WorldWideScience

Sample records for membrane lipoprotein required

  1. Outer membrane lipoprotein VacJ is required for the membrane integrity, serum resistance and biofilm formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang; Li, Gang; Zhang, Wanjiang; Zhang, Yanhe; Zhou, Long; Liu, Shuanghong; Liu, Siguo; Wang, Chunlai

    2016-02-01

    The outer membrane proteins of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae are mediators of infection, acting as targets for the host's defense system. The outer membrane lipoprotein VacJ is involved in serum resistance and intercellular spreading in several pathogenic bacteria. To investigate the role of VacJ in the pathogenicity of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the vacJ gene-deletion mutant MD12 ΔvacJ was constructed. The increased susceptibility to KCl, SDS plus EDTA, and several antibiotics in the MD12ΔvacJ mutant suggested that the stability of the outer membrane was impaired as a result of the mutation in the vacJ gene. The increased NPN fluorescence and significant cellular morphological variation in the MD12ΔvacJ mutant further demonstrated the crucial role of the VacJ lipoprotein in maintaining the outer membrane integrity of A. pleuropneumoniae. In addition, the MD12ΔvacJ mutant exhibited decreased survival from the serum and complement killing compared to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the MD12ΔvacJ mutant showed reduced biofilm formation compared to the wild-type strain. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the VacJ lipoprotein contributing to bacterial biofilm formation. The data presented in this study illustrate the important role of the VacJ lipoprotein in the maintenance of cellular integrity, serum resistance, and biofilm formation in A. pleuropneumoniae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-05

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology.

  3. An efficient depyrogenation method for recombinant bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Afonso P; Morais, Joana; Marcelino, Eduardo; Leitão, Alexandre; Santos, Dulce M

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins are anchored in the outer membrane lipid layer in close association with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and with other hydrophobic membrane proteins, making their purification technically challenging. We have previously shown that a thorough delipidation of outer membrane preparations from the Escherichia coli expression host is an important step to eliminate contaminant proteins when purifying recombinant antigens expressed in fusion with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprI lipoprotein. Here we report the cloning and expression of three antigens in fusion with OprI (ovalbumin, eGFP and BbPDI) and our efforts to deal with the variable LPS contamination levels observed in different batches of purified lipoproteins. The use of polymyxin B columns or endotoxin removal polycationic magnetic beads for depyrogenation of purified lipoproteins resulted in high protein losses and the use of Triton X-114 or sodium deoxycholate during the course of affinity chromatography showed to be ineffective to reduce LPS contamination. Instead, performing a hot phenol/water LPS extraction from outer membrane preparations prior to metal affinity chromatography allowed the purification of the recombinant fusion lipoproteins with LPS contents below 0.02EU/μg of protein. The purified recombinant lipoproteins retain their capacity to stimulate bone marrow-derived dendritic cells allowing for the study of their immunomodulatory properties through TLR2/1. This is a simple and easy to scale up method that can also be considered for the purification of other outer membrane lipoproteins.

  4. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Secretion of bacterial lipoproteins: through the cytoplasmic membrane, the periplasm and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zückert, Wolfram R

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-positive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporter-like LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the "+2 rule". Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  6. Dissection of LolB function--lipoprotein binding, membrane targeting and incorporation of lipoproteins into lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukahara, Jun; Mukaiyama, Keita; Okuda, Suguru; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-08-01

    Escherichia coli cells express at least 90 species of lipoprotein. LolB is one of the essential outer membrane lipoproteins, being involved in the last step of lipoprotein sorting. It accepts lipoproteins from a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA, and mediates the outer membrane anchoring of lipoproteins through a largely unknown mechanism. It has been shown previously that a LolB derivative, mLolB, lacking an N-terminal acyl chain, can bind lipoproteins. We examined how the lack of an N-terminal anchor affects the outer membrane anchoring of lipoproteins. Surprisingly, mLolB compensates for LolB function and supports E. coli growth, indicating that the N-terminal anchor is not essential for its function. Indeed, mLolB correctly localizes lipoproteins to either the inner or outer membrane depending on the sorting signal at the steady state. Furthermore, periplasmic mLolB enables the dissection of LolB function, namely lipoprotein binding, membrane targeting and lipoprotein anchoring. It mediates the transfer of lipoproteins from LolA to the outer membrane, but also the inner membrane and liposomes, indicating that mLolB exhibits no membrane preference and targets to phospholipids. Consequently, an outer membrane-specific lipoprotein is transiently mislocalized to the inner membrane when cells express only mLolB. LolB anchored to the outer membrane does not cause such mislocalization and is more active than mLolB. Phosphatidylethanolamine has been found to stimulate the mLolB-dependent membrane anchoring of lipoproteins. Taken together, these results indicate that lipoprotein binding, membrane targeting and membrane incorporation of lipoproteins are intrinsic functions of LolB.

  7. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane.

  8. Interaction of variable bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins with brain endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Gandhi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previously we reported that the variable outer membrane lipoprotein Vsp1 from the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia turicatae disseminates from blood to brain better than the closely related Vsp2 [1]. Here we studied the interaction between Vsp1 and Vsp2 with brain endothelium in more detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared Vsp1 to Vsp2 using human brain microvascular endothelial cell (HBMEC association assays with aminoacid radiolabeled Vsp-expressing clones of recombinant Borrelia burgdorferi and lanthanide-labeled purified lipidated Vsp1 (LVsp1 and Vsp2 (LVsp2 and inoculations of the lanthanide-labeled proteins into mice. The results showed that heterologous expression of LVsp1 or LVsp2 in B. burgdorferi increased its association with HBMEC to a similar degree. Purified lanthanide-labeled lipidated Vsp1 (LVsp1 and LVsp2 by themselves were capable of associating with HBMEC. The association of LVsp1 with brain endothelium was time-dependent, saturable, and required the lipidation. The association of Vsp1 with HBMEC was inhibited by incubation at lower temperature or with excess unlabeled LVsp1 or LVsp2 but not with excess rVsp1 or mouse albumin or an anti Vsp1 monoclonal antibody. The association of LVsp2 with HBMEC and its movement from blood to brain parenchyma significantly increased in the presence of LVsp1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Variable bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins interact with brain endothelium differently; the lipidation and variable features at the protein dome region are key modulators of this interaction.

  9. Sorting of bacterial lipoproteins to the outer membrane by the Lol system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins comprise a subset of membrane proteins with a lipid-modified cysteine residue at their amino termini through which they are anchored to the membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane. The Lol system is responsible for the transport of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.The Lol system comprises an inner-membrane ABC transporter LolCDE complex, a periplasmic carrier protein, LolA, and an outer membrane receptor protein, LolB. Lipoproteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and then translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the outer leaflet of the inner membrane, where lipoprotein precursors are processed to mature lipoproteins. The LolCDE complex then mediates the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane while the inner membrane-specific lipoproteins possessing Asp at position 2 are not released by LolCDE because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal, causing the retention of these lipoproteins in the inner membrane. A water-soluble lipoprotein-LolA complex is formed as a result of the release reaction mediated by LolCDE. This complex traverses the hydrophilic periplasm to reach the outer membrane, where LolB accepts a lipoprotein from LolA and then catalyzes its incorporation into the inner leaflet of the outer membrane.

  10. Mechanism underlying the inner membrane retention of Escherichia coli lipoproteins caused by Lol avoidance signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takashi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2003-10-10

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or outer membrane depending on the residue at position 2. The inner membrane retention signal, Asp at position 2 in combination with certain residues at position 3, functions as a Lol avoidance signal, i.e. the signal inhibits the recognition of lipoproteins by LolCDE that releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane. To understand the role of the residue at position 2, outer membrane-specific lipoproteins with Cys at position 2 were subjected to chemical modification followed by the release reaction in reconstituted proteoliposomes. Sulfhydryl-specific introduction of nonprotein molecules or a negative charge to Cys did not inhibit the LolCDE-dependent release. In contrast, oxidation of Cys to cysteic acid resulted in generation of the Lol avoidance signal, indicating that the Lol avoidance signal requires a critical length of negative charge at the second residue. Furthermore, not only modification of the carboxylic acid of Asp at position 2 but also that of the amine of phosphatidylethanolamine abolished the Lol avoidance function. Based on these results, the Lol avoidance mechanism is discussed.

  11. A novel lipoprotein nanoparticle system for membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfeld, Jens; Löving, Robin; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sonnen, Andreas; Guettou, Fatma; Moberg, Per; Zhu, Lin; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Flayhan, Ali; Briggs, John A.G.; Garoff, Henrik; Löw, Christian; Cheng, Yifan; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are of outstanding importance in biology, drug discovery and vaccination. A common limiting factor in research and applications involving membrane proteins is the ability to solubilize and stabilize membrane proteins. Although detergents represent the major means for solubilizing membrane proteins, they are often associated with protein instability and poor applicability in structural and biophysical studies. Here, we present a novel lipoprotein nanoparticle system that allows for the reconstitution of membrane proteins into a lipid environment that is stabilized by a scaffold of Saposin proteins. We showcase the applicability of the method on two purified membrane protein complexes as well as the direct solubilization and nanoparticle-incorporation of a viral membrane protein complex from the virus membrane. We also demonstrate that this lipid nanoparticle methodology facilitates high-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins in a lipid environment by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and allows for the stabilization of the HIV-envelope glycoprotein in a functional state. PMID:26950744

  12. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-08

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  13. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detai...

  14. Drosophila Lipophorin Receptors Recruit the Lipoprotein LTP to the Plasma Membrane to Mediate Lipid Uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipophorin, the main Drosophila lipoprotein, circulates in the hemolymph transporting lipids between organs following routes that must adapt to changing physiological requirements. Lipophorin receptors expressed in developmentally dynamic patterns in tissues such as imaginal discs, oenocytes and ovaries control the timing and tissular distribution of lipid uptake. Using an affinity purification strategy, we identified a novel ligand for the lipophorin receptors, the circulating lipoprotein Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP. We show that specific isoforms of the lipophorin receptors mediate the extracellular accumulation of LTP in imaginal discs and ovaries. The interaction requires the LA-1 module in the lipophorin receptors and is strengthened by a contiguous region of 16 conserved amino acids. Lipophorin receptor variants that do not interact with LTP cannot mediate lipid uptake, revealing an essential role of LTP in the process. In addition, we show that lipophorin associates with the lipophorin receptors and with the extracellular matrix through weak interactions. However, during lipophorin receptor-mediated lipid uptake, LTP is required for a transient stabilization of lipophorin in the basolateral plasma membrane of imaginal disc cells. Together, our data suggests a molecular mechanism by which the lipophorin receptors tether LTP to the plasma membrane in lipid acceptor tissues. LTP would interact with lipophorin particles adsorbed to the extracellular matrix and with the plasma membrane, catalyzing the exchange of lipids between them.

  15. Vesicle-independent extracellular release of a proinflammatory outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarsson Jan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral bacterium associated with aggressively progressing periodontitis. Extracellular release of bacterial outer membrane proteins has been suggested to mainly occur via outer membrane vesicles. This study investigated the presence and conservation of peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (AaPAL among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, the immunostimulatory effect of AaPAL, and whether live cells release this structural outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form independent of vesicles. Results The pal locus and its gene product were confirmed in clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunoblotting. Culturing under different growth conditions revealed no apparent requirement for the AaPAL expression. Inactivation of pal in a wild-type strain (D7S and in its spontaneous laboratory variant (D7SS resulted in pleiotropic cellular effects. In a cell culture insert model (filter pore size 0.02 μm, AaPAL was detected from filtrates when strains D7S and D7SS were incubated in serum or broth in the inserts. Electron microscopy showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans vesicles (0.05–0.2 μm were larger than the filter pores and that there were no vesicles in the filtrates. The filtrates were immunoblot negative for a cytoplasmic marker, cyclic AMP (cAMP receptor protein. An ex vivo model indicated cytokine production from human whole blood stimulated by AaPAL. Conclusion Free-soluble AaPAL can be extracellularly released in a process independent of vesicles.

  16. Outer membrane protein A, peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein, and murein lipoprotein are released by Escherichia coli bacteria into serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, J; Loiselle, P M; Tehan, M M; Allaire, J E; Boyle, L A; Kurnick, J T; Andrews, D M; Sik Kim, K; Warren, H S

    2000-05-01

    Complexes containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and three outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are released by gram-negative bacteria incubated in human serum and into the circulation in an experimental model of sepsis. The same OMPs are bound by immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the cross-protective antiserum raised to Escherichia coli J5 (anti-J5 IgG). This study was performed to identify the three OMPs. The 35-kDa OMP was identified as outer membrane protein A (OmpA) by immunoblotting studies using OmpA-deficient bacteria and recombinant OmpA protein. The 18-kDa OMP was identified as peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) based on peptide sequences from the purified protein and immunoblotting studies using PAL-deficient bacteria. The 5- to 9-kDa OMP was identified as murein lipoprotein (MLP) based on immunoblotting studies using MLP-deficient bacteria. The studies identify the OMPs released into human serum and into the circulation in an experimental model of sepsis as OmpA, PAL, and MLP.

  17. Enterococcus faecalis Glycolipids Modulate Lipoprotein-Content of the Bacterial Cell Membrane and Host Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Andreas; Sava, Irina G.; Wobser, Dominique; Bao, Yinyin; Hese, Katrin; Broszat, Melanie; Henneke, Philipp; Becher, Dörte; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of the cell membrane composition of E. faecalis on its recognition by the host immune system. To this end, we employed an E. faecalis deletion mutant (ΔbgsA) that does not synthesize the major cell membrane glycolipid diglycosyl-diacylglycerol (DGlcDAG). Proteomic analysis revealed that 13 of a total of 21 upregulated surface-associated proteins of E. faecalis ΔbgsA were lipoproteins. This led to a total lipoprotein content in the cell membrane of 35.8% in ΔbgsA compared to only 9.4% in wild-type bacteria. Increased lipoprotein content strongly affected the recognition of ΔbgsA by mouse macrophages in vitro with an increased stimulation of TNF-α production by heat-fixed bacteria and secreted antigens. Inactivation of the prolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (lgt) in ΔbgsA abrogated TNF-α induction by a ΔbgsA_lgt double mutant indicating that lipoproteins mediate increased activation of mouse macrophages by ΔbgsA. Heat-fixed ΔbgsA bacteria, culture supernatant, or cell membrane lipid extract activated transfected HEK cells in a TLR2-dependent fashion; the same was not true of wild-type bacteria. In mice infected intraperitoneally with a sublethal dose of E. faecalis we observed a 70% greater mortality in mice infected with ΔbgsA compared with wild-type-infected mice. Increased mortality due to ΔbgsA infection was associated with elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-2. In summary, our results provide evidence that an E. faecalis mutant lacking its major bilayer forming glycolipid DGlcDAG upregulates lipoprotein expression leading to increased activation of the host innate immune system and virulence in vivo. PMID:26172831

  18. Large-scale preparation of the homogeneous LolA–lipoprotein complex and efficient in vitro transfer of lipoproteins to the outer membrane in a LolB-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Shoji; Oguchi, Yuki; Yokota, Naoko; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli releases lipoproteins destined to the outer membrane from the inner membrane as a complex with a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. Interaction of the LolA–lipoprotein complex with an outer membrane receptor, LolB, then causes localization of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. As far as examined, formation of the LolA–lipoprotein complex strictly depends on ATP hydrolysis by the LolCDE complex in the presence of LolA. It has be...

  19. Surface display of a borrelial lipoprotein on meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salverda, Merijn L M; Meinderts, Sanne M; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Wagemakers, Alex; Hovius, Joppe W R; van der Ark, Arno; Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-02-17

    Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) are gaining attention as vaccine candidates. The successful expression of heterologous antigens in OMVs, with the OMV functioning both as adjuvant and delivery vehicle, has greatly enhanced their vaccine potential. Since there are indications that surface exposed antigens might induce a superior immune response, targeting of heterologous antigens to the OMV surface is of special interest. Several systems for surface display of heterologous antigens on OMVs have been developed. However, these systems have not been used to display lipidated membrane-associated proteins known as lipoproteins, which are emerging as key targets for protective immunity. We were therefore interested to see whether we could express a foreign lipoprotein on the outer surface of OMVs. When outer surface protein A (OspA), a borrelial surface-exposed lipoprotein, was expressed in meningococci, it was found that although OspA was present in OMVs, it was no longer surface-exposed. Therefore, a set of fusions of OspA to different regions of factor H binding protein (fHbp), a meningococcal surface-exposed lipoprotein, were designed and tested for their surface-exposure. An N-terminal part of fHbp was found to be necessary for the successful surface display of OspA on meningococcal OMVs. When mice were immunized with this set of OMVs, an OspA-specific antibody response was only elicited by OMVs with clearly surface-exposed OspA, strengthening the idea that the exact positioning of an antigen in the OMV affects the immune response. This method for the surface display of heterologous lipoproteins on OMVs is a step forward in the development of OMVs as a vaccine platform.

  20. Low-density lipoprotein apheresis by membrane differential filtration (cascade filtration) via arteriovenous fistula performed in children with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülle, Saniye; Bak, Mustafa; Serdaroglu, Erkin; Can, Demet; Karabay, Ozalp

    2010-02-01

    Membrane differential filtration (cascade filtration) is an apheresis technique by which atherogenic lipoproteins can be eliminated from plasma on the basis of particle size. In this study, we aim to discuss the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis performed by providing alternative vascular routes in two siblings with familial hypercholesterolemia who did not respond to medical treatment and diet. Of the two siblings, one was nine years old and the other one was three-and-a-half years old. Of the total of 78 apheresis processes performed, 24 were done via a permanent subclavian catheter, 36 were done via a subsequently provided arteriovenous fistula, and 18 were done via an arteriovenous graft. We observed a mean reduction in the plasma levels of total cholesterol (61.6%), LDL cholesterol (65.5%), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (38.6%). We noted that cascade filtration apheresis was effective in decreasing the LDL cholesterol in plasma, and no serious complications were noted. The success of the apheresis program depends on well-functioning blood access. An arteriovenous fistula may be the best route for the long-term treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia, which requires complication-free apheresis treatments.

  1. Cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein-1 receptor function by membrane raft disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Sara; Quitadamo, Maria Chiara; Mango, Ruggiero; Ciccone, Sarah; Novelli, Giuseppe; Biocca, Silvia

    2012-08-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1), the primary receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in endothelial cells, is up-regulated in atherosclerotic lesions. Statins are the principal therapeutic agents for cardiovascular diseases and are known to down-regulate LOX-1 expression. Whether the effect on the LOX-1 receptor is related to statin-mediated cholesterol-lowering activity is unknown. We investigate the requirement of cholesterol for LOX-1-mediated lipid particle internalization, trafficking, and processing and the role of statins as inhibitors of LOX-1 function. Disruption of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains by acute exposure of cells to methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chronic exposure to different statins (lovastatin and atorvastatin) led to a spatial disorganization of LOX-1 in plasma membranes and a marked loss of specific LOX-1 function in terms of ox-LDL binding and internalization. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemical studies indicate that LOX-1 is naturally present in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and, by cholesterol reduction, the amount of LOX-1 in this fraction is highly decreased (≥60%). In contrast, isoprenylation inhibition had no effect on the distribution and function of LOX-1 receptors. Furthermore, in primary cultures from atherosclerotic human aorta lesions, we confirm the presence of LOX-1 in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and demonstrate that lovastatin treatment led to down-regulation of LOX-1 in lipid rafts and rescue of the ox-LDL-induced apoptotic phenotype. Taken together, our data reveal a previously unrecognized essential role of membrane cholesterol for LOX-1 receptor activity and suggest that statins protect vascular endothelium against the adverse effect of ox-LDL by disruption of membrane rafts and impairment of LOX-1 receptor function.

  2. 21-Methylpyrenyl-cholesterol stably and specifically associates with lipoprotein peripheral hemi-membrane: A new labelling tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaibelet, Gérald [INSERM U563, CHU Purpan, Toulouse (France); CEA, SB2SM and UMR8221 CNRS, IBiTec-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tercé, François [Université Toulouse III, UMR 1048, Toulouse (France); INSERM U1048, Toulouse (France); Bertrand-Michel, Justine [Université Toulouse III, UMR 1048, Toulouse (France); INSERM U1048, Lipidomic Platform Metatoul, Toulouse (France); Allart, Sophie [Plateau Technique d’Imagerie Cellulaire, INSERM U1043, Toulouse (France); Azalbert, Vincent [Université Toulouse III, UMR 1048, Toulouse (France); INSERM U1048, Toulouse (France); Lecompte, Marie-France [INSERM U563, Faculté de Médecine de Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Collet, Xavier [Université Toulouse III, UMR 1048, Toulouse (France); INSERM U1048, Toulouse (France); Orlowski, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.orlowski@cea.fr [INSERM U563, CHU Purpan, Toulouse (France); CEA, SB2SM and UMR8221 CNRS, IBiTec-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •21-Methylpyrenyl-cholesterol specifically and stably associates to lipoproteins. •It is not esterified by LCAT, and thus reliably labels their peripheral hemi-membrane. •HDL vs. LDL are well distinguishable by various fluorescent labelling characteristics. •LDL peripheral hemi-membrane harbors cholesterol-rich ordered lipid (micro)domains. •Cultured cells can be stained by such labelled lipoproteins-mediated delivery. -- Abstract: Lipoproteins are important biological components. However, they have few convenient fluorescent labelling probes currently reported, and their physiological reliability can be questioned. We compared the association of two fluorescent cholesterol derivatives, 22-nitrobenzoxadiazole-cholesterol (NBD-Chol) and 21-methylpyrenyl-cholesterol (Pyr-met-Chol), to serum lipoproteins and to purified HDL and LDL. Both lipoproteins could be stably labelled by Pyr-met-Chol, but virtually not by NBD-Chol. At variance with NBD-Chol, LCAT did not esterify Pyr-met-Chol. The labelling characteristics of lipoproteins by Pyr-met-Chol were well distinguishable between HDL and LDL, regarding dializability, associated probe amount and labelling kinetics. We took benefit of the pyrene labelling to approach the structural organization of LDL peripheral hemi-membrane, since Pyr-met-Chol-labelled LDL, but not HDL, presented a fluorescence emission of pyrene excimers, indicating that the probe was present in an ordered lipid micro-environment. Since the peripheral membrane of LDL contains more sphingomyelin (SM) than HDL, this excimer formation was consistent with the existence of cholesterol- and SM-enriched lipid microdomains in LDL, as already suggested in model membranes of similar composition and reminiscent to the well-described “lipid rafts” in bilayer membranes. Finally, we showed that Pyr-met-Chol could stain cultured PC-3 cells via lipoprotein-mediated delivery, with a staining pattern well different to that observed with NBD

  3. The outer membrane cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, C R; Myers, J M

    2004-01-01

    To determine if the outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA and OmcB of the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are lipoproteins, and to assess cell surface exposure of the cytochromes by radioiodination. In anaerobic MR-1 cells grown with (3)H-palmitoleic acid, both OmcA and OmcB were radiolabelled. The identities of these bands were confirmed by the absence of each radiolabelled band in the respective mutants lacking individual OM cytochromes. Radioiodination of cell surface proteins in anaerobic cells resulted in (125)I-labelled OmcA. The identity of this band was confirmed by its absence in an OmcA-minus mutant. A ubiquitous radioiodinated band that migrates similarly to OmcB precluded the ability to determine the potential cell surface exposure of OmcB by this method. Both OmcA and OmcB are lipoproteins, and OmcA is cell surface exposed. The lipoprotein modification of these OM cytochromes could be important for their localization or incorporation into the OM. The cell surface exposure of OmcA could allow it to directly transfer electrons to extracellular electron acceptors (e.g. manganese oxides) and is consistent with its in vivo role.

  4. Murein lipoprotein is a critical outer membrane component involved in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium systemic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadl, A A; Sha, J; Klimpel, G R; Olano, J P; Niesel, D W; Chopra, A K

    2005-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Braun (murein) lipoprotein (Lpp) are major components of the outer membrane of gram-negative enteric bacteria that function as potent stimulators of inflammatory and immune responses. In a previous paper, we provided evidence that two functional copies of the lipoprotein gene (lppA and lppB) located on the chromosome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contributed to bacterial virulence. In this study, we characterized lppA and lppB single-knockout (SKO) mutants and compared them with an lpp double-knockout (DKO) mutant using in vitro and in vivo models. Compared to the lpp DKO mutant, which was nonmotile, the motility of the lpp SKO mutants was significantly increased (73 to 77%), although the level of motility did not reach the level of wild-type (WT) S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Likewise, the cytotoxicity was also significantly increased when T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and RAW264.7 murine macrophages were infected with the lpp SKO mutants compared to the cytotoxicity when cells were infected with the lpp DKO mutant. The level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in polarized T84 cells infected with the lppB SKO mutant was significantly higher (two- to threefold higher), reaching the level in cells infected with WT S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, than the level in host cells infected with the lppA SKO mutant. The lpp DKO mutant induced minimal levels of IL-8. Similarly, sera from mice infected with the lppB SKO mutant contained 4.5- to 10-fold-higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-6; the levels of these cytokines were 1.7- to 3.0-fold greater in the lppA SKO mutant-infected mice than in animals challenged with the lpp DKO mutant. The increased cytokine levels observed with the lppB SKO mutant in mice correlated with greater tissue damage in the livers and spleens of these mice than in the organs of animals infected with the lppA SKO and lpp DKO mutants. Moreover, the lppB SKO mutant-infected mice had increased

  5. Large-scale preparation of the homogeneous LolA lipoprotein complex and efficient in vitro transfer of lipoproteins to the outer membrane in a LolB-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shoji; Oguchi, Yuki; Yokota, Naoko; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-12-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli releases lipoproteins destined to the outer membrane from the inner membrane as a complex with a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. Interaction of the LolA-lipoprotein complex with an outer membrane receptor, LolB, then causes localization of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. As far as examined, formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex strictly depends on ATP hydrolysis by the LolCDE complex in the presence of LolA. It has been speculated, based on crystallographic and biochemical observations, that LolA undergoes an ATP-dependent conformational change upon lipoprotein binding. Thus, preparation of a large amount of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is difficult. Moreover, lipoproteins bound to LolA are heterogeneous. We report here that the coexpression of LolA and outer membrane-specific lipoprotein Pal from a very efficient plasmid causes the unusual accumulation of the LolA-Pal complex in the periplasm. The complex was purified to homogeneity and shown to be a functional intermediate of the lipoprotein localization pathway. In vitro incorporation of Pal into outer membranes revealed that a single molecule of LolB catalyzes the incorporation of more than 100 molecules of Pal into outer membranes. Moreover, the LolB-dependent incorporation of Pal was not affected by excess-free LolA, indicating that LolB specifically interacts with liganded LolA. Finally, the LolB depletion caused the accumulation of a significant amount of Pal in the periplasm, thereby establishing the conditions for preparation of the homogeneous LolA-lipoprotein complex.

  6. Interactions of egg yolk lipoprotein fraction with boar spermatozoa assessed with a fluorescent membrane probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Zasiadczyk

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of a fluorescent membrane probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (1,8-ANS, with boar spermatozoa were followed through the use of lipoprotein fraction of ostrich egg yolk (LPFo. Semen samples, extended in Kortowo 3 (K3 extender, were supplemented with 2% or 5% LPFo and stored for 3h at 16 degrees C. Additionally, cold shock-treated spermatozoa (1h at 4 degrees C were stored in K3 extender supplemented with LPFo for 3h at 16 degrees C. In each boar, the fluorescent enhancement of ANS was observed in K3-extended semen supplemented with LPFo, prior to storage. Following storage, there was a significant increase in LPFo-ANS fluorescence, particularly in the sperm membrane overlying the head and midpiece regions. There were significant differences among the boars with respect to the sperm populations defined by the LPFo-ANS fluorescence. Sperm viability was not significantly affected during the storage period. Furthermore, the proportions of spermatozoa defined by the different patterns of LPFo-ANS fluorescence were low and remained unchanged after storage of cold shock-treated spermatozoa with 2% or 5% LPFo, suggesting irreversible damage to the sperm membrane architecture. These findings indicate that the ANS fluorescent probe could be used to shed more light on the nature of the interactions between LPFo and sperm membrane following semen preservation. Such valuable information could contribute to the development of an optimal protocol for cryopreservation of boar semen.

  7. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed.

  8. The interaction between human low density lipoproteins and bovine aortic endothelial cells. Measurements of membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, M G; Sima, A; Jinga, V V; Hörer, O

    1989-01-01

    Bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture have been incubated with human low density lipoproteins (LDL) characterized in their cholesterol content. The incubation was done at different time intervals up to 72 h and various LDL concentrations. It began after endothelial cells had been starved for 24 h in lipoprotein deficient serum. The transfer of some LDL-components to endothelial cells plasmalemma was monitored by measurements of membrane fluidity. Namely, the fluorescent probe trimethylamonio-diphenyl hexatriene was inserted in the cell membrane and fluorescence anisotropy was determined; a higher fluorescence anisotropy means a higher rigidity of the plasmalemma. The results show that the rigidity of the endothelial cell plasmalemma increased progressively with the time of incubation (+11% to +19.5% after 24 h and 72 h, respectively for the concentration of 200 micrograms. LDL-cholesterol/dish) and with the greater amount of cholesterol in LDL (+10.9%) for 200 micrograms LDL-cholesterol/dish to +15% for 800 micrograms LDL-cholesterol/dish after 24 h incubation). In order to see if the LDL material transfer proceeded by receptor-mediated endocytosis of LDL and/or directly through aqueous solution a lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine, was used at the concentration of 20 microM for preventing the lysosomal hydrolase activity. In the presence of this inhibitor the fluorescence anisotropy in treated endothelial cells increased by a lesser amount, suggesting an approx. 30% participation of intracellular route. Therefore, the transfer of material (probably cholesterol) from LDL to endothelial plasmalemma could take place both by receptor-mediated endocytosis and directly through the aqueous solution.

  9. 1H, 13C and 15N assignment of the GNA1946 outer membrane lipoprotein from Neisseria meningitidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumoin, A.; Leonchiks, A.; Petit, P.; Vuillard, L.; Pizza, M.; Soriani, M.; Boelens, R.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    GNA1946 (Genome-derived Neisseria Antigen 1946) is a highly conserved exposed outer membrane lipoprotein from Neisseria meningitidis bacteria of 287 amino acid length (31 kDa). Although the structure of NMB1946 has been solved recently by X-Ray crystallography, understanding the behaviour of GNA1946

  10. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  11. Low-density Lipoprotein Improves Motility and Plasma Membrane Integrity of Cryopreserved Canine Epididymal Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Prapaiwan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa is an effective technique to conserve genetic potentials of superior dogs when it is not possible to collect ejaculated spermatozoa. Although hen egg yolk is commonly supplemented into the semen extender, active substances within the egg yolk which protect sperm against cryoinjury remain to be discovered. Among its compositions, low-density lipoprotein (LDL has been reported to have a cryoprotective property for sperm cryopreservation. However, the effects of LDL on dog epididymal spermatozoa during cryopreservation have not yet been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of LDL on epididymal spermatozoa quality following cryopreservation and thawing. After routine castration of 12 dogs, caudal epididymides from individuals were separated from the testes and cut into a few pieces in a Tris-buffer. Spermatozoa recovered from each sample were examined at once for sperm quality and divided into six groups of extender: no LDL, 20% egg yolk, 4%, 8%, 16%, and 24% LDL, before cryopreservation. The sperm aliquots were then equilibrated and conventionally frozen. After thawing, sperm motility, morphology, plasma membrane integrity, and acrosome integrity were evaluated. The results revealed that 4% LDL and 20% egg yolk yielded significantly higher sperm motility (57.69% and 52.69%, respectively, p<0.05 than other LDLs. In addition, 4% LDL yielded the significantly highest plasma membrane integrity (70.54%, p<0.05. In conclusion, the supplementation of 4% LDL in Tris-glucose extender could be applied for cryopreservation of canine epididymal spermatozoa.

  12. The role of lipoprotein processing by signal peptidase II in the Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus subtilis : Signal peptidase II is required for the efficient secretion of alpha-amylase, a non-lipoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjalsma, H; Kontinen, VP; Pragai, Z; Meima, R; Venema, G; Bron, S; Sarvas, M; van Dijl, JM

    1999-01-01

    Computer-assisted analyses indicate that Bacillus subtilis contains approximately 300 genes for exported proteins with an amino-terminal signal peptide. About 114 of these are lipoproteins, which are retained in the cytoplasmic membrane. We have investigated the importance of lipoprotein processing

  13. Comparative transcriptional analysis of Bacillus subtilis cells overproducing either secreted proteins, lipoproteins or membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciniak Bogumiła C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus subtilis is a favorable host for the production of industrially relevant proteins because of its capacity of secreting proteins into the medium to high levels, its GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe status, its genetic accessibility and its capacity to grow in large fermentations. However, production of heterologous proteins still faces limitations. Results This study aimed at the identification of bottlenecks in secretory protein production by analyzing the response of B. subtilis at the transcriptome level to overproduction of eight secretory proteins of endogenous and heterologous origin and with different subcellular or extracellular destination: secreted proteins (NprE and XynA of B. subtilis, Usp45 of Lactococcus lactis, TEM-1 β-lactamase of Escherichia coli, membrane proteins (LmrA of L. lactis and XylP of Lactobacillus pentosus and lipoproteins (MntA and YcdH of B. subtilis. Responses specific for proteins with a common localization as well as more general stress responses were observed. The latter include upregulation of genes encoding intracellular stress proteins (groES/EL, CtsR regulated genes. Specific responses include upregulation of the liaIHGFSR operon under Usp45 and TEM-1 β-lactamase overproduction; cssRS, htrA and htrB under all secreted proteins overproduction; sigW and SigW-regulated genes mainly under membrane proteins overproduction; and ykrL (encoding an HtpX homologue specifically under membrane proteins overproduction. Conclusions The results give better insights into B. subtilis responses to protein overproduction stress and provide potential targets for genetic engineering in order to further improve B. subtilis as a protein production host.

  14. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael;

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and...

  15. Disruption of lolCDE, Encoding an ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter, Is Lethal for Escherichia coli and Prevents Release of Lipoproteins from the Inner Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kimie; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE was previously identified, by using reconstituted proteoliposomes, as an apparatus catalyzing the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Mutations resulting in defective LolD were previously shown to be lethal for E. coli. The amino acid sequences of LolC and LolE are similar to each other, but the necessity of both proteins for lipoprotein release has not been proved. Moreover, previous reconstituti...

  16. Surface glycosylation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) membrane for selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Lan, Ping

    2014-01-01

    A novel method of constructing a glycosylated surface on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB)] membrane surface for the selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was developed, which involved the photoinduced graft polymerization of acrylic acid followed by the chemical binding of carboxyl groups with glucosamine in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(dimethyl-aminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxy-succinimide. The chemical structures of the fabricated membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Zeta potential and water contact angle measurements were performed to investigate the surface charge and wettability of the membranes, respectively. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the LDL adsorption on the plain and modified membrane surfaces. It was found that the surface glycosylation of P(3HB-co-4HB) membrane greatly enhanced the affinity interactions with LDL and the absorbed LDL could be easily desorbed with eluents, indicating a specific and reversible binding of LDL to the surface. Furthermore, the hemocompatibility of glycosylated membrane was improved as examined by platelet adhesion. The results suggest that the glycosylated P(3HB-co-4HB) membrane is promising for application in LDL apheresis therapy.

  17. Immobilization of sodium alginate sulfates on polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes for selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Cao, Jian-Da; Lan, Ping; Wu, Wen

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for the immobilization of sodium alginate sulfates (SAS) on polysulfone (PSu) ultrafiltration membranes to achieve selective adsorption of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was developed, which involved the photoinduced graft polymerization of acrylamide on the membrane and the Hofmann rearrangement reaction of grafted acrylamide followed by chemical binding of SAS with glutaraldehyde. The surface modification processes were confirmed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization. Zeta potential and water contact angle measurements were performed to investigate the surface charge and wettability of the membranes. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the binding of LDL on plain and modified PSu membranes. It was found that the PSu membrane immobilized with sodium alginate sulfates (PSu-SAS) greatly enhanced the selective adsorption of LDL from protein solutions and the absorbed LDL could be easily eluted with sodium chloride solution, indicating a specific and reversible binding of LDL to SAS, mainly driven by electrostatic forces. Furthermore, the PSu-SAS membrane showed good blood compatibility as examined by platelet adhesion. The results suggest that the PSu-SAS membranes are promising for application in simultaneous hemodialysis and LDL apheresis therapy. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Roles of internal cysteines in the function, localization, and reactivity of the TraV outer membrane lipoprotein encoded by the F plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robin L; Silverman, Philip M

    2002-06-01

    We have examined the functional role of two internal cysteine residues of the F-plasmid TraV outer membrane lipoprotein. Each was mutated to a serine separately and together to yield three mutant traV genes: traV(C10S), traV(C18S), and traV(C10S/C18S). All three cysteine mutations complemented a traV mutant for DNA donor activity and for sensitivity to donor-specific bacteriophage; however, when measured by a transduction assay, the donor-specific DNA bacteriophage sensitivities of the traV(C18S) and, especially, traV(C10S/C18S) mutant strains were significantly less than those of the traV(+) and traV(C10S) strains. Thus, unlike the Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-plasmid-encoded VirB7 outer membrane lipoprotein, TraV does not require either internal cysteine to retain significant biological activity. By Western blot analysis, all three mutant TraV proteins were shown to accumulate in the outer membrane. However, by nonreducing gel electrophoresis, wild-type TraV and especially the TraV(C18S) mutant were shown to form mixed disulfides with numerous cell envelope proteins. This was not observed with the TraV(C10S) or TraV(C10S/C18S) proteins. Thus, it appears that TraV C10 is unusually reactive and that this reactivity is reduced by C18, perhaps by intramolecular oxidation. Finally, whereas the TraV(C10S) and TraV(C18S) proteins fractionated primarily with the outer membrane, as did the wild-type protein, the TraV(C10S/C18S) protein was found in osmotic shock fluid and inner membrane fractions as well as outer membrane fractions. Hence, at least one cysteine is required for the efficient localization of TraV to the outer membrane.

  19. Lipoprotein biosynthesis by prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase is required for efficient spore germination and full virulence of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Shu; Moayeri, Mahtab; Pomerantsev, Andrei P.; Sastalla, Inka; Crown, Devorah; Gupta, Pradeep K.; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins play a crucial role in virulence in some Gram-positive bacteria. However, the role of lipoprotein biosynthesis in Bacillus anthracis is unknown. We created a B. anthracis mutant strain altered in lipoproteins by deleting the lgt gene encoding the enzyme prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase, which attaches the lipid anchor to prolipoproteins. 14C-palmitate labeling confirmed that the mutant strain lacked lipoproteins, and hydrocarbon partitioning showed it to have decreased surface hydrophobicity. The anthrax toxin proteins were secreted from the mutant strain at nearly the same levels as from the wild-type strain. The TLR2-dependent TNF-α response of macrophages to heat-killed lgt mutant bacteria was reduced. Spores of the lgt mutant germinated inefficiently in vitro and in mouse skin. As a result, in a murine subcutaneous infection model, lgt mutant spores had markedly attenuated virulence. In contrast, vegetative cells of the lgt mutant were as virulent as those of the wild-type strain. Thus, lipoprotein biosynthesis in B. anthracis is required for full virulence in a murine infection model. PMID:22103323

  20. Scavenger Receptor BI-mediated Selective Uptake Is Required for the Remodeling of High Density Lipoprotein by Endothelial Lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, Niels; Wiersma, Harmen; Gautier, Thomas; van der Giet, Markus; Maugeais, Cyrille; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a negative regulator of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol plasma levels, and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is involved in remodeling of HDL. The present study investigates the requirement of SR-BI for the effects of EL- mediated phospholipid hydrolysis on HDL meta

  1. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  2. In LDL receptor-deficient mice, catabolism of remnant lipoproteins requires a high level of apoE but is inhibited by excess apoE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Hof, H.B. van 't; Zee, A. van der; Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Berkel, T.J.C. van; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative requirement for apolipoprotein (apo) E in the clearance of lipoproteins via the non-low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mediated pathway, human APOE was overexpressed at various levels in the livers of mice deficient for both the endogenous Apoe and Ldlr genes

  3. Slam is an outer membrane protein that is required for the surface display of lipidated virulence factors in Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Yogesh; Lai, Christine Chieh-Lin; Judd, Andrew; Buckwalter, Carolyn M; Shin, Hyejin Esther; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Moraes, Trevor F

    2016-02-29

    Lipoproteins decorate the surface of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, playing essential roles in immune evasion and nutrient acquisition. In Neisseria spp., the causative agents of gonorrhoea and meningococcal meningitis, surface lipoproteins (SLPs) are required for virulence and have been extensively studied as prime candidates for vaccine development. However, the machinery and mechanism that allow for the surface display of SLPs are not known. Here, we describe a transposon (Tn5)-based search for the proteins required to deliver SLPs to the surface of Neisseria meningitidis, revealing a family of proteins that we have named the surface lipoprotein assembly modulator (Slam). N. meningitidis contains two Slam proteins, each exhibiting distinct substrate preferences. The Slam proteins are sufficient to reconstitute SLP transport in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, which are otherwise unable to efficiently display these lipoproteins on their cell surface. Immunoprecipitation and domain probing experiments suggest that the SLP, TbpB, interacts with Slam during the transit process; furthermore, the membrane domain of Slam is sufficient for selectivity and proper surface display of SLPs. Rather than being a Neisseria-specific factor, our bioinformatic analysis shows that Slam can be found throughout proteobacterial genomes, indicating a conserved but until now unrecognized virulence mechanism.

  4. Lipoproteins of Bacterial Pathogens▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs-Simon, A.; Titball, R. W.; Michell, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  5. Staphylococcus aureus DsbA is a membrane-bound lipoprotein with thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Alexis; Grauschopf, Ulla; Bischoff, Markus; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    2005-11-01

    DsbA proteins, the primary catalysts of protein disulfide bond formation, are known to affect virulence and penicillin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. We identified a putative DsbA homologue in the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that was able to restore the motility phenotype of an Escherichia coli dsbA mutant and thus demonstrated a functional thiol oxidoreductase activity. The staphylococcal DsbA (SaDsbA) had a strong oxidative redox potential of -131 mV. The persistence of the protein throughout the growth cycle despite its predominant transcription during exponential growth phase suggested a rather long half-life for the SaDsbA. SaDsbA was found to be a membrane localised lipoprotein, supporting a role in disulfide bond formation. But so far, neither in vitro nor in vivo phenotype could be identified in a staphylococcal dsbA mutant, leaving its physiological role unknown. The inability of SaDsbA to interact with the E. coli DsbB and the lack of an apparent staphylococcal DsbB homologue suggest an alternative re-oxidation pathway for the SaDsbA.

  6. Structural Requirements for Membrane Assembly of Proteins Spanning the Membrane Several Times

    OpenAIRE

    Lipp, Joachim; Flint, Nicholas; Haeuptle, Marie-Theres; Dobberstein, Bernhard

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the structural requirements for the biogenesis of proteins spanning the membrane several times. Proteins containing various combinations of topological signals (signal anchor and stop transfer sequences) were synthesized in a cell-free translation system and their membrane topology was determined. Proteins spanning the membrane twice were obtained when a signal anchor sequence was followed by either a stop transfer sequence or a second signal anchor sequence. Thus, a sig...

  7. Membrane requirements for high-flux and convective therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowry, Sudhir Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, high-flux dialysis (HF-HD) has now surpassed low-flux dialysis (LF-HD) as the predominant treatment modality, recognition that removal of larger uremic retention solutes is desirable for the treatment of patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). An even more advanced form of HF-HD in terms of removal of a broad spectrum of uremic toxins is on-line hemodiafiltration (HDF), involving convective transport mechanisms for solute removal. With the modality reaching considerable technical maturity over the last two decades, on-line HDF is now recognized for its clinical efficiency and effectiveness, versatility and safety. Such has been the success of on-line HDF that, in Europe, more patients are treated with on-line HDF than even peritoneal dialysis. Fabrication of high-flux membranes for convective therapies is more than a matter of simply making the membrane 'more open' or of increasing the membrane pore size which is not the only determinant for achieving higher convection. While convective transport of larger uremic retention solutes primarily demands membranes with high hydraulic permeability and sieving capabilities, the making of a modern dialysis membrane involves several other considerations that culminate in the delivery of an effective and safe therapy. In this communication I outline the essential membrane requirements and principles for solute removal by convection, as well of meeting additional features related to the therapy. The basic principles of the membrane manufacturing processes by which desired membrane morphology is derived for the separation phenomena involved in dialysis are further described. An awareness of this enables one to appreciate that, depending on the individual constituents and variations of the manufacturing processes, fabrication of all high-flux membranes entails achieving a balance between the ideal or desired criteria for blood purification. Dialysis membranes for convective therapies, even from the same

  8. Roles of Internal Cysteines in the Function, Localization, and Reactivity of the TraV Outer Membrane Lipoprotein Encoded by the F Plasmid

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Robin L.; Silverman, Philip M.

    2002-01-01

    We have examined the functional role of two internal cysteine residues of the F-plasmid TraV outer membrane lipoprotein. Each was mutated to a serine separately and together to yield three mutant traV genes: traVC10S, traVC18S, and traVC10S/C18S. All three cysteine mutations complemented a traV mutant for DNA donor activity and for sensitivity to donor-specific bacteriophage; however, when measured by a transduction assay, the donor-specific DNA bacteriophage sensitivities of the traVC18S and...

  9. The Acylation State of Surface Lipoproteins of Mollicute Acholeplasma laidlawii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakova, Marina V.; Demina, Irina A.; Galyamina, Maria A.; Kondratov, Ilya G.; Ladygina, Valentina G.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Acylation of the N-terminal Cys residue is an essential, ubiquitous, and uniquely bacterial posttranslational modification that allows anchoring of proteins to the lipid membrane. In Gram-negative bacteria, acylation proceeds through three sequential steps requiring lipoprotein diacylglyceryltransferase, lipoprotein signal peptidase, and finally lipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The apparent lack of genes coding for recognizable homologs of lipoprotein N-acyltransferase in Gram-positive bacteria and Mollicutes suggests that the final step of the protein acylation process may be absent in these organisms. In this work, we monitored the acylation state of eight major lipoproteins of the mollicute Acholeplasma laidlawii using a combination of standard two-dimensional gel electrophoresis protein separation, blotting to nitrocellulose membranes, and MALDI-MS identification of modified N-terminal tryptic peptides. We show that for each A. laidlawii lipoprotein studied a third fatty acid in an amide linkage on the N-terminal Cys residue is present, whereas diacylated species were not detected. The result thus proves that A. laidlawii encodes a lipoprotein N-acyltransferase activity. We hypothesize that N-acyltransferases encoded by genes non-homologous to N-acyltransferases of Gram-negative bacteria are also present in other mollicutes and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21540185

  10. The membrane bound LRR lipoprotein Slr, and the cell wall-anchored M1 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes both interact with type I collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bober

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen and surface structures allow it to adhere to, colonize and invade the human host. Proteins containing leucine rich repeats (LRR have been identified in mammals, viruses, archaea and several bacterial species. The LRRs are often involved in protein-protein interaction, are typically 20-30 amino acids long and the defining feature of the LRR motif is an 11-residue sequence LxxLxLxxNxL (x being any amino acid. The streptococcal leucine rich (Slr protein is a hypothetical lipoprotein that has been shown to be involved in virulence, but at present no ligands for Slr have been identified. We could establish that Slr is a membrane attached horseshoe shaped lipoprotein by homology modeling, signal peptidase II inhibition, electron microscopy (of bacteria and purified protein and immunoblotting. Based on our previous knowledge of LRR proteins we hypothesized that Slr could mediate binding to collagen. We could show by surface plasmon resonance that recombinant Slr and purified M1 protein bind with high affinity to collagen I. Isogenic slr mutant strain (MB1 and emm1 mutant strain (MC25 had reduced binding to collagen type I as shown by slot blot and surface plasmon resonance. Electron microscopy using gold labeled Slr showed multiple binding sites to collagen I, both to the monomeric and the fibrillar structure, and most binding occurred in the overlap region of the collagen I fibril. In conclusion, we show that Slr is an abundant membrane bound lipoprotein that is co-expressed on the surface with M1, and that both these proteins are involved in recruiting collagen type I to the bacterial surface. This underlines the importance of S. pyogenes interaction with extracellular matrix molecules, especially since both Slr and M1 have been shown to be virulence factors.

  11. Revisiting the Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVullo, Eric D.; Wright, Lori F.; Isabella, Vincent; Huntley, Jason F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The processing of lipoproteins (Lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted by the Lol system, with most Lpps inserted into the outer membrane (OM). We demonstrate here that the lnt gene is not essential to the Gram-negative pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu or to the live vaccine strain LVS. An LVS Δlnt mutant has a small-colony phenotype on sucrose medium and increased susceptibility to globomycin and rifampin. We provide data indicating that the OM lipoprotein Tul4A (LpnA) is diacylated but that it, and its paralog Tul4B (LpnB), still sort to the OM in the Δlnt mutant. We present a model in which the Lol sorting pathway of Francisella has a modified ABC transporter system that is capable of recognizing and sorting both triacylated and diacylated lipoproteins, and we show that this modified system is present in many other Gram-negative bacteria. We examined this model using Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which has the same Lol architecture as that of Francisella, and found that the lnt gene is not essential in this organism. This work suggests that Gram-negative bacteria fall into two groups, one in which full lipoprotein processing is essential and one in which the final acylation step is not essential, potentially due to the ability of the Lol sorting pathway in these bacteria to sort immature apolipoproteins to the OM. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the novel finding that the final stage in lipoprotein processing (normally considered an essential process) is not required by Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The paper provides a potential reason for this and shows that it may be widespread in other Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25755189

  12. Two outer membrane lipoproteins from Histophilus somni are immunogenic in rabbits and sheep and induce protection against bacterial challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Histophilus somni is an economically important pathogen of cattle and other ruminants and is considered one of the key components of the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex, the leading cause of economic loss in the livestock industry. BRD is a multifactorial syndrome, in which a triad of agents, including bacteria, viruses, and predisposing factors or "stressors," combines to induce disease. Although vaccines against H. somni have been used for many decades, traditional bacterins have failed to demonstrate effective protection in vaccinated animals. Hence, the BRD complex continues to produce strong adverse effects on the health and well-being of stock and feeder cattle. The generation of recombinant proteins may facilitate the development of more effective vaccines against H. somni, which could confer better protection against BRD. In the present study, primers were designed to amplify, clone, express, and purify two recombinant lipoproteins from H. somni, p31 (Plp4) and p40 (LppB), which are structural proteins of the outer bacterial membrane. The results presented here demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that when formulated, an experimental vaccine enriched with these two recombinant lipoproteins generates high antibody titers in rabbits and sheep and exerts a protective effect in mice against septicemia induced by H. somni bacterial challenge.

  13. Evolutionary Implication of Outer Membrane Lipoprotein-Encoding Genes ompL1, lipL32 and lipL41 of Pathogenic Leptospira Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Vedhagiri; K. Natarajaseenivasan; P. Chellapandi; S.G. Prabhalaran; Joseph Selvin; S. Sharma; P. Vijayachari

    2009-01-01

    Leptospirosis is recognized as the most widespread zoonosis with a global distribu-tion. In this study, the antigenic variation in Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira borgpetersenii isolated from human urine and field rat kidney was preliminarily confirmed by microscopic agglutination test using monoclonal antibodies, and was further subjected to amplification and identification of outer membrane lipopro-teins with structural gene variation. Sequence similarity analysis revealed that these protein sequences, namely OmpL1, LipL32 and LipL41, showed no more ho-mologies to outer membrane lipoproteins of non-pathogenic Leptospira and other closely related Spirochetes, but showed a strong identity within L. interrogans, suggesting intra-specific phylogenetic lineages that might be originated from a common pathogenic leptospiral origin. Moreover, the ompL1 gene showed more antigenic variation than lipL32 and lipL41 due to less conservation in secondary structural evolution within closely related species. Phylogenetically, ompL1 and lipL41 of these strains gave a considerable proximity to L. weilii and L. santaro-sai. The ompL1 gene of L. interrogans clustered distinctly from other pathogenic and non-pathogenic leptospiral species. The diversity of ompL genes has been an-alyzed and it envisaged that sequence-specific variations at antigenic determinant sites would result in slow evolutionary changes along with new serovar origina-tion within closely related species. Thus, a crucial work on effective recombinant vaccine development and engineered antibodies will hopefully meet to solve the therapeutic challenges.

  14. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PLASMA CHOLESTEROL、TRIGLYCERIDE、HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN AND ION TRANSPORT ENZYMES IN ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符云峰; 王素敏; 卢振敏; 李红

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationships between levels of plasma cholesterol (Ch), triglyceride (TG)、high density lipoprotein(HDL) and ion transport enzyme activities in red cell membranes of essential hypertensive patients.Methods Plasma Ch, TG, HDL-c, activites of Na+ -K+ -ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase, Ca2+-binding capacity of interior membrane surface, and membrane Ch, phospholipid(PL) were measured in 32 normotensive (NT) subjects and 55 essential hypertensive patients(HT).Results ①Mean artery pressure(MAP), plasma Ch、TG and membrane Ch levels, and membrane cholesterol/phospholipid(C/P) molar ratio were significantly increased compared with those in NT group, respectively; ②The plasma HDL-c level, the activities of Na+-K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase, and the Ca2+-binding capacity of the interior membrane surface in HT group were significantly lower than those in NT group, respectively.Conclusion The depressed activities of Na+-K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase, and Ca2+-binding capacity of the interior surface in cell membranes are the major evidence of ion transport abnormalities in essential hypertension. The plasma TG and membrance C/P molar ratio-dependent changes in membrane microviscosity seem to be responsible for the modulation of particular ion transport pathways.

  15. ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling, but is not required for bacterial lipoprotein-induced tolerance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Liu, Jinghua

    2010-05-15

    Activation of TLR signaling is critical for host innate immunity against bacterial infection. Previous studies reported that the ST2 receptor, a member of the Toll\\/IL-1 receptor superfamily, functions as a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling and maintains LPS tolerance. However, it is undetermined whether ST2 negatively regulates TLR2 signaling and furthermore, whether a TLR2 agonist, bacterial lipoprotein (BLP)-induced tolerance is dependent on ST2. In this study, we show that BLP stimulation-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines and immunocomplex formation of TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK) were significantly enhanced in ST2-deficient macrophages compared with those in wild-type controls. Furthermore, overexpression of ST2 dose-dependently attenuated BLP-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting a negative regulatory role of ST2 in TLR2 signaling. A moderate but significantly attenuated production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on a second BLP stimulation was observed in BLP-pretreated, ST2-deficient macrophages, which is associated with substantially reduced IRAK-1 protein expression and downregulated TLR2-MyD88 and MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex formation. ST2-deficient mice, when pretreated with a nonlethal dose of BLP, benefitted from an improved survival against a subsequent lethal BLP challenge, indicating BLP tolerance develops in the absence of the ST2 receptor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that ST2 acts as a negative regulator of TLR2 signaling, but is not required for BLP-induced tolerance.

  16. Binding of β-VLDL to heparan sulfate proteoglycans requires lipoprotein lipase, whereas apoE only modulates binding affinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, F. de; Hendriks, W.L.; Vark, L.C. van; Kamerling, S.W.A.; Dijk, K.W. van; Hofker, M.H.; Smelt, A.H.M.; Havekes, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    The binding of β-VLDL to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) has been reported to be stimulated by both apoE and lipoprotein lipase (LPL). In the present study we investigated the effect of the isoform and the amount of apoE per particle, as well as the role of LPL on the binding of β-VLDL to HSPG.

  17. Isolation of mitochondria with cubic membrane morphology reveals specific ionic requirements for the preservation of membrane structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Ketpin; Tan, Olivia Li Ling; Almsherqi, Zakaria A; Lin, Qingsong; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Deng, Yuru

    2015-03-01

    Biological membranes with cubic symmetry are a hallmark of virus-infected or diseased cells. The mechanisms of formation and specific cellular functions of cubic membranes, however, are unclear. The best-documented cubic membrane formation occurs in the free-living giant amoeba Chaos carolinense. In that system, mitochondrial inner membranes undergo a reversible structural change from tubular to cubic membrane organization upon starvation of the organism. As a prerequisite to further analyze the structural and functional features of cubic membranes, we adapted protocols for the isolation of mitochondria from starved amoeba and have identified buffer conditions that preserve cubic membrane morphology in vitro. The requirement for high concentration of ion-chelating agents in the isolation media supports the importance of a balanced ion milieu in establishing and maintaining cubic membranes in vivo.

  18. Disruption of human plasma high-density lipoproteins by streptococcal serum opacity factor requires labile apolipoprotein A-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mikyung; Gillard, Baiba K; Courtney, Harry S; Ward, Kathryn; Rosales, Corina; Khant, Htet; Ludtke, Steven J; Pownall, Henry J

    2009-02-24

    Human plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL), the primary vehicle for reverse cholesterol transport, are the target of serum opacity factor (SOF), a virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes that turns serum opaque. HDL comprise a core of neutral lipidscholesteryl esters and some triglyceridesurrounded by a surface monolayer of cholesterol, phospholipids, and specialized proteins [apolipoproteins (apos) A-I and A-II]. A HDL is an unstable particle residing in a kinetic trap from which it can escape via chaotropic, detergent, or thermal perturbation. Recombinant (r) SOF catalyzes the transfer of nearly all neutral lipids of approximately 100,000 HDL particles (D approximately 8.5 nm) into a single, large cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM; D > 100 nm), leaving a new HDL-like particle [neo HDL (D approximately 5.8 nm)] while releasing lipid-free (LF) apo A-I. CERM formation and apo A-I release have similar kinetics, suggesting parallel or rapid consecutive steps. By using complementary physicochemical methods, we have refined the mechanistic model for HDL opacification. According to size exclusion chromatography, a HDL containing nonlabile apo A-I resists rSOF-mediated opacification. On the basis of kinetic cryo-electron microscopy, rSOF (10 nM) catalyzes the conversion of HDL (4 microM) to neo HDL via a stepwise mechanism in which intermediate-sized particles are seen. Kinetic turbidimetry revealed opacification as a rising exponential reaction with a rate constant k of (4.400 +/- 0.004) x 10(-2) min(-1). Analysis of the kinetic data using transition state theory gave an enthalpy (DeltaH()), entropy (DeltaS(++)), and free energy (DeltaG()) of activation of 73.9 kJ/mol, -66.87 J/K, and 94.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The free energy of activation for opacification is nearly identical to that for the displacement of apo A-I from HDL by guanidine hydrochloride. We conclude that apo A-I lability is required for HDL opacification, LF apo A-I desorption is the

  19. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-02-17

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI(-) mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations.

  20. [Lipoprotein receptors. Old acquaintances and newcomers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducobu, J

    1997-02-01

    Lipoprotein receptors are plasma membrane proteins of high affinity which interact with circulating lipoprotein particles. The well characterized LDL receptor continues to be analysed and some new findings on its intracellular mechanisms of action have emerged. New lipoprotein receptors have recently been described: the chylomicron remnant receptor or LDL-related protein (LRP), the lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR), the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), the HDL receptor (HDLR) and the scavenger receptor (SR). The molecular details of the receptors will facilitate the development of new therapeutic means to improve receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins.

  1. Improved diagnostic PCR assay for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae based on the nucleotide sequence of an outer membrane lipoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Trine; Ahrens, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The gene (omlA) coding for an outer membrane protein of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 and 5 has been described earlier and has formed the basis for development of a specific PCR assay, The corresponding regions of all 12 A. pleuropneumoniae reference strains of biovar 1 were sequenc...... and sensitivity of this PCR compared to those of culture suggest the use of this PCR for routine identification of A. pleuropneumoniae.......The gene (omlA) coding for an outer membrane protein of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 and 5 has been described earlier and has formed the basis for development of a specific PCR assay, The corresponding regions of all 12 A. pleuropneumoniae reference strains of biovar 1 were sequenced...... species related to A. pleuropneumoniae or isolated from pigs were assayed. They were all found negative in the PCR, as were tonsil cultures from 50 pigs of an A. pleuropneumoniae-negative herd. The sensitivity assessed by agarose gel analysis of the PCR product was 10(2) CFU/PCR test tube. The specificity...

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant Pasteurella lipoprotein E and outer membrane protein H from Pasteurella multocida A:3 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okay, Sezer; Özcengiz, Erkan; Gürsel, Ihsan; Özcengiz, Gülay

    2012-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida serotype A:3 is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, one of the causative agents of shipping fever of cattle. In this study, outer membrane protein H (ompH) and Pasteurella lipoprotein E (plpE) genes were cloned and plpEC-ompH fusion was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PlpE, OmpH and PlpEC-OmpH fusion proteins were purified and formulated with oil-based and oil-based CpG ODN adjuvants. Antibody responses in mice vaccinated with recombinant PlpE and PlpEC-OmpH proteins formulated with both adjuvants were significantly (pmultocida A:3. The recombinant proteins PlpE and PlpEC-OmpH fusion conferred 100% protection when formulated with oil-based CpG ODN while the protectivity was found to be 80% and 60%, respectively when only oil-based adjuvant was used in respective formulations. These findings indicated that the recombinant PlpE or PlpEC-OmpH fusion proteins formulated with oil-based CpG ODN adjuvant are possible acellular vaccine candidates against shipping fever.

  3. Insights into the potential function and membrane organization of the TP0435 (Tp17) lipoprotein from Treponema pallidum derived from structural and biophysical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Liu, Wei Z; Norgard, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    The sexually transmitted disease syphilis is caused by the bacterial spirochete Treponema pallidum. This microorganism is genetically intractable, accounting for the large number of putative and undercharacterized members of the pathogen's proteome. In an effort to ascribe a function(s) to the TP0435 (Tp17) lipoprotein, we engineered a soluble variant of the protein (rTP0435) and determined its crystal structure at a resolution of 2.42 Å. The structure is characterized by an eight-stranded β-barrel protein with a shallow "basin" at one end of the barrel and an α-helix stacked on the opposite end. Furthermore, there is a disulfide-linked dimer of the protein in the asymmetric unit of the crystals. Solution hydrodynamic experiments established that purified rTP0435 is monomeric, but specifically forms the disulfide-stabilized dimer observed in the crystal structure. The data herein, when considered with previous work on TP0435, imply plausible roles for the protein in either ligand binding, treponemal membrane architecture, and/or pathogenesis.

  4. The Campylobacter jejuni/coli cjaA (cj0982c) gene encodes an N-glycosylated lipoprotein localized in the inner membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszyńska, Agnieszka; Zycka, Joanna; Godlewska, Renata; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2008-09-01

    The Campylobacter coli 72Dz/92 cjaA gene (orthologue of cj0982c of C. jejuni NCTC 11168) product is a highly immunogenic, amino acid-binding protein. CjaA was palmitic acid-modified when processed in E. coli. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of the Cys residue of the LAAC motif of its signal sequence confirmed that CjaA is a lipoprotein when processed in Campylobacter. Localization of the protein appeared to be host dependent. In Campylobacter, CjaA was recovered mainly as an inner-membrane protein, whereas in E. coli most of the protein was present in the periplasmic space. Interestingly, antiserum raised against Campylobacter glycine-extracted material also recognized CjaA produced by Campylobacter and Escherichia coli, indicating that at least part of the protein may be surface exposed. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Asn residues of two putative N-linked glycosylation sites (NIS and NFT) showed that CjaA is glycosylated and that only the first N-X-S/T sequeon serves as a glycan acceptor.

  5. Leptospiral outer membrane lipoprotein LipL32 binding on toll-like receptor 2 of renal cells as determined with an atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shen-Hsing; Lo, Yueh-Yu; Tung, Jung-Yu; Ko, Yi-Ching; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Fu, Chien-Chung; Pan, Rong-Long

    2010-07-06

    Leptopirosis is a renal disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira that primarily infects the renal proximal tubules, consequently resulting in severe tubular injuries and malfunctions. The protein extracted from the outer membrane of this pathogenic strain contains a major component of a 32 kDa lipoprotein (LipL32), which is absent in the counter membrane of nonpathogenic strains and has been identified as a crucial factor for host cell infection. Previous studies showed that LipL32 induced inflammatory responses and interacted with the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the host cell. However, the exact relationship between LipL32-mediated inflammatory responses and ECM binding is still unknown. In this study, an atomic force microscope with its tip modified by purified LipL32 was used to assess the interaction between LipL32 and cell surface receptors. Furthermore, an antibody neutralization technique was employed to identify Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4 as the major target of LipL32 attack. The interaction force between LipL32 and TLR2 was measured as approximately 59.5 +/- 8.7 pN, concurring with the theoretical value for a single-pair molecular interaction. Moreover, transformation of a TLR deficient cell line with human TLR2 brought the interaction force from the basal level to approximately 60.4 +/- 11.5 pN, confirming unambiguously TLR2 as counter receptor for LipL32. The stimulation of CXCL8/IL-8 expression by full-length LipL32 as compared to that without the N-terminal signal peptide domain suggests a significant role of the signal peptide of the protein in the inflammatory responses. This study provides direct evidence that LipL32 binds to TLR2, but not TLR4, on the cell surface, and a possible mechanism for the virulence of leptospirosis is accordingly proposed.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins in virulence and immunity - fighting with a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Katja; Sander, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are secreted membrane-anchored proteins characterized by a lipobox motif. This lipobox motif directs post-translational modifications at the conserved cysteine through the consecutive action of three enzymes: Lgt, LspA and Lnt, which results in di- or triacylated forms. Lipoproteins are abundant in all bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and often involved in virulence and immunoregulatory processes. On the one hand, disruption of the biosynthesis pathway of lipoproteins leads to attenuation of M. tuberculosis in vivo, and mycobacteria deficient for certain lipoproteins have been assessed as attenuated live vaccine candidates. On the other hand, several mycobacterial lipoproteins form immunodominant antigens which promote an immune response. Some of these have been explored in DNA or subunit vaccination approaches against tuberculosis. The immune recognition of specific lipoproteins, however, might also benefit long-term survival of M. tuberculosis through immune modulation, while others induce protective responses. Exploiting lipoproteins as vaccines is thus a complex matter which requires deliberative investigation. The dual role of lipoproteins in the immunity to and pathogenicity of mycobacteria is discussed here. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Low thrombogenicity of polyethylene glycol-grafted cellulose membranes does not influence heparin requirements in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M J; Woodrow, G; Umpleby, S; Hull, S; Brownjohn, A M; Turney, J H

    1999-07-01

    Heparin is the most commonly used anticoagulant for hemodialysis despite potentially serious side effects. Polyethylene glycol-grafted cellulose (PGC) membranes produce less activation of the coagulation cascade than cuprophane membranes. Anecdotally, we found some patients required a surprisingly low level of anticoagulation using these membranes. We compared the anticoagulant requirement of the PGC membrane with that of the cuprophane membrane in this randomized, prospective, crossover study. Sixty-three patients were randomized to treatment using either membrane, and heparin administration was progressively reduced to the lowest dose that prevented visible clotting in excess of that normally encountered. Patients underwent dialysis at this dose for 1 month, after which the heparin requirement and Kt/Vurea (1.162 x ln [urea pre/urea post]) were assessed. This process was then repeated for each patient using the other membrane, and the results were compared. Heparin administration during dialysis was reduced from a mean loading dose of 29.0 +/- 9.4 to 1.5 +/- 3.2 IU/kg for both membranes and a mean maintenance infusion of 14.0 +/- 6.7 to 0.77 +/- 1.6 IU/kg/h for both membranes (both P < 0.0001 v full anticoagulation; no difference between membranes). The Kt/Vurea was not significantly altered. Forty-six patients with PGC and 45 patients with cuprophane membranes underwent dialysis successfully without heparin during dialysis, and the other patients were using considerably reduced doses. Aspirin and warfarin had no effect on the heparin requirement. These results do not support the theory that PGC membranes have a lower anticoagulant requirement than cuprophane membranes; however, they suggest that dialysis can be performed successfully with much smaller anticoagulant doses than are currently in common use.

  8. Vaccinia virus virion membrane biogenesis protein A11 associates with viral membranes in a manner that requires the expression of another membrane biogenesis protein, A6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang; Meng, Xiangzhi; Yan, Bo; Rose, Lloyd; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2012-10-01

    A group of vaccinia virus (VACV) proteins, including A11, L2, and A6, are required for biogenesis of the primary envelope of VACV, specifically, for the acquisition of viral membrane precursors. However, the interconnection among these proteins is unknown and, with the exception of L2, the connection of these proteins with membranes is also unknown. In this study, prompted by the findings that A6 coprecipitated A11 and that the cellular distribution of A11 was dramatically altered by repression of A6 expression, we studied the localization of A11 in cells by using immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analysis. A11 was found to associate with membranes and colocalize with virion membrane proteins in viral replication factories during normal VACV replication. A11 partitioned almost equally between the detergent and aqueous phases upon Triton X-114 phase separation, demonstrating an intrinsic affinity with lipids. However, in the absence of infection or VACV late protein synthesis, A11 did not associate with cellular membranes. Furthermore, when A6 expression was repressed, A11 did not colocalize with any viral membrane proteins or associate with membranes. In contrast, when virion envelope formation was blocked at a later step by repression of A14 expression or by rifampin treatment, A11 colocalized with virion membrane proteins in the factories. Altogether, our data showed that A11 associates with viral membranes during VACV replication, and this association requires A6 expression. This study provides a physical connection between A11 and viral membranes and suggests that A6 regulates A11 membrane association.

  9. Phytosterols, Phytostanols, and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Gylling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of phytosterols and phytostanols added to foods and food supplements to obtain significant non-pharmacologic serum and low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol reduction is well documented. Irrespective of age, gender, ethnic background, body weight, background diet, or the cause of hypercholesterolemia and, even added to statin treatment, phytosterols and phytostanols at 2 g/day significantly lower LDL cholesterol concentration by 8%–10%. They do not affect the concentrations of high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein (a or serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. In some studies, phytosterols and phytostanols have modestly reduced serum triglyceride levels especially in subjects with slightly increased baseline concentrations. Phytosterols and phytostanols lower LDL cholesterol by displacing cholesterol from mixed micelles in the small intestine so that cholesterol absorption is partially inhibited. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis have been carefully evaluated during phytosterol and phytostanol supplementation. However, only a few lipoprotein kinetic studies have been performed, and they revealed that LDL apoprotein B-100 transport rate was reduced. LDL particle size was unchanged, but small dense LDL cholesterol concentration was reduced. In subjects with metabolic syndrome and moderate hypertriglyceridemia, phytostanols reduced not only non- high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol concentration but also serum triglycerides by 27%, and reduced the large and medium size very low density lipoprotein particle concentrations. In the few postprandial studies, the postprandial lipoproteins were reduced, but detailed studies with apoprotein B-48 are lacking. In conclusion, more kinetic studies are required to obtain a more complete understanding of the fasting and postprandial lipoprotein metabolism caused by phytosterols and phytostanols. It seems obvious, however, that the most atherogenic lipoprotein

  10. Cellular Membrane Composition Requirement by Antimicrobial and Anticancer Peptide GA-K4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Gombosuren, Davaadulam; Jigjid, Altanchimeg; Tuguldur, Badamkhatan; Chuluunbaatar, Galbadrakh; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Pathak, Chinar; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides important for innate immunity are widely studied for their antimicrobial and anticancer activity. The primary target of these AMPs is believed to be the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. However, the interaction between cytoplasmic membrane and the antimicrobial peptides remains poorly understood. Therefore to focus on the target membrane composition that is required by AMPs to interact with membranes, we have examined the interaction of the antimicrobial and anticancer active 11-residue GA-K4 (FLKWLFKWAKK) peptide with model and intact cell membranes. Effect on the structural conformational properties of GA-K4 peptide was investigated by means of far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The different conformation of GA-K4 peptide in large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) bilayer and micelle environment suggest that the curvature has an influence on the secondary structure acquired by the peptide. Furthermore, the leakage experiment result confirmed that GA-K4 induced the leakage of cytoplasmic membrane in Staphylococcus аureus bacterial cells. Fluorescence data revealed the interfacial location of GA-K4 peptide in the model membranes. The blue-shift in emission wavelength by tryptophan residues in fluorescence data indicated the penetration of GA-K4 peptide in micelles and phospholipid bilayers. These results showed that the GA-K4 peptide is a membrane-active peptide and its activity depends on membrane curvature and lipid composition. Although further studies are required to confirm the mechanism of action, the data suggest mechanism of toroidal pore formation for the interaction of GA-K4 peptide with membranes. Our studies will be helpful in better understanding of the membrane requirment of peptides to express their therapeutic effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Tyrosine motifs are required for prestin basolateral membrane targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prestin is targeted to the lateral wall of outer hair cells (OHCs where its electromotility is critical for cochlear amplification. Using MDCK cells as a model system for polarized epithelial sorting, we demonstrate that prestin uses tyrosine residues, in a YXXΦ motif, to target the basolateral surface. Both Y520 and Y667 are important for basolateral targeting of prestin. Mutation of these residues to glutamine or alanine resulted in retention within the Golgi and delayed egress from the Golgi in Y667Q. Basolateral targeting is restored upon mutation to phenylalanine suggesting the importance of a phenol ring in the tyrosine side chain. We also demonstrate that prestin targeting to the basolateral surface is dependent on AP1B (μ1B, and that prestin uses transferrin containing early endosomes in its passage from the Golgi to the basolateral plasma membrane. The presence of AP1B (μ1B in OHCs, and parallels between prestin targeting to the basolateral surface of OHCs and polarized epithelial cells suggest that outer hair cells resemble polarized epithelia rather than neurons in this important phenotypic measure.

  12. The angiopoietin-like protein ANGPTL4 catalyzes unfolding of the hydrolase domain in lipoprotein lipase and the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 counteracts this unfolding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) undergoes spontaneous inactivation via global unfolding and this unfolding is prevented by GPIHBP1 (Mysling et al., 2016). We now show: (1) that ANGPTL4 inactivates LPL by catalyzing the unfolding of its hydrolase domain; (2) that binding to GPIHBP1 renders LPL largely...

  13. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L.; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  14. Methane to syngas conversion. Part I. Equilibrium conditions and stability requirements of membrane materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, J. R.; Kharton, V. V.; Yaremchenko, A.; Naumovich, E.

    Thermodynamic data have been used to predict the dependence of methane conversion on temperature and oxygen partial pressure in mixed conducting membrane reactors, and the corresponding fractions of water vapor, H 2, CO and CO 2. The relations between methane conversion, gas composition and oxygen partial pressure were also used to formulate the oxygen balance in mixed conducting membrane reactors, with tubular reactor and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) configurations. A single dimensionless parameter accounts for the combined effects of geometric parameters of the membrane reactor, the permeability of the membrane material, and flow rate at the entry of the reactor. Selected examples were calculated to illustrate the effects of steam to methane and inert to methane ratios in the gas entering the reactor. The values of oxygen partial pressure required to attain the highest yield of CO and H 2 were also used to estimate the stability requirements to be met by mixed conducting membrane materials. Suitable membrane designs might be needed to bridge the difference between the conditions inside the reactors and the stability limits of known mixed conductors.

  15. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic ...

  16. Lipoprotein-a

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007262.htm Lipoprotein-a To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lipoproteins are molecules made of proteins and fat. They ...

  17. Lipoprotein(a) metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an atherogenic lipoprotein. The metabolism of this lipoprotein is still not well understood. It has long been known that the plasma concentration of Lp(a) is highly heritable, with its genetic determinants located in the apo(a) locus and regulating the rate of hepatic apo(a...

  18. The p21 ras C-terminus is required for transformation and membrane association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Christensen, A; Hubbert, N L;

    1984-01-01

    , undergoes posttranslational modification and the mature protein subsequently becomes associated with the inner surface of the plasma membrane and binds lipid tightly. The p21 proteins have the capacity to bind guanine nucleotides non-covalently in vitro. To assess the biological relevance...... of these biochemical features of the protein, we have now studied a series of deletion mutants located at or near the C-terminus of the viral p21 protein. Our tissue culture studies indicate that amino acids located at or near the C-terminus are required for cellular transformation, membrane association and lipid...

  19. Lipoprotein profiling methodology based on determination of apolipoprotein concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Tomita, Atsumi; Koike, Tomonari; Shiomi, Masashi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Matsuda, Fumio; Bamba, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolism results in the alteration of lipid compositions in lipoproteins; therefore an accurate and quantitative analytical approach is required for the detailed structural characterization of lipoproteins. However, the specific lipid composition of each lipoprotein particle is poorly understood. Lipid composition of very-low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein particles derived from myocardial infarction-prone rabbits was determined by normalization of lipidomics data using apoB-100 levels. The ratio of lipid levels between very-low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein particles was different according to not only lipid classes, but also phosphatidylethanolamine subclasses by applying our developed methodology to myocardial infarction-prone rabbits. Our novel analytical approach represents to be a potentially useful tool to obtain particle-specific lipid components of lipoproteins.

  20. Glycosaminoglycans are required for translocation of amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides across membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, Janely; Liivamägi, Laura; Lubenets, Dmitri; Arukuusk, Piret; Langel, Ülo; Pooga, Margus

    2016-08-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are considered as one of the most promising tools to mediate the cellular delivery of various biologically active compounds that are otherwise cell impermeable. CPPs can internalize into cells via two different pathways - endocytosis and direct translocation across the plasma membrane. In both cases, the initial step of internalization requires interactions between CPPs and different plasma membrane components. Despite the extensive research, it is not yet fully understood, which of these cell surface molecules mediate the direct translocation of CPPs across the plasma- and endosomal membrane. In the present study we used giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) as a model membrane system to elucidate the specific molecular mechanisms behind the internalization and the role of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the translocation of four well-known CPPs, classified as cationic (nona-arginine, Tat peptide) and amphipathic (transportan and TP10). We demonstrate here that GAGs facilitate the translocation of amphipathic CPPs, but not the internalization of cationic CPPs; and that the uptake is not mediated by a specific GAG class, but rather the overall amount of these polysaccharides is crucial for the internalization of amphipathic peptides.

  1. Triggered Ca2+ influx is required for extended synaptotagmin 1-induced ER-plasma membrane tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idevall-Hagren, Olof; Lü, Alice; Xie, Beichen; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    The extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts) are ER proteins that act as Ca(2+)-regulated tethers between the ER and the plasma membrane (PM) and have a putative role in lipid transport between the two membranes. Ca(2+) regulation of their tethering function, as well as the interplay of their different domains in such function, remains poorly understood. By exposing semi-intact cells to buffers of variable Ca(2+) concentrations, we found that binding of E-Syt1 to the PI(4,5)P2-rich PM critically requires its C2C and C2E domains and that the EC50 of such binding is in the low micromolar Ca(2+) range. Accordingly, E-Syt1 accumulation at ER-PM contact sites occurred only upon experimental manipulations known to achieve these levels of Ca(2+) via its influx from the extracellular medium, such as store-operated Ca(2+) entry in fibroblasts and membrane depolarization in β-cells. We also show that in spite of their very different physiological functions, membrane tethering by E-Syt1 (ER to PM) and by synaptotagmin (secretory vesicles to PM) undergo a similar regulation by plasma membrane lipids and cytosolic Ca(2+).

  2. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  3. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Lipoprotein(a)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Kamstrup, Pia R; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    tested whether normal food intake or inflammation influenced lipoprotein(a)'s ability to predict ischemic heart disease. METHODS: We studied 34 829 individuals from the Danish general population using the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study. RESULTS: Lipoprotein......(a) levels did not change in response to normal food intake: median fasting levels were 17.3 mg/dL, while median levels at 3-4 h since last meal were 19.4 mg/dL(p = 0.38). Lipoprotein(a) levels increased minimally with increasing levels of C-reactive protein(CRP): median lipoprotein(a) levels at CRP

  5. Identification of regions required for apical membrane localization of human multidrug resistance protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, Paul E; Westlake, Christopher J; Grant, Caroline E; Cole, Susan P C; Deeley, Roger G

    2008-07-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 transport a wide range of endo- and xenobiotics. However, with the exception of certain parts of the brain, MRP1 traffics to basolateral membranes of polarized cells, whereas MRP2 is apical in location and thus it is particularly important for systemic elimination of such compounds. Different regions of MRP1 and MRP2 seem to target them to their respective membrane locations. In addition to two "core" membrane spanning domains (MSDs) characteristic of ATP-binding cassette transporters, MRP1 and MRP2 have a third NH2-terminal MSD (MSD0), which is not required for basolateral targeting of MRP1, or for transport of at least some substrates. Here, we demonstrate that all elements necessary for apical targeting of MRP2 reside in MSD0 and the adjacent cytoplasmic loop (CL) 3. Furthermore, we show that this region of MRP2 can target the core of MRP1 to an exclusively apical location. Within MRP2 CL3, we identified a lysine-rich element that is essential for apical targeting. When introduced into MRP1, this element alone is sufficient to result in partial apical localization. However, exclusive targeting to the apical membrane seems to require the integrity of the entire region encompassing MSD0 and CL3 of MRP2. Because CL3 of MRP1 is critical for binding, transport, or both of several compounds, we also examined the function of hybrids containing all, or portions of MRP2 MSD0 and CL3. Our results indicate that CL3 is important for interaction with both the glutathione and glucuronide conjugates tested, but that different regions may be involved.

  6. Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, U; Ostergren-Lundén, G; Moses, J

    2001-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) bound to various proteoglycans (PGs) present in the cardiovascular system have been proposed to perform a wide range of functions. These include conferring viscoelastic properties; interacting with and modulating growth factors and enzymes; and as receptors and co-receptors in lipoprotein metabolism. Binding of apoB-100 lipoproteins, particularly low density lipoproteins (LDL), to GAGs of extracellular matrix PGs in arteries has been proposed to be an initiating event in development of atherosclerosis. This study was initiated with the aim of getting an overview of the binding patterns of different lipoprotein subclasses with individual GAG categories. We thus evaluated the interaction of lipoproteins with GAGs commonly found in the cardiovascular system using a gel mobility-shift assay developed for this purpose. The same procedure was used to measure lipoproteins binding to metabolically [(35)S]-labeled whole PGs prepared from three cell types, arterial smooth muscle cells, THP-1 macrophages and from HepG2 cells. The effect of GAG composition on PGs on lipoprotein binding was evaluated by enzymatic degradation of the carbohydrate chains. Heparan sulfate was found to bind beta very low density lipoproteins (beta-VLDL) and a chylomicron remnant model (beta-VLDL+apoE), but not LDL. Dermatan sulfate was found to bind LDL, but not beta-VLDL or the chylomicron remnant model. Chondroitin sulfate and heparin were found to bind all lipoproteins tested (LDL, beta-VLDL and beta-VLDL+apoE) although with different affinities. We can conclude that each lipoprotein subclass tested binds a specific assortment of the GAGs tested. The observations made contribute to the understanding of new and complex mechanisms by which carbohydrate and lipid metabolism may be linked.

  7. Cross-linking of anaplasma marginale outer membrane proteins enhances immunogenicity, but is not required for protection from challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial outer membrane proteins are the primary targets of a protective immune response. The specific characteristics of outer membrane-based immunogens, in terms of antigen content and context that are required for protective immunity remain unknown for a wide variety of bacterial pathogens. Usin...

  8. A non-permselective membrane reactor for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, H.J.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    A novel type of membrane reactor with separated feeding of the reactants is presented for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of premixed reactants. The reactants are fed in the reactor to the different sides of a porous membrane which is impregnated with a catalys

  9. A non-permselective membrane reactor for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of reactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, H.J.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    A novel type of membrane reactor with separated feeding of the reactants is presented for chemical processes normally requiring strict stoichiometric feed rates of premixed reactants. The reactants are fed in the reactor to the different sides of a porous membrane which is impregnated with a

  10. Activation of integrin α5 mediated by flow requires its translocation to membrane lipid rafts in vascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Fu, Yi; Gu, Mingxia; Zhang, Lu; Li, Dan; Li, Hongliang; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J; Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-19

    Local flow patterns determine the uneven distribution of atherosclerotic lesions. Membrane lipid rafts and integrins are crucial for shear stress-regulated endothelial function. In this study, we investigate the role of lipid rafts and integrin α5 in regulating the inflammatory response in endothelial cells (ECs) under atheroprone versus atheroprotective flow. Lipid raft proteins were isolated from ECs exposed to oscillatory shear stress (OS) or pulsatile shear stress, and then analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Among 396 proteins redistributed in lipid rafts, integrin α5 was the most significantly elevated in lipid rafts under OS. In addition, OS increased the level of activated integrin α5 in lipid rafts through the regulation of membrane cholesterol and fluidity. Disruption of F-actin-based cytoskeleton and knockdown of caveolin-1 prevented the OS-induced integrin α5 translocation and activation. In vivo, integrin α5 activation and EC dysfunction were observed in the atheroprone areas of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice, and knockdown of integrin α5 markedly attenuated EC dysfunction in partially ligated carotid arteries. Consistent with these findings, mice with haploinsufficency of integrin α5 exhibited a reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the regions under atheroprone flow. The present study has revealed an integrin- and membrane lipid raft-dependent mechanotransduction mechanism by which atheroprone flow causes endothelial dysfunction.

  11. FadD is required for utilization of endogenous fatty acids released from membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-Canul, Ángel; Nogales, Joaquina; Miranda-Molina, Alfonso; Álvarez, Laura; Geiger, Otto; Soto, María José; López-Lara, Isabel M

    2011-11-01

    FadD is an acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase responsible for the activation of exogenous long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) into acyl-CoAs. Mutation of fadD in the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti promotes swarming motility and leads to defects in nodulation of alfalfa plants. In this study, we found that S. meliloti fadD mutants accumulated a mixture of free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. The composition of the free fatty acid pool and the results obtained after specific labeling of esterified fatty acids with a Δ5-desaturase (Δ5-Des) were in agreement with membrane phospholipids being the origin of the released fatty acids. Escherichia coli fadD mutants also accumulated free fatty acids released from membrane lipids in the stationary phase. This phenomenon did not occur in a mutant of E. coli with a deficient FadL fatty acid transporter, suggesting that the accumulation of fatty acids in fadD mutants occurs inside the cell. Our results indicate that, besides the activation of exogenous LCFA, in bacteria FadD plays a major role in the activation of endogenous fatty acids released from membrane lipids. Furthermore, expression analysis performed with S. meliloti revealed that a functional FadD is required for the upregulation of genes involved in fatty acid degradation and suggested that in the wild-type strain, the fatty acids released from membrane lipids are degraded by β-oxidation in the stationary phase of growth.

  12. Components of SurA required for outer membrane biogenesis in uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Watts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SurA is a periplasmic peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase and chaperone of Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast to other PPIases, SurA appears to have a distinct role in chaperoning newly synthesized porins destined for insertion into the outer membrane. Previous studies have indicated that the chaperone activity of SurA rests in its "core module" (the N- plus C-terminal domains, based on in vivo envelope phenotypes and in vitro binding and protection of non-native substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we determined the components of SurA required for chaperone activity using in vivo phenotypes relevant to disease causation by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, namely membrane resistance to permeation by antimicrobials and maturation of the type 1 pilus usher FimD. FimD is a SurA-dependent, integral outer membrane protein through which heteropolymeric type 1 pili, which confer bladder epithelial binding and invasion capacity upon uropathogenic E. coli, are assembled and extruded. Consistent with prior results, the in vivo chaperone activity of SurA in UPEC rested primarily in the core module. However, the PPIase domains I and II were not expendable for wild-type resistance to novobiocin in broth culture. Steady-state levels of FimD were substantially restored in the UPEC surA mutant complemented with the SurA N- plus C-terminal domains. The addition of PPIase domain I augmented FimD maturation into the outer membrane, consistent with a model in which domain I enhances stability of and/or substrate binding by the core module. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results confirm the core module of E. coli SurA as a potential target for novel anti-infective development.

  13. Requirements for the formation of membrane pores by the reovirus myristoylated micro1N peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Agosto, Melina A; Ivanovic, Tijana; King, David S; Nibert, Max L; Harrison, Stephen C

    2009-07-01

    The outer capsid of the nonenveloped mammalian reovirus contains 200 trimers of the micro1 protein, each complexed with three copies of the protector protein sigma3. Conformational changes in micro1 following the proteolytic removal of sigma3 lead to release of the myristoylated N-terminal cleavage fragment micro1N and ultimately to membrane penetration. The micro1N fragment forms pores in red blood cell (RBC) membranes. In this report, we describe the interaction of recombinant micro1 trimers and synthetic micro1N peptides with both RBCs and liposomes. The micro1 trimer mediates hemolysis and liposome disruption under conditions that promote the micro1 conformational change, and mutations that inhibit micro1 conformational change in the context of intact virus particles also prevent liposome disruption by particle-free micro1 trimer. Autolytic cleavage to form micro1N is required for hemolysis but not for liposome disruption. Pretreatment of RBCs with proteases rescues hemolysis activity, suggesting that micro1N cleavage is not required when steric barriers are removed. Synthetic myristoylated micro1N peptide forms size-selective pores in liposomes, as measured by fluorescence dequenching of labeled dextrans of different sizes. Addition of a C-terminal solubility tag to the peptide does not affect activity, but sequence substitution V13N or L36D reduces liposome disruption. These substitutions are in regions of alternating hydrophobic residues. Their locations, the presence of an N-terminal myristoyl group, and the full activity of a C-terminally extended peptide, along with circular dichroism data that indicate prevalence of beta-strand secondary structure, suggest a model in which micro1N beta-hairpins assemble in the membrane to form a beta-barrel pore.

  14. Integrating complex functions: coordination of nuclear pore complex assembly and membrane expansion of the nuclear envelope requires a family of integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiter, Roger; Cole, Charles N

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope harbors numerous large proteinaceous channels, the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), through which macromolecular exchange between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm occurs. This double-membrane nuclear envelope is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and thus functionally connected to such diverse processes as vesicular transport, protein maturation and lipid synthesis. Recent results obtained from studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that assembly of the nuclear pore complex is functionally dependent upon maintenance of lipid homeostasis of the ER membrane. Previous work from one of our laboratories has revealed that an integral membrane protein Apq12 is important for the assembly of functional nuclear pores. Cells lacking APQ12 are viable but cannot grow at low temperatures, have aberrant NPCs and a defect in mRNA export. Remarkably, these defects in NPC assembly can be overcome by supplementing cells with a membrane fluidizing agent, benzyl alcohol, suggesting that Apq12 impacts the flexibility of the nuclear membrane, possibly by adjusting its lipid composition when cells are shifted to a reduced temperature. Our new study now expands these findings and reveals that an essential membrane protein, Brr6, shares at least partially overlapping functions with Apq12 and is also required for assembly of functional NPCs. A third nuclear envelope membrane protein, Brl1, is related to Brr6, and is also required for NPC assembly. Because maintenance of membrane homeostasis is essential for cellular survival, the fact that these three proteins are conserved in fungi that undergo closed mitoses, but are not found in metazoans or plants, may indicate that their functions are performed by proteins unrelated at the primary sequence level to Brr6, Brl1 and Apq12 in cells that disassemble their nuclear envelopes during mitosis.

  15. Factors that influence the membrane area of a multistage microfiltration process required to produce a micellar casein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the work reported in this paper was to develop a theoretical model to determine the effect of type of microfiltration (MF)-process feed, number of stages, and flux on the minimization of the MF membrane area required to produce a 95% serum protein-reduced micellar casein concentrate. The MF feed, number of stages, and flux were all factors that had an effect on the MF membrane area and should be taken into consideration when designing a MF system to produce a 95% serum protein-reduced micellar casein concentrate. Feeding the MF process with a diluted ultrafiltration retentate (DUR) diluted to the protein concentration of skim milk, as opposed to skim milk, reduced the required membrane area by 36% for a 5-stage process. When DUR was the MF feed, feed protein concentration, which depended on the number of MF stages, was optimized. The DUR protein concentration that minimized the required MF membrane area was 2.47, 3.85, 4.77, and 5.41% for a 2-, 3-, 4-, or 5-stage MF process, respectively. For a 5-stage process, increasing the protein concentration of the feed from 3.2 to 5.4% decreased the required MF membrane area by 10%. It was also found that as the number of stages increased from 2 to 5, the required MF membrane area decreased by 39%, when the MF feed was DUR at the optimal feed protein concentration. Finally, increasing the flux from 50 to 60 kg/m(2) per hour decreased the required MF membrane area by 17% when the MF feed was DUR at the optimal MF feed protein concentration. Overall, using DUR as a feed for MF could reduce the amount of MF membrane area required to make a 95% serum protein-reduced micellar casein concentrate.

  16. Early postpartum mitral valve thrombosis requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation before successful valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, H; Nordström, J; Brattström, O; Sennström, M M; Sartipy, U; Mattsson, E

    2016-05-01

    Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis in women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves. We present the case of a 29-year-old woman who developed early postpartum mitral valve thrombus after an elective cesarean delivery. The patient had a mechanical mitral valve and was treated with warfarin in the second trimester, which was replaced with high-dose dalteparin during late pregnancy. Elective cesarean delivery was performed under general anesthesia at 37weeks of gestation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for postoperative care and within 30min she developed dyspnea and hypoxia requiring mechanical ventilation. She deteriorated rapidly and developed pulmonary edema, worsening hypoxia and severe acidosis. Urgent extra corporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a mitral valve thrombus. The patient underwent a successful mitral valve replacement after three days on extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. This case highlights the importance of multidisciplinary care and frequent monitoring of anticoagulation during care of pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves.

  17. Cysteine residues of SNAP-25 are required for SNARE disassembly and exocytosis, but not for membrane targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbourne, P; Cansino, V; Mathews, J R; Graham, M; Burgoyne, R D; Wilson, M C

    2001-08-01

    The release of neurotransmitter at a synapse occurs via the regulated fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane. The fusion of the two lipid bilayers is mediated by a protein complex that includes the plasma membrane target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (t-SNAREs), syntaxin 1A and synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), and the vesicle SNARE (v-SNARE), vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP). Whereas syntaxin 1A and VAMP are tethered to the membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain, SNAP-25 has been suggested to be anchored to the membrane via four palmitoylated cysteine residues. We demonstrate that the cysteine residues of SNAP-25 are not required for membrane localization when syntaxin 1A is present. Analysis of the 7 S and 20 S complexes formed by mutants that lack cysteine residues demonstrates that the cysteines are required for efficient SNARE complex dissociation. Furthermore, these mutants are unable to support exocytosis, as demonstrated by a PC12 cell secretion assay. We hypothesize that syntaxin 1A serves to direct newly synthesized SNAP-25 through the Golgi transport pathway to the axons and synapses, and that palmitoylation of cysteine residues is not required for targeting, but to optimize interactions required for SNARE complex dissociation.

  18. Ankyrin and band 3 differentially affect expression of membrane glycoproteins but are not required for erythroblast enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-01-27

    During late stages of mammalian erythropoiesis the nucleus undergoes chromatin condensation, migration to the plasma membrane, and extrusion from the cytoplasm surrounded by a segment of plasma membrane. Since nuclear condensation occurs in all vertebrates, mammalian erythroid membrane and cytoskeleton proteins were implicated as playing important roles in mediating the movement and extrusion of the nucleus. Here we use erythroid ankyrin deficient and band 3 knockout mouse models to show that band 3, but not ankyrin, plays an important role in regulating the level of erythroid cell membrane proteins, as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of glycophorin A in band 3 knockout mice. However, neither band 3 nor ankyrin are required for enucleation. These results demonstrate that mammalian erythroblast enucleation does not depend on the membrane integrity generated by the ankyrin-band 3 complex.

  19. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lol system as a lipoprotein sorting mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shin-Ya; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-05-04

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or the outer membrane depending on the residue that is present next to the N-terminal acylated Cys. Asp at position 2 causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane. In contrast, the accompanying study (9) revealed that the residues at positions 3 and 4 determine the membrane specificity of lipoproteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since the five Lol proteins involved in the sorting of E. coli lipoproteins are conserved in P. aeruginosa, we examined whether or not the Lol proteins of P. aeruginosa are also involved in lipoprotein sorting but utilize different signals. The genes encoding LolCDE, LolA, and LolB homologues were cloned and expressed. The LolCDE homologue thus purified was reconstituted into proteoliposomes with lipoproteins. When incubated in the presence of ATP and a LolA homologue, the reconstituted LolCDE homologue released lipoproteins, leading to the formation of a LolA-lipoprotein complex. Lipoproteins were then incorporated into the outer membrane depending on a LolB homologue. As revealed in vivo, lipoproteins with Lys and Ser at positions 3 and 4, respectively, remained in proteoliposomes. On the other hand, E. coli LolCDE released lipoproteins with this signal and transferred them to LolA of not only E. coli but also P. aeruginosa. These results indicate that Lol proteins are responsible for the sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, as in the case of E. coli, but respond differently to inner membrane retention signals.

  20. Ganglioside embedded in reconstituted lipoprotein binds cholera toxin with elevated affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricarello, Daniel A; Mills, Emily J; Petrlova, Jitka; Voss, John C; Parikh, Atul N

    2010-09-01

    The ability to exogenously present cell-surface receptors in high-affinity conformations in a synthetic system offers an opportunity to provide host cells with protection from pathogenic toxins. This strategy requires improvement of the synthetic receptor binding affinity against its native counterpart, particularly with polyvalent toxins where clustering of membrane receptors can hinder binding. Here we demonstrate that reconstituted lipoprotein, nanometer-sized discoidal lipid bilayers bounded by apolipoprotein and functionalized by incorporation of pathogen receptors, provides a means to enhance toxin-receptor binding through molecular-level control over the receptor microenvironment (specifically, its rigidity, composition, and heterogeneity). Using a Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based assay, we found that reconstituted lipoprotein incorporating low concentrations of ganglioside monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) binds polymeric cholera toxin with significantly higher affinity than liposomes or supported lipid bilayers, most likely a result of the enhanced control over receptor clustering provided by the lipoprotein platform. Using wide-area epifluorescence, we found that this enhanced binding capacity can be effectively utilized to divert cholera toxin away from populations of healthy mammalian cells. In summary, we found that reconstitutions of high-density lipoprotein can be engineered to include specific pathogen receptors; that their pathogen binding affinity is altered, presumably due to attenuation of receptor aggregation; and that these assemblies are effective at protecting cells from biological toxins.

  1. Ankyrin and band 3 differentially affect expression of membrane glycoproteins but are not required for erythroblast enucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Peng, E-mail: peng-ji@fsm.northwestern.edu [Department of Pathology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Lodish, Harvey F. [Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankyrin and band 3 are not required for erythroblasts enucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ankyrin does not affect erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of band 3 influences erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. -- Abstract: During late stages of mammalian erythropoiesis the nucleus undergoes chromatin condensation, migration to the plasma membrane, and extrusion from the cytoplasm surrounded by a segment of plasma membrane. Since nuclear condensation occurs in all vertebrates, mammalian erythroid membrane and cytoskeleton proteins were implicated as playing important roles in mediating the movement and extrusion of the nucleus. Here we use erythroid ankyrin deficient and band 3 knockout mouse models to show that band 3, but not ankyrin, plays an important role in regulating the level of erythroid cell membrane proteins, as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of glycophorin A in band 3 knockout mice. However, neither band 3 nor ankyrin are required for enucleation. These results demonstrate that mammalian erythroblast enucleation does not depend on the membrane integrity generated by the ankyrin-band 3 complex.

  2. Phagocytosis of IgG‐Coated Polystyrene Beads by Macrophages Induces and Requires High Membrane Order

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magenau, Astrid; Benzing, Carola; Proschogo, Nicholas; Don, Anthony S; Hejazi, Leila; Karunakaran, Denuja; Jessup, Wendy; Gaus, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    ...)‐coated polystyrene particles. We found that the plasma membrane undergoes rapid actin‐independent condensation to form highly ordered phagosomal membranes, the biophysical hallmark of lipid rafts...

  3. Arabidopsis CHL27, located in both envelope and thylakoid membranes, is required for the synthesis of protochlorophyllide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottey, Stephen; Block, Maryse A; Allen, Michael; Westergren, Tomas; Albrieux, Catherine; Scheller, Henrik V; Merchant, Sabeeha; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2003-12-23

    CHL27, the Arabidopsis homologue to Chlamydomonas Crd1, a plastid-localized putative diiron protein, is required for the synthesis of protochlorophyllide and therefore is a candidate subunit of the aerobic cyclase in chlorophyll biosynthesis. delta-Aminolevulinic acid-fed antisense Arabidopsis plants with reduced amounts of Crd1/CHL27 accumulate Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester, the substrate of the cyclase reaction. Mutant plants have chlorotic leaves with reduced abundance of all chlorophyll proteins. Fractionation of Arabidopsis chloroplast membranes shows that Crd1/CHL27 is equally distributed on a membrane-weight basis in the thylakoid and inner-envelope membranes.

  4. 聚丙烯微孔膜表面肝素化及其对低密度脂蛋白的吸附特性%SURFACE HEPARINIZATION OF POLYPROPYLENE MICROPOROUS MEMBRANES FOR SELECTIVE ADSORPTION OF LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑细鸣; 黄小军; 徐志康

    2011-01-01

    为了赋予聚丙烯微孔膜(PPMM)选择性吸附低密度脂蛋白(LDL)的能力,发展了一种有效的PPMM表面共价固定肝素的方法.基于紫外引发丙烯酸的接枝聚合,通过碳二亚胺活化,以乙二胺为间隔臂,将肝素共价固定于PPMM表面,获得表面肝素化的PPMM.ATR-FTIR和XPS分析确证了修饰过程中膜表面基团及化学成分的变化.采用静态水接触角测定和血小板黏附实验,考察了肝素化前后膜表面的亲水性及血液相容性,发现在肝素固定化密度为7.39 μg/cm2时,膜表面水接触角由(138±7.2)°下降至(35.1±2.7)°,血液相容性也得到明显改善.以酶联免疫吸附测定技术(ELISA)分析了肝素化前后PPMM对单及二元混合蛋白溶液中LDL的吸附与脱吸附性能.结果表明,肝素化PPMM对LDL的吸附量明显增大,且受人血清蛋白(HSA)的干扰较小,说明肝素化PPMM对LDL具有选择性吸附性能;NaC1溶液能将肝素化PPMM表面吸附的LDL洗脱除去,说明肝素化PPMM对LDL的吸附具有可逆性.%To endow polypropylene microporous membrane (PPMM) with adsorption selectivity to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) ,a versatile method was developed to covalently immobilize heparin on the PPMM surface. This was achieved by grafting acrylic acid ( AA ) on the PPMM surface by UV irradiation, and subsequent chemical binding of heparin with ethylenediamine as a spacer. The membrane surfaces were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The hydrophilicity and blood compatibility of the PPMM surface were improved obviously by the surface heparinization. Water contact angle of the membrane surface was decreased from (138 ±7. 2) ° for the nascent PPMM to ( 35. 1 ± 2.7 ) ° for the heparinized PPMM with 7. 39 |xg/cm2 heparin. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA) was employed to analyze the adsorption of the LDL on the nascent and heparinized PPMMs. It

  5. Analysis of individual lipoproteins and liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, D.L.; Keller, R.A.; Nolan, J.P. [and others

    1997-08-01

    We describe the application of single molecule detection (SMD) technologies for the analysis of natural (serum lipoproteins) and synthetic (liposomes) transport systems. The need for advanced analytical procedures of these complex and important systems is presented with the specific enhancements afforded by SMD with flowing sample streams. In contrast to bulk measurements which yield only average values, measurement of individual species allows creation of population histograms from heterogeneous samples. The data are acquired in minutes and the analysis requires relatively small sample quantities. Preliminary data are presented from the analysis of low density lipoprotein, and multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles.

  6. RNA Replication and Membrane Modification Require the Same Functions of Alphavirus Nonstructural Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Katri; Hellström, Kirsi; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2015-11-18

    The alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations known as spherules as their RNA replication sites. Here, we show that inactivation of any function (polymerase, helicase, protease, or membrane association) essential for RNA synthesis also prevents the generation of spherule structures in a Semliki Forest virus trans-replication system. Mutants capable of negative-strand synthesis, including those defective in RNA capping, gave rise to spherules. Recruitment of RNA to membranes in the absence of spherule formation was not detected.

  7. Sex steroids and lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers Leuven, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lipoprotein metabolism is involved in atherogenesis. Female sex-hormones have substantial effects on both lipoprotein metabolism and the vessel wall. Cholesterol, one of the major lipids in lipoproteins, is both the substrate for, and the target of, the steroidal sex hormones.

  8. Maximum yields of microsomal-type membranes from small amounts of plant material without requiring ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Lindy; Luschnig, Christian

    2010-06-15

    Isolation of a microsomal membrane fraction is a common procedure in studies involving membrane proteins. By conventional definition, microsomal membranes are collected by centrifugation of a postmitochondrial fraction at 100,000g in an ultracentrifuge, a method originally developed for large amounts of mammalian tissue. We present a method for isolating microsomal-type membranes from small amounts of Arabidopsis thaliana plant material that does not rely on ultracentrifugation but instead uses the lower relative centrifugal force (21,000g) of a microcentrifuge. We show that the 21,000g pellet is equivalent to that obtained at 100,000g and that it contains all of the membrane fractions expected in a conventional microsomal fraction. Our method incorporates specific manipulation of sample density throughout the procedure, with minimal preclearance, minimal volumes of extraction buffer, and minimal sedimentation pathlength. These features allow maximal membrane yields, enabling membrane isolation from limited amounts of material. We further demonstrate that conventional ultracentrifuge-based protocols give submaximal yields due to losses during early stages of the procedure; that is, extensive amounts of microsomal-type membranes can sediment prematurely during the typical preclearance steps. Our protocol avoids such losses, thereby ensuring maximal yield and a representative total membrane fraction. The principles of our method can be adapted for nonplant material.

  9. Distinct Hepatic Receptors for Low Density Lipoprotein and Apolipoprotein E in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeg, Jeffrey M.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Gregg, Richard E.; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    1985-02-01

    Since the liver is a central organ for lipid and lipoprotein synthesis and catabolism, hepatic receptors for specific apolipoproteins on plasma lipoproteins would be expected to modulate lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The role of hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E-containing lipoproteins was evaluated in patients with complementary disorders in lipoprotein metabolism: abetalipoproteinemia and homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. In addition, hepatic membranes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia were studied and compared before and after portacaval shunt surgery. The results establish that the human liver has receptors for apolipoproteins B and E. Furthermore, in the human, hepatic receptors for low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein E are genetically distinct and can undergo independent control.

  10. Acid phosphatase 2 (ACP2) is required for membrane fusion during influenza virus entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Jinhee; Son, Kidong; d’Alexandry d’Orengiani, Anne-Laure Pham Humg; Min, Ji-Young

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses exploit host factors to successfully replicate in infected cells. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology, we identified six human genes required for influenza A virus (IAV) replication. Here we focused on the role of acid phosphatase 2 (ACP2), as its knockdown showed the greatest inhibition of IAV replication. In IAV-infected cells, depletion of ACP2 resulted in a significant reduction in the expression of viral proteins and mRNA, and led to the attenuation of virus multi-cycle growth. ACP2 knockdown also decreased replication of seasonal influenza A and B viruses and avian IAVs of the H7 subtype. Interestingly, ACP2 depletion had no effect on the replication of Ebola or hepatitis C virus. Because ACP2 is known to be a lysosomal acid phosphatase, we assessed the role of ACP2 in influenza virus entry. While neither binding of the viral particle to the cell surface nor endosomal acidification was affected in ACP2-depleted cells, fusion of the endosomal and viral membranes was impaired. As a result, downstream steps in viral entry were blocked, including nucleocapsid uncoating and nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins. Our results established ACP2 as a necessary host factor for regulating the fusion step of influenza virus entry. PMID:28272419

  11. Lipoproteins and lipoprotein mimetics for imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaxton, C Shad; Rink, Jonathan S; Naha, Pratap C; Cormode, David P

    2016-11-15

    Lipoproteins are a set of natural nanoparticles whose main role is the transport of fats within the body. While much work has been done to develop synthetic nanocarriers to deliver drugs or contrast media, natural nanoparticles such as lipoproteins represent appealing alternatives. Lipoproteins are biocompatible, biodegradable, non-immunogenic and are naturally targeted to some disease sites. Lipoproteins can be modified to act as contrast agents in many ways, such as by insertion of gold cores to provide contrast for computed tomography. They can be loaded with drugs, nucleic acids, photosensitizers or boron to act as therapeutics. Attachment of ligands can re-route lipoproteins to new targets. These attributes render lipoproteins attractive and versatile delivery vehicles. In this review we will provide background on lipoproteins, then survey their roles as contrast agents, in drug and nucleic acid delivery, as well as in photodynamic therapy and boron neutron capture therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Studies on the Formation of Murein-Bound Lipoprotein in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-15

    Proteus mirabilis, Morqanella morqanii, Erwinia amylovora and serratia marcescens, and in Pseudomonas aeruqinosa lipoprotein I (Fig. 5., YU, 1987... Erwinia amylovora lipoprotein gene. J. Biol. Chern. 256:2194-2198. Yamaguchi, K., and Inouye, M. (1988). Lipoprotein 28, an inner membrane protein of...et AI., 1983), ~. amylovora (Yamagata et li., 1981) and ~. marcescens (Braun et al., 1970), and in .E. aeruginosa (Mizuno and Kageyama, 1979). Like

  13. Crystal structures of bacterial lipoprotein localization factors, LolA and LolB

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Kazuki; Miyatake, Hideyuki; Yokota, Naoko; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime; Miki, Kunio

    2003-01-01

    Lipoproteins having a lipid-modified cysteine at the N-terminus are localized on either the inner or the outer membrane of Escherichia coli depending on the residue at position 2. Five Lol proteins involved in the sorting and membrane localization of lipoprotein are highly conserved in Gram-negative bacteria. We determined the crystal structures of a periplasmic chaperone, LolA, and an outer membrane lipoprotein receptor, LolB. Despite their dissimilar amino acid sequences, the structures of ...

  14. The beta-barrel outer membrane protein assembly complex of Neisseria meningitidis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volokhina, E.B.; Beckers, F.; Tommassen, J.; Bos, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein Omp85 is required for outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly in gram-negative bacteria and in mitochondria. Its Escherichia coli homolog, designated BamA, functions with four accessory lipoproteins, BamB, BamC, BamD, and BamE, together forming the beta-barrel asse

  15. Plasma membrane localization is required for RasA-mediated polarized morphogenesis and virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortwendel, Jarrod R; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Rogg, Luise E; Asfaw, Yohannes G; Burns, Kimberlie A; Randell, Scott H; Steinbach, William J

    2012-08-01

    Ras is a highly conserved GTPase protein that is essential for proper polarized morphogenesis of filamentous fungi. Localization of Ras proteins to the plasma membrane and endomembranes through posttranslational addition of farnesyl and palmitoyl residues is an important mechanism through which cells provide specificity to Ras signal output. Although the Aspergillus fumigatus RasA protein is known to be a major regulator of growth and development, the membrane distribution of RasA during polarized morphogenesis and the role of properly localized Ras signaling in virulence of a pathogenic mold remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that Aspergillus fumigatus RasA localizes primarily to the plasma membrane of actively growing hyphae. We show that treatment with the palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate disrupts normal RasA plasma membrane association and decreases hyphal growth. Targeted mutations of the highly conserved RasA palmitoylation motif also mislocalized RasA from the plasma membrane and led to severe hyphal abnormalities, cell wall structural changes, and reduced virulence in murine invasive aspergillosis. Finally, we provide evidence that proper RasA localization is independent of the Ras palmitoyltransferase homolog, encoded by erfB, but requires the palmitoyltransferase complex subunit, encoded by erfD. Our results demonstrate that plasma membrane-associated RasA is critical for polarized morphogenesis, cell wall stability, and virulence in A. fumigatus.

  16. Heat shock protein 27 is required for sex steroid receptor trafficking to and functioning at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razandi, Mahnaz; Pedram, Ali; Levin, Ellis R

    2010-07-01

    Classical sex steroid receptors (SRs) localize at the plasma membranes (PMs) of cells, initiating signal transduction through kinase cascades that contribute to steroid hormone action. Palmitoylation of the SRs is required for membrane localization and function, but the proteins that facilitate this modification and subsequent receptor trafficking are unknown. Initially using a proteomic approach, we identified that heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) binds to a motif in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and promotes palmitoylation of the SR. Hsp27-induced acylation occurred on the ERalpha monomer and augmented caveolin-1 interactions with ERalpha, resulting in membrane localization, kinase activation, and DNA synthesis in breast cancer cells. Oligomerization of Hsp27 was required, and similar results were found for the trafficking of endogenous progesterone and androgen receptors to the PMs of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of Hsp27 prevented sex SR trafficking to and signaling from the membrane. These results identify a conserved and novel function for Hsp27 with potential as a target for interrupting signaling from membrane sex SRs to tumor biology in hormone-responsive cancers.

  17. Endocytic sorting and recycling require membrane phosphatidylserine asymmetry maintained by TAT-1/CHAT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baohui; Jiang, Yue; Zeng, Sheng; Yan, Jiacong; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Wei; Wang, Xiaochen

    2010-12-09

    Endocytic sorting is achieved through the formation of morphologically and functionally distinct sub-domains within early endosomes. Cargoes destined for recycling are sorted to and transported through newly-formed tubular membranes, but the processes that regulate membrane tubulation are poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel Caenorhabditis elegans Cdc50 family protein, CHAT-1, which acts as the chaperone of the TAT-1 P4-ATPase to regulate membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) asymmetry and endocytic transport. In chat-1 and tat-1 mutants, the endocytic sorting process is disrupted, leading to defects in both cargo recycling and degradation. TAT-1 and CHAT-1 colocalize to the tubular domain of the early endosome, the tubular endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and the recycling endosome where PS is enriched on the cytosolic surface. Loss of tat-1 and chat-1 function disrupts membrane PS asymmetry and abrogates the tubular membrane structure. Our data suggest that CHAT-1 and TAT-1 maintain membrane phosphatidylserine asymmetry, thus promoting membrane tubulation and regulating endocytic sorting and recycling.

  18. Identification of a New Lipoprotein Export Signal in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Frédéric; Cornelis, Guy Richard; Renzi, Francesco

    2016-10-25

    Bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes, including commensal organisms and opportunistic pathogens, harbor abundant surface-exposed multiprotein membrane complexes (Sus-like systems) involved in carbohydrate acquisition. These complexes have been mostly linked to commensalism, and in some instances, they have also been shown to play a role in pathogenesis. Sus-like systems are mainly composed of lipoproteins anchored to the outer membrane and facing the external milieu. This lipoprotein localization is uncommon in most studied Gram-negative bacteria, while it is widespread in Bacteroidetes Little is known about how these complexes assemble and particularly about how lipoproteins reach the bacterial surface. Here, by bioinformatic analyses, we identify a lipoprotein export signal (LES) at the N termini of surface-exposed lipoproteins of the human pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus corresponding to K-(D/E)2 or Q-A-(D/E)2 We show that, when introduced in sialidase SiaC, an intracellular lipoprotein, this signal is sufficient to target the protein to the cell surface. Mutational analysis of the LES in this reporter system showed that the amino acid composition, position of the signal sequence, and global charge are critical for lipoprotein surface transport. These findings were further confirmed by the analysis of the LES of mucinase MucG, a naturally surface-exposed C. canimorsus lipoprotein. Furthermore, we identify a LES in Bacteroides fragilis and Flavobacterium johnsoniae surface lipoproteins that allow C. canimorsus surface protein exposure, thus suggesting that Bacteroidetes share a new bacterial lipoprotein export pathway that flips lipoproteins across the outer membrane. Bacteria of the phylum Bacteroidetes are important human commensals and pathogens. Understanding their biology is therefore a key question for human health. A main feature of these bacteria is the presence of abundant lipoproteins at their surface that play a role in nutrient acquisition. To

  19. Required water quality for the use of high-performance membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoike, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The clinical benefits of high-performance membrane (HPM) dialyzers have often been reported since the advent of the synthetic polyacrylonitrile dialysis membrane. HPMs, which have high water permeability, eliminate a wide spectrum of uremic toxins, and offer excellent biocompatibility, are now essential for hemodialysis, hemofiltration, and hemodiafiltration. For HPMs whose mean pore size is enlarged to secure better dialysis membrane performance, however, the dialyzing fluid must be highly purified to prevent contamination. Blood purification therapies using highly purified dialyzing fluid and HPM are expected to improve the prognosis of future patients undergoing dialysis. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Adaptive immune response to lipoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu, Chi Hai; Kolata, Julia; Stentzel, Sebastian; Beyer, Anica; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Steil, Leif; Pané-Farré, Jan; Rühmling, Vanessa; Engelmann, Susanne; Götz, Friedrich; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hecker, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Schmidt, Frank; Völker, Uwe; Bröker, Barbara M

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent commensal but also a dangerous pathogen, causing many forms of infection ranging from mild to life-threatening conditions. Among its virulence factors are lipoproteins, which are anchored in the bacterial cell membrane. Lipoproteins perform various functions in co

  1. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubicciotti, Roger S. (El Cerrito, CA); Karu, Alexander E. (Kensington, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  2. Reduction of low potential electron acceptors requires the CbcL inner membrane cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharoff, Lori; Chan, Chi Ho; Bond, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The respiration of metals by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires electrons generated by metabolism to pass from the interior of the cell to electron acceptors beyond the cell membranes. The G. sulfurreducens inner membrane multiheme c-type cytochrome ImcH is required for respiration to extracellular electron acceptors with redox potentials greater than -0.1 V vs. SHE, but ImcH is not essential for electron transfer to lower potential acceptors. In contrast, deletion of cbcL, encoding an inner membrane protein consisting of b-type and multiheme c-type cytochrome domains, severely affected reduction of low potential electron acceptors such as Fe(III)-oxides and electrodes poised at -0.1 V vs. SHE. Catalytic cyclic voltammetry of a ΔcbcL strain growing on poised electrodes revealed a 50 mV positive shift in driving force required for electron transfer out of the cell. In non-catalytic conditions, low-potential peaks present in wild type biofilms were absent in ∆cbcL mutants. Expression of cbcL in trans increased growth at low redox potential and restored features to cyclic voltammetry. This evidence supports a model where CbcL is a component of a second electron transfer pathway out of the G. sulfurreducens inner membrane that dominates when redox potential is at or below -0.1 V vs. SHE.

  3. Enhanced Membrane Fusion in Sterol-enriched Vacuoles Bypasses the Vrp1p RequirementD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Tedrick, Kelly; Trischuk, Tim; Lehner, Richard; Eitzen, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Organization of lipids into membrane microdomains is a vital mechanism of protein processing. Here we show that overexpression of ERG6, a gene involved in ergosterol synthesis, elevates sterol levels 1.5-fold on the vacuole membrane and enhances their homotypic fusion. The mechanism of sterol-enhanced fusion is not via more efficient sorting, but instead promotes increased kinetics of fusion subreactions. We initially isolated ERG6 as a suppressor of a vrp1Δ growth defect selective for vacuol...

  4. Enhanced Membrane Fusion in Sterol-enriched Vacuoles Bypasses the Vrp1p RequirementD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Tedrick, Kelly; Trischuk, Tim; Lehner, Richard; Eitzen, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Organization of lipids into membrane microdomains is a vital mechanism of protein processing. Here we show that overexpression of ERG6, a gene involved in ergosterol synthesis, elevates sterol levels 1.5-fold on the vacuole membrane and enhances their homotypic fusion. The mechanism of sterol-enhanced fusion is not via more efficient sorting, but instead promotes increased kinetics of fusion subreactions. We initially isolated ERG6 as a suppressor of a vrp1Δ growth defect selective for vacuol...

  5. Intraflagellar transport is required for the vectorial movement of TRPV channels in the ciliary membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hongmin; Burnette, Dylan T; Bae, Young-Kyung; Forscher, Paul; Barr, Maureen M; Rosenbaum, Joel L

    2005-09-20

    The membranes of all eukaryotic motile (9 + 2) and immotile primary (9 + 0) cilia harbor channels and receptors involved in sensory transduction (reviewed by). These membrane proteins are transported from the cytoplasm onto the ciliary membrane by vesicles targeted for exocytosis at a point adjacent to the ciliary basal body. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to demonstrate that select GFP-tagged sensory receptors undergo rapid vectorial transport along the entire length of the cilia of Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons. Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels OSM-9 and OCR-2 move in ciliary membranes at rates comparable to the intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery located between the membrane and the underlying axonemal microtubules. OSM-9 motility is disrupted in certain IFT mutant backgrounds. Surprisingly, motility of transient receptor potential polycystin (TRPP) channel PKD-2 (polycystic kidney disease-2), a mechano-receptor, was not detected. Our study demonstrates that IFT, previously shown to be necessary for transport of axonemal components, is also involved in the motility of TRPV membrane protein movement along cilia of C. elegans sensory cells.

  6. Dissecting the membrane cholesterol requirement for mycobacterial entry into host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Jafurulla, Md; Kumar, G Aditya; Raghunand, Tirumalai R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacteria are intracellular pathogens that can invade and survive within host macrophages, and are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The molecular mechanism involved in the internalization of mycobacteria is poorly understood. In this work, we have explored the role of host membrane cholesterol in the entry of the avirulent surrogate mycobacterial strain Mycobacterium smegmatis into THP-1 macrophages. Our results show that depletion of host membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in a significant reduction in the entry of M. smegmatis into host cells. More importantly, we show that the inhibition in the ability of M. smegmatis to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon replenishment of membrane cholesterol. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first report showing that membrane cholesterol replenishment can reverse the inhibition in the entry of mycobacteria into host cells. In addition, we demonstrate that cholesterol complexation using amphotericin B (without physical depletion) is sufficient to inhibit mycobacterial entry. Importantly, we observed a significant reduction in mycobacterial entry upon enrichment of host membrane cholesterol. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that an optimum host plasma membrane cholesterol is necessary for the entry of mycobacteria. These results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated mycobacterial host cell entry.

  7. Cholesterol and F-actin are required for clustering of recycling synaptic vesicle proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dason, Jeffrey S; Smith, Alex J; Marin, Leo; Charlton, Milton P

    2014-02-15

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) and their proteins must be recycled for sustained synaptic transmission. We tested the hypothesis that SV cholesterol is required for proper sorting of SV proteins during recycling in live presynaptic terminals. We used the reversible block of endocytosis in the Drosophila temperature-sensitive dynamin mutant shibire-ts1 to trap exocytosed SV proteins, and then examined the effect of experimental treatments on the distribution of these proteins within the presynaptic plasma membrane by confocal microscopy. SV proteins synaptotagmin, vglut and csp were clustered following SV trapping in control experiments but dispersed in samples treated with the cholesterol chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin to extract SV cholesterol. There was accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) in presynaptic terminals following SV trapping and this was reduced following SV cholesterol extraction. Reduced PIP2 accumulation was associated with disrupted accumulation of actin in presynaptic terminals. Similar to vesicular cholesterol extraction, disruption of actin by latrunculin A after SV proteins had been trapped on the plasma membrane resulted in the dispersal of SV proteins and prevented recovery of synaptic transmission due to impaired endocytosis following relief of the endocytic block. Our results demonstrate that vesicular cholesterol is required for aggregation of exocytosed SV proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane and are consistent with a mechanism involving regulation of PIP2 accumulation and local actin polymerization by cholesterol. Thus, alteration of membrane or SV lipids may affect the ability of synapses to undergo sustained synaptic transmission by compromising the recycling of SV proteins.

  8. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goolab, S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available of Brucellalipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown...

  9. Mitochondrial outer membrane proteome of Trypanosoma brucei reveals novel factors required to maintain mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Moritz; Wiese, Sebastian; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Jackson, Christopher; Meisinger, Chris; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2013-02-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes devastating diseases in humans and animals. It diverged from most other eukaryotes very early in evolution and, as a consequence, has an unusual mitochondrial biology. Moreover, mitochondrial functions and morphology are highly regulated throughout the life cycle of the parasite. The outer mitochondrial membrane defines the boundary of the organelle. Its properties are therefore key for understanding how the cytosol and mitochondria communicate and how the organelle is integrated into the metabolism of the whole cell. We have purified the mitochondrial outer membrane of T. brucei and characterized its proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for protein abundance profiling in combination with statistical analysis. Our results show that the trypanosomal outer membrane proteome consists of 82 proteins, two-thirds of which have never been associated with mitochondria before. 40 proteins share homology with proteins of known functions. The function of 42 proteins, 33 of which are specific to trypanosomatids, remains unknown. 11 proteins are essential for the disease-causing bloodstream form of T. brucei and therefore may be exploited as novel drug targets. A comparison with the outer membrane proteome of yeast defines a set of 17 common proteins that are likely present in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotes. Known factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology are virtually absent in T. brucei. Interestingly, RNAi-mediated ablation of three outer membrane proteins of unknown function resulted in a collapse of the network-like mitochondrion of procyclic cells and for the first time identified factors that control mitochondrial shape in T. brucei.

  10. Requirements for the Formation of Membrane Pores by the Reovirus Myristoylated μ1N Peptide▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lan; Agosto, Melina A.; Ivanovic, Tijana; King, David S.; Nibert, Max L.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    The outer capsid of the nonenveloped mammalian reovirus contains 200 trimers of the μ1 protein, each complexed with three copies of the protector protein σ3. Conformational changes in μ1 following the proteolytic removal of σ3 lead to release of the myristoylated N-terminal cleavage fragment μ1N and ultimately to membrane penetration. The μ1N fragment forms pores in red blood cell (RBC) membranes. In this report, we describe the interaction of recombinant μ1 trimers and synthetic μ1N peptides...

  11. Oxidized lipoprotein lipids and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahotupa, Markku

    2017-04-01

    Plasma lipoproteins contain variable amounts of lipid oxidation products (LOP), which are known to impair normal physiological functions and stimulate atherosclerotic processes. Recent evidence indicates that plasma lipoproteins are active carriers of LOP, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) directing transport toward peripheral tissues, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) being active in the reverse transport. It has been proposed that the lipoprotein-specific transport of LOP could play a role in atherosclerosis-related effects of LDL and HDL. This article gives an overview of the present knowledge of lipoprotein LOP transport and its association with the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Evidence of the significance of lipoprotein LOP transport comes mainly from studies of physiological oxidative stress and is supported by studies of the functionality apolipoprotein A-1 mimetic peptides. A large body of data has accumulated indicating that lipoprotein LOP transport is connected to the risk of atherosclerosis. While high levels of LOP carried by LDL are indicative of elevated risk, high LOP level in HDL appears to associate with protection. If confirmed, the proposed lipoprotein LOP transport function would affect conception of the etiology of atherosclerosis, but would not conflict current views of the pathophysiological mechanisms. It could open new perspectives, such as the dietary origin of LOP, and the protective function of HDL in clearance of LOP. Focusing on LOP could give additional tools especially for prevention and diagnosis, but would not radically change the management of atherosclerosis and CVD.

  12. Neurotensin receptor-1 inducible palmitoylation is required for efficient receptor-mediated mitogenic-signaling within structured membrane microdomains

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Neurotensin receptor-1 (NTSR-1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been recently identified as a mediator of cancer progression. NTSR-1 and its endogenous ligand, neurotensin (NTS), are co-expressed in several breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer tumor samples. Based on our previously published study demonstrating that intact structured membrane microdomains (SMDs) are required for NTSR-1 mitogenic signaling, we hypothesized that regulated receptor palmitoylation is respons...

  13. Chronic mould exposure as a risk factor for severe community acquired pneumonia in a patient requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stephanie; Hassan, Ibrahim; Barker, Julian; Ashworth, Alan; Barnes, Anita; Fedor, Igor; Feddy, Lee; Hayes, Tim; Malagon, Ignacio; Stirling, Sarah; Szentgyorgyi, Lajos; Mutton, Ken; Richardson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    A previously fit and well man developed acute respiratory failure due to environmental mould exposure from living in damp rental accommodation. Despite aggressive intensive care management he rapidly deteriorated and required respiratory and cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. We hypothesize that poor domiciliary conditions may make an underestimated contribution to community respiratory disease. These conditions may present as acute and severe illness with non-typical pathogens identified. PMID:26236598

  14. Chronic mould exposure as a risk factor for severe community acquired pneumonia in a patient requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously fit and well man developed acute respiratory failure due to environmental mould exposure from living in damp rental accommodation. Despite aggressive intensive care management he rapidly deteriorated and required respiratory and cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. We hypothesize that poor domiciliary conditions may make an underestimated contribution to community respiratory disease. These conditions may present as acute and severe illness with non-typical pathogens identified.

  15. Cdc42 expression in keratinocytes is required for the maintenance of the basement membrane in skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xunwei; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Brakebusch, Cord

    2006-01-01

    , structure and number of hemidesomosomes were not significantly changed in the Cdc42 mutant skin compared with the control mice and no blister formation was observed in mutant skin. These data indicate that Cdc42 in keratinocytes is important for maintenance of the basement membrane of skin....

  16. A transmembrane ubiquitin ligase required to sort membrane proteins into multivesicular bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiori, Fulvio; Pelham, Hugh R B; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2002-01-01

    Membrane proteins with transmembrane domains (TMDs) that contain polar residues exposed to the lipid bilayer are selectively sorted into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and delivered to the yeast vacuole. Sorting of some, although not all, proteins into these structures is mediated by ubiquitination. W

  17. A transmembrane ubiquitin ligase required to sort membrane proteins into multivesicular bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiori, Fulvio; Pelham, Hugh R B; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2002-01-01

    Membrane proteins with transmembrane domains (TMDs) that contain polar residues exposed to the lipid bilayer are selectively sorted into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and delivered to the yeast vacuole. Sorting of some, although not all, proteins into these structures is mediated by ubiquitination. W

  18. Wolbachia lipoproteins: abundance, localisation and serology of Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6 from Brugia malayi and Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Denis; Guimarães, Ana F; Molyneux, Gemma R; Johnston, Kelly L; Ford, Louise; Taylor, Mark J

    2014-10-06

    Lipoproteins are the major agonists of Wolbachia-dependent inflammatory pathogenesis in filariasis and a validated target for drug discovery. Here we characterise the abundance, localisation and serology of the Wolbachia lipoproteins: Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6. We used proteomics to confirm lipoprotein presence and relative abundance; fractionation, immunoblotting and confocal and electron immuno-microscopy for localisation and ELISA for serological analysis. Proteomic analysis of Brugia malayi adult female protein extracts confirmed the presence of two lipoproteins, previously predicted through bioinformatics: Wolbachia peptidoglycan associated lipoprotein (wBmPAL) and the Type IV Secretion System component, VirB6 (wBmVirB6). wBmPAL was among the most abundant Wolbachia proteins present in an extract of adult female worms with wBmVirB6 only detected at a much lower abundance. This differential abundance was reflected in the immunogold-labelling, which showed wBmPAL localised at numerous sites within the bacterial membranes, whereas wBmVirB6 was present as a single cluster on each bacterial cell and also located within the bacterial membranes. Immunoblotting of fractionated extracts confirmed the localisation of wBmPAL to membranes and its absence from cytosolic fractions of C6/36 mosquito cells infected with wAlbB. In whole worm mounts, antibody labelling of both lipoproteins were associated with Wolbachia. Serological analysis showed that both proteins were immunogenic and raised antibody responses in the majority of individuals infected with Wuchereria bancrofti. Two Wolbachia lipoproteins, wBmPAL and wBmVirB6, are present in extracts of Brugia malayi with wBmPAL among the most abundant of Wolbachia proteins. Both lipoproteins localised to bacterial membranes with wBmVirB6 present as a single cluster suggesting a single Type IV Secretory System on each Wolbachia cell.

  19. Lipoprotein Apheresis for Lipoprotein(a)-Associated Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roeseler, Eberhard; Julius, Ulrich; Heigl, Franz

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lipoprotein(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia (Lp(a)-HLP) along with progressive cardiovascular disease has been approved as indication for regular lipoprotein apheresis (LA) in Germany since 2008. We aimed to study the long-term preventive effect of LA and to assess hypothetical clinical correl...

  20. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Gram-Negative Lipoprotein Trafficking Discovered by Phenotypic Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul R.; MacCormack, Kathleen; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Whiteaker, James D.; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Tokuda, Hajime; Miller, Alita A.

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins are transported to the outer membrane by the Lol system. In this process, lipoproteins are released from the inner membrane by the ABC transporter LolCDE and passed to LolA, a diffusible periplasmic molecular chaperone. Lipoproteins are then transferred to the outer membrane receptor protein, LolB, for insertion in the outer membrane. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of novel pyridineimidazole compounds that inhibit this process. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to the pyridineimidazoles show no cross-resistance to other classes of antibiotics and map to either the LolC or LolE protein of the LolCDE transporter complex. The pyridineimidazoles were shown to inhibit the LolA-dependent release of the lipoprotein Lpp from E. coli spheroplasts. These results combined with bacterial cytological profiling are consistent with LolCDE-mediated disruption of lipoprotein targeting to the outer membrane as the mode of action of these pyridineimidazoles. The pyridineimidazoles are the first reported inhibitors of the LolCDE complex, a target which has never been exploited for therapeutic intervention. These compounds open the door to further interrogation of the outer membrane lipoprotein transport pathway as a target for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:25583975

  1. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves...

  2. Lipoprotein metabolism indicators improve cardiovascular risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, D.B. van; Graaf, A.A. de; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Parnell, L.D.; Werff-van der Vat, B.J.C. van der; Ommen, B. van; Greef, J. van der; Ordovás, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease risk increases when lipoprotein metabolism is dysfunctional. We have developed a computational model able to derive indicators of lipoprotein production, lipolysis, and uptake processes from a single lipoprotein profile measurement. This is the first study to inves

  3. Genetics of non-conventional lipoprotein fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoprotein subclass measures associate with cardiometabolic disease risk. Currently the information that lipoproteins convey on disease risk over that of traditional demographic and lipid measures is minimal, and so their use is clinics is limited. However, lipoprotein subclass perturbations repres...

  4. Physiological regulation of lipoprotein lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL), originally identified as the clearing factor lipase, hydrolyzes triglycerides present in the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins VLDL and chylomicrons. LPL is primarily expressed in tissues that oxidize or store fatty acids in large quantities such as the heart, skele

  5. Congenital β-lipoprotein deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchem, F.S.P. van; Pol, G.; Gier, J. de; Böttcher, C.J.F.; Pries, C.

    1966-01-01

    There are several degrees of β-lipoprotein deficiency. If there is no β-lipoprotein present, or if there are only traces of it, the Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome develops. A constant feature of this syndrome is disturbed fat absorption with accumulation of fat in the epithelium of intestinal mucosa and

  6. A plant plasma membrane Ca2+ pump is required for normal pollen tube growth and fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtt, Morten; Romanowsky, Shawn M; Bækgaard, Lone

    2004-01-01

    Ca(2+) signals are thought to play important roles in plant growth and development, including key aspects of pollen tube growth and fertilization. The dynamics of a Ca(2+) signal are largely controlled by influx (through channels) and efflux (through pumps and antiporters). The Arabidopsis genome...... and a high frequency of aborted fertilization, resulting in a >80% reduction in seed set. These findings identify a plasma membrane Ca(2+) transporter as a key regulator of pollen development and fertilization in flowering plants....

  7. Evaluation of membrane bioreactor process capabilities to meet stringent effluent nutrient discharge requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Edwin J; Broderick, Thomas A; Daigger, Glen T; Fonseca, Anabela D; Holbrook, R David; Murthy, Sudhir N

    2005-01-01

    A six-stage membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was operated to determine and demonstrate the capability of this process to produce a low-nutrient effluent, consistent with the nutrient reduction goals for the Chesapeake Bay. Biological nitrogen removal was accomplished using a multistage configuration with an initial anoxic zone (using the carbon in the influent wastewater), an aerobic zone (where nitrification occurred), a downstream anoxic zone (where methanol was added as a carbon source), and the aerated submerged membrane zone. The capability to reliably reduce effluent total nitrogen to less than 3 mg/L as nitrogen (N) was demonstrated. A combination of biological (using an initial anaerobic zone) and chemical (using alum) phosphorus removal was used to achieve effluent total phosphate concentrations reliably less than 0.1 mg/L as phosphorus (P) and as low as 0.03 mg/L as P. Alum addition also appeared to enhance the filtration characteristics of the MBR sludge and to reduce membrane fouling. Aeration of the submerged membranes results in thickened sludge with a high dissolved oxygen concentration (approaching saturation), which can be recycled to the main aeration zone rather than to an anoxic or anaerobic zone to optimize biological nutrient removal. Biological nutrient removal was characterized using the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d. The stoichiometry of chemical phosphorus removal was also consistent with conventional theory and experience. The characteristics of the solids produced in the MBR were compared with those of a parallel full-scale conventional biological nitrogen removal process and were generally found to be similar. These results provide valuable insight to the design and operating characteristics of MBRs intended to produce effluents with very low nutrient concentrations.

  8. Requirements on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data for membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Daniel; Reckel, Sina; Dötsch, Volker; Güntert, Peter

    2012-06-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure calculations of the α-helical integral membrane proteins DsbB, GlpG, and halorhodopsin show that distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) can provide sufficient structural information to determine their structure with an accuracy of about 1.5 Å in the absence of other long-range conformational restraints. Our systematic study with simulated NMR data shows that about one spin label per transmembrane helix is necessary for obtaining enough PRE distance restraints to exclude wrong topologies, such as pseudo mirror images, if only limited other NMR restraints are available. Consequently, an experimentally realistic amount of PRE data enables α-helical membrane protein structure determinations that would not be feasible with the very limited amount of conventional NOESY data normally available for these systems. These findings are in line with our recent first de novo NMR structure determination of a heptahelical integral membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, that relied extensively on PRE data.

  9. N-terminal palmitoylation is required for Toxoplasma gondii HSP20 inner membrane complex localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M G; de Miguel, N; Lebrun, M; Moreno, S N J; Angel, S O; Corvi, M M

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Protein palmitoylation is known to play roles in signal transduction and in enhancing the hydrophobicity of proteins thus contributing to their membrane association. Global inhibition of protein palmitoylation has been shown to affect T. gondii physiology and invasion of the host cell. However, the proteins affected by this modification have been understudied. This paper shows that the small heat shock protein 20 from T. gondii (TgHSP20) is synthesized as a mature protein in the cytosol and is palmitoylated in three cysteine residues. However, its localization at the inner membrane complex (IMC) is dependent only on N-terminal palmitoylation. Absence or incomplete N-terminal palmitoylation causes TgHSP20 to partially accumulate in a membranous structure. Interestingly, TgHSP20 palmitoylation is not responsible for its interaction with the daughter cells IMCs. Together, our data describe the importance of palmitoylation in protein targeting to the IMC in T. gondii.

  10. Characterization and Purification of Polydisperse Reconstituted Lipoproteins and Nanolipoprotein Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Hoeprich

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is a fact that plagues the characterization and application of many self-assembled biological constructs. The importance of obtaining particle homogeneity in biological assemblies is a critical goal, as bulk analysis tools often require identical species for reliable interpretation of the results—indeed, important tools of analysis such as x-ray diffraction typically require over 90% purity for effectiveness. This issue bears particular importance in the case of lipoproteins. Lipid-binding proteins known as apolipoproteins can self assemble with liposomes to form reconstituted high density lipoproteins (rHDLs or nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs when used for biotechnology applications such as the solubilization of membrane proteins. Typically, the apolipoprotein and phospholipids reactants are self assembled and even with careful assembly protocols the product often contains heterogeneous particles. In fact, size polydispersity in rHDLs and NLPs published in the literature are frequently observed, which may confound the accurate use of analytical methods. In this article, we demonstrate a procedure for producing a pure, monodisperse NLP subpopulation from a polydisperse self-assembly using size exclusion chromatography (SEC coupled with high resolution particle imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM. In addition, NLPs have been shown to self assemble both in the presence and absence of detergents such as cholate, yet the effects of cholate on NLP polydispersity and separation has not been systematically examined. Therefore, we examined the separation properties of NLPs assembled in both the absence and presence of cholate using SEC and native gel electrophoresis. From this analysis, NLPs prepared with and without cholate showed particles with well defined diameters spanning a similar size range. However, cholate was shown to have a dramatic affect on NLP separation by SEC and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, under

  11. Golgi membrane fission requires the CtBP1-S/BARS-induced activation of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase δ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliuso, Alessandro; Valente, Carmen; Giordano, Lucia Laura; Filograna, Angela; Li, Guiling; Circolo, Diego; Turacchio, Gabriele; Marzullo, Vincenzo Manuel; Mandrich, Luigi; Zhukovsky, Mikhail A; Formiggini, Fabio; Polishchuk, Roman S; Corda, Daniela; Luini, Alberto

    2016-07-12

    Membrane fission is an essential cellular process by which continuous membranes split into separate parts. We have previously identified CtBP1-S/BARS (BARS) as a key component of a protein complex that is required for fission of several endomembranes, including basolateral post-Golgi transport carriers. Assembly of this complex occurs at the Golgi apparatus, where BARS binds to the phosphoinositide kinase PI4KIIIβ through a 14-3-3γ dimer, as well as to ARF and the PKD and PAK kinases. We now report that, when incorporated into this complex, BARS binds to and activates a trans-Golgi lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acyltransferase type δ (LPAATδ) that converts LPA into phosphatidic acid (PA); and that this reaction is essential for fission of the carriers. LPA and PA have unique biophysical properties, and their interconversion might facilitate the fission process either directly or indirectly (via recruitment of proteins that bind to PA, including BARS itself).

  12. Changes in lipoprotein kinetics associated with type 2 diabetes affect the distribution of lipopolysaccharides among lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergès, Bruno; Duvillard, Laurence; Lagrost, Laurent; Vachoux, Christelle; Garret, Céline; Bouyer, Karine; Courtney, Michael; Pomié, Céline; Burcelin, Rémy

    2014-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are inflammatory components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and, in plasma, are mostly associated with lipoproteins. This association is thought to promote their catabolism while reducing their proinflammatory effects. Our aim was to determine the impact of lipoprotein kinetics on plasma LPS distribution and how it may affect patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We performed a kinetic study in 30 individuals (16 T2DM patients, 14 controls) and analyzed the impact of changes in lipoprotein kinetics on LPS distribution among lipoproteins. Plasma LPS levels in T2DM patients were not different from those in controls, but LPS distribution in the two groups was different. Patients with T2DM had higher LPS-very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL; 31% ± 7% vs 22% ± 11%, P = .002), LPS-high-density lipoprotein (HDL; 29% ± 9% vs 19% ± 10%, P = .015), free (nonlipoprotein bound) LPS (10% ± 4% vs 7% ± 4%, P = .043) and lower LPS-low-density lipoprotein (LDL; 30% ± 13% vs 52% ± 16%, P = .001). In multivariable analysis, VLDL-LPS was associated with HDL-LPS (P < .0001); LDL-LPS was associated with VLDL-LPS (P = .004), and VLDL apolipoprotein (apo) B100 catabolism (P = .002); HDL-LPS was associated with free LPS (P < .0001) and VLDL-LPS (P = .033); free LPS was associated with HDL-LPS (P < .0001). In a patient featuring a dramatic decrease in VLDL catabolism due to apoA-V mutation, LDL-LPS was severely decreased (0.044 EU/mL vs 0.788 EU/mL in controls). The difference between T2DM patients and controls for LDL-LPS fraction was no longer significant after controlling for VLDL apoB100 total fractional catabolic rate. Our data suggest that in humans, free LPS transfers first to HDL and then to VLDL, whereas the LPS-bound LDL fraction is mainly derived from VLDL catabolism; the latter may hence represent a LPS catabolic pathway. T2DM patients show lower LDL-LPS secondary to reduced VLDL catabolism, which may represent an

  13. Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein is involved in selective lipoprotein endocytosis and parasite replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Maria R; Miras, Silvana L; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Rópolo, Andrea S; Touz, Maria C

    2011-03-01

    As Giardia lamblia is unable to synthesize cholesterol de novo, this steroid might be obtained from the host's intestinal milieu by endocytosis of lipoproteins. In this work, we identified a putative Giardia lamblia low-density lipoprotein receptor-related proteins (GlLRP), a type I membrane protein, which shares the substrate N-terminal binding domain and a FXNPXY-type endocytic motif with human LRPs. Expression of tagged GlLRP showed that it was localized predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomal-like peripheral vacuoles and plasma membrane. However, the FXNPXY-deleted GlLRP was retained at the plasma membrane suggesting that it is abnormally transported and processed. The low-density lipoprotein and chylomicrons interacted with GlLRP, with this interaction being necessary for lipoprotein internalization and cell proliferation. Finally, we show that GlLRP binds directly to the medium subunit of Giardia adaptor protein 2, indicating that receptor-mediated internalization occurs through an adaptin mechanism.

  14. Sialic acid is required for neuronal inhibition by soluble MAG but not for membrane bound MAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najat eAl-Bashir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein (MAG, a major inhibitor of axonal growth, is a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig super-family. Importantly, MAG (also known as Siglec-4 is a member of the Siglec family of proteins (sialic acid-binding, immunoglobulin-like lectins, MAG binds to complex gangliosides, specifically GD1a and/or GT1b. Therefore, it has been proposed as neuronal receptors for MAG inhibitory effect of axonal growth. Previously, we showed that MAG binds sialic acid through domain 1 at Arg118 and is able to inhibit axonal growth through domain 5.We developed a neurite outgrowth assay (NOG, in which both wild type MAG and mutated MAG (MAG Arg118 are expressed on cells. In addition we also developed a soluble form NOG in which we utilized soluble MAG-Fc and mutated MAG (Arg118-Fc. Only MAG-Fc is able to inhibit neurite outgrowth, but not mutated MAG (Arg118-Fc that has been mutated at its sialic acid binding site. However, both forms of membrane bound MAG- and MAG (Arg118- expressing cells still inhibit neurite outgrowth. Here, we review various results from different groups regarding MAG’s inhibition of axonal growth. Also, we propose a model in which the sialic acid binding is not necessary for the inhibition induced by the membrane form of MAG, but it is necessary for the soluble form of MAG. This finding highlights the importance of understanding the different mechanisms by which MAG inhibits neurite outgrowth in both the soluble fragmented form and the membrane-bound form in myelin debris following CNS damage

  15. Carrier subunit of plasma membrane transporter is required for oxidative folding of its helper subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Mònica; Chillarón, Josep

    2012-05-25

    We study the amino acid transport system b(0,+) as a model for folding, assembly, and early traffic of membrane protein complexes. System b(0,+) is made of two disulfide-linked membrane subunits: the carrier, b(0,+) amino acid transporter (b(0,+)AT), a polytopic protein, and the helper, related to b(0,+) amino acid transporter (rBAT), a type II glycoprotein. rBAT ectodomain mutants display folding/trafficking defects that lead to type I cystinuria. Here we show that, in the presence of b(0,+)AT, three disulfides were formed in the rBAT ectodomain. Disulfides Cys-242-Cys-273 and Cys-571-Cys-666 were essential for biogenesis. Cys-673-Cys-685 was dispensable, but the single mutants C673S, and C685S showed compromised stability and trafficking. Cys-242-Cys-273 likely was the first disulfide to form, and unpaired Cys-242 or Cys-273 disrupted oxidative folding. Strikingly, unassembled rBAT was found as an ensemble of different redox species, mainly monomeric. The ensemble did not change upon inhibition of rBAT degradation. Overall, these results indicated a b(0,+)AT-dependent oxidative folding of the rBAT ectodomain, with the initial and probably cotranslational formation of Cys-242-Cys-273, followed by the oxidation of Cys-571-Cys-666 and Cys-673-Cys-685, that was completed posttranslationally.

  16. Carrier Subunit of Plasma Membrane Transporter Is Required for Oxidative Folding of Its Helper Subunit*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Mònica; Chillarón, Josep

    2012-01-01

    We study the amino acid transport system b0,+ as a model for folding, assembly, and early traffic of membrane protein complexes. System b0,+ is made of two disulfide-linked membrane subunits: the carrier, b0,+ amino acid transporter (b0,+AT), a polytopic protein, and the helper, related to b0,+ amino acid transporter (rBAT), a type II glycoprotein. rBAT ectodomain mutants display folding/trafficking defects that lead to type I cystinuria. Here we show that, in the presence of b0,+AT, three disulfides were formed in the rBAT ectodomain. Disulfides Cys-242-Cys-273 and Cys-571-Cys-666 were essential for biogenesis. Cys-673-Cys-685 was dispensable, but the single mutants C673S, and C685S showed compromised stability and trafficking. Cys-242-Cys-273 likely was the first disulfide to form, and unpaired Cys-242 or Cys-273 disrupted oxidative folding. Strikingly, unassembled rBAT was found as an ensemble of different redox species, mainly monomeric. The ensemble did not change upon inhibition of rBAT degradation. Overall, these results indicated a b0,+AT-dependent oxidative folding of the rBAT ectodomain, with the initial and probably cotranslational formation of Cys-242-Cys-273, followed by the oxidation of Cys-571-Cys-666 and Cys-673-Cys-685, that was completed posttranslationally. PMID:22493502

  17. Severe Tumor Lysis Syndrome and Acute Pulmonary Edema Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Following Initiation of Chemotherapy for Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Ethan; Wolbrink, Traci; Mack, Jennifer; Rowe, R Grant

    2016-05-01

    We present an 8-year-old male with metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) who developed precipitous cardiopulmonary collapse with severe tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) 48 hr after initiation of chemotherapy. Despite no detectable pulmonary metastases, acute hypoxemic respiratory failure developed, requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Although TLS has been reported in disseminated ARMS, this singular case of life-threatening respiratory deterioration developing after initiation of chemotherapy presented unique therapeutic dilemmas. We review the clinical aspects of this case, including possible mechanisms of respiratory failure, and discuss the role of ECMO utilization in pediatric oncology.

  18. H3N2 Virus as Causative Agent of ARDS Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Peris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pandemic influenza virus A(H1N1 2009 was associated with a higher risk of viral pneumonia in comparison with seasonal influenza viruses. The influenza season 2011-2012 was characterized by the prevalent circulation of influenza A(H3N2 viruses. Whereas most H3N2 patients experienced mild, self-limited influenza-like illness, some patients were at increased risk for influenza complications because of age or underlying medical conditions. Cases presented were patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of ECMO referral center (Careggi Teaching Hospital, Florence, Italy. Despite extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment (ECMO, one patient with H3N2-induced ARDS did not survive. Our experience suggests that viral aetiology is becoming more important and hospitals should be able to perform a fast differential diagnosis between bacterial and viral aetiology.

  19. FadD Is Required for Utilization of Endogenous Fatty Acids Released from Membrane Lipids ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-Canul, Ángel; Nogales, Joaquina; Miranda-Molina, Alfonso; Álvarez, Laura; Geiger, Otto; Soto, María José; López-Lara, Isabel M.

    2011-01-01

    FadD is an acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase responsible for the activation of exogenous long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) into acyl-CoAs. Mutation of fadD in the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti promotes swarming motility and leads to defects in nodulation of alfalfa plants. In this study, we found that S. meliloti fadD mutants accumulated a mixture of free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. The composition of the free fatty acid pool and the results obtained after specific labeling of esterified fatty acids with a Δ5-desaturase (Δ5-Des) were in agreement with membrane phospholipids being the origin of the released fatty acids. Escherichia coli fadD mutants also accumulated free fatty acids released from membrane lipids in the stationary phase. This phenomenon did not occur in a mutant of E. coli with a deficient FadL fatty acid transporter, suggesting that the accumulation of fatty acids in fadD mutants occurs inside the cell. Our results indicate that, besides the activation of exogenous LCFA, in bacteria FadD plays a major role in the activation of endogenous fatty acids released from membrane lipids. Furthermore, expression analysis performed with S. meliloti revealed that a functional FadD is required for the upregulation of genes involved in fatty acid degradation and suggested that in the wild-type strain, the fatty acids released from membrane lipids are degraded by β-oxidation in the stationary phase of growth. PMID:21926226

  20. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Christine M; Bronnimann, Matthew P; Manson, Ariana R; Li, Shuaizhi; Chapman, Janice A; Suarez-Berumen, Marcela; Williamson, Tatum R; Molugu, Sudheer K; Bernal, Ricardo A; Campos, Samuel K

    2017-05-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA) traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  1. Respiratory Failure Secondary to Human Metapneumovirus Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a 32-Month-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (HMPV is a common virus that can cause respiratory problems ranging from mild upper respiratory tract disease to respiratory failure requiring mechanical support. Here, we report a case of a 32-month-old male with a previous history of asthma, who developed respiratory failure two weeks after onset of cough and rhinorrhea and required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO for 9 days after failing high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV. To our knowledge, this is the oldest reported pediatric patient with respiratory failure secondary to human metapneumovirus that did not respond to mechanical ventilation. This case highlights three critical points: the potentially fatal causative role of HMPV in respiratory failure in an older pediatric age group of immunocompetent hosts, the importance of early recognition of impending respiratory failure, and the timely utilization of ECMO.

  2. Lifecycle of a Lipoprotein from a Biophysical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, John C.; Huser, Thomas; Voss, John; Chan, James; Parikh, Atul

    The goal of our project was to understand how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes. This chapter will present the five major areas in which we have focused our attention on understanding how lipids and lipoproteins interact with cell membranes (Fig. 11.1): (1) triglycerides and vascular injury, (2) single lipoprotein analysis, (3) apolipoprotein E (apoE) conformation changes in the postprandial state, (4) triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs) and endothelial cell inflammation, and (5) TGRL lipolysis products and monocyte activation. For over a hundred years, Western civilization has questioned how the food we eat translates into disease, and specifically atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although most information indicates that this basic pathophysiological process is mediated through consumption of excess saturated fats, much remains unknown. After humans eat a meal, there is an elevation of triglycerides in the blood in the postprandial state. In normal individuals, triglycerides can rise after a meal by 50 to 100%. This has been documented many times in the past, including a paper by Hyson et al, (1998) [1]. In that study, normal healthy individuals were given a 40%-fat meal. Plasma triglycerides, which were modestly elevated initially, rose about 60% higher three to four hours after ingestion of the meal. Subsequently plasma triglycerides fell to baseline levels six hours after the meal. Even in these healthy individuals, a significant elevation of triglycerides was noted after ingestion of a moder ately high-fat meal.

  3. Electrostatically induced recruitment of membrane peptides into clusters requires ligand binding at both interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri N Antonenko

    Full Text Available Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin. Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility D(PLL and (ii by an increased lifetime τ(PLL of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither D(PLL nor τ(P changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors.

  4. The integral membrane protein SEN1 is required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation in Lotus japonicus nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoyama, Tsuneo; Niimi, Kaori; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Isobe, Sawa; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Kumagai, Hirotaka; Umehara, Yosuke; Brossuleit, Katja; Petersen, Thomas R; Sandal, Niels; Stougaard, Jens; Udvardi, Michael K; Tamaoki, Masanori; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Suganuma, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Legume plants establish a symbiotic association with bacteria called rhizobia, resulting in the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. A Lotus japonicus symbiotic mutant, sen1, forms nodules that are infected by rhizobia but that do not fix nitrogen. Here, we report molecular identification of the causal gene, SEN1, by map-based cloning. The SEN1 gene encodes an integral membrane protein homologous to Glycine max nodulin-21, and also to CCC1, a vacuolar iron/manganese transporter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and VIT1, a vacuolar iron transporter of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of the SEN1 gene was detected exclusively in nodule-infected cells and increased during nodule development. Nif gene expression as well as the presence of nitrogenase proteins was detected in rhizobia from sen1 nodules, although the levels of expression were low compared with those from wild-type nodules. Microscopic observations revealed that symbiosome and/or bacteroid differentiation are impaired in the sen1 nodules even at a very early stage of nodule development. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that SEN1 belongs to a protein clade specific to legumes. These results indicate that SEN1 is essential for nitrogen fixation activity and symbiosome/bacteroid differentiation in legume nodules.

  5. Synthetic Lipoproteins as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lipoprotein is an effective carrier of targeted delivery for drugs. It has the very small size, good biocompatibility, suitable half-life, and specific lipoprotein receptorbinding capacity. Compared with the traditional natural lipoprotein, synthetic lipoprotein not only retains the original biological characteristics and functions, but also exhibits the excellent characteristics in drug delivery. Herein, the advantages, development, applications, and prospect of synthetic lipoproteins as drug carriers were summarized.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  7. Klebsiella pneumoniae outer membrane protein A is required to prevent the activation of airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Catalina; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Llobet, Enrique; Tomás, Anna; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2011-03-25

    Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is a class of proteins highly conserved among the Enterobacteriaceae family and throughout evolution. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a capsulated gram-negative pathogen. It is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that K. pneumoniae infections are characterized by a lack of an early inflammatory response. Data from our laboratory indicate that K. pneumoniae CPS helps to suppress the host inflammatory response. However, it is unknown whether K. pneumoniae employs additional factors to modulate host inflammatory responses. Here, we report that K. pneumoniae OmpA is important for immune evasion in vitro and in vivo. Infection of A549 and normal human bronchial cells with 52OmpA2, an ompA mutant, increased the levels of IL-8. 52145-Δwca(K2)ompA, which does not express CPS and ompA, induced the highest levels of IL-8. Both mutants could be complemented. In vivo, 52OmpA2 induced higher levels of tnfα, kc, and il6 than the wild type. ompA mutants activated NF-κB, and the phosphorylation of p38, p44/42, and JNK MAPKs and IL-8 induction was via NF-κB-dependent and p38- and p44/42-dependent pathways. 52OmpA2 engaged TLR2 and -4 to activate NF-κB, whereas 52145-Δwca(K2)ompA activated not only TLR2 and TLR4 but also NOD1. Finally, we demonstrate that the ompA mutant is attenuated in the pneumonia mouse model. The results of this study indicate that K. pneumoniae OmpA contributes to attenuate airway cell responses. This may facilitate pathogen survival in the hostile environment of the lung.

  8. Lipoproteins, cholesterol homeostasis and cardiac health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler F. Daniels, Karen M. Killinger, Jennifer J. Michal, Raymond W. Wright Jr., Zhihua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential substance involved in many functions, such as maintaining cell membranes, manufacturing vitamin D on surface of the skin, producing hormones, and possibly helping cell connections in the brain. When cholesterol levels rise in the blood, they can, however, have dangerous consequences. In particular, cholesterol has generated considerable notoriety for its causative role in atherosclerosis, the leading cause of death in developed countries around the world. Homeostasis of cholesterol is centered on the metabolism of lipoproteins, which mediate transport of the lipid to and from tissues. As a synopsis of the major events and proteins that manage lipoprotein homeostasis, this review contributes to the substantial attention that has recently been directed to this area. Despite intense scrutiny, the majority of phenotypic variation in total cholesterol and related traits eludes explanation by current genetic knowledge. This is somewhat disappointing considering heritability estimates have established these traits as highly genetic. Thus, the continued search for candidate genes, mutations, and mechanisms is vital to our understanding of heart disease at the molecular level. Furthermore, as marker development continues to predict risk of vascular illness, this knowledge has the potential to revolutionize treatment of this leading human disease.

  9. The ppm operon is essential for acylation and glycosylation of lipoproteins in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Mohiman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to their contribution to bacterial virulence, lipoproteins and members of the lipoprotein biogenesis pathway represent potent drug targets. Following translocation across the inner membrane, lipoprotein precursors are acylated by lipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt, cleaved off their signal peptides by lipoprotein signal peptidase (Lsp and, in Gram-negative bacteria, further triacylated by lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt. The existence of an active apolipoprotein N-acyltransferase (Ms-Ppm2 involved in the N-acylation of LppX was recently reported in M. smegmatis. Ms-Ppm2 is part of the ppm operon in which Ppm1, a polyprenol-monophosphomannose synthase, has been shown to be essential in lipoglycans synthesis but whose function in lipoprotein biosynthesis is completely unknown. RESULTS: In order to clarify the role of the ppm operon in lipoprotein biosynthesis, we investigated the post-translational modifications of two model lipoproteins (AmyE and LppX in C. glutamicum Δppm1 and Δppm2 mutants. Our results show that both proteins are anchored into the membrane and that their N-termini are N-acylated by Cg-Ppm2. The acylated N-terminal peptide of LppX was also found to be modified by hexose moieties. This O-glycosylation is localized in the N-terminal peptide of LppX and disappeared in the Δppm1 mutant. While compromised in the absence of Cg-Ppm2, LppX O-glycosylation could be restored when Cg-Ppm1, Cg-Ppm2 or the homologous Mt-Ppm1 of M. tuberculosis was overexpressed. CONCLUSION: Together, these results show for the first time that Cg-Ppm1 (Ppm synthase and Cg-Ppm2 (Lnt operate in a common biosynthetic pathway in which lipoprotein N-acylation and glycosylation are tightly coupled.

  10. What are lipoproteins doing in the brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins in plasma transport lipids between tissues, however, only high-density lipoproteins (HDL) appear to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB); thus, lipoproteins found in the brain must be produced within the central nervous system. Apolipoproteins E (ApoE) and ApoJ are the most abundant apolipoproteins in the brain, are mostly synthesized by astrocytes, and are found on HDL. In the hippocampus and other brain regions, lipoproteins help to regulate neurobehavioral functions by processes that are lipoprotein receptor-mediated. Moreover, lipoproteins and their receptors also have roles in the regulation of body weight and energy balance, acting through lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (LRP). Thus, understanding lipoproteins and their metabolism in the brain provides a new opportunity with potential therapeutic relevance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reactivation of DNA replication in nuclei from terminally differentiated cells: nuclear membrane permeabilization is required for initiation in Xenopus egg extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leno, G H; Munshi, R

    1997-05-01

    We have used Xenopus egg extract to investigate the requirements for reactivation of DNA replication in nuclei isolated from terminally differentiated chicken erythrocytes. Previous work has shown that reactivation of erythrocyte nuclei in egg extract is accompanied by chromatin decondensation, nuclear envelope reformation, and the accumulation of egg lamin, LIII. However, in those studies, erythrocyte nuclei were prepared by methods that were not designed to maintain the selective permeability of the nuclear membrane, and as such, it is not clear if loss of nuclear membrane integrity played a role in the reactivation process. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if changes in nuclear membrane permeability are required for reactivation of erythrocyte nuclei in egg extract. Nuclei with intact nuclear membranes were prepared from erythrocytes with streptolysin O and permeable nuclei by treatment of intact nuclei with the detergent Nonidet-P40. Like permeable nuclei, most intact nuclei decondensed, imported nuclear protein, and accumulated lamin LIII from the extract. However, unlike permeable nuclei, which replicated extensively in the extract, few intact nuclei initiated replication under the same conditions. These data demonstrate that permeabilization of the nuclear membrane is required for reactivation of DNA replication in terminally differentiated erythrocyte nuclei by egg extract and suggest that loss of nuclear membrane integrity may be a general requirement for replication of quiescent cell nuclei by this system.

  12. RAB-5- and RAB-11-dependent vesicle-trafficking pathways are required for plasma membrane repair after attack by bacterial pore-forming toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Ferdinand C O; Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Smitham, Jane; McDonald, Kent L; Ha, Christine; Peixoto, Christina A; Aroian, Raffi V

    2011-02-17

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) secreted by pathogenic bacteria are the most common bacterial protein toxins and are important virulence factors for infection. PFTs punch holes in host cell plasma membranes, and although cells can counteract the resulting membrane damage, the underlying mechanisms at play remain unclear. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, we demonstrate in vivo and in an intact epithelium that intestinal cells respond to PFTs by increasing levels of endocytosis, dependent upon RAB-5 and RAB-11, which are master regulators of endocytic and exocytic events. Furthermore, we find that RAB-5 and RAB-11 are required for protection against PFT and to restore integrity to the plasma membrane. One physical mechanism involved is the RAB-11-dependent expulsion of microvilli from the apical side of the intestinal epithelial cells. Specific vesicle-trafficking pathways thus protect cells against an attack by PFTs on plasma membrane integrity, via altered plasma membrane dynamics.

  13. Structural requirements of organophosphorus insecticides (OPI) to inhibit chicken yolk sac membrane kynurenine formamidase related to OPI teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Josef

    2013-03-01

    This paper provides new information related to the mechanism of OPI (organophosphorus insecticides) teratogenesis. The COMFA (comparative molecular field analysis) and COMSIA (comparative molecular similarity indices analysis) suggest that the electrostatic and steric fields are the best predictors of OPI structural requirements to inhibit in ovo chicken embryo yolk sac membrane kynurenine formamidase, the proposed target for OPI teratogens. The dominant electrostatic interactions are localized at nitrogen-1, nitrogen-3, nitrogen of 2-amino substituent of the pyrimidinyl of pyrimidinyl phosphorothioates, and the oxygen of crotonamide carbonyl in crotonamide phosphates. Bulkiness of the substituents at carbon-2 and carbon-6 of the pyrimidinyls and/or N-substituents and carbon-3 substituents of crotonamides are the steric structural components that contribute to superiority of those OPI as in ovo inhibitors of kynurenine formamidase.

  14. A membrane-proximal, C-terminal α-helix is required for plasma membrane localization and function of the G Protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) TGR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spomer, Lina; Gertzen, Christoph G W; Schmitz, Birte; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger; Keitel, Verena

    2014-02-07

    The C terminus of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important for G protein-coupling and activation; in addition, sorting motifs have been identified in the C termini of several GPCRs that facilitate correct trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane. The C terminus of the GPCR TGR5 lacks any known sorting motif such that other factors must determine its trafficking. Here, we investigate deletion and substitution variants of the membrane-proximal C terminus of TGR5 with respect to plasma membrane localization and function using immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry, and luciferase assays. Peptides of the membrane-proximal C-terminal variants are subjected to molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed with respect to their secondary structure. Our results reveal that TGR5 plasma membrane localization and responsiveness to extracellular ligands is fostered by a long (≥ 9 residues) α-helical stretch at the C terminus, whereas the presence of β-strands or only a short α-helical stretch leads to retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and a loss of function. As a proof-of-principle, chimeras of TGR5 containing the membrane-proximal amino acids of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1), or the κ-type opioid receptor (κOR) were generated. These TGR5β2AR, TGR5S1P1, or TGR5κOR chimeras were correctly sorted to the plasma membrane. As the exchanged amino acids of the β2AR, the S1P1, or the κOR form α-helices in crystal structures but lack significant sequence identity to the respective TGR5 sequence, we conclude that the secondary structure of the TGR5 membrane-proximal C terminus is the determining factor for plasma membrane localization and responsiveness towards extracellular ligands.

  15. Reduced anesthetic requirements, diminished brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumping, and enhanced brain synaptic plasma membrane phospholipid methylation in diabetic rats: effects of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, P K; Horn, J L; Singh, G; Janson, V E; Franks, W T; Franks, J J

    1995-01-01

    We have recently reported that streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats was associated with i) reduced Ca2+ pumping by rat brain synaptic plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) and ii) a substantial reduction in the partial pressures of halothane and xenon required to prevent movement in response to stimulation (minimum effective dose or MED). MED for both agents correlated well with the degree of hemoglobin glycation and with PMCA activity. We now report that MEDs for isoflurane, enflurane, and desflurane were also substantially reduced in STZ-diabetic rats, compared with placebo-injected controls. In addition, we examined the effect of insulin treatment, begun 2 weeks after induction of diabetes and continued for 3 more weeks, on isoflurane MED and on brain synaptic PMCA and phospholipid-N-methyltransferase I (PLMT I), another enzyme altered by inhalation anesthetics (IA). Partial treatment of diabetes, as indicated by decreased glycated hemoglobin (GHb) compared to untreated diabetic rats, was associated with an isoflurane MED of 1.05 vol%, intermediate between a control mean of 1.57 vol% and an untreated diabetic mean of 0.82 vol% (p SPM from diabetic rats did not differ from control values, but PMCA pumping in SPM from the D-M was reduced to about 85% of control levels. Good correlation (r = 0.89, p < 0.01) was found between isoflurane MED and GHb in all treatment groups. These findings provide further evidence for an important role for PMCA in IA action. They also suggest that anesthetic effects on the calcium pump at specific anatomic sites may be of major importance in producing anesthesia.

  16. Classifying lipoproteins based on their polar profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Uversky, Vladimir N; Amkie, Rafael Zonana

    2016-01-01

    The lipoproteins are an important group of cargo proteins known for their unique capability to transport lipids. By applying the Polarity index algorithm, which has a metric that only considers the polar profile of the linear sequences of the lipoprotein group, we obtained an analytical and structural differentiation of all the lipoproteins found in UniProt Database. Also, the functional groups of lipoproteins, and particularly of the set of lipoproteins relevant to atherosclerosis, were analyzed with the same method to reveal their structural preference, and the results of Polarity index analysis were verified by an alternate test, the Cumulative Distribution Function algorithm, applied to the same groups of lipoproteins.

  17. Phosphate starvation triggers production and secretion of an extracellular lipoprotein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Le Blastier

    Full Text Available Life in oligotrophic environments necessitates quick adaptive responses to a sudden lack of nutrients. Secretion of specific degradative enzymes into the extracellular medium is a means to mobilize the required nutrient from nearby sources. The aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus must often face changes in its environment such as phosphate limitation. Evidence reported in this paper indicates that under phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces a membrane surface-anchored lipoprotein named ElpS subsequently released into the extracellular medium. A complete set of 12 genes encoding a type II secretion system (T2SS is located adjacent to the elpS locus in the C. crescentus genome. Deletion of this T2SS impairs release of ElpS in the environment, which surprisingly remains present at the cell surface, indicating that the T2SS is not involved in the translocation of ElpS to the outer membrane but rather in its release. Accordingly, treatment with protease inhibitors prevents release of ElpS in the extracellular medium suggesting that ElpS secretion relies on a T2SS-secreted protease. Finally, secretion of ElpS is associated with an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in culture supernatants, suggesting a role of the secreted protein in inorganic phosphate mobilization. In conclusion, we have shown that upon phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces an outer membrane bound lipoprotein, ElpS, which is further cleaved and released in the extracellular medium in a T2SS-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ElpS is associated with an alkaline phosphatase activity, thereby allowing the bacterium to gather inorganic phosphates from a poor environment.

  18. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  19. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J (Berkeley, CA)

    2012-01-17

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  20. Transendothelial lipoprotein exchange and microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Skov; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Jensen, Kurt Svarre

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Microalbuminuria associates with increased risk of atherosclerosis in individuals without diabetes. We hypothesized that transendothelial lipoprotein exchange is elevated among such individuals, possibly explaining increased intimal lipoprotein accumulation and thus atherosclerosis....... METHODS: Using an in vivo isotope technique, transendothelial exchange of low density lipoprotein (LDL) was measured in 77 non-diabetic individuals. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-h fractional escape rate was calculated as index of transendothelial exchange. RESULTS...... transformed) plasma insulin: beta=0.6 (95% CI: 0.1-1.1); R=0.22; Plipoproteins, LDL size, body mass index, plasma volume, and use of medicine, and it was unlikely caused by altered hepatic LDL receptor expression...

  1. Single-Particle Tracking of Human Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Messieres, Michel; Ng, Abby; Duarte, Cornelio J; Remaley, Alan T; Lee, Jennifer C

    2016-01-05

    Lipoproteins, such as high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), play a critical role in heart disease. Lipoproteins vary in size and shape as well as in their apolipoprotein content. Here, we developed a new experimental framework to study freely diffusing lipoproteins from human blood, allowing analysis of even the smallest HDL with a radius of 5 nm. In an easily constructed confinement chamber, individual HDL, LDL, and VLDL particles labeled with three distinct fluorophores were simultaneously tracked by wide-field fluorescence microscopy and their sizes were determined by their motion. This technique enables studies of individual lipoproteins in solution and allows characterization of the heterogeneous properties of lipoproteins which affect their biological function but are difficult to discern in bulk studies.

  2. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy individuals with background of diabetic sibling. ... As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of ... Article Metrics.

  3. Pneumococcal lipoproteins involved in bacterial fitness, virulence, and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Sylvia; Voß, Franziska; Gómez Mejia, Alejandro; Brown, Jeremy S; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) has evolved sophisticated strategies to survive in several niches within the human body either as a harmless commensal or as a serious pathogen causing a variety of diseases. The dynamic interaction between pneumococci and resident host cells during colonization of the upper respiratory tract and at the site of infection is critical for bacterial survival and the development of disease. Pneumococcal lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins and have pivotal roles in bacterial fitness including envelope stability, cell division, nutrient acquisition, signal transduction, transport (as substrate-binding proteins of ABC transporter systems), resistance to oxidative stress and antibiotics, and protein folding. In addition, lipoproteins are directly involved in virulence-associated processes such as adhesion, colonization, and persistence through immune evasion. Conversely, lipoproteins are also targets for the host response both as ligands for toll-like receptors and as targets for acquired antibodies. This review summarizes the multifaceted roles of selected pneumococcal lipoproteins and how this knowledge can be exploited to combat pneumococcal infections. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Computational modeling of lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, Daniël Bernardus van

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis contains the following chapters. The first part, containing chapter 2 and 3 mainly concerns model development. Chapter 2 describes the development of a mathematical modeling framework within which different diagnostic models based on lipoprotein profiles can be developed, and a first

  5. Butter, margarine and serum lipoproteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, P.L.; Katan, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids unfavorably affects blood lipoproteins. As margarines are a major source of trans, claims for the advantages of margarines over butter need to be scrutinized. Here we review dietary trials that directly compared the effects of butter and margarine on blood lipids. We iden

  6. A pore-forming toxin requires a specific residue for its activity in membranes with particular physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante, Koldo; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Koji; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-04-24

    The physicochemical landscape of the bilayer modulates membrane protein function. Actinoporins are a family of potent hemolytic proteins from sea anemones acting at the membrane level. This family of cytolysins preferentially binds to target membranes containing sphingomyelin, where they form lytic pores giving rise to cell death. Although the cytolytic activity of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) is sensitive to vesicles made of various lipid compositions, it is far from clear how this toxin adjusts its mechanism of action to a broad range of physiochemical landscapes. Herein, we show that the conserved residue Phe-16 of FraC is critical for pore formation in cholesterol-rich membranes such as those of red blood cells. The interaction of a panel of muteins of Phe-16 with model membranes composed of raft-like lipid domains is inactivated in cholesterol-rich membranes but not in cholesterol-depleted membranes. These results indicate that actinoporins recognize different membrane environments, resulting in a wider repertoire of susceptible target membranes (and preys) for sea anemones. In addition, this study has unveiled promising candidates for the development of protein-based biosensors highly sensitive to the concentration of cholesterol within the membrane.

  7. Osh proteins regulate membrane sterol organization but are not required for sterol movement between the ER and PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Alexander; Sullivan, David P.; Kersting, Michael C.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Beh, Christopher T.; Menon, Anant K.

    2011-01-01

    Sterol transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane (PM) occurs by an ATP-dependent, non-vesicular mechanism that is presumed to require sterol transport proteins (STPs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologues of the mammalian oxysterol-binding protein (Osh1–7) have been proposed to function as STPs. To evaluate this proposal we took two approaches. First we used dehydroergosterol (DHE) to visualize sterol movement in living cells by fluorescence microscopy. DHE was introduced into the PM under hypoxic conditions and observed to redistribute to lipid droplets on growing the cells aerobically. Redistribution required ATP and the sterol acyltransferase Are2, but did not require PM-derived transport vesicles. DHE redistribution occurred robustly in a conditional yeast mutant (oshΔ osh4-1ts) that lacks all functional Osh proteins at 37°C. In a second approach we used a pulse-chase protocol to analyze the movement of metabolically radiolabeled ergosterol from the ER to the PM. Arrival of radiolabeled ergosterol at the PM was assessed in isolated PM-enriched fractions as well by extracting sterols from intact cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These experiments revealed that whereas ergosterol is transported effectively from the ER to the PM in Osh-deficient cells, the rate at which it moves within the PM to equilibrate with the methyl-β-cyclodextrin extractable sterol pool is slowed. We conclude (i) that the role of Osh proteins in nonvesicular sterol transport between the PM, ER and lipid droplets is either minimal, or subsumed by other mechanisms and (ii) that Osh proteins regulate the organization of sterols at the PM. PMID:21689253

  8. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. PMID:26193433

  9. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  10. OmcF, a Putative c-Type Monoheme Outer Membrane Cytochrome Required for the Expression of Other Outer Membrane Cytochromes in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Outer membrane cytochromes are often proposed as likely agents for electron transfer to extracellular electron acceptors, such as Fe(III). The omcF gene in the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganism Geobacter sulfurreducens is predicted to code for a small outer membrane monoheme c-type cytochrome. An OmcF-deficient strain was constructed, and its ability to reduce and grow on Fe(III) citrate was found to be impaired. Following a prolonged lag phase (150 h), the OmcF-deficient strain de...

  11. Lipoprotein(a) and dietary proteins: casein lowers lipoprotein(a) concentrations as compared with soy protein1-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilausen, Karin Johanne; Meinertz, H.

    1999-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a), plasma lipoproteins, dietary proteins, soy protein, casein, liquid-formula, coronary artery disease, men, Denmark......Lipoprotein(a), plasma lipoproteins, dietary proteins, soy protein, casein, liquid-formula, coronary artery disease, men, Denmark...

  12. Nanobiotechnology applications of reconstituted high density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert O

    2010-12-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) plays a fundamental role in the Reverse Cholesterol Transport pathway. Prior to maturation, nascent HDL exist as disk-shaped phospholipid bilayers whose perimeter is stabilized by amphipathic apolipoproteins. Methods have been developed to generate reconstituted (rHDL) in vitro and these particles have been used in a variety of novel ways. To differentiate between physiological HDL particles and non-natural rHDL that have been engineered to possess additional components/functions, the term nanodisk (ND) is used. In this review, various applications of ND technology are described, such as their use as miniature membranes for solubilization and characterization of integral membrane proteins in a native like conformation. In other work, ND harboring hydrophobic biomolecules/drugs have been generated and used as transport/delivery vehicles. In vitro and in vivo studies show that drug loaded ND are stable and possess potent biological activity. A third application of ND is their use as a platform for incorporation of amphiphilic chelators of contrast agents, such as gadolinium, used in magnetic resonance imaging. Thus, it is demonstrated that the basic building block of plasma HDL can be repurposed for alternate functions.

  13. Neisserial surface lipoproteins: structure, function and biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyejin E; Bateman, Thomas J; Moraes, Trevor F

    2017-03-01

    The surface of many Gram-negative bacteria contains lipidated protein molecules referred to as surface lipoproteins or SLPs. SLPs play critical roles in host immune evasion, nutrient acquisition and regulation of the bacterial stress response. The focus of this review is on the SLPs present in Neisseria, a genus of bacteria that colonise the mucosal surfaces of animals. Neisseria contains two pathogens of medical interest, namely Neisseria meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. Several SLPs have been identified in Neisseria and their study has elucidated key strategies used by these pathogens to survive inside the human body. Herein, we focus on the identification, structure and function of SLPs that have been identified in Neisseria. We also survey the translocation pathways used by these SLPs to reach the cell surface. Specifically, we elaborate on the strategies used by neisserial SLPs to translocate across the outer membrane with an emphasis on Slam, a novel outer membrane protein that has been implicated in SLP biogenesis. Taken together, the study of SLPs in Neisseria illustrates the widespread roles played by this family of proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Cysteine 70 of ankyrin-G is S-palmitoylated and is required for function of ankyrin-G in membrane domain assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meng; Jenkins, Paul; Bennett, Vann

    2012-12-21

    Ankyrin-G (AnkG) coordinates protein composition of diverse membrane domains, including epithelial lateral membranes and neuronal axon initial segments. However, how AnkG itself localizes to these membrane domains is not understood. We report that AnkG remains on the plasma membrane in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells grown in low calcium, although these cells lack apical-basal polarity and exhibit loss of plasma membrane association of AnkG partners, E-cadherin and β(2)-spectrin. We subsequently demonstrate using mutagenesis and mass spectrometry that AnkG is S-palmitoylated exclusively at Cys-70, which is located in a loop of the first ankyrin repeat and is conserved in the vertebrate ankyrin family. Moreover, C70A mutation abolishes membrane association of 190-kDa AnkG in MDCK cells grown in low calcium. C70A 190-kDa AnkG fails to restore biogenesis of epithelial lateral membranes in MDCK cells depleted of endogenous AnkG. In addition, C70A 270-kDa AnkG fails to cluster at the axon initial segment of AnkG-depleted cultured hippocampal neurons and fails to recruit neurofascin as well as voltage-gated sodium channels. These effects of C70A mutation combined with evidence for its S-palmitoylation are consistent with a requirement of palmitoylation for targeting and function of AnkG in membrane domain biogenesis at epithelial lateral membranes and neuronal axon initial segments.

  15. The Journey of Lipoproteins Through the Cell: One Birthplace, Multiple Destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, J; Collet, J-F

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a very diverse group of proteins characterized by the presence of an N-terminal lipid moiety that serves as a membrane anchor. Lipoproteins have a wide variety of crucial functions, ranging from envelope biogenesis to stress response. In Gram-negative bacteria, lipoproteins can be targeted to various destinations in the cell, including the periplasmic side of the cytoplasmic or outer membrane, the cell surface or the external milieu. The sorting mechanisms have been studied in detail in Escherichia coli, but exceptions to the rules established in this model bacterium exist in other bacteria. In this chapter, we will present the current knowledge on lipoprotein sorting in the cell. Our particular focus will be on the surface-exposed lipoproteins that appear to be much more common than previously assumed. We will discuss the different targeting strategies, provide numerous examples of surface-exposed lipoproteins and discuss the techniques used to assess their surface exposure. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  16. Physical rehabilitation of patients in the intensive care unit requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a small case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Rod A; Skrzat, Julie; Reddy, Dereddi Raja S; Zanni, Jennifer M; Fan, Eddy; Stephens, R Scott; Needham, Dale M

    2013-02-01

    Neuromuscular weakness and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting complications experienced by intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. There is growing evidence that implementing rehabilitation therapy shortly after ICU admission improves physical function and reduces health care utilization. Recently, there is increasing interest and utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to support patients with severe respiratory failure. Patients receiving ECMO are at great risk for significant physical impairments and pose unique challenges for delivering rehabilitation therapy. Consequently, there is a need for innovative examples of safely and feasibly delivering active rehabilitation to these patients. This case report describes 3 patients with respiratory failure requiring ECMO who received physical rehabilitation to illustrate and discuss relevant feasibility and safety issues. In case 1, sedation and femoral cannulation limited rehabilitation therapy while on ECMO. In the 2 subsequent cases, minimizing sedation and utilizing a single bicaval dual lumen ECMO cannula placed in the internal jugular vein allowed patients to be alert and participate in active physical therapy while on ECMO, illustrating feasible rehabilitation techniques for these patients. Although greater experience is needed to more fully evaluate the safety of rehabilitation on ECMO, these initial cases are encouraging. We recommend systematically and prospectively tracking safety events and patient outcomes during rehabilitation on ECMO to provide greater evidence in this area.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid transport between the ER and plasma membrane during PLC activation requires the Nir2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeun Ju; Guzman-Hernandez, Maria Luisa; Wisniewski, Eva; Echeverria, Nicolas; Balla, Tamas

    2016-02-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated hydrolysis of the limited pool of plasma membrane (PM) phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] requires replenishment from a larger pool of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) via sequential phosphorylation by PtdIns 4-kinases and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) 5-kinases. Since PtdIns is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and PtdIns(4,5)P2 is generated in the PM, it has been postulated that PtdIns transfer proteins (PITPs) provide the means for this lipid transfer function. Recent studies identified the large PITP protein, Nir2 as important for PtdIns transfer from the ER to the PM. It was also found that Nir2 was required for the transfer of phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) from the PM to the ER. In Nir2-depleted cells, activation of PLC leads to PtdOH accumulation in the PM and PtdIns synthesis becomes severely impaired. In quiescent cells, Nir2 is localized to the ER via interaction of its FFAT domain with ER-bound VAMP-associated proteins VAP-A and-B. After PLC activation, Nir2 also binds to the PM via interaction of its C-terminal domains with diacylglycerol (DAG) and PtdOH. Through these interactions, Nir2 functions in ER-PM contact zones. Mutations in VAP-B that have been identified in familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou-Gehrig's disease) cause aggregation of the VAP-B protein, which then impairs its binding to several proteins, including Nir2. These findings have shed new lights on the importance of non-vesicular lipid transfer of PtdIns and PtdOH in ER-PM contact zones with a possible link to a devastating human disease.

  18. Effects of hormones on lipids and lipoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.M.

    1991-12-01

    Levels of plasma lipids and lipoproteins are strong predictors for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. In women, as in men, numerous factors contribute to variations in plasma lipoproteins that may affect cardiovascular disease risk. These include age, dietary components, adiposity, genetic traits, and hormonal changes. Each of these factors may operate to varying degrees in determining changes in plasma lipoprotein profiles accompanying menopause- Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested increases in levels of cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL) and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins associated with menopause. High density lipoproteins (HDL), which are higher in women than men and are thought to contribute to relative protection of premenopausal women from cardiovascular disease, remain relatively constant in the years following menopause, although small, and perhaps transient reductions in the HDL{sub 2} subfraction have been reported in relation to reduced estradiol level following menopause. Despite these associations, it has been difficult to determine the role of endogenous hormones in influencing the plasma lipoproteins of postmenopausal women. In principle, the effects of hormone replacement should act to reverse any alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that are due to postmenopausal hormone changes. While there may be beneficial effects on lipoproteins, hormone treatment does not restore a premenopausal lipoprotein profile. Furthermore, it is not dear to what extent exogenous hormone-induced lipoprotein changes contribute to the reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease with hormone replacement therapy.

  19. Quantitative Lipoproteomics in Clostridium difficile Reveals a Role for Lipoproteins in Sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Thomas M; Kovacs-Simon, Andrea; Michell, Stephen L; Fairweather, Neil F; Tate, Edward W

    2015-11-19

    Bacterial lipoproteins are surface exposed, anchored to the membrane by S-diacylglyceryl modification of the N-terminal cysteine thiol. They play important roles in many essential cellular processes and in bacterial pathogenesis. For example, Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive anaerobe that causes severe gastrointestinal disease; however, its lipoproteome remains poorly characterized. Here we describe the application of metabolic tagging with alkyne-tagged lipid analogs, in combination with quantitative proteomics, to profile protein lipidation across diverse C. difficile strains and on inactivation of specific components of the lipoprotein biogenesis pathway. These studies provide the first comprehensive map of the C. difficile lipoproteome, demonstrate the existence of two active lipoprotein signal peptidases, and provide insights into lipoprotein function, implicating the lipoproteome in transmission of this pathogen.

  20. Lipoprotein (a: Structure, Pathophysiology and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Cavalcante Maranhão

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemical structure of lipoprotein (a is similar to that of LDL, from which it differs due to the presence of apolipoprotein (a bound to apo B100 via one disulfide bridge. Lipoprotein (a is synthesized in the liver and its plasma concentration, which can be determined by use of monoclonal antibody-based methods, ranges from 1,000 mg/dL. Lipoprotein (a levels over 20-30 mg/dL are associated with a two-fold risk of developing coronary artery disease. Usually, black subjects have higher lipoprotein (a levels that, differently from Caucasians and Orientals, are not related to coronary artery disease. However, the risk of black subjects must be considered. Sex and age have little influence on lipoprotein (a levels. Lipoprotein (a homology with plasminogen might lead to interference with the fibrinolytic cascade, accounting for an atherogenic mechanism of that lipoprotein. Nevertheless, direct deposition of lipoprotein (a on arterial wall is also a possible mechanism, lipoprotein (a being more prone to oxidation than LDL. Most prospective studies have confirmed lipoprotein (a as a predisposing factor to atherosclerosis. Statin treatment does not lower lipoprotein (a levels, differently from niacin and ezetimibe, which tend to reduce lipoprotein (a, although confirmation of ezetimibe effects is pending. The reduction in lipoprotein (a concentrations has not been demonstrated to reduce the risk for coronary artery disease. Whenever higher lipoprotein (a concentrations are found, and in the absence of more effective and well-tolerated drugs, a more strict and vigorous control of the other coronary artery disease risk factors should be sought.

  1. Association of Arabidopsis type-II ROPs with the plasma membrane requires a conserved C-terminal sequence motif and a proximal polybasic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Meirav; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2006-06-01

    Plant ROPs (or RACs) are soluble Ras-related small GTPases that are attached to cell membranes by virtue of the post-translational lipid modifications of prenylation and S-acylation. ROPs (RACs) are subdivided into two major subgroups called type-I and type-II. Whereas type-I ROPs terminate with a conserved CaaL box and undergo prenylation, type-II ROPs undergo S-acylation on two or three C-terminal cysteines. In the present work we determined the sequence requirement for association of Arabidopsis type-II ROPs with the plasma membrane. We identified a conserved sequence motif, designated the GC-CG box, in which the modified cysteines are flanked by glycines. The GC-CG box cysteines are separated by five to six mostly non-polar residues. Deletion of this sequence or the introduction of mutations that change its nature disrupted the association of ROPs with the membrane. Mutations that changed the GC-CG box glycines to alanines also interfered with membrane association. Deletion of a polybasic domain proximal to the GC-CG box disrupted the plasma membrane association of AtROP10. A green fluorescent protein fusion protein containing the C-terminal 25 residues of AtROP10, including its polybasic domain and GC-CG box, was primarily associated with the plasma membrane but a similar fusion protein lacking the polybasic domain was exclusively localized in the soluble fraction. These data provide evidence for the minimal sequence required for plasma membrane association of type-II ROPs in Arabidopsis and other plant species.

  2. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  3. Lipoprotein apheresis: present and future uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Patrick M

    2015-12-01

    For the past 40 years, apheresis, in particular, lipoprotein apheresis, has been the therapy of choice to lower LDL-C for familial hypercholesterolemia patients with uncontrolled dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. With the advent of recent and future lipid-modifying agents and their ability to lower LDL-C, the question arises on what will be the future of lipoprotein apheresis. Lipoprotein apheresis lowers not only plasma levels of apolipoprotein B lipoproteins but also markers of vascular inflammation and blood rheology. Other vascular diseases, not necessarily associated with familial hypercholesterolemia, such as nephrotic syndrome and peripheral arterial disease have profited from lipoprotein apheresis therapy. In 2013, the Food and Drug Administration approved lipoprotein apheresis therapy for patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Since 2010, the German healthcare ministry has approved lipoprotein apheresis therapy for patients with an elevated lipoprotein(a) and ongoing cardiovascular disease irrespective of LDL-C levels. Recent and future lipid-modifying therapies will most likely reduce the practice of lipoprotein apheresis therapy for familial hypercholesterolemia patients. Future implications for lipoprotein apheresis will involve vascular diseases that are at present lacking clinically effective therapy, whereas acute and chronic reductions of lipids, vascular inflammation, and/or rheology may improve the clinical outcome.

  4. Linkage between anaplasma marginale outer membrane proteins enhances immunogenicity, but is not required for protection from challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevention of bacterial infections via immunization presents particular challenges. While outer membrane extracts are often protective; they are difficult and expensive to isolate and standardize, and thus often impractical for development and implementation in vaccination programs. In contrast, ind...

  5. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  6. Outer membrane biogenesis in Helicobacter pylori: A deviation from the paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Liechti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is capable of colonizing the gastric mucosa of the human stomach using a variety of factors associated with or secreted from its outer membrane (OM. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS and numerous outer membrane proteins have been shown to be involved in adhesion and immune stimulation/evasion. Many of these factors are essential for colonization and/or pathogenesis in a variety of animal models. Despite this wide array of potential targets present on the bacterial surface, the ability of H. pylori to vary its outer membrane profile limits the effectiveness of vaccines that use any single one of these components. However, it has become evident that the proteins comprising the complexes that transport the majority of these molecules to the OM are highly conserved and often essential. The field of membrane biogenesis has progressed remarkably in the last few years, and the possibility now exists for targeting the mechanisms by which β-barrel proteins, lipoproteins, and LPS are transported to the OM, resulting in loss of bacterial fitness and significant altering of membrane permeability. In this review, the OM transport machinery for LPS, lipoproteins, and outer membrane proteins are discussed. While the principal investigations of these transport mechanisms have been conducted in Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, here these systems will be presented in the genetic context of ε- proteobacteria. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that minimalist genomes, such as that of Helicobacter pylori, offer insight into the smallest number of components required for these essential pathways to function. Interestingly, in the majority of ε-proteobacteria, while the inner and outer membrane associated apparatus of LPS, lipoprotein, and OM protein transport pathways appear to all be intact, most of the components associated with the periplasmic compartment are either missing or are almost unrecognizable when compared to

  7. Lipoprotein lipase release from BFC-1 beta adipocytes. Effects of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and lipolysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, A; Goldberg, I J

    1992-07-25

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), synthesized by adipocytes and myocytes, must be transported to the luminal endothelial cell surface where it then interacts with circulating lipoproteins. The first step in this extracellular LPL transport pathway is LPL release from the surface of LPL-synthesizing cells. Because hydrolysis of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins releases LPL from the apical surface of endothelial cells, we hypothesized that the same substances dissociate LPL from adipocytes. 125I-LPL was bound to the surface of brown adipocytes (BFC-1 beta). LPL binding to the adipocyte surface was greater than to endothelial cell surfaces. Using low concentrations of heparin, more LPL was released from endothelial cells than BFC-1 beta, suggesting that the affinity of LPL binding to the adipocytes was greater than LPL affinity for endothelial cells. Greater than 3-fold more LPL was released from the cell surface when very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) were added to culture medium containing 3% bovine serum albumin. LPL remaining on the cell surface decreased with VLDL addition. Endogenously produced LPL activity was also released from the cells by VLDL. Low and high density lipoproteins did not release 125I-LPL or LPL activity from the adipocytes. To assess whether lipolysis was necessary for LPL release, BFC-1 beta were incubated with TG-rich lipoproteins from a patient with apoCII deficiency. The apoCII-deficient lipoproteins did not release LPL unless an exogenous source of apoCII was added. Apolipoproteins E and Cs and high molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin did not release surface-associated LPL. Lysolecithin (25 and 100 microM), but not lecithin, monoglycerides, or diglycerides, released adipocyte surface LPL. Because lysolecithin also released LPL during a 4 degrees C incubation, cellular metabolic functions are not required for LPL dissociation from the cells. Lysolecithin also inhibited LPL binding to endothelial cells; however, this effect was

  8. Recent advances in physiological lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Indra

    2014-12-01

    Research into lipoprotein metabolism has developed because understanding lipoprotein metabolism has important clinical indications. Lipoproteins are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Recent advances include the identification of factors in the synthesis and secretion of triglyceride rich lipoproteins, chylomicrons (CM) and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). These included the identification of microsomal transfer protein, the cotranslational targeting of apoproteinB (apoB) for degradation regulated by the availability of lipids, and the characterization of transport vesicles transporting primordial apoB containing particles to the Golgi. The lipase maturation factor 1, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein binding protein 1 and an angiopoietin-like protein play a role in lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated hydrolysis of secreted CMs and VLDL so that the right amount of fatty acid is delivered to the right tissue at the right time. Expression of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) has a pivotal role in the degradation of LDL receptor. Plasma remnant lipoproteins bind to specific receptors in the liver, the LDL receptor, VLDL receptor and LDL receptor-like proteins prior to removal from the plasma. Reverse cholesterol transport occurs when lipid free apoAI recruits cholesterol and phospholipid to assemble high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. The discovery of ABC transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) provided further information on the biogenesis of HDL. In humans HDL-cholesterol can be returned to the liver either by direct uptake by SR-BI or through cholesteryl ester transfer protein exchange of cholesteryl ester for triglycerides in apoB lipoproteins, followed by hepatic uptake of apoB containing particles. Cholesterol content in cells is regulated by several

  9. Nuclear inner membrane fusion facilitated by yeast Jem1p is required for spindle pole body fusion but not for the first mitotic nuclear division during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Hirata, Aiko; Endo, Toshiya

    2008-11-01

    During mating of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse to produce a diploid nucleus. The process of nuclear fusion requires two J proteins, Jem1p in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and Sec63p, which forms a complex with Sec71p and Sec72p, in the ER membrane. Zygotes of mutants defective in the functions of Jem1p or Sec63p contain two haploid nuclei that were closely apposed but failed to fuse. Here we analyzed the ultrastructure of nuclei in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes using electron microscope with the freeze-substituted fixation method. Three-dimensional reconstitution of nuclear structures from electron microscope serial sections revealed that Jem1p facilitates nuclear inner-membrane fusion and spindle pole body (SPB) fusion while Sec71p facilitates nuclear outer-membrane fusion. Two haploid SPBs that failed to fuse could duplicate, and mitotic nuclear division of the unfused haploid nuclei started in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes. This observation suggests that nuclear inner-membrane fusion is required for SPB fusion, but not for SPB duplication in the first mitotic cell division.

  10. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2/megalin is expressed in oligodendrocytes in the mouse spinal cord white matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wicher, Grzegorz; Larsson, Mårten; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex

    2006-01-01

    Lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 (LRP2)/megalin is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family, and is essential in absorptive epithelia for endocytosis of lipoproteins, low molecular weight proteins, cholesterol and vitamins, as well as in cellular signaling. Previous st...... that spinal cord oligodendrocytes are phenotypically different from those in the brain, and indicate that megalin translocates signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus of oligodendrocytes during the formation and maintenance of myelin of long spinal cord pathways....

  11. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  12. Functional Characterization of SbmA, a Bacterial Inner Membrane Transporter Required for Importing the Antimicrobial Peptide Bac7(1-35)

    OpenAIRE

    Runti, Giulia; Lopez Ruiz, Maria del Carmen; Stoilova, Tatiana; Hussain, Rohanah; Jennions, Matthew; Choudhury, Hassanul G.; Benincasa, Monica; Gennaro, Renato; Beis, Konstantinos; Scocchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    SbmA is an inner membrane protein of Gram-negative bacteria that is involved in the internalization of glycopeptides and prokaryotic and eukaryotic antimicrobial peptides, as well as of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers. The SbmA homolog BacA is required for the development of Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteroids within plant cells and favors chronic infections with Brucella abortus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice. Here, we investigated functional features of SbmA/BacA using the prolin...

  13. Structure of the cytoplasmic domain of TcpE, the inner membrane core protein required for assembly of the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Craig, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    Type IV pili are long thin surface-displayed polymers of the pilin subunit that are present in a diverse group of bacteria. These multifunctional filaments are critical to virulence for pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, which use them to form microcolonies and to secrete the colonization factor TcpF. The type IV pili are assembled from pilin subunits by a complex inner membrane machinery. The core component of the type IV pilus-assembly platform is an integral inner membrane protein belonging to the GspF superfamily of secretion proteins. These proteins somehow convert chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis by an assembly ATPase on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane to mechanical energy for extrusion of the growing pilus filament out of the inner membrane. Most GspF-family inner membrane core proteins are predicted to have N-terminal and central cytoplasmic domains, cyto1 and cyto2, and three transmembrane segments, TM1, TM2 and TM3. Cyto2 and TM3 represent an internal repeat of cyto1 and TM1. Here, the 1.88 Å resolution crystal structure of the cyto1 domain of V. cholerae TcpE, which is required for assembly of the toxin-coregulated pilus, is reported. This domain folds as a monomeric six-helix bundle with a positively charged membrane-interaction face at one end and a hydrophobic groove at the other end that may serve as a binding site for partner proteins in the pilus-assembly complex.

  14. Membrane targeting of cGMP-dependent protein kinase is required for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); A. Smolenski; B.C. Tilly (Bernard); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); A.G. Bot (Alice); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); W.E. Boomaars (Wendy); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA recently cloned isoform of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK), designated type II, was implicated as the mediator of cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion based on its localization in the apical membrane of enterocytes and on its capacity to activate cys

  15. Fusion between perinuclear virions and the outer nuclear membrane requires the fusogenic activity of herpes simplex virus gB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Catherine C; Wisner, Todd W; Hannah, Brian P; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Johnson, David C

    2009-11-01

    Herpesviruses cross nuclear membranes (NMs) in two steps, as follows: (i) capsids assemble and bud through the inner NM into the perinuclear space, producing enveloped virus particles, and (ii) the envelopes of these virus particles fuse with the outer NM. Two herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins, gB and gH (the latter, likely complexed as a heterodimer with gL), are necessary for the second step of this process. Mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate in the perinuclear space or in herniations (membrane vesicles derived from the inner NM). Both gB and gH/gL are also known to act directly in fusing the virion envelope with host cell membranes during HSV entry into cells, i.e., both glycoproteins appear to function directly in different aspects of the membrane fusion process. We hypothesized that HSV gB and gH/gL also act directly in the membrane fusion that occurs during virus egress from the nucleus. Previous studies of the role of gB and gH/gL in nuclear egress involved HSV gB and gH null mutants that could potentially also possess gross defects in the virion envelope. Here, we produced recombinant HSV-expressing mutant forms of gB with single amino acid substitutions in the hydrophobic "fusion loops." These fusion loops are thought to play a direct role in membrane fusion by insertion into cellular membranes. HSV recombinants expressing gB with any one of four fusion loop mutations (W174R, W174Y, Y179K, and A261D) were unable to enter cells. Moreover, two of the mutants, W174Y and Y179K, displayed reduced abilities to mediate HSV cell-to-cell spread, and W174R and A261D exhibited no spread. All mutant viruses exhibited defects in nuclear egress, enveloped virions accumulated in herniations and in the perinuclear space, and fewer enveloped virions were detected on cell surfaces. These results support the hypothesis that gB functions directly to mediate the fusion between perinuclear virus particles and the outer NM.

  16. Diagnostic markers based on a computational model of lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, D.B. van; Ommen, B. van; Freidig, A.P.; Greef, J. van der; Graaf, A.A. de

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: Dyslipidemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes. Lipoprotein diagnostics, such as LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol, help to diagnose these diseases. Lipoprotein profile measurements could improve lipoprotein diagnostics, but interpreta

  17. Lipoprotein lipase gene variants: Association with acute myocardial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipoprotein lipase gene variants: Association with acute myocardial infarction and lipid profiles. ... Therefore, genes involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism pathways such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), are proper candidates ... Article Metrics.

  18. Variations in plasma lipids and lipoproteins among cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variations in plasma lipids and lipoproteins among cardiovascular disease patients in ... This study was designed to assess the changes in plasma lipids and lipoproteins, in particular highdensity lipoprotein (HDLC) in patients ... Article Metrics.

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that

  1. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Kersten

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels.

  2. Vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP)-7 and VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2 or VAMP-3, are required for activation-induced degranulation of mature human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Leif E; Frank, Simon P C; Bolat, Seza; Blank, Ulrich; Galli, Thierry; Bigalke, Hans; Bischoff, Stephan C; Lorentz, Axel

    2008-03-01

    Mediator release from mast cells (MC) is a crucial step in allergic and non-allergic inflammatory disorders. However, the final events in response to activation leading to membrane fusion and thereby facilitating degranulation have hitherto not been analyzed in human MC. Soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNARE) represent a highly conserved family of proteins that have been shown to mediate intracellular membrane fusion events. Here, we show that mature MC isolated from human intestinal tissue express soluble N-ethylmaleide sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP)-23, Syntaxin (STX)-1B, STX-2, STX-3, STX-4, and STX-6 but not SNAP-25. Furthermore, we found that primary human MC express substantial amounts of vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP)-3, VAMP-7 and VAMP-8 and, in contrast to previous reports about rodent MC, only low levels of VAMP-2. Furthermore, VAMP-7 and VAMP-8 were found to translocate to the plasma membrane and interact with SNAP-23 and STX-4 upon activation. Inhibition of SNAP-23, STX-4, VAMP-7 or VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2 or VAMP-3, resulted in a markedly reduced high-affinity IgE receptor-mediated histamine release. In summary, our data show that mature human MC express a specific pattern of SNARE and that VAMP-7 and VAMP-8, but not VAMP-2, are required for rapid degranulation.

  3. Rac1-mediated membrane raft localization of PI3K/p110β is required for its activation by GPCRs or PTEN loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Onur; Ni, Jing; Xie, Shaozhen; Zhao, Jean J; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to understand how spatial compartmentalization in the plasma membrane might contribute to the functions of the ubiquitous class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoforms, p110α and p110β. We found that p110β localizes to membrane rafts in a Rac1-dependent manner. This localization potentiates Akt activation by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus genetic targeting of a Rac1 binding-deficient allele of p110β to rafts alleviated the requirement for p110β-Rac1 association for GPCR signaling, cell growth and migration. In contrast, p110α, which does not play a physiological role in GPCR signaling, is found to reside in nonraft regions of the plasma membrane. Raft targeting of p110α allowed its EGFR-mediated activation by GPCRs. Notably, p110β dependent, PTEN null tumor cells critically rely upon raft-associated PI3K activity. Collectively, our findings provide a mechanistic account of how membrane raft localization regulates differential activation of distinct PI3K isoforms and offer insight into why PTEN-deficient cancers depend on p110β. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17635.001

  4. Truncation of the membrane-spanning domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein defines elements required for fusion, incorporation, and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ling; Shang, Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein from human (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency viruses plays a key role in anchoring the Env complex into the viral membrane but also contributes to its biological function in fusion and virus entry. In HIV type 1 (HIV-1), it has been predicted to span 27 amino acids, from lysine residue 681 to arginine 707, and encompasses an internal arginine at residue 694. By examining a series of C-terminal-truncation mutants of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein that substituted termination codons for amino acids 682 to 708, we show that this entire region is required for efficient viral infection of target cells. Truncation to the arginine at residue 694 resulted in an Env complex that was secreted from the cells. In contrast, a region from residues 681 to 698, which contains highly conserved hydrophobic residues and glycine motifs and extends 4 amino acids beyond 694R, can effectively anchor the protein in the membrane, allow efficient transport to the plasma membrane, and mediate wild-type levels of cell-cell fusion. However, these fusogenic truncated Env mutants are inefficiently incorporated into budding virions. Based on the analysis of these mutants, a "snorkeling" model, in which the flanking charged amino acid residues at 681 and 694 are buried in the lipid while their side chains interact with polar head groups, is proposed for the HIV-1 MSD.

  5. Effects of cholesterol and lipoproteins on endocytosis by a monocyte-like cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, M; Scerbo, L; Lund-Katz, S; DePace, D M; Maniglia, R; Alexander, J K; Phillips, M C

    1986-12-19

    The human monocyte/macrophage-like cell line U937 is a cholesterol auxotroph. Incubation of these cells in the growth medium in which delipidated fetal calf serum has been substituted for fetal calf serum depletes cellular cholesterol and inhibits growth. The cholesterol requirement of these cells for growth can be satisfied by human low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), but not by high-density lipoprotein (HDL). U937 cells can bind and degrade LDL via a high-affinity site and this recognition is altered by acetylation of LDL. This indicates that these cells express relatively high LDL receptor activity and low levels of the acetyl-LDL receptor. The cells were used to study the role of cholesterol in lectin-mediated and fluid-phase endocytosis. Growth of the cells in the medium containing delipidated fetal calf serum results in impairment of both concanavalin A-mediated endocytosis of horseradish peroxidase and concanavalin A-independent endocytosis of Lucifer Yellow. Supplementation of the medium with cholesterol prevents cellular cholesterol depletion, supports growth and stimulates Lucifer Yellow endocytosis but fails to restore horseradish peroxidase endocytosis. However, if the cells are incubated in the presence of no less than 40 micrograms LDL protein/ml to maintain normal cell cholesterol levels, concanavalin A-mediated endocytosis of horseradish peroxidase is activated. The effect of LDL is specific since neither VLDL nor HDL3 at the same protein concentration activates horseradish peroxidase uptake by the cells. Furthermore, the activation of endocytosis by LDL is not inhibited by the inclusion of heparin or acetylation of the LDL indicating that binding of LDL to the LDL receptor is not required for these effects. The mediation of activation of horseradish peroxidase endocytosis by the lectin is presumed to involve binding of LDL to concanavalin A associated with the cell surface which in turn stimulates horseradish

  6. A monomeric G protein-coupled receptor isolated in a high-density lipoprotein particle efficiently activates its G protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whorton, Matthew R; Bokoch, Michael P; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a diverse array of ligands, mediating cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as the senses of smell and taste. The structures of the GPCR rhodopsin and several G proteins have been determined by x-ray crystallography, yet...... the organization of the signaling complex between GPCRs and G proteins is poorly understood. The observations that some GPCRs are obligate heterodimers, and that many GPCRs form both homo- and heterodimers, has led to speculation that GPCR dimers may be required for efficient activation of G proteins. However......, technical limitations have precluded a definitive analysis of G protein coupling to monomeric GPCRs in a biochemically defined and membrane-bound system. Here we demonstrate that a prototypical GPCR, the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), can be incorporated into a reconstituted high-density lipoprotein...

  7. Diminished brain synaptic plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase activity in rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes: association with reduced anesthetic requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, P K; Horn, J L; Singh, G; Franks, W T; Franks, J J

    1994-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that chronic hyperglycemia may inhibit plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) in cells from several tissues. Inhalational anesthetics (IA) can inhibit brain synaptic PMCA activity. We proposed that diabetic rats may manifest chronic inhibition of brain synaptic PMCA and thus provide a model for testing the hypothesis that synaptic PMCA plays a key role in IA pharmacodynamics. Ca2+ pumping activity of PMCA was measured in cerebral synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) vesicles prepared from rats with streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and from control, normoglycemic rats. Dose requirements for halothane and xenon were estimated in treated and untreated rats. Brain PMCA activity in hyperglycemic rats was depressed by about 8.4%, compared to controls. In vitro glycation also caused a significant decrease in PMCA pumping activity. Halothane requirement for STZ-hyperglycemic rats was dramatically reduced to about 65% of control. Xenon requirement was also significantly reduced, to 88% of control. Correlation of IA dose with percent glycated hemoglobin for each rat revealed a strong association between reduced requirements for halothane or xenon and increased protein glycation. These results indicate that inhibition of brain synaptic PMCA in chronically hyperglycemic rats is associated with a significant reduction in IA requirement.

  8. Computational studies of plasma lipoprotein lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lurong; Segrest, Jere P

    2016-10-01

    Plasma lipoproteins are macromolecular assemblies of proteins and lipids found in the blood. The lipid components of lipoproteins are amphipathic lipids such as phospholipids (PLs), and unesterified cholesterols (UCs) and hydrophobic lipids such as cholesteryl esters (CEs) and triglycerides (TGs). Since lipoproteins are soft matter supramolecular assemblies easily deformable by thermal fluctuations and they also exist in varying densities and protein/lipid components, a detailed understanding of their structure/function is experimentally difficult. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has emerged as a particularly promising way to explore the structure and dynamics of lipoproteins. The purpose of this review is to survey the current status of computational studies of the lipid components of the lipoproteins. Computational studies aim to explore three levels of complexity for the 3-dimensional structural dynamics of lipoproteins at various metabolic stages: (i) lipoprotein particles consist of protein with minimal lipid; (ii) lipoprotein particles consist of PL-rich discoidal bilayer-like lipid particles; (iii) mature circulating lipoprotein particles consist of CE-rich or TG-rich spheroidal lipid-droplet-like particles. Due to energy barriers involved in conversion between these species, other biomolecules also participate in lipoprotein biological assembly. For example: (i) lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) interacts with ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) to produce nascent discoidal high density lipoprotein (dHDL) particles; (ii) lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) mediates the conversion of UC to CE in dHDL, driving spheroidal HDL (sHDL) formation; (iii) transfer proteins, cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), transfer both CE and TG and PL, respectively, between lipoprotein particles. Computational studies have the potential to explore different lipoprotein particles at each metabolic stage in

  9. The iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eSheldon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipoproteins fulfill diverse roles in antibiotic resistance, adhesion, protein secretion, signaling and sensing, and many also serve as the substrate binding protein (SBP partner to ABC transporters for the acquisition of a diverse array of nutrients including peptides, sugars, and scarcely abundant metals. In the staphylococci, the iron-regulated SBPs are significantly upregulated during iron starvation and function to sequester and deliver iron into the bacterial cell, enabling staphylococci to circumvent iron restriction imposed by the host environment. Accordingly, this subset of lipoproteins has been implicated in staphylococcal pathogenesis and virulence. Lipoproteins also activate the host innate immune response, triggered through Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2 and, notably, the iron-regulated subset of lipoproteins are particularly immunogenic. In this review, we discuss the iron-regulated staphylococcal lipoproteins with regard to their biogenesis, substrate specificity, and impact on the host innate immune response.

  10. The pathophysiology of intestinal lipoprotein production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina eGiammanco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal lipoprotein production is a multistep process, essential for the absorption of dietary fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Chylomicron assembly begins in the endoplasmic reticulum with the formation of primordial, phospholipids-rich particles that are then transported to the Golgi for secretion. Several classes of transporters play a role in the selective uptake and/or export of lipids through the villus enterocytes. Once secreted in the lymph stream, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs are metabolized by Lipoprotein lipase (LPL, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols of very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs and chylomicrons, thereby delivering free fatty acids to various tissues. Genetic mutations in the genes codifying for these proteins are responsible of different inherited disorders affecting chylomicron metabolism.This review focuses on the molecular pathways that modulate the uptake and the transport of lipoproteins of intestinal origin and it will highlight recent findings on TRLs assembly.

  11. A Computational Model for the Analysis of Lipoprotein Distributions in the Mouse : Translating FPLC Profiles to Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sips, Fianne L. P.; Tiemann, Christian A.; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Groen, Albert K.; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    Disturbances of lipoprotein metabolism are recognized as indicators of cardiometabolic disease risk. Lipoprotein size and composition, measured in a lipoprotein profile, are considered to be disease risk markers. However, the measured profile is a collective result of complex metabolic interactions,

  12. A novel fixed fibre biofilm membrane process for on-site greywater reclamation requiring no fouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabornig, Simon; Podmirseg, Sabine Marie

    2015-03-01

    On-site greywater treatment and reuse in urban areas bears the potential to reduce huge quantities of wastewater and lower freshwater shortages. Until now dissemination of small, single household applications has been rather limited as simple and high quality water producing, but also cost-effective treatment units have not been developed so far. This paper proposes a new process, based on a concurrently working hollow-fibre membrane as fixed biofilm support and filtration device. Bioreactor characteristics, influence of different aeration rates, membrane flux development, as well as structure and composition of biofilm were monitored to evaluate the performance of the tested pilot unit. The introduced process achieved international water reuse guidelines, worked soundly and could, compared to conventional micro MBR, significantly reduce energy demand (greywater treatment and provides valuable design data for future optimization and systematic analysis.

  13. Plasma membrane proteins Yro2 and Mrh1 are required for acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabatake, Akiko; Kawazoe, Nozomi; Izawa, Shingo

    2015-03-01

    Yro2 and its paralogous protein Mrh1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have seven predicted transmembrane domains and predominantly localize to the plasma membrane. Their physiological functions and regulation of gene expression have not yet been elucidated in detail. We herein demonstrated that MRH1 was constitutively expressed, whereas the expression of YRO2 was induced by acetic acid stress and entering the stationary phase. Fluorescence microscopic analysis revealed that Mrh1 and Yro2 were distributed as small foci in the plasma membrane under acetic acid stress conditions. The null mutants of these genes (mrh1∆, yro2∆, and mrh1∆yro2∆) showed delayed growth and a decrease in the productivity of ethanol in the presence of acetic acid, indicating that Yro2 and Mrh1 are involved in tolerance to acetic acid stress.

  14. A Mediterranean-style, low-glycemic-load diet decreases atherogenic lipoproteins and reduces lipoprotein (a) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein in women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer L; Comperatore, Michael; Barona, Jacqueline; Calle, Mariana C; Andersen, Catherine; McIntosh, Mark; Najm, Wadie; Lerman, Robert H; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2012-03-01

    The objective was to assess the impact of a Mediterranean-style, low-glycemic-load diet (control group, n = 41) and the same diet plus a medical food (MF) containing phytosterols, soy protein, and extracts from hops and Acacia (MF group, n = 42) on lipoprotein atherogenicity in women with metabolic syndrome. Plasma lipids, apolipoproteins (apos), lipoprotein subfractions and particle size, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, and lipoprotein (a) were measured at baseline, week 8, and week 12 of the intervention. Three-day dietary records were collected at the same time points to assess compliance. Compared with baseline, women decreased energy intake from carbohydrate (P lipoproteins, large very low-density lipoprotein (P lipoprotein to smaller high-density lipoprotein particles was increased (P lipoprotein (a) (P lipoproteins, oxidized LDL, and apo B. Inclusion of an MF may have an additional effect in reducing apo B. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Plasma membrane aminoglycerolipid flippase function is required for signaling competence in the yeast mating pheromone response pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorel, Elodie; Barrey, Evelyne; Lau, Rebecca K; Thorner, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The class 4 P-type ATPases ("flippases") maintain membrane asymmetry by translocating phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine from the outer leaflet to the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five related gene products (Dnf1, Dnf2, Dnf3, Drs2, and Neo1) are implicated in flipping of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylcholine. In MAT A: cells responding to α-factor, we found that Dnf1, Dnf2, and Dnf3, as well as the flippase-activating protein kinase Fpk1, localize at the projection ("shmoo") tip where polarized growth is occurring and where Ste5 (the central scaffold protein of the pheromone-initiated MAPK cascade) is recruited. Although viable, a MAT A: dnf1∆ dnf2∆ dnf3∆ triple mutant exhibited a marked decrease in its ability to respond to α-factor, which we could attribute to pronounced reduction in Ste5 stability resulting from an elevated rate of its Cln2⋅Cdc28-initiated degradation. Similarly, a MAT A: dnf1∆ dnf3∆ drs2∆ triple mutant also displayed marked reduction in its ability to respond to α-factor, which we could attribute to inefficient recruitment of Ste5 to the plasma membrane due to severe mislocalization of the cellular phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate pools. Thus proper remodeling of plasma membrane aminoglycerolipids and phosphoinositides is necessary for efficient recruitment, stability, and function of the pheromone signaling apparatus. © 2015 Sartorel et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Hierarchical phosphorylation of apical membrane antigen 1 is required for efficient red blood cell invasion by malaria parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Boris Prinz; Katherine L. Harvey; Louisa Wilcke; Ulrike Ruch; Klemens Engelberg; Laura Biller; Isabelle Lucet; Steffen Erkelenz; Dorothee Heincke; Tobias Spielmann; Christian Doerig; Conrad Kunick; Brendan S Crabb; Gilson, Paul R.; Gilberger, Tim W

    2016-01-01

    Central to the pathogenesis of malaria is the proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum parasites within human erythrocytes. Parasites invade erythrocytes via a coordinated sequence of receptor-ligand interactions between the parasite and host cell. One key ligand, Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), is a leading blood-stage vaccine and previous work indicates that phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain (CPD) is important to its function during invasion. Here we investigate the significance of ...

  17. Early events in the generation of autophagosomes are required for the formation of membrane structures involved in hepatitis C virus genome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Bartlett, Christopher; Mankouri, Jamel; Harris, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been shown to induce autophagy but the mechanisms underpinning this process remain to be elucidated. Induction of autophagy requires the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Vps34, which produces phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. This recruits proteins with PI3P binding domains such as the double-FYVE-containing protein 1 (DFCP1). DFCP1 generates cup-shaped protrusions from the ER membrane, termed omegasomes, which provide a platform for the production of autophagosomes. Here we present data demonstrating that both Vps34 and DFCP1 are required for HCV genome replication, in the context of both a subgenomic replicon and virus infection, but did not affect virus entry or initial translation. Using live cell fluorescence microscopy we demonstrated that early during HCV infection the nascent viral genome replication complexes (identified by using non-structural protein NS5A as a marker) transiently colocalize with DFCP1-positive punctae (omegasomes), before the two structures move apart from each other. This observation is reminiscent of the transient association of LC3 and DFCP1 during omegasome formation, and therefore we propose that omegasomes are utilized by HCV to generate the double-membrane vesicles which are the hallmark of HCV replication complexes.

  18. Functional characterization of ExFadLO, an outer membrane protein required for exporting oxygenated long-chain fatty acids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eriel; Estupiñán, Mónica; Pastor, F I Javier; Busquets, Montserrat; Díaz, Pilar; Manresa, Angeles

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial proteins of the FadL family have frequently been associated to the uptake of exogenous hydrophobic substrates. However, their outer membrane location and involvement in substrate uptake have been inferred mainly from sequence similarity to Escherichia coli FadL, the first well-characterized outer membrane transporters of Long-Chain Fatty Acids (LCFAs) in bacteria. Here we report the functional characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane protein (ORF PA1288) showing similarities to the members of the FadL family, for which we propose the name ExFadLO. We demonstrate herein that this protein is required to export LCFAs 10-HOME and 7,10-DiHOME, derived from a diol synthase oxygenation activity on oleic acid, from the periplasm to the extracellular medium. Accumulation of 10-HOME and 7,10-DiHOME in the extracellular medium of P. aeruginosa was abolished by a transposon insertion mutation in exFadLO (ExFadLO¯ mutant). However, intact periplasm diol synthase activity was found in this mutant, indicating that ExFadLO participates in the export of these oxygenated LCFAs across the outer membrane. The capacity of ExFadLO¯ mutant to export 10-HOME and 7,10-DiHOME was recovered after complementation with a wild-type, plasmid-expressed ExFadLO protein. A western blot assay with a variant of ExFadLO tagged with a V5 epitope confirmed the location of ExFadLO in the bacterial outer membrane under the experimental conditions tested. Our results provide the first evidence that FadL family proteins, known to be involved in the uptake of hydrophobic substrates from the extracellular environment, also function as secretion elements for metabolites of biological relevance.

  19. Vipp1 is required for basic thylakoid membrane formation but not for the assembly of thylakoid protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseeva, Elena; Ossenbühl, Friederich; Sippel, Claudia; Cho, Won K; Stein, Bernhard; Eichacker, Lutz A; Meurer, Jörg; Wanner, Gerhard; Westhoff, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2007-02-01

    Vipp1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) is found in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts where it is essential for thylakoid formation. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant plants with a reduction of Vipp1 to about 20% of wild type content become albinotic at an early stage. We propose that this drastic phenotype results from an inability of the remaining Vipp1 protein to assemble into a homo-oligomeric complex, indicating that oligomerization is a prerequisite for Vipp1 function. A Vipp1-ProteinA fusion protein, expressed in the Deltavipp1 mutant background, is able to reinstate oligomerization and restore photoautotrophic growth. Plants containing Vipp1-ProteinA in amounts comparable to Vipp1 in the wild type exhibit a wild type phenotype. However, plants with a reduced amount of Vipp1-ProteinA protein are growth-retarded and significantly paler than the wild type. This phenotype is caused by a decrease in thylakoid membrane content and a concomitant reduction in photosynthetic activity. To the extent that thylakoid membranes are made in these plants they are properly assembled with protein-pigment complexes and are photosynthetically active. This strongly supports a function of Vipp1 in basic thylakoid membrane formation and not in the functional assembly of thylakoid protein complexes. Intriguingly, electron microscopic analysis shows that chloroplasts in the mutant plants are not equally affected by the Vipp1 shortage. Indeed, a wide range of different stages of thylakoid development ranging from wild-type-like chloroplasts to plastids nearly devoid of thylakoids can be observed in organelles of one and the same cell.

  20. Effects of a vitamin E-bonded membrane and of glutathione on anemia and erythropoietin requirements in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usberti, Mario; Gerardi, Gianmario; Micheli, Annamaria; Tira, Paola; Bufano, Giuseppe; Gaggia, Paola; Movilli, Ezio; Cancarini, Giovanni C; De Marinis, Sergio; D'Avolio, Gerolamo; Broccoli, Roberto; Manganoni, Annunciata; Albertin, Alberto; Di Lorenzo, Diego

    2002-01-01

    The oxidative damage of RBC membranes in hemodialysis (HD) patients increases red blood cell (RBC) susceptibility to hemolysis and impairs cell survival. Reduction of the oxidative stress might lead to better control of anemia and reduction of the erythropoietin (rhEPO) dose. We studied 38 stable HD patients, given a mean dose of rhEPO of 104+/-65 U/kg BW/week, at baseline and during antioxidant treatment with either a full or a 50% dose of EPO. Antioxidant treatment involved the combined use of glutathione, GSH (1200 mg i.v. at the end of each dialysis session) and a vitamin E-bonded HD membrane, CL-E. RBC and reticulocyte counts were done monthly. RBC survival (51Cr T/2) was assayed in 18 patients before and after the end of the study. Oxidative status was determined in 10 patients by measuring plasma concentrations of malondyhaldeide-4-hydroxynonenal (MDA-4HNE), reactive oxygen molecular species (ROMs), and oxydized-LDL (oxLDL) as indices of oxidative stress, alpha-tocopherol and total thiols as single antioxidants, and TAS as a marker of total antioxidant plasma activity. Antioxidant treatment significantly reduced the high basal plasma concentrations of MDA4HNE and oxLDL, and significantly increased those of alpha-tocopherol, whereas TAS and thiols were unmodified. These changes lasted after the reduction of EPO. Anemia significantly improved with treatment, due to a significant increase in RBC survival. A close direct linear relationship was detected between plasma levels of vitamin E and hemoglobin. Adequate control of oxidative stress achieves better control of anemia in HD patients. Since several antioxidant systems are impaired in uremia, the combined use of the CL-E membrane and GSH seems to be the best antioxidant therapy so far, with significant saving of the rhEPO dose.

  1. Membrane-aerated biofilms for high rate biotreatment: performance appraisal, engineering principles, scale-up, and development requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syron, Eoin; Casey, Eoin

    2008-03-15

    Diffusion of the electron acceptor is the rate controlling step in virtually all biofilm reactors employed for aerobic wastewater treatment. The membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) is a technology that can deliver oxygen at high rates and transfer efficiencies, thereby enhancing the biofilm activity. This paper provides a comparative performance rate analysis of the MABR in terms of its application for carbonaceous pollutant removal, nitrification/denitrification and xenobiotic biotreatment. We also describe the mechanisms influencing process performance in the MABR and the inter-relationships between these factors. The challenges involved in scaling-up the process are discussed with recommendations for prioritization of research needs.

  2. The evolutionarily conserved protein PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 is required for efficient manganese uptake at the thylakoid membrane in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Anja; Steinberger, Iris; Herdean, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven oxidation of water. The oxygen-evolving complex of PSII is a Mn4CaO5 cluster embedded in a well-defined protein environment in the thylakoid membrane. However, transport of manganese and calcium into the thylakoid...... by oxygen evolution rates) and for manganese incorporation. Manganese binding to PSII was severely reduced in pam71 thylakoids, particularly in PSII supercomplexes. In cation partitioning assays with intact chloroplasts, Mn2+ and Ca2+ ions were differently sequestered in pam71, with Ca2+ enriched in pam71...

  3. Pravastatin transport across the hepatocyte canalicular membrane requires both ATP and a transmembrane pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Y; Okuyama, Y; Miya, H; Matsusita, H; Kitano, M; Kamisako, T; Yamamoto, T

    1996-06-01

    Hepatic excretion of non-bile acid organic anions is reported to be ATP-dependent and a defect of this transport has been reported in congenitally jaundiced rats, animal models of human Dubin-Johnson syndrome. To investigate the effect of the transmembrane pH gradient on hepatocyte canalicular membrane transport of ATP-dependent organic anions, uptake of pravastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase-inhibiting organic anion, by hepatocyte canalicular membrane vesicles was observed in the presence or absence of transmembrane pH gradients. Uptake was assessed by a rapid filtration technique. ATP-dependent pravastatin uptake was stimulated in the presence of a transmembrane pH gradient (in > out) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Uptake was dependent on both pravastatin and ATP concentrations and showed saturation kinetics. After intravenous injection of [14C]-pravastatin (0.3 mumol), 81% of the dose was excreted in the bile within 35 min in SD rats, whereas only 20% was excreted in the bile in Eisai hyperbilirubinuria rats. ATP and the pH gradient also co-stimulated the uptake of pravastatin in Eisai hyperbilirubinuria rats, although the K(m) was much higher and Vmax was much lower than corresponding values in SD rats. This coincided well with the marked reduction in vivo biliary excretion of pravastatin in jaundiced rats.

  4. An allosteric rheostat in HIV-1 gp120 reduces CCR5 stoichiometry required for membrane fusion and overcomes diverse entry limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Durnin, James P; Shinde, Ujwal; Kabat, David

    2007-11-16

    Binding of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CCR5 co-receptor reduces constraints on the metastable transmembrane subunit gp41, thereby enabling gp41 refolding, fusion of viral and cellular membranes, and infection. We previously isolated adapted HIV-1(JRCSF) variants that more efficiently use mutant CCR5s, including CCR5(Delta18) lacking the important tyrosine sulfate-containing amino terminus. Effects of mutant CCR5 concentrations on HIV-1 infectivities were highly cooperative, implying that several may be required. However, because wild-type CCR5 efficiently mediates infections at trace concentrations that were difficult to measure accurately, analyses of its cooperativity were not feasible. New HIV-1(JRCSF) variants efficiently use CCR5(HHMH), a chimera containing murine extracellular loop 2. The adapted virus induces large syncytia in cells containing either wild-type or mutant CCR5s and has multiple gp120 mutations that occurred independently in CCR5(Delta18)-adapted virus. Accordingly, these variants interchangeably use CCR5(HHMH) or CCR5(Delta18). Additional analyses strongly support a novel energetic model for allosteric proteins, implying that the adaptive mutations reduce quaternary constraints holding gp41, thus lowering the activation energy barrier for membrane fusion without affecting bonds to specific CCR5 sites. In accordance with this mechanism, highly adapted HIV-1s require only one associated CCR5(HHMH), whereas poorly adapted viruses require several. However, because they are allosteric ensembles, complexes with additional co-receptors fuse more rapidly and efficiently than minimal ones. Similarly, wild-type HIV-1(JRCSF) is highly adapted to wild-type CCR5 and minimally requires one. The adaptive mutations cause resistances to diverse entry inhibitors and cluster appropriately in the gp120 trimer interface overlying gp41. We conclude that membrane fusion complexes are allosteric machines with an

  5. The majority of lipoprotein lipase in plasma is bound to remnant lipoproteins: A new definition of remnant lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Miyashita, Kazuya; Imamura, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Junji; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J; Machida, Tetsuo; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Masami; Schaefer, Ernst; Nakajima, Katsuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a multifunctional protein and a key enzyme involved in the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. We determined the lipoproteins to which LPL is bound in the pre-heparin and post-heparin plasma. Tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), a potent inhibitor of serine lipases, was used to block the lipolytic activity of LPL, thereby preventing changes in the plasma lipoproteins due to ex vivo lipolysis. Gel filtration was performed to obtain the LPL elution profiles in plasma and the isolated remnant lipoproteins (RLP). When ex vivo lipolytic activity was inhibited by THL in the post-heparin plasma, majority of the LPL was found in the VLDL elution range, specifically in the RLP as inactive dimers. However, in the absence of THL, most of the LPL was found in the HDL elution range as active dimers. Furthermore, majority of the LPL in the pre-heparin plasma was found in the RLP as inactive form, with broadly diffused lipoprotein profiles in the presence and absence of THL. It is suggested that during lipolysis in vivo, the endothelial bound LPL dimers generates RLP, forming circulating RLP-LPL complexes in an inactive form that subsequently binds and initiates receptor-mediated catabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  7. Low-density lipoprotein analysis in microchip capillary electrophoresis systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceriotti, Laura; Shibata, Takayuki; Folmer, Britta; Weiller, Bruce H.; Roberts, Matthew A.; De Rooij, Nico F.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2002-01-01

    Due to the mounting evidence for altered lipoprotein and cholesterol-lipoprotein content in several disease states, there has been an increasing interest in analytical methods for lipoprotein profiling for diagnosis. The separation of low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL and HDL, respectively)

  8. Association of lipase lipoprotein polymorphisms with high-density lipoprotein and triglycerides in elderly men

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo,Lara Miguel Quirino; Cendoroglo, Maysa Seabra [UNIFESP; Gigek, Carolina de Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Smith, Maria de Arruda Cardoso [UNIFESP

    2010-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase is essential for triglyceride hydrolysis. the polymorphisms S447X in exon 9 and HindIII in intron 8 have been associated with lower triglyceride levels and lower cardiovascular risk in adult men. We examined the association of these lipoprotein lipase polymorphisms with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglyceride levels in elderly men. Blood samples were obtained from 87 elderly men, 48 of whom had cardiovascular disease and 39 (controls) had no history of cardiovascula...

  9. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthesis in the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts is required for enhanced growth under sucrose supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato eMurakawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant galactolipid synthesis on the outer envelope membranes of chloroplasts is an important biosynthetic pathway for sustained growth under conditions of phosphate (Pi depletion. During Pi starvation, the amount of digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG is increased to substitute for the phospholipids that are degraded for supplying Pi. An increase in DGDG concentration depends on an adequate supply of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, which is a substrate for DGDG synthesis and is synthesized by a type-B MGDG synthase, MGD3. Recently, sucrose was suggested to be a global regulator of plant responses to Pi starvation. Thus, we analyzed expression levels of several genes involved in lipid remodeling during Pi starvation in Arabidopsis thaliana and found that the abundance of MGD3 mRNA increased when sucrose was exogenously supplied to the growth medium. Sucrose supplementation retarded the growth of the Arabidopsis MGD3 knockout mutant mgd3 but enhanced the growth of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing MGD3 compared with wild type, indicating the involvement of MGD3 in plant growth under sucrose-replete conditions. Although most features such as chlorophyll content, photosynthetic activity, and Pi content were comparable between wild-type and the transgenic plants overexpressing MGD3, sucrose content in shoot tissues decreased and incorporation of exogenously supplied carbon to DGDG was enhanced in the MGD3-overexpressing plants compared with wild type. Our results suggest that MGD3 plays an important role in supplying DGDG as a component of extraplastidial membranes to support enhanced plant growth under conditions of carbon excess.

  10. Computational models for analyzing lipoprotein profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, A.A. de; Schalkwijk, D.B. van

    2011-01-01

    At present, several measurement technologies are available for generating highly detailed concentration-size profiles of lipoproteins, offering increased diagnostic potential. Computational models are useful in aiding the interpretation of these complex datasets and making the data more accessible f

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rare Disorders (NORD) RareConnect GeneReviews (1 link) Familial Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  12. Contribution of lipoproteins and lipoprotein processing to endocarditis virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sankar; Kanamoto, Taisei; Ge, Xiuchun; Xu, Ping; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L; Kitten, Todd

    2009-07-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Previous studies have identified lipoproteins as virulence determinants in other streptococcal species. Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified 52 putative lipoprotein genes in S. sanguinis strain SK36 as well as genes encoding the lipoprotein-processing enzymes prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (lgt) and signal peptidase II (lspA). We employed a directed signature-tagged mutagenesis approach to systematically disrupt these genes and screen each mutant for the loss of virulence in an animal model of endocarditis. All mutants were viable. In competitive index assays, mutation of a putative phosphate transporter reduced in vivo competitiveness by 14-fold but also reduced in vitro viability by more than 20-fold. Mutations in lgt, lspA, or an uncharacterized lipoprotein gene reduced competitiveness by two- to threefold in the animal model and in broth culture. Mutation of ssaB, encoding a putative metal transporter, produced a similar effect in culture but reduced in vivo competiveness by >1,000-fold. [(3)H]palmitate labeling and Western blot analysis confirmed that the lgt mutant failed to acylate lipoproteins, that the lspA mutant had a general defect in lipoprotein cleavage, and that SsaB was processed differently in both mutants. These results indicate that the loss of a single lipoprotein, SsaB, dramatically reduces endocarditis virulence, whereas the loss of most other lipoproteins or of normal lipoprotein processing has no more than a minor effect on virulence.

  13. Contribution of Lipoproteins and Lipoprotein Processing to Endocarditis Virulence in Streptococcus sanguinis▿ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sankar; Kanamoto, Taisei; Ge, Xiuchun; Xu, Ping; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L.; Kitten, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is an important cause of infective endocarditis. Previous studies have identified lipoproteins as virulence determinants in other streptococcal species. Using a bioinformatic approach, we identified 52 putative lipoprotein genes in S. sanguinis strain SK36 as well as genes encoding the lipoprotein-processing enzymes prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (lgt) and signal peptidase II (lspA). We employed a directed signature-tagged mutagenesis approach to systematically disrupt these genes and screen each mutant for the loss of virulence in an animal model of endocarditis. All mutants were viable. In competitive index assays, mutation of a putative phosphate transporter reduced in vivo competitiveness by 14-fold but also reduced in vitro viability by more than 20-fold. Mutations in lgt, lspA, or an uncharacterized lipoprotein gene reduced competitiveness by two- to threefold in the animal model and in broth culture. Mutation of ssaB, encoding a putative metal transporter, produced a similar effect in culture but reduced in vivo competiveness by >1,000-fold. [3H]palmitate labeling and Western blot analysis confirmed that the lgt mutant failed to acylate lipoproteins, that the lspA mutant had a general defect in lipoprotein cleavage, and that SsaB was processed differently in both mutants. These results indicate that the loss of a single lipoprotein, SsaB, dramatically reduces endocarditis virulence, whereas the loss of most other lipoproteins or of normal lipoprotein processing has no more than a minor effect on virulence. PMID:19395487

  14. Combined analysis of six lipoprotein lipase genetic variants on triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittrup, Hans H; Andersen, Rolf V; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne;

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variants in lipoprotein lipase may affect triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD).......Genetic variants in lipoprotein lipase may affect triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD)....

  15. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance...... of such genetic determinants with cardiovascular disease risk will either favor or disfavor that these lipoproteins are causally related to cardiovascular disease....

  16. Combined analysis of six lipoprotein lipase genetic variants on triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittrup, Hans H; Andersen, Rolf V; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variants in lipoprotein lipase may affect triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD).......Genetic variants in lipoprotein lipase may affect triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD)....

  17. Remodeling of plasma lipoproteins in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Interleukin-6 receptor-alpha inhibition with tocilizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janet S; Chapman, M John; Piraino, Paolo; Lamerz, Jens; Schindler, Thomas; Cutler, Paul; Dernick, Gregor

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, mediated in part by elevated circulating interleukin-6 levels and proinflammatory changes in plasma lipoproteins. We hypothesized that RA patients acquire inflammation-induced modifications to the protein cargo of circulating lipoproteins that may be reversed by tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor-alpha inhibitor. Size-exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase protein arrays using 29 antibodies against 26 proteins were applied at baseline and after tocilizumab treatment to analyze the distributions of apolipoproteins, enzymes, lipid transfer proteins, and other associated proteins in plasma lipoprotein fractions from 20 women with RA. A 30% reduction in high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated serum amyloid A4 and complement C4 occurred with tocilizumab. Levels of C-reactive protein, associated or comigrating with HDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) peaks, were reduced on treatment by approximately 80% and 24%, respectively. Reductions in lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, lipoprotein (a), and cholesteryl ester transfer protein in the LDL fraction suggest reductions in LDL-associated proatherogenic factors. Elevations in very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) enriched with apolipoprotein E were equally observed. Tocilizumab treatment led to reductions in proinflammatory components and proatherogenic proteins associated with HDL. Whether changes in the proteome of VLDL, LDL, and HDL induced by anti-inflammatory tocilizumab treatment in RA patients modify cardiovascular disease risk requires further investigation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshio; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Nagano, Tomohisa; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-09-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotrophic virus and a major cause of chronic liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma, worldwide. The life cycle of HCV is closely associated with the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins. The main function of lipoproteins is transporting lipids throughout the body. Triglycerides, free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and phospholipids are the major components of the transported lipids. The pathway of HCV assembly and secretion is closely linked to lipoprotein production and secretion, and the infectivity of HCV particles largely depends on the interaction of lipoproteins. Moreover, HCV entry into hepatocytes is strongly influenced by lipoproteins. The key lipoprotein molecules mediating these interactions are apolipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are amphipathic proteins on the surface of a lipoprotein particle, which help stabilize lipoprotein structure. They perform a key role in lipoprotein metabolism by serving as receptor ligands, enzyme co-factors, and lipid transport carriers. Understanding the association between the life cycle of HCV and lipoprotein metabolism is important because each step of the life cycle of HCV that is associated with lipoprotein metabolism is a potential target for anti-HCV therapy. In this article, we first concisely review the nature of lipoprotein and its metabolism to better understand the complicated interaction of HCV with lipoprotein. Then, we review the outline of the processes of HCV assembly, secretion, and entry into hepatocytes, focusing on the association with lipoproteins. Finally, we discuss the clinical aspects of disturbed lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and the significance of dyslipoproteinemia in chronic HCV infection with regard to abnormal apolipoproteins.

  19. The meiosis-specific nuclear passenger protein is required for proper assembly of forespore membrane in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaine, Masak; Imada, Kazuki; Numata, Osamu; Nakamura, Taro; Nakano, Kentaro

    2014-10-15

    Sporulation, gametogenesis in yeast, consists of meiotic nuclear division and spore morphogenesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the four haploid nuclei produced after meiosis II are encapsulated by the forespore membrane (FSM), which is newly synthesized from spindle pole bodies (SPBs) in the cytoplasm of the mother cell as spore precursors. Although the coordination between meiosis and FSM assembly is vital for proper sporulation, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we identified a new meiosis-specific protein Npg1, and found that it was involved in the efficient formation of spores and spore viability. The accumulation and organization of the FSM was compromised in npg1-null cells, leading to the error-prone envelopment of nuclei. Npg1 was first seen as internuclear dots and translocated to the SPBs before the FSM assembled. Genetic analysis revealed that Npg1 worked in conjunction with the FSM proteins Spo3 and Meu14. These results suggest a possible signaling link from the nucleus to the meiotic SPBs in order to associate the onset of FSM assembly with meiosis II, which ensures the successful partitioning of gametic nuclei. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. A Novel and Conserved Plasmodium Sporozoite Membrane Protein SPELD is Required for Maturation of Exo-erythrocytic Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nihmi, Faisal Mohammed Abdul; Kolli, Surendra Kumar; Reddy, Segireddy Rameswara; Mastan, Babu S.; Togiri, Jyothi; Maruthi, Mulaka; Gupta, Roshni; Sijwali, Puran Singh; Mishra, Satish; Kumar, Kota Arun

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium sporozoites are the infective forms of malaria parasite to vertebrate host and undergo dramatic changes in their transcriptional repertoire during maturation in mosquito salivary glands. We report here the role of a novel and conserved Plasmodium berghei protein encoded by PBANKA_091090 in maturation of Exo-erythrocytic Forms (EEFs) and designate it as Sporozoite surface Protein Essential for Liver stage Development (PbSPELD). PBANKA_091090 was previously annotated as PB402615.00.0 and its transcript was recovered at maximal frequency in the Serial Analysis of the Gene Expression (SAGE) of Plasmodium berghei salivary gland sporozoites. An orthologue of this transcript was independently identified in Plasmodium vivax sporozoite microarrays and was designated as Sporozoite Conserved Orthologous Transcript-2 (scot-2). Functional characterization through reverse genetics revealed that PbSPELD is essential for Plasmodium liver stage maturation. mCherry transgenic of PbSPELD localized the protein to plasma membrane of sporozoites and early EEFs. Global microarray analysis of pbspeld ko revealed EEF attenuation being associated with down regulation of genes central to general transcription, cell cycle, proteosome and cadherin signaling. pbspeld mutant EEFs induced pre-erythrocytic immunity with 50% protective efficacy. Our studies have implications for attenuating the human Plasmodium liver stages by targeting SPELD locus. PMID:28067322

  1. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner-core phosphates are required for complete LPS synthesis and transport to the outer membrane in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucia, Angela M; Six, David A; Caughlan, Ruth E; Gee, Patricia; Hunt, Ian; Lam, Joseph S; Dean, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Gram-negative outer membrane (OM) integrity is maintained in part by Mg(2+) cross-links between phosphates on lipid A and on core sugars of adjacent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. In contrast to other Gram-negative bacteria, waaP, encoding an inner-core kinase, could not be inactivated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To examine this further, expression of the kinases WaaP or WapP/WapQ/PA5006 was placed under the control of the arabinose-regulated pBAD promoter. Growth of these strains was arabinose dependent, confirming that core phosphorylation is essential in P. aeruginosa. Transmission electron micrographs of kinase-depleted cells revealed marked invaginations of the inner membrane. SDS-PAGE of total LPS from WaaP-depleted cells showed accumulation of a fast-migrating band. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that LPS from these cells exhibits a unique truncated core consisting of two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acids (Kdo), two l-glycero-d-manno-heptoses (Hep), and one hexose but completely devoid of phosphates, indicating that phosphorylation by WaaP is necessary for subsequent core phosphorylations. MS analysis of lipid A from WaaP-depleted cells revealed extensive 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose modification. OM prepared from these cells by Sarkosyl extraction of total membranes or by sucrose density gradient centrifugation lacked truncated LPS. Instead, truncated LPS was detected in the inner membrane fractions, consistent with impaired transport/assembly of this species into the OM. IMPORTANCE Gram-negative bacteria have an outer membrane (OM) comprised of a phospholipid inner leaflet and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer leaflet. The OM protects cells from toxic molecules and is important for survival during infection. The LPS core kinase gene waaP can be deleted in several Gram-negative bacteria but not in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used a controlled-expression system to deplete WaaP directly in P. aeruginosa cells, which halted growth. WaaP depletion

  2. Periplasmic nitrate reduction in Wolinella succinogenes: cytoplasmic NapF facilitates NapA maturation and requires the menaquinol dehydrogenase NapH for membrane attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Melanie; Simon, Jörg

    2009-08-01

    Various nitrate-reducing bacteria produce proteins of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) system to catalyse electron transport from the membraneous quinol pool to the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA. The composition of the corresponding nap gene clusters varies but, in addition to napA, genes encoding at least one membrane-bound quinol dehydrogenase module (NapC and/or NapGH) are regularly present. Moreover, some nap loci predict accessory proteins such as the iron-sulfur protein NapF, whose function is poorly understood. Here, the role of NapF in nitrate respiration of the Epsilonproteobacterium Wolinella succinogenes was examined. Immunoblot analysis showed that NapF is located in the membrane fraction in nitrate-grown wild-type cells whereas it was found to be a soluble cytoplasmic protein in a napH deletion mutant. This finding indicates the formation of a membrane-bound NapGHF complex that is likely to catalyse NapH-dependent menaquinol oxidation and electron transport to the iron-sulfur adaptor proteins NapG and NapF, which are located on the periplasmic and cytoplasmic side of the membrane, respectively. The cysteine residues of a CX(3)CP motif and of the C-terminal tetra-cysteine cluster of NapH were found to be required for interaction with NapF. A napF deletion mutant accumulated the catalytically inactive cytoplasmic NapA precursor, suggesting that electron flow or direct interaction between NapF and NapA facilitated NapA assembly and/or export. On the other hand, NapA maturation and activity was not impaired in the absence of NapH, demonstrating that soluble NapF is functional. Each of the four tetra-cysteine motifs of NapF was modified but only one motif was found to be essential for efficient NapA maturation. It is concluded that the NapGHF complex plays a multifunctional role in menaquinol oxidation, electron transfer to periplasmic NapA and maturation of the cytoplasmic NapA precursor.

  3. [Serum lipoprotein profile in newly recognized arterial hypertension. The role of atherogenic lipoproteins in the pathogenesis of disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravec, S; Dukát, A; Gavorník, P; Caprdna, M; Kucera, M

    2010-09-01

    New examination approaches in biochemical analysis of lipoproteins can identify and quantify atherogenic plasma lipoproteins, including small dense LDL and characterise a lipoprotein spectrum as a non-atherogenic lipoprotein profile phenotype A, respectively as an atherogenic lipoprotein profile phenotype B. Identification of a non-aterogenic hypercholesterolemia (48%), atherogenic hypertriglyceridemia (93%), atherogenic normolipemia (13%) in patients with arterial hypertension and an atherogenic normolipemia in control group of healthy subjects (7%), is an essential contribution of this new laboratory diagnostics.

  4. The catalytic activity of the CD45 membrane-proximal phosphatase domain is required for TCR signaling and regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, D M; Sap, J; Silvennoinen, O;

    1994-01-01

    Cell surface expression of CD45, a receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), is required for T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-mediated signal transduction. Like the majority of transmembrane PTPases, CD45 contains two cytoplasmic phosphatase domains, whose relative in vivo function is not...

  5. The two murein lipoproteins of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contribute to the virulence of the organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, J; Fadl, A A; Klimpel, G R; Niesel, D W; Popov, V L; Chopra, A K

    2004-07-01

    Septic shock due to Salmonella and other gram-negative enteric pathogens is a leading cause of death worldwide. The role of lipopolysaccharide in sepsis is well studied; however, the contribution of other bacterial outer membrane components, such as Braun (murein) lipoprotein (Lpp), is not well defined. The genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium harbors two copies of the lipoprotein (lpp) gene. We constructed a serovar Typhimurium strain with deletions in both copies of the lpp gene (lpp1 and lpp2) by marker exchange mutagenesis. The integrity of the cell membrane and the secretion of the effector proteins through the type III secretion system were not affected in the lpp double-knockout mutant. Subsequently, the virulence potential of this mutant was examined in a cell culture system using T84 intestinal epithelial and RAW264.7 macrophage cell lines and a mouse model of salmonellosis. The lpp double-knockout mutant was defective in invading and inducing cytotoxic effects in T84 and RAW264.7 cells, although binding of the mutant to the host cell was not affected when compared to the wild-type (WT) serovar Typhimurium. The motility of the mutant was impaired, despite the finding that the number of flagella was similar in the lpp double knockout mutant and the WT serovar Typhimurium. Deletion in the lpp genes did not affect the intracellular survival and replication of Salmonella in macrophages and T84 cells. Induction of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-8 (IL-8) was significantly reduced in macrophages and T84 cells infected with the lpp double-knockout mutant. The levels of IL-8 remained unaffected in T84 cells when infected with either live or heat-killed WT and lpp mutant, indicating that invasion was not required for IL-8 production and that Toll-like receptor 2 signaling might be affected in the Lpp double-knockout mutant. These effects of the Lpp protein could be restored by complementation of the isogenic

  6. Lipoprotein profile, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and cardiovascular risk in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolla, Roberta; De Mauri, Andreana; Valsesia, Ambra; Vidali, Matteo; Chiarinotti, Doriana; Bellomo, Giorgio

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients; the increased risk of cardiovascular disease is due to accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and impaired lipoprotein metabolism. We aimed to evaluate lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) and some pro-inflammatory aspects of the lipoprotein profile in dialyzed patients in order to evaluate the relationship with the accelerated atherosclerosis and vascular accidents. In 102 dialysis patients and 40 non-uremic controls, we investigated the lipoprotein plasma profile, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), ceruloplasmin and serum amyloid A protein (SAA), and followed patients for 1 year to analyze the risk of acute cardiovascular events. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein plasma levels were significantly lower in uremic patients than controls, whereas CRP, SAA, ceruloplasmin, Lp-PLA2 and their ratio with apolipoprotein A1 were significantly higher. Patients with Lp-PLA2 levels >194 nmol/min/ml had more acute cardiovascular events than patients with lower values. Our results show that in dialysis subjects: (1) low-density lipoproteins show a more atherogenic phenotype than in the general population; (2) high-density lipoproteins are less anti-inflammatory; (3) Lp-PLA2 could potentially be used to evaluate cardiovascular risk.

  7. Distinct Functional Domains Contribute to Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) by the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (IDOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Scheer, Lilith; Santos, Ana; Reits, Eric; Bleijlevens, Boris; Zelcer, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the liver X receptor-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) as a modulator of lipoprotein metabolism. Acting as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, IDOL triggers ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). We demonstrate here that this outcome requires the conserved FERM and RING domains present in IDOL. The RING domain promotes ubiquitination in vitro and Lys-63-specific ubiquitination of the LDLR in vivo in response to IDOL or liver X receptor activation. We further identify RING residues that differentially influence ubiquitination of the LDLR or stability of IDOL. The FERM domain interacts with the LDLR and in living cells co-localizes with the receptor at the plasma membrane. Homology modeling revealed a phosphotyrosine-binding element embedded in the FERM domain. Mutating residues within this region or residues in the LDLR preceding the NPVY endocytosis motif abrogate LDLR degradation by IDOL. Collectively, our results indicate that both the FERM and RING domains are required for promoting lysosomal degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. Our findings may facilitate development of structure-based IDOL inhibitors aimed at increasing LDLR abundance in therapeutic strategies to treat cardiovascular disease. PMID:21734303

  8. Reduced anesthetic requirements in aged rats: association with altered brain synaptic plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pump and phospholipid methyltransferase I activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, J L; Janicki, P K; Singh, G; Wamil, A W; Franks, J J

    1996-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decrease in anesthetic requirements. Animal models of aging manifest alteration of brain Ca2+ homeostasis and increased methyltransferase I (PLMTI) activity. In this study we evaluated concurrently anesthetic requirements and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) and PLMTI activities in young and aged rats. Halothane, desflurane, isoflurane and xenon MEDs (lowest partial pressures that suppress a pain response) were measured in 2 and 25 month old, male Fisher-344 rats. Halothane MED was also measured in 2 and 30 month old F344/BNF1 rats, a strain that undergoes aging with less debilitation. PMCA pumping and PLMTI activities were measured in synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) prepared from the cortex and diencephalon-mesencephalon (DM). For aged Fisher-344 rats, MEDs for halothane, desflurane, isoflurane and xenon were reduced to 81%, 82%, 67% and 86%, respectively, of young controls; PMCA activity was diminished to 91% in cortical SPM and 82% in DM SPM; and cortical and DM PLMTI activities were increased to 131% and 114% of young control. For F344/BNF1 rats, MED for halothane was reduced to 87%, PMCA activity was diminished to 90% in cortical SPM and 72% DM SPM, and PLMTI activity was increased to 133% in cortical SPM and 112% in DM SPM. The strong association between age and reduced anesthetic requirements for inhalational agents on the one hand and altered PMCA and PLMTI activity on the other lends support to the underlying hypothesis that PMCA and PLMTI may be involved in the production of the anesthetic state.

  9. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Activity Is Involved in the Plasma Membrane Redox System Required for Pigment Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand; Albertsen, K.S.; Stougaard, P.

    2010-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductases (MTHFRs) play a key role in biosynthesis of methionine and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) via the recharging methionine biosynthetic pathway. Analysis of 32 complete fungal genomes showed that fungi were unique among eukaryotes by having two MTHFRs, MET12 and M...... are the first to show that MET13, in addition to its function in methionine biosynthesis, is required for the generation of the extracellular reduction potential necessary for pigment production in filamentous fungi....

  10. High antibody titer against apical membrane antigen-1 is required to protect against malaria in the Aotus model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetij Dutta

    Full Text Available A Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1 vaccine, formulated with AS02(A adjuvant, slowed parasite growth in a recent Phase 1/2a trial, however sterile protection was not observed. We tested this AS02(A, and a Montanide ISA720 (ISA formulation of 3D7 AMA1 in Aotus monkeys. The 3D7 parasite does not invade Aotus erythrocytes, hence two heterologous strains, FCH/4 and FVO, were used for challenge, FCH/4 AMA1 being more homologous to 3D7 than FVO AMA1. Following three vaccinations, the monkeys were challenged with 50,000 FCH/4 or 10,000 FVO parasites. Three of the six animals in the AMA+ISA group were protected against FCH/4 challenge. One monkey did not become parasitemic, another showed only a short period of low level parasitemia that self-cured, and a third animal showed a delay before exhibiting its parasitemic phase. This is the first protection shown in primates with a recombinant P. falciparum AMA1 without formulation in Freund's complete adjuvant. No animals in the AMA+AS02(A group were protected, but this group exhibited a trend towards reduced growth rate. A second group of monkeys vaccinated with AMA+ISA vaccine was not protected against FVO challenge, suggesting strain-specificity of AMA1-based protection. Protection against FCH/4 strain correlated with the quantity of induced antibodies, as the protected animals were the only ones to have in vitro parasite growth inhibitory activity of >70% at 1:10 serum dilution; immuno-fluorescence titers >8,000; ELISA titers against full-length AMA1 >300,000 and ELISA titer against AMA1 domains1+2 >100,000. A negative correlation between log ELISA titer and day 11 cumulative parasitemia (Spearman rank r = -0.780, p value = 0.0001, further confirmed the relationship between antibody titer and protection. High titers of cross-strain inhibitory antibodies against AMA1 are therefore critical to confer solid protection, and the Aotus model can be used to down-select future AMA1

  11. A Framework for Better Understanding and Enhancing Direct Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) in Terms of Module Design, Cost Analysis and Energy Required

    KAUST Repository

    AbuHannoud, Ali

    2011-07-01

    Water is becoming scarcer and several authors have highlighted the upcoming problem of higher water salinity and the difficulty of treating and discharging water. Moreover, current discoveries of problems with chemicals that have been used for pretreating or post-treating water alerted scientists to research better solutions to treat water. Membrane distillation (MD) is a promising technology that might replace current processes as it has lower pretreatment requirements combined with a tremendous ability to treat a wide range of feed sources while producing very high product quality. If it enters the market, it will have a big influence on all products, from food industry to spaceflight. However, there are several problems which make MD a hot topic for research. One of them is the question about the real cost of MD in terms of heating feed and cooling distillate over time with respect to product quantity and quality. In this work, extensive heating and cooling analyses are covered to answer this question in order to enhance the MD process. Results show energy cost to produce water and the main source of energy loss for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD), and several suggestions are made in order to better understand and hence enhance the process.

  12. Requirements for F-BAR proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in actin dynamics and membrane trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte growth and embryonic epidermal morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Giuliani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The TOCA family of F-BAR-containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii CeTOCA proteins localize to cell-cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP-dependent actin-dynamics.

  13. Current situation of lipoprotein apheresis in Saxony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julius, U; Taseva, K; Fischer, S; Passauer, J; Bornstein, S R

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the situation pertinent to treatment via lipoprotein apheresis in the federal state of Saxony, Germany in 2010. In total, 119 predominately male patients were treated in 10 centers; the majority of the patients was older than the mean age of the general population. Several risk factors were present, particularly a familial predisposition and hypertension. All patients had experienced cardiovascular events and the majority was taking statins. Patient data from the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus in Dresden concurred with data derived from patients treated at nephrological practices. In the mean, patients attended the centers for about 6 years, the majority weekly. LDL cholesterol concentrations prior to apheresis were clearly higher than target levels; apheresis sessions decreased LDL cholesterol by 69%. Lipoprotein(a) levels could be measured in 75 patients and were effectively reduced by lipoprotein apheresis. In Saxony, 29 patients per 1 million inhabitants received lipoprotein apheresis, which is higher than the proportion of patients treated in Germany as a whole. The need for this extracorporeal treatment seems to be much greater than its current utilization. Among the patients only one homozygous patient with familial hypercholesterolemia was observed. Physicians should be actively informed about this therapeutic possibility to reduce the cardiovascular risk efficiently. The introduction of new drugs may alter the position of lipoprotein apheresis within the therapeutic spectrum.

  14. 梅毒螺旋体Tp0821基因的克隆、表达、纯化及免疫活性研究%Gene cloning,expression and purification of Tp0821,a membrane lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum and its immunocompetence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍宁; 肖勇健; 顾伟鸣; 刘双全; 赵飞骏; 张跃军; 吴移谋

    2010-01-01

    目的 构建梅毒螺旋体(Tp)膜脂蛋白Tp0821的重组质粒,表达、纯化其相应蛋白,研究其免疫活性.方法 构建重组质粒pQE32/Tp082l,诱导表达其相应蛋白,以纯化的重组蛋白免疫新西兰兔,制备多克隆抗体并测定其效价.建立间接ELISA法,检测80份梅毒参比血清、临床经FTA-ABS确诊的阳性血清各150份.结果 成功构建重组质粒pQE32/Tp0821,十二烷基硫酸钠-聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(SDS-PAGE)分析重组蛋白分子量与预期结果相符.将亲和层析后所获高纯度重组蛋白免疫新西兰兔,制备的多克隆抗体效价达1:6400.间接ELISA法检测梅毒参比血清、临床梅毒患者血清,与间接免疫荧光螺旋体抗体吸附试验(FTA-ABS)法比较,其灵敏度、特异度分别为92.6%和98.6%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 Tp0821重组蛋白具有较好的免疫活性,可用于梅毒血清学检测.%Objective To construct a recombinant plasmid encoding Tp0821,a membrane lipoprotein of T. pallidum,express and purify this protein,and to evaluate its immunocompetence.Methods The recombinant plasmid pQE32/Tp0821 was constructed and induced to express the corresponding protein.Then,New Zealand rabbits were immunized with purified recombinant protein to prepare polycional antibodies,and the titer of polyclonal antibody was determinated.Indirect ELISA was developed with the recombinant protein of T. pallidum as coating antigen to detect 80 control sera and 150 FTA-ABS-positive sera.Results The recombinant plasmid pQE32/Tp0821 was constructed and a fusion protein with expected molecular weight was expressed.Specific humoral response was elicited by the recombinant protein in New Zealand rabbits and the antibody titer reached 1:6400.Compared with FTA-ABS test,the indirect ELISA showed a sensitivity and specificity of 92.6%and 98.6%,respectively,in the detection of control and clinical sera.Conclusion The recombinant protein Tp0821 shows excellent immunocompetence

  15. Increased transvascular lipoprotein transport in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Skov; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: Diabetes is associated with a highly increased risk of atherosclerosis, especially if hypertension or albuminuria is present. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that the increased transvascular lipoprotein transport in diabetes may be further accelerated if hypertension or albuminuria is present......, possibly explaining increased intimal lipoprotein accumulation and thus atherosclerosis. DESIGN: The study was cross-sectional and was performed in 1999-2002. SETTING: The study took place in the referral center. PATIENTS: The patients included 60 with diabetes mellitus (27 with type 1 diabetes and 33...... with type 2 diabetes) and 42 healthy controls. All were randomly recruited. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: We used an in vivo method for measurement of transvascular transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Autologous 131I-LDL was reinjected iv, and the 1-h fractional escape rate was taken as an index...

  16. Immune response to lipoproteins in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Sonia; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  17. Moesin is required for HIV-1-induced CD4-CXCR4 interaction, F-actin redistribution, membrane fusion and viral infection in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero-Villar, Marta; Cabrero, José Román; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Alvarez-Losada, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope regulates the initial attachment of viral particles to target cells through its association with CD4 and either CXCR4 or CCR5. Although F-actin is required for CD4 and CXCR4 redistribution, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this fundamental process in HIV infection. Using CD4(+) CXCR4(+) permissive human leukemic CEM T cells and primary lymphocytes, we have investigated whether HIV-1 Env might promote viral entry and infection by activating ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins to regulate F-actin reorganization and CD4/CXCR4 co-clustering. The interaction of the X4-tropic protein HIV-1 gp120 with CD4 augments ezrin and moesin phosphorylation in human permissive T cells, thereby regulating ezrin-moesin activation. Moreover, the association and clustering of CD4-CXCR4 induced by HIV-1 gp120 requires moesin-mediated anchoring of actin in the plasma membrane. Suppression of moesin expression with dominant-negative N-moesin or specific moesin silencing impedes reorganization of F-actin and HIV-1 entry and infection mediated by the HIV-1 envelope protein complex. Therefore, we propose that activated moesin promotes F-actin redistribution and CD4-CXCR4 clustering and is also required for efficient X4-tropic HIV-1 infection in permissive lymphocytes.

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel stress-responsive outer membrane protein Lip40 from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuehe; Yan, Hao; Liu, Ke; Hu, Jiansheng; Qi, Chao; Yang, Jihong; Liu, Yanli; Zhao, Jin; Liu, Jinlin

    2015-11-25

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious and often fatal disease. Because current vaccines confer limited protection against A. pleuropneumoniae infection, the development of more effective vaccines is urgently required. The identification of immunogenic and protective antigens, such as an outer-membrane lipoprotein, will advance this purpose. Sixty putative lipoproteins were predicted from the genomic sequence of A. pleuropneumoniae using multiple algorithms. Here, we focused on the characteristics of the putative lipoprotein Lip40 from A. pleuropneumoniae strain SLW01 (serovar 1). Lip40 shares sequence similarity with many bacterial lipoproteins, and the structural prediction of Lip40 suggests that it is similar to A. pleuropneumoniae TbpB. The N-terminus of Lip40 contains an interesting tandemly repeated sequence, Q(E/D/P)QPK. Real-time RT-PCR indicated that the expression of lip40 was significantly upregulated at 42 °C, at 16 °C, and under anaerobic conditions. Recombinant Lip40 (rLip40) produced in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was specifically recognized by porcine convalescent serum directed against A. pleuropneumoniae. Lip40 was confirmed to localize at the bacterial outer membrane, and its expression was significantly stimulated when A. pleuropneumoniae was cultured under various stress conditions. Lip40 also protected 75% of mice from fatal virulent A. pleuropneumoniae infection. The immunogenic outer-membrane protein Lip40 is stress responsive, protects mice against infection, and might be a virulence determinant. Further investigation of Lip40 should expedite vaccine development and provide insight into the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae.

  19. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance of such gene......To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance...

  20. Lipoprotein apheresis for the treatment of elevated circulating levels of lipoprotein(a): a critical literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a), which consists of a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle linked to an apolipoprotein(a) moiety, is currently considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease due to its atherogenic (LDL-like) and prothrombotic (plasminogen-like) properties. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current and newer therapies for lowering increased lipoprotein(a) levels, focusing on lipoprotein apheresis. After a systematic literature search, we identified ten studies which, overall, documented that lipoprotein apheresis is effective in reducing increased lipoprotein(a) levels and cardiovascular events. PMID:26710351

  1. Acute changes in lipoprotein subclasses during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Poulsen, Marianne K; Jensen, Michael D; Nielsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are important substrates for oxidation in the basal fasting state and during exercise. Studies have demonstrated beneficial changes in lipoprotein subclass composition the day after an exercise bout. However, the acute effect of exercise on TG concentration and lipoprotein subclass composition remains unclear. Sixteen lean, healthy individuals (8 men and 8 women) were recruited (age 20-30 years, BMILipoprotein subclass composition was measured with (1)H NMR spectroscopy. During exercise, LDL and HDL particle concentration increased significantly (plipoprotein subclass composition. These changes are similar to the effects of exercise training. © 2013.

  2. Lipoprotein subfractions by nuclear magnetic resonance are associated with tumor characteristics in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flote, Vidar G; Vettukattil, Riyas; Bathen, Tone F; Egeland, Thore; McTiernan, Anne; Frydenberg, Hanne; Husøy, Anders; Finstad, Sissi E; Lømo, Jon; Garred, Øystein; Schlichting, Ellen; Wist, Erik A; Thune, Inger

    2016-03-12

    High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, has been associated with breast cancer development, but the association is under debate, and whether lipoprotein subfractions is associated with breast tumor characteristics remains unclear. Among 56 women with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer stage I/II, aged 35-75 years, pre-surgery overnight fasting serum concentrations of lipids were assessed, and body mass index (BMI) was measured. All breast tumors were immunohistochemically examined in the surgical specimen. Serum metabolomics of lipoprotein subfractions and their contents of cholesterol, free cholesterol, phospholipids, apolipoprotein-A1 and apolipoprotein-A2, were assessed using nuclear magnetic resonance. Principal component analysis, partial least square analysis, and uni- and multivariable linear regression models were used to study whether lipoprotein subfractions were associated with breast cancer tumor characteristics. The breast cancer patients had following means: age at diagnosis: 55.1 years; BMI: 25.1 kg/m(2); total-Cholesterol: 5.74 mmol/L; HDL-Cholesterol: 1.78 mmol/L; Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-Cholesterol: 3.45 mmol/L; triglycerides: 1.18 mmol/L. The mean tumor size was 16.4 mm, and the mean Ki67 hotspot index was 26.5%. Most (93%) of the patients had estrogen receptor (ER) positive tumors (≥ 1% ER+), and 82% had progesterone receptor (PgR) positive tumors (≥ 10% PgR+). Several HDL subfraction contents were strongly associated with PgR expression: Apolipoprotein-A1 (β 0.46, CI 0.22-0.69, p lipoproteins and ER expression. Our findings hypothesize associations between different lipoprotein subfractions, and PgR expression, and Ki 67 % in breast tumors. These findings may have clinical implications, but require confirmation in larger studies.

  3. Cardiomyocyte Regulation of Systemic Lipid Metabolism by the Apolipoprotein B-Containing Lipoproteins in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    The heart has emerged as an important organ in the regulation of systemic lipid homeostasis; however, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Drosophila cardiomyocytes regulate systemic lipid metabolism by producing apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (apoB-lipoproteins), essential lipid carriers that are so far known to be generated only in the fat body. In a Drosophila genetic screen, we discovered that when haplo-insufficient, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (mtp), required for the biosynthesis of apoB-lipoproteins, suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity. Tissue-specific inhibition of Mtp revealed that whereas knockdown of mtp only in the fat body decreases systemic triglyceride (TG) content on normal food diet (NFD) as expected, knockdown of mtp only in the cardiomyocytes also equally decreases systemic TG content on NFD, suggesting that the cardiomyocyte- and fat body-derived apoB-lipoproteins serve similarly important roles in regulating whole-body lipid metabolism. Unexpectedly, on high fat diet (HFD), knockdown of mtp in the cardiomyocytes, but not in fat body, protects against the gain in systemic TG levels. We further showed that inhibition of the Drosophila apoB homologue, apolipophorin or apoLpp, another gene essential for apoB-lipoprotein biosynthesis, affects systemic TG levels similarly to that of Mtp inhibition in the cardiomyocytes on NFD or HFD. Finally, we determined that HFD differentially alters Mtp and apoLpp expression in the cardiomyocytes versus the fat body, culminating in higher Mtp and apoLpp levels in the cardiomyocytes than in fat body and possibly underlying the predominant role of cardiomyocyte-derived apoB-lipoproteins in lipid metabolic regulation. Our findings reveal a novel and significant function of heart-mediated apoB-lipoproteins in controlling lipid homeostasis. PMID:28095410

  4. Self-assembling peptides form nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Kirkensgaard, Jacob Judas Kain;

    2014-01-01

    New methods to handle membrane bound proteins, e.g. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), are highly desirable. Recently, apoliprotein A1 (ApoA1) based lipoprotein particles have emerged as a new platform for studying membrane proteins, and it has been shown that they can self-assemble in combinat...

  5. Atherogenic subfractions of lipoproteins in the treatment of metabolic syndrome by physical activity and diet - the RESOLVE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutheil, Frédéric; Walther, Guillaume; Chapier, Robert; Mnatzaganian, George; Lesourd, Bruno; Naughton, Geraldine; Verney, Julien; Fogli, Anne; Sapin, Vincent; Duclos, Martine; Vinet, Agnès; Obert, Philippe; Courteix, Daniel; Lac, Gérard

    2014-07-11

    the 3-week residential program. During a 12 month follow-up, the time-related regains remained closer to the values of healthy controls than they were at baseline. CIMT improved throughout the lifestyle intervention. However, we failed to demonstrate a link between some lipoprotein subfractions and the atherogenicity directly measured from the wall thickness of arteries (CIMT). Further investigations are required to explore the atherogenicity of lipoprotein subfractions. NCT00917917.

  6. The usefulness of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The usefulness of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein - cholesterol ratio in ... cholesterol and/or highdensity lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol ratios in the interpretation of lipid profile result in clinical practice. ... Article Metrics.

  7. Evaluation of Homocysteine, Lipoprotein(a) and Endothelin as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Homocysteine, Lipoprotein(a) and Endothelin as diagnostic markers of Coronary Artery Disease in Indian population. ... The objective of this study was to assess the role of endothelin, lipoprotein(a), ... Article Metrics.

  8. Correlation between serum lipoproteins and abdominal fat pad in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation between serum lipoproteins and abdominal fat pad in broiler chickens. ... The high density lipoprotein (HDL) concentration in birds fed fish oil diet was higher than other treatments, but the serum low density ... Article Metrics.

  9. Serum Lipids and Lipoproteins Levels and Selected Trace Metals In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum Lipids and Lipoproteins Levels and Selected Trace Metals In Newly ... This study aim to determine the serum levels of trace metals and correlate same with serum levels of lipoproteins (an established marker of HBP) in ... Article Metrics.

  10. Effects of dietary turmeric supplementation on plasma lipoproteins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dietary turmeric supplementation on plasma lipoproteins, meat quality and fatty acid composition in broilers. ... dietary supplementation of turmeric rhizome powder (TRP) on plasma lipoprotein concentrations, and the ... Article Metrics.

  11. Human Low Density Lipoprotein as a Vehicle of Atherosclerosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Low Density Lipoprotein as a Vehicle of Atherosclerosis. ... Low-density lipoproteins have been sufficiently established as an important precursor of atherosclerosis. The actual mechanism is still ... Article Metrics. Metrics Loading .

  12. Evaluation of plasma lipids and lipoproteins in nigerians suffering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of plasma lipids and lipoproteins in nigerians suffering from depressive illness. ... Very little is known about the lipid and lipoprotein status in Nigerian adults suffering from depression. One hundred subjects ... Article Metrics.

  13. Apolipoprotein (A) Isoform Distribution and Plasma Lipoprotein (a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apolipoprotein (A) Isoform Distribution and Plasma Lipoprotein (a) Levels In Nigerian Subjects With and Without Coronary Heart Disease. ... Plasma lipoprotein (a) Concentrations and apo(a) isoforms were determined in 101 ... Article Metrics.

  14. Interference of phenol during quantification of a bacterial lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interference of phenol during quantification of a bacterial lipoprotein. ... bacterial Braun liporotein (BLP) from E. coli (a Toll-2 receptor ligand) is purified via phenol extraction on the basis of selective extraction of the lipoprotein. ... Article Metrics.

  15. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) impacts on erythrocyte viscoelasticity and its molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Yang, Li; Liu, Yao; Gao, Wei; Peng, Weiyan; Sung, K-L Paul; Sung, Lanping Amy

    2009-10-16

    The oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) plays an important role in atherosclerosis, yet it remains unclear if it damages circulating erythrocytes. In this study, erythrocyte deformability and its membrane proteins after Ox-LDL incubations are investigated by micropipette aspiration, thiol radical measurement, and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results show that Ox-LDL incubation reduces the erythrocyte deformability, decreases free thiol radical contents in erythrocytes, and induces the cross-linking among membrane proteins. SDS-PAGE analysis reveals a high molecular weight (HMW) complex as well as new bands between spectrins and band 3 and reduced ratios between band 3 and other major membrane skeletal proteins. Analyses indicate that Ox-LDL makes erythrocytes harder to deform through a molecular mechanism by which the oxidation of free thiol radicals forms disulfide bonds among membrane skeletal proteins.

  16. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Christian M; Kinsella, Rachel L; Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion.

  17. 应用纯化重组外膜脂蛋白LipL32检测钩端螺旋体病抗体%Application of purified recombinant outer membrane lipoprotein LipL32 in detecting antibodies among leptospirosis cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国英; 严延生; 张志珊; 李世清; 王灵岚; 邓艳琴; 潘敏楠

    2008-01-01

    Objective To establish recombinant outer membrane lipoprotein LipL32-based antibody detection assays in identifying leptospirosis. Methods Recombinant leptospiral outer membrane protein LipL32 was obtained by genetic engineering method. This purified protein was used in the indirect and sandwich ELISA assays to test the antibodies in sera of human beings and rats, and the results were compared with those obtained by microscopy agglutination test (MAT) and imported ELISA kit. Results When the acute and convalescent phase specimens from 9 leptospiral patients were tested, the detected rates of three ELISAs were similar to the MAT. Among the 45 probable cases which MAT showed positive, 32 (71.11%) samples were positive by r32-I-ELISA, 36(80.00%) by r32-S-ELISA,while 28.89% (13/45) samples were positive and 55.56% (25/45)were suspicious by D.A.I-ELISA. The specificity of r32-I-ELISA and r32-S-ELISA were 97.10 % (67/69) for 69 specimens. 43 healthy specimens were negative by both r32-I-ELISA and r32-S-ELISA, 14 healthy specimens were negative by D.A.I-ELISA. Among 16 non-leptospirosis patients, two specimens were positive by r32-I-ELISA and r32-S-ELISA, D.A.I-ELISA and identified one positive specimen, while 12 specimens were suspicious by D.A.I-ELISA. For 10 syphilis specimens, data obtained through three ELISAs were in consistent with that by MAT. A sandwiched ELISA, using rLipL32 protein as the antigen was developed to detect rat sera. Considering MAT as standard test, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.75 % (131/151), 99.19 % (122/123) respectively with coincidence rate as 92.34% (253/274). Conclusion The recombinant protein LipL32 had high immunoresctivity and could be used as an antigen for the detection of panthogenic leptospirosis. In summary, the novel sandwiched ELISA with rLipL32 showed similar sensitivity and specificity to that of MAT in the antibody detection of rat leptospirosis. It was suitable for large scales field sero-epidemiological studies

  18. Lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt1) is dispensable for protein O-mannosylation by Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Dávalos, Laura Elena; Espitia, Clara; González-Cerón, Gabriela; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria; Servín-González, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A protein glycosylation system related to that for protein mannosylation in yeast is present in many actinomycetes. This system involves polyprenyl phosphate mannose synthase (Ppm), protein mannosyl transferase (Pmt), and lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). In this study, we obtained a series of mutants in the ppm (sco1423), lnt1 (sco1014), and pmt (sco3154) genes of Streptomyces coelicolor, which encode Ppm, Lnt1, and Pmt, to analyze their requirement for glycosylation of the heterologously expressed Apa glycoprotein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results show that both Ppm and Pmt were required for Apa glycosylation, but that Lnt1 was dispensable for both Apa and the bacteriophage φC31 receptor glycosylation. A bacterial two-hybrid assay revealed that contrary to M. tuberculosis, Lnt1 of S. coelicolor does not interact with Ppm. The D2 catalytic domain of M. tuberculosisPpm was sufficient for complementation of an S. coelicolor double mutant lacking Lnt1 and Ppm, both for Apa glycosylation and for glycosylation of φC31 receptor. On the other hand, M. tuberculosisPmt was not active in S. coelicolor, even when correctly localized to the cytoplasmic membrane, showing fundamental differences in the requirements for Pmt activity in these two species.

  19. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain regulates the energy requirement for EBV-induced membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xianming; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is preceded by membrane fusion, which in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is thought to be mediated by the refolding of glycoprotein B (gB) from a prefusion to a postfusion state. In our current studies, we characterized a gB C-terminal tail domain (CTD) mutant truncated at amino acid 843 (gB843). This truncation mutant is hyperfusogenic as monitored by syncytium formation and in a quantitative fusion assay and is dependent on gH/gL for fusion activity. gB843 can rescue the fusion function of other glycoprotein mutants that have null or decreased fusion activity in epithelial and B cells. In addition, gB843 requires less gp42 and gH/gL for fusion, and can function in fusion at a lower temperature than wild-type gB, indicating a lower energy requirement for fusion activation. Since a key step in fusion is the conversion of gB from a prefusion to an active postfusion state by gH/gL, gB843 may access this activated gB state more readily. Our studies indicate that the gB CTD may participate in the fusion function by maintaining gB in an inactive prefusion form prior to activation by receptor binding. Importance: Diseases resulting from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in humans range from the fairly benign disease infectious mononucleosis to life-threatening cancer. As an enveloped virus, EBV must fuse with a host cell membrane for entry and infection by using glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42. Among these glycoproteins, gB is thought to be the protein that executes fusion. To further characterize the function of the EBV gB cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain (CTD) in fusion, we used a previously constructed CTD truncation mutant and studied its fusion activity in the context of other EBV glycoprotein mutants. From these studies, we find that the gB CTD regulates fusion by altering the energy requirements for the triggering of fusion mediated by gH/gL or gp42. Overall, our studies may lead to a better understanding of EBV fusion

  20. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP-3) and VAMP-8 are present in human platelets and are required for granule secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, János; Chung, Sul-Hee; Reed, Guy L

    2002-08-01

    Secretion of platelet granules is necessary for normal hemostasis. Platelet secretion requires soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptor (SNARE) complex formation between different members of the syntaxin, SNAP-25, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) gene families. Using microcapillary reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 as VAMP isoforms coimmunoprecipitated from platelets with syntaxin 4. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed the presence of VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 but not VAMP-1 or VAMP-2 in platelets. To examine the effect of VAMP proteins on platelet secretion, soluble recombinant (r) VAMP-2, rVAMP-3, and rVAMP-8 were incubated with streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets. Secretion of alpha granules (monitored by flow cytometric measurement of P-selectin) was blocked, and dense-granule secretion (assessed by release of carbon 14-serotonin) was almost completely inhibited by rVAMP-3, whereas rVAMP-8 inhibited secretion of dense granules but not alpha granules. In contrast, rVAMP-2, which formed SNARE complexes in vitro, had no effect on platelet exocytosis. We conclude that VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 form SNARE complexes with platelet syntaxin 4 and are required for platelet granule secretion.

  1. Functional characterization of SbmA, a bacterial inner membrane transporter required for importing the antimicrobial peptide Bac7(1-35).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runti, Giulia; Lopez Ruiz, Maria del Carmen; Stoilova, Tatiana; Hussain, Rohanah; Jennions, Matthew; Choudhury, Hassanul G; Benincasa, Monica; Gennaro, Renato; Beis, Konstantinos; Scocchi, Marco

    2013-12-01

    SbmA is an inner membrane protein of Gram-negative bacteria that is involved in the internalization of glycopeptides and prokaryotic and eukaryotic antimicrobial peptides, as well as of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers. The SbmA homolog BacA is required for the development of Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteroids within plant cells and favors chronic infections with Brucella abortus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice. Here, we investigated functional features of SbmA/BacA using the proline-rich antimicrobial peptide Bac7(1-35) as a substrate. Circular dichroism and affinity chromatography studies were used to investigate the ability of SbmA to bind the peptide, and a whole-cell transport assay with fluorescently labeled peptide allowed the determination of transport kinetic parameters with a calculated Km value of 6.95 ± 0.89 μM peptide and a Vmax of 53.91 ± 3.17 nmol/min/mg SbmA. Use of a bacterial two-hybrid system coupled to SEC-MALLS (size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle laser light scattering) analyses established that SbmA is a homodimer in the membrane, and treatment of the cells with arsenate or ionophores indicated that the peptide transport mediated by SbmA is driven by the electrochemical gradient. Overall, these results shed light on the SbmA-mediated internalization of peptide substrates and suggest that the transport of an unknown substrate(s) represents the function of this protein.

  2. Lipoprotein lipase isoelectric point isoforms in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badia-Villanueva, M.; Carulla, P.; Carrascal, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes circulating triacylglycerols (TAG) into free fatty acids and glycerol. It is present in almost all tissues and its tissue-specific regulation directs the flow of circulating TAG in the body. We demonstrated in a previous study that, in rat heart and post-hepari...

  3. Enzymatic Modification of Plasma Low Density Lipoproteins in Rabbits: A Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeque, Regine; Mullon, Claudy J. P.; Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.; Lees, Robert S.; Langer, Robert

    1993-04-01

    Phospholipase A_2 (EC 3.1.1.4) hydrolyzes certain phospholipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Plasma clearance of phospholipase A_2-modified human LDL is up to 17 times faster than that of native human LDL in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Modification of blood lipoproteins of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was performed by using an extracorporeal circuit containing immobilized phospholipase A_2. After 90-min treatments, nearly 30% decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations were observed. Erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts showed no net change after treatment. This technique does not require any fluid replacement or sorbent regeneration and offers a potential approach for lowering serum cholesterol and LDL levels.

  4. Unfavorable apoAI-containing lipoproteins profile in Tunisian obese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    be more sensitive to obesity effect than traditional lipid and lipoprotein parameters. The nature of .... The glucose assay was immediate, while other parameters were quantified ..... Regulation of plasma high-density lipoprotein levels by the ABCA1 transporter ... regulator of very low density lipoprotein metabolism and insulin.

  5. Metabolism of high density lipoproteins in liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Ting Jiang; Ning Xu; Chang-Ping Wu

    2007-01-01

    Liver plays a vital role in the production and catabolism of plasma lipoproteins. It depends on the integrity of cellular function of liver, which ensures homeostasis of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. When liver cancer occurs these processes are impaired and high-density lipoproteins are changed.

  6. Hyphenating size-exclusion chromatography with electrospray mass spectrometry; using on-line liquid-liquid extraction to study the lipid composition of lipoprotein particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Michael; Griffin, Julian L; Koulman, Albert

    2015-11-15

    Lipoproteins belong to the most commonly measured clinical biochemical parameters. Lipidomics is an orthogonal approach and aims to profile the individual lipid molecules that jointly form the lipoprotein particles. However, in the first step of the extraction of lipid molecules from serum, an organic solvent is used leading to dissociation of the lipoproteins. Thus far it has been impossible to combine lipidomics and lipoprotein analysis in one analytical system. Human plasma was diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and injected onto a Superose 6 PC 3.2 column with PBS as a mobile phase to separate lipoproteins. The eluent was led to a Syrris FLLEX module, which also received CHCl3 /MeOH (3:1). The two phases were mixed and subsequently separated using a Teflon membrane in an especially designed pressurized flow chamber. The organic phase was led to a standard electrospray source of an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) has been commonly applied to separate lipoproteins and is considered a practical alternative to ultracentrifugation. Through the on-line liquid-liquid extraction method it becomes possible to obtained detailed mass spectra of lipids across different lipoprotein fractions. The extracted ion chromatograms of specific lipid signals showed their distribution against the size of lipoprotein particles. The application of on-line liquid-liquid extraction allows for the continuous electrospray-based mass spectral analysis of SEC eluent, providing the detailed lipid composition of lipoprotein particles separated by size. This approach provides new possibilities for the study of the biochemistry of lipoproteins. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins protect lipoprotein lipase from inactivation by ANGPTL3 and ANGPTL4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Stefan K; Anderson, Fredrick; Ericsson, Madelene; Larsson, Mikael; Makoveichuk, Elena; Lookene, Aivar; Heeren, Joerg; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2012-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is important for clearance of triacylglycerols (TG) from plasma both as an enzyme and as a bridging factor between lipoproteins and receptors for endocytosis. The amount of LPL at the luminal side of the capillary endothelium determines to what extent lipids are taken up. Mechanisms to control both the activity of LPL and its transport to the endothelial sites are regulated, but poorly understood. Angiopoietin-like proteins (ANGPTLs) 3 and 4 are potential control proteins for LPL, but plasma concentrations of ANGPTLs do not correlate with plasma TG levels. We investigated the effects of recombinant human N-terminal (NT) ANGPTLs3 and 4 on LPL-mediated bridging of TG-rich lipoproteins to primary mouse hepatocytes and found that the NT-ANGPTLs, in concentrations sufficient to cause inactivation of LPL in vitro, were unable to prevent LPL-mediated lipoprotein uptake. We therefore investigated the effects of lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL and LDL) on the inactivation of LPL in vitro by NT-ANGPTLs3 and 4 and found that LPL activity was protected by TG-rich lipoproteins. In vivo, postprandial TG protected LPL from inactivation by recombinant NT-ANGPTL4 injected to mice. We conclude that lipoprotein-bound LPL is stabilized against inactivation by ANGPTLs. The levels of ANGPTLs found in blood may not be sufficient to overcome this stabilization. Therefore it is likely that the prime site of action of ANGPTLs on LPL is in subendothelial compartments where TG-rich lipoprotein concentration is lower than in blood. This could explain why the plasma levels of TG and ANGPTLs do not correlate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Computational Model for the Analysis of Lipoprotein Distributions in the Mouse: Translating FPLC Profiles to Lipoprotein Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sips, Fianne L. P.; Tiemann, Christian A.; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Groen, Albert K.; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances of lipoprotein metabolism are recognized as indicators of cardiometabolic disease risk. Lipoprotein size and composition, measured in a lipoprotein profile, are considered to be disease risk markers. However, the measured profile is a collective result of complex metabolic interactions, which complicates the identification of changes in metabolism. In this study we aim to develop a method which quantitatively relates murine lipoprotein size, composition and concentration to the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein metabolism. We introduce a computational framework which incorporates a novel kinetic model of murine lipoprotein metabolism. The model is applied to compute a distribution of plasma lipoproteins, which is then related to experimental lipoprotein profiles through the generation of an in silico lipoprotein profile. The model was first applied to profiles obtained from wild-type C57Bl/6J mice. The results provided insight into the interplay of lipoprotein production, remodelling and catabolism. Moreover, the concentration and metabolism of unmeasured lipoprotein components could be determined. The model was validated through the prediction of lipoprotein profiles of several transgenic mouse models commonly used in cardiovascular research. Finally, the framework was employed for longitudinal analysis of the profiles of C57Bl/6J mice following a pharmaceutical intervention with a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. The multifaceted regulatory response to the administration of the compound is incompletely understood. The results explain the characteristic changes of the observed lipoprotein profile in terms of the underlying metabolic perturbation and resultant modifications of lipid fluxes in the body. The Murine Lipoprotein Profiler (MuLiP) presented here is thus a valuable tool to assess the metabolic origin of altered murine lipoprotein profiles and can be applied in preclinical research performed in mice for analysis of lipid fluxes and

  9. A computational model for the analysis of lipoprotein distributions in the mouse: translating FPLC profiles to lipoprotein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sips, Fianne L P; Tiemann, Christian A; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Groen, Albert K; Hilbers, Peter A J; van Riel, Natal A W

    2014-05-01

    Disturbances of lipoprotein metabolism are recognized as indicators of cardiometabolic disease risk. Lipoprotein size and composition, measured in a lipoprotein profile, are considered to be disease risk markers. However, the measured profile is a collective result of complex metabolic interactions, which complicates the identification of changes in metabolism. In this study we aim to develop a method which quantitatively relates murine lipoprotein size, composition and concentration to the molecular mechanisms underlying lipoprotein metabolism. We introduce a computational framework which incorporates a novel kinetic model of murine lipoprotein metabolism. The model is applied to compute a distribution of plasma lipoproteins, which is then related to experimental lipoprotein profiles through the generation of an in silico lipoprotein profile. The model was first applied to profiles obtained from wild-type C57Bl/6J mice. The results provided insight into the interplay of lipoprotein production, remodelling and catabolism. Moreover, the concentration and metabolism of unmeasured lipoprotein components could be determined. The model was validated through the prediction of lipoprotein profiles of several transgenic mouse models commonly used in cardiovascular research. Finally, the framework was employed for longitudinal analysis of the profiles of C57Bl/6J mice following a pharmaceutical intervention with a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. The multifaceted regulatory response to the administration of the compound is incompletely understood. The results explain the characteristic changes of the observed lipoprotein profile in terms of the underlying metabolic perturbation and resultant modifications of lipid fluxes in the body. The Murine Lipoprotein Profiler (MuLiP) presented here is thus a valuable tool to assess the metabolic origin of altered murine lipoprotein profiles and can be applied in preclinical research performed in mice for analysis of lipid fluxes and

  10. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particle assembly: Lipid capacity of the nascent lipoprotein particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchekar, Medha; Forte, Trudy M.; Datta, Geeta; Richardson, Paul E.; Segrest, Jere P.; Dashti, Nassrin

    2003-12-01

    '' without a structural requirement for MTP; (2) amino acids between 931 to 1000 of apoB-100 are critical for the formation of a nascent lipoprotein particle, and (3) the ''lipid pocket'' created by the first 1000 amino acid residues of apoB-100 is PL-rich, suggesting a small bilayer type organization and has a maximum capacity on the order of 70 molecules of lipid. This model is supported by the allatom molecular model of the {beta}{alpha}{sub 1} lipid pocket presented in the accompanying paper.

  11. Effect of apolipoprotein E variants on lipolysis of very low density lipoproteins by heparan sulphate proteoglycan-bound lipoprotein lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, F.H.A.F. de; Beer, F. de; Laarse, A. van der; Smelt, A.H.M.; Leuven, J.A.G.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is bound to heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG) at the luminal surface of endothelium. It is the key enzyme involved in the hydrolysis of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). Prior to lipolysis by LPL, the lipoproteins are considered to interact with vessel wall HSPG. Apo

  12. Lipoprotein apheresis in the management of severe hypercholesterolemia and of elevation of lipoprotein(a): current perspectives and patient selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julius, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This review reports the current situation with respect to therapeutic options (lifestyle and drugs) reducing the concentrations of atherogenic low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]). Three lipoprotein apheresis (LA) principles have been realized: precipitation, filtration, and adsorption. Available LA methods are herein described in detail – major components, pumps, extracorporeal volume, treated volume, and anticoagulation. General features of all LA methods as well as pleotropic effects are elaborated. Indications for LA therapy are quoted: homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HCH), severe HCH, and isolated elevation of Lp(a) and progress of atherosclerotic disease. A major focus is on the evidence of the effect of LA on cardiovascular outcome data, and the most important publications are cited in this context. The best studies have been performed in patients with elevated Lp(a) in whom cardiovascular events were reduced by more than 80%. Major adverse effects and contraindications are listed. The impact of an LA therapy on patient quality of life and the requirements they have to fulfill are also highlighted. Finally, the future role of LA in treating high-risk patients with high LDL-C and/or high Lp(a) is discussed. It is probable that the significance of LA for treating patients with elevated LDL-C will decrease (with the exception of homozygous familial HCH) due to the application of PCSK9 inhibitors. The antisense oligonucleotide against apolipoprotein(a) could replace LA in patients with high Lp(a), provided positive outcome data are generated. PMID:27785114

  13. Overt and latent activities of diacylglycerol acytransferase in rat liver microsomes: possible roles in very-low-density lipoprotein triacylglycerol secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, M R; Corstorphine, C C; Zammit, V A

    1997-01-01

    The possibility that triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis occurs on both aspects of the endoplasmic-reticular membrane during the process of incorporation of TAG into secreted very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) [Zammit (1996) Biochem. J. 314, 1-14] was investigated by measuring the latency of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) in microsomal fractions obtained from rat liver homogenates. Permeabilization of microsomes with taurocholate resulted in the doubling of the activity, indicating that DGAT activities of approximately equal magnitude occur on either aspect of the microsomal membrane. The taurocholate concentrations required for exposure of the latent activity of DGAT were identical with those that resulted in the exposure of marker enzymes for the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Fractionation of the microsomes into smooth and rough populations indicated that the distribution of overt and latent DGAT activities was the same throughout. The possibility that taurocholate effects may result from non-specific activation of the overt enzyme was excluded by employing the channel-forming peptide alamethicin to effect permeabilization, and by varying the mode of delivery of diacylglycerol substrate to the microsomal membranes. Permeabilization using alamethicin gave a slightly higher latent/overt ratio for DGAT. The possible roles of overt and latent DGAT activities in the synthesis and secretion of TAG by the liver are discussed. PMID:9173878

  14. Nanoengineered membrane electrode assembly interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A

    2013-08-06

    A membrane electrode structure suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) that comprises membrane-affixed metal nanoparticles whose formation is controlled by a photochemical process that controls deposition of the metal nanoparticles using a photocatalyst integrated with a polymer electrolyte membrane, such as an ionomer membrane. Impregnation of the polymer membrane with the photocatalyst prior to metal deposition greatly reduces the required amount of metal precursor in the deposition reaction solution by restricting metal reduction substantially to the formation of metal nanoparticles affixed on or near the surface of the polymer membrane with minimal formation of metallic particles not directly associated with the membrane.

  15. Binding of anthracycline derivatives to human serum lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O; Urien, S; Claudepierre, P; Bastian, G; Tillement, J P

    1994-01-01

    The binding of eight anthracycline analogues (including mitoxantrone) to isolated serum lipoproteins (high, low and very low density lipoproteins) was studied in order to elucidate some determinants of their interaction with lipidic structures. Serum lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation. Drug binding experiments were run by ultrafiltration at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4. Anthracycline concentrations (total and free) were determined by HPLC with fluorometric detection. All the ligands were significantly bound to the three lipoprotein classes, and for each ligand the binding increased as the lipidic fraction of lipoprotein increased. From doxorubicin to iododoxorubicin, there was a tenfold increase in lipoprotein binding (doxorubicin < mitoxantrone < epirubicin < daunorubicin < pirarubicin < aclarubicin < zorubicin < iododoxorubicin). For all the ligands studied, the extent of lipoprotein binding appears to be related to chemical determinants of lipophilicity.

  16. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    KAUST Repository

    Almadanim, M. Cecília

    2017-01-19

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analyzing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing, and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose phosphate synthase OsSPS4, and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism.

  17. A simplified formula using early blood gas analysis can predict survival outcomes and the requirements for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Won; Lee, Byong Sop; Lim, Gina; Choi, Yong-Sung; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan; Kim, Ki-Soo

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether early arterial blood gas analysis (ABGA) could define the severity of disease in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We conducted a retrospective study over a 21-yr period of infants diagnosed with CDH. Outcomes were defined as death before discharge, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation requirements (ECMO) or death. A total 114 infants were included in this study. We investigated whether simplified prediction formula [PO2-PCO2] values at 0, 4, 8, and 12 hr after birth were associated with mortality, and ECMO or death. The area under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the optimum ABGA values for predicting outcomes. The value of [PO2-PCO2] at birth was the best predictor of mortality (AUC 0.803, P < 0.001) and at 4 hr after birth was the most reliable predictor of ECMO or death (AUC 0.777, P < 0.001). The value of [PO2-PCO2] from ABGA early period after birth can reliably predict outcomes in infants with CDH.

  18. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  19. Modulation of BAG3 Expression and Proteasomal Activity by sAPPα Does Not Require Membrane-Tethered Holo-APP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Arpita; Milosch, Nelli; Antonietti, Patrick; Baumkötter, Frederik; Zymny, Andreas; Müller, Ulrike C; Kins, Stefan; Hajieva, Parvana; Behl, Christian; Kögel, Donat

    2016-11-01

    Maintenance of intracellular proteostasis is essential for neuronal function, and emerging data support the view that disturbed proteostasis plays an important role in brain aging and the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). sAPPalpha (sAPPα), the extracellularly secreted N-terminal alpha secretase cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), has an established function in neuroprotection. Recently, we provided evidence that membrane-bound holo-APP functionally cooperates with sAPPα to mediate neuroprotection via activation of the Akt survival signaling pathway and sAPPα directly affects proteostasis. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to its anti-apoptotic function, sAPPα has effects on neuronal proteostasis under conditions of proteasomal stress. In particular, recombinant sAPPα significantly suppressed MG132-triggered expression of the co-chaperone BAG3 and aggresome formation, and it partially rescued proteasomal activity in a dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In analogy, sAPPα was able to inhibit MG132-induced BAG3 expression in primary hippocampal neurons. Strikingly, these sAPPα-induced changes were unaltered in APP-depleted SH-SY5Y cells and APP-deficient neurons, demonstrating that holo-APP is not required for this particular function of sAPPα. Importantly, recombinant sAPPbeta (sAPPβ) failed to modulate BAG3 expression and proteostasis in APP-proficient wild-type (wt) cells, indicating that these biological effects are highly selective for sAPPα. In conclusion, we demonstrate that modulation of proteostasis is a distinct biological function of sAPPα and does not require surface-bound holo-APP. Our data shed new light on the physiological functions of APP and the interplay between APP processing and proteostasis during brain aging.

  20. Transmembrane segment (TMS) VIII of the Na+/citrate transporter CitS requires downstream TMS IX for insertion in the Escherichia coli membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geest, M; Lolkema, JS

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the sodium ion-dependent citrate transporter CitS of IL pneumoniae contains 12 hydrophobic stretches that could form membrane-spanning segments. A previous analysis of the membrane topology in Escherichia coli using the PhoA gene fusion technique indicated that only nine o

  1. Sortilins: new players in lipoprotein metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willnow, Thomas; Kjølby, Mads Fuglsang; Nykjær, Anders

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sortilins are sorting receptors that direct proteins through secretory and endocytic pathways of the cell. Previously, these receptors have been shown to play important roles in regulating protein transport in neurons and to control neuronal viability and death in many diseases...... of the nervous system. Recent data, including genome-wide association studies, now suggest equally important functions for sortilins in control of systemic lipoprotein metabolism and risk of cardiovascular disease. This review discusses the evidence implicating two members of this gene family, sortilin and SORLA...... on the importance of sorting receptors in control of cellular and systemic lipoprotein metabolism and how altered trafficking pathways may represent a major risk factor for dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis in the human population....

  2. Mycoplasma lipoproteins and Toll-like receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-ling ZUO; Yi-mou WU; Xiao-xing YOU

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasmas, the smallest free-living, self-replicating bacteria with diameters of 200 to 800 nm, have been reported to be associated with human diseases. It is well known that the mycoplasma lipoprotein/peptide is able to modulate the host immune system, whose N-terminal structure is an important factor in inducing immunity and distinguishing Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, there is still no clear elucidation about the pathogenic mechanism of mycoplasma lipoprotein/peptide and the signaling pathway. Some researchers have focused on understanding the structures of these proteins and the relationships between their structure and biological function. This review provides an update on the research in this field.

  3. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency with visceral xanthomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servaes, Sabah; Bellah, Richard [Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Verma, Ritu [Department of Gastroenterology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pawel, Bruce [Department of Pathology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LLD) is a rare metabolic disorder that typically presents with skin xanthomas and pancreatitis in childhood. We report a case of LLD in an infant who presented with jaundice caused by a pancreatic head mass. Abdominal imaging also incidentally revealed hyperechoic renal masses caused by renal xanthomas. This appearance of the multiple abdominal masses makes this a unique infantile presentation of LLD. (orig.)

  4. Lipoprotein secretion: It takes two to TANGO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2016-05-09

    An unsolved mystery in cell biology is how unusually large secretory cargoes are exported from the endoplasmic reticulum. In this issue, Santos et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201603072) report the function of a Mia2/cTAGE5 transcript fusion, named TALI, in the endoplasmic reticulum export of chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins, but not collagen XII.

  5. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Samson; Lakshmi Mundkur; Kakkar, Vijay V

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation re...

  6. [Analysis of lipoprotein metabolism in alcoholics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Yuki; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Usui, Shinichi; Hosaki, Seijin; Maruyama, Katsuya; Hosokawa, Yu

    2008-04-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is increased by exercise and drinking and is well known as a negative risk factor of coronary heart disease. We analyzed serum lipids of alcoholics from the view points of biochemical examination, remnant like particle (RLP) and particle size of lipoprotein for the purpose of estimated effect of serum lipids, especially HDL quality in alcoholics. Serum levels of total cholesterol, free glycerol, RLP-C and RLP-TG were significantly decreased after hospitalization. The condition of RLP-C/RLP-TG on admission revealed cholesterol-rich composition. In case of HDL-C, the longer period from last drinking to hospitalization affected its decrease. From analytical study of particle size of lipoprotein, quantities of HDL-C in very large size and large size were significantly decreased after hospitalization which means that HDL composition at hospitalization is cholesterol-rich. So, it is speculated that increased serum level of HDL in alcoholics may be caused by expanded cholesterol ester and its quality may be different from that of healthy people. In this meaning, the study of arteriosclerosis in alcoholics will be necessary in relation to high level of serum HDL-C.

  7. Immune Response to Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Samson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, is characterized by chronic inflammation and altered immune response. Cholesterol is a well-known risk factor associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum cholesterol is unique because it can lead to development of atherosclerosis in animals and humans even in the absence of other risk factors. Modifications of low-density lipoproteins mediated by oxidation, enzymatic degradation, and aggregation result in changes in their function and activate both innate and adaptive immune system. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL has been identified as one of the most important autoantigens in atherosclerosis. This escape from self-tolerance is dependent on the formation of oxidized phospholipids. The emerging understanding of the importance of immune responses against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis has focused attention on the possibility of development of novel therapy for atherosclerosis. This review provides an overview of immune response to lipoproteins and the fascinating possibility of developing an immunomodulatory therapy for atherosclerosis.

  8. Abnormal high density lipoproteins in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, V. (Lawrence Livermore Lab., CA); Salen, G.; Cheng, F.W.; Forte, T.; Shefer, S.; Tint, G.S.

    1981-11-01

    The plasma lipoprotein profiles and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were characterized in patients with the genetic disease cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). The mean HDL-cholesterol concentration in the CTX plasmas was 14.5 +/- 3.2 mg/dl, about one-third the normal value. The low HDL-cholesterol reflects a low concentration and an abnormal lipid composition of the plasma HDL. Relative to normal HDL, the cholesteryl esters are low, free cholesterol and phospholipids essentially normal, and triglycerides increased. The ratio of apoprotein (apo) to total cholesterol in the HDL of CTX was two to three times greater than normal. In the CTX HDL, the ratio of apoAI to apoAII was high, the proportion of apoC low, and a normally minor form of apoAI increased relative to other forms. The HDL in electron micrographs appeared normal morphologically and in particle size. The adnormalities in lipoprotein distribution profiles and composition of the plasma HDL result from metabolic defects that are not understood but may be linked to the genetic defect in bile acid synthesis in CTX. As a consequence, it is probable that the normal functions of the HDL, possibly including modulation of LDL-cholesterol uptake and the removal of excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues, are perturbed significantly in this disease.

  9. The impact of lipoprotein apheresis in patients with refractory angina and raised lipoprotein(a): Objectives and methods of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tina Z; Pottle, Alison; Pennell, Dudley J; Barbir, Mahmoud S

    2015-05-01

    It is well established that Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an independent cardiovascular risk factor and predictor of major adverse cardiovascular events. Lipoprotein apheresis is currently the most effective approved treatment available, with minimal effect conferred by conventional lipid lowering agents. A growing body of evidence suggests that aggressively lowering raised Lp(a) may improve cardiovascular and clinical outcomes, although more prospective research is required in this field. Angina which is refractory to conventional medical therapy and revascularisation is extremely challenging to manage. There is a significant unmet need to establish therapeutic options. Our goal is to determine the impact of lipoprotein apheresis on clinical parameters and symptoms of patients with refractory angina secondary to advanced coronary disease and raised Lp(a). Determining whether we should aggressively lower Lp(a) in such patients remains a very important question, which could potentially impact on the management of a large population. We will also gain insight into how this treatment works and the mechanisms via which Lp(a) increases cardiovascular risk. We are currently conducting a prospective, randomised controlled crossover study of patients with refractory angina and raised Lp(a), randomised to undergoing three months of weekly lipoprotein apheresis or sham apheresis. Patients will then crossover to the opposite study arm after a 1 month wash-out phase. We will assess myocardial perfusion, carotid atherosclerosis, endothelial vascular function, thrombogenesis, oxidised LDL and their antibodies, exercise capacity, angina and quality of life at the beginning and end of treatment, to determine the net true treatment effect on the above parameters. This is a novel area of research, as previous studies have not assessed the role of lipoprotein apheresis in patients with refractory angina and raised Lp(a) in a prospective randomised controlled manner.

  10. Chromatofocusing of human high density lipoproteins and isolation of lipoproteins A and A-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestruck, A C; Niedmann, P D; Wieland, H; Seidel, D

    1983-08-29

    Using chromatofocusing, a column chromatography method with an internally generated pH gradient and focusing effects, human plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) were fractionated into six subclasses within an interval of less than 1 pH unit (pH 5.1-4.2). All fractions floated in the ultracentrifuge at density = 1.21 g X ml-1, retained a typical HDL electron micrographic morphology and as a single band, alpha-migration on agarose electrophoresis. Compositional analysis of the subclasses revealed an inverse relationship between cholesterol ester and cholesterol on a molar basis. Distinct differences in the distribution of the apolipoproteins between the fractions were found. Two of the subclasses contained only apolipoprotein A-I and were therefore considered to be two forms of the lipid-combined form of apolipoprotein A-I, i.e., lipoprotein A-I. One subclass contained only apolipoproteins A-I + A-II and was, therefore, lipoprotein A. One subclass contained apolipoproteins A-I + A-II + D, and the two remaining contained additionally apolipoproteins C and E. Lipoprotein A-I was also demonstrated after immunoabsorption of apolipoprotein A-II-containing lipoproteins from whole serum. It is suggested that this method, which allows the fractionation of HDL into subclasses with distinct differences in apolipoprotein composition, offers new avenues for the study of the structural and metabolic heterogeneity of HDL.

  11. Characteristics of Lipoprotein Peak x Eluted from a Column with the Eluent of High-magnesium Ion Concentration in Lipoprotein Analysis Using the Cation-exchange Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji Hirowatari; Hiroshi Yoshida; Yutaka Ogura; Hidekastu Yanai; Hideo Kurosawa; Norio Tada

    2005-01-01

    The new lipoprotein analysis method using a cation-exchange chromatography, which contains a sulfopropyl-ligand column and two magnesium ion-containing eluents was previously reported. This method can separate serum lipoproteins on the column gel with a magnesium ion concentration gradient and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and an unspecified lipoprotein peak are eluted in order from the column. We have now characterize...

  12. Lipoprotein-induced phenoloxidase-activity in tarantula hemocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Sven; Schmidt, Juliane; Hoeger, Ulrich; Decker, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    Phenoloxidases play vital roles in invertebrate innate immune reactions, wound closure and sclerotization processes in arthropods. In chelicerates, where phenoloxidases are lacking, phenoloxidase-activity can be induced in the oxygen carrier hemocyanin in vitro by proteolytic cleavage, incubation with the artificial inducer SDS, or lipids. The role of protein-protein interaction has up to now received little attention. This is remarkable, as lipoproteins - complexes of proteins and lipids - are present at high concentrations in arthropod hemolymph. We characterized the three lipoproteins present in tarantula hemolymph, two high-density lipoproteins and one very high-density lipoprotein, and show that the two high-density lipoproteins have distinct structures: the more abundant high-density lipoprotein is an ellipsoid particle with axes of ~22.5 nm and ~16.8 nm, respectively. The second high-density lipoprotein, present only in trace amount, is a large discoidal lipoprotein with a diameter of ~38.4 nm and an on-edge thickness of ~7.1 nm. We further demonstrate that the interaction between lipoproteins and hemocyanin induces phenoloxidase activity in hemocyanin, and propose that this activation is due to protein-protein interaction rather than protein-lipid interaction, as neither lipid micelles nor lipid monomers were found to be activating. Activation was strongest in the presence of high-density lipoproteins; very high-density lipoproteins were found to be non-activating. This is the first time that the ability of lipoproteins to induce phenoloxidase activity of hemocyanin has been demonstrated, thus adding novel aspects to the function of lipoproteins apart from their known role in nutrient supply. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Altered activation of endothelial anti- and proapoptotic pathways by high-density lipoprotein from patients with coronary artery disease: role of high-density lipoprotein-proteome remodeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riwanto, Meliana; Rohrer, Lucia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Besler, Christian; Mocharla, Pavani; Mueller, Maja; Perisa, Damir; Heinrich, Kathrin; Altwegg, Lukas; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Lüscher, Thomas F; Landmesser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    ...). High-density lipoprotein from healthy subjects (HDL(Healthy)) has been proposed to exert endothelial antiapoptotic effects that may represent an important antiatherogenic property of the lipoprotein...

  14. Expression of Haemophilus ducreyi collagen binding outer membrane protein NcaA is required for virulence in swine and human challenge models of chancroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Robert A; Cole, Leah E; Janowicz, Diane M; Toffer, Kristen L; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Orndorff, Paul E; Spinola, Stanley M; Kawula, Thomas H

    2006-05-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid, has been shown to associate with dermal collagen fibers within infected skin lesions. Here we describe NcaA, a previously uncharacterized outer membrane protein that is important for H. ducreyi collagen binding and host colonization. An H. ducreyi strain lacking the ncaA gene was impaired in adherence to type I collagen but not fibronectin (plasma or cellular form) or heparin. The mutation had no effect on serum resistance or binding to HaCaT keratinocytes or human foreskin fibroblasts in vitro. Escherichia coli expressing H. ducreyi NcaA bound to type I collagen, demonstrating that NcaA is sufficient to confer collagen attachment. The importance of NcaA in H. ducreyi pathogenesis was assessed using both swine and human experimental models of chancroid. In the swine model, 20% of lesions from sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant were culture positive for H. ducreyi 7 days after inoculation, compared to 73% of wild-type-inoculated sites. The average number of CFU recovered from mutant-inoculated lesions was also significantly reduced compared to that recovered from wild-type-inoculated sites at both 2 and 7 days after inoculation. In the human challenge model, 8 of 30 sites inoculated with wild-type H. ducreyi progressed to the pustular stage, compared to 0 of 30 sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant. Together these results demonstrate that the collagen binding protein NcaA is required for H. ducreyi infection.

  15. Interaction of Mycoplasma hominis PG21 with Human Dendritic Cells: Interleukin-23-Inducing Mycoplasmal Lipoproteins and Inflammasome Activation of the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goret, J; Béven, L; Faustin, B; Contin-Bordes, C; Le Roy, C; Claverol, S; Renaudin, H; Bébéar, C; Pereyre, S

    2017-08-01

    Mycoplasma hominis lacks a cell wall, and lipoproteins anchored to the extracellular side of the plasma membrane are in direct contact with the host components. A Triton X-114 extract of M. hominis enriched with lipoproteins was shown to stimulate the production of interleukin-23 (IL-23) by human dendritic cells (hDCs). The inflammasome activation of the host cell has never been reported upon M. hominis infection. We studied here the interaction between M. hominis PG21 and hDCs by analyzing both the inflammation-inducing mycoplasmal lipoproteins and the inflammasome activation of the host cell. IL-23-inducing lipoproteins were determined using a sequential extraction strategy with two nondenaturing detergents, Sarkosyl and Triton X-114, followed by SDS-PAGE separation and mass spectrometry identification. The activation of the hDC inflammasome was assessed using PCR array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We defined a list of 24 lipoproteins that could induce the secretion of IL-23 by hDCs, 5 with a molecular mass between 20 and 35 kDa and 19 with a molecular mass between 40 and 100 kDa. Among them, lipoprotein MHO_4720 was identified as potentially bioactive, and a synthetic lipopeptide corresponding to the N-terminal part of the lipoprotein was subsequently shown to induce IL-23 release by hDCs. Regarding the hDC innate immune response, inflammasome activation with caspase-dependent production of IL-1β was observed. After 24 h of coincubation of hDCs with M. hominis, downregulation of the NLRP3-encoding gene and of the adaptor PYCARD-encoding gene was noticed. Overall, this study provides insight into both protagonists of the interaction of M. hominis and hDCs.IMPORTANCEMycoplasma hominis is a human urogenital pathogen involved in gynecologic and opportunistic infections. M. hominis lacks a cell wall, and its membrane contains many lipoproteins that are anchored to the extracellular side of the plasma membrane. In the present study, we focused on

  16. Selective association of outer surface lipoproteins with the lipid rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T; Coleman, James L; LaRocca, Timothy J; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L

    2014-03-11

    Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ospA, ospB, and ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism's adaptation to changing environments. IMPORTANCE Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich clusters within the membranes of cells. Lipid rafts contain proteins that have functions in sensing the cell environment and transmitting signals. Although selective proteins are present in

  17. [Cholesterol in serum high density lipoprotein fraction (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, C; Jeanblanc, B; Offner, M

    1980-11-22

    The risk of atheroma can be assessed and valid epidemiological surveys can be carried out by measuring cholesterol in serum high density lipoprotein fraction (HDL) and calculating the HDL cholesterol: VLDL + LDL ratio. This was done in 39 patients free from surgically confirmed atheromatous lesions and in 51 patients presenting with such lesions. Of the four different techniques used for separation in these patients (ultracentrifugation, precipitation with heparin-Mn2+, precipitation with phosphotungstate-Mg2+ and electrophoresis), precipitation with phosphotungstate-Mg/2+ seems to be the most suitable, since there is no degradation of the HDL fraction as during electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel, and less floculation of the supernatant after separation. Contrary to ultracentrifugation, which requires sophisticated equipment and good technical skill, the technique is easily carried out.

  18. Human placenta secretes apolipoprotein B-100-containing lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Eva; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk; Andersen, Claus B;

    2004-01-01

    early during pregnancy in the placenta. To examine whether the human placenta produces lipoproteins, we examined apoB and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) mRNA expression in placental biopsies. ApoB and MTP are mandatory for assembly and secretion of apoB-containing lipoproteins. Both...... genes were expressed in placenta and microsomal extracts from human placenta contained triglyceride transfer activity, indicating expression of bioactive MTP. To detect lipoprotein secretion, biopsies from term placentas were placed in medium with [(35)S]methionine and [(35)S]cysteine for 3-24 h. Upon...... lipoproteins secreted from placental tissue showed spherical particles with a diameter of 47 +/- 10 nm. These results demonstrate that human placenta expresses both apoB and MTP and consequently synthesize and secrete apoB-100-containing lipoproteins. Placental lipoprotein formation constitutes a novel pathway...

  19. KIF6, LPA, TAS2R50, and VAMP8 genetic variation, low density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering response to pravastatin, and heart disease risk reduction in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the KIF6 (kinesin like protein 6, rs20455 or 719Arg), LPA (lipoprotein(a), rs3798220), TAS2R50 (taste receptor type 2, member 50, rs1376251) and VAMP8 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 8, rs1010) have previously been associated with low density lipoprotei...

  20. Increased transvascular low density lipoprotein transport in insulin dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Karen; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increased risk of atherosclerosis associated with diabetes cannot be explained by conventional cardiovascular risk factors alone. We hypothesized that transvascular lipoprotein transport may be increased in patients with diabetes, possibly explaining increased intimal lipoprotein ...... be increased in patients with type 1 diabetes. This suggests that lipoprotein flux into the arterial wall is increased in people with type 1 diabetes, possibly explaining accelerated development of atherosclerosis....

  1. Fish plasma lipoproteins--comparative observations in serranides and sparides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, A; Cusenza, L; Modica, A; Curatolo, A; D'Amelio, V

    1991-01-01

    1. Diet, time from last feeding, temperature, season and sexual stage are some of the factors influencing the lipoprotein pattern. 2. Keeping these factors constant species-specific differences observed among lipoprotein patterns of Sparus aurata, Puntazzo puntazzo, Diplodus sargus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax are discussed. 3. Feeding habits and therefore lipid absorption and the rate of lipoprotein maturation process are the factors determining the observed differences.

  2. Computational lipidology: predicting lipoprotein density profiles in human blood plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hübner

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring cholesterol levels is strongly recommended to identify patients at risk for myocardial infarction. However, clinical markers beyond "bad" and "good" cholesterol are needed to precisely predict individual lipid disorders. Our work contributes to this aim by bringing together experiment and theory. We developed a novel computer-based model of the human plasma lipoprotein metabolism in order to simulate the blood lipid levels in high resolution. Instead of focusing on a few conventionally used predefined lipoprotein density classes (LDL, HDL, we consider the entire protein and lipid composition spectrum of individual lipoprotein complexes. Subsequently, their distribution over density (which equals the lipoprotein profile is calculated. As our main results, we (i successfully reproduced clinically measured lipoprotein profiles of healthy subjects; (ii assigned lipoproteins to narrow density classes, named high-resolution density sub-fractions (hrDS, revealing heterogeneous lipoprotein distributions within the major lipoprotein classes; and (iii present model-based predictions of changes in the lipoprotein distribution elicited by disorders in underlying molecular processes. In its present state, the model offers a platform for many future applications aimed at understanding the reasons for inter-individual variability, identifying new sub-fractions of potential clinical relevance and a patient-oriented diagnosis of the potential molecular causes for individual dyslipidemia.

  3. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  4. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of alpha-1...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5600 - Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system....5600 Low-density lipoprotein immunological test system. (a) Identification. A low-density lipoprotein... the low-density lipoprotein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of low-density lipoprotein in...

  6. A new LxxxA motif in the transmembrane Helix3 of maize aquaporins belonging to the plasma membrane intrinsic protein PIP2 group is required for their trafficking to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Adrien S; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François

    2014-09-01

    Aquaporins play important roles in maintaining plant water status under challenging environments. The regulation of aquaporin density in cell membranes is essential to control transcellular water flows. This work focuses on the maize (Zea mays) plasma membrane intrinsic protein (ZmPIP) aquaporin subfamily, which is divided into two sequence-related groups (ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s). When expressed alone in mesophyll protoplasts, ZmPIP2s are efficiently targeted to the plasma membrane, whereas ZmPIP1s are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A protein domain-swapping approach was utilized to demonstrate that the transmembrane domain3 (TM3), together with the previously identified N-terminal ER export diacidic motif, account for the differential localization of these proteins. In addition to protoplasts, leaf epidermal cells transiently transformed by biolistic particle delivery were used to confirm and refine these results. By generating artificial proteins consisting of a single transmembrane domain, we demonstrated that the TM3 of ZmPIP1;2 or ZmPIP2;5 discriminates between ER and plasma membrane localization, respectively. More specifically, a new LxxxA motif in the TM3 of ZmPIP2;5, which is highly conserved in plant PIP2s, was shown to regulate its anterograde routing along the secretory pathway, particularly its export from the ER.

  7. A New LxxxA Motif in the Transmembrane Helix3 of Maize Aquaporins Belonging to the Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein PIP2 Group Is Required for Their Trafficking to the Plasma Membrane1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Adrien S.; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporins play important roles in maintaining plant water status under challenging environments. The regulation of aquaporin density in cell membranes is essential to control transcellular water flows. This work focuses on the maize (Zea mays) plasma membrane intrinsic protein (ZmPIP) aquaporin subfamily, which is divided into two sequence-related groups (ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s). When expressed alone in mesophyll protoplasts, ZmPIP2s are efficiently targeted to the plasma membrane, whereas ZmPIP1s are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A protein domain-swapping approach was utilized to demonstrate that the transmembrane domain3 (TM3), together with the previously identified N-terminal ER export diacidic motif, account for the differential localization of these proteins. In addition to protoplasts, leaf epidermal cells transiently transformed by biolistic particle delivery were used to confirm and refine these results. By generating artificial proteins consisting of a single transmembrane domain, we demonstrated that the TM3 of ZmPIP1;2 or ZmPIP2;5 discriminates between ER and plasma membrane localization, respectively. More specifically, a new LxxxA motif in the TM3 of ZmPIP2;5, which is highly conserved in plant PIP2s, was shown to regulate its anterograde routing along the secretory pathway, particularly its export from the ER. PMID:24989232

  8. Lipoprotein Subfractions in Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Clinical Significance and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi Rizzo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Small, dense low density lipoprotein (sdLDL represents an emerging cardiovascular risk factor, since these particles can be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD independently of established risk factors, including plasma lipids. Obese subjects frequently have atherogenic dyslipidaemia, including elevated sdLDL levels, in addition to elevated triglycerides (TG, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL and apolipoprotein-B, as well as decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels. Obesity-related co-morbidities, such as metabolic syndrome (MetS are also characterized by dyslipidaemia. Therefore, agents that favourably modulate LDL subclasses may be of clinical value in these subjects. Statins are the lipid-lowering drug of choice. Also, anti-obesity and lipid lowering drugs other than statins could be useful in these patients. However, the effects of anti-obesity drugs on CVD risk factors remain unclear. We review the clinical significance of sdLDL in being overweight and obesity, as well as the efficacy of anti-obesity drugs on LDL subfractions in these individuals; a short comment on HDL subclasses is also included. Our literature search was based on PubMed and Scopus listings. Further research is required to fully explore both the significance of sdLDL and the efficacy of anti-obesity drugs on LDL subfractions in being overweight, obesity and MetS. Improving the lipoprotein profile in these patients may represent an efficient approach for reducing cardiovascular risk.

  9. Lipoprotein subfractions in metabolic syndrome and obesity: clinical significance and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Dragana; Katsiki, Niki; Montalto, Giuseppe; Isenovic, Esma R; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Rizzo, Manfredi

    2013-03-18

    Small, dense low density lipoprotein (sdLDL) represents an emerging cardiovascular risk factor, since these particles can be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) independently of established risk factors, including plasma lipids. Obese subjects frequently have atherogenic dyslipidaemia, including elevated sdLDL levels, in addition to elevated triglycerides (TG), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and apolipoprotein-B, as well as decreased high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Obesity-related co-morbidities, such as metabolic syndrome (MetS) are also characterized by dyslipidaemia. Therefore, agents that favourably modulate LDL subclasses may be of clinical value in these subjects. Statins are the lipid-lowering drug of choice. Also, anti-obesity and lipid lowering drugs other than statins could be useful in these patients. However, the effects of anti-obesity drugs on CVD risk factors remain unclear. We review the clinical significance of sdLDL in being overweight and obesity, as well as the efficacy of anti-obesity drugs on LDL subfractions in these individuals; a short comment on HDL subclasses is also included. Our literature search was based on PubMed and Scopus listings. Further research is required to fully explore both the significance of sdLDL and the efficacy of anti-obesity drugs on LDL subfractions in being overweight, obesity and MetS. Improving the lipoprotein profile in these patients may represent an efficient approach for reducing cardiovascular risk.

  10. Lrp13 is a novel vertebrate lipoprotein receptor that binds vitellogenins in teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Benjamin J; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Schilling, Justin; Molloy, Katelyn T; Glassbrook, Norm; Mizuta, Hiroko; Luo, Wenshu; Baltzegar, David A; Williams, Valerie N; Todo, Takashi; Hara, Akihiko; Sullivan, Craig V

    2014-11-01

    Transcripts encoding a novel member of the lipoprotein receptor superfamily, termed LDL receptor-related protein (Lrp)13, were sequenced from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana) ovaries. Receptor proteins were purified from perch ovary membranes by protein-affinity chromatography employing an immobilized mixture of vitellogenins Aa and Ab. RT-PCR revealed lrp13 to be predominantly expressed in striped bass ovary, and in situ hybridization detected lrp13 transcripts in the ooplasm of early secondary growth oocytes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed peak lrp13 expression in the ovary during early secondary growth. Quantitative mass spectrometry revealed peak Lrp13 protein levels in striped bass ovary during late-vitellogenesis, and immunohistochemistry localized Lrp13 to the oolemma and zona radiata of vitellogenic oocytes. Previously unreported orthologs of lrp13 were identified in genome sequences of fishes, chicken (Gallus gallus), mouse (Mus musculus), and dog (Canis lupus familiaris). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) lrp13 loci are discrete and share genomic synteny. The Lrp13 appears to function as a vitellogenin receptor and may be an important mediator of yolk formation in fishes and other oviparous vertebrates. The presence of lrp13 orthologs in mammals suggests that this lipoprotein receptor is widely distributed among vertebrates, where it may generally play a role in lipoprotein metabolism.

  11. Apolipoprotein B-100 containing lipoprotein metabolism in subjects with lipoprotein lipase gene mutations (106/120)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Esther M M; Russell, Betsy S; Olson, Eric; Sun, Sam Z; Diffenderfer, Margaret R; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Keilson, Leonard; Barrett, P Hugh R; Schaefer, Ernst J; Sprecher, Dennis L

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated the impact of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene mutations on apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 metabolism. Methods and Results We studied 3 subjects with familial LPL deficiency (FLD), 14 subjects heterozygous for the LPL gene mutations, Gly188Glu, Trp64Stop and Ile194Thr, and 10 control subjects. Very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB-100 kinetics were determined in the fed state using stable isotope methods and compartmental modeling. Compared with controls, FLD had markedly elevated plasma triglycerides and lower VLDL-apoB-100 fractional catabolic rate (FCR), IDL-apoB-100 FCR, VLDL-to-IDL conversion and VLDL-apoB-100 production rate (PR) (ptriglyceride, VLDL- and IDL-apoB-100 concentrations, and lower VLDL- and IDL-apoB-100 FCR (ptriglycerides were not different but IDL-apoB-100 concentration and PR, and VLDL-to-IDL conversion were lower in Trp64Stop compared with controls (ptriglycerides. The changes in plasma triglycerides and apoB-100 kinetics are attributable to the effects of the LPL genotype. PMID:22095987

  12. Lipoprotein glomerulopathy treated with LDL-apheresis (Heparin-induced Extracorporeal Lipoprotein Precipitation system: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivasi Paolo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lipoprotein glomerulopathy is a glomerulonephritis which was described for the first time by Saito in 1989 and is currently acknowledged as a separate nosological entity. It is histologically characterized by a marked dilatation of the glomerular capillaries and the presence of lipoprotein thrombi in the glomerular lumens. The dyslipidemic profile is similar to that of type III dyslipoproteinemia with Apolipoprotein E values that are often high; proteinuria and renal dysfunction are present. Proteinuria often does not respond to steroid and cytostatic treatments. The phenotypic expression of lipoprotein glomerulopathy is most probably correlated to a genetic alteration of the lipoprotein metabolism (mutation of the Apolipoprotein E coding gene. In literature, lipoprotein glomerulopathies have mainly been reported in Japanese and Chinese subjects, except for three cases in the Caucasian race, reported in France and the USA. Case presentation We describe the case of a 60-year-old female, Caucasian patient suffering from lipoprotein glomerulopathy, carrier of a new mutation on the Apolipoprotein E gene (Apolipoprotein EMODENA, and treated successfully with low density lipoprotein-apheresis with the Heparin induced extracorporeal lipoprotein precipitation system. After a first phase of therapeutic protocol with statins, the patient was admitted for nephrotic syndrome, renal failure and hypertension. Since conventional treatment alone was not able to control dyslipidemia, aphaeretic treatment with heparin-induced Extracorporeal Lipoprotein Precipitation - apheresis (HELP-apheresis was started to maintain angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy for the treatment of hypertension. Treatment with HELP-apheresis led to a complete remission of the proteinuria in a very short time (four months, as well as control of hypercholesterolemia and renal function recovery. Conclusion According to this case of lipoprotein glomerulopathy

  13. Blood Lipoproteins under the Action of Exogenous Sex Steroids in the Postresuscitation Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Shcherbakova

    2011-01-01

    dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate activation of the receptor transport of polyunsaturated fatty acids to the cells and that of reverse cholesterol outflow from the cell membranes in the resuscitated animals. Key words: cardiac arrest, reproductive steroids, blood lipoproteins, gynodian, postresuscitation period.

  14. Polarized secretion of newly synthesized lipoproteins by the Caco-2 human intestinal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traber, M G; Kayden, H J; Rindler, M J

    1987-11-01

    Lipoprotein secretion by Caco-2 cells, a human intestinal cell line, was studied in cells grown on inserts containing a Millipore filter (0.45 micron), separating secretory products from the apical and basolateral membranes into separate chambers. Under these conditions, as observed by electron microscopy, the cells formed a monolayer of columnar epithelial cells with microvilli on the apical surface and tight junctions between cells. The electrical resistances of the cell monolayers were 250-500 ohms/cm2. Both 14C-labeled lipids and 35S-labeled proteins were used to assess lipoprotein secretion. After a 24-hr incubation with [14C]oleic acid, 60-80% of the secreted triglyceride (TG) was in the basolateral chamber; 40% of the TG was present in the d less than 1.006 g/ml (chylomicron + VLDL) fraction and 50% in the 1.006 less than d less than 1.063 g/ml (LDL) fraction. After a 4-hr incubation with [35S]methionine, apolipoproteins were found to be major secretory products with 75-100% secreted to the basolateral chamber. Apolipoproteins B-100, B-48, E, A-I, A-IV, and C-III were identified by immunoprecipitation. The d less than 1.006 g/ml fraction was found to contain all of the major apolipoproteins, while the LDL fraction contained primarily apoB-100 and apoE; the HDL (1.063 less than d less than 1.21 g/ml) fraction principally contained apoA-I and apoA-IV. Mn-heparin precipitated all of the [35S]methionine-labeled apoB-100 and B-48 and a majority of the other apolipoproteins, and 80% of the [14C]oleic acid-labeled triglyceride, but only 15% of the phospholipid, demonstrating that Caco-2 cells secrete triglyceride-rich lipoproteins containing apoB. Secretion of lipoproteins was dependent on the lipid content of the medium; prior incubation with lipoprotein-depleted serum specifically reduced the secretion of lipoproteins, while addition of both LDL and oleic acid to the medium maintained the level of apoB-100, B-48, and A-IV secretion to that observed in the control

  15. FcɛRI-mediated mast cell degranulation requires calcium-independent microtubule-dependent translocation of granules to the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Keigo; Yamasaki, Satoru; Ito, Yukitaka; Kabu, Koki; Hattori, Kotaro; Tezuka, Tohru; Nishizumi, Hirofumi; Kitamura, Daisuke; Goitsuka, Ryo; Geha, Raif S.; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Yagi, Takeshi; Hirano, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    The aggregation of high affinity IgE receptors (Fcɛ receptor I [FcɛRI]) on mast cells is potent stimulus for the release of inflammatory and allergic mediators from cytoplasmic granules. However, the molecular mechanism of degranulation has not yet been established. It is still unclear how FcɛRI-mediated signal transduction ultimately regulates the reorganization of the cytoskeleton and how these events lead to degranulation. Here, we show that FcɛRI stimulation triggers the formation of microtubules in a manner independent of calcium. Drugs affecting microtubule dynamics effectively suppressed the FcɛRI-mediated translocation of granules to the plasma membrane and degranulation. Furthermore, the translocation of granules to the plasma membrane occurred in a calcium-independent manner, but the release of mediators and granule–plasma membrane fusion were completely dependent on calcium. Thus, the degranulation process can be dissected into two events: the calcium-independent microtubule-dependent translocation of granules to the plasma membrane and calcium-dependent membrane fusion and exocytosis. Finally, we show that the Fyn/Gab2/RhoA (but not Lyn/SLP-76) signaling pathway plays a critical role in the calcium-independent microtubule-dependent pathway. PMID:15998803

  16. Membrane reactor. Membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindo, Y.; Wakabayashi, K. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    Many reaction examples were introduced of membrane reactor, to be on the point of forming a new region in the field of chemical technology. It is a reactor to exhibit excellent function, by its being installed with membrane therein, and is generally classified into catalyst function type and reaction promotion type. What firstly belongs to the former is stabilized zirconia, where oxygen, supplied to the cathodic side of membrane with voltage, impressed thereon, becomes O {sup 2 {minus}} to be diffused through the membrane and supplied, as variously activated oxygenous species, on the anodic side. Examples with many advantages can be given such as methane coupling, propylene oxidation, methanating reaction of carbon dioxide, etc. Apart, palladium film and naphion film also belong to the former. While examples of the latter comprise, among others, decomposition of hydrogen sulfide by porous glass film and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane or palladium alloy film, which are expected to be developed and materialized in the industry. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Raf activation by Ras and promotion of cellular metastasis require phosphorylation of prohibitin in the raft domain of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C-F; Ho, M-Y; Peng, J-M; Hung, S-W; Lee, W-H; Liang, C-M; Liang, S-M

    2013-02-01

    Prohibitin (PHB) is indispensable for Ras-induced Raf-1 activation, cell migration and growth; however, the exact role of PHB in the molecular pathogenesis of cancer metastasis remains largely unexamined. Here, we found a positive correlation between plasma membrane-associated PHB and the clinical stages of cancer. The level of PHB phosphorylated at threonine 258 (T258) and tyrosine 259 (Y259) in human cancer-cell membranes correlated with the invasiveness of cancer cells. Overexpression of phosphorylated PHB (phospho-PHB) in the lipid-raft domain of the cell membrane enhanced cell migration/invasion through PI3K/Akt and Raf-1/ERK activation. It also enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and invasiveness of cancer cells in vitro. Immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that phospho-PHB associated with Raf-1, Akt and Ras in the membrane and was essential for the activation of Raf-1 signaling by Ras. Mice implanted with cancer cells stably overexpressing PHB in the plasma membrane showed enlarged cervical tumors, enhanced metastasis and shorter survival time compared with mice implanted with cancer cells without PHB overexpression. Dephosphorylation of PHB at T258 by site-directed mutagenesis diminished the in vitro and in vivo effects of PHB. These results suggest that increase in phospho-PHB T258 in the raft domain of the plasma membrane has a role in the Ras-driven activation of PI3K/Akt and Raf-1/ERK-signaling cascades and results in the promotion of cancer metastasis.

  18. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Yamamoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV, but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV.

  19. Lipoprotein Receptors Redundantly Participate in Entry of Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satomi; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Ono, Chikako; Uemura, Kentaro; Kawachi, Yukako; Shiokawa, Mai; Mori, Hiroyuki; Wada, Masami; Shima, Ryoichi; Okamoto, Toru; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Chayama, Kazuaki; Wakita, Takaji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) are known to be involved in entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV), but their precise roles and their interplay are not fully understood. In this study, deficiency of both SR-B1 and LDLR in Huh7 cells was shown to impair the entry of HCV more strongly than deficiency of either SR-B1 or LDLR alone. In addition, exogenous expression of not only SR-B1 and LDLR but also very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) rescued HCV entry in the SR-B1 and LDLR double-knockout cells, suggesting that VLDLR has similar roles in HCV entry. VLDLR is a lipoprotein receptor, but the level of its hepatic expression was lower than those of SR-B1 and LDLR. Moreover, expression of mutant lipoprotein receptors incapable of binding to or uptake of lipid resulted in no or slight enhancement of HCV entry in the double-knockout cells, suggesting that binding and/or uptake activities of lipid by lipoprotein receptors are essential for HCV entry. In addition, rescue of infectivity in the double-knockout cells by the expression of the lipoprotein receptors was not observed following infection with pseudotype particles bearing HCV envelope proteins produced in non-hepatic cells, suggesting that lipoproteins associated with HCV particles participate in the entry through their interaction with lipoprotein receptors. Buoyant density gradient analysis revealed that HCV utilizes these lipoprotein receptors in a manner dependent on the lipoproteins associated with HCV particles. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoprotein receptors redundantly participate in the entry of HCV.

  20. Identification of a TcpC-TcpQ Outer Membrane Complex Involved in the Biogenesis of the Toxin-Coregulated Pilus of Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Niranjan; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2005-01-01

    The toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) of Vibrio cholerae and the soluble TcpF protein that is secreted via the TCP biogenesis apparatus are essential for intestinal colonization. The TCP biogenesis apparatus is composed of at least nine proteins but is largely uncharacterized. TcpC is an outer membrane lipoprotein required for TCP biogenesis that is a member of the secretin protein superfamily. In the present study, analysis of TcpC in a series of strains deficient in each of the TCP biogenesis p...

  1. SCARB1 Gene Variants Are Associated With the Phenotype of Combined High High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and High Lipoprotein (a)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Sethi, Amar A; Yanek, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: SR-B1 (scavenger receptor class B type 1), encoded by the gene SCARB1, is a lipoprotein receptor that binds both high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein. We reported that SR-B1 is also a receptor for lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)), mediating cellular uptake of Lp(a) in vitro...

  2. Turkish Heart Study: lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahley, R W; Palaoğlu, K E; Atak, Z; Dawson-Pepin, J; Langlois, A M; Cheung, V; Onat, H; Fulks, P; Mahley, L L; Vakar, F

    1995-04-01

    We examined the plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and selected apolipoproteins in approximately 9,000 men and women from six different regions of Turkey with markedly different diets, ranging from an Aegean coast diet high in olive oil (plasma cholesteryl ester fatty acids enriched in monounsaturated fatty acids) to an inland Anatolian diet high in meat and dairy products (plasma cholesteryl esters enriched in saturated fatty acids). The rural population consuming an olive oil-rich diet had the lowest plasma cholesterol levels (men, 149 mg/dl; women, 150 mg/dl). The urban populations of Istanbul and Adana had higher plasma cholesterol levels (men, 202 and 184 mg/dl, respectively; women, 181 and 190 mg/dl, respectively). Affluent men had the highest cholesterol levels (207 mg/dl). The low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels tended to parallel the total cholesterol levels (highest for Istanbul men at 136 mg/dl and lowest for Aegean coast men and women at approximately 100 mg/dl). Strikingly, the Turkish people were found to have very low levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) (mean values for all six regions: men, 34-38 mg/dl; women, 37-45 mg/dl) and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratios that were high (mean values for all six regions: men, 4.5-5.5; women, 3.9-5.0). The low HDL-C levels appear to be caused, at least in part, by a genetic factor. Triglyceride levels also tended to be high in Turkish men (approximately 120-150 mg/dl) and women (approximately 90-110 mg/dl). Thus, even though the total plasma cholesterol levels are not excessively elevated in comparison to those in other populations, the presence of low HDL-C or low HDL-C coupled with mildly elevated triglyceride levels may represent a significant risk factor for heart disease in the Turkish population. Affluence and higher education were associated with higher cholesterol levels. Lack of physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption also tended to be associated with a

  3. Methylation at CPT1A locus is associated with lipoprotein subfraction profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoprotein subfractions help discriminate cardiometabolic disease risk. Genetic loci validated as associating with lipoprotein measures do not account for a large proportion of the individual variation in lipoprotein measures. We hypothesized that DNA methylation levels across the genome contribute...

  4. Hindiii and S447x polymorphisms of lipoprotein lipase gene and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hindiii and S447x polymorphisms of lipoprotein lipase gene and their relationship to coronary artery disease. ... Lipoprotein lipase is a key enzyme in lipoprotein metabolism and its gene is a major candidate gene for coronary ... Article Metrics.

  5. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli to a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of LolCDE, an Essential Component of the Lipoprotein Transport Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christian; Dougherty, Thomas J; Lory, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, a dedicated machinery consisting of LolABCDE components targets lipoproteins to the outer membrane. We used a previously identified small-molecule inhibitor of the LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli to assess the global transcriptional consequences of interference with lipoprotein transport. Exposure of E. coli to the LolCDE inhibitor at concentrations leading to minimal and significant growth inhibition, followed by transcriptome sequencing, identified a small group of genes whose transcript levels were decreased and a larger group whose mRNA levels increased 10- to 100-fold compared to those of untreated cells. The majority of the genes whose mRNA concentrations were reduced were part of the flagellar assembly pathway, which contains an essential lipoprotein component. Most of the genes whose transcript levels were elevated encode proteins involved in selected cell stress pathways. Many of these genes are involved with envelope stress responses induced by the mislocalization of outer membrane lipoproteins. Although several of the genes whose RNAs were induced have previously been shown to be associated with the general perturbation of the cell envelope by antibiotics, a small subset was affected only by LolCDE inhibition. Findings from this work suggest that the efficiency of the Lol system function may be coupled to a specific monitoring system, which could be exploited in the development of reporter constructs suitable for use for screening for additional inhibitors of lipoprotein trafficking. Inhibition of the lipoprotein transport pathway leads to E. coli death and subsequent lysis. Early significant changes in the levels of RNA for a subset of genes identified to be associated with some periplasmic and envelope stress responses were observed. Together these findings suggest that disruption of this key pathway can have a severe impact on balanced outer membrane synthesis sufficient to affect viability. Copyright © 2016 Lorenz et al.

  6. Biobased Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.A.B.; Zlopasa, J.; Picken, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane applicable to building material, such as concrete, cement, etc., to a meth od of applying said composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane, a biocompatible membrane, use of said membrane for various pu

  7. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  8. TRIIODOTHYRONINE RAPIDLY LOWERS PLASMA-LIPOPROTEIN (A) IN HYPOTHYROID SUBJECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; VANDOORMAAL, JJ; HOOGENBERG, K; SLUITER, WJ

    1995-01-01

    Background: Increases in plasma low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apo-B) are well known in primary hypothyroidism, but it is uncertain whether thyroid dysfunction is associated with elevated levels of the atherogenic lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)). Methods: The effect of short

  9. A Phospholipidomic Analysis of All Defined Human Plasma Lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dashti, Monireh; Kulik, Willem; Hoek, Frans; Veerman, Enno C.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Since plasma lipoproteins contain both protein and phospholipid components, either may be involved in processes such as atherosclerosis. In this study the identification of plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipids, which is essential for understanding these processes at the molecular level, are

  10. A phospholipidomic analysis of all defined human plasma lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dashti, M.; Kulik, W.; Hoek, F.; Veerman, E.C.; Peppelenbosch, M.P.; Rezaee, F.

    2011-01-01

    Since plasma lipoproteins contain both protein and phospholipid components, either may be involved in processes such as atherosclerosis. In this study the identification of plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipids, which is essential for understanding these processes at the molecular level, are

  11. Extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and improved cardiovascular risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-01-01

    The study tested whether extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and/or corresponding LPA risk genotypes improve myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction beyond conventional risk factors.......The study tested whether extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and/or corresponding LPA risk genotypes improve myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction beyond conventional risk factors....

  12. Mendelian Disorders of High-Density Lipoprotein Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldoni, Federico; Sinke, Richard J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are a highly heterogeneous and dynamic group of the smallest and densest lipoproteins present in the circulation. This review provides the current molecular insight into HDL metabolism led by articles describing mutations in genes that have a large affect on HDL chol

  13. A clustering analysis of lipoprotein diameters in the metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of smaller low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been associated with atherosclerosis risk, and the insulin resistance (IR) underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, some research has supported the association of very low-, low- and high-density lipoprotein (VLDL HDL) particle...

  14. Asparaginase-associated concurrence of hyperlipidemia, hyperglobulinemia, and thrombocytosis was successfully treated by centrifuge/membrane hybrid double-filtration plasmapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taina; Xu, Bin; Fan, Rong; Liu, Zhihong; Gong, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase-associated concurrence of hyperlipidemia, hyperglobulinemia, and thrombocytosis is a rare complication requiring aggressive lipoprotein apheresis, but no one of currently available lipoprotein apheresis methods can simultaneously resolve the 3 abnormalities. Herein, we reported a construction of double-filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) using a combination of centrifugal/membranous plasma separation techniques to successfully treat a patient with hyperlipidemia, hyperglobulinemia, and thrombocytosis. A male presented with severe hyperlipidemia, hyperglobulinemia, and thrombocytosis during asparaginase treatment for NK/T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma and was scheduled to receive lipoprotein apheresis. To simultaneously remove lipoproteins, immunoglobulin, and deplete platelets from blood, a centrifuge/membrane hybrid DFPP was constructed as following steps: plasma and part of platelets were separated first from whole blood by centrifugal technique and then divided by a fraction plasma separator into 2 parts: platelets and plasma components with large size, which were discarded; and those containing albumin, which were returned to blood with a supplement of extrinsic albumin solution. DFPP lasted 240 minutes uneventfully, processing 5450-mL plasma. The concentrations of plasma components before DFPP were as follows: triglycerides 38.22 mmol/L, total cholesterols 22.98 mmol/L, immunoglobulin A (IgA) 15.7 g/L, IgG 12.7 g/L, and IgM 14.3 g/L; whereas after treatment were 5.69 mmol/L, 2.38 mmol/L, 2.5 g/L, 7.7 g/L, and 0.4 g/L, respectively. The respective reduction ratio was 85.1%, 89.6%, 83.9%, 39.4%, and 96.9%. Platelet count decreased by 40.4% (from 612 × 10(9)/L to 365 × 10(9)/L). Centrifuge/membrane hybrid DFPP can simultaneously remove lipoproteins, immunoglobulin, and deplete platelets, with a success in treatment of asparaginase treatment-induced hyperlipidemia, hyperglobulinemia, and thrombocytosis, and may be useful for patients

  15. The lipid requirement of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase in the human erythrocyte membrane, as studied by various highly purified phospholipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofsen, B; Schatzmann, H J

    1977-01-04

    1. When complete hydrolysis of glycerophosphlipids and sphingomyelin in the outer membrane leaflet is brought about by treatment of intact red blood cells with phospholipase A2 and sphingomyelinase C, the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity is not affected. 2. Complete hydrolysis of sphingomyelin, by treatment of leaky ghosts with spingomyelinase C, does not lead to an inactivation of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase. 3. Treatment of ghosts with phospholipase A2 (from either procine pancreas of Naja naja venom), under conditions causing an essentially complete hydrolysis of the total glycerophospholipid fraction of the membrane, results in inactivation of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase by some 80--85%. The residual activity is lost when the produced lyso-compounds (and fatty acids) are removed by subsequent treatment of the ghosts with bovine serum albumin. 4. The degree of inactivation of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase, caused by treatment of ghosts with phospholipase C, is directly proportional to the percentage by which the glycerophospholipid fraction in the inner membrane layer is degraded. 5. After essentially complete inactivation of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase by treatment of ghosts with phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus, the enzyme is reactivated by the addition of any of the glycerophospholipids, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine or lysophosphatidylcholine, but not by addition of sphingomyeline, free fatty acids or the detergent Triton X-100. 6. It is concluded that only the glycerophospholipids in the human erythrocyte membrane are involved in the maintenance of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity, and in particular that fraction of these phospholipids located in the inner half of the membrane.

  16. Serum lipoproteins attenuate macrophage activation and Toll-Like Receptor stimulation by bacterial lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Richard W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia trachomatis was previously shown to express a lipoprotein, the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip, exposed at the bacterial surface, and able to stimulate human primary monocytes/macrophages through Toll Like Receptor (TLR2/TLR1/TLR6, and CD14. In PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells the proinflammatory activity of Mip was significantly higher in the absence than in the presence of serum. The present study aims to investigate the ability of different serum factors to attenuate Mip proinflammatory activity in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and in primary human differentiated macrophages. The study was also extend to another lipoprotein, the Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein (OspA. The proinflammatory activity was studied through Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α and Interleukin (IL-8 release. Finally, TLR1/2 human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293 transfected cells were used to test the ability of the serum factors to inhibit Mip and OspA proinflammatory activity. Results In the absence of any serum and in the presence of 10% delipidated FBS, production of Mip-induced TNF-α and IL-8 in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were similar whereas they were significantly decreased in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting an inhibiting role of lipids present in FBS. In the presence of 10% human serum, the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-8 were 2 to 5 times lower than in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting the presence of more potent inhibitor(s in human serum than in FBS. Similar results were obtained in primary human differentiated macrophages. Different lipid components of human serum were then tested (total lipoproteins, HDL, LDL, VLDL, triglyceride emulsion, apolipoprotein (apoA-I, B, E2, and E3. The most efficient inhibitors were LDL, VLDL, and apoB that reduced the mean concentration of TNF-α release in Mip-induced macrophages to 24, 20, and 2%, respectively (p Conclusions These results demonstrated the ability of

  17. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisen, Kaemisa; Röhrl, Clemens; Meisslitzer-Ruppitsch, Claudia; Ranftler, Carmen; Ellinger, Adolf; Pavelka, Margit; Neumüller, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL), and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate), cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal intraellular

  18. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaemisa Srisen

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL, and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal

  19. Prediction of lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Willenbrock, Hanni; Von Heijne, G.

    2003-01-01

    A method to predict lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative Eubacteria, LipoP, has been developed. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was able to distinguish between lipoproteins (SPaseII-cleaved proteins), SPaseI-cleaved proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, and transmembrane proteins. This predictor...... was able to predict 96.8% of the lipoproteins correctly with only 0.3% false positives in a set of SPaseI-cleaved, cytoplasmic, and transmembrane proteins. The results obtained were significantly better than those of previously developed methods. Even though Gram-positive lipoprotein signal peptides differ...... from Gram-negatives, the HMM was able to identify 92.9% of the lipoproteins included in a Gram-positive test set. A genome search was carried out for 12 Gram-negative genomes and one Gram-positive genome. The results for Escherichia coli K12 were compared with new experimental data, and the predictions...

  20. Lipoprotein ratios: Physiological significance and clinical usefulness in cardiovascular prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Jesús; Pintó, Xavier; Muñoz, Anna; Zúñiga, Manuel; Rubiés-Prat, Joan; Pallardo, Luis Felipe; Masana, Luis; Mangas, Alipio; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; González-Santos, Pedro; Ascaso, Juan F; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration has been the prime index of cardiovascular disease risk and the main target for therapy. However, several lipoprotein ratios or "atherogenic indices" have been defined in an attempt to optimize the predictive capacity of the lipid profile. In this review, we summarize their pathophysiological aspects, and highlight the rationale for using these lipoprotein ratios as cardiovascular risk factors in clinical practice, specifying their cut-off risk levels and a target for lipid-lowering therapy. Total/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and LDL/HDL cholesterol ratios are risk indicators with greater predictive value than isolated parameters used independently, particularly LDL. Future recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia, including instruments for calculating cardiovascular risk or action guidelines, should include the lipoprotein ratios with greater predictive power which, in view of the evidence-based results, are none other than those which include HDL cholesterol.

  1. Mesoporous and microporous titania membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekulic-Kuzmanovic, Jelena

    2004-01-01

    The research described in this thesis deals with the synthesis and properties of ceramic oxide membrane materials. Since most of the currently available inorganic membranes with required separation properties have limited reliability and long-term stability, membranes made of new oxide materials tha

  2. Modulation of low-density lipoprotein-induced inhibition of intercellular communication by antioxidants and high-density lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, R M; de Haan, L. H. J.; Kuivenhoven, J A; Nusselder, I C

    1991-01-01

    In order to study the capacity of antioxidants and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to modulate the effects of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on intercellular communication, arterial smooth muscle cells and a dye transfer method were used. LDL, in contrast to HDL, inhibited the communication between a

  3. Modulation of low-density lipoprotein-induced inhibition of intercellular communication by antioxidants and high-density lipoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, R M; de Haan, L. H. J.; Kuivenhoven, J A; Nusselder, I C

    In order to study the capacity of antioxidants and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to modulate the effects of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) on intercellular communication, arterial smooth muscle cells and a dye transfer method were used. LDL, in contrast to HDL, inhibited the communication between

  4. Softness of atherogenic lipoproteins: a comparison of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikl, Christian; Peters, Judith; Trapp, Marcus; Kornmueller, Karin; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Prassl, Ruth

    2011-08-31

    Apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100)-containing plasma lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL) supply tissues and cells with cholesterol and fat. During lipolytic conversion from VLDL to LDL the size and chemical composition of the particles change, but the apoB100 molecule remains bound to the lipids and regulates the receptor mediated uptake. The molecular physical parameters which control lipoprotein remodeling and enable particle stabilization by apoB100 are largely unknown. Here, we have compared the molecular dynamics and elasticities of VLDL and LDL derived by elastic neutron scattering temperature scans. We have determined thermal motions, dynamical transitions, and molecular fluctuations, which reflect the temperature-dependent motional coupling between lipid and protein. Our results revealed that lipoprotein particles are extremely soft and flexible. We found substantial differences in the molecular resiliences of lipoproteins, especially at higher temperatures. These discrepancies not only can be explained in terms of lipid composition and mobility but also suggest that apoB100 displays different dynamics dependent on the lipoprotein it is bound to. Hence, we suppose that the inherent conformational flexibility of apoB100 permits particle stabilization upon lipid exchange, whereas the dynamic coupling between protein and lipids might be a key determinant for lipoprotein conversion and atherogenicity.

  5. Nanotechnology for Synthetic High Density Lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Patel, Pinal C.; Ko, Caroline H.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the disease mechanism responsible for coronary heart disease (CHD), the leading cause of death worldwide. One strategy to combat atherosclerosis is to increase the amount of circulating high density lipoproteins (HDL), which transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The process, known as reverse cholesterol transport, is thought to be one of the main reasons for the significant inverse correlation observed between HDL blood levels and the development of CHD. This article highlights the most common strategies for treating atherosclerosis using HDL. We further detail potential treatment opportunities that utilize nanotechnology to increase the amount of HDL in circulation. The synthesis of biomimetic HDL nanostructures that replicate the chemical and physical properties of natural HDL provides novel materials for investigating the structure-function relationships of HDL and for potential new therapeutics to combat CHD. PMID:21087901

  6. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O. H. S.; Lamberg, A.; Lehtivaara, M.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively) are essentia...... of interfacial tension becomes significant for particles with a radius of similar to 5 nm, when the area per molecule in the surface region is...

  7. Transcriptomic Analysis of THP-1 Macrophages Exposed to Lipoprotein Hydrolysis Products Generated by Lipoprotein Lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Marshall, Jenika D; Pickett, Arthur T; Schumacher, Clemens; Yang, Yanbo; Christian, Sherri L; Brown, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) induces lipid accumulation and promotes atherosclerosis. However, the effects of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL on macrophage-derived foam cell formation are not clearly understood. Thus, we analyzed the transcriptomic response to hydrolysis products via microarray analyses on RNA isolated from human THP-1 macrophages incubated with total lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL. The expression of 183 transcripts was significantly upregulated and 133 transcripts were significantly downregulated. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that there was a significant over-representation of genes involved in cell cycling, stress response, type I interferon signaling, cellular metal ion homeostasis, sterol metabolism, and nuclease activity. Interestingly, transcripts for 63 small nucleolar RNA were significantly upregulated. We verified the microarray data by quantitative real-time PCR and found that the expression of SNORA56, as well as the expression of genes associated with the cell cycle (PCNA and DKC1 variant 3), stress response (ATF3), type I interferon signaling (IFITM1), and lipid metabolism (CD36 and PLIN2) were significantly affected by LPL hydrolysis products. To determine if the free fatty acid (FFA) component of total lipoprotein hydrolysis products is sufficient to alter the expression of these genes, THP-1 macrophages were also incubated with the total FFA or individual classes of the FFA component. The gene regulation by the FFA component did not mimic that of the hydrolysis products, suggesting that the regulation of gene expression in THP-1 macrophages depends on the specific combination and concentration of lipid species present in the hydrolysis products, and not solely on FFA.

  8. Leukocyte activation by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Arash; van Oostrom, Antonie J H H M; Izraeljan, Alisa; Verseyden, Caroline; Collins, Jennifer M; Frayn, Keith N; Plokker, Thijs W M; Elte, Jan Willem F; Castro Cabezas, Manuel

    2008-04-01

    Postprandial lipemia has been linked to atherosclerosis and inflammation. Because leukocyte activation is obligatory for atherogenesis, leukocyte activation by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) was investigated. The expression of CD11b and CD66b after incubation with glucose and native and artificial TRLs (NTRL and ATRL) in vivo and in vitro was evaluated by flowcytometry. Oral fat loading tests showed an increased expression of CD11b on monocytes and neutrophils and CD66b on neutrophils. In 11 volunteers, postprandial leukocytes became enriched with meal-derived fatty acids ([1-(13)C]16:0) suggesting uptake of exogenous fat. ApoB binding on leukocytes measured by flowcytometry in 65 subjects was highest on neutrophils and monocytes suggesting adherence of apoB-containing lipoproteins. Physiological concentrations of TRLs showed 62% increased neutrophil CD11b and a dose-dependent increased monocyte CD11b up to 84% in vitro. Incubations with lipid emulsions in the hypertriglyceridemic range showed a 5-fold increased monocyte CD11b expression, which was higher than the positive control (fMLP), and a dose-dependent 2- to 3-fold increased neutrophil CD11b and CD66b. The oxidative scavenger DMTU decreased the neutrophil CD66b expression by 36%. Acute hypertriglyceridemia is a leukocyte activator most likely by direct interaction between TRLs and leukocytes and uptake of fatty acids. TG-mediated leukocyte activation is an alternative proinflammatory and proatherogenic mechanism of hypertriglyceridemia in part associated to the generation of oxidative stress.

  9. Cloning and Characterization of an Outer Membrane Protein of Vibrio vulnificus Required for Heme Utilization: Regulation of Expression and Determination of the Gene Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Litwin, Christine M.; Byrne, Burke L.

    1998-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic, marine pathogen that has been associated with septicemia and serious wound infections in patients with iron overload and preexisting liver disease. For V. vulnificus, the ability to acquire iron from the host has been shown to correlate with virulence. V. vulnificus is able to use host iron sources such as hemoglobin and heme. We previously constructed a fur mutant of V. vulnificus which constitutively expresses at least two iron-regulated outer membrane pro...

  10. The outer membrane protein TolC is required for phytoalexin resistance and virulence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Summary Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight on several plant species such as apple and pear, which produce diverse phytoalexins as defence mechanisms. An evolutionary successful pathogen thus must develop resistance mechanisms towards these toxic compounds. The E. amylovora outer membrane protein, TolC, might mediate phytoalexin resistance through its interaction with the multidrug efflux pump, AcrAB. To prove this, a tolC mutant and an acrB/tolC double mutant were constructed. The minimal i...

  11. Specificity of Lipoprotein Chaperones for the Characteristic Lipidated Structural Motifs of their Cognate Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejuch, Tom; van Hattum, Hilde; Triola, Gemma; Jaiswal, Mamta; Waldmann, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    Lipoprotein-binding chaperones mediate intracellular transport of lipidated proteins and determine their proper localisation and functioning. Understanding of the exact structural parameters that determine recognition and transport by different chaperones is of major interest. We have synthesised several lipid-modified peptides, representative of different lipoprotein classes, and have investigated their binding to the relevant chaperones PDEδ, UNC119a, UNC119b, and galectins-1 and -3. Our results demonstrate that PDEδ recognises S-isoprenylated C-terminal peptidic structures but not N-myristoylated peptides. In contrast, UNC119 proteins bind only mono-N-myristoylated, but do not recognise doubly lipidated and S-isoprenylated peptides at the C terminus. For galectins-1 and -3, neither binding to N-acylated, nor to C-terminally prenylated peptides could be determined. These results shed light on the specificity of the chaperone-mediated cellular lipoprotein transport systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Lipoprotein particle distribution and skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase activity after acute exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Michael

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the metabolic effects of exercise are due to the most recent exercise session. With recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS, it is possible to gain insight about which lipoprotein particles are responsible for mediating exercise effects. Methods Using a randomized cross-over design, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL responses were evaluated in eight men on the morning after i an inactive control trial (CON, ii exercising vigorously on the prior evening for 100 min followed by fasting overnight to maintain an energy and carbohydrate deficit (EX-DEF, and iii after the same exercise session followed by carbohydrate intake to restore muscle glycogen and carbohydrate balance (EX-BAL. Results The intermediate, low and high density lipoprotein particle concentrations did not differ between trials. Fasting triglyceride (TG determined biochemically, and mean VLDL size were lower in EX-DEF but not in EX-BAL compared to CON, primarily due to a reduction in VLDL-TG in the 70–120 nm (large particle range. In contrast, VLDL-TG was lower in both EX-DEF and EX-BAL compared to CON in the 43–55 nm (medium particle range. VLDL-TG in smaller particles (29–43 nm was unaffected by exercise. Because the majority of VLDL particles were in this smallest size range and resistant to change, total VLDL particle concentration was not different between any of these conditions. Skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase (LPL activity was also not different across these 3 trials. However, in CON only, the inter-individual differences in LPL activity were inversely correlated with fasting TG, VLDL-TG, total, large and small VLDL particle concentration and VLDL size, indicating a regulatory role for LPL in the non-exercised state. Conclusions These findings reveal a high level of differential regulation between different sized triglyceride-rich lipoproteins following exercise and feeding, in the absence of changes in

  13. Lipoprotein particle distribution and skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase activity after acute exercise

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, Michael

    2012-06-06

    AbstractBackgroundMany of the metabolic effects of exercise are due to the most recent exercise session. With recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS), it is possible to gain insight about which lipoprotein particles are responsible for mediating exercise effects.MethodsUsing a randomized cross-over design, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) responses were evaluated in eight men on the morning after i) an inactive control trial (CON), ii) exercising vigorously on the prior evening for 100 min followed by fasting overnight to maintain an energy and carbohydrate deficit (EX-DEF), and iii) after the same exercise session followed by carbohydrate intake to restore muscle glycogen and carbohydrate balance (EX-BAL).ResultsThe intermediate, low and high density lipoprotein particle concentrations did not differ between trials. Fasting triglyceride (TG) determined biochemically, and mean VLDL size were lower in EX-DEF but not in EX-BAL compared to CON, primarily due to a reduction in VLDL-TG in the 70–120 nm (large) particle range. In contrast, VLDL-TG was lower in both EX-DEF and EX-BAL compared to CON in the 43–55 nm (medium) particle range. VLDL-TG in smaller particles (29–43 nm) was unaffected by exercise. Because the majority of VLDL particles were in this smallest size range and resistant to change, total VLDL particle concentration was not different between any of these conditions. Skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was also not different across these 3 trials. However, in CON only, the inter-individual differences in LPL activity were inversely correlated with fasting TG, VLDL-TG, total, large and small VLDL particle concentration and VLDL size, indicating a regulatory role for LPL in the non-exercised state.ConclusionsThese findings reveal a high level of differential regulation between different sized triglyceride-rich lipoproteins following exercise and feeding, in the absence of changes in LPL activity.

  14. Recent Advances in Pd-Based Membranes for Membrane Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arratibel Plazaola, Alba; Pacheco Tanaka, David Alfredo; Van Sint Annaland, Martin; Gallucci, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    Palladium-based membranes for hydrogen separation have been studied by several research groups during the last 40 years. Much effort has been dedicated to improving the hydrogen flux of these membranes employing different alloys, supports, deposition/production techniques, etc. High flux and cheap membranes, yet stable at different operating conditions are required for their exploitation at industrial scale. The integration of membranes in multifunctional reactors (membrane reactors) poses additional demands on the membranes as interactions at different levels between the catalyst and the membrane surface can occur. Particularly, when employing the membranes in fluidized bed reactors, the selective layer should be resistant to or protected against erosion. In this review we will also describe a novel kind of membranes, the pore-filled type membranes prepared by Pacheco Tanaka and coworkers that represent a possible solution to integrate thin selective membranes into membrane reactors while protecting the selective layer. This work is focused on recent advances on metallic supports, materials used as an intermetallic diffusion layer when metallic supports are used and the most recent advances on Pd-based composite membranes. Particular attention is paid to improvements on sulfur resistance of Pd based membranes, resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and stability at high temperature.

  15. Recent Advances in Pd-Based Membranes for Membrane Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Arratibel Plazaola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium-based membranes for hydrogen separation have been studied by several research groups during the last 40 years. Much effort has been dedicated to improving the hydrogen flux of these membranes employing different alloys, supports, deposition/production techniques, etc. High flux and cheap membranes, yet stable at different operating conditions are required for their exploitation at industrial scale. The integration of membranes in multifunctional reactors (membrane reactors poses additional demands on the membranes as interactions at different levels between the catalyst and the membrane surface can occur. Particularly, when employing the membranes in fluidized bed reactors, the selective layer should be resistant to or protected against erosion. In this review we will also describe a novel kind of membranes, the pore-filled type membranes prepared by Pacheco Tanaka and coworkers that represent a possible solution to integrate thin selective membranes into membrane reactors while protecting the selective layer. This work is focused on recent advances on metallic supports, materials used as an intermetallic diffusion layer when metallic supports are used and the most recent advances on Pd-based composite membranes. Particular attention is paid to improvements on sulfur resistance of Pd based membranes, resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and stability at high temperature.

  16. Tannerella forsythia Outer Membrane Vesicles Are Enriched with Substrates of the Type IX Secretion System and TonB-Dependent Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Paul D; Chen, Yu-Yen; Chen, Dina; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Cecil, Jessica D; Holden, James A; Lenzo, Jason C; Reynolds, Eric C

    2015-12-04

    Tannerella forsythia, a Gram-negative oral bacterium closely associated with chronic periodontitis, naturally produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). In this study, OMVs were purified by gradient centrifugation, and the proteome was investigated together with cellular fractions using LC-MS/MS analyses of SDS-PAGE fractions, resulting in the identification of 872 proteins including 297 OMV proteins. Comparison of the OMV proteome with the subcellular proteomes led to the localization of 173 proteins to the vesicle membrane and 61 proteins to the vesicle lumen, while 27 substrates of the type IX secretion system were assigned to the vesicle surface. These substrates were generally enriched in OMVs; however, the stoichiometry of the S-layer proteins, TfsA and TfsB, was significantly altered, potentially to accommodate the higher curvature required of the S-layer around OMVs. A vast number of TonB-dependent receptors related to SusC, together with their associated SusD-like lipoproteins, were identified, and these were also relatively enriched in OMVs. In contrast, other lipoproteins were significantly depleted from the OMVs. This study identified the highest number of membrane-associated OMV proteins to date in any bacterium and conclusively demonstrates cargo sorting of particular classes of proteins, which may have significant impact on the virulence of OMVs.

  17. High-density lipoprotein and atherosclerosis: Roles of lipid transporters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshinari; Uehara; Keijiro; Saku

    2014-01-01

    Various previous studies have found a negative cor-relation between the risk of cardiovascular events and serum high-density lipoprotein(HDL) cholesterol levels. The reverse cholesterol transport, a pathway of choles-terol from peripheral tissue to liver which has several potent antiatherogenic properties. For instance, the particles of HDL mediate to transport cholesterol from cells in arterial tissues, particularly from atherosclerotic plaques, to the liver. Both ATP-binding cassette trans-porters(ABC) A1 and ABCG1 are membrane cholesterol transporters and have been implicated in mediating cholesterol effluxes from cells in the presence of HDL and apolipoprotein A-I, a major protein constituent of HDL. Previous studies demonstrated that ABCA1 and ABCG1 or the interaction between ABCA1 and ABCG1 exerted antiatherosclerotic effects. As a therapeutic approach for increasing HDL cholesterol levels, much focus has been placed on increasing HDL cholesterol levels as well as enhancing HDL biochemical functions. HDL therapies that use injections of reconstituted HDL, apoA-I mimetics, or full-length apoA-I have shown dramatic effectiveness. In particular, a novel apoA-I mi-metic peptide, Fukuoka University ApoA-I Mimetic Pep-tide, effectively removes cholesterol via specific ABCA1 and other transporters, such as ABCG1, and has an an-tiatherosclerotic effect by enhancing the biological func-tions of HDL without changing circulating HDL choles-terol levels. Thus, HDL-targeting therapy has significant atheroprotective potential, as it uses lipid transporter-targeting agents, and may prove to be a therapeutic tool for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000472.htm Membranous nephropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Membranous nephropathy is a kidney disorder that leads to changes ...

  19. The influence of lipoprotein(a) on fibrinolytic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rahajuningsih D. Setiabudy; Marzuki Suryaatmadja; Fifi Henrika

    2004-01-01

    Lipoprotein(a) is a plasma lipoprotein whose structure and composition are similar with low density lipoprotein (LDL) with an addition of apo(a) that is bound to apo B100. The structure of apo(a) is similar with plasminogen, a proenzym in fibrinolytic system. Due to this similarity, it is assumed that Lp(a) can inhibit plasminogen activity and decreases fibrinolytic activity. The purpose of this study is to prove that addition of Lp(a) to normal plasma can inhibit fibrinolytic activity. Four ...

  20. Hepatitis C virus relies on lipoproteins for its life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Germana; Di Caprio, Giorgia; Fimia, Gian Maria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Marco; Alonzi, Tonino

    2016-02-14

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 150 million people worldwide. In most cases, HCV infection becomes chronic causing liver disease ranging from fibrosis to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Viral persistence and pathogenesis are due to the ability of HCV to deregulate specific host processes, mainly lipid metabolism and innate immunity. In particular, HCV exploits the lipoprotein machineries for almost all steps of its life cycle. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge concerning the interplay between HCV and lipoprotein metabolism. We discuss the role played by members of lipoproteins in HCV entry, replication and virion production.

  1. The role of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in comparison with whole egg yolk for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiao-Xiang; Rodenburg, Sarah E; Hill, Dana; Vandevoort, Catherine A

    2011-05-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) extracted from hen egg yolk has recently been considered to be superior to whole egg yolk in sperm cryopreservation of various animal species. Meanwhile, there was a notion that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in egg yolk may have a negative effect on post-thaw survival. The role of LDL and HDL in sperm cryopreservation of rhesus monkeys has not been explored. The present study evaluates their effect in comparison with egg yolk with or without the addition of permeable cryoprotectant (glycerol) on sperm cryopreservation of rhesus macaques. In addition, various additives intended to change the lipid composition of LDL-sperm membrane complex have also been tested for their effectiveness in preserving post-thaw viability. Our findings indicated that LDL is the main component in egg yolk that is responsible for its protective role for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys. Regardless of the presence or absence of glycerol, the protective role of LDL is similar to that of egg yolk and we did not observe any superiority in post-thaw survival with LDL when compared to egg yolk. Modifying the lipid composition of LDL-sperm membrane complex with the addition of cholesterol, cholesterol loaded cyclodextrin and phosphatidylcholine also did not yield any improvements in post-thaw survival; while addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced post-thaw motility. HDL plays a neutral role in sperm cryopreservation of rhesus monkeys. The present study suggests that egg yolk may still hold advantages when compared with LDL as effective components in extenders for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys.

  2. The role of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in comparison with whole egg yolk for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao-Xiang Dong; Sarah E Rodenburg; Dana Hill; Catherine A VandeVoort

    2011-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) extracted from hen egg yolk has recently been considered to be superior to whole egg yolk in sperm cryopreservation of various animal species. Meanwhile, there was a notion that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in egg yolk may have a negative effect on post-thaw survival. The role of LDL and HDL in sperm cryopreservation of rhesus monkeys has not been explored. The present study evaluates their effect in comparison with egg yolk with or without the addition of permeable cryoprotectant (glycerol) on sperm cryopreservation of rhesus macaques. In addition, various additives intended to change the lipid composition of LDL-sperm membrane complex have also been tested for their effectiveness in preserving post-thaw viability. Our findings indicated that LDL is the main component in egg yolk that is responsible for its protective role for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys. Regardless of the presence or absence of glycerol, the protective role of LDL is similar to that of egg yolk and we did not observe any superiority in post-thaw survival with LDL when compared to egg yolk. Modifying the lipid composition of LDL-sperm membrane complex with the addition of cholesterol, cholesterol loaded cyclodextrin and phosphatidylcholine also did not yield any improvements in post-thaw survival; while addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced post-thaw motility. HDL plays a neutral role in sperm cryopreservation of rhesus monkeys. The present study suggests that egg yolk may still hold advantages when compared with LDL as effective components in extenders for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys.

  3. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-08

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP.

  4. Genetic determinants of LDL, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL: concordance and discordance with cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate whether new and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and HDL cholesterol associate with the risk of cardiovascular disease expected from the effect on lipoprotein levels. Concordance or discordance of such genetic determinants with cardiovascular disease risk will either favor or disfavor that these lipoproteins are causally related to cardiovascular disease. Evidence for concordance or discordance with cardiovascular disease risk has come from Mendelian randomization studies, whereas indirect evidence also has emerged from genome-wide and candidate gene association studies. The major limitations of studies of genetic variation and concordance or discordance with cardiovascular disease are pleiotropic effects of the variants studied, and/or lack of sufficient statistical power of the majority of studies to firmly demonstrate a positive association, or even more difficult, to exclude an association. New and known genetic determinants of plasma levels of LDL cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are concordant with both the magnitude and direction of the expected risk of cardiovascular disease, whereas this is unclear for HDL cholesterol. The data are compatible with cardiovascular disease causality for the three former lipoprotein classes, but not for HDL cholesterol.

  5. Firing membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappert, Emiel Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thermal processing is commonly employed to alter the chemistry and microstructure of membrane layers. It can shape, strengthen, and give functionality to a membrane. A good understanding of the processes taking place during the thermal processing of a membrane material allows for optimization and tu

  6. Biogenesis of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luirink, Joen; Yu, Zhong; Wagner, Samuel; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2012-06-01

    The inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli is composed of inner membrane proteins, lipoproteins and peripherally attached soluble proteins. Our knowledge of the biogenesis of inner membrane proteins is rapidly increasing. This is in particular true for the early steps of biogenesis - protein targeting to and insertion into the membrane. However, our knowledge of inner membrane protein folding and quality control is still fragmentary. Furthering our knowledge in these areas will bring us closer to understand the biogenesis of individual inner membrane proteins in the context of the biogenesis of the inner membrane proteome of Escherichia coli as a whole. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  7. A membrane microdomain-associated protein, Arabidopsis Flot1, is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and is required for seedling development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruili; Liu, Peng; Wan, Yinglang; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qinli; Mettbach, Ursula; Baluska, Frantisek; Samaj, Jozef; Fang, Xiaohong; Lucas, William J; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-05-01

    Endocytosis is essential for the maintenance of protein and lipid compositions in the plasma membrane and for the acquisition of materials from the extracellular space. Clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytic processes are well established in yeast and animals; however, endocytic pathways involved in cargo internalization and intracellular trafficking remain to be fully elucidated for plants. Here, we used transgenic green fluorescent protein-flotillin1 (GFP-Flot1) Arabidopsis thaliana plants in combination with confocal microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy immunogold labeling to study the spatial and dynamic aspects of GFP-Flot1-positive vesicle formation. Vesicle size, as outlined by the gold particles, was ∼100 nm, which is larger than the 30-nm size of clathrin-coated vesicles. GFP-Flot1 also did not colocalize with clathrin light chain-mOrange. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy also revealed that the dynamic behavior of GFP-Flot1-positive puncta was different from that of clathrin light chain-mOrange puncta. Furthermore, disruption of membrane microdomains caused a significant alteration in the dynamics of Flot1-positive puncta. Analysis of artificial microRNA Flot1 transgenic Arabidopsis lines established that a reduction in Flot1 transcript levels gave rise to a reduction in shoot and root meristem size plus retardation in seedling growth. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that, in plant cells, Flot1 is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and functions in seedling development.

  8. The β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is required for the assembly of a primitive S-layer protein in the ancient outer membrane of Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Federico; Ferreras, Eloy; Berenguer, José

    2012-11-01

    The ancient bacterial lineage Thermus spp has a primitive form of outer membrane attached to the cell wall through SlpA, a protein that shows intermediate properties between S-layer proteins and outer membrane (OM) porins. In E. coli and related Proteobacteria, porins are secreted through the BAM (β-barrel assembly machinery) pathway, whose main component is BamA. A homologue to this protein is encoded in all the Thermus spp so far sequenced, so we wondered if this pathway could be responsible for SlpA secretion in this ancient bacterial model. To analyse this hypothesis, we attempted to get mutants on this BamA(th) of T. thermophilus HB27. Knockout and deletion mutants lacking the last 10 amino acids were not viable, whereas its depletion by means of a BamA antisense RNA lead defective attachment to the cell wall of its OM-like envelope. Such defects were related to defective folding of the SlpA protein that was more sensitive to proteases than in a wild-type strain. A similar phenotype was found in mutants lacking the terminal Phe of SlpA. Further protein-protein interaction assays confirmed the existence of specific binding between SlpA and BamA(th). Taking together, these data suggest that SlpA is secreted through a BAM-like pathway in this ancestral bacterial lineage, supporting an ancient origin of this pathway before the evolution of the Proteobacteria.

  9. 21 CFR 866.5590 - Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. 866.5590... Lipoprotein X immunolog-ical test system. (a) Identification. A lipoprotein X immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques lipoprotein X (a high...

  10. Development of an integrated model for analysis of the kinetics of apolipoprotein B in plasma very low density lipoproteins, intermediate density lipoproteins, and low density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltz, W F; Kesäniemi, Y A; Howard, B V; Grundy, S M

    1985-01-01

    To quantify more precisely the metabolism of apolipoprotein B (apo B) in human beings, an integrated model was developed for the analysis of the isotope kinetics of apo B in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL), and low density lipoproteins (LDL). The experimental basis for model development was a series of 30 triple-isotope studies in which patients received autologous 131I-VLDL, 125I-IDL, and [3H]glycerol as a precursor of VLDL triglycerides. The currently proposed model contains the following components: (a) a VLDL delipidation cascade that has a variable number of subcompartments, (b) a slowly catabolized pool of VLDL, (c) an IDL compartment consisting of two closely connected subcompartments, one of which is outside the immediate circulation, and (d) a two-compartment subsystem for LDL. Because mass data indicate that not all VLDL were converted to LDL, the model allows for irreversible removal of apo B from VLDL (or IDL) subsystems. It accounts for apparent "direct" input of LDL by postulating an early, rapidly metabolized compartment of VLDL that is converted directly to IDL. The model appears to be consistent with specific activity curves from the current triple-isotope studies and with present concepts of lipoprotein physiology; it also can be used to quantify pathways of lipoprotein apo B transport in normal and abnormal states. PMID:4031063

  11. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  12. Distribution of perfluorooctanesulfonate and perfluorooctanoate into human plasma lipoprotein fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butenhoff, J.L.; Pieterman, E.; Ehresman, D.J.; Gorman, G.S.; Olsen, G.W.; Chang, S.C.; Princen, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Some cross-sectional epidemiological studies have reported positive associations of serum concentrations of non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol with serum perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA). However, the strength of the reported associations is inconsistent for

  13. Mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 binds human protein HER2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Wu, Lijuan; Fang, Cheng; Nie, Rong; Wang, Jiamou; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Wenbin

    2016-11-01

    Mycoplasmas are a group of microbes that can cause human diseases. The mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 promotes cancer metastasis, at least in part, by interacting with EGFR. In this study, we show that the p37 lipoprotein binds another member of the EGFR family, HER2, through the HER2 extracellular domain. The binding of p37-HER2 promotes phosphorylation of HER2 and activates the downstream signaling molecule Erk1/2. Because the HER2 signaling pathway contributes to breast tumor metastasis, our results imply that the mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 may also be involved in breast cancer metastasis. This study contributes to our understanding of mycoplasmal lipoprotein p37 function and its potential involvement in tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. [Basic mechanisms: structure, function and metabolism of plasma lipoproteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Teresa L; Chen, Xiangyu; Martin Campos, Jesús M; Julve, Josep; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present basic information on the lipoprotein physiology. The protein fraction of lipoproteins consists of several apolipoproteins and enzymes whose functions are lipid transport and metabolism. Classification of lipoproteins is based on their density. Chylomicrons, VLDL, IDL, LDL and HDL can be isolated by ultracentrifugation. Both chylomicrons- and VLDL-triglycerides are transported from the intestine and liver, respectively, to the peripheral tissues. The metabolism of VLDL originates IDL and LDL. LDL is the main transporter of cholesterol to extrahepatic tissues. HDL mobilizes cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver where it is secreted to bile as free cholesterol or bile salts, a process termed reverse cholesterol transport. Lipoprotein metabolism can be regulated by nuclear receptors that regulate the expression of genes involved in triglyceride and apolipoprotein metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  15. Inner membrane proteins YgdD and SbmA are required for the complete susceptibility of E. coli to the proline-rich antimicrobial peptide arasin 1(1-25).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Victoria S; Mardirossian, Mario; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Benincasa, Monica; Runti, Giulia; Nepa, Matteo; Haug, Tor; Stensvåg, Klara; Scocchi, Marco

    2016-02-08

    Arasin 1 from the spider crab Hyas araneus is a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide, which kills target bacteria by a non-membranolytic mechanism. By using a fluorescent derivative of the peptide, we showed that arasin 1 rapidly penetrates into Escherichia coli cells without membrane damage. To unravel its mode of action, a knock-out gene library of E. coli was screened and two types of mutants with a less susceptible phenotype to the arasin 1 fragment (1-23) were found. The first bore the mutation of sbmA, a gene coding for an inner membrane protein involved in the uptake of different antibiotic peptides. The second one was located in the ygdD gene, coding for a conserved inner membrane protein of unknown function. Functional studies showed that YgdD is required for the full susceptibility to arasin 1(1-25), possibly by supporting its uptake and/or intracellular action. These results indicate that different bacterial proteins are exploited by arasin 1(1-25) to exert its antibacterial activity and add new insights in the complex mode of action of proline-rich antimicrobial peptides.

  16. Heritability of Biomarkers of Oxidized Lipoproteins: Twin Pair Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fangwen; Schork, Andrew J; Maihofer, Adam X; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Marcovina, Santica M; Miller, Elizabeth R; Witztum, Joseph L; O'Connor, Daniel T; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-07-01

    To determine whether biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are genetically determined. Lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is a heritable risk factor and carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL). We measured oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (OxPL-apoB), Lp(a), IgG, and IgM autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes in 386 monozygotic and dizygotic twins to estimate trait heritability (h(2)) and determine specific genetic effects among traits. A genome-wide linkage study followed by genetic association was performed. The h(2) (scale: 0-1) for Lp(a) was 0.91±0.01 and for OxPL-apoB 0.87±0.02, which were higher than physiological, inflammatory, or lipid traits. h(2) of IgM malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes were 0.69±0.04, 0.67±0.05, and 0.80±0.03, respectively, and for IgG malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes 0.62±0.05, 0.52±0.06, and 0.53±0.06, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between the major apo(a) isoform and OxPL-apoB (R=-0.49; Plipoprotein and copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes. Sib-pair genetic linkage of the Lp(a) trait revealed that single nucleotide polymorphism rs10455872 was significantly associated with OxPL-apoB after adjusting for Lp(a). OxPL-apoB and other biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are highly heritable cardiovascular risk factors that suggest novel genetic origins of atherothrombosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Rapid 1α,25(OH)₂D ₃ membrane-mediated activation of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in growth plate chondrocytes requires Pdia3, PLAA and caveolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroudi, Maryam; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2014-08-01

    1α,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D3 [1α,25(OH)2D3] regulates growth zone chondrocytes (GC) via classical steroid hormone receptor-mediated gene transcription and by initiating rapid membrane-mediated signaling pathways. 1α,25(OH)2D3 initiates its membrane effects via its specific membrane-associated receptor (Pdia3) in caveolae. 1α,25(OH)2D3 binding to Pdia3 leads to phospholipase-A2 (PLA2)-activating protein (PLAA) activation, stimulating PLA2, resulting in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release and protein kinase C activation. Recently, we reported that 1α,25(OH)2D3 rapidly activates Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in GC cells. However, the roles of Pdia3, PLAA and caveolae in 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent rapid activation of CaMKII are not clear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the roles of Pdia3, PLAA and caveolae in 1α,25(OH)2D3 membrane-stimulated CaMKII activation. Pre-treating chondrocytes from the growth zone of the rat costochondral cartilage with antibodies against PLAA or Pdia3 blocked activation of CaMKII by 1α,25(OH)2D3. PLAA peptide rapidly activated CaMKII in GC cells. Caveolae disruption abolished CaMKII activation in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3 or PLAA peptide treatment. Immunoprecipitation studies showed increased CaM binding to PLAA in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. The results indicated that Pdia3, PLAA and caveolae are required for rapid 1α,25(OH)2D3 membrane-mediated activation of CaMKII. 1α,25(OH)2D3 signaling via Pdia3 receptor triggered the interaction between PLAA and CaM suggesting that CaM may play a major role linking PLAA to CaMKII in membrane-mediated actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3.

  18. Optimized Negative-Staining Electron Microscopy for Lipoprotein Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Garewal, Mark; Ren, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative-staining (NS), a rapid, simple and conventional technique of electron microscopy (EM), has been commonly used to initially study the morphology and structure of proteins for half a century. Certain NS protocols however can cause artifacts, especially for structurally flexible or lipid-related proteins, such as lipoproteins. Lipoproteins were often observed in the form of rouleau as lipoprotein particles appeared to be stacked together by conventional NS protocols. The flexible components of lipoproteins, i.e. lipids and amphipathic apolipoproteins, resulted in the lipoprotein structure being sensitive to the NS sample preparation parameters, such as operational procedures, salt concentrations, and the staining reagents. Scope of review The most popular NS protocols that have been used to examine lipoprotein morphology and structure were reviewed. Major conclusions The comparisons show that an optimized NS (OpNS) protocol can eliminate the rouleau artifacts of lipoproteins, and that the lipoproteins are similar in size and shape as statistically measured from two EM methods, OpNS and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). OpNS is a high-throughput, high-contrast and high-resolution (near 1 nm, but rarely better than 1 nm) method which has been used to discover the mechanics of a small protein, 53 kDa cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP), and the structure of an individual particle of a single protein by individual-particle electron tomography (IPET), i.e. a 14 Å-resolution IgG antibody three-dimensional map. General significance It is suggested that OpNS can be used as a general protocol to study the structure of proteins, especially highly dynamic proteins with equilibrium-fluctuating structures. PMID:23032862

  19. Lipoprotein(a) as a cardiovascular risk factor: current status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Chapman, M John; Ray, Kausik

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the study were, first, to critically evaluate lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] as a cardiovascular risk factor and, second, to advise on screening for elevated plasma Lp(a), on desirable levels, and on therapeutic strategies.......The aims of the study were, first, to critically evaluate lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] as a cardiovascular risk factor and, second, to advise on screening for elevated plasma Lp(a), on desirable levels, and on therapeutic strategies....

  20. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: How High

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rajagopal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C is considered anti-atherogenic good cholesterol. It is involved in reverse transport of lipids. Epidemiological studies have found inverse relationship of HDL-C and coronary heart disease (CHD risk. When grouped according to HDL-C, subjects having HDL-C more than 60 mg/dL had lesser risk of CHD than those having HDL-C of 40-60 mg/dL, who in turn had lesser risk than those who had HDL-C less than 40 mg/dL. No upper limit for beneficial effect of HDL-C on CHD risk has been identified. The goals of treating patients with low HDL-C have not been firmly established. Though many drugs are known to improve HDL-C concentration, statins are proven to improve CHD risk and mortality. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP is involved in metabolism of HDL-C and its inhibitors are actively being screened for clinical utility. However, final answer is still awaited on CETP-inhibitors.

  1. Lipoprotein(a in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a (Lp(a is an LDL-like molecule consisting of an apolipoprotein B-100 (apo(B-100 particle attached by a disulphide bridge to apo(a. Many observations have pointed out that Lp(a levels may be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Lp(a inhibits the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF and contributes to the growth of arterial atherosclerotic lesions by promoting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the migration of smooth muscle cells to endothelial cells. Moreover Lp(a inhibits plasminogen binding to the surfaces of endothelial cells and decreases the activity of fibrin-dependent tissue-type plasminogen activator. Lp(a may act as a proinflammatory mediator that augments the lesion formation in atherosclerotic plaques. Elevated serum Lp(a is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. Furthermore, Lp(a levels should be a marker of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, saphenous vein bypass graft atherosclerosis, and accelerated coronary atherosclerosis of cardiac transplantation. Finally, the possibility that Lp(a may be a risk factor for ischemic stroke has been assessed in several studies. Recent findings suggest that Lp(a-lowering therapy might be beneficial in patients with high Lp(a levels. A future therapeutic approach could include apheresis in high-risk patients in order to reduce major coronary events.

  2. Role of adipocyte-derived lipoprotein lipase in adipocyte hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Robert A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major portion of available fatty acids for adipocyte uptake is derived from lipoprotein lipase (LPL-mediated hydrolysis of circulating lipoprotein particles. In vivo studies aimed at identifying the precise role of adipocyte-derived LPL in fat storage function of adipose tissue have been unable to provide conclusive evidence due to compensatory mechanisms that activate endogenous fatty acid synthesis. To address this gap in knowledge, we have measured the effect of reducing adipocyte LPL expression on intracellular lipid accumulation using a well-established cultured model of adipocyte differentiation. Methods siRNA specific for mouse LPL was transfected into 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Expression of LPL was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and cell surface-associated LPL enzymatic activity was measured by colorimetric detection following substrate (p-nitrophenyl butyrate hydrolysis. Apolipoprotein CII and CIII expression ratios were also measured by qRT-PCR. Intracellular lipid accumulation was quantified by Nile Red staining. Results During differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes, LPL mRNA expression increases 6-fold resulting in a 2-fold increase in cell surface-associated LPL enzymatic activity. Parallel to this increase in LPL expression, we found that intracellular lipids increased ~10-fold demonstrating a direct correlation between adipocyte-derived LPL expression and lipid storage. We next reduced LPL expression in adipocytes using siRNA transfections to directly quantify the contributions of adipocyte-derived LPL to lipid storage, This treatment reduced LPL mRNA expression and cell surface-associated LPL enzymatic activity to ~50% of non-treated controls while intracellular lipid levels were reduced by 80%. Exogenous addition of purified LPL (to restore extracellular lipolytic activity or palmitate (as a source of free fatty acids to siRNA-treated cells restored intracellular lipid levels to those measured for non

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of apolipoprotein E-containing lipoprotein particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newhouse, Yvonne [Gladstone Institutes of Cardiovascular and Neurological Disease, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Peters-Libeu, Clare [Gladstone Institutes of Cardiovascular and Neurological Disease, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Weisgraber, Karl H., E-mail: kweisgraber@gladstone.ucsf.edu [Gladstone Institutes of Cardiovascular and Neurological Disease, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Further understanding of the structure and function of plasma apolipoproteins requires the determination of their high-resolution structures when complexed with lipids. In these studies, the production of homogeneous, biologically active lipoprotein particles of apolipoprotein E complexed with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and their crystallization and X-ray diffraction are demonstrated. High-resolution structural information is available for several soluble plasma apolipoproteins (apos) in a lipid-free state. However, this information provides limited insight into structure–function relationships, as this class of proteins primarily performs its functions of lipid transport and modulation of lipid metabolism in a lipid-bound state on lipoprotein particles. Here, the possibility of generating homogeneous lipoprotein particles that could be crystallized was explored, opening the possibility of obtaining high-resolution structural information by X-ray crystallography. To test this possibility, apoE4 complexed with the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine was chosen. Uniform particles containing 50% lipid and 50% apoE4 were obtained and crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Two crystal forms diffract to beyond 8 Å resolution.

  4. Peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (Pal) of Gram-negative bacteria: function, structure, role in pathogenesis and potential application in immunoprophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Renata; Wiśniewska, Katarzyna; Pietras, Zbigniew; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta Katarzyna

    2009-09-01

    The protein Pal (peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein) is anchored in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria and interacts with Tol proteins. Tol-Pal proteins form two complexes: the first is composed of three inner membrane Tol proteins (TolA, TolQ and TolR); the second consists of the TolB and Pal proteins linked to the cell's OM. These complexes interact with one another forming a multiprotein membrane-spanning system. It has recently been demonstrated that Pal is essential for bacterial survival and pathogenesis, although its role in virulence has not been clearly defined. This review summarizes the available data concerning the structure and function of Pal and its role in pathogenesis.

  5. A membrane-associated adenylate cyclase modulates lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities required for bull sperm capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Silvina; Córdoba, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid, as well as heparin, is a glycosaminoglycan present in the female genital tract of cattle. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative metabolism and intracellular signals mediated by a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (mAC), in sperm capacitation with hyaluronic acid and heparin, in cryopreserved bull sperm. The mAC inhibitor, 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, was used in the present study. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities and lactate concentration were determined spectrophotometrically in the incubation medium. Capacitation and acrosome reaction were evaluated by chlortetracycline technique, while plasma membrane and acrosome integrity were determined by trypan blue stain/differential interference contrast microscopy. Heparin capacitated samples had a significant decrease in LDH and CK activities, while in hyaluronic acid capacitated samples LDH and CK activities both increased compared to control samples, in heparin and hyaluronic acid capacitation conditions, respectively. A significant increase in lactate concentration in the incubation medium occurred in hyaluronic acid-treated sperm samples compared to heparin treatment, indicating this energetic metabolite is produced during capacitation. The LDH and CK enzyme activities and lactate concentrations in the incubation medium were decreased with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine treatment in hyaluronic acid samples. The mAC inhibitor significantly inhibited heparin-induced capacitation of sperm cells, but did not completely inhibit hyaluronic acid capacitation. Therefore, hyaluronic acid and heparin are physiological glycosaminoglycans capable of inducing in vitro capacitation in cryopreserved bull sperm, stimulating different enzymatic pathways and intracellular signals modulated by a mAC. Hyaluronic acid induces sperm capacitation involving LDH and CK activities, thereby reducing oxidative metabolism, and this process is mediated by mAC.

  6. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.M.; Plump, A.S.

    1993-12-01

    The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  7. Mechanisms and signiifcance of lipoprotein(a) in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Ting Jiang; Chang-Ping Wu; Ning Xu; Xue-Guang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The liver plays a key role in the metabolism of plasma apolipoproteins, endogenous lipids and lipoproteins. Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common fatal malignant tumors in China and in other Southeast Asian countries. It has been demonstrated that plasma lipid proifles are changed in liver cancer. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE database search was performed to identify relevant articles using the keywords "hepatocellular carcinoma" and "lipoprotein(a)". The search was conducted and research articles were reviewed from 1960 to 2008. RESULTS: Production and homeostasis of lipids, apo-lipoproteins and lipoproteins depend on the integrity of hepatocellular functions, which ensures normal lipid and lipoprotein metabolismin vivo. When hepatocellular injury or liver cancer occurs these processes can be impaired. It has been suggested that plasma levels of apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) and/or lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) may be considered as sensitive markers of hepatic impairment. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma levels of apo(a) and Lp(a) display signiifcant correlations with hepatic status. Most studies demonstrated that the plasma levels of apo(a) and Lp(a) can be considered as an additional clinical index of liver function.

  8. Modulation of lipoprotein receptor functions by intracellular adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolt, Peggy C; Bock, Hans H

    2006-10-01

    Members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family are critically involved in a wide range of physiological processes including lipid and vitamin homeostasis, cellular migration, neurodevelopment, and synaptic plasticity, to name a few. Lipoprotein receptors exert these diverse biological functions by acting as cellular uptake receptors or by inducing intracellular signaling cascades. It was discovered that a short sequence in the intracellular region of all lipoprotein receptors, Asn-Pro-X-Tyr (NPXY) is important for mediating either endocytosis or signal transduction events, and that this motif serves as a binding site for phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain containing scaffold proteins. These molecular adaptors connect the transmembrane receptors with the endocytosis machinery and regulate cellular trafficking, or function as assembly sites for dynamic multi-protein signaling complexes. Whereas the LDL receptor represents the archetype of an endocytic lipoprotein receptor, the structurally closely related apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor activate a kinase-dependent intracellular signaling cascade after binding to the neuronal signaling molecule Reelin. This review focuses on two related PTB domain containing adaptor proteins that mediate these divergent lipoprotein receptor responses, ARH (autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein) and Dab1 (disabled-1), and discusses the structural and molecular basis of this different behaviour.

  9. Transvascular lipoprotein transport in patients with chronic renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While increased plasma cholesterol is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor in the general population, this is not so among patients with chronic renal disease. We hypothesized that the transvascular lipoprotein transport, in addition to the lipoprotein concentration in plasma......: Transvascular LDL transport may be increased in diabetic patients with chronic renal disease, suggesting that lipoprotein flux into the arterial wall is increased. A similar mechanism does not operate in nondiabetic patients with chronic renal disease.......BACKGROUND: While increased plasma cholesterol is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor in the general population, this is not so among patients with chronic renal disease. We hypothesized that the transvascular lipoprotein transport, in addition to the lipoprotein concentration in plasma......, determines the degree of atherosclerosis among patients with chronic renal disease. METHODS: We used an in vivo method for measurement of transvascular transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in 21 patients with chronic renal disease and in 42 healthy control patients. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL...

  10. Dissecting the proteome of lipoproteins: New biomarkers for cardiovascular diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne von Zychlinski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics has proven to be a powerful tool for the characterization of lipoproteins and has provided important insights into the biochemistry and pathophysiology of various lipoprotein classes. It has significantly contributed to the way we now see lipoproteins as complex particles not only involved in lipid transport and exchange, but also in processes such as immune response, inflammation and wound healing. Ongoing proteomics research is focussing on the identification of new candidate markers for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. The ratio between good cholesterol (high density lipoprotein and bad cholesterol (low density lipoprotein is routinely used to estimate an individual’s risk for developing premature coronary heart disease. While statin therapy has proven effects in reducing cardiovascular events, other therapies such as resins, fibrates and niacin have failed to substantially reduce cardiovascular risk. Thus new targets and candidate biomarkers for risk assessment and for the development of alternative drugs and treatments of disease are needed. Here we review the recent findings in lipoprotein proteomics with the main emphasis on studies that differentially displayed various states of diseases and on new targeted, high throughput strategies with the capability to translate discovery findings into the clinical context of large cohort analyzes.

  11. SAA is Found on ApoB-Containing Lipoproteins in Obese Diabetic Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Jahangiri, Anisa; Wilson, Patricia G.; Hou, Tianfei; Brown, Aparna; King, Victoria L.; Tannock, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    In murine models of obesity/diabetes there is an increase in plasma SAA levels along with redistribution of SAA from high density lipoprotein (HDL) to apo-B containing lipoprotein particles, namely low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). The goal of this study was to determine if obesity is associated with similar SAA lipoprotein redistribution in humans. Three groups of obese individuals were recruited from a weight loss clinic: healthy obese (n=14), metabolic ...

  12. Lipoprotein biosynthesis as a target for anti-Wolbachia treatment of filarial nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slatko Barton E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are debilitating diseases caused by filarial nematodes. Disease pathogenesis is induced by inflammatory responses following the death of the parasite. Wolbachia endosymbionts of filariae are potent inducers of innate and adaptive inflammation and bacterial lipoproteins have been identified as the ligands that bind toll-like receptors (TLR 2 and TLR6. Lipoproteins are important structural and functional components of bacteria and therefore enzymes involved in Wolbachia lipoprotein biosynthesis are potential chemotherapeutic targets. Results Globomycin, a signal peptidase II (LspA inhibitor, has activity against Gram-negative bacteria and a putative lspA gene has been identified from the Wolbachia genome of Brugia malayi (wBm. The amino acids required for function are strictly conserved and functionality was verified by complementation tests in a temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli lspA mutant. Also, transformation of wild type E. coli with Wolbachia lspA conferred significant globomycin resistance. A cell-based screen has been developed utilizing a Wolbachia-containing Aedes albopictus cell line to assay novel compounds active against Wolbachia. Globomycin was screened using this assay, which resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in Wolbachia load. Furthermore, globomycin was also effective in reducing the motility and viability of adult B. malayi in vitro. Conclusions These studies validate lipoprotein biosynthesis as a target in an organism for which no genetic tools are available. Further studies to evaluate drugs targeting this pathway are underway as part of the A-WOL drug discovery and development program.

  13. Long term effects on human plasma lipoproteins of a formulation enriched in butter milk polar lipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Åke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingolipids (SL, in particular sphingomyelin (SM are important components of milk fat polar lipids. Dietary SM inhibits cholesterol absorption in rats (Nyberg et al. J Nutr Biochem. 2000 and SLs decrease both cholesterol and TG concentrations in lipid- and cholesterol fed APOE*3Leiden mice (Duivenvoorden et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006. This human study examines effects of a butter milk formulation enriched in milk fat globule membrane material, and thereby in SLs, on blood lipids in healthy volunteers. In a four week parallel group study with 33 men and 15 women we examined the effects of an SL-enriched butter milk formulation (A and an equivalent control formulation (B on plasma lipid levels. Plasma concentrations of HDL and LDL cholesterol, triacylglycerols (TG, apolipoproteins AI and B, and lipoprotein (a were measured. The daily dose of SL in A was 975 mg of which 700 mg was SM. The participants registered food and drink intake four days before introducing the test formula and the last four days of the test period. Results A daily increase of SL intake did not significantly influence fasting plasma lipids or lipoproteins. In group B TG, cholesterol, LDL, HDL and apolipoprotein B concentrations increased, however, but not in group A after four weeks. The difference in LDL cholesterol was seen primarily in women and difference in TG primarily in men. No significant side effects were observed. Conclusion The study did not show any significant decrease on plasma lipids or lipoprotein levels of an SL-enriched formulation containing 2-3 times more SL than the normal dietary intake on cholesterol, other plasma lipids or on energy intake. The formulation A may, however, have counteracted the trend towards increased blood lipid concentrations caused by increased energy intake that was seen with the B formulation.

  14. Beyond high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels evaluating high-density lipoprotein function as influenced by novel therapeutic approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    deGoma, Emil M; deGoma, Rolando L; Rader, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    A number of therapeutic strategies targeting high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and reverse cholesterol transport are being developed to halt the progression of atherosclerosis or even induce regression...

  15. Self-assembling peptide and protein nanodiscs for studies of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi

    Particles containing both lipids and proteins (so-called lipoproteins) are vital to study. They are selfassembling particles that, in the human body, are responsible for the transport of lipids and cholesterol. Due to the increasing problems of obesity and related illnesses in the world, obtaining...... more knowledge about the cholesterol and lipid metabolism is paramount. As an example, in 2012, cardiovascular disease was still the main cause of death in the U.S. This means that the study of lipoproteins is not only of pure academic interest but vital to current world problems. Another reason...... for working with lipoprotein particles are their potential in the study membrane proteins. Membrane proteins are responsible for most of the transport in and out of cells and signaling between cells. As an example G-protein coupled receptors, a class of membrane proteins, are the third largest class...

  16. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M.; Brown, Robert J., E-mail: rbrown@mun.ca

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Lipoprotein hydrolysis products were produced by lipoprotein lipase. • Hydrolysis products lowers expression of macrophage cholesterol transporters. • Hydrolysis products reduces expression of select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products lowers cholesterol transporters and select nuclear receptors. • Fatty acid products reduces cholesterol efflux from macrophages. - Abstract: Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  17. Pistachio intake increases high density lipoprotein levels and inhibits low-density lipoprotein oxidation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Nur; Aksoy, Mehmet; Bagci, Cahit; Gergerlioglu, H Serdar; Celik, Hakim; Herken, Emine; Yaman, Abdullah; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet; Soydinc, Serdar; Sari, Ibrahim; Davutoglu, Vedat

    2007-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that nuts have protective effects against coronary artery disease by improving lipid profile and inhibiting lipid oxidation. However, data about pistachio nuts are limited, and to our knowledge, there is no study investigating the effects of pistachio intake on lipid oxidation and serum antioxidant levels. This study, therefore, sought to determine the effects of pistachio intake on serum lipids and determine whether consumption of pistachio would alter serum antioxidant levels. Rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=12 for each): control group fed basic diet for 10 weeks and treated groups fed basic diet plus pistachio which constituted 20% and 40% of daily caloric intake, respectively. Consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and decreased total cholesterol (TC)/HDL ratio, compared with those not taking pistachio. However, TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels were unaffected by pistachio consumption. Consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake increased serum paraoxonase activity by 35% and arylesterase activity by 60%, which are known to inhibit LDL cholesterol oxidation, compared with the control group. However, increased antioxidant activity was blunted when pistachio intake was increased to 40% of daily caloric intake. In conclusion, the present results show that consumption of pistachio as 20% of daily caloric intake leads to significant improvement in HDL and TC/HDL ratio and inhibits LDL cholesterol oxidation. These results suggest that pistachio may be beneficial for both prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease.

  18. Cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages is impaired by the fatty acid component from lipoprotein hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanbo; Thyagarajan, Narmadaa; Coady, Breanne M; Brown, Robert J

    2014-09-05

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is an extracellular lipase that primarily hydrolyzes triglycerides within circulating lipoproteins. Macrophage LPL contributes to atherogenesis, but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the products of lipoprotein hydrolysis generated by LPL promote atherogenesis by inhibiting the cholesterol efflux ability by macrophages. To test this hypothesis, we treated human THP-1 macrophages with total lipoproteins that were hydrolyzed by LPL and we found significantly reduced transcript levels for the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and scavenger receptor BI. These decreases were likely due to significant reductions for the nuclear receptors liver-X-receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ. We prepared a mixture of free fatty acids (FFA) that represented the ratios of FFA species within lipoprotein hydrolysis products, and we found that the FFA mixture also significantly reduced cholesterol transporters and nuclear receptors. Finally, we tested the efflux of cholesterol from THP-1 macrophages to apolipoprotein A-I, and we found that the treatment of THP-1 macrophages with the FFA mixture significantly attenuated cholesterol efflux. Overall, these data show that the FFA component of lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by LPL may promote atherogenesis by inhibiting cholesterol efflux, which partially explains the pro-atherogenic role of macrophage LPL.

  19. High hydrostatic pressure specifically affects molecular dynamics and shape of low-density lipoprotein particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M.; Lehofer, B.; Martinez, N.; Ollivier, J.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Prassl, R.; Peters, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lipid composition of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its physicochemical characteristics are relevant for proper functioning of lipid transport in the blood circulation. To explore dynamical and structural features of LDL particles with either a normal or a triglyceride-rich lipid composition we combined coherent and incoherent neutron scattering methods. The investigations were carried out under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), which is a versatile tool to study the physicochemical behavior of biomolecules in solution at a molecular level. Within both neutron techniques we applied HHP to probe the shape and degree of freedom of the possible motions (within the time windows of 15 and 100 ps) and consequently the flexibility of LDL particles. We found that HHP does not change the types of motion in LDL, but influences the portion of motions participating. Contrary to our assumption that lipoprotein particles, like membranes, are highly sensitive to pressure we determined that LDL copes surprisingly well with high pressure conditions, although the lipid composition, particularly the triglyceride content of the particles, impacts the molecular dynamics and shape arrangement of LDL under pressure.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Lpl Lipoproteins Delay G2/M Phase Transition in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Thu; Deplanche, Martine; Nega, Mulugeta; Le Loir, Yves; Peisl, Loulou; Götz, Friedrich; Berkova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle is an ordered set of events, leading to cell growth and division into two daughter cells. The eukaryotic cell cycle consists of interphase (G1, S, and G2 phases), followed by the mitotic phase and G0 phase. Many bacterial pathogens secrete cyclomodulins that interfere with the host cell cycle. In Staphylococcus aureus four cyclomodulins have been described so far that all represent toxins and are secreted into the culture supernatant. Here we show that the membrane-anchored lipoprotein-like proteins (Lpl), encoded on a genomic island called νSaα, interact with the cell cycle of HeLa cells. By comparing wild type and lpl deletion mutant it turned out that the lpl cluster is causative for the G2/M phase transition delay and also contributes to increased invasion frequency. The lipoprotein Lpl1, a representative of the lpl cluster, also caused G2/M phase transition delay. Interestingly, the lipid modification, which is essential for TLR2 signaling and activation of the immune system, is not necessary for cyclomodulin activity. Unlike the other staphylococcal cyclomodulins Lpl1 shows no cytotoxicity even at high concentrations. As all Lpl proteins are highly conserved there might be a common function that is accentuated by their multiplicity in a tandem gene cluster. The cell surface localized Lpls' suggests a correlation between G2/M phase transition delay and host cell invasion.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Lpl Lipoproteins Delay G2/M Phase Transition in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Thu; Deplanche, Martine; Nega, Mulugeta; Le Loir, Yves; Peisl, Loulou; Götz, Friedrich; Berkova, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle is an ordered set of events, leading to cell growth and division into two daughter cells. The eukaryotic cell cycle consists of interphase (G1, S, and G2 phases), followed by the mitotic phase and G0 phase. Many bacterial pathogens secrete cyclomodulins that interfere with the host cell cycle. In Staphylococcus aureus four cyclomodulins have been described so far that all represent toxins and are secreted into the culture supernatant. Here we show that the membrane-anchored lipoprotein-like proteins (Lpl), encoded on a genomic island called νSaα, interact with the cell cycle of HeLa cells. By comparing wild type and lpl deletion mutant it turned out that the lpl cluster is causative for the G2/M phase transition delay and also contributes to increased invasion frequency. The lipoprotein Lpl1, a representative of the lpl cluster, also caused G2/M phase transition delay. Interestingly, the lipid modification, which is essential for TLR2 signaling and activation of the immune system, is not necessary for cyclomodulin activity. Unlike the other staphylococcal cyclomodulins Lpl1 shows no cytotoxicity even at high concentrations. As all Lpl proteins are highly conserved there might be a common function that is accentuated by their multiplicity in a tandem gene cluster. The cell surface localized Lpls' suggests a correlation between G2/M phase transition delay and host cell invasion. PMID:28083519

  2. Localization of the outer membrane protein OmpA2 in Caulobacter crescentus depends on the position of the gene in the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginez, Luis David; Osorio, Aurora; Poggio, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is an essential structure involved in nutrient uptake, protection against harmful substances, and cell growth. Different proteins keep the outer membrane from blebbing out by simultaneously interacting with it and with the cell wall. These proteins have been mainly studied in enterobacteria, where OmpA and the Braun and Pal lipoproteins stabilize the outer membrane. Some degree of functional redundancy exists between these proteins, since none of them is essential but the absence of two of them results in a severe phenotype. Caulobacter crescentus has a different strategy to maintain its outer membrane, since it lacks the Braun lipoprotein and Pal is essential. In this work, we characterized OmpA2, an OmpA-like protein, in this bacterium. Our results showed that this protein is required for normal stalk growth and that it plays a minor role in the stability of the outer membrane. An OmpA2 fluorescent fusion protein showed that the concentration of this protein decreases from the stalk to the new pole. This localization pattern is important for its function, and it depends on the position of the gene locus in the chromosome and, as a consequence, in the cell. This result suggests that little diffusion occurs from the moment that the gene is transcribed until the mature protein attaches to the cell wall in the periplasm. This mechanism reveals the integration of different levels of information from protein function down to genome arrangement that allows the cell to self-organize.

  3. Proteome of human plasma very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein exhibits a link with coagulation and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dashty Rahmatabady, Monireh; Motazacker, Mohammad M.; Levels, Johannes; de Vries, Marcel; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Peppelenbosch, Maikel; Rezaee, Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Apart from transporting lipids through the body, the human plasma lipoproteins very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are also thought to serve as a modality for intra-organismal protein transfer, shipping proteins with important roles in inflammation and thrombosis fr

  4. Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factor 1 is required for ROMK1 K(+) channel expression in the surface membrane of cultured M-1 cortical collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Mayanagi, Taira; Sobue, Kenji; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2017-07-22

    The ROMK1 K(+) channel, a member of the ROMK channel family, is the major candidate for the K(+) secretion pathway in the renal cortical collecting duct (CCD). ROMK1 possesses a PDZ domain-binding motif at its C-terminus that is considered a modulator of ROMK1 expression via interaction with Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factor (NHERF) 1 and NHERF2 scaffold protein. Although NHERF1 is a potential binding partner of the ROMK1 K(+) channel, the interaction between NHERF1 and K(+) channel activity remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we knocked down NHERF1 in cultured M-1 cells derived from mouse CCD and investigated the surface expression and K(+) channel current in these cells after exogenous transfection with EGFP-ROMK1. NHERF1 knockdown resulted in reduced surface expression of ROMK1 as indicated by a cell biotinylation assay. Using the patch-clamp technique, we further found that the number of active channels per patched membrane and the Ba(2+)-sensitive whole-cell K(+) current were decreased in the knockdown cells, suggesting that reduced K(+) current was accompanied by decreased surface expression of ROMK1 in the NHERF1 knockdown cells. Our results provide evidence that NHERF1 mediates K(+) current activity through acceleration of the surface expression of ROMK1 K(+) channels in M-1 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 localizes to cyto-membrane and is required for B16F1 melanoma cell metastasis in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3 is a member of the novel phosphatases of regenerating liver family, characterized by one protein tyrosine phosphatase active domain and a C-terminal prenylation (CCVM motif. Though widely proposed to facilitate metastasis in many cancer types, PRL-3's cellular localization and the function of its CCVM motif in metastatic process remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, a series of Myc tagged PRL-3 wild type or mutant plasmids were expressed in B16F1 melanoma cells to investigate the relationship between PRL-3's cellular localization and metastasis. With immuno-fluorescence microcopy and cell adhesion/migration assay in vitro, and an experimental passive metastasis model in vivo, we found that CCVM motif is critical for the localization of PRL-3 on cell plasma membrane and the lung metastasis of melanoma. In particular, Cystine170 is the key site for prenylation in this process. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that cellular localization of PRL-3 is highly correlated with its function in tumor metastasis, and inhibition of PRL-3 prenylation might be a new approach to cancer therapy.

  6. The outer membrane protein TolC is required for phytoalexin resistance and virulence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Karablieh, Nehaya; Weingart, Helge; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2009-07-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight on several plant species such as apple and pear, which produce diverse phytoalexins as defence mechanisms. An evolutionary successful pathogen thus must develop resistance mechanisms towards these toxic compounds. The E. amylovora outer membrane protein, TolC, might mediate phytoalexin resistance through its interaction with the multidrug efflux pump, AcrAB. To prove this, a tolC mutant and an acrB/tolC double mutant were constructed. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of diverse antimicrobials and phytoalexins were determined for these mutants and compared with that of a previously generated acrB mutant. The tolC and arcB/tolC mutants were considerably more susceptible than the wild type but showed similar levels as the acrB mutant. The results clearly indicated that neither TolC nor AcrAB significantly interacted with other transport systems during the efflux of the tested toxic compounds. Survival and virulence assays on inoculated apple plants showed that pathogenicity and the ability of E. amylovora to colonize plant tissue were equally impaired by mutations of tolC and acrB/tolC. Our results allowed the conclusion that TolC plays an important role as a virulence and fitness factor of E. amylovora by mediating resistance towards phytoalexins through its exclusive interaction with AcrAB.

  7. Lipoprotein-Related and Apolipoprotein-Mediated Delivery Systems for Drug Targeting and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almer, Gunter; Mangge, Harald; Zimmer, Andreas; Prassl, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The integration of lipoprotein-related or apolipoprotein-targeted nanoparticles as pharmaceutical carriers opens new therapeutic and diagnostic avenues in nanomedicine. The concept is to exploit the intrinsic characteristics of lipoprotein particles as being the natural transporter of apolar lipids and fat in human circulation. Discrete lipoprotein assemblies and lipoprotein-based biomimetics offer a versatile nanoparticle platform that can be manipulated and tuned for specific medical applications. This article reviews the possibilities for constructing drug loaded, reconstituted or artificial lipoprotein particles. The advantages and limitations of lipoprotein-based delivery systems are critically evaluated and potential future challenges, especially concerning targeting specificity, concepts for lipoprotein rerouting and design of innovative lipoprotein mimetic particles using apolipoprotein sequences as targeting moieties are discussed. Finally, the review highlights potential medical applications for lipoprotein-based nanoparticle systems in the fields of cardiovascular research, cancer therapy, gene delivery and brain targeting focusing on representative examples from literature. PMID:26180001

  8. Sterol requirements in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida de Carvalho, Maria Joao

    2009-01-01

    Sterol is an abundant component of eukaryotic cell membranes and is thought to influence membrane properties such as permeability, fluidity and microdomain formation. Drosophila is an excellent model system in which to study functional requirements for membrane sterol because, although it does not synthesize sterol, it nevertheless requires sterols to complete development. Moreover, Drosophila normally incorporates sterols into cell membranes. Thus, dietary sterol depletion can be used to ...

  9. Defining the antigenic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 and the requirements for a multi-allele vaccine against malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien R Drew

    Full Text Available Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 is a leading malaria vaccine candidate and a target of naturally-acquired human immunity. Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 is polymorphic and in vaccine trials it induces strain-specific protection. This antigenic diversity is a major roadblock to development of AMA1 as a malaria vaccine and understanding how to overcome it is essential. To assess how AMA1 antigenic diversity limits cross-strain growth inhibition, we assembled a panel of 18 different P. falciparum isolates which are broadly representative of global AMA1 sequence diversity. Antibodies raised against four well studied AMA1 alleles (W2Mef, 3D7, HB3 and FVO were tested for growth inhibition of the 18 different P. falciparum isolates in growth inhibition assays (GIA. All antibodies demonstrated substantial cross-inhibitory activity against different isolates and a mixture of the four different AMA1 antibodies inhibited all 18 isolates tested, suggesting significant antigenic overlap between AMA1 alleles and limited antigenic diversity of AMA1. Cross-strain inhibition by antibodies was only moderately and inconsistently correlated with the level of sequence diversity between AMA1 alleles, suggesting that sequence differences are not a strong predictor of antigenic differences or the cross-inhibitory activity of anti-allele antibodies. The importance of the highly polymorphic C1-L region for inhibitory antibodies and potential vaccine escape was assessed by generating novel transgenic P. falciparum lines for testing in GIA. While the polymorphic C1-L epitope was identified as a significant target of some growth-inhibitory antibodies, these antibodies only constituted a minor proportion of the total inhibitory antibody repertoire, suggesting that the antigenic diversity of inhibitory epitopes is limited. Our findings support the concept that a multi-allele AMA1 vaccine would give broad coverage against the diversity of AMA1 alleles and establish new tools to

  10. Plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate is required for internalization of foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Vázquez-Calvo

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, PI(4,5P(2, is a phospholipid which plays important roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To investigate the possible role of this lipid on viral entry, two viruses important for animal health were selected: the enveloped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV - which uses a well characterized clathrin mediated endocytic route - and two different variants of the non-enveloped foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV with distinct receptor specificities. The expression of a dominant negative dynamin, a PI(4,5P(2 effector protein, inhibited the internalization and infection of VSV and both FMDV isolates. Depletion of PI(4,5P(2 from plasma membrane using ionomycin or an inducible system, and inhibition of its de novo synthesis with 1-butanol revealed that VSV as well as FMDV C-S8c1, which uses integrins as receptor, displayed a high dependence on PI(4,5P(2 for internalization. Expression of a kinase dead mutant (KD of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-5-kinase Iα (PIP5K-Iα, an enzyme responsible for PI(4,5P(2 synthesis that regulates clathrin-dependent endocytosis, also impaired entry and infection of VSV and FMDV C-S8c1. Interestingly FMDV MARLS variant that uses receptors other than integrins for cell entry was less sensitive to PI(4,5P(2 depletion, and was not inhibited by the expression of the KD PIP5K-Iα mutant suggesting the involvement of endocytic routes other than the clathrin-mediated on its entry. These results highlight the role of PI(4,5P(2 and PIP5K-Iα on clathrin-mediated viral entry.

  11. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-rescue of dystrophin/utrophin double knockout mice does not require nNOS localization to the cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    Full Text Available Survival of dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dko mice was increased by muscle-specific expression of a neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS transgene. Dko mice expressing the transgene (nNOS TG+/dko experienced delayed onset of mortality and increased life-span. The nNOS TG+/dko mice demonstrated a significant decrease in the concentration of CD163+, M2c macrophages that can express arginase and promote fibrosis. The decrease in M2c macrophages was associated with a significant reduction in fibrosis of heart, diaphragm and hindlimb muscles of nNOS TG+/dko mice. The nNOS transgene had no effect on the concentration of cytolytic, CD68+, M1 macrophages. Accordingly, we did not observe any change in the extent of muscle fiber lysis in the nNOS TG+/dko mice. These findings show that nNOS/NO (nitric oxide-mediated decreases in M2c macrophages lead to a reduction in the muscle fibrosis that is associated with increased mortality in mice lacking dystrophin and utrophin. Interestingly, the dramatic and beneficial effects of the nNOS transgene were not attributable to localization of nNOS protein at the cell membrane. We did not detect any nNOS protein at the sarcolemma in nNOS TG+/dko muscles. This important observation shows that sarcolemmal localization is not necessary for nNOS to have beneficial effects in dystrophic tissue and the presence of nNOS in the cytosol of dystrophic muscle fibers can ameliorate the pathology and most importantly, significantly increase life-span.

  12. Moderate Exercise Increases Affinity of Large Very Low-Density Lipoproteins for Hydrolysis by Lipoprotein Lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Khloud; Cooney, Josephine; Bedford, Dorothy K; Wilson, John; Caslake, Muriel J; Gill, Jason M R

    2015-06-01

    Postprandial triglyceride (TG) concentration is independently associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Exercise reduces postprandial TG concentrations, but the mechanisms responsible are unclear. The objective was to determine the effects of exercise on affinity of chylomicrons, large very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL1), and smaller VLDL (VLDL2) for lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated TG hydrolysis. This was designed as a within-participant crossover study. The setting was a university metabolic investigation unit. Participants were 10 overweight/obese men. Participants undertook two oral fat tolerance tests, separated by 7-14 days, in which they had blood taken while fasting and for 4 hours after a high-fat mixed meal. On the afternoon before one test, they performed a 90-minute treadmill walk at 50% maximal oxygen uptake (exercise trial [EX]); no exercise was performed before the control trial (CON). We measured circulating TG-rich lipoprotein concentrations and affinity of chylomicrons, VLDL1, and VLDL2 for LPL-mediated TG hydrolysis. Exercise significantly reduced fasting VLDL1-TG concentration (CON, 0.49 [0.33-0.72] mmol.L(-1); EX, 0.36 [0.22-0.59] mmol.L(-1); geometric means [95% confidence interval]; P = .04). Time-averaged postprandial chylomicron-TG (CON, 0.55 ± 0.10 mmol.L(-1); EX, 0.39 ± 0.08 mmol.L(-1); mean ± SEM; P = .03) and VLDL1-TG (CON, 0.85 ± 0.13 mmol.L(-1); EX, 0.66 ± 0.10 mmol.L(-1); P = .01) concentrations were both lower in EX than CON. Affinity of VLDL1 for LPL-mediated TG hydrolysis increased by 2.2 (1.3-3.7)-fold [geometric mean (95% confidence interval)] (P = .02) in the fasted state and 2.6 (1.8-2.6)-fold (P = .001) postprandially. Affinity of chylomicrons and VLDL2 was not significantly different between trials. Exercise increases affinity of VLDL1 for LPL-mediated TG hydrolysis both fasting and postprandially. This mechanism is likely to contribute to the TG-lowering effect of exercise.

  13. Achieving secondary prevention low-density lipoprotein particle concentration goals using lipoprotein cholesterol-based data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C Mathews

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies suggest that LDL particle concentration (LDL-P may remain elevated at guideline recommended LDL cholesterol goals, representing a source of residual risk. We examined the following seven separate lipid parameters in achieving the LDL-P goal of <1000 nmol/L goal for very high risk secondary prevention: total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio, TC/HDL, <3; a composite of ATP-III very high risk targets, LDL-C<70 mg/dL, non-HDL-C<100 mg/dL and TG<150 mg/dL; a composite of standard secondary risk targets, LDL-C<100, non-HDL-C<130, TG<150; LDL phenotype; HDL-C ≥ 40; TG<150; and TG/HDL-C<3. METHODS: We measured ApoB, ApoAI, ultracentrifugation lipoprotein cholesterol and NMR lipoprotein particle concentration in 148 unselected primary and secondary prevention patients. RESULTS: TC/HDL-C<3 effectively discriminated subjects by LDL-P goal (F = 84.1, p<10(-6. The ATP-III very high risk composite target (LDL-C<70, nonHDL-C<100, TG<150 was also effective (F = 42.8, p<10(-5. However, the standard secondary prevention composite (LDL-C<100, non-HDL-C<130, TG<150 was also effective but yielded higher LDL-P than the very high risk composite (F = 42.0, p<10(-5 with upper 95% confidence interval of LDL-P less than 1000 nmol/L. TG<150 and TG/HDL-C<3 cutpoints both significantly discriminated subjects but the LDL-P upper 95% confidence intervals fell above goal of 1000 nmol/L (F = 15.8, p = 0.0001 and F = 9.7, p = 0.002 respectively. LDL density phenotype neared significance (F = 2.85, p = 0.094 and the HDL-C cutpoint of 40 mg/dL did not discriminate (F = 0.53, p = 0.47 alone or add discriminatory power to ATP-III targets. CONCLUSIONS: A simple composite of ATP-III very high risk lipoprotein cholesterol based treatment targets or TC/HDL-C ratio <3 most effectively identified subjects meeting the secondary prevention target level of LDL-P<1000 nmol/L, providing a potential alternative to advanced lipid testing in many clinical

  14. l-Cystathionine Inhibits the Mitochondria-Mediated Macrophage Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingzhu; Du, Junbao; Chen, Siyao; Liu, Angie Dong; Holmberg, Lukas; Chen, Yonghong; Zhang, Chunyu; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the regulatory role of l-cystathionine in human macrophage apoptosis induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and its possible mechanisms. THP-1 cells were induced with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and differentiated into macrophages. Macrophages were incubated with ox-LDL after pretreatment with l-cystathionine. Superoxide anion, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening were examined. Caspase-9 activities and expression of cleaved caspase-3 were measured. The results showed that compared with control group, ox-LDL treatment significantly promoted superoxide anion generation, release of cytochrome c (cytc) from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and cell apoptosis, in addition to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential as well as increased MPTP opening. However, 0.3 and 1.0 mmol/L l-cystathionine significantly reduced superoxide anion generation, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and markedly decreased MPTP opening in ox-LDL + l-cystathionine macrophages. Moreover, compared to ox-LDL treated-cells, release of cytc from mitochondrion into cytoplasm, caspase-9 activities, cleavage of caspase-3, and apoptosis levels in l-cystathionine pretreated cells were profoundly attenuated. Taken together, our results suggested that l-cystathionine could antagonize mitochondria-mediated human macrophage apoptosis induced by ox-LDL via inhibition of cytc release and caspase activation. PMID:25514411

  15. Chlamydial Lipoproteins Stimulate Toll-Like Receptors 1/2 Mediated Inflammatory Responses through MyD88-Dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Ding; Guan, Jie; Ma, Linghui; Zhong, Guangming; Shu, Hengping; Wu, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydiae are very important pathogens which could cause several types of diseases in human, but little is known about its pathogenic mechanism. In order to elucidate host inflammatory response and the signal pathway induced by Chlamydial lipoproteins, the predicted lipoproteins of Chlamydia trachomatis were tested for their ability to induce the release of proinflammatory cytokines by mouse macrophages or human TLR (Toll-Like Receptor) expressing cell lines. The results showed that recombinant proteins of C. trachomatis D381, D541, D067, and D775 displayed a strong ability to induce the release of IL-8 in TLR expressing cell line. The signal pathways involved TLR1/2 and TLR2/CD14 but not TLR4. Moreover, except D067, the proinflammatory cytokine induction by D381, D541, and D775 required the thioacylation site (cysteine) for lipid modification and the induction was through MyD88-mediated pathway. Our data supported that lipoproteins played a vital role in pathogenesis of C. trachomatis-induced inflammatory responses via TLR pathway. It was the first study to characterize other chlamydial lipoproteins after identifying the role of MIP (D541) on pathogenesis of Chlamydial diseases. PMID:28184217

  16. Hepatic trans-Golgi action coordinated by the GTPase ARFRP1 is crucial for lipoprotein lipidation and assembly[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Deike; Radloff, Katrin; Jaschke, Alexander; Lagerpusch, Merit; Chung, Bomee; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Schürmann, Annette

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a major organ in whole body lipid metabolism and malfunctioning can lead to various diseases including dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes. Triglycerides and cholesteryl esters are packed in the liver as very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs). Generation of these lipoproteins is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum and further maturation likely occurs in the Golgi. ADP-ribosylation factor-related protein 1 (ARFRP1) is a small trans-Golgi-associated guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that regulates protein sorting and is required for chylomicron lipidation and assembly in the intestine. Here we show that the hepatocyte-specific deletion of Arfrp1 (Arfrp1liv−/−) results in impaired VLDL lipidation leading to reduced plasma triglyceride levels in the fasted state as well as after inhibition of lipoprotein lipase activity by Triton WR-1339. In addition, the concentration of ApoC3 that comprises 40% of protein mass of secreted VLDLs is markedly reduced in the plasma of Arfrp1liv−/− mice but accumulates in the liver accompanied by elevated triglycerides. Fractionation of Arfrp1liv−/− liver homogenates reveals more ApoB48 and a lower concentration of triglycerides in the Golgi compartments than in the corresponding fractions from control livers. In conclusion, ARFRP1 and the Golgi apparatus play an important role in lipoprotein maturation in the liver by influencing lipidation and assembly of proteins to the lipid particles. PMID:24186947

  17. General N-and O-Linked Glycosylation of Lipoproteins in Mycoplasmas and Role of Exogenous Oligosaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Daubenspeck

    Full Text Available The lack of a cell wall, flagella, fimbria, and other extracellular appendages and the possession of only a single membrane render the mycoplasmas structurally simplistic and ideal model organisms for the study of glycoconjugates. Most species have genomes of about 800 kb and code for few proteins predicted to have a role in glycobiology. The murine pathogens Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma pulmonis have only a single gene annotated as coding for a glycosyltransferase but synthesize glycolipid, polysaccharide and glycoproteins. Previously, it was shown that M. arthritidis glycosylated surface lipoproteins through O-linkage. In the current study, O-linked glycoproteins were similarly found in M. pulmonis and both species of mycoplasma were found to also possess N-linked glycans at residues of asparagine and glutamine. Protein glycosylation occurred at numerous sites on surface-exposed lipoproteins with no apparent amino acid sequence specificity. The lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae also are glycosylated. Glycosylation was dependent on the glycosidic linkages from host oligosaccharides. As far as we are aware, N-linked glycoproteins have not been previously described in Gram-positive bacteria, the organisms to which the mycoplasmas are phylogenetically related. The findings indicate that the mycoplasma cell surface is heavily glycosylated with implications for the modulation of mycoplasma-host interactions.

  18. Genetic and serological analysis of the immunogenic 67-kDa lipoprotein of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, J; Cheng, X; Monnerat, M P; Abdo, E M; Krawinkler, M; Bölske, G; Nicolet, J

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding a lipoprotein of 67 kDa, named P67, was cloned from Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 strain PG50 and expressed in Escherichia coli K12. Analysis of the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence of the P67 gene revealed a typical prokaryotic signal peptidase II membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site and a transmembrane structure domain in the leader sequence at the amino-terminal end of the protein. Protein P67 showed 91% identical amino acid residues to the lipoprotein P72 of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small colony type (SC) and 53% identical amino acid residues to a peptide of an unassigned gene on the genome of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum. Antibodies made against recombinant P67 reacted with a 67-kDa protein in all Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 strains tested and also, to some extent, with P72 of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. The gene encoding P67 was present in all strains of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7 analysed, but not in other Mycoplasma sp. of the "mycoides cluster" and not in the phylogenetically related Mycoplasma putrefaciens. PCR and restriction fragment analysis revealed that the gene of P67 is conserved in all strains of Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7. A specific PCR reaction based on the P67 gene sequence enabled rapid identification of strains belonging to Mycoplasma sp. bovine group 7.

  19. New and emerging regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2014-04-01

    Overproduction of hepatic apoB100-containing VLDL particles has been well documented in animal models and in humans with insulin resistance such as the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, and contributes to the typical dyslipidemia of these conditions. In addition, postprandial hyperlipidemia and elevated plasma concentrations of intestinal apoB48-containing chylomicron and chylomicron remnant particles have been demonstrated in insulin resistant states. Intestinal lipoprotein production is primarily determined by the amount of fat ingested and absorbed. Until approximately 10 years ago, however, relatively little attention was paid to the role of the intestine itself in regulating the production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) and its dysregulation in pathological states such as insulin resistance. We and others have shown that insulin resistant animal models and humans are characterized by overproduction of intestinal apoB48-containing lipoproteins. Whereas various factors are known to regulate hepatic lipoprotein particle production, less is known about factors that regulate the production of intestinal lipoprotein particles. Monosacharides, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), resveratrol, intestinal peptides (e.g. GLP-1 and GLP-2), and pancreatic hormones (e.g. insulin) have recently been shown to be important regulators of intestinal lipoprotein secretion. Available evidence in humans and animal models strongly supports the concept that the small intestine is not merely an absorptive organ but rather plays an active role in regulating the rate of production of chylomicrons in fed and fasting states. Metabolic signals in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and in some cases an aberrant intestinal response to these factors contribute to the enhanced formation and secretion of TRL. Understanding the regulation of intestinal lipoprotein production is imperative for the development of new therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of

  20. Functional Requirements for DjlA- and RraA-Mediated Enhancement of Recombinant Membrane Protein Production in the Engineered Escherichia coli Strains SuptoxD and SuptoxR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialama, Dimitra; Delivoria, Dafni Chrysanthi; Michou, Myrsini; Giannakopoulou, Artemis; Skretas, Georgios

    2017-06-16

    In previous work, we have generated the engineered Escherichia coli strains SuptoxD and SuptoxR, which upon co-expression of the effector genes djlA or rraA, respectively, are capable of suppressing the cytotoxicity caused by membrane protein (MP) overexpression and of producing dramatically enhanced yields for a variety of recombinant MPs of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Here, we investigated the functional requirements for DnaJ-like protein A (DjlA)- and regulator of ribonuclease activity A (RraA)-mediated enhancement of recombinant MP production in these strains and show that: (i) DjlA and RraA act independently, that is, the beneficial effects of each protein on recombinant MP production occur through a mechanism that does not involve the other, and in a non-additive manner; (ii) full-length and membrane-bound DjlA is required for exerting its beneficial effects on recombinant MP production in E. coli SuptoxD; (iii) the MP production-promoting properties of DjlA in SuptoxD involve the action of the molecular chaperone DnaK but do not rely on the activation of the regulation of capsular synthesis response, a well-established consequence of djlA overexpression; (iv) the observed RraA-mediated effects in E. coli SuptoxR involve the ribonucleolytic activity of RNase E, but not that of its paralogous ribonuclease RNase G; and (v) DjlA and RraA are unique among similar E. coli proteins in their ability to promote bacterial recombinant MP production. These observations provide important clues about the molecular requirements for suppressed toxicity and enhanced MP accumulation in SuptoxD/SuptoxR and will guide future studies aiming to decipher the exact mechanism of DjlA- and RraA-mediated enhancement of recombinant MP production in these strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Capillary isotachophoresis study of lipoprotein network sensitive to apolipoprotein E phenotype. 1. ApoE distribution between lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergunov, Alexander D; Ponthieux, Anne; Mel'kin, Maxim V; Lambert, Daniel; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Siest, Gerard

    2009-05-01

    Sixteen patients differing widely in plasma triglyceride content were divided into three groups by their apolipoprotein E (apoE) phenotype-E33 homozygotes, E23, and E34 heterozygotes. The plasma lipid and apoE distribution between individual lipoproteins was followed by capillary isotachophoresis (CITP) of plasma samples pre-stained with lipid fluorescent probe NBD-C6-ceramide and by fluorescein-labeled apoE, respectively. Among 12 peaks visualized by ceramide staining, an individual peak with very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) was identified. The VLDL cholesterol and apoE content determined by CITP directly in whole plasma were significantly related to their content as determined by conventional analysis with isolated VLDL. The ceramide distribution among lipoprotein pools was insensitive to apoE phenotype (49-53 : 7-11 : 39-43% for HDL, VLDL, and IDL/LDL, respectively) while the preferential binding of apoE to VLDL was observed in E34 patients compared to E33 (62 : 19 : 20 vs. 70 : 9 : 22%). In a study of apoE/F displacement from lipoproteins at plasma titration by apoC-III in vitro, apoE was found to bind more tightly to VLDL from E34 compared to E33 patients as evidenced by both the increased non-displaceable apoE pool, the increased VLDL sorbtion capacity for apoE, and the decreased displacement parameter in a "container" model of lipoprotein binding. Two different types of apoE package in a whole lipoprotein profile were observed. ApoE structure in a particular lipoprotein may underlie the phenotype-sensitive apoE distribution and apoC-III interference in hypertriglyceridemia.

  2. Hydrolysis of guinea pig nascent very low density lipoproteins catalyzed by lipoprotein lipase: activation by hjman apolipoprotein C-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzharris, T J; Quinn, D M; Goh, E H; Johnson, J D; Kashyap, M L; Srivastava, L S; Jackson, R L; Harmony, J A

    1981-08-01

    Very low density lipoproteins isolated from guinea pig liver perfusate (VLDLp) lack the equivalent of human apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II), the activator of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). These lipoproteins are therefore ideal substrates with which to investigate the mechanism by which apoC-II activates the enzyme. VLDLp binds apoC-II, and apoC-II associated with VLDLp markedly increases the rate of lipoprotein lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of VLDLp-triglycerides. The activator potency of apoC-II is independent of the method of enrichment of VLDLp with apoC-II: delipidated human apoC-II and apoC-II transferred from human high density lipoproteins activate lipoprotein lipase to equal extents. ApoC-II causes pH-dependent changes in both apparent Km and VmaX of LpL-catalyzed hydrolysis of VLDLp-triglycerides. At pH l7.4--7.5, the major effects of apoC-II is to decrease the apparent Km by 3.3--4.0 fold. The apparent Vmax is increased 1.3-fold. At pH 6.5 and 8.5, the decrease of apparent Km is less marked, 1.6-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively. At pH 6.5, apoC-II increases the apparent Vmax ty 1.3-fold, while at pH 8.5 the primary effect of apoC-II is a 1.6-fold increase of apparent Vmax. Based on a simple kinetic model, the data suggest that apoC-II favors direct interaction between enzyme and triglyceride within the lipoprotein particle, as well as subsequent catalytic turnover.

  3. Role of Brown Fat in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeke, Geerte; Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P

    2016-01-08

    Atherosclerosis, for which hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society, and new therapeutic strategies are highly warranted. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is metabolically active in human adults. Although positron emission tomography-computed tomography using a glucose tracer is the golden standard to visualize and quantify the volume and activity of BAT, it has become clear that activated BAT combusts fatty acids rather than glucose. Here, we review the role of brown and beige adipocytes in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, with evidence derived from both animal and human studies. On the basis of mainly data from animal models, we propose a model in which activated brown adipocytes use their intracellular triglyceride stores to generate fatty acids for combustion. BAT rapidly replenishes these stores by internalizing primarily lipoprotein triglyceride-derived fatty acids, generated by lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides, rather than by holoparticle uptake. As a consequence, BAT activation leads to the generation of lipoprotein remnants that are subsequently cleared via the liver provided that an intact apoE-low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway is present. Through these mechanisms, BAT activation reduces plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and attenuates diet-induced atherosclerosis development. Initial studies suggest that BAT activation in humans may also reduce triglyceride and cholesterol levels, but potential antiatherogenic effects should be assessed in future studies. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Low density lipoproteins mediated nanoplatforms for cancer targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Kesharwani, Prashant, E-mail: prashant_pharmacy04@rediffmail.com; Jain, Narendra K., E-mail: jnarendr@yahoo.co.in [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-09-15

    Chemotherapy is a foremost remedial approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized tumors. In order to explore new treatment modalities for cancer, it is important to identify qualitative or quantitative differences in metabolic processes between normal and malignant cells. One such difference may be that of increased receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by cancer cells. Lipoproteins in general and specifically LDL are ideal candidates for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents due to their biocompatibility. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the reconstituted lipoproteins can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body's defenses. In this account, we review the field of low density inspired nanoparticles in relation to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapeutic agents. LDL has instinctive cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate various lipophillic molecules to transport them to tumors. Nature's method of rerouting LDL provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins far off its constricted purview. In this review, we have discussed the various aspects of LDL including its role in cancer imaging and chemotherapy in retrospect and prospect and current efforts aimed to further improve the delivery efficacy of LDL-drug complexes with reduced chances of drug resistance leading to optimal drug delivery. This review provides a strong support for the concept of using LDL as a drug carrier.

  5. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti, E-mail: keertijain02@gmail.com; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar, E-mail: neelesh81mph@gmail.com; Jain, N. K., E-mail: dr.jnarendr@gmail.com [Dr. H. S. Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  6. Lipoproteins tethered dendrimeric nanoconstructs for effective targeting to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, poly (propylene imine) dendrimers up to fifth generation (PPI G5.0) were synthesized using ethylene diamine and acrylonitrile. Lipoproteins (high-density lipoprotein; HDL and low-density lipoprotein; LDL) were isolated from human plasma by discontinuous density gradient ultracentrifugation, characterized and tethered to G5.0 PPI dendrimers to construct LDL- and HDL-conjugated dendrimeric nanoconstructs for tumor-specific delivery of docetaxel. Developed formulations showed sustained release characteristics in in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The cancer targeting potential of lipoprotein coupled dendrimers was investigated by ex vivo cytotoxicity and cell uptake studies using human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) and biodistribution studies in albino rats of Sprague-Dawley strain. Lipoprotein anchored dendrimeric nanoconstructs showed significant uptake by cancer cells as well as higher biodistribution of docetaxel to liver and spleen. It is concluded that these precisely synthesized engineered dendrimeric nanoconstructs could serve as promising drug carrier for fighting with the fatal disease, i.e., cancer, attributed to their defined targeting and therapeutic potential.

  7. Identification of the gene encoding BmpB, a 30 kDa outer envelope lipoprotein of Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, and immunogenicity of recombinant BmpB in mice and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B J; La, T; Mikosza, A S; Hampson, D J

    2000-10-01

    A gene encoding a 30kDa outer envelope protein of the intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli strain XLOLR. Five phagemids containing DNA inserts encoding the protein were established and one clone (pSHA) was sequenced. An 816bp hypothetical open reading frame (ORF) was identified, with a potential ribosome binding site (AGGAG), and putative -10 (TATAAT) and -35 (TTGAAA) promoter regions upstream from the ATG start of the ORF. A 12bp inverted repeat sequence, possibly serving as a transcription terminator, was identified downstream from the TAA stop codon. Analysis of the amino acid sequence identified a 19 residue hydrophobic signal peptide, incorporating a potential signal peptidase cleavage site and membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site. Further analysis of the amino acid usage of this lipoprotein, designated BmpB, showed its possible outer membrane localisation. Comparison of the gene encoding the lipoprotein, bmpB, with GenBank nucleotide sequences showed that it has homology with the gene (plp3) encoding Plp3, an outer membrane lipoprotein of Pasteurella haemolytica (54% identity in 735bp). Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the SWISS-PROT amino acid database revealed greatest homology with the outer membrane lipoproteins (Plp1, 2, 3) of P. haemolytica (34% identity in 242 aa, 37% identity in 250 aa, and 39% identity in 272 aa, respectively), and lipoproteins (rcsF and lipoprotein-28) of E. coli (40% identity in 267 aa and 36% identity in 263 aa, respectively). Three of the recombinant E. coli clones (pSHA, pSHD, and pSHE) were formalinised and used to immunise mice. A bacterin preparation of one recombinant E. coli clone (pSHA) was used to immunise pigs. Sera from these mice and pigs recognised the 30kDa lipoprotein in outer membrane preparations of B. hyodysenteriae, indicating the immunogenicity of recombinant BmpB. Sera from pigs naturally infected with B

  8. High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Conrad B.; Levy, Robert I.; Eisenberg, Shlomo; Hall, Marshall; Goebel, Robert H.; Berman, Mones

    1977-01-01

    The turnover of 125I-high density lipoprotein (HDL) was examined in a total of 14 studies in eight normal volunteers in an attempt to determine the metabolic relationship between apolipoproteins A-I (apoA-I) and A-II (apoA-II) of HDL and to define further some of the determinants of HDL metabolism. All subjects were first studied under conditions of an isocaloric balanced diet (40% fat, 40% carbohydrate). Four were then studied with an 80% carbohydrate diet, and two were studied while receiving nicotinic acid (1 g three times daily) and ingesting the same isocaloric balanced diet. The decay of autologous 125I-HDL and the appearance of urinary radioactivity were followed for at least 2 wk in each study. ApoA-I and apoA-II were isolated by Sephadex G-200 chromatography from serial plasma samples in each study. The specific activities of these peptides were then measured directly. It was found that the decay of specific activity of apoA-I and apoA-II were parallel to one another in all studies. The mean half-life of the terminal portion of decay was 5.8 days during the studies with a balanced diet. Mathematical modeling of the decay of plasma radioactivity and appearance of urinary radioactivity was most consistent with a two-compartment model. One compartment is within the plasma and exchanges with a nonplasma component. Catabolism occurs from both of these compartments. With a balanced isocaloric diet, the mean synthetic rate for HDL protein was 8.51 mg/kg per day. HDL synthesis was not altered by the high carbohydrate diet and was only slightly decreased by nicotinic acid treatment. These perturbations had effects on HDL catabolic pathways that were reciprocal in many respects. With an 80% carbohydrate diet, the rate of catabolism from the plasma compartment rose by a mean of 39.1%; with nicotinic acid treatment, it fell by 42.2%. Changes in the rate of catabolism from the second compartment were generally opposite those in the rate of catabolism from the plasma

  9. Effect of oral mesoglycan on plasma lipoprotein concentration and on lipoprotein lipase activity in primary hyperlipoproteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiglione, A; De Simone, B; Rubba, P; Lamenza, F; Montefusco, S; Mastranzo, P

    1984-01-01

    Mesoglycan extracted from calf aorta was orally administered (96 mg/day) to 15 patients with primary hyperlipoproteinemia: 4 type IIA, 4 type IIB, 6 type IV and one type V. In the seven hypertriglyceridemic patients the drug after two months of treatment reduced total and VLDL-triglyceride from 701 mg/dl to 423 mg/dl (p less than 0.025) and from 562 mg/dl to 377 mg/dl (p less than 0.025) respectively and increased lipoprotein lipase activity from 19.7 mumol/l/min to 27.8 mumol/l/min (p less than 0.05). No change was observed in the group with type IIA-IIB hyperlipoproteinemia.

  10. Self-Segregation of Myelin Membrane Lipids in Model Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yurlova, Larisa; Kahya, Nicoletta; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Chiantia, Salvatore; Bakhti, Mostafa; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Ben-David, Oshrit; Futerman, Anthony H.; Bruegger, Britta; Simons, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin sheaths, which are multilamellar, lipid-rich membranes produced by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. To act as an insulator, myelin has to form a stable and firm membrane structure. In this study, we have analyzed t

  11. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  12. Lipoprotein Metabolism, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David E.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease represents the most common cause of death in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD patients exhibit an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is characterized by an increased plasma concentration of triglycerides, reduced concentration of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that are smaller and more dense than normal. The pathogenesis of NAFLD-associated atherogenic dyslipidemia is multifaceted, but many aspects are attributable to manifestations of insulin resistance. Here we review the structure, function and metabolism of lipoproteins, which are macromolecular particles of lipids and proteins that transport otherwise insoluble triglyceride and cholesterol molecules within the plasma. We provide a current explanation of the metabolic perturbations that are observed in the setting of insulin resistance. An improved understanding of the pathophysiology of atherogenic dyslipidemia would be expected to guide therapies aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality in NAFLD patients. PMID:24222095

  13. Accumulation of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Psoriatic Skin and Changes of Plasma Lipid Levels in Psoriatic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgun Solak Tekin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by an accelerated turnover of epidermal cells and an incomplete differentiation in epidermis with lesion. However, the exact etiology of psoriasis is unknown. Abnormalities in essential fatty acid metabolism, free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, and release of lymphokines have been proposed. Objective. Our purpose was to evaluate the plasma lipids and oxidized low-density lipoprotein accumulation in psoriatic skin lesion in order to ascertain the possible participation of oxidative stress and oxidative modification of lipids in pathogenesis of psoriasis. Methods. The study group included 84 patients with psoriasis, and 40 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Blood lipid profile was determined. Psoriatic and nonlesional skin samples of psoriatic patients were evaluated for the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein by using an immune-fluorescent staining method. Results. The mean levels of lipids (total cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL cholesterol in patients with psoriasis were found to be significantly higher than those of healthy subjects. Psoriatic skins were shown positive oxidized low-density lipoprotein staining. There was no staining in nonlesional skin samples of the same individuals. Conclusion. Lipid peroxidation mediated by free radicals is believed to be one of the important causes of cell membrane destruction and cell damage. This study shows for the first time the accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in psoriatic skin lesion. We believe that accumulation of ox-LDL in psoriatic skin may have an important role in the immune-inflammatory events that result in progressive skin damage.

  14. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution among lipoproteins differs in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvie, Jennifer L; Wang, Hong; Kinney, Gregory L; Snell-Bergeon, Janet; Hokanson, John E; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    LpPLA2 mass and activity have been variably related to cardiovascular disease risk, and the distribution of LpPLA2 in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), wherein cardiovascular disease risk is high despite normal or higher levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, is unknown. To determine whether there are differences in the distribution of LpPLA2 mass and activity across lipoproteins and their association with coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with T1D. Men with T1D (n = 19) not on statins, with and without CAC progression, and men without diabetes matched for HDL cholesterol (n = 25) had lipoproteins separated by fast protein liquid chromatography. Both LpPLA2 mass and activity were found within low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL pools with more LpPLA2 mass being associated with HDL (54% vs 44%; P-value diabetes. However, no difference in LpPLA2 activity or mass between lipoprotein subfractions was observed between all groups, and there was no relationship between LpPLA2 activity or mass and its distribution and CAC score progression in healthy or T1D men. LpPLA2 is found in both LDL and HDL and is distributed differently in men with T1D without any relationship to CAC score progression. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipoprotein Metabolism in APOB L343V Familial Hypobetalipoproteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Amanda J; Heeks, Liesl; Robertson, Ken; Champain, Danie; Hua, Jianmin; Song, Swithin; Parhofer, Klaus G; Barrett, P Hugh R; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Burnett, John R

    2015-11-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) is a codominant disorder of lipoprotein metabolism characterized by decreased plasma concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apoB). The objective was to examine the effect of heterozygous APOB L343V FHBL on postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) and fasting lipoprotein metabolism. Plasma incremental area under the curve apoB-48 and apoB-48 kinetics were determined after ingestion of a standardized oral fat load using compartmental modeling. Very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-, intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL)-, and LDL-apoB kinetics were determined in the fasting state using stable isotope methods and compartmental modeling. The postprandial incremental area under the curve (0-10 h) in FHBL subjects (n = 3) was lower for large TRL-triglyceride (-77%; P < .0001), small TRL-cholesterol (-83%; P < .001), small TRL-triglyceride (-88%; P < .001), and for plasma triglyceride (-70%; P < .01) and apoB (-63%; P < .0001) compared with controls. Compartmental analysis showed that apoB-48 production was lower (-91%; P < .05) compared with controls. VLDL-apoB concentrations in FHBL subjects (n = 2) were lower by more than 75% compared with healthy, normolipidemic control subjects (P < .01). The VLDL-apoB fractional catabolic rate (FCR) was more than 5-fold higher in the FHBL subjects (P = .07). ApoB production rates and IDL- and LDL-apoB FCRs were not different between FHBL subjects and controls. We conclude that when compared to controls, APOB L343V FHBL heterozygotes show lower TRL production with normal postprandial TRL particle clearance. In contrast, VLDL-apoB production was normal, whereas the FCR was higher in heterozygotes compared with lean control subjects. These mechanisms account for the marked hypolipidemic state observed in these FHBL subjects.

  16. Influence of liver cancer on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson-Ehle Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Liver plays a key role in the metabolism of plasma apolipoproteins, endogenous lipids and lipoproteins. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common fatal malignant tumors in China and in other Southeast Asian countries. This has been attributed to the high incidence of hepatitis B infection. Hepatitis B proteins, such as the hepatitis B X protein (HBx that is large hepatitis B surface protein could regulate transcription of many candidate genes for liver carcinogenesis. It has known that patients who suffered from acute hepatitis B could have lipid disorders such as decreased plasma level of high-density lipoproteins (HDL. Furthermore, aberrations of lipid metabolism are often seen in the chronic hepatitis B infection. Plasma lipid profiles could be changed under HCC. In majority of the reports in HCC, plasma levels of triglycerides (TG, cholesterol, free fatty acids (FFA, HDL, low-density lipoproteins (LDL, lipoprotein (a (Lp(a, apolipoprotein AI (apoAI and apoB were slight to significantly decreased, however, in some cases plasma levels of TG and Lp(a might be increased. It has been suggested that analysis of plasma levels of lipids, lipoproteins and apolipoproteins in the patients suffered from HCC reflects on the hepatic cellular impairment status. Studies revealed that alterations seen in the plasma levels of lipids, lipoproteins and apolipoproteins reflecting patients' pathologic conditions. Decreased serum levels of cholesterol and apoAI may indicate a poor prognosis. Human leukaemic cells and certain tumor tissues have a higher receptor-mediated uptake of HDL and LDL than the corresponding normal cells or tissues. LDL and HDL have therefore been proposed as a carrier for the water-insoluble anti-cancer agents.

  17. Bacteria/virus filter membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, M. S.; Goodwin, F.; Roebelen, G.

    1977-01-01

    Hollow acrylate fiber membrane that filters bacterial and viral organisms can be used with closed-cycle life-support systems for underwater habitations or laboratories. Membrane also has applications in fields of medicine, gnotobiotics, pharmaceutical production, and industries and research facilities that require sterile water. Device eliminates need for strong chemicals or sterilizing agents, thereby reducing costs.

  18. Bacteria/virus filter membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, M. S.; Goodwin, F.; Roebelen, G.

    1977-01-01

    Hollow acrylate fiber membrane that filters bacterial and viral organisms can be used with closed-cycle life-support systems for underwater habitations or laboratories. Membrane also has applications in fields of medicine, gnotobiotics, pharmaceutical production, and industries and research facilities that require sterile water. Device eliminates need for strong chemicals or sterilizing agents, thereby reducing costs.

  19. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need.......1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate...

  20. LRP-1 and LRP-2 receptors function in the membrane neuron. Trafficking mechanisms and proteolytic processing in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eSpuch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP belongs to the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, generally recognized as cell surface endocytic receptors, which bind and internalize extracellular ligands for degradation in lysosomes. Neurons require cholesterol to function and keep the membrane rafts stable. Cholesterol uptake into the neuron is carried out by ApoE via LRPs receptors on the cell surface. In neurons the most important are LRP-1 and LRP-2, even it is thought that a causal factor in Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the malfunction of this process which cause impairment intracellular signalling as well as storage and/or release of nutrients and toxic compounds. Both receptors are multifunctional cell surface receptors that are widely expressed in several tissues including neurons and astrocytes. LRPs are constituted by an intracellular (ICD and extracellular domain (ECD. Through its ECD, LRPs bind at least 40 different ligands ranging from lipoprotein and protease inhibitor complex to growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins. These receptors has also been shown to interact with scaffolding and signalling proteins via its ICD in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and to function as a co-receptor partnering with other cell surface or integral membrane proteins. Thus, LRPs are implicated in two major physiological processes: endocytosis and regulation of signalling pathways, which are both involved in diverse biological roles including lipid metabolism, cell growth processes, degradation of proteases, and tissue invasion. Interestingly, LRPs were also localized in neurons in different stages, suggesting that both receptors could be implicated in signal transduction during embryonic development, neuronal outgrowth or in the pathogenesis of AD

  1. Role of MINOS in Mitochondrial Membrane Architecture : Cristae Morphology and Outer Membrane Interactions Differentially Depend on Mitofilin Domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerbes, Ralf M.; Bohnert, Maria; Stroud, David A.; von der Malsburg, Karina; Kram, Anita; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina; Becker, Thomas; Wiedemann, Nils; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane contains a large protein complex crucial for membrane architecture, the mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). MINOS is required for keeping cristae membranes attached to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions and interacts with protein com

  2. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolaemia mice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HAILONG OU; QINGHAI ZHANG; JIA ZENG

    2016-06-01

    The defect of low density lipoprotein receptor disturbs cholesterol metabolism and causes familial hypercholesterolaemia(FH). In this study, we directly delivered exogenousLdlrgene into the liver of FH model mice (Ldlr − / −) by lentiviral genetransfer system. The results showed that theLdlrgene controlled by hepatocyte-specific human thyroxine-binding globulin(TBG) promoter successfully and exclusively expressed in livers. We found that, although, the content of high density lipopro-tein in serum was not significantly affected by theLdlrgene expression, the serum low density lipoprotein level was reducedby 46%, associated with a 30% and 28% decrease in triglyceride and total cholesterol, respectively, compared to uninjectedLdlr − / −mice. Moreover, the TBG directed expression ofLdlrsignificantly decreased the lipid accumulation in liver andreduced plaque burden in aorta (32%). Our results indicated that the hepatocyte-specific expression ofLdlrgene strikinglylowered serum lipid levels and resulted in amelioration of hypercholesterolaemia.

  3. Development of a low-cost, high-throughput native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (N-PAGE) protocol for lipoprotein sub-fractionation using Quality by Design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Mili; Chaudhary, Neha; Rathore, Anurag S

    2014-04-01

    Ratio of low density to high density lipoprotein concentration is critical for normal functioning of human body. Deviation in this ratio has been linked to various diseases, many of which are fatal if not diagnosed at early stages. For example, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have been linked to the level of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Henceforth, detection of the lipoprotein subtractions is crucial for health of an individual. To date, methods like ultracentrifugation, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE) have been used for separation and identification of lipoprotein types and subtypes. However, these methods are expensive, time consuming and require specialized equipments and expertise. This paper aims to propose a low-cost, high-throughput native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (N-PAGE) based protocol for analysis of lipoproteins. Quality by Design (QbD) based approach has been utilized. The initial screening of parameters was followed by a fractional factorial design to optimize the protocol. The lipoprotein subtractions obtained by the optimized protocol were compared with the commercially available and commonly used Lipoprint(®) Lipoprotein Subfractions Testing System from Quantimetrix. The proposed method gave comparable results to those obtained with the commercial system. The proposed method is capable of analysis of up to forty different samples in two hours at a cost of approximately 2$/sample. This is an order of magnitude better than the present cost of 265$/sample when using the commercial system. We think that the proposed method would be of particular interest to the developing and under-developed economies of the world, where this cost differential would be deemed quite significant and would make testing affordable to the majority of the population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Loci Associated With Plasma Concentration of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Apolipoprotein A1, and Apolipoprotein B Among 6382 White Women in Genome-Wide Analysis With Replication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chasman, Daniel I; Pare, Guillaume; Zee, Robert Y.L; Parker, Alex N; Cook, Nancy R; Buring, Julie E; Kwiatkowski, David J; Rose, Lynda M; Smith, Joshua D; Williams, Paul T; Rieder, Mark J; Rotter, Jerome I; Nickerson, Deborah A; Krauss, Ronald M; Miletich, Joseph P; Ridker, Paul M

    2008-01-01

    Genetic Loci Associated With Plasma Concentration of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Apolipoprotein A1, and Apolipoprotein B Among 6382 White...

  5. DMPD: Low density lipoprotein oxidation and its pathobiological significance. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9261091 Low density lipoprotein oxidation and its pathobiological significance. Ste...in oxidation and its pathobiological significance. PubmedID 9261091 Title Low density lipoprotein oxidation ...and its pathobiological significance. Authors Steinberg D. Publication J Biol Che

  6. Lipoprotein Lipase mRNA expression in different tissues of farm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipoprotein Lipase mRNA expression in different tissues of farm animals. ... Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) controls triacylglycerol partitioning between adipose tissues and muscles, so it is important enzyme for ... Article Metrics. Metrics Loading .

  7. The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of interaction between Lipoprotein Lipase and ApoVLDL-II genes on fat and serum biochemical levels. ... Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in apoVLDL-II and lipoprotein lipase genes was screened by ... Article Metrics.

  8. Quantification of lipoprotein profiles by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aru, Violetta; Lam, Chloie; Khakimov, Bekzod

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins and their subfraction profiles have been associated to diverse diseases including Cardio Vascular Disease (CVD). There is thus a great demand for measuring and quantifying the lipoprotein profile in an efficient and accurate manner. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy...

  9. Circulating lipoproteins are a crucial component of host defense against invasive Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Keuter, M.; Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Kullberg, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Circulating lipoproteins improve the outcome of severe Gram-negative infections through neutralizing lipopolysaccharides (LPS), thus inhibiting the release of proinflammatory cytokines. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Low density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLR-/-) mice, with a 7-fold i

  10. Circulating Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins and Antibodies against Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins as Potential Biomarkers of Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the study was evaluation of the diagnostic utility of serum oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL), antibodies against oxLDLs (o-LAB), and CEA as risk markers of colorectal cancer (CRC). Material and Methods. The serum levels of study factors were measured in 73 patients with CRC and in 35 healthy controls who were gender- and BMI-matched to the study group. Concentrations of oxLDL, o-LAB, and CEA were detected in ELISA tests. Serum lipids, lipoproteins, and gl...

  11. One precursor, three apolipoproteins: the relationship between two crustacean lipoproteins, the large discoidal lipoprotein and the high density lipoprotein/β-glucan binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieb, Stefanie; Roth, Ziv; Dal Magro, Christina; Fischer, Sabine; Butz, Eric; Sagi, Amir; Khalaila, Isam; Lieb, Bernhard; Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The novel discoidal lipoprotein (dLp) recently detected in the crayfish, differs from other crustacean lipoproteins in its large size, apoprotein composition and high lipid binding capacity, We identified the dLp sequence by transcriptome analyses of the hepatopancreas and mass spectrometry. Further de novo assembly of the NGS data followed by BLAST searches using the sequence of the high density lipoprotein/1-glucan binding protein (HDL-BGBP) of Astacus leptodactylus as query revealed a putative precursor molecule with an open reading frame of 14.7 kb and a deduced primary structure of 4889 amino acids. The presence of an N-terminal lipid bind- ing domain and a DUF 1943 domain suggests the relationship with the large lipid transfer proteins. Two-putative dibasic furin cleavage sites were identified bordering the sequence of the HDL-BGBP. When subjected to mass spectroscopic analyses, tryptic peptides of the large apoprotein of dLp matched the N-terminal part of the precursor, while the peptides obtained for its small apoprotein matched the C-terminal part. Repeating the analysis in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii revealed a similar protein with identical domain architecture suggesting that our findings do not represent an isolated instance. Our results indicate that the above three apolipoproteins (i.e HDL-BGBP and both the large and the small subunit of dLp) are translated as a large precursor. Cleavage at the furin type sites releases two subunits forming a heterodimeric dLP particle, while the remaining part forms an HDL-BGBP whose relationship with other lipoproteins as well as specific functions are yet to be elucidated.

  12. In silico analysis and experimental validation of lipoprotein and novel Tat signal peptides processing in Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sonika; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Signal peptide (SP) plays a pivotal role in protein translocation. Lipoprotein- and twin arginine translocase (Tat) dependent signal peptides were studied in All3087, a homolog of competence protein of Synechocystis PCC6803 and in two putative alkaline phosphatases (ALPs, Alr2234 and Alr4976), respectively. In silico analysis of All3087 is shown to possess the characteristics feature of competence proteins such as helix-hairpin-helix, N and C-terminal HKD endonuclease domain, calcium binding domain and N-terminal lipoprotein signal peptide. The SP recognition-cleavage site in All3087 was predicted (AIA-AC) using SignalP while further in-depth analysis using Pred-Lipo and WebLogo analysis for consensus sequence showed it as IAA-C. Activities of putative ALPs were confirmed by heterologous overexpression, activity assessment and zymogram analysis. ALP activity in Anabaena remains cell bound in log-phase, but during late log/stationary phase, an enhanced ALP activity was detected in extracellular milieu. The enhancement of ALP activity during stationary phase was not only due to inorganic phosphate limitation but also contributed by the presence of novel bipartite Tat-SP. The Tat signal transported the folded active ALPs to the membrane, followed by anchoring into the membrane and successive cleavage enabling transportation of the ALPs to the extracellular milieu, because of bipartite architecture and processing of transit Tat-SP.

  13. Peri and Postparturient Concentrations of Lipid Lipoprotein Insulin and Glucose in Normal Dairy Cows

    OpenAIRE

    BAŞOĞLU, Abdullah; SEVİNÇ, Mutlu; OK, Mahmut

    1998-01-01

    In order to provide uniqe insight into the metabolic disturbences seen after calving cholesterol, triglycerid, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein, glucose and insulin levels in serum were studied before calving (group I), in aerly (group II) and late (group III) lactation in 24 normal cows. Serum lipoproteins were separeted into various density classes by repeated ultracentrifugation. The results indicate that there was a rise in glucose, trygl...

  14. Associations between airway hyperresponsiveness, obesity, and lipoproteins in a longitudinal cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Finn; Hancox, Robert; Nair, Parameswaran;

    2013-01-01

    . The present study investigated the association between airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine and body mass index (BMI) and plasma lipoproteins [low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and total cholesterol]. Methods Associations between AHR, BMI and plasma lipoproteins were...... assessed in a population-based cohort at ages 14 and 20 years. Results In unadjusted analyses, higher LDL cholesterol levels at age 14 were associated with AHR at age 20 in both sexes (P...

  15. Human placenta secretes apolipoprotein B-100-containing lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Madsen, Eva; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk; Andersen, Claus B

    2004-01-01

    Supply of lipids from the mother is essential for fetal growth and development. In mice, disruption of yolk sac cell secretion of apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins results in embryonic lethality. In humans, the yolk sac is vestigial. Nutritional functions are instead established very...... of lipid transfer from the mother to the developing fetus....

  16. Intravenous Glucose Acutely Stimulates Intestinal Lipoprotein Secretion in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Changting; Dash, Satya; Morgantini, Cecilia; Lewis, Gary F

    2016-07-01

    Increased production of intestinal triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) contributes to dyslipidemia and increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We have previously demonstrated that enteral glucose enhances lipid-stimulated intestinal lipoprotein particle secretion. Here, we assessed whether glucose delivered systemically by intravenous infusion also enhances intestinal lipoprotein particle secretion in humans. On 2 occasions, 4 to 6 weeks apart and in random order, 10 healthy men received a constant 15-hour intravenous infusion of either 20% glucose to induce hyperglycemia or normal saline as control. Production of TRL-apolipoprotein B48 (apoB48, primary outcomes) and apoB100 (secondary outcomes) was assessed during hourly liquid-mixed macronutrient formula ingestion with stable isotope enrichment and multicompartmental modeling, under pancreatic clamp conditions to limit perturbations in pancreatic hormones (insulin and glucagon) and growth hormone. Compared with saline infusion, glucose infusion induced both hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, increased plasma triglyceride levels, and increased TRL-apoB48 concentration and production rate (Plipoprotein production. Hyperglycemia may contribute to intestinal lipoprotein overproduction in type 2 diabetes. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02607839. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Lipoprotein Particle Subclasses, Cardiovascular Disease and HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Duprez, Daniel A.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Tracy, Russell; Otvos, James; Cooper, David; Hoy, Jennifer; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Paton, Nicholas I; Friis-Moller, Nina; Lampe, Fiona; Liappis, Angelike P.; Neaton, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Both HIV and treatment for HIV have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfavorable lipid changes could offer a possible explanation for the increased risk of CVD. We examined the association of lipoprotein particles with CVD in HIV-infected patients.

  18. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and risk of gallstone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Benn, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Drugs which reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) may protect against gallstone disease. Whether plasma levels of LDL-C per se predict risk of gallstone disease remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that elevated LDL-C is a causal risk factor for symptomatic gallstone...

  19. Epidemiological reference ranges for low-density lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-06

    Apr 6, 1991 ... (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is recommended for subjects .... with this differential precipitation method for LDL-C in non- fasting subjects did not ..... Henderson LO er al. Phase V Preliminary Repor!

  20. Lipoprotein(a) Management: Pharmacological and Apheretic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Ruth; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2017-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is a low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-like particle with an additional apolipoprotein, apolipoprotein (a), [apo(a)] attached to apolipoprotein B. Recent epidemiologic and Mendelian randomization studies have provided evidence that Lp(a) is causally related to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The risk association between Lp(a) concentrations and CVD is still controversial but seems to be continuous and without an obvious threshold Lp(a) level. Circulating concentrations of Lp(a) are genetically determined; desirable levels are lipoprotein apheresis can decrease Lp(a) concentrations. The method is expensive and impractical for most patients and its feasibility depends mainly on the healthcare reimbursement system. Since no established treatment reduces Lp(a) without influencing other lipoproteins, there has been no trial that evaluated whether decreasing Lp(a) concentrations translates to clinical benefits. Recently, an antisense oligonucleotide against apo(a), IONIS-APO(a)Rx, has been shown to selectively decrease Lp(a) by almost 80%. A phase 2 study with this drug has been completed in late 2015 and results are expected to be published soon. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.