to validate the methodology. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis using the first principal component (PC1) as predictive score for the validation database yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92. AUC is interpreted as the probability that a binder will have a better score than a non-binder. The use of first component analysis of binding energies for multiple sites is a novel approach for hit selection. The very high prediction power for this approach increases confidence in the outcome from the fluorescent library screening. Ten of the top scoring candidates for isoform-selective putative binding sites are suggested for future testing as fluorescent molecular probe candidates.

  3. Potential of two-line atomic fluorescence for temperature imaging in turbulent indium-oxide-producing flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Münsterjohann, Bettina; Huber, Franz J. T.; Klima, Tobias C.; Holfelder, Sandra; Engel, Sascha R. [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Lehrstuhl für Technische Thermodynamik (LTT) (Germany); Miller, Joseph D. [Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (United States); Meyer, Terrence R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT) (Germany); Will, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.will@fau.de [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Lehrstuhl für Technische Thermodynamik (LTT) (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The applicability of two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) for temperature imaging in an indium-based flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) process is demonstrated using a single tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to generate the required excitation wavelengths consecutively. Single-shot images of the detected fluorescence signals demonstrate that the signal levels in the flame are suitable for evaluation of temperature and verify the capability and potential of the measurement technique directly during particle formation without additional indium seeding. Qualitative averaged two-dimensional temperature distributions in the FSP flame are presented, showing the influence of varying sheath gas flow rates on the resulting temperature distribution. With the addition of a second OPO and detection system, the two fluorescence signals acquired consecutively in this work could be obtained simultaneously and enable spatio-temporally resolved single-shot temperature measurements in flame synthesis processes of indium-containing nanoparticles.

  4. Effect of cadmium and lead on the membrane potential and photoelectric reaction of Nitellopsis obtusa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtyka, Renata; Burdach, Zbigniew; Karcz, Waldemar

    2011-03-01

    The effects of Cd and Pb on membrane potential (E(m)) and photoelectric reaction of Nitellopsis obtusa cells were investigated. It was found that Cd and Pb at 1.0 mM caused a depolarization of the E(m), whereas both metals at lower concentrations changed the E(m) in a different way. Pb at 0.1 mM and 0.01 mM hyperpolarized the E(m), whereas Cd at the same concentrations depolarized and did not change the E(m), respectively. In the presence of 0.01 mM Pb, the light-induced hyperpolarization of the E(m) was by 18% higher as compared to the control, whereas at 1.0 mM Pb it was by 40% lower. Pb at 0.1 mM and Cd at 0.01 mM or 5 × 0.01 mM did not change the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. However, in the presence of Cd at 0.1 mM and 1.0 mM this hyperpolarization was 2-fold lower or was completely abolished, respectively. These results suggest that at high Cd and Pb concentrations both depolarization of the E(m) and decrease of light-induced membrane hyperpolarization in Nitellopsis obtusa cells are probably due to inhibition of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, whereas both metals at lower concentrations differ in mechanism of membrane potential changes.

  5. Synchronous plasma membrane electrochemical potential oscillations during yeast colony development and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuse; Gásková, Dana; Kucerová, Helena

    2009-05-01

    Microorganisms that survive in natural environments form organized multicellular communities, biofilms and colonies with specific properties. During stress and nutrient limitation, slow growing and senescent cells in such communities retain vital processes by maintaining plasma membrane integrity and retaining the ability to generate transmembrane electrochemical gradients. We report the use of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonial model to show that population growth in a multicellular community depends on nutrient diffusion and that resting cells start to accumulate from the beginning of the second acidic phase of colony development. Despite differentiation of colony members, synchronous transmembrane potential oscillation was detected in the organized colony. The electrochemical membrane potential periodically oscillated at frequencies between those for circadian to infradian rhythms during colony aging and transiently decreased at time points previously linked with rebuilding of yeast metabolism. Despite extensive decreases in the intracellular ATP concentration and in the amount and activity of the plasma membrane proton pump during nutrient limited growth and colony aging, the transmembrane electrochemical potential appeared to be maintained above a level critical for population survival.

  6. On Neuron Membrane Potential Distributions for Voltage and Time Dependent Current Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salig, J. B.; Carpio-Bernido, M. V.; Bernido, C. C.; Bornales, J. B.

    Tracking variations of neuronal membrane potential in response to multiple synaptic inputs remains an important open field of investigation since information about neural network behavior and higher brain functions can be inferred from such studies. Much experimental work has been done, with recent advances in multi-electrode recordings and imaging technology giving exciting results. However, experiments have also raised questions of compatibility with available theoretical models. Here we show how methods of modern infinite dimensional analysis allow closed form expressions for important quantities rich in information such as the conditional probability density (cpd). In particular, we use a Feynman integral approach where fluctuations in the dynamical variable are parametrized with Hida white noise variables. The stochastic process described then gives variations in time of the relative membrane potential defined as the difference between the neuron membrane and firing threshold potentials. We obtain the cpd for several forms of current modulation coefficients reflecting the flow of synaptic currents, and which are analogous to drift coefficients in the configuration space Fokker-Planck equation. In particular, we consider cases of voltage and time dependence for current modulation for periodic and non-periodic oscillatory current modulation described by sinusoidal and Bessel functions.

  7. A preliminary study of protoporphyrin-IX as a potential candidate for identification of lung cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Dae-Sung; Kim, Hong-Tae; Jheon, Sang-Hoon; Park, Seung-Il; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2009-01-01

    There is need for a cheap, sensitive, and specific method to identify and localize early stage lung cancer. In order to improve the sensitivity of fluorescent agents that exhibit selective tumor uptake that are used as population screening tools for the detection of early lung cancer, a number of porphyrins including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX) were tested. We stained lung cancer cells using three different sample preparation schemes for fluorescence microscopy. Lung tissues and sputum samples of nineteen patients were studied. Cells were collected on glass slides by touching tumor surfaces of surgically sectioned lung cancer tissue and normal regions of the lung during surgery. Filtered sputum cells were also collected. Cell-attached slides were stained with porphyrin using three different methods, including fixing (SM-1) prior to staining, and diluting porphyrin stock solutions in either RPMI-1640 medium (SM-2) or 100mM MES buffer (SM-3). Slides from normal lung tissue lacked fluorescent epithelial cells. Tumor slides containing typical lung cancer cells exhibited red fluorescence upon excitation through the soret band (400-450 nm) of porphyrin compounds. Tumor-selective staining was only observed on unfixed tumor slides that were incubated with PpIX in a RPMI-1640 culture medium (SM-3) used as a working solution for staining and washing. Protoporphyrin-IX is a potentially useful tumor-staining molecular agent for fluorescent location of cancer cell in sputum samples from lung cancer patients.

  8. A TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor of Pseudomonas fluorescens: virulence and vaccine potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong-hua; Dang, Wei; Sun, Li

    2012-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative bacterium and a common aquaculture pathogen. In this study, we identified from a pathogenic P. fluorescens strain a TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor, TdrA, as a secreted protein and examined its function and vaccine potential. TdrA is composed of 746 residues and possesses conserved structural domains of TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that expression of tdrA was upregulated under conditions of iron starvation and during infection of host cells. Consistently, iron depletion induced increased production of TdrA protein in the outer membrane. Compared to the wild type, a tdrA-knock out mutant (1) was unable to grow in the absence of iron, (2) exhibited drastically attenuated overall bacterial virulence, and (3) was impaired in the ability to establish lethal infection in host tissues. Purified recombinant TdrA (rTdrA), when used as a subunit vaccine to immunize flounder, was able to induce strong protective immunity, including production of serum-specific antibodies that resulted in effective protection against lethal-dose P. fluorescens challenge. Together, these results indicate that TdrA is an outer membrane receptor and a protective immunogen that is likely to be involved in iron acquisition and, as a result, required for optimal bacterial virulence.

  9. CM2 antigen, a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on rat hepatocyte canalicular membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The polarized molecules predominately distributing at hepatocyte canalicular surface play a vital role in disclosing the process of bile formation and etiopathogenisis of cholestatic live diseases. Therefore, it is important to find novel polarized molecules on hepatocyte canalicular membrane. In the present study, canalicular membrane vesicles (CMVs isolated from rat hepatocyte by density gradient centrifugation were used as immunogens to produce hybridoma and 46 strains of monoclonal antibodies (mAb against CMVs were obtained. With a series of morphological assay methods, including immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscope, the antigens recognized by canalicular mAb1 (CM1 and canalicular mAb2 (CM2 were confirmed to predominately distribute at hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Transport activity assay revealed that CM2 could inhibit ATP-dependent E217βG uptake of rat hepatocyte CMVs. Meanwhile, Western blotting analysis showed that the molecular mass of CM2 antigen was approximately 110kDa, which was much less than Mr 180kDa of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2 involved in glucuronide transport. These data indicated that CM2 antigen might be a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on the hepatocyte canalicular membrane.

  10. Regulation of brain mitochondrial H2O2 production by membrane potential and NAD(P)H redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary

    2003-09-01

    Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at Complex I of the electron transport chain is implicated in the etiology of neural cell death in acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known regarding the regulation of mitochondrial ROS production by NADH-linked respiratory substrates under physiologically realistic conditions in the absence of respiratory chain inhibitors. This study used Amplex Red fluorescence measurements of H2O2 to test the hypothesis that ROS production by isolated brain mitochondria is regulated by membrane potential (DeltaPsi) and NAD(P)H redox state. DeltaPsi was monitored by following the medium concentration of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium with a selective electrode. NAD(P)H autofluorescence was used to monitor NAD(P)H redox state. While the rate of H2O2 production was closely related to DeltaPsi and the level of NAD(P)H reduction at high values of DeltaPsi, 30% of the maximal rate of H2O2 formation was still observed in the presence of uncoupler (p-trifluoromethoxycarbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone) concentrations that provided for maximum depolarization of DeltaPsi and oxidation of NAD(P)H. Our findings indicate that ROS production by mitochondria oxidizing physiological NADH-dependent substrates is regulated by DeltaPsi and by the NAD(P)H redox state over ranges consistent with those that exist at different levels of cellular energy demand.

  11. Synthesis, Molecular Structure, DNA/Protein Binding, Cytotoxicity, Apoptosis, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential of Dibenzoxanthenes Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Hui; Han, Bing-Jie; Li, Wei; Liu, Yun-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Two dibenzoxanthene isomers 3 and 4 were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of the two compounds were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Binding of two compounds with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and BSA (bovine serum albumin) has been thoroughly investigated by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The DNA-binding constants were determined to be 2.51 (± 0.09) × 10(3) for compound 3 and 4.55 (± 0.10) × 10(3) for compound 4. Two compounds can cleave pBR322 DNA upon irradiation. Significant nuclear damages of BEL-7402 cells were observed with compound treatment in a comet assay. The cytotoxicity in vitro was investigated by MTT method. These compounds have been found to induce nuclear condensation and fragmentation in BEL-7402 cells. The two compounds can enhance intracellular reactive oxygen species and decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. The compounds activated caspase-3 and caspase-7, down-regulated the expression levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, and up-regulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. These compounds induce apoptosis of BEL-7402 cells through an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  12. Blood compatibility and permeability of heparin-modified polysulfone as potential membrane for simultaneous hemodialysis and LDL removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Jun; Guduru, Deepak; Xu, Zhi-Kang; Vienken, Jörg; Groth, Thomas

    2011-01-10

    Heparin was covalently immobilized on PSf membranes to obtain a dialysis membrane with high affinity for LDL. WCA and streaming potential measurements were performed to investigate wettability and surface charge of the membranes. The morphology of the membranes was investigated by SEM. An ELISA was used to measure the adsorption and desorption of LDL on plain and modified PSf. Blood compatibility was studied by measurement of thrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, kallikrein activity and platelet adhesion. It was found that the blood compatibility of the membrane was improved by covalent immobilization of heparin at its surface. However, PSf-Hep membrane showed higher flux recovery after BSA solution filtration, which revealed antifouling property of PSf-Hep membranes.

  13. Development of a no-wash assay for mitochondrial membrane potential using the styryl dye DASPEI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reveles Jensen, Kristian; Rekling, Jens C

    2010-01-01

    potential assay using 2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-ethylpyridinium iodide (DASPEI), a rarely used mitochondrial potentiometric probe, in a 96-well format using a fluorescent plate reader. The assay was validated using 2 protonophores (CCCP, DNP), which are known uncouplers, and the neuroleptic thioridazine......-handling stability, and thus is suitable for large-scale screening efforts. In summary, the DASPEI assay is simple and rapid and may be of use in toxicological testing, drug target discovery, and mechanistic models of diseases involving mitochondrial dysfunction....

  14. Dendritic attenuation of synaptic potentials and currents: the role of passive membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruston, N; Jaffe, D B; Johnston, D

    1994-04-01

    The dendritic trees of neurons are structurally and functionally complex integrative units receiving thousands of synaptic inputs that have excitatory and inhibitory, fast and slow, and electrical and biochemical effects. The pattern of activation of these synaptic inputs determines if the neuron will fire an action potential at any given point in time and how it will respond to similar inputs in the future. Two critical factors affect the integrative function of dendrites: the distribution of voltage-gated ion channels in the dendritic tree and the passive electrical properties, or 'electrotonic structure', upon which these active channels are superimposed. The authors review recent data from patch-clamp recordings that provide new estimates of the passive membrane properties of hippocampal neurons, and show, with examples, how these properties affect the shaping and attenuation of synaptic potentials as they propagate in the dendrites, as well as how they affect the measurement of current from synapses located in the dendrites. Voltage-gated channels might influence the measurement of 'passive' membrane properties and, reciprocally, passive membrane properties might affect the activation of voltage-gated channels in dendrites.

  15. Toward high-content screening of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, Eligio F; Willems, Peter H G M; Pellegrini, Mina; Beyrath, Julien; Smeitink, Jan A M; Blanchet, Lionel; Koopman, Werner J H

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are double membrane organelles involved in various key cellular processes. Governed by dedicated protein machinery, mitochondria move and continuously fuse and divide. These "mitochondrial dynamics" are bi-directionally linked to mitochondrial and cell functional state in space and time. Due to the action of the electron transport chain (ETC), the mitochondrial inner membrane displays a inside-negative membrane potential (Δψ). The latter is considered a functional readout of mitochondrial "health" and required to sustain normal mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial fusion. During the last decade, live-cell microscopy strategies were developed for simultaneous quantification of Δψ and mitochondrial morphology. This revealed that ETC dysfunction, changes in Δψ and aberrations in mitochondrial structure often occur in parallel, suggesting they are linked potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss how combining high-content and high-throughput strategies can be used for analysis of genetic and/or drug-induced effects at the level of individual organelles, cells and cell populations. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  16. Inorganic nanoparticles kill Toxoplasma gondii via changes in redox status and mitochondrial membrane potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Oluyomi Stephen; Murata, Yuho; Sugi, Tatsuki; Kato, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Toxoplasma gondii potential of gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles (NPs). Inorganic NPs (0.01–1,000 µg/mL) were screened for antiparasitic activity. The NPs caused >90% inhibition of T. gondii growth with EC50 values of ≤7, ≤1, and ≤100 µg/mL for gold, silver, and platinum NPs, respectively. The NPs showed no host cell cytotoxicity at the effective anti-T. gondii concentrations; the estimated selectivity index revealed a ≥20-fold activity toward the parasite versus the host cell. The anti-T. gondii activity of the NPs, which may be linked to redox signaling, affected the parasite mitochondrial membrane potential and parasite invasion, replication, recovery, and infectivity potential. Our results demonstrated the antiparasitic potential of NPs. The findings support the further exploration of NPs as a possible source of alternative and effective anti-T. gondii agents.

  17. Conjugation of cholesterol to HIV-1 fusion inhibitor C34 increases peptide-membrane interactions potentiating its action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Hollmann

    Full Text Available Recently, the covalent binding of a cholesterol moiety to a classical HIV-1 fusion inhibitor peptide, C34, was shown to potentiate its antiviral activity. Our purpose was to evaluate the interaction of cholesterol-conjugated and native C34 with membrane model systems and human blood cells to understand the effects of this derivatization. Lipid vesicles and monolayers with defined compositions were used as model membranes. C34-cholesterol partitions more to fluid phase membranes that mimic biological membranes. Importantly, there is a preference of the conjugate for liquid ordered membranes, rich in cholesterol and/or sphingomyelin, as observed both from partition and surface pressure studies. In human erythrocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, C34-cholesterol significantly decreases the membrane dipole potential. In PBMC, the conjugate was 14- and 115-fold more membranotropic than T-1249 and enfuvirtide, respectively. C34 or cholesterol alone did not show significant membrane activity. The enhanced interaction of C34-cholesterol with biological membranes correlates with its higher antiviral potency. Higher partitions for lipid-raft like compositions direct the drug to the receptor-rich domains where membrane fusion is likely to occur. This intermediary membrane binding step may facilitate the drug delivery to gp41 in its pre-fusion state.

  18. Effect of Qingkailing injection on rat embryonic neuronal apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Pang; Lingqun Zhu; Shuoren Wang; Fuing Niu; Wei Cui

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential(MMP)is an irreversible marker of neuronal apoptosis during ischemla/reperfusion(I/R)injury of brain tissue.Qingkaiing injection is proved to have protective effect on neuronal ischemic injury.Whether inhibiting the decrease of MMP can inhibit apoptosis when I/R injury of brain tissue occurs is unclear.OBJECTIVE:To observe the effect of Qingkaiing injection on rat embryonic hippocampal neuronal apoptosis,MMP and mitochondroal activity after hypoxia/hypoglycamia and reoxygenation,and make a comparison of therapeutic effect on I/R injury between Oingkaiing injection and nimodipine.DESIGN:Observation and controlled trial.SETTING:Peropheral Vascular Center,Dongzhimen Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine;the Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing Key Laboratory.Dongzhimen Hospital,Beijing University of Chinese Medicine.MATERIALS:Eight Wistar rats at embryonic 18 days,provided by Breeding Farm of Experimental Animals,Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences(Permission No.SCXK-11-00-0006) were employed in this trial.Qingkaiing injection (Pharmaceutical Factory of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine,Batch No.213710A,10 Ml each,baicalin 50 g and total nitrogen 25 mg included)and nimodipine(ICN company,USA)were also used.METHODS:This experiment was carried out in the Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education,Dongzhimen Hospital,Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and Beijing Key Laboratory from January 2003 to December 2005.①The pregnant rats were anesthetized and fetal rats were isolated for culturong fetal rat hippocampal neurons.The neurons cultured for 10 days were used for expedment.The neurons were divided into 5 groups:model group,control group,nimodipine group.Qingkailing high-dose group and Oingkailing low-dose group.Hypoxia/hypoglycemia and reoxygenation models served as model group,and they were used to simulate reperfusion

  19. Changes in the Sterol Composition of the Plasma Membrane Affect Membrane Potential, Salt Tolerance and the Activity of Multidrug Resistance Pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of the deletions of genes from the final steps in the biosynthesis of ergosterol (ERG6, ERG2, ERG3, ERG5, ERG4) on the physiological function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasma membrane by a combination of biological tests and the diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay. Most of the erg mutants were more sensitive than the wild type to salt stress or cationic drugs, their susceptibilities were proportional to the hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes. The different sterol composition of the plasma membrane played an important role in the short-term and long-term processes that accompanied the exposure of erg strains to a hyperosmotic stress (effect on cell size, pH homeostasis and survival of yeasts), as well as in the resistance of cells to antifungal drugs. The pleiotropic drug-sensitive phenotypes of erg strains were, to a large extent, a result of the reduced efficiency of the Pdr5 efflux pump, which was shown to be more sensitive to the sterol content of the plasma membrane than Snq2p. In summary, the erg4Δ and erg6Δ mutants exhibited the most compromised phenotypes. As Erg6p is not involved in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, it may become a target for a new generation of antifungal drugs.

  20. Modelisation of the contribution of the Na/Ca exchanger to cell membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlouli, S; Hamdache, F; Riane, H

    2008-09-01

    Modelisation plays a significant role in the study of ion transfer through the cell membrane and in the comprehension of cellular excitability. We were interested in the selective ion transfers through the K(Ca), Na(v), Ca(v) channels and the Na/Ca exchanger (NCX). The membrane behaves like an electric circuit because of the existence of ion gradients maintained by the cell. The non-linearity of this circuit gives rise to complex oscillations of the membrane potential. By application of the finite difference method (FDM) and the concept of percolation we studied the role of the NCX in the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and the oscillations of the membrane potential. The fractal representation of the distribution of active channels allows us to follow the diffusion of intracellular Ca(2+) ions. These calculations show that the hyperpolarization and the change in the burst duration of the membrane potential are primarily due to the NCX.

  1. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albers

    Full Text Available Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP. Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious and strong (teacher spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns.

  2. Potential antitumor therapeutic strategies of human amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Kim, S U; Kim, Y-B; Hyun, S-H; Jeung, E-B; Choi, K-C

    2012-08-01

    As stem cells are capable of self-renewal and can generate differentiated progenies for organ development, they are considered as potential source for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Along with this capacity, stem cells have the therapeutic potential for treating human diseases including cancers. According to the origins, stem cells are broadly classified into two types: embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells. In terms of differentiation potential, ESCs are pluripotent and adult stem cells are multipotent. Amnion, which is a membranous sac that contains the fetus and amniotic fluid and functions in protecting the developing embryo during gestation, is another stem cell source. Amnion-derived stem cells are classified as human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells, human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells. They are in an intermediate stage between pluripotent ESCs and lineage-restricted adult stem cells, non-tumorigenic, and contribute to low immunogenicity and anti-inflammation. Furthermore, they are easily available and do not cause any controversial issues in their recovery and applications. Not only are amnion-derived stem cells applicable in regenerative medicine, they have anticancer capacity. In non-engineered stem cells transplantation strategies, amnion-derived stem cells effectively target the tumor and suppressed the tumor growth by expressing cytotoxic cytokines. Additionally, they also have a potential as novel delivery vehicles transferring therapeutic genes to the cancer formation sites in gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy. Owing to their own advantageous properties, amnion-derived stem cells are emerging as a new candidate in anticancer therapy.

  3. Parameter estimation in neuronal stochastic differential equation models from intracellular recordings of membrane potentials in single neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Samson, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the membrane potential in a single neuron can be studied by estimating biophysical parameters from intracellular recordings. Diffusion processes, given as continuous solutions to stochastic differential equations, are widely applied as models for the neuronal membrane potential...... evolution. One-dimensional models are the stochastic integrate-and-fire neuronal diffusion models. Biophysical neuronal models take into account the dynamics of ion channels or synaptic activity, leading to multidimensional diffusion models. Since only the membrane potential can be measured......, this complicates the statistical inference and parameter estimation from these partially observed detailed models. This paper reviews parameter estimation techniques from intracellular recordings in these diffusion models....

  4. Nature of the charged headgroup determines the fusogenic potential and membrane properties of lithocholic acid phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Manish; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-08-07

    Phospholipids play a crucial role in many cellular processes ranging from selective membrane permeability, to membrane fission and fusion, to cellular signaling. Headgroups of phospholipids determine the membrane properties and fusogenicity of these lipids with target cell membranes. We studied the fusogenic and membrane properties of phospholipids possessing unnatural charged headgroups with model membranes using laurdan based membrane hydration studies, DPH based membrane fluidity, and differential scanning calorimetry. We unravel that fusogenicity, membrane hydration, and fluidity of membranes are strongly contingent on the nature of the phospholipid charged headgroup. Our studies unraveled that introduction of bulky headgroups like dimethylamino pyridine induces maximum membrane hydration and perturbations with high fusogenicity as compared to small headgroup based phospholipids. These phospholipids also have the capability of high retention in DPPC membranes. Hydration and fluidity of these phospholipid-doped DPPC membranes are contingent on the nature of the charged headgroup. This study would help in future design of phospholipid based nanomaterials for effective drug delivery.

  5. [Potential difference across the membrane of subcellular particles. V. Generation of potential differences by mitochondria and submitochondrial particles under anaerobic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, E A; Vladimirova, M A; Tsofina, L M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown by the mehtod of penetrating ions that Site O and I of the respiratory chain of submitochondrial particles are able to generate a membrane potential of the normal value under anaerobic conditons. When succinate is an electron donor and ferricyanide-an acceptor (Site II), the oxygen addition sharply increases the membrane potential at pH above 7.5 and does not change or even decreases it in reaction conditions more acid than pH 6.5. The generation of the membrane potential at low pH and in the absence of oxygen is predicted by the chemielectric hypothesis and cannot be explained by the chemiosmotic one. Mitochondria usually generate the membrane potential without O2 at pH 7.5 in the presence of ferricyanide when the substrate concentration exceeds 5 mM.

  6. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes a calcium-independent loss in mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sobolewski

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Gas microembolism remains a serious risk associated with surgical procedures and decompression. Despite this, the signaling consequences of air bubbles in the vasculature are poorly understood and there is a lack of pharmacological therapies available. Here, we investigate the mitochondrial consequences of air bubble contact with endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were loaded with an intracellular calcium indicator (Fluo-4 and either a mitochondrial calcium indicator (X-Rhod-1 or mitochondrial membrane potential indicator (TMRM. Contact with 50-150 µm air bubbles induced concurrent rises in intracellular and mitochondrial calcium, followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pre-treating cells with 1 µmol/L ruthenium red, a TRPV family calcium channel blocker, did not protect cells from the mitochondrial depolarization, despite blocking the intracellular calcium response. Mitigating the interactions between the air-liquid interface and the endothelial surface layer with 5% BSA or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, inhibiting protein kinase C-α (PKCα, with 5 µmol/L Gö6976, protected cells from mitochondrial depolarization, but did not affect the intracellular calcium response. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that air bubble contact with endothelial cells activates a novel, calcium-independent, PKCα-dependent signaling pathway, which results in mitochondrial depolarization. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunction is likely to be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of gas embolism injury. Further, this connection between the endothelial surface layer and endothelial mitochondria may also play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease.

  7. Potential Application of Fluorescence Imaging for Assessing Fecal Contamination of Soil and Compost Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjeong Cho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic microorganisms can lead to serious outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, particularly if fresh produce becomes contaminated and then happens to be inappropriately handled in a manner that can incubate pathogens. Pathogenic microbial contamination of produce can occur through a variety of pathways, such as from the excrement of domesticated and wild animals, biological soil amendment, agricultural water, worker health and hygiene, and field tools used during growth and harvest. The use of mature manure compost and preventative control of fecal contamination from wildlife and livestock are subject to safety standards to minimize the risk of foodborne illness associated with produce. However, in a field production environment, neither traces of animal feces nor the degree of maturity of manure compost can be identified by the naked eye. In this study, we investigated hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques to characterize fecal samples from bovine, swine, poultry, and sheep species, and to determine feasibilities for both detecting the presence of animal feces as well as identifying the species origin of the feces in mixtures of soil and feces. In addition, the imaging techniques were evaluated for assessing the maturity of manure compost. The animal feces exhibited dynamic and unique fluorescence emission features that allowed for the detection of the presence of feces and showed that identification of the species origin of fecal matter present in soil-feces mixtures is feasible. Furthermore, the results indicate that using simple single-band fluorescence imaging at the fluorescence emission maximum for animal feces, simpler than full-spectrum hyperspectral fluorescence imaging, can be used to assess the maturity of manure compost.

  8. Membrane potential and mechanical responses of the opossum esophagus to vagal stimulation and swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, S; Gidda, J S; Goyal, R K

    1983-10-01

    Studies were performed in anesthetized opossums. The electrical changes, recorded using a suction electrode applied to the outside of the esophagus, and mechanical activity, recorded by an intraluminal catheter, were monitored from 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Swallowing was associated with membrane hyperpolarization followed by depolarization and spike burst. Electrical stimulation of the decentralized vagus also caused a prompt hyperpolarization followed by an overshoot depolarization. Single pulses of stimulation caused primarily hyperpolarization. The amplitude and duration of hyperpolarization increased with increasing frequencies of vagal stimulation. Spike burst occurred as the membrane potential was recovering from the peak hyperpolarization and moving toward peak depolarization. The latency of onset of spike burst decreased with increasing frequency of vagal stimulation. The muscle contraction occurred after a latency. The latency of contractions, like the latency of spike burst, decreased with increased frequency of vagal stimulation. These studies show that (a) membrane hyperpolarization is present during the latent period of contraction associated with swallowing, suggesting that swallow-induced esophageal response may be mediated by vagal inhibitory pathway to the esophagus and (b) spike bursts can be temporally dissociated from depolarization by changing the vagal stimulation frequency, suggesting that spike burst and depolarization may be mediated by different excitatory mechanisms.

  9. Potential use of nanofiltration membrane in treatment of wastewater from fish and surimi industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ta Yeong

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the potential use of nanofiltration (NF membranes in treating the wastewater, generated from the fish and surimi industries. The possibility of recovering the protein from the wastewater was also investigated, since these effluents contain a large amount of protein,which could be concentrated by means of NF and recycled into the fishmeal process. The protein could also be traded as fertilizer or animal feed by-products. In this study, fish and surimi washing wastewater was generated in the laboratory. Then, the wastewater was subjected to pre-treatment by using a filter paper (due to the high concentration of suspended matter in these effluents before it was treated/separated by using a polyamide NF membrane of 500 Da. Permeation experiments showed that NF was capable of reducing COD and TSS up to 93 % and 87 %, respectively. Study on long-term flux decline indicated that polyamide NF membrane fouled much more slowly.

  10. Analysis of light-induced transmembrane ion gradients and membrane potential in Photosystem I proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  11. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennisi, Cristian P. [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Yoshida, Ken [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  12. Assessment of the potential for refinery applications of inorganic membrane technology: An identification and screening analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.E.; Schulman, B.L.

    1993-05-01

    Commercial application of membrane technology in the separation of gas, liquid, and solid streams has grown to a business with worldwide revenues exceeding $1 billion annually. Use of organic membranes for industrial gas separation, particularly in the refining industry, is one of the major growth areas. However, organic membranes based on polymeric separation barriers, are susceptible to damage by liquids, and careful precautions must be taken to retain the system integrity. Researchers are currently developing small pore sized inorganic membranes which may substantially increase the efficiency and economics in selected refinery separation applications. Expected advantages of these advanced inorganic membranes include high permeability, high selectivity, and low manufacturing cost. SFA Pacific conducted a screening analysis to identify applications for inorganic membrane technology in the petroleum refining industry and their potential cost advantages over competing separation systems. Two meetings were held in connection with this project. Copies of Viewgraphs presented by SFA Pacific at these meetings are attached in Appendices A and C. Potential high priority applications and market impacts of advanced inorganic membrane technology in the refining industry are addressed in this report, and include the following areas: Competitive separation technologies; application of those technologies; incentives for inorganic membranes; market benefits and impacts of inorganic membranes.

  13. An Exploration of the Range of Noise Intensity That Affects the Membrane Potential of Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity in the human brain occurs in a complex physiologic environment, and noise from all aspects in this physiologic environment affects all aspects of nervous-system function. An essential issue of neural information processing is whether the environmental noise in a neural system can be estimated and quantified in a proper way. In this paper, we calculated the neural energy to estimate the range of critical values of thermal noise intensity that markedly affect the membrane potential and the energy waveform, in order to define such a noisy environment which neuronal activity relies on.

  14. Knockdown of cytosolic glutaredoxin 1 leads to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential: implication in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Saeed

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction including that caused by oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1, a cytosolic thiol disulfide oxido-reductase, reduces glutathionylated proteins to protein thiols and helps maintain redox status of proteins during oxidative stress. Grx1 downregulation aggravates mitochondrial dysfunction in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and motor neuron disease. We examined the mechanism underlying the regulation of mitochondrial function by Grx1. Downregulation of Grx1 by shRNA results in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, which is prevented by the thiol antioxidant, alpha-lipoic acid, or by cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition. The thiol groups of voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC, an outer membrane protein in mitochondria but not adenosine nucleotide translocase (ANT, an inner membrane protein, are oxidized when Grx1 is downregulated. We then examined the effect of beta-N-oxalyl amino-L-alanine (L-BOAA, an excitatory amino acid implicated in neurolathyrism (a type of motor neuron disease, that causes mitochondrial dysfunction. Exposure of cells to L-BOAA resulted in loss of MMP, which was prevented by overexpression of Grx1. Grx1 expression is regulated by estrogen in the CNS and treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with estrogen upregulated Grx1 and protected from L-BOAA mediated MMP loss. Our studies demonstrate that Grx1, a cytosolic oxido-reductase, helps maintain mitochondrial integrity and prevents MMP loss caused by oxidative insult. Further, downregulation of Grx1 leads to mitochondrial dysfunction through oxidative modification of the outer membrane protein, VDAC, providing support for the critical role of Grx1 in maintenance of MMP.

  15. The timing of phasic transmitter release is Ca2+-dependent and lacks a direct influence of presynaptic membrane potential

    OpenAIRE

    Felmy, Felix; Neher, Erwin; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and the resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, triggers transmitter release in nerve terminals. However, it is controversial whether in addition to the opening of Ca2+ channels, membrane potential directly affects transmitter release. Here, we assayed the influence of membrane potential on transmitter release at the calyx of Held nerve terminals. Transmitter release was evoked by presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging, or by presyn...

  16. Analysis of Antimicrobial-Triggered Membrane Depolarisation Using Voltage Sensitive Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Derk te Winkel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is a major inhibitory target for antimicrobial compounds. Commonly, although not exclusively, these compounds unfold their antimicrobial activity by disrupting the essential barrier function of the cell membrane. As a consequence, membrane permeability assays are central for mode of action studies analysing membrane-targeting antimicrobial compounds. The most frequently used in vivo methods detect changes in membrane permeability by following internalization of normally membrane impermeable and relatively large fluorescent dyes. Unfortunately, these assays are not sensitive to changes in membrane ion permeability which are sufficient to inhibit and kill bacteria by membrane depolarization. In this manuscript, we provide experimental advice how membrane potential, and its changes triggered by membrane-targeting antimicrobials can be accurately assessed in vivo. Optimized protocols are provided for both qualitative and quantitative kinetic measurements of membrane potential. At last, single cell analyses using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with fluorescence microscopy are introduced and discussed.

  17. CdTe quantum dots conjugated to concanavalin A as potential fluorescent molecular probes for saccharides detection in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenório, Denise P L A; Andrade, Camila G; Cabral Filho, Paulo E; Sabino, Caetano P; Kato, Ilka T; Carvalho, Luiz B; Alves, Severino; Ribeiro, Martha S; Fontes, Adriana; Santos, Beate S

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have been applied in biological analysis due to their unique optical properties and their versatility to be conjugated to biomolecules, such as lectins and antibodies, acquiring specificity to label a variety of targets. Concanavalin A (Con A) lectin binds specifically to α-d-mannose and α-d-glucose regions of saccharides that are usually expressed on membranes of mammalian cells and on cell walls of microbials. Candida albicans is the most common fungal opportunistic pathogen present in humans. Therefore, in this work, this fungus was chosen as a model for understanding cells and biofilm-forming organisms. Here, we report an efficient bioconjugation process to bind CdTe (Cadmium Telluride) QDs to Con A, and applied the bioconjugates to label saccharide structures on the cellular surface of C. albicans suspensions and biofilms. By accomplishing hemagglutination experiments and circular dichroism, we observed that the Con A structure and biochemical properties were preserved after the bioconjugation. Fluorescence microscopy images of yeasts and hyphae cells, as well as biofilms, incubated with QDs-(Con A) showed a bright orange fluorescence profile, indicating that the cell walls were specifically labeled. Furthermore, flow cytometry measurements confirmed that over 93% of the yeast cells were successfully labeled by QD-(Con A) complex. In contrast, non-conjugated QDs or QDs-(inhibited Con A) do not label any kind of biological system tested, indicating that the bioconjugation was specific and efficient. The staining pattern of the cells and biofilms demonstrate that QDs were effectively bioconjugated to Con A with specific labeling of saccharide-rich structures on C. albicans. Consequently, this work opens new possibilities to monitor glucose and mannose molecules through fluorescence techniques, which can help to optimize phototherapy protocols for this kind of fungus.

  18. Excess chemical potential of small solutes across water--membrane and water--hexane interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The excess chemical potentials of five small, structurally related solutes, CH4, CH3F, CH2F2, CHF3, and CF4, across the water-glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer and water-hexane interfaces were calculated at 300, 310, and 340 K using the particle insertion method. The excess chemical potentials of nonpolar molecules (CH4 and CF4) decrease monotonically or nearly monotonically from water to a nonpolar phase. In contrast, for molecules that possess permanent dipole moments (CH3F, CH2F, and CHF3), the excess chemical potentials exhibit an interfacial minimum that arises from superposition of two monotonically and oppositely changing contributions: electrostatic and nonelectrostatic. The nonelectrostatic term, dominated by the reversible work of creating a cavity that accommodates the solute, decreases, whereas the electrostatic term increases across the interface from water to the membrane interior. In water, the dependence of this term on the dipole moment is accurately described by second order perturbation theory. To achieve the same accuracy at the interface, third order terms must also be included. In the interfacial region, the molecular structure of the solvent influences both the excess chemical potential and solute orientations. The excess chemical potential across the interface increases with temperature, but this effect is rather small. Our analysis indicates that a broad range of small, moderately polar molecules should be surface active at the water-membrane and water-oil interfaces. The biological and medical significance of this result, especially in relation to the mechanism of anesthetic action, is discussed.

  19. Potential applications of near infrared auto-fluorescence spectral polarized imaging for assessment of food quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kenneth J.; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    The current growing of food industry for low production costs and high efficiency needs for maintenance of high-quality standards and assurance of food safety while avoiding liability issues. Quality and safety of food depend on physical (texture, color, tenderness etc.), chemical (fat content, moisture, protein content, pH, etc.), and biological (total bacterial count etc.) features. There is a need for a rapid (less than a few minutes) and accurate detection system in order to optimize quality and assure safety of food. However, the fluorescence ranges for known fluorophores are limited to ultraviolet emission bands, which are not in the tissue near infrared (NIR) "optical window". Biological tissues excited by far-red or NIR light would exhibit strong emission in spectral range of 650-1,100 nm although no characteristic peaks show the emission from which known fluorophores. The characteristics of the auto-fluorescence emission of different types of tissues were found to be different between different tissue components such as fat, high quality muscle food. In this paper, NIR auto-fluorescence emission from different types of muscle food and fat was measured. The differences of fluorescence intensities of the different types of muscle food and fat emissions were observed. These can be explained by the change of the microscopic structure of physical, chemical, and biological features in meat. The difference of emission intensities of fat and lean meat tissues was applied to monitor food quality and safety using spectral polarized imaging, which can be detect deep depth fat under the muscle food up to several centimeter.

  20. Excitation of fluorescent dyes inactivates the outer hair cell integral membrane motor protein prestin and betrays its lateral mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2003-08-01

    The outer hair cell motor protein, prestin, which resides exclusively in the cell's lateral membrane, underlies the mammal's exquisite sense of hearing. Here we show that photoexposure of the commonly used dyes Lucifer yellow, 6-carboxy-fluorescein, and 4-(2-[6-(dioctylamino)-2-naphthalenyl]ethenyl)-1-(3-sulfopropyl)-pyridinium (di-8-ANEPPS), that are in contact with the cell's lateral membrane can photo-inactivate the motor irreversibly, as evidenced by reduction in prestin's gating charge displacement or non-linear capacitance. Furthermore, utilizing restricted fiber optic illumination of the lateral membrane, we show that whole-cell, non-linear capacitance is depleted beyond that expected for an immobile population in the exposed area. These data indicate that lateral diffusion of prestin occurs within the cell's lateral plasma membrane.

  1. Fluorescent pirenzepine derivatives as potential bitopic ligands of the human M1 muscarinic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahtaoui, Chouaib; Parrot, Isabelle; Klotz, Philippe; Guillier, Fabrice; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Hibert, Marcel; Ilien, Brigitte

    2004-08-12

    Following a recent description of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused human muscarinic M1 receptors and Bodipy-labeled pirenzepine, we synthesized seven fluorescent derivatives of this antagonist in order to further characterize ligand-receptor interactions. These compounds carry Bodipy [558/568], Rhodamine Red-X [560/580], or Fluorolink Cy3 [550/570] fluorophores connected to pirenzepine through various linkers. All molecules reversibly bind with high affinity to M1 receptors (radioligand and energy transfer binding experiments) provided that the linker contains more than six atoms. The energy transfer efficiency exhibits modest variations among ligands, indicating that the distance separating EGFP from the fluorophores remains almost constant. This also supports the notion that the fluorophores may bind to the receptor protein. Kinetic analyses reveal that the dissociation of two Bodipy derivatives (10 or 12 atom long linkers) is sensitive to the presence of the allosteric modulator brucine, while that of all other molecules (15-24 atom long linkers) is not. The data favor the idea that these analogues might interact with both the acetylcholine and the brucine binding domains. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  2. Exploring metal detoxification and accumulation potential during vermicomposting of Tea factory coal ash: sequential extraction and fluorescence probe analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Linee; Pratihar, Sanjay; Dasgupta, Suman; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Mudoi, Pronab; Bora, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Metal contamination from coal ashes (CAs) is widely recognized as a significant environmental concern. To learn more about metal detoxification and accumulation potential of earthworm species, metal-rich tea factory coal ashes (TFCA) were fed to Eisenia fetida and Lampito mauritii by employing a fluorescent tag detection method. Fascinatingly, on feeding fluorescence probed Zn and Cd along with cow dung to Eisenia fetida, the detection of the gut-proteins with a molecular mass higher than 100 kDa was a distinct evidence of metal binding. Significant increases were observed in the content of humified organic C [humic acid (HAC) and fulvic acid C (FAC)] and degree of humification during vermicomposting. Concurrently, considerably large amount of toxic metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn) was transformed from exchangeable to recalcitrant (organic matter and mineral bound) fractions. Moreover, total metal concentrations were reduced with high removal efficiency upon vermicomposting.

  3. Exploring metal detoxification and accumulation potential during vermicomposting of Tea factory coal ash: sequential extraction and fluorescence probe analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Linee; Pratihar, Sanjay; Dasgupta, Suman; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Mudoi, Pronab; Bora, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Metal contamination from coal ashes (CAs) is widely recognized as a significant environmental concern. To learn more about metal detoxification and accumulation potential of earthworm species, metal-rich tea factory coal ashes (TFCA) were fed to Eisenia fetida and Lampito mauritii by employing a fluorescent tag detection method. Fascinatingly, on feeding fluorescence probed Zn and Cd along with cow dung to Eisenia fetida, the detection of the gut-proteins with a molecular mass higher than 100 kDa was a distinct evidence of metal binding. Significant increases were observed in the content of humified organic C [humic acid (HAC) and fulvic acid C (FAC)] and degree of humification during vermicomposting. Concurrently, considerably large amount of toxic metals (Cr, Cd, Pb, and Zn) was transformed from exchangeable to recalcitrant (organic matter and mineral bound) fractions. Moreover, total metal concentrations were reduced with high removal efficiency upon vermicomposting. PMID:27456167

  4. Dielectric Spectroscopy: noninvasive and fast method for measuring changes in the membrane potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Corina; Prodan, Camelia; Prodan, Emil

    2008-03-01

    We present a noninvasive and fast method, dielectric spectroscopy, to measure changes in the membrane potential of live cell suspensions, in particular to E. coli. This technique can be applied virtually to any cell suspension, regardless of size or shape and is tested against the traditional one-using voltage sensitive dyes. Precise measurements of the dielectric permittivity ɛ and conductivity σ of live cells suspensions require prior elimination of the polarization errors. Polarization errors are caused by the ionic content of a buffer, and they affect the total impedance in the low frequency interval. We hereby present our approach of polarization removal in low frequency limit by fitting both real and imaginary experimental curves with an ideal impedance Z=d/iφɛ^*S, where ɛ^*=ɛ+1/iφσ. Here, ɛ and σ represent the fitting parameters; a higher weight is given to each of them for the high frequency domain (3kHz-10kHz), where polarization effects were proven negligible. Measurements were performed in a low electric field (1V/cm) and 40Hz-10kHz frequency domain. Different buffers are measured, such as HEPES, DMEM with different KCl concentrations. Adding different KCl concentration or ionophores triggers changes in the membrane potential of E. coli. Those changes are measured using dielectric spectroscopy and voltage sensitive dyes.

  5. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  6. Potentialities of a Membrane Reactor with Laccase Grafted Membranes for the Enzymatic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorleak Chea

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the degradation of phenolic compounds by laccases from Trametes versicolor in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR. The enzymatic membranes were prepared by grafting laccase on a gelatine layer previously deposited onto α-alumina tubular membranes. The 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP was selected  from among the three different phenolic compounds tested (guaiacol, 4-chlorophenol and DMP to study the performance of the EMR in dead end configuration. At the lowest feed substrate concentration tested (100 mg·L−1, consumption increased with flux (up to 7.9 × 103 mg·h−1·m−2 at 128 L·h−1·m−2, whereas at the highest substrate concentration (500 mg·L−1, it was shown that the reaction was limited by the oxygen content.

  7. Potentialities of a membrane reactor with laccase grafted membranes for the enzymatic degradation of phenolic compounds in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chea, Vorleak; Paolucci-Jeanjean, Delphine; Sanchez, José; Belleville, Marie-Pierre

    2014-10-06

    This paper describes the degradation of phenolic compounds by laccases from Trametes versicolor in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR). The enzymatic membranes were prepared by grafting laccase on a gelatine layer previously deposited onto α-alumina tubular membranes. The 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) was selected  from among the three different phenolic compounds tested (guaiacol, 4-chlorophenol and DMP) to study the performance of the EMR in dead end configuration. At the lowest feed substrate concentration tested (100 mg·L-1), consumption increased with flux (up to 7.9 × 103 mg·h-1·m-2 at 128 L·h-1·m-2), whereas at the highest substrate concentration (500 mg·L-1), it was shown that the reaction was limited by the oxygen content.

  8. Analysis of Pheochromocytoma (PC12) Membrane Potential under the Exposure to Millimeter-wave Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M.; Hirata, A.; Kawase, K.; Otani, C.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2004-08-01

    Non-thermal effects of millimeter wave (MMW) on Pheochromocytoma (PC12) were studied by potential measurement with a voltage sensitive dye (DiBAC4(3)). Cells were irradiated at fixed frequencies of 30, 40, 60, 76GHz as well as sweeping frequency between 10 and 100 GHz by an MMW generator based on a uni-traveling-carrier photodiode (UTC-PD), the most widely tunable MMW source. However there were no significant changes in membrane potential between MMW-irradiated and control cells. The results suggest that MMW irradiation in the range from 10 to 100GHz appears to be safe for ordinary PC12 cells under non-thermal conditions.

  9. Site-directed fluorescence labeling reveals a revised N-terminal membrane topology and functional periplasmic residues in the Escherichia coli cell division protein FtsK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezuk, Alison M; Goodyear, Mara; Khursigara, Cezar M

    2014-08-22

    In Escherichia coli, FtsK is a large integral membrane protein that coordinates chromosome segregation and cell division. The N-terminal domain of FtsK (FtsKN) is essential for division, and the C terminus (FtsKC) is a well characterized DNA translocase. Although the function of FtsKN is unknown, it is suggested that FtsK acts as a checkpoint to ensure DNA is properly segregated before septation. This may occur through modulation of protein interactions between FtsKN and other division proteins in both the periplasm and cytoplasm; thus, a clear understanding of how FtsKN is positioned in the membrane is required to characterize these interactions. The membrane topology of FtsKN was initially determined using site-directed reporter fusions; however, questions regarding this topology persist. Here, we report a revised membrane topology generated by site-directed fluorescence labeling. The revised topology confirms the presence of four transmembrane segments and reveals a newly identified periplasmic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains. Within this loop, four residues were identified that, when mutated, resulted in the appearance of cellular voids. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of these voids showed asymmetric division of the cytoplasm in the absence of outer membrane invagination or visible cell wall ingrowth. This uncoupling reveals a novel role for FtsK in linking cell envelope septation events and yields further evidence for FtsK as a critical checkpoint of cell division. The revised topology of FtsKN also provides an important platform for future studies on essential interactions required for this process.

  10. Changes of plasma membrane ATPase activity,membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in Kandelia candel and Avicennia marina seedlings with various salinities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhong-qiu; ZHENG Hai-lei; ZHU Yong-guan

    2004-01-01

    The salt-secreting mangrove, Avicennia marina, and non-salt-secreting mangrove, Kandelia candel were cultivated in sand with various salinities(0 ‰, 10 ‰, 20 ‰, 30 ‰, 40 ‰) for 60 d. Plasma membrane vesicles of high-purity in leaves and roots of A.marina and K. candel seedlings were obtained by two-phase partitioning. The function of the plasma membranes, the activity of ATPase, membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient, at various salinities were investigated. The results showed that within a certain range of salinity(A. marina and roots of K. candel: 0-30‰;leaves of K.candel: 0-20‰), the activity of ATPase increased with increasing salinity, while high salinity(above 30‰ or 20‰) inhibited ATPase activity. In comparison with A. marina, K. candel appeared to be more sensitive to salinity. The dynamics of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in leaves and roots of A. marina and K. candel seedlings were similar to that of ATPase. When treated directly by NaCl all the indexes were inhibited markedly: there was a little increase within 0-10‰(K. candel) or 0-20‰(A. marina) followed by sharp declining. It indicated that the structure and function of plasma membrane was damaged severely.

  11. Selection of fluorescent probes for flow cytometric viability assessment of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to membrane-active and oxidizing disinfectants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppens, S.B.I.; Barbaras, B.; Breeuwer, P.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select fluorescence methods for use as alternatives to plate counting to assess the viability of Listeria monocytogenes cells exposed to benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and hydrogen peroxide, two disinfectants with different mechanisms of action. A further aim of this study

  12. Positive Feedback Amplifies the Response of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential to Glucose Concentration in Clonal Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2017-05-01

    Analysis of the cellular mechanisms of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, is complicated by the large number of reactions and interactions in metabolic networks. Metabolic control analysis with appropriate modularization is a powerful method for simplifying and analyzing these networks. To analyze control of cellular energy metabolism in adherent cell cultures of the INS-1 832/13 pancreatic β-cell model we adapted our microscopy assay of absolute mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) to a fluorescence microplate reader format, and applied it in conjunction with cell respirometry. In these cells the sensitive response of ΔψM to extracellular glucose concentration drives glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Using metabolic control analysis we identified the control properties that generate this sensitive response. Force-flux relationships between ΔψM and respiration were used to calculate kinetic responses to ΔψM of processes both upstream (glucose oxidation) and downstream (proton leak and ATP turnover) of ΔψM. The analysis revealed that glucose-evoked ΔψM hyperpolarization is amplified by increased glucose oxidation activity caused by factors downstream of ΔψM. At high glucose, the hyperpolarized ΔψM is stabilized almost completely by the action of glucose oxidation, whereas proton leak also contributes to the homeostatic control of ΔψM at low glucose. These findings suggest a strong positive feedback loop in the regulation of β-cell energetics, and a possible regulatory role of proton leak in the fasting state. Analysis of islet bioenergetics from published cases of type 2 diabetes suggests that disruption of this feedback can explain the damaged bioenergetic response of β-cells to glucose. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Quality in Diabetes/Obesity and Critical Illness Spectrum of Diseases - edited by P. Hemachandra Reddy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Simultaneous Single Neuron Recording of O2 Consumption, [Ca2+]i and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Glutamate Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichmann, Marc; Collis, Leon P.; Smith, Peter J.S.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    To order the cellular processes in glutamate toxicity, we simultaneously recorded O2 consumption, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) in single cortical neurons. O2 consumption was measured using an amperometric self-referencing platinum electrode adjacent to neurons in which [Ca2+]i and mΔψ were monitored with Fluo-4 and TMRE+, respectively using a spinning disk laser confocal microscope. Excitotoxic doses of glutamate caused an elevation of [Ca2+]i followed seconds afterwards by an increase in O2 consumption which reached a maximum level within 1 to 5 min. A modest increase in mΔψ occurred during this time period, and then, shortly before maximal O2 consumption was reached, the mΔψ, as indicated by TMRE+ fluorescence, dissipated. Maximal O2 consumption lasted up to 5 min and then declined together with mΔψ and ATP levels, while [Ca2+]i further increased. mΔψ and [Ca2+]i returned to baseline levels when neurons were treated with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist shortly after the [Ca2+]i increased. Our unprecedented spatial and time resolution revealed that this sequence of events is identical in all neurons, albeit with considerable variability in magnitude and kinetics of changes in O2 consumption, [Ca2+]i and mΔψ. The data obtained using this new method are consistent with a model where Ca2+ influx causes ATP depletion, despite maximal mitochondrial respiration, minutes after glutamate receptor activation. PMID:19226367

  14. Fabrication of bacterial cellulose/polyaniline/single-walled carbon nanotubes membrane for potential application as biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, Ashwak; Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Shi, Zhijun; Lin, Xiao; Yang, Guang

    2017-05-01

    Electrically conductive polymeric membranes of BC with polyaniline (PAni) were fabricated through ex situ oxidative polymerization. PAni was densely arrayed along BC fibers and SWCNTs were uniformly distributed in the composites as confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra of the composite membranes exhibited characteristic peaks for specific functional groups of PAni and SWCNTs besides BC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated the presence of specific peaks for BC, PAni, and SWCNTs in the composites. The conjugated backbone of PAni and SWCNTs contributed to improve the degradation temperatures from 232°C for BC to 260°C, 302°C, and 310°C for BC-PAni, BC-PAni/SWCNTs-I (0.05mg/mL), and BC-PAni/SWCNTs-II (0.1mg/mL) composites, respectively. The electrical conductivity of BC was enhanced to 1.04×10(-3)S/cm, 4.64×10(-3)S/cm, and 1.41×10(-2)S/cm upon doping with PAni, and 0.05mg/mL and 0.1mg/mL SWCNTs, respectively in dry state which was further increased to 4.02×10(-2)S/cm, 3.03×10(-2)S/cm, 5.93×10(-1)S/cm, and 7.36×10(-1)S/cm, respectively in PBS solution. These membranes can potentially be used for applications requiring biocompatibility and electrical conductivity such as biological and chemical sensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nibhriti; Biswas, Bintili; Khera, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    For the last two decades, there had been remarkable advancement in understanding the role of complement regulatory proteins in autoimmune disorders and importance of complement inhibitors as therapeutics. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a prototype of systemic autoimmune disorders. The disease, though rare, is potentially fatal and afflicts women at their reproductive age. It is a complex disease with multiorgan involvement, and each patient presents with a different set of symptoms. The diagnosis is often difficult and is based on the diagnostic criteria set by the American Rheumatology Association. Presence of antinuclear antibodies and more specifically antidouble-stranded DNA indicates SLE. Since the disease is multifactorial and its phenotypes are highly heterogeneous, there is a need to identify multiple noninvasive biomarkers for SLE. Lack of validated biomarkers for SLE disease activity or response to treatment is a barrier to the efficient management of the disease, drug discovery, as well as development of new therapeutics. Recent studies with gene knockout mice have suggested that membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) may critically determine the sensitivity of host tissues to complement injury in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Case-controlled and followup studies carried out in our laboratory suggest an intimate relation between the level of DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 transcripts and the disease activity in SLE. Based on comparative evaluation of our data on these four membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins, we envisaged CR1 and MCP transcripts as putative noninvasive disease activity markers and the respective proteins as therapeutic targets for SLE. Following is a brief appraisal on membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SLE.

  16. Radiosensitization by fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene on human malignant melanoma through lipid peroxidation and enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Kimura, Masatsugu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2014-04-01

    We examined fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene (C60/Sqe) for the ability to potentiate the radiosensitization under X-ray irradiation on human malignant melanoma HMV-II cells, which were treated with C60/Sqe and thereafter irradiated with X-ray. The cell proliferation for C60/Sqe was inhibited more markedly than for Sqe alone. Meanwhile, cell proliferation was almost unaltered for C60/squalane (Sqa) or Sqa, a hydrogenated form of Sqe, as compared to no-additive control. Thus radiosensitization of C60/Sqe is attributed to peroxidation of unsaturated bonds of squalene by X-ray-excited C60 in contrast to squalane. The fluorescence images of HMV-II cells stained with Rhodamine123, an indicator for mitochondrial membrane potential, were monitored for 6 h after X-ray irradiation. C60/Sqe obviously exhibited more augmented fluorescence intensity on perinuclear region of HMV-II cells than Sqe alone. TBARS assay showed that the lipid peroxidation level as malondialdehyde-equivalent increased by combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray dose-dependently on X-ray doses. C60/Sqe exhibited lipid peroxidation more markedly by 1.2-fold than Sqe alone. Thus the level of lipid peroxidation of squalene was sufficiently higher in C60/Sqe than in Sqe in the absence of C60 under X-ray irradiation, suggesting the combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray irradiation induced radiosensitization on HMV-II cells by peroxidation of absorbed Sqe in mitochondrial membrane via oxidative stress mediated by fullerene-C60.

  17. A simple route to develop transparent doxorubicin-loaded nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes as potential wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaogang; Zhang, Hao; Cao, Zhenni; Cai, Ning; Xue, Yanan; Yu, Faquan

    2016-06-05

    The objective of this study is to develop transparent porous nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes with controlled release of doxorubicin for potential applications as wound dressings, which were fabricated by tape casting method from dispersing carboxylated nanodiamonds and dissolving cellulose homogeneously in 7 wt% NaOH/12 wt% urea aqueous solution. By adjusting the carboxylated nanodiamonds content, various nanocomposite membranes were obtained. The structure and properties of these membranes have been investigated by light transmittance measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile tests, water loss analyses, etc. The drug loading and release was investigated using doxorubicin hydrochloride as a model drug. In vitro cytotoxicity assay of the membranes was also studied. This work presented a proof-of-concept utility of these membranes for loading and release of bioactive compounds to be employed as a candidate for wound dressing.

  18. Study on the mitochondrial activity and membrane potential after exposing later stage oocytes of two gorgonian corals (Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis) to cryoprotectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S; Spikings, E; Huang, I-C; Lin, C

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs provide a valuable habitat for many economically valuable fish and invertebrates. However, they are in serious jeopardy, threatened by increasing over-exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, disease and global climate change. Here, we examined the effect of cryoprotectant exposure on mitochondrial activity and membrane potential in coral oocytes in order to find suitable cryoprotectants towards their successful cryopreservation. According to the No Observed Effect Concentrations (NOECs), methanol was found to be the least toxic cryoprotectant whilst DMSO was the most toxic cryoprotectant. The results also demonstrated that there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in ATP concentrations between Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis after exposure to all concentrations of all cryoprotectants for 30 min. Using confocal microscopy, JC-1 (5,50,6,60-tetrachloro-1,10,3,30-tetraethyl-imidacarbocyanine iodide) staining indicated that the mitochondrial membrane potential of Junceella fragilis oocytes reduced after 1 M and 2 M methanol treatment and a loss of the mitochondrial distribution pattern and poor green fluorescence after 3M methanol treatment. Therefore, even oocytes that show no adverse effect of cryoprotectants on survival might suffer some more subtle impacts. The results obtained from this study will provide a basis for development of protocols to cryopreserve the oocytes of gorgonian corals.

  19. Membrane Potential and Calcium Dynamics in Beta Cells from Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices: Theory, Experimentation, and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Špelič, Denis; Klemen, Maša Skelin; Žalik, Borut; Gosak, Marko; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-10-28

    Beta cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are precise biological sensors for glucose and play a central role in balancing the organism between catabolic and anabolic needs. A hallmark of the beta cell response to glucose are oscillatory changes of membrane potential that are tightly coupled with oscillatory changes in intracellular calcium concentration which, in turn, elicit oscillations of insulin secretion. Both membrane potential and calcium changes spread from one beta cell to the other in a wave-like manner. In order to assess the properties of the abovementioned responses to physiological and pathological stimuli, the main challenge remains how to effectively measure membrane potential and calcium changes at the same time with high spatial and temporal resolution, and also in as many cells as possible. To date, the most wide-spread approach has employed the electrophysiological patch-clamp method to monitor membrane potential changes. Inherently, this technique has many advantages, such as a direct contact with the cell and a high temporal resolution. However, it allows one to assess information from a single cell only. In some instances, this technique has been used in conjunction with CCD camera-based imaging, offering the opportunity to simultaneously monitor membrane potential and calcium changes, but not in the same cells and not with a reliable cellular or subcellular spatial resolution. Recently, a novel family of highly-sensitive membrane potential reporter dyes in combination with high temporal and spatial confocal calcium imaging allows for simultaneously detecting membrane potential and calcium changes in many cells at a time. Since the signals yielded from both types of reporter dyes are inherently noisy, we have developed complex methods of data denoising that permit for visualization and pixel-wise analysis of signals. Combining the experimental approach of high-resolution imaging with the advanced analysis of noisy data enables novel

  20. Membrane Potential and Calcium Dynamics in Beta Cells from Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices: Theory, Experimentation, and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Dolenšek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Beta cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are precise biological sensors for glucose and play a central role in balancing the organism between catabolic and anabolic needs. A hallmark of the beta cell response to glucose are oscillatory changes of membrane potential that are tightly coupled with oscillatory changes in intracellular calcium concentration which, in turn, elicit oscillations of insulin secretion. Both membrane potential and calcium changes spread from one beta cell to the other in a wave-like manner. In order to assess the properties of the abovementioned responses to physiological and pathological stimuli, the main challenge remains how to effectively measure membrane potential and calcium changes at the same time with high spatial and temporal resolution, and also in as many cells as possible. To date, the most wide-spread approach has employed the electrophysiological patch-clamp method to monitor membrane potential changes. Inherently, this technique has many advantages, such as a direct contact with the cell and a high temporal resolution. However, it allows one to assess information from a single cell only. In some instances, this technique has been used in conjunction with CCD camera-based imaging, offering the opportunity to simultaneously monitor membrane potential and calcium changes, but not in the same cells and not with a reliable cellular or subcellular spatial resolution. Recently, a novel family of highly-sensitive membrane potential reporter dyes in combination with high temporal and spatial confocal calcium imaging allows for simultaneously detecting membrane potential and calcium changes in many cells at a time. Since the signals yielded from both types of reporter dyes are inherently noisy, we have developed complex methods of data denoising that permit for visualization and pixel-wise analysis of signals. Combining the experimental approach of high-resolution imaging with the advanced analysis of noisy

  1. Modeling the electric potential across neuronal membranes: the effect of fixed charges on spinal ganglion neurons and neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago M Pinto

    Full Text Available We present a model for the electric potential profile across the membranes of neuronal cells. We considered the resting and action potential states, and analyzed the influence of fixed charges of the membrane on its electric potential, based on experimental values of membrane properties of the spinal ganglion neuron and the neuroblastoma cell. The spinal ganglion neuron represents a healthy neuron, and the neuroblastoma cell, which is tumorous, represents a pathological neuron. We numerically solved the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the regions of the membrane model we have adopted, by considering the densities of charges dissolved in an electrolytic solution and fixed on both glycocalyx and cytoplasmic proteins. Our model predicts that there is a difference in the behavior of the electric potential profiles of the two types of cells, in response to changes in charge concentrations in the membrane. Our results also describe an insensitivity of the neuroblastoma cell membrane, as observed in some biological experiments. This electrical property may be responsible for the low pharmacological response of the neuroblastoma to certain chemotherapeutic treatments.

  2. Modeling the electric potential across neuronal membranes: the effect of fixed charges on spinal ganglion neurons and neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Thiago M; Wedemann, Roseli S; Cortez, Célia M

    2014-01-01

    We present a model for the electric potential profile across the membranes of neuronal cells. We considered the resting and action potential states, and analyzed the influence of fixed charges of the membrane on its electric potential, based on experimental values of membrane properties of the spinal ganglion neuron and the neuroblastoma cell. The spinal ganglion neuron represents a healthy neuron, and the neuroblastoma cell, which is tumorous, represents a pathological neuron. We numerically solved the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the regions of the membrane model we have adopted, by considering the densities of charges dissolved in an electrolytic solution and fixed on both glycocalyx and cytoplasmic proteins. Our model predicts that there is a difference in the behavior of the electric potential profiles of the two types of cells, in response to changes in charge concentrations in the membrane. Our results also describe an insensitivity of the neuroblastoma cell membrane, as observed in some biological experiments. This electrical property may be responsible for the low pharmacological response of the neuroblastoma to certain chemotherapeutic treatments.

  3. Chondrogenic potential of subpopulations of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers derived from human synovial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes, I; de Toro, F J; Blanco, F J

    2010-11-01

    In this study we analyzed the chondrogenic potential of subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human synovial membranes enriched for CD73, CD106, and CD271 markers. Subpopulations of human synovial membrane MSCs enriched for CD73, CD106, and CD271 markers were isolated using a cytometry sorter and characterized by flow cytometry for MSC markers. The expression of Sox9, Nanog, and Runx2 genes by these cells was measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The chondrogenesis of each subpopulation was assessed by culturing the cells in a defined medium to produce spontaneous spheroid formation and differentiation towards chondrocyte-like cells. The examination of the spheroids by histological and immunohistochemical analyses for collagen type II (COL2), aggrecan, collagen type I (COL1), metalloprotease 13 (MMP13), and collagen type X (COLX) levels were performed to assess their chondrogenesis capacity. The adipogenesis and osteogenesis potential of each subpopulation was determined using commercial media; the resulting cells were stained with oil red O or red alizarin to test the degree of differentiation. The subpopulations had different profiles of cells positive for the MSC markers CD44, CD69, CD73, CD90, and CD105 and showed different expression levels of the genes Sox9, Nanog, and Runx2 involved in chondrogenesis, undifferentiation, and osteoblastogenesis, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that COL1, COL2, COLX, MMP13, and aggrecan were expressed in the spheroids as soon as 14 days of culture. The CD271(+) subpopulation expressed the highest levels of COL2 staining compared to the other subpopulations. CD105 and Runx2 were shown by immunohistochemistry and genetic analysis to have significantly higher expression CD271(+) subpopulation than the other subpopulations. Spheroids formed from CD271-enriched and CD73-enriched MSCs from normal human synovial membranes mimic the native cartilage extracellular

  4. Tetraphenylethene-Based Conjugated Fluoranthene: A Potential Fluorescent Probe for Detection of Nitroaromatic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Yogesh; Venkatramaiah, Nutalapati; Patil, Satish

    2016-04-04

    This study reports the synthesis and photophysical properties of a star-shaped, novel, fluoranthene-tetraphenylethene (TFPE) conjugated luminogen, which exhibits aggregation-induced blue-shifted emission (AIBSE). The bulky fluoranthene units at the periphery prevent intramolecular rotation (IMR) of phenyl rings and induces a blueshift with enhanced emission. The AIBSE phenomenon was investigated by solvatochromic and temperature-dependent emission studies. Nanoaggregates of TFPE, formed by varying the water/THF ratio, were investigated by SEM and TEM and correlated with optical properties. The TFPE conjugate was found to be a promising fluorescent probe towards the detection of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs), especially for 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (PA) with high sensitivity and a high Stern-Volmer quenching constant. The study reveals that nanoaggregates of TFPE formed at 30 and 70% water in THF showed unprecedented sensitivity with detection limits of 0.8 and 0.5 ppb, respectively. The nanoaggregates formed at water fractions of 30 and 70% exhibit high Stern-Volmer constants (Ksv=79,998 and 51,120 M(-1), respectively) towards PA. Fluorescence quenching is ascribed to photoinduced electron transfer between TFPE and NACs with a static quenching mechanism. Test strips coated with TFPE luminogen demonstrate fast and ultra-low-level detection of PA for real-time field analysis.

  5. Direct borohydride fuel cell: Main issues met by the membrane-electrodes-assembly and potential solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Umit B.

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is a fuel cell for which there is consensus about its promising commercial future as a portable power system. However, its development faces three main issues: the borohydride hydrolysis (issue 1) and crossover (issue 2), and the cost (issue 3). These issues are encountered by the membrane-electrodes-assembly. By a discussion around these three issues, the present paper reviews the experimental aspects. The discussion stresses on the opportunities of improvements and reviews the potential solutions that are proposed in the open literature. For each issue, the best solution seems to be a combination of improvements. The issue 1 may be solved thanks to a gold-based anode catalyst and an optimized fuel. The solution to the issue 2 may be a more efficient membrane combined with an optimized fuel and an inactive-towards-borohydride cathode catalyst like MnO 2. Regarding the issue 3, cheaper materials and better fuel use efficiency are the keys. The DBFC is still in a development phase with a small number of years of R&D invested and it appears that there are real improvement opportunities on the path of the DBFC marketing.

  6. Determination of the in vivo redox potential using roGFP and fluorescence spectra obtained from one-wavelength excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierer, S.; Elgass, K.; Bieker, S.; Zentgraf, U.; Meixner, A. J.; Schleifenbaum, F.

    2011-02-01

    The analysis of molecular processes in living (plant) cells such as signal transduction, DNA replication, carbon metabolism and senescence has been revolutionized by the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants as specific cellular markers. Many cell biological processes are accompanied by changes in the intracellular redox potential. To monitor the redox potential, a redox-sensitive mutant of GFP (roGFP) was created, which shows changes in its optical properties in response to changes in the redox state of its surrounding medium. For a quantitative analysis in living systems, it is essential to know the optical properties of roGFP in vitro. Therefore, we applied spectrally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on purified roGFP exposed to different redox potentials to determine shifts in both the absorption and the emission spectra of roGFP. Based on these in vitro findings, we introduce a new approach using one-wavelength excitation to use roGFP for the in vivo analysis of cell biological processes. We demonstrate the ability this technique by investigating chloroplast-located Grx1-roGFP2 expressing Arabidopsis thaliana cells as example for dynamically moving intracellular compartments. This is not possible with the two-wavelength excitation technique established so far, which hampers a quantitative analysis of highly mobile samples due to the time delay between the two measurements and the consequential displacement of the investigated area.

  7. A single-cell technique for the measurement of membrane potential, membrane conductance, and the efflux of rapidly penetrating solutes in Amphiuma erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, L C; Kregenow, F M

    1980-10-01

    We describe a single-cell technique for measuring membrane potential, membrane resistance, and the efflux of rapidly penetrating solutes such as Cl and H2O. Erythrocytes from Amphiuma means were aspirated into a Sylgard (Dow Corning Corp.)-coated capillary. The aspirated cell separated a solution within the capillary from a solution in the bath. Each of these two solutions was contiguous with approximately 5% of the total membrane surface. Microelectrodes placed concentrically within the capillary permit the measurement of intracellular voltage, specific membrane resistance, and the electrical seal between the two solutions. The intracellular voltage averaged -17.7 mV (pH 7.6) and changed as either intra- or extracellular chloride was varied. The average specific membrane resistance measured by passing current across the exposed membrane surface was 110 ohm-cm2. 36Cl and tritiated H2O fluxes (0.84 +/- 0.05 x 10(-6) M . cm-2 . min-1 and 6.4 +/- 1.5 x 10(-3) M . cm-2 . min-1, respectively) were determined by noting the rate at which isotope leaves the cell and crosses the membrane exposed to the bath. Our measured values for the flux of 36Cl and tritiated H2O approximate reported values for free-floating cells. 36Cl efflux, in addition, is inhibited by 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyano-stilbene 2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS) and furosemide, known inhibitors of the anion exchange mechanism responsible for the rapid anion fluxes of red blood cells. One can also demonstrate directly that > 89% of 36Cl efflux is "electrically silent" by analyzing the flux in the presence of an imposed transcellular voltage.

  8. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity.

  9. Chemisorption of estrone in nylon microfiltration membranes: Adsorption mechanism and potential use for estrone removal from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Qiu, Wei; Hu, Jiangyong; Gao, Wei

    2012-03-01

    Estrone is a representative steroid estrogen contaminant that has been detected in effluents from sewage treatment facilities, as well as in surface and ground waters. Our study shows that estrone can be readily removed from water via a unique chemisorption mechanism using nylon microfiltration membranes. Experiments on a laboratory in-line filtration system showed instant removal of estrone from 200 μg/l aqueous solutions by 0.45-μm nylon membranes (ca. 35 L per m(2) membrane). Comparisons with 0.45-μm PVDF, PTFE and glass microfiber membranes suggested that the significant estrone adsorption in nylon membrane should be predominately driven by a different mechanism rather than common physical adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study on nylon membranes and a model compound, N-methylacetamide, showed that the significant adsorption originated from the hydrogen bonding between terminal -OH groups on estrone molecules and nucleophile -C=O groups in amide groups of nylon 6,6. The saturated nylon membrane showed very low leachability in ambient water, while it could be effectively regenerated in alkaline or ethanol solutions. Preliminary reusability study showed that the membrane maintained a consistent adsorption capacity for estrone during ten cycles of reuse. The chemisorption-based polymeric adsorption may provide a new alternative approach for removing estrone and potentially other trace organic contaminants from water.

  10. Biophysical and biological characterization of intraoral multilayer membranes as potential carriers: A new drug delivery system for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mariana Dos Santos; Neto, Natalino Lourenço; da Costa, Silgia Aparecida; da Costa, Sirlene Maria; Oliveira, Thais Marchini; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso de; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira

    2017-02-01

    The current study developed through layer-by-layer deposition a multilayer membrane for intraoral drug delivery and analyzed the biochemical, functional, and biological properties of this membrane. For that purpose, we designed a three-layer chlorhexidine-incorporated membrane composed by pure chitosan and alginate. The biochemical, functional, and biological properties were analyzed by the following tests: degradation in saliva medium; controlled drug release; water absorption, mass loss; pH analysis; and biocompatibility through fibroblast cell viability by MTT assay. All tests were conducted at three different periods (24, 48 and 72hours). The results demonstrated that hybrid membranes composed by alginate and chitosan with glycerol had greater water absorption and mass loss in buffer solution and in artificial saliva. The controlled drug release test revealed that the hybrid membrane exhibited greater drug release (0.075%). All chlorhexidine-incorporated membranes reduced the cell viability, and chitosan membranes with and without glycerol did not interfere with fibroblast viability. The biochemical and biophysical characteristics of the designed membranes and the findings of cell viability tests indicate great potential for application in Dentistry.

  11. Electrospun nanofibrous SF/P(LLA-CL membrane: a potential substratum for endothelial keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JZ

    2015-05-01

    had different light transmittance properties. The 25:75 blended ratio membrane had the best transmittance among these scaffolds. All electrospun nanofibrous membranes showed improved speed of cell adherence when compared with the control group, especially when the P(LLA-CL ratio increased. The 25:75 blended ratio membranes also had the highest cell proliferation. B4G12 cells could form a monolayer on all scaffolds, and most functional genes were also stably expressed on all scaffolds. Only two genes showed changes in expression.Conclusion: All blended ratios of SF:P(LLA-CL scaffolds were evaluated and showed good biocompatibility for cell adherence and monolayer formation. Among them, the 25:75 blended ratio SF:P(LLA-CL scaffold had the best transmittance and the highest cell proliferation. These attributes further the potential application of the SF:P(LLA-CL scaffold for corneal endothelial transplantation. Keywords: silk fibroin, poly(L-lactic acid-co-Ɛ-caprolactone, B4G12, corneal endothelium, regeneration

  12. Potential oscillations in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with a Pd-Pt/C anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Pietro P.; Ticianelli, Edson A.; Varela, Hamilton

    We report in this paper the occurrence of potential oscillations in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a Pd-Pt/C anode, fed with H 2/100 ppm CO, and operated at 30 °C. We demonstrate that the use of Pd-Pt/C anode enables the emergence of dynamic instabilities in a PEMFC. Oscillations are characterized by the presence of very high oscillation amplitude, ca. 0.8 V, which is almost twice that observed in a PEMFC with a Pt-Ru/C anode under similar conditions. The effects of the H 2/CO flow rate and cell current density on the oscillatory dynamics were investigated and the mechanism rationalized in terms of the CO oxidation and adsorption processes. We also discuss the fundamental aspects concerning the operation of a PEMFC under oscillatory regime in terms of the benefit resulting from the higher average power output.

  13. Variation of the input resistance and membrane potential of a neuron in trace formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'yakonova, T L; Mikhal'tsev, I E

    1985-01-01

    Trace changes in electrical activity, input resistance (Rinp), and membrane potential (MP) of brain neurons are studied in the mollusk Limnaea stagnalis for intracellular stimulation with a sinusoidal threshold current with a frequency of 0.1 Hz during 20 min. Some neurons are shown to exhibit an effect of facilitation, a rise in the level of activity being attending by an increase in Rinp and depolarization. Other neurons displayed lowered activity with a decrease of Rinp and hyperpolarization. The selectivity of the Rinp variations relative to the parameters of the stimuli (maximum changes at the frequency of the current used) suggests that it is precisely trace changes of Rinp which lie at the basis of the neuronal plasticity in "learning." Some neurons in this series of experiments did not alter their electrical response, Rinp, or MP for stimulation. The possible reason for the non-uniform reaction of different neurons to identical stimulation is discussed.

  14. Restoration of membrane potential in mitochondria deenergized with carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toninello, A; Siliprandi, N

    1982-11-15

    The membrane potential (delta psi) of rat liver mitochondria dropped upon addition of carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) but was gradually and fully restored to the original value by the subsequent addition of dithioerythritol. Concomitantly, Ca2+ released from mitochondria was reaccumulated and the oxidative phosphorylation process completely recoupled. Neither of these effects has been observed with dinitro-o-cresol or 2,4-dinitrophenol, uncouplers which, unlike FCCP, do not react with thiols. Delta psi abolished by FCCP was also restored, though incompletely, by albumin; a prompt and complete restoration was however achieved upon subsequent addition of dithioerythritol. Dithioerythritol also completely and rapidly restored the delta psi decreased by addition of diazene dicarboxylic acid bisdimethylamide (diamide).

  15. Membrane potential dynamics of populations of cortical neurons during auditory streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Brandon J; Noreña, Arnaud J

    2015-10-01

    How a mixture of acoustic sources is perceptually organized into discrete auditory objects remains unclear. One current hypothesis postulates that perceptual segregation of different sources is related to the spatiotemporal separation of cortical responses induced by each acoustic source or stream. In the present study, the dynamics of subthreshold membrane potential activity were measured across the entire tonotopic axis of the rodent primary auditory cortex during the auditory streaming paradigm using voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Consistent with the proposed hypothesis, we observed enhanced spatiotemporal segregation of cortical responses to alternating tone sequences as their frequency separation or presentation rate was increased, both manipulations known to promote stream segregation. However, across most streaming paradigm conditions tested, a substantial cortical region maintaining a response to both tones coexisted with more peripheral cortical regions responding more selectively to one of them. We propose that these coexisting subthreshold representation types could provide neural substrates to support the flexible switching between the integrated and segregated streaming percepts.

  16. Exploring the potential of DOC fluorescence as proxy for groundwater contamination by pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlin, Julien; Gallé, Tom; Bayerle, Michael; Pittois, Denis; Huck, viola

    2017-04-01

    Of the different water quality surrogates the fluorescence of dissolved organic content (FDOC) appears particularly promising due to its sensitivity and specificity. A complete spectrum of FDOC can be obtained using bench top instruments scanning a spectral space going from short wavelength UV to visible blue, yielding a so-called an excitation-emission matrix (EEM). The raw EEM can be either used directly for correlation analysis with the variable of interest, or first decomposed into underlying elements corresponding to different groups of organic compounds displaying similar properties using multiway techniques such as Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Fluorescence spectroscopy has up to now only rarely been applied specifically to groundwater environments. The objective of the project was to explore systematically the possibilities offered by FDOC and PARAFAC for the assessment of groundwater contamination by pesticides, taking into account the transit time from the pesticide source to the groundwater outlet. Three sites corresponding to different transit times were sampled: -one spring regularly contaminated by surface water from a nearby stream (sub-daily to daily response to fast-flow generating storm events) -one spring displaying a weekly to monthly response to interflow -sampling along a flowline consisting of a series of springs and an observation well situated upgradient with mean transit times difference of several years Preliminary results show that a three component PARAFAC model is sufficient to decompose the raw EEMs, which is less than the seven or eight component models often encountered in surface water studies. For the first site, one component in the protein-like region 275(excitation)/310 (emission) nm measured in the stream samples was filtrered completely by the aquifer and did not appear in the spring samples. The other two components followed roughly the trend of the DOC and pesticide breakthrough. For the second site, soil sampling of

  17. Cholesterol-Dependent Energy Transfer between Fluorescent Proteins—Insights into Protein Proximity of APP and BACE1 in Different Membranes in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern von Einem

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET -based techniques have recently been applied to study the interactions between β-site APP-cleaving enzyme-GFP (BACE1-GFP and amyloid precursor protein-mRFP (APP-mRFP in U373 glioblastoma cells. In this context, the role of APP-BACE1 proximity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis has been discussed. FRET was found to depend on intracellular cholesterol levels and associated alterations in membrane stiffness. Here, NPC1 null cells (CHO-NPC1−/−, exhibiting increased cholesterol levels and disturbed cholesterol transport similar to that observed in Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC, were used to analyze the influence of altered cholesterol levels on APP-BACE1 proximity. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of whole CHO-wild type (WT and CHO-NPC1−/− cells (EPI-illumination microscopy, as well as their plasma membranes (total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, TIRFM, were performed. Additionally, generalized polarization (GP measurements of CHO-WT and CHO-NPC1−/− cells incubated with the fluorescence marker laurdan were performed to determine membrane stiffness of plasma- and intracellular-membranes. CHO-NPC1−/− cells showed higher membrane stiffness at intracellular- but not plasma-membranes, equivalent to cholesterol accumulation in late endosomes/lysosomes. Along with higher membrane stiffness, the FRET efficiency between BACE1-GFP and APP-mRFP was reduced at intracellular membranes, but not within the plasma membrane of CHO-NPC1−/−. Our data show that FRET combined with TIRF is a powerful technique to determine protein proximity and membrane fluidity in cellular models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Investigating the potential of fluorescent fingerprint powders as a marker for blow fly larvae (Diptera: calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Jennifer Y; Robinson, Scott D; Devine, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Four fluorescent fingerprint powders (RedWop(™) , GreenWop(™) , Basic Yellow(™) , and Yellow Powder(™) ) were evaluated as a marker for blow fly larvae. Administration methods included ingestion (high vs. low concentration) or topical. Ingestion of high concentrations of Basic Yellow(™) and RedWop(™) caused higher larval mortality. Basic Yellow(™) delayed development and adult emergence while RedWop(™) and Yellow Powder(™) had a significant effect on particular stages of development, however, emergence time was not altered. Optimal administration is through ingestion at low concentration levels (powders was 450 nm. This research can aid in investigative training to increase visibility of larval and pupal blow flies. It can also be used in entomological studies to differentiate between larval blow flies (or other dipteran) species or individuals to further understand complex interactions and behavior during larval development.

  19. Heat shock induces production of reactive oxygen species and increases inner mitochondrial membrane potential in winter wheat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyaeva, A V; Stepanov, A V; Lyubushkina, I V; Pobezhimova, T P; Rikhvanov, E G

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock leads to oxidative stress. Excessive ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation could be responsible for expression of genes of heat-shock proteins or for cell death. It is known that in isolated mammalian mitochondria high protonic potential on the inner membrane actuates the production of ROS. Changes in viability, ROS content, and mitochondrial membrane potential value have been studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultured cells under heat treatment. Elevation of temperature to 37-50°C was found to induce elevated ROS generation and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, but it did not affect viability immediately after treatment. More severe heat exposure (55-60°C) was not accompanied by mitochondrial potential elevation and increased ROS production, but it led to instant cell death. A positive correlation between mitochondrial potential and ROS production was observed. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by the protonophore CCCP inhibited ROS generation under the heating conditions. These data suggest that temperature elevation leads to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in winter wheat cultured cells, which in turn causes the increased ROS production.

  20. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  1. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  2. Effects of thallium on membrane currents at diastolic potentials in canine cardiac Purkinje strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I S; Mulrine, N K

    1986-01-01

    A two-micro-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to record membrane currents from canine cardiac Purkinje strands during hyperpolarizing steps to potentials between -70 and -150 mV in Tyrode solutions containing K+ and/or Tl+. Complete replacement of external K+ by equimolar Tl+ increases the instantaneous inwardly rectifying current. The inwardly rectifying region of the instantaneous I-V relation is shifted to more positive potentials and its slope is increased. The diastolic time-dependent current is reduced or reversed. Partial substitution of equimolar Tl+ for K+ reduces the diastolic time-dependent current. The instantaneous I-V relation is shifted inward for molar fractions of Tl+ (YTl) greater than 0.5, and is slightly more inward or unchanged for YTl less than or equal to 0.5. Addition of small amounts of Tl+ shifts the instantaneous I-V relation inward and reduces the diastolic time-dependent current. Addition of Tl+ in solutions containing Ba2+ to block the background inward rectifier has no effect on the instantaneous I-V relation; the diastolic time-dependent (pace-maker) current is reduced. Block of the pace-maker current by Tl+ is largely independent of potential in Ba2+ Tyrode solution. Since Tl+ has opposite effects on the pace-maker current and the inward rectifier, these findings support other evidence that the pace-maker current is not part of the background inward rectifier.

  3. Effects of NaCl and Ca2+on Membrane Potential of Epidermal Cells of Maize Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Jia-min; WANG Xiao-li; ZHAI Fu-qin; YAN Feng; FENG Ke

    2008-01-01

    The effects of salt-stress on plants involve not only the water stress caused by low osmotic pressure,but also the toxicity of excess Na+.A large amount of Na+ entering cells would reduce K+ uptake,which leads to an imbalance of K:Na ratio in cells.One of the reasons for the reduced K+-uptake iS the closure of K+-channel which is controlled by membrane potential.Calcium is usually applied to improve the growth of plants on saline soils and shows positive influence in the integrality of cell membrane.This study applied glass microelectrode technique to monitoring the NaCl-induced changes of membrane potential of root epidermal cells of maize(Zea mays L.,Denghai 11)seedlings at NaCl concentrations of 0,8,20,50,100,200 mmol L-1,respectively.The effect of Ca2+ on the changes of membrane potential caused by NaCl Was also studied.The results showed that:NaCl caused cell membrane depolarization.The depolarization became greater and faster with increasing of NaCl concentration.Moreover,the extent of depolarization was positively correlated with NaCl concentration.The addition of calcium postponed the depolarization,and decreased the degree of depolarization caused by NaCl.High NaCl concentration leads to depolarization of maize root cell membrane,which can partly be counteracted by calcium.

  4. New crosslinking method of polyamide-imide membranes for potential application in harsh polar aprotic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, S.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Cuperus, F.P.; Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time successful crosslinking of polyamide–imide (Torlon®) based membranes using di-isocyanates. The crosslinked membranes are resistant to N-methyl pyrrolidone (which is solvent of the non-crosslinked membranes) and have very good mechanical properties. In contrast to the

  5. A set of fluorescent protein-based markers expressed from constitutive and arbuscular mycorrhiza-inducible promoters to label organelles, membranes and cytoskeletal elements in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey; Harrison, Maria J

    2014-12-01

    Medicago truncatula is widely used for analyses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis and nodulation. To complement the genetic and genomic resources that exist for this species, we generated fluorescent protein fusions that label the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, trans-Golgi network, plasma membrane, apoplast, late endosome/multivesicular bodies (MVB), transitory late endosome/ tonoplast, tonoplast, plastids, mitochondria, peroxisomes, autophagosomes, plasmodesmata, actin, microtubules, periarbuscular membrane (PAM) and periarbuscular apoplastic space (PAS) and expressed them from the constitutive AtUBQ10 promoter and the AM symbiosis-specific MtBCP1 promoter. All marker constructs showed the expected expression patterns and sub-cellular locations in M. truncatula root cells. As a demonstration of their utility, we used several markers to investigate AM symbiosis where root cells undergo major cellular alterations to accommodate their fungal endosymbiont. We demonstrate that changes in the position and size of the nuclei occur prior to hyphal entry into the cortical cells and do not require DELLA signaling. Changes in the cytoskeleton, tonoplast and plastids also occur in the colonized cells and in contrast to previous studies, we show that stromulated plastids are abundant in cells with developing and mature arbuscules, while lens-shaped plastids occur in cells with degenerating arbuscules. Arbuscule development and secretion of the PAM creates a periarbuscular apoplastic compartment which has been assumed to be continuous with apoplast of the cell. However, fluorescent markers secreted to the periarbuscular apoplast challenge this assumption. This marker resource will facilitate cell biology studies of AM symbiosis, as well as other aspects of legume biology. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Anion Channel Inhibitor NPPB-Inhibited Fluoride Accumulation in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) Is Related to the Regulation of Ca2+, CaM and Depolarization of Plasma Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Chen; Gao, Hong-Jian; Yang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Hong-Hong; Wang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Tea plant is known to be a hyper-accumulator of fluoride (F). Over-intake of F has been shown to have adverse effects on human health, e.g., dental fluorosis. Thus, understanding the mechanisms fluoride accumulation and developing potential approaches to decrease F uptake in tea plants might be beneficial for human health. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with the anion channel inhibitor NPPB reduced F accumulation in tea plants. Simultaneously, we observed that NPPB triggered Ca2+ efflux from mature zone of tea root and significantly increased relative CaM in tea roots. Besides, pretreatment with the Ca2+ chelator (EGTA) and CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP) suppressed NPPB-elevated cytosolic Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and CaM concentration in tea roots, respectively. Interestingly, NPPB-inhibited F accumulation was found to be significantly alleviated in tea plants pretreated with either Ca2+ chelator (EGTA) or CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP). In addition, NPPB significantly depolarized membrane potential transiently and we argue that the net Ca2+ and H+ efflux across the plasma membrane contributed to the restoration of membrane potential. Overall, our results suggest that regulation of Ca2+-CaM and plasma membrane potential depolarization are involved in NPPB-inhibited F accumulation in tea plants. PMID:26742036

  7. Anion Channel Inhibitor NPPB-Inhibited Fluoride Accumulation in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) Is Related to the Regulation of Ca²⁺, CaM and Depolarization of Plasma Membrane Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Chen; Gao, Hong-Jian; Yang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Hong-Hong; Wang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-05

    Tea plant is known to be a hyper-accumulator of fluoride (F). Over-intake of F has been shown to have adverse effects on human health, e.g., dental fluorosis. Thus, understanding the mechanisms fluoride accumulation and developing potential approaches to decrease F uptake in tea plants might be beneficial for human health. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with the anion channel inhibitor NPPB reduced F accumulation in tea plants. Simultaneously, we observed that NPPB triggered Ca(2+) efflux from mature zone of tea root and significantly increased relative CaM in tea roots. Besides, pretreatment with the Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) and CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP) suppressed NPPB-elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and CaM concentration in tea roots, respectively. Interestingly, NPPB-inhibited F accumulation was found to be significantly alleviated in tea plants pretreated with either Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) or CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP). In addition, NPPB significantly depolarized membrane potential transiently and we argue that the net Ca(2+) and H⁺ efflux across the plasma membrane contributed to the restoration of membrane potential. Overall, our results suggest that regulation of Ca(2+)-CaM and plasma membrane potential depolarization are involved in NPPB-inhibited F accumulation in tea plants.

  8. Intrinsically fluorescent carbon nanospheres as a nuclear targeting vector: delivery of membrane-impermeable molecule to modulate gene expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, B Ruthrotha; Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Suma, B S; Nagashankar, G; Arif, M; Balasubramanyam, K; Eswaramoorthy, M; Kundu, Tapas K

    2008-10-01

    In this report, we demonstrate glucose-derived carbon nanospheres to be an emerging class of intracellular carriers. The surfaces of these spheres are highly functionalized and do not need any further modification. Besides, the intrinsic fluorescence property of carbon nanospheres helps in tracking their cellular localization without any additional fluorescent tags. The spheres are found to target the nucleus of the mammalian cells, causing no toxicity. Interestingly, the in vivo experiments show that these nanospheres have an important ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and localize in the brain besides getting localized in the liver and the spleen. There is also evidence to show that they are continuously being removed from these tissues over time. Furthermore, these nanospheres were used as a carrier for the membrane-impermeable molecule CTPB (N-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-2-ethoxybenzamide), the only known small-molecule activator of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300. Biochemical analyses such as Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression analysis show the induction of the hyperacetylation of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 (autoacetylation) as well as histones both in vitro and in vivo and the activation of HAT-dependent transcription upon CTPB delivery. These results establish an alternative path for the activation of gene expression mediated by the induction of HAT activity instead of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition.

  9. Propagation-of-uncertainty from contact angle and streaming potential measurements to XDLVO model assessments of membrane-colloid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Satish; Childress, Amy; Brant, Jonathan

    2014-08-15

    Membrane fouling assessed from a fundamental standpoint within the context of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model. The DLVO model requires that the properties of the membrane and foulant(s) be quantified. Membrane surface charge (zeta potential) and free energy values are characterized using streaming potential and contact angle measurements, respectively. Comparing theoretical assessments for membrane-colloid interactions between research groups requires that the variability of the measured inputs be established. The impact that such variability in input values on the outcome from interfacial models must be quantified to determine an acceptable variance in inputs. An interlaboratory study was conducted to quantify the variability in streaming potential and contact angle measurements when using standard protocols. The propagation of uncertainty from these errors was evaluated in terms of their impact on the quantitative and qualitative conclusions on extended DLVO (XDLVO) calculated interaction terms. The error introduced into XDLVO calculated values was of the same magnitude as the calculated free energy values at contact and at any given separation distance. For two independent laboratories to draw similar quantitative conclusions regarding membrane-foulant interfacial interactions the standard error in contact angle values must be⩽2.5°, while that for the zeta potential values must be⩽7 mV.

  10. The ATP-sensitive K + channel and membrane potential in the pathogenesis of vascular hyporeactivity in severe hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the mechanism of vascular hyporeactivity following severe hemorrhagic shock (HS) by studying the changes of ATP-sensitive potassium channels'(KATP) properties and membrane potential of mesenteric arteriolar smooth muscle cells. Methods: Single channel currents were studied on cell-attached and inside-out patches of enzymatically isolated mesenteric arteriolar smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Membrane potentials of arteriolar strips and ASMCs were recorded by intracellular membrane potential recording method and confocal microscopy, respectively. Results: KATP channels in ASMCs were activated,which induced smooth muscle hyperpolarization following vsscular hyporeactivity in HS. Conclusions: Hyperpolarizing effect of KATP channel activation plays an important role in low vasoreactivity during severe hemorrhagic shock.

  11. Accelerating potential of mean force calculations for lipid membrane permeation: System size, reaction coordinate, solute-solute distance, and cutoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Naomi; Atkovska, Kalina; Hub, Jochen S.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are capable of predicting the permeability of lipid membranes for drug-like solutes, but the calculations have remained prohibitively expensive for high-throughput studies. Here, we analyze simple measures for accelerating potential of mean force (PMF) calculations of membrane permeation, namely, (i) using smaller simulation systems, (ii) simulating multiple solutes per system, and (iii) using shorter cutoffs for the Lennard-Jones interactions. We find that PMFs for membrane permeation are remarkably robust against alterations of such parameters, suggesting that accurate PMF calculations are possible at strongly reduced computational cost. In addition, we evaluated the influence of the definition of the membrane center of mass (COM), used to define the transmembrane reaction coordinate. Membrane-COM definitions based on all lipid atoms lead to artifacts due to undulations and, consequently, to PMFs dependent on membrane size. In contrast, COM definitions based on a cylinder around the solute lead to size-independent PMFs, down to systems of only 16 lipids per monolayer. In summary, compared to popular setups that simulate a single solute in a membrane of 128 lipids with a Lennard-Jones cutoff of 1.2 nm, the measures applied here yield a speedup in sampling by factor of ˜40, without reducing the accuracy of the calculated PMF.

  12. Multi-confocal Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy : experimental demonstration and potential applications for living cell measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Galland, Rémi; Kloster, Meike; Herbomel, Gaetan; Destaing, Olivier; Balland, Martial; Souchier, Catherine; Usson, Yves; Derouard, Jacques; Wang, Irène; Delon, Antoine; 10.2741/e263

    2011-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a multi-confocal Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (mFCS) technique which allows parallel measurements at different locations, by combining a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), with an Electron Multiplying-CCD camera (EM-CCD). The SLM is used to produce a series of laser spots, while the pixels of the EM-CCD play the roles of virtual pinholes. The phase map addressed to the SLM is calculated by using the spherical wave approximation and makes it possible to produce several diffraction limited laser spots, either aligned or spread over the field of view. To attain fast enough imaging rates, the camera has been used in different acquisition modes, the fastest of which leads to a time resolution of 100 $\\mu$s. We qualified the experimental set-up by using solutions of sulforhodamine G in glycerol and demonstrated that the observation volumes are similar to that of a standard confocal set-up. To demonstrate that our mFCS method is suitable for intracellular studies, experiments have...

  13. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of dioxopyrrolopyrroles as potential low-affinity fluorescent Ca2+ indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesibe Avcıbaşi

    2004-01-01

    1,4-dihydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione (DPP3 have been synthesized and evaluated for their Ca2+ binding properties via fluorimetric titrations. The in vitro dissociation constant Kd measured at 21 ∘C in 100 mM KCl buffered solution, pH 7.05, for the Ca2+ –DPP1 complex is 10 μM; for Ca2+ –DPP2 and Ca2+ –DPP3 a Kd value of 20 μM is found. All three indicators form 1 : 1 complexes with Ca2+. The fluorescence quantum yields of the uncomplexed forms of DPP1, DPP2 and DPP3 are 1.2×10−2, 3.4×10−2 and 3.6×10−2, respectively. After binding to Ca2+ these values increase to 4.8×10−2, 5.0×10−2 and 5.1×10−2, respectively.

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in potential organ donors for brain death determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C-E; Lin, H-C; Tsui, Y-C; Lin, P-Y; Lin, K-H; Chang, Y-Y; Chen, Y-L

    2011-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) must be applied in early stages to perfuse organs before donation in order to expand the donor pool. The aim of this study was to examine the benefits of ECMO for potential organ donors with multiple complications. This retrospective review describes patients with ECMO support who were on the verge of brain death and therefore potential subjects for organ donation. Six organ donors with severe neurological damage under ECMO support completed the procedures, namely, two women and four men of ages 19 to 58 years (mean, 32 years). Three donors completed the brain-death determination procedure, one failed the procedure, and two experienced cardiac asystole prior to the procedure and were unable to be declared dead even after resuscitation. Nine kidneys and three livers were successfully retrieved from 5/6 donors, leading to 11 successful transplantations: eight kidneys, two livers, and one simultaneous kidney-liver transplantations. The organs functioned well and the recipients made full recoveries. ECMO allows for the maintenance of abdominal organ tissue perfusion without warm ischemia before organ procurement, providing sufficient time for safe organ donation procedures and reducing the risk of unpredictable cardiac arrest that could result in the donor death and graft loss. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Membrane Potential Dynamics of Spontaneous and Visually Evoked Gamma Activity in V1 of Awake Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Perrenoud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gamma activity (30-80 Hz is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV and pyramidal cells (PYRs. However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain unclear. Here, we characterized the intracellular dynamics of PVs and PYRs during spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in layers 2/3 of V1 of awake mice using targeted patch-clamp recordings and synchronous local field potentials (LFPs. Strong gamma activity patterned in short bouts (one to three cycles, occurred when PVs and PYRs were depolarizing and entrained their membrane potential dynamics regardless of the presence of visual stimulation. PV firing phase locked unconditionally to gamma activity. However, PYRs only phase locked to visually evoked gamma bouts. Taken together, our results indicate that gamma activity corresponds to short pulses of correlated background synaptic activity synchronizing the output of cortical neurons depending on external sensory drive.

  16. Potential Usefulness of Streptococcus pneumoniae Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Antibacterial Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chi-Won; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop

    2017-01-01

    The secretion of extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs) is a common phenomenon that occurs in archaea, bacteria, and mammalian cells. The EMVs of bacteria play important roles in their virulence, biogenesis mechanisms, and host cell interactions. Bacterial EMVs have recently become the focus of attention because of their potential as highly effective vaccines that cause few side effects. Here, we isolated the EMVs of Streptococcus pneumoniae and examined their potential as new vaccine candidates. Although the S. pneumoniae bacteria were highly pathogenic in a mouse model, the EMVs purified from these bacteria showed low pathological activity both in cell culture and in mice. When mice were injected intraperitoneally with S. pneumoniae EMVs and then challenged, they were protected from both the homologous strain and another pathogenic serotype of S. pneumoniae. We also identified a number of proteins that may have immunogenic activity and may be responsible for the immune responses by the hosts. These results suggest that S. pneumoniae EMVs or their individual immunogenic antigens may be useful as new vaccine agents.

  17. Reduction of low potential electron acceptors requires the CbcL inner membrane cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharoff, Lori; Chan, Chi Ho; Bond, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The respiration of metals by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires electrons generated by metabolism to pass from the interior of the cell to electron acceptors beyond the cell membranes. The G. sulfurreducens inner membrane multiheme c-type cytochrome ImcH is required for respiration to extracellular electron acceptors with redox potentials greater than -0.1 V vs. SHE, but ImcH is not essential for electron transfer to lower potential acceptors. In contrast, deletion of cbcL, encoding an inner membrane protein consisting of b-type and multiheme c-type cytochrome domains, severely affected reduction of low potential electron acceptors such as Fe(III)-oxides and electrodes poised at -0.1 V vs. SHE. Catalytic cyclic voltammetry of a ΔcbcL strain growing on poised electrodes revealed a 50 mV positive shift in driving force required for electron transfer out of the cell. In non-catalytic conditions, low-potential peaks present in wild type biofilms were absent in ∆cbcL mutants. Expression of cbcL in trans increased growth at low redox potential and restored features to cyclic voltammetry. This evidence supports a model where CbcL is a component of a second electron transfer pathway out of the G. sulfurreducens inner membrane that dominates when redox potential is at or below -0.1 V vs. SHE.

  18. Membrane potential bistability in nonexcitable cells as described by inward and outward voltage-gated ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Alcaraz, Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2014-10-30

    The membrane potential of nonexcitable cells, defined as the electrical potential difference between the cell cytoplasm and the extracellular environment when the current is zero, is controlled by the individual electrical conductance of different ion channels. In particular, inward- and outward-rectifying voltage-gated channels are crucial for cell hyperpolarization/depolarization processes, being amenable to direct physical study. High (in absolute value) negative membrane potentials are characteristic of terminally differentiated cells, while low membrane potentials are found in relatively depolarized, more plastic cells (e.g., stem, embryonic, and cancer cells). We study theoretically the hyperpolarized and depolarized values of the membrane potential, as well as the possibility to obtain a bistability behavior, using simplified models for the ion channels that regulate this potential. The bistability regions, which are defined in the multidimensional state space determining the cell state, can be relevant for the understanding of the different model cell states and the transitions between them, which are triggered by changes in the external environment.

  19. Sclareol, a plant diterpene, exhibits potent antiproliferative effects via the induction of apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential loss in osteosarcoma cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; He, Hong-Sheng; Yu, Hua-Long; Zeng, Yun; Han, Heng; He, Ning; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Shou-Jia; Xiong, Min

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of sclareol against MG63 osteosarcoma cells. A 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the cell viability of cells following treatment with sclareol. The extent of cell death induced by sclareol was evaluated using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. The effect of sclareol on cell cycle progression and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm) was evaluated with flow cytometry using the DNA‑binding fluorescent dyes propidium iodide and rhodamine‑123, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy was used to detect the morphological changes in the MG63 osteosarcoma cancer cells and the appearance of apoptotic bodies following sclareol treatment. The results revealed that sclareol induced dose‑ and time‑dependent growth inhibition of MG63 cancer cells with an IC50 value of 65.2 µM following a 12‑h incubation. Furthermore, sclareol induced a significant increase in the release of LDH from MG63 cell cultures, which was much more pronounced at higher doses. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that sclareol induced characteristic morphological features of apoptosis and the appearance of apoptotic bodies. Flow cytometry revealed that sclareol induced G1‑phase cell cycle arrest, which showed significant dose‑dependence. Additionally, sclareol induced a progressive and dose‑dependent reduction in the ΛΨm. In summary, sclareol inhibits the growth of osteosarcoma cancer cells via the induction of apoptosis, which is accompanied by G1‑phase cell cycle arrest and loss of ΛΨm.

  20. A potential food biopreservative, CecXJ-37N, non-covalently intercalates into the nucleotides of bacterial genomic DNA beyond membrane attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongliang; Liu, Jun; Li, Jinyao; Xia, Lijie; Yang, Jianhua; Sun, Surong; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Fuchun

    2017-02-15

    The antibacterial activities and mechanism of an amide-modified peptide CecXJ-37N were investigated in this study. CecXJ-37N showed small MICs (0.25-7.8μM) against eight harmful strains common in food industry. The α-helix proportion of CecXJ-37N increased by 11-fold in prokaryotic membrane comparable environments; cytotoxicity studies demonstrated the MHC was significantly higher than that of non-amidated isoform. Moreover, CecXJ-37N possessed stronger capacities to resist trypsin and pepsin hydrolysis within two hours. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that CecXJ-37N induced pore-formation, morphological changes, and lysed E. coli cells. Fluorescence microscopy indicated that CecXJ-37N penetrated E. coli membrane and accumulated in cytoplasm. Further ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy suggested that CecXJ-37N changed the action mode of parental peptide interacting with bacterial genome from outside binding to a tightly non-covalent intercalation into nucleotides. Overall, this study suggested that amide-modification enhanced antimicrobial activity and reduced the cytotoxicity, thus could be potential strategies for developing novel food preservatives.

  1. Mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer fibrous membranes as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juan; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-06-01

    Bilayer fibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning, using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration that resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with fibers aligned across the two parallel disks and a layer with randomly oriented fibers, both layers deposited in a single process step. Membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than single-layer membranes consisting of randomly oriented fibers fabricated with a solid-drum collector. However, despite their higher porosity, bilayer membranes demonstrated generally higher elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness than single-layer membranes with random fibers. Bilayer membrane deformation at relatively high strain rates comprised multiple abrupt microfracture events characterized by discontinuous fiber breakage. Bilayer membrane elongation yielded excessive necking of the layer with random fibers and remarkable fiber stretching (on the order of 400%) in the layer with fibers aligned in the stress direction. In addition, fibers in both layers exhibited multiple localized necking, attributed to the nonuniform distribution of crystalline phases in the fibrillar structure. The high membrane porosity, good mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability of PLLA (demonstrated in previous studies) make the present bilayer membranes good scaffold candidates for a wide range of tissue engineering applications.

  2. Influence of the external conditions on salt retention and pressure-induced electrical potential measured across a composite membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence on these paramet......Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence...

  3. Self-organized two-state membrane potential transitions in a network of realistically modeled cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Siu; Kitano, Katsunori; Fukai, Tomoki

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies have revealed that in vivo cortical neurons show spontaneous transitions between two subthreshold levels of the membrane potentials, 'up' and 'down' states. The neural mechanism of generating those spontaneous states transitions, however, remains unclear. Recent electrophysiological studies have suggested that those state transitions may occur through activation of a hyperpolarization-activated cation current (H-current), possibly by inhibitory synaptic inputs. Here, we demonstrate that two-state membrane potential fluctuations similar to those exhibited by in vivo neurons can be generated through a spike-timing-dependent self-organizing process in a network of inhibitory neurons and excitatory neurons expressing the H-current.

  4. Rapid on-site detection of airborne asbestos fibers and potentially hazardous nanomaterials using fluorescence microscopy-based biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Akio; Alexandrov, Maxym; Nishimura, Tomoki; Ishida, Takenori

    2016-06-01

    A large number of peptides with binding affinity to various inorganic materials have been identified and used as linkers, catalysts, and building blocks in nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology. However, there have been few applications of material-binding peptides in the fluorescence microscopy-based biosensing (FM method) of environmental pollutants. A notable exception is the application of the FM method for the detection of asbestos, a dangerous industrial toxin that is still widely used in many developing countries. This review details the selection and isolation of asbestos-binding proteins and peptides with sufficient specificity to distinguish asbestos from a large variety of safer fibrous materials used as asbestos substitutes. High sensitivity to nanoscale asbestos fibers (30-35 nm in diameter) invisible under conventional phase contrast microscopy can be achieved. The FM method is the basis for developing an automated system for asbestos biosensing that can be used for on-site testing with a portable fluorescence microscope. In the future, the FM method could also become a useful tool for detecting other potentially hazardous nanomaterials in the environment.

  5. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  6. O2-dependent electron flow, membrane energization and the mechanism of non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, U; Neubauer, C

    1990-09-01

    Recent progress in chlorophyll fluorescence research is reviewed, with emphasis on separation of photochemical and non-photochemical quenching coefficients (qP and qN) by the 'saturation pulse method'. This is part of an introductory talk at the Wageningen Meeting on 'The use of chlorophyll fluorescence and other non-invasive techniques in plant stress physiology'. The sequence of events is investigated which leads to down-regulation of PS II quantum yield in vivo, expressed in formation of qN. The role of O2-dependent electron flow for ΔpH- and qN-formation is emphasized. Previous conclusions on the rate of 'pseudocyclic' transport are re-evaluated in view of high ascorbate peroxidase activity observed in intact chloroplasts. It is proposed that the combined Mehler-Peroxidase reaction is responsible for most of the qN developed when CO2-assimilation is limited. Dithiothreitol is shown to inhibit part of qN-formation as well as peroxidase-induced electron flow. As to the actual mechanism of non-photochemical quenching, it is demonstrated that quenching is favored by treatments which slow down reactions at the PS II donor side. The same treatments are shown to stimulate charge recombination, as measured via 50 μs luminescence. It is suggested that also in vivo internal thylakoid acidification leads to stimulation of charge recombination, although on a more rapid time scale. A unifying model is proposed, incorporating reaction center and antenna quenching, with primary control of ΔpH at the PS II reaction center, involving radical pair spin transition and charge recombination to the triplet state in a first quenching step. In a second step, triplet excitation is trapped by zeaxanthin (if present) which in its triplet excited state causes additional quenching of singlet excited chlorophyll.

  7. Potential actionable targets in appendiceal cancer detected by immunohistochemistry, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and mutational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Sherri Z.; Kimbrough, Jeffery; Doll, Nancy; Von Hoff, Daniel; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Appendiceal cancers are rare and consist of carcinoid, mucocele, pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP), goblet cell carcinoma, lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma histologies. Current treatment involves surgical resection or debulking, but no standard exists for adjuvant chemotherapy or treatment for metastatic disease. Methods Samples were identified from approximately 60,000 global tumors analyzed at a referral molecular profiling CLIA-certified laboratory. A total of 588 samples with appendix primary tumor sites were identified (male/female ratio of 2:3; mean age =55). Sixty-two percent of samples were adenocarcinomas (used for analysis); the rest consisted of 9% goblet cell, 15% mucinous; 6% pseudomyxoma, and less than 5% carcinoids and 2% neuroendocrine. Tests included sequencing [Sanger, next generation sequencing (NGS)], protein expression/immunohistochemistry (IHC), and gene amplification [fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or CISH]. Results Profiling across all appendiceal cancer histological subtypes for IHC revealed: 97% BRCP, 81% MRP1, 81% COX-2, 71% MGMT, 56% TOPO1, 5% PTEN, 52% EGFR, 40% ERCC1, 38% SPARC, 35% PDGFR, 35% TOPO2A, 25% RRM1, 21% TS, 16% cKIT, and 12% for TLE3. NGS revealed mutations in the following genes: 50.4% KRAS, 21.9% P53, 17.6% GNAS, 16.5% SMAD4, 10% APC, 7.5% ATM, 5.5% PIK3CA, 5.0% FBXW7, and 1.8% BRAF. Conclusions Appendiceal cancers show considerable heterogeneity with high levels of drug resistance proteins (BCRP and MRP1), which highlight the difficulty in treating these tumors and suggest an individualized approach to treatment. The incidence of low TS (79%) could be used as a backbone of therapy (using inhibitors such as 5FU/capecitabine or newer agents). Therapeutic options includeTOPO1 inhibitors (irinotecan/topotecan), EGFR inhibitors (erlotinib, cetuximab), PDGFR antagonists (regorafenib, axitinib), MGMT (temozolomide). Clinical trials targeting pathways involving KRAS, p53, GNAS, SMAD4, APC, ATM, PIK3CA, FBXW7, and

  8. Photocatalytic oxidation of humic acid and its effect on haloacetic acid formation potential: a fluorescence spectrometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoju, Yan; Ruiling, Bao; Shuili, Yu; Qiongfang, Li; Wei, Chen

    2012-01-01

    By fluorescence spectrometry method, molecular conformation changes of humic acid (HA) during the photocatalytic oxidation process were studied. Haloacetic acids formation potential (HAAFP) changes during the oxidation process were also measured. The results indicated that aromatic rings of HA decreased and conjugated double bonds were destroyed at the beginning of the process. Meanwhile, organic matter with large molecular weight decomposed into intermediates with smaller molecular weight, such as tryptophan and tyrosine. HA can be degraded almost completely, but not be mineralized thoroughly. Structures of the intermediates were changing during the oxidation process. Molecular structure transformation of HA led to the fluctuation tendency of the HAAFP changes during the photocatalytic oxidation process. HAAFP increased to 1.22 times that in raw water after 30 min of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and decreased to 0.66 times that in raw water after 60 min of photocatalytic oxidation.

  9. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Tan, Zhaofeng; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Broch, Sebastian; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Holland, Frank; Künstler, Christopher; Gomm, Sebastian; Rohrer, Franz; Schrade, Stephanie; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low-pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was over flowed by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  10. Membrane potential dynamics of populations of cortical neurons during auditory streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Brandon J.

    2015-01-01

    How a mixture of acoustic sources is perceptually organized into discrete auditory objects remains unclear. One current hypothesis postulates that perceptual segregation of different sources is related to the spatiotemporal separation of cortical responses induced by each acoustic source or stream. In the present study, the dynamics of subthreshold membrane potential activity were measured across the entire tonotopic axis of the rodent primary auditory cortex during the auditory streaming paradigm using voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Consistent with the proposed hypothesis, we observed enhanced spatiotemporal segregation of cortical responses to alternating tone sequences as their frequency separation or presentation rate was increased, both manipulations known to promote stream segregation. However, across most streaming paradigm conditions tested, a substantial cortical region maintaining a response to both tones coexisted with more peripheral cortical regions responding more selectively to one of them. We propose that these coexisting subthreshold representation types could provide neural substrates to support the flexible switching between the integrated and segregated streaming percepts. PMID:26269558

  11. Membrane potential-dependent modulation of recurrent inhibition in rat neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic balance of excitation and inhibition is crucial for network stability and cortical processing, but it is unclear how this balance is achieved at different membrane potentials (V(m of cortical neurons, as found during persistent activity or slow V(m oscillation. Here we report that a V(m-dependent modulation of recurrent inhibition between pyramidal cells (PCs contributes to the excitation-inhibition balance. Whole-cell recording from paired layer-5 PCs in rat somatosensory cortical slices revealed that both the slow and the fast disynaptic IPSPs, presumably mediated by low-threshold spiking and fast spiking interneurons, respectively, were modulated by changes in presynaptic V(m. Somatic depolarization (>5 mV of the presynaptic PC substantially increased the amplitude and shortened the onset latency of the slow disynaptic IPSPs in neighboring PCs, leading to a narrowed time window for EPSP integration. A similar increase in the amplitude of the fast disynaptic IPSPs in response to presynaptic depolarization was also observed. Further paired recording from PCs and interneurons revealed that PC depolarization increases EPSP amplitude and thus elevates interneuronal firing and inhibition of neighboring PCs, a reflection of the analog mode of excitatory synaptic transmission between PCs and interneurons. Together, these results revealed an immediate V(m-dependent modulation of cortical inhibition, a key strategy through which the cortex dynamically maintains the balance of excitation and inhibition at different states of cortical activity.

  12. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Terriza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD, onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes.

  13. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriza, Antonia; Vilches-Pérez, Jose I.; de la Orden, Emilio; Yubero, Francisco; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan L.; González-Elipe, Agustin R.; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes. PMID:24883304

  14. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  15. Ion channel regulation of the dynamical instability of the resting membrane potential in saccular hair cells of the green frog (Rana esculenta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, F; Kroese, ABA

    2005-01-01

    Aims: We investigated the ion channel regulation of the resting membrane potential of hair cells with the aim to determine if the resting membrane potential is poised close to instability and thereby a potential cause of the spontaneous afferent spike activity. Methods: The ionic mechanism and the d

  16. Generation of the membrane potential and its impact on the motility, ATP production and growth in Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generation of an electrical membrane potential (''), the major constituent of the proton motive force (pmf) is crucial for the ATP synthesis, bacterial growth and motility. The pmf drives the rotation of flagella and is vital for the microaerophilic human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni to coloniz...

  17. An investigation of the potential application of chitosan/aloe-based membranes for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S S; Popa, E G; Gomes, M E; Cerqueira, M; Marques, A P; Caridade, S G; Teixeira, P; Sousa, C; Mano, J F; Reis, R L

    2013-06-01

    A significant number of therapeutics derived from natural polymers and plants have been developed to replace or to be used in conjunction with existing dressing products. The use of the therapeutic properties of aloe vera could be very useful in the creation of active wound dressing materials. The present work was undertaken to examine issues concerning structural features, topography, enzymatic degradation behavior, antibacterial activity and cellular response of chitosan/aloe vera-based membranes. The chitosan/aloe vera-based membranes that were developed displayed satisfactory degradation, roughness, wettability and mechanical properties. A higher antibacterial potency was displayed by the blended membranes. Moreover, in vitro assays demonstrated that these blended membranes have good cell compatibility with primary human dermal fibroblasts. The chitosan/aloe vera-based membranes might be promising wound dressing materials.

  18. Pre- and Posttransplant Refractory Idiopathic Membranous Glomerulonephritis: The Forgotten Potential Culprit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbari, Antoine

    2017-08-28

    Idiopathic membranous nephropathy has been recently recognized as an autoimmune disease that may recur or develop de novo posttransplant, whereby specific auto- or alloantibodies are directed against recently recognized podocyte structures such as the phospholipase receptor PLAR2 and the thrombospondin receptor THSD7A. The observed inconsistencies in therapeutic responses with all presently recognized therapies irrespective of immunosuppressive regimen used and the superiority of complete and sustained remission rates in recurrent disease after kidney transplant compared with native disease imply the existence of different immunopathogenic signatures that may be operational, either isolated or combined, in the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. These pathogenic mechanisms involve primarily B-cell-mediated pathways with a T-cell help component and distinct auto- and alloantibody-secreting mechanisms involving different B cells. These pathways are present in separate compartments such as in CD20+-activated B cells found in spleen and lymph nodes, CD19+/CD20- plasmablasts and short-lived plasma cells in the blood, and CD19-/CD20-/CD38+/CD138+ long-lived memory plasma cells niched naturally in the bone marrow and ectopically in the native or grafted inflamed kidney. These latter nonproliferating plasma cells lacking CD19 and CD20 markers would be resistant to in vivo B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 monoclonal therapies. They produce considerable amounts of immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies and alloantibodies and provide the basis for humoral memory and refractory autoimmune diseases. This may explain the limited rate of sustained complete remission, which, as observed in most studies, does not exceed a rate of 20% in all rituximab-treated patients despite total B-cell eradication. There is an important need for the development of new biomarkers to help identify and predict therapeutic responses. Potential new therapeutic targets against plasma cells such as

  19. Testing of a 7-tube palladium membrane reactor for potential use in TEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Bryan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Willms, R. Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR) consists of a palladium/silver membrane permeator filled with catalyst (catalyst may be inside or outside the membrane tubes). The PMR is designed to recover tritium from the methane, water, and other impurities present in fusion reactor effluent. A key feature of a PMR is that the total hydrogen isotope content of a stream is significantly reduced as (1) methane-steam reforming and/or water-gas shift reactions proceed on the catalyst bed and (2) hydrogen isotopes are removed via permeation through the membrane. With a PMR design matched to processing requirements, nearly complete hydrogen isotope removals can be achieved. A 3-tube PMR study was recently completed. From the results presented in this study, it was possible to conclude that a PMR is appropriate for TEP, perforated metal tube protectors function well, platinum on aluminum (PtA) catalyst performs the best, conditioning with air is probably required to properly condition the Pd/Ag tubes, and that CO/CO{sub 2} ratios maybe an indicator of coking. The 3-tube PMR had a permeator membrane area of 0.0247 m{sup 2} and a catalyst volume to membrane area ratio of 4.63 cc/cm{sup 2} (with the catalyst on the outside of the membrane tubes and the catalyst only covering the membrane tube length). A PMR for TEP will require a larger membrane area (perhaps 0.35 m{sup 2}). With this in mind, an intermediate sized PMR was constructed. This PMR has 7 permeator tubes and a total membrane area of 0.0851 m{sup 2}. The catalyst volume to membrane area ratio for the 7-tube PMR was 5.18 cc/cm{sup 2}. The total membrane area of the 7-tube PMR (0.0851 m{sup 2}) is 3.45 times larger than total membrane area of the 3-tube PMR (0.0247 m{sup 2}). The following objectives were identified for the 7-tube PMR tests: (1) Refine test measurements, especially humidity and flow; (2) Refine maintenance procedures for Pd/Ag tube conditioning; (3) Evaluate baseline PMR operating conditions; (4) Determine PMR

  20. Electrospun PDLLA/PLGA composite membranes for potential application in guided tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ershuai; Zhu, Chuanshun; Yang, Jun; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Li, Suhua; Wang, Yonglan; Sun, Lu; Yao, Fanglian

    2016-01-01

    With the aim to explore a membrane system with appropriate degradation rate and excellent cell-occlusiveness for guided tissue regeneration (GTR), a series of poly(D, L-lactic acid) (PDLLA)/poly(D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (100/0, 70/30, 50/50, 30/70, 0/100, w/w) composite membranes were fabricated via electrospinning. The fabricated membranes were evaluated by morphological characterization, water contact angle measurement and tensile test. In vitro degradation was characterized in terms of the weight loss and the morphological change. Moreover, in vitro cytologic research revealed that PDLLA/PLGA composite membranes could efficiently inhibit the infiltration of 293 T cells. Finally, subcutaneous implant test on SD rat in vivo showed that PDLLA/PLGA (70/30, 50/50) composite membranes could function well as a physical barrier to prevent cellular infiltration within 13 weeks. These results suggested that electrospun PDLLA/PLGA (50/50) composite membranes could serve as a promising barrier membrane for guided tissue regeneration due to suitable biodegradability, preferable mechanical properties and excellent cellular shielding effects.

  1. UV-visible spectroscopy method for screening the chemical stability of potential antioxidants for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banham, Dustin; Ye, Siyu; Knights, Shanna; Stewart, S. Michael; Wilson, Mahlon; Garzon, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    A novel method based on UV-visible spectroscopy is reported for screening the chemical stability of potential antioxidant additives for proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and the chemical stabilities of three CeOx samples of varying crystallite sizes (6, 13, or 25 nm) are examined. The chemical stabilities predicted by this new screening method are compared to in-situ membrane electrode assembly (MEA) accelerated stress testing, with the results confirming that this rapid and inexpensive method can be used to accurately predict performance impacts of antioxidants.

  2. Functional fluorescent protein insertions in herpes simplex virus gB report on gB conformation before and after execution of membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Gallagher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entry of herpes simplex virus (HSV into a target cell requires complex interactions and conformational changes by viral glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. During viral entry, gB transitions from a prefusion to a postfusion conformation, driving fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. While the structure of postfusion gB is known, the prefusion conformation of gB remains elusive. As the prefusion conformation of gB is a critical target for neutralizing antibodies, we set out to describe its structure by making genetic insertions of fluorescent proteins (FP throughout the gB ectodomain. We created gB constructs with FP insertions in each of the three globular domains of gB. Among 21 FP insertion constructs, we found 8 that allowed gB to remain membrane fusion competent. Due to the size of an FP, regions in gB that tolerate FP insertion must be solvent exposed. Two FP insertion mutants were cell-surface expressed but non-functional, while FP insertions located in the crown were not surface expressed. This is the first report of placing a fluorescent protein insertion within a structural domain of a functional viral fusion protein, and our results are consistent with a model of prefusion HSV gB constructed from the prefusion VSV G crystal structure. Additionally, we found that functional FP insertions from two different structural domains could be combined to create a functional form of gB labeled with both CFP and YFP. FRET was measured with this construct, and we found that when co-expressed with gH/gL, the FRET signal from gB was significantly different from the construct containing CFP alone, as well as gB found in syncytia, indicating that this construct and others of similar design are likely to be powerful tools to monitor the conformation of gB in any model system accessible to light microscopy.

  3. Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispersyn, G; Nuydens, R; Connors, R; Borgers, M; Geerts, H

    1999-08-05

    This report addresses the relation between Bcl-2 and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) in apoptotic cell death. Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are differentiated into neuron-like cells with nerve growth factor (NGF). It is known that Bcl-2 can attenuate apoptosis induced by deprivation of neurotrophic factor. The protective effect of Bcl-2 has been correlated with preservation of DeltaPsi(m). Protonophores, such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), collapse the proton gradient across the mitochondrial inner membrane, resulting in a complete abolition of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Based on the analysis of morphology, of phosphatidylserine exposure and of nuclear fragmentation we conclude that FCCP induces apoptosis in PC12 cells, which can be prevented by overexpression of Bcl-2. To determine whether the cytoprotective effect of Bcl-2 is due to stabilization of DeltaPsi(m), we investigated the effect of Bcl-2 on changes in DeltaPsi(m), induced by FCCP in PC12 cells. We showed that treatment with FCCP induced a reduction in DeltaPsi(m), as assessed with the lipophilic cationic membrane potential-sensitive dye JC-1, and that Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced changes in NGF differentiated PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced cell death by stabilizing DeltaPsi(m).

  4. New potential antitumoral fluorescent tetracyclic thieno[3,2-b]pyridine derivatives: interaction with DNA and nanosized liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calhelha Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fluorescence properties of two new potential antitumoral tetracyclic thieno[3,2-b]pyridine derivatives were studied in solution and in liposomes of DPPC (dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, egg lecithin (phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk; Egg-PC and DODAB (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide. Compound 1, pyrido[2',3':3,2]thieno[4,5-d]pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-6-one, exhibits reasonably high fluorescence quantum yields in all solvents studied (0.20 ≤ ΦF ≤ 0.30, while for compound 2, 3-[(p-methoxyphenylethynyl]pyrido[2',3':3,2]thieno[4,5-d]pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-6-one, the values are much lower (0.01 ≤ ΦF ≤ 0.05. The interaction of these compounds with salmon sperm DNA was studied using spectroscopic methods, allowing the determination of intrinsic binding constants, K i = (8.7 ± 0.9 × 103 M-1 for compound 1 and K i = (5.9 ± 0.6 × 103 M-1 for 2, and binding site sizes of n = 11 ± 3 and n = 7 ± 2 base pairs, respectively. Compound 2 is the most intercalative compound in salmon sperm DNA (35%, while for compound 1 only 11% of the molecules are intercalated. Studies of incorporation of both compounds in liposomes of DPPC, Egg-PC and DODAB revealed that compound 2 is mainly located in the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer, while compound 1 prefers a hydrated and fluid environment.

  5. Antagonistic potential of fluorescent pseudomonads and control of charcoal rot of chickpea caused by Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Anuj; Kharwar, R N

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria especially Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates were tested against charcoal rot of chickpea both in green house as well as in field conditions. Most of the isolates reduced charcoal rot disease and promoted plant growth in green house. A marked increase in shoot and root length was observed in P. fluorescens treated plants. Among all the P. fluorescens isolates Pf4-99, was found most effective in the improvement of chickpea crop in green house as well as in field. Pf4-99 effectively promoted plant growth and produced indole acetic acid in culture medium. This isolate also inhibited the mycelial growth of the M. phaseolina under in vitro conditions and reduced the disease severity Potential isolate (Pf4-99) also significantly increased the biomass of the chickpea plants, shoot length, root length and protein content of the chickpea seeds. A part from these, the total number of seeds per plant and their weight were also enhanced. The colonization of Pf4-99 reduced the incidence of seed mycoflora by which indirectly enhanced the seed germination and vigour index of seedlings. The observations revealed that isolate Pf4-99 is quite effective to reduce the charcoal rot disease both in field and greenhouse, and also increases seed yields significantly Therefore, this isolate appears to be an efficient biocontrol agent against charcoal rot disease as well as yield increasing rhizobacterium.

  6. GATA-4 protects against hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte injury: effects on mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Bin; Yang, Xiang-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that GATA-4 increases the differentiation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into cardiac phenotypes. This study further investigated whether GATA-4 enhances MSC-mediated cardioprotection following hypoxia. MSCs were harvested from rat bone marrow and transduced with GATA-4 (MSC(GATA-4)). To mimic ischemic injury, cultured cardiomyocytes (CMs) isolated from neonatal rat ventricles were exposed to hypoxia or were pretreated with concentrated conditioned medium (CdM) from MSC(GATA-4) or transduced control MSC (MSC(Null)) for 16 h before exposure to hypoxic culture conditions (low glucose and low oxygen). Myocyte damage was estimated by annexin-V-PE and TUNEL technique and by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Cell survival was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) uptake. Mitochondrial membrane potential was determined using confocal microscopy. ELISA studies indicated that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly increased in MSC(GATA-4) compared with MSC(Null). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis/cell death was significantly reduced when CMs were co-cultured with MSC(GATA-4) in a dual-chamber system. Cell protection mediated by MSC(GATA-4) was mimicked by treating CMs with CdM from MSC(GATA-4) and abrogated with IGF-1- and VEGF-neutralizing antibodies. MSC(GATA-4) protects CMs under hypoxic conditions. The release of IGF-1 and VEGF from MSC(GATA-4) is likely to be responsible for protection of CMs.

  7. Membrane potential gradient is carbon monoxide-dependent in mouse and human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Lei; Farrugia, Gianrico; Harmsen, W Scott; Szurszewski, Joseph H

    2007-08-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the change in resting membrane potential (RMP) across the thickness of the circular muscle layer in the mouse and human small intestine and to determine whether the gradient in RMP is dependent on the endogenous production of carbon monoxide (CO). Conventional sharp glass microelectrodes were used to record the RMPs of circular smooth muscle cells at different depths in the human small intestine and in wild-type, HO2-KO, and W/W(V) mutant mouse small intestine. In the wild-type mouse and human intestine, the RMP of circular smooth muscle cells near the myenteric plexus was -65.3 +/- 2 mV and -58.4 +/- 2 mV, respectively, and -60.1 +/- 2 mV and -49.1 +/- 1 mV, respectively, in circular smooth muscle cells at the submucosal border. Oxyhemoglobin (20 microM), a trapping agent for CO, and chromium mesoporphyrin IX, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase, abolished the transwall gradient. The RMP gradients in mouse and human small intestine were not altered by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (200 microM). No transwall RMP gradient was found in HO2-KO mice and W/W(V) mutant mice. TTX (1 microM) and 1H-[1,2,4-]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 microM) had no effect on the RMP gradient. These data suggest that the gradient in RMP across the thickness of the circular muscle layer of mouse and human small intestine is CO dependent.

  8. Glutaminolysis and glycolysis regulation by troglitazone in breast cancer cells: Relationship to mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, Ellen; Oliver, Robert; Welbourne, Tomas; Turturro, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    We studied the roles of glycolysis and glutaminolysis following an acute reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψ(m)) induced by the thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRO) and compared the responses with CCCP-induced depolarization in breast cancer derived MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells as well as in the MCF-10A normal breast cell line. TRO and CCCP both acutely reduced Ψ(m) but after 24 h TRO-treated cells had restored Ψ(m) associated with both increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis. In contrast, CCCP-treated cells exhibited only a partial restoration of Ψ(m) associated with increased glycolysis but decreased glutaminolysis. TRO-induced glutaminolysis was coupled to increased ammonium (GDH flux) and decreased alanine production (ALT flux) in all three cell lines. Both cancer cell lines exhibited a higher spontaneous GDH/ALT flux than the normal breast cell line associated with a reduced keto-acid pool. TRO's effect on GDH/ALT fluxes and mitochondrial keto-acid pool homeostasis was additive with glucose withdrawal suggesting limited intramitochondrial pyruvate availability. The TRO-induced acceleration in GDH flux supplies substrate for Complex I contributing to the restoration of Ψ(m) as well as Krebs cycle intermediates for biosynthesis. Inhibiting mitochondrial proton ATPase with oligomycin or nullifying the proton gradient with CCCP prevented both the TRO-induced recovery of Ψ(m) and accelerated GDH flux but restored ALT flux consonant with important roles for proton pumping in regulating GDH flux and Ψ(m) recovery. Blocking enhanced GDH flux reduced DNA synthesis consistent with glutaminolysis via GDH playing an important biosynthetic role in tumorigenesis. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Potentiality of a ceramic membrane reactor for the laccase-catalyzed removal of bisphenol A from secondary effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca-Ramos, A; Eibes, G; Feijoo, G; Lema, J M; Moreira, M T

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the removal of bisphenol A (BPA) by laccase in a continuous enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) was investigated. The effects of key parameters, namely, type of laccase, pH, and enzyme activity, were initially evaluated. Once optimal conditions were determined, the continuous removal of the pollutant in an EMR was assessed in synthetic and real biologically treated wastewaters. The reactor configuration consisted of a stirred tank reactor coupled to a ceramic membrane, which prevented the sorption of the pollutant and allowed the recovery and recycling of laccase. Nearly complete removal of BPA was attained under both operation regimes with removal yields above 94.5 %. In experiments with real wastewater, the removal of BPA remained high while the presence of colloids and certain ions and the formation of precipitates on the membrane potentially affected enzyme stability and made necessary the periodic addition of laccase. Polymerization and degradation were observed as probable mechanisms of BPA transformation by laccase.

  10. Plasma-grafted alkaline anion-exchange membranes based on polyvinyl chloride for potential application in direct alcohol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jue; Zhang, Chengxu; Cong, Jie; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Meng, Yuedong

    2011-05-01

    Plasma grafting is employed to prepare alkaline anion-exchange membranes in this study. The attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis demonstrate that the benzyltrimethylammonium cationic groups are successfully introduced into the polyvinyl chloride matrix via plasma grafting, quaternization and alkalization. The plasma-grafted alkaline anion-exchange membrane exhibits a satisfactory ionic exchange capacity (1.01 mmol g-1), thermal stability, mechanical property, ionic conductivity (0.0145 S cm-1) and methanol permeability (9.59 × 10-12 m2 s-1), suggesting a great potential for application in direct alcohol fuel cells. The open circuit voltage of air-breathing ADAFC using plasma-grafted alkaline anion-exchange membrane is 0.796 V with 1 M EtOH solution at ambient temperature.

  11. Modification of trout sperm membranes associated with activation and cryopreservation. Implications for fertilizing potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract We investigated the effects of two trout sperm activation solutions on sperm physiology and membrane organization prior to and following cryopreservation using flow cytometry and investigated their impact on in vitro fertility. Cryopreservation caused greater phospholipid disorder (high pl...

  12. Molecular View of Cholesterol Flip-Flop and Chemical Potential in Different Membrane Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, W. F. Drew; MacCallum, Justin L.; Hinner, Marlon J.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2009-01-01

    The relative stability of cholesterol in cellular membranes and the thermodynamics of fluctuations from equilibrium have important consequences for sterol trafficking and lateral domain formation. We used molecular dynamics computer simulations to investigate the partitioning of cholesterol in a sys

  13. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Akanksha Gupta; Kedige, Suresh D.; Kanu Jain

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have ...

  14. Characterization of the thermolysis products of Nafion membrane: A potential source of perfluorinated compounds in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Liansheng; Sun, Ping; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-05-01

    The thermal decomposition of Nafion N117 membrane, a typical perfluorosulfonic acid membrane that is widely used in various chemical technologies, was investigated in this study. Structural identification of thermolysis products in water and methanol was performed using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS). The fluoride release was studied using an ion-chromatography system, and the membrane thermal stability was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis. Notably, several types of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) including perfluorocarboxylic acids were detected and identified. Based on these data, a thermolysis mechanism was proposed involving cleavage of both the polymer backbone and its side chains by attack of radical species. This is the first systematic report on the thermolysis products of Nafion by simulating its high-temperature operation and disposal process via incineration. The results of this study indicate that Nafion is a potential environmental source of PFCs, which have attracted growing interest and concern in recent years. Additionally, this study provides an analytical justification of the LC/ESI-MS/MS method for characterizing the degradation products of polymer electrolyte membranes. These identifications can substantially facilitate an understanding of their decomposition mechanisms and offer insight into the proper utilization and effective management on these membranes.

  15. Fluorescent multiple staining and CASA system to assess boar sperm viability and membranes integrity in short and long-term extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Consiglio, A; Meucci, A; Cremonesi, F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect on boar spermatozoa quality of in vitro storage in short and long-term extenders by fluorescent multiple staining (FMS) and computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). Fresh ejaculates from three healthy, sexually mature boars were diluted with equal volumes of six short-term or three long-term commercial extenders and stored at 19°C for 6 days (short-term) or 12 days (long-term). The integrity of spermatozoa membranes was analyzed by FMS using propidium iodide, 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3' tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PNA). The results obtained from this staining were compared with spermatozoa motility assessed by CASA. Our study showed that the number of viable spermatozoa with non-reacted acrosomes and intact mitochondria was positively correlated with the rate of motile spermatozoa (r(2)>0.9) irrespective of the extender used. In all extenders the number of motile spermatozoa significantly decreased as preservation period increased (P<0.05). FMS test is a potent indicator of sperm motility because it analyses mitochondrial integrity independently from observable alterations in motility. The best performing extenders were BTS for short-term storage and TRI-x-Cell for long-term storage.

  16. Fluorescent multiple staining and CASA system to assess boar sperm viability and membranes integrity in short and long-term extenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cremonesi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect on boar spermatozoa quality of in vitro storage in short and long-term extenders by fluorescent multiple staining (FMS and computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA. Fresh ejaculates from three healthy, sexually mature boars were diluted with equal volumes of six short-term or three long-term commercial extenders and stored at 19°C for 6 days (short-term or 12 days (long-term. The integrity of spermatozoa membranes was analyzed by FMS using propidium iodide, 5,5’,6,6’-tetrachloro-1,1’,3,3’ tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1 and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PNA. The results obtained from this staining were compared with spermatozoa motility assessed by CASA. Our study showed that the number of viable spermatozoa with non-reacted acrosomes and intact mitochondria was positively correlated with the rate of motile spermatozoa (r2>0.9 irrespective of the extender used. In all extenders the number of motile spermatozoa significantly decreased as preservation period increased (P<0.05. FMS test is a potent indicator of sperm motility because it analyses mitochondrial integrity independently from observable alterations in motility. The best performing extenders were BTS for short-term storage and TRI-x-Cell for long-term storage.

  17. Role of the Na+/K+-ATPase in regulating the membrane potential in rat peritoneal mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, U G; Praetorius, H A; Knudsen, T; Johansen, T

    1997-10-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the Na+/K+-ATPase on the membrane potential of peritoneal mast cells isolated from male Sprague-Dawley SPF-rats. 2. Experiments were performed at 22-26 degrees C in the tight-seal whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique by use of Sylgard-coated patch pipettes (3-6 M[omega]). High-resolution membrane currents were recorded with an EPC-9 patch-clamp amplifier controlled by the 'E9SCREEN' software. In addition, a charting programme on another computer synchronously recorded at low resolution (2 Hz) membrane potential and holding current (low-pass filtered at 500 Hz). 3. Na+/K+-ATPase activity was measured as the ouabain-sensitive change in the zero-current potential. The zero-current potential in rat peritoneal mast cells measured 2 min after obtaining whole-cell configuration amounted to 1.7 +/- 2.5 mV (n = 21). Ouabain (5 mM), a Na+/K+-ATPase-inhibitor, had only a very minor effect upon the membrane potential under resting conditions (n = 3). 4. When mast cells were superfused with nominal calcium-free external solution, the cells hyperpolarized (delta mV: 20.2 +/- 3.8 mV (n = 5)). In addition, when the mast cells were preincubated in nominal calcium-free external solution for 12 +/- 1.6 min before whole-cell configuration, the membrane potential amounted to -53.7 +/- 9.8 mV (n = 8). A subsequent superfusion with ouabain (5 mM) depolarized the membrane potential (ouabain-sensitive hyperpolarization (delta mV): 23.0 +/- 8.4 mV (n = 8)). 5. A high intracellular concentration of Na+ ([Na+]i) (26.6 mM) also resulted in hyperpolarization (delta mV: 20.2 +/- 9.1 mV (n = 7)), but only when ATP was present. A subsequent superfusion with ouabain (5 mM) repolarized these cells to -1.2 +/- 14 mV (ouabain-sensitive hyperpolarization (delta mV): 19.7 +/- 7.7 mV (n = 7)). 6. The size of the [Na+]i-dependent hyperpolarization was dose-dependent. Low [Na+]i (1 mM) had no effect on membrane potential and these

  18. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Sarkar, Paramita; Samaddar, Sandip; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Farias-Junior, Celio; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandam; Shome, Bibek R; Franco, Octávio L; Haldar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin) to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells). The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC) clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms) and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections.

  19. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R; Shaffer, Karl J; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J; Robb, Ellen L; Prime, Tracy A; Chouchani, Edward T; Cochemé, Helena M; Fearnley, Ian M; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M; Porteous, Carolyn M; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by "click" chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo.

  20. (Non-targeted) radioactive/fluorescent nanoparticles and their potential in combined pre- and intraoperative imaging during sentinel lymph node resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckle, Tessa; Chin, Patrick T K; Van Leeuwen, Fijs W B, E-mail: fw.v.leeuwen@nki.nl [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Division of Diagnostic Oncology at the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-12-03

    One clinical precedent for the use of nanosized imaging agents is the localization of the tumor draining sentinel lymph nodes. In this application, radiocolloids such as {sup 99m}Tc-NanoColl are currently used to plan the surgical procedure and to provide acoustic guidance during the intervention. Additional injections of dyes are common to provide optical surgical guidance. Bimodal imaging agents, which are both radioactive and fluorescent, have the potential to be used for both surgical planning and intraoperative fluorescence guidance towards the sentinel lymph nodes. This review provides an overview of the radioactive, fluorescent, and size properties of (non-targeted) bimodal nanoparticles, and their (potential) value in sentinel lymph node detection. (topical review)

  1. Pure Silica Zeolite Beta Membrane: A Potential Low Dielectric Constant Material For Microprocessor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Yeong Yin; Bhatia, Subhash

    The semiconductor industry needs low dielectric constant (low k-value) materials for more advance microprocessor and chips by reducing the size of the device features. In fabricating these contents, a new material with lower k-value than conventional silica (k = 3.9-4.2) is needed in order to improve the circuit performance. The choice of the inorganic zeolite membrane is an attractive option for low k material and suitable for microprocessor applications. A pure silica zeolite beta membrane was synthesized and coated on non-porous stainless steel support using insitu crystallization in the presence of tetraethylammonium hydroxide, TEA (OH), as structure directing agent, fumed silica, HF and deionized water at pH value of 9. The crystallization was carried out for the duration of 14 days under hydrothermal conditions at 130°C. The membrane was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). SEM results show a highly crystalline; with a truncated square bipyramidal morphology of pure silica zeolite beta membrane strongly adhered on the non-porous stainless steel support. In the present work, the k-value of the membrane was measured as 2.64 which make it suitable for the microprocessor applications.

  2. Potential environmental impacts from the metals in incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Kang, Daniel; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-01-15

    Artificial lighting systems are transitioning from incandescent to compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs in response to the U.S. Energy Independence and Security Act and the EU Ecodesign Directive, which leads to energy savings and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Although CFLs and LEDs are more energy-efficient than incandescent bulbs, they require more metal-containing components. There is uncertainty about the potential environmental impacts of these components and whether special provisions must be made for their disposal at the end of useful life. Therefore, the objective of this study is to analyze the resource depletion and toxicity potentials from the metals in incandescent, CFL, and LED bulbs to complement the development of sustainable energy policy. We assessed the potentials by examining whether the lighting products are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing U.S. federal and California state regulations and by applying life cycle impact-based and hazard-based assessment methods (note that "life cycle impact-based method" does not mean a general life cycle assessment (LCA) but rather the elements in LCA used to quantify toxicity potentials). We discovered that both CFL and LED bulbs are categorized as hazardous, due to excessive levels of lead (Pb) leachability (132 and 44 mg/L, respectively; regulatory limit: 5) and the high contents of copper (111,000 and 31,600 mg/kg, respectively; limit: 2500), lead (3860 mg/kg for the CFL bulb; limit: 1000), and zinc (34,500 mg/kg for the CFL bulb; limit: 5000), while the incandescent bulb is not hazardous (note that the results for CFL bulbs excluded mercury vapor not captured during sample preparation). The CFLs and LEDs have higher resource depletion and toxicity potentials than the incandescent bulb due primarily to their high aluminum, copper, gold, lead, silver, and zinc. Comparing the bulbs on an equivalent quantity basis with respect to the expected lifetimes of

  3. Vanillin, a potential agent to prevent biofouling of reverse osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappachery, Sajeesh; Paul, Diby; Yoon, Jeyong; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2010-08-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems are widely used in water purification plants. Reduction in plant performance due to biofilm formation over the membrane is an inherent problem. As quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms of microorganisms have been reported to be involved in the formation of biofilm, ways are sought for quorum quenching (QQ) and thereby prevention of biofilm formation. In this study using a chemostat culture run for seven days in a CDC reactor it was found that a natural QQ compound, vanillin considerably suppressed bacterial biofilm formation on RO membrane. There was 97% reduction in biofilm surface coverage, when grown in the presence of vanillin. Similarly, the average thickness, total biomass and the total protein content of the biofilm that formed in the presence of vanillin were significantly less than that of the control. However vanillin had no effect on 1-day old pre-formed biofilm.

  4. Immobilized biocatalytic process development and potential application in membrane separation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sudip; Rusli, Handajaya; Nath, Arijit; Sikder, Jaya; Bhattacharjee, Chiranjib; Curcio, Stefano; Drioli, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Biocatalytic membrane reactors have been widely used in different industries including food, fine chemicals, biological, biomedical, pharmaceuticals, environmental treatment and so on. This article gives an overview of the different immobilized enzymatic processes and their advantages over the conventional chemical catalysts. The application of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) reduces the energy consumption, and system size, in line with process intensification. The performances of MBR are considerably influenced by substrate concentration, immobilized matrix material, types of immobilization and the type of reactor. Advantages of a membrane associated bioreactor over a free-enzyme biochemical reaction, and a packed bed reactor are, large surface area of immobilization matrix, reuse of enzymes, better product recovery along with heterogeneous reactions, and continuous operation of the reactor. The present research work highlights immobilization techniques, reactor setup, enzyme stability under immobilized conditions, the hydrodynamics of MBR, and its application, particularly, in the field of sugar, starch, drinks, milk, pharmaceutical industries and energy generation.

  5. 60 Hz electric field changes the membrane potential during burst phase in pancreatic β-cells: in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Gesilda F; Silva, José R F; Moraes, Renato B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Tenorio, Bruno M; Nogueira, Romildo A

    2014-06-01

    The production, distribution and use of electricity can generate low frequency electric and magnetic fields (50-60 Hz). Considering that some studies showed adverse effects on pancreatic β-cells exposed to these fields; the present study aimed to analyze the effects of 60 Hz electric fields on membrane potential during the silent and burst phases in pancreatic β-cells using a mathematical model. Sinusoidal 60 Hz electric fields with amplitude ranging from 0.5 to 4 mV were applied on pancreatic β-cells model. The sinusoidal electric field changed burst duration, inter-burst intervals (silent phase) and spike sizes. The parameters above presented dose-dependent response with the voltage amplitude applied. In conclusion, theoretical analyses showed that a 60 Hz electric field with low amplitudes changes the membrane potential in pancreatic β-cells.

  6. K+ Channels and Their Effects on Membrane Potential in Rat Bronchial Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘先胜; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 倪望

    2003-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the K+ channels and their effects on resting membrane potential(Em) and excitability in rat bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMCs), the components of outward K+channel currents and the effects of K+ channels on Em and tension in rat bronchial smooth musclewere observed by using standard whole-cell recording of patch clamp and isometric tension recordingtechniques. The results showed that under resting conditions, total outward K+ channel currents infreshly isolated BSMCs were unaffected by ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker. There were two typesof K+ currents: voltage-dependent delayed rectifier K+ channel (Ky) and large conductance calcium-activated K+ channel (BKca) currents. 1 mmol/L 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, an inhibitor of Ky)caused a significant depolarization (from - 8.7 ± 5.9 mV to - 25. 4± 3.1 mV, n = 18, P<0. 001 ).In contrast, 1 mmol/L tetraethylammonium (TEA, an inhibitor of BKca) had no significant effect onEm (from -37. 6±4.8 mV to -36. 8±4.1 mV, n=12, P>0. 05). 4-AP caused a concentration-dependent contraction in resting bronchial strips. TEA had no effect on resting tension, but applica-tion of 5 mmol/L TEA resulted in a left shift with bigger pD2(the negative logarithm of the drug con-centration causing 50 % of maximal effect) (from 6. 27±0. 38 to 6.89±0. 54, n=10, P<0. 05) inthe concentration-effect curve of endothine-1, and a right shift with smaller pD2 (from 8. 10± 0. 23 to7. 69±0. 08, n= 10, P<0. 05) in the concentration-effect curve of isoprenaline. It was suggestedthat in rat BSMCs there may be two types of K+ channels, Kv and BKca, which serve distinct roles.Kv participates in the control of resting Em and tension. BKca is involved in the regulation of relax-ation or contraction associated with excitation.

  7. Key steps in type III secretion system (T3SS) towards translocon assembly with potential sensor at plant plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongtao; Dong, Hansong

    2015-09-01

    Many plant- and animal-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria employ the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins from bacterial cells into the cytosol of eukaryotic host cells. The effector translocation occurs through an integral component of T3SS, the channel-like translocon, assembled by hydrophilic and hydrophobic proteinaceous translocators in a two-step process. In the first, hydrophilic translocators localize to the tip of a proteinaceous needle in animal pathogens, or a proteinaceous pilus in plant pathogens, and associate with hydrophobic translocators, which insert into host plasma membranes in the second step. However, the pilus needs to penetrate plant cell walls in advance. All hydrophilic translocators so far identified in plant pathogens are characteristic of harpins: T3SS accessory proteins containing a unitary hydrophilic domain or an additional enzymatic domain. Two-domain harpins carrying a pectate lyase domain potentially target plant cell walls and facilitate the penetration of the pectin-rich middle lamella by the bacterial pilus. One-domain harpins target plant plasma membranes and may play a crucial role in translocon assembly, which may also involve contrapuntal associations of hydrophobic translocators. In all cases, sensory components in the target plasma membrane are indispensable for the membrane recognition of translocators and the functionality of the translocon. The conjectural sensors point to membrane lipids and proteins, and a phosphatidic acid and an aquaporin are able to interact with selected harpin-type translocators. Interactions between translocators and their sensors at the target plasma membrane are assumed to be critical for translocon assembly.

  8. Study on the oscillating phenomena of electrical potential across a liquid membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zhang Gao; Hong Xia Dai; Hua Chen; Jie Ren; Wu Yang

    2007-01-01

    The electrical oscillations across a liquid membrane in water/oil/water system was studied with octanol as oil phase by introducing two opposite charged surfactants in oil and aqueous phase, respectively. The sustained and rhythmic oscillation was observed. To a certain extent, the features of the oscillation (e.g. induction time, frequency, life time and orientation of the pulse pikes) strongly depend on the property of surfactant, dissolved in octanol. The mechanism may be explained by the formation and destruction of dual-ion surfactant membrane accompanying with emulsification at the interface and considering the coupling effect of diffusion and associated reaction in the vicinity of the interface.

  9. Membrane integrity and fertilizing potential of cryopreserved spermatozoa in European mouflon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitana, S; Ledda, S; Leoni, G; Bogliolo, L; Loi, P; Cappai, P

    1998-08-21

    There is a pressing need to develop and use assisted reproductive techniques in wildlife species living in small and captive groups. We evaluated the effect of freezing on membrane integrity and fertilizing capacity of European mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon) spermatozoa collected during the breeding season. After thawing, the percentage of live spermatozoa, stained with fluorescein isothiocynate labeled Pisum Sativum agglutinin and propidium iodide, was 47% of which 19% showed intact acrosomal membrane. After culture in TCM 199 + 10% FCS, the number of live spermatozoa was significantly (P European mouflon.

  10. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Eleanor; Sherry, Aileen; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Jyothi, Dushyanth; Yaga, Raja; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Everest, Paul; Smith, David G E

    2014-09-01

    Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC-ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith-Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  11. Fluorescent microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  12. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30–35% in the presence of TMRM and saf...

  13. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  14. Toward high-content screening of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannetti, E.F.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Pellegrini, M.; Beyrath, J.D.; Smeitink, J.; Blanchet, L.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are double membrane organelles involved in various key cellular processes. Governed by dedicated protein machinery, mitochondria move and continuously fuse and divide. These "mitochondrial dynamics" are bi-directionally linked to mitochondrial and cell functional state in space and time

  15. Membrane filtration technologies applied to municipal secondary effluents for potential reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan L; Benitez, F Javier; Leal, Ana I; Real, Francisco J; Teva, Fernando

    2010-05-15

    Four UF membranes (denoted GH, GK, PT and PW with MWCO of 1000, 2000, 5000 and 20,000Da, respectively) and four NF membranes (denoted DL, CK, DK and HL, with an approximate MWCO of 150-300Da in all cases) were used for the filtration of an effluent generated in a municipal wastewater plant after a secondary treatment. The influence of the most important operating variables (nature and MWCO of the membranes, transmembrane pressure, tangential velocity, and temperature) on the permeate flux was widely discussed, and the resistances to the permeate flux were determined following the resistances in series model. Rejection coefficients for parameters that measure the global pollutant content of the effluent (chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, absorbance at 254nm, turbidity, total nitrogen and total phosphorus) were also evaluated, and the results revealed that both UF and NF are feasible options for the treatment of this effluent, yielding a permeate stream that can be reused in several applications. Finally, 28 pharmaceutical compounds were initially detected in this effluent, and their respective rejection coefficients were determined, with eliminations higher than 75% in the case of NF with the HL membrane. Therefore, it is concluded that NF is an excellent option for the removal of toxic pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewaters.

  16. Investigating the Potential of Amnion-Based Scaffolds as a Barrier Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wuwei; Ma, Guowu; Brazile, Bryn; Li, Nan; Dai, Wei; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew A; Wertheim, Jason A; Liao, Jun; Wang, Bo

    2015-08-11

    Guided bone regeneration is a new concept of large bone defect therapy, which employs a barrier membrane to afford a protected room for osteogenesis and prevent the invasion of fibroblasts. In this study, we developed a novel barrier membrane made from lyophilized multilayered acellular human amnion membranes (AHAM). After decellularization, the AHAM preserved the structural and biomechanical integrity of the amnion extracellular matrix (ECM). The AHAM also showed minimal toxic effects when cocultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), as evidenced by high cell density, good cell viability, and efficient osteogenic differentiation after 21-day culturing. The effectiveness of the multilayered AHAM in guiding bone regeneration was evaluated using an in vivo rat tibia defect model. After 6 weeks of surgery, the multilayered AHAM showed great efficiency in acting as a shield to avoid the invasion of the fibrous tissues, stabilizing the bone grafts and inducing the massive bone growth. We hence concluded that the advantages of the lyophilized multilayered AHAM barrier membrane are as follows: preservation of the structural and mechanical properties of the amnion ECM, easiness for preparation and handling, flexibility in adjusting the thickness and mechanical properties to suit the application, and efficiency in inducing bone growth and avoiding fibrous tissues invasion.

  17. The potential of nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide membranes to influence skin wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Leigh G; Giles, Natalie L; Adcroft, Katharine F; Fear, Mark W; Wood, Fiona M; Poinern, Gerard E

    2009-12-01

    Cells respond to changes in the environment by altering their phenotype. The ability to influence cell behavior by modifying their environment provides an opportunity for therapeutic application, for example, to promote faster wound healing in response to skin injury. Here, we have modified the preparation of an aluminium oxide template to generate large uniform membranes with differing nano-pore sizes. Epidermal cells (keratinocytes) and dermal cells (fibroblasts) readily adhere to these nanoporous membranes. The pore size appears to influence the rate of cell proliferation and migration, important aspects of cell behavior during wound healing. The suitability of the membrane to act as a dressing after a burn injury was assessed in vivo; application of the membrane demonstrated adherence and conformability to the skin surface of a pig, with no observed degradation or detrimental effect on the repair. Our results suggest that keratinocytes are sensitive to changes in topography at the nanoscale level and that this property may be exploited to improve wound repair after tissue injury.

  18. Functional characterisation of the human alpha1 glycine receptor in a fluorescence-based membrane potential assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    be suppressed by pre-incubation with GlyR antagonists. Agonists and antagonists displayed EC50 and Ki values in good agreement with previously reported values from studies of recombinant alpha1 GlyRs and native alpha1beta GlyRs. The rank orders of potencies was glycine > beta-alanine > taurine for the agonists...

  19. Yeast Kch1 and Kch2 membrane proteins play a pleiotropic role in membrane potential establishment and monovalent cation homeostasis regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felcmanova, Kristina; Neveceralova, Petra; Sychrova, Hana; Zimmermannova, Olga

    2017-08-01

    The Kch1 and Kch2 plasma-membrane proteins were identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as being essential for the activation of a high-affinity Ca2+ influx system. We searched for Kch proteins roles in the maintenance of cation homeostasis and tested the effect of kch1 and/or kch2 deletions on various physiological parameters. Compared to wild-type, kch1 kch2 mutant cells were smaller, relatively hyperpolarised, grew better under limited K+ conditions and exhibited altered growth in the presence of monovalent cations. The absence of Kch1 and Kch2 did not change the intracellular pH in cells growing at low potassium or the tolerance of cells to divalent cations, high concentration of sorbitol or extreme external pH. The overexpression of KCH1 only increased the intracellular pH in the presence of elevated K+ in media. None of the phenotypes associated with the deletion of KCH1 and KCH2 in wild type were observed in a strain lacking KCH genes and main K+ uptake systems Trk1 and Trk2. The role of the Kch homologue in cation homeostasis was also tested in Candida albicans cells. Our data demonstrate that Kch proteins significantly contribute to the maintenance of optimal cation homeostasis and membrane potential in S. cerevisiae but not in C. albicans. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Effect of manganese supplementation on the membrane integrity and the mitochondrial potential of the sperm of grazing Nelore bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, L S L S; Ramos, A A; Camargos, A S; Oba, E

    2014-11-10

    The effect of dietary manganese (Mn(2+)) supplementation on the reproductive performance of Nelore bulls was evaluated by assessment of sperm membrane integrity. Sixty Nelore bulls (Bos taurus indicus) aged 18-20 mo were randomly divided into four groups (n=15) receiving dietary Mn(2+) supplementation at 540, 1300, 3800 and 6300mg/kg (treatments TC, T1300, T3800 and T6300, respectively). The diets were changed for the groups every 70d. Semen samples were obtained 15 and 56d after the diet change, which corresponded to the period of adjustment to the new diet and the time required for a complete spermatogenesis cycle, respectively. Sperm integrity was assessed by detection of: intact (IMe) or damaged (DMe) membranes, intact (IA) or damaged (DA) acrosomes, and high (HM) or low (LM) mitochondrial membrane potentials. Only bulls from the TC treatment showed a significant increase in the production of intact sperm [IMe/IA/LM] and decrease in the production of sperm with damaged acrosome [IMe/DA/LM] or completely damaged sperm [DMe/DA/LM] (Pbulls must be limited to 540mg of Mn(2+)/kg given that higher doses are detrimental to the integrity of the plasma and acrosomal sperm membranes.