WorldWideScience

Sample records for membrane fluidity

  1. Rho signaling participates in membrane fluidity homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lockshon

    Full Text Available Preservation of both the integrity and fluidity of biological membranes is a critical cellular homeostatic function. Signaling pathways that govern lipid bilayer fluidity have long been known in bacteria, yet no such pathways have been identified in eukaryotes. Here we identify mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose growth is differentially influenced by its two principal unsaturated fatty acids, oleic and palmitoleic acid. Strains deficient in the core components of the cell wall integrity (CWI pathway, a MAP kinase pathway dependent on both Pkc1 (yeast's sole protein kinase C and Rho1 (the yeast RhoA-like small GTPase, were among those inhibited by palmitoleate yet stimulated by oleate. A single GEF (Tus1 and a single GAP (Sac7 of Rho1 were also identified, neither of which participate in the CWI pathway. In contrast, key components of the CWI pathway, such as Rom2, Bem2 and Rlm1, failed to influence fatty acid sensitivity. The differential influence of palmitoleate and oleate on growth of key mutants correlated with changes in membrane fluidity measured by fluorescence anisotropy of TMA-DPH, a plasma membrane-bound dye. This work provides the first evidence for the existence of a signaling pathway that enables eukaryotic cells to control membrane fluidity, a requirement for division, differentiation and environmental adaptation.

  2. Correlation between membrane fluidity cellular development and stem cell differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Noutsi, Pakiza

    2016-12-01

    Cell membranes are made up of a complex structure of lipids and proteins that diffuse laterally giving rise to what we call membrane fluidity. During cellular development, such as neuronal differentiation, cell membranes undergo dramatic structural changes induced by proteins such as ARC and Cofilin among others in the case of synaptic modification. In this study we used the generalized polarization (GP) property of fluorescent probe Laurdan using two-photon microscopy to determine membrane fluidity as a function of time and for various cell lines. A low GP value corresponds to a higher fluidity and a higher GP value is associated with a more rigid membrane. Four different cell lines were monitored such as hN2, NIH3T3, HEK293 and L6 cells. As expected, NIH3T3 cells have more rigid membrane at earlier stages of their development. On the other hand neurons tend to have the highest membrane fluidity early in their development emphasizing its correlation with plasticity and the need for this malleability during differentiation. This study sheds light on the involvement of membrane fluidity during neuronal differentiation and development of other cell lines.

  3. Membrane fluidity in the presence of membrane-binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrola Gabilondo, Beatriz; Losert, Wolfgang; Randazzo, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Arf proteins are GTP-ases that participate in vesicle trafficking inside cells. They are able to interact with membranes through their N-terminus when they are bound to GTP, and they detach from the membrane when GTP is hydrolyzed. The N-terminus of Arf1 (amino acids 2-17) folds into an amphipathic helix that can insert into lipid bilayers. Arf1 is also myristoylated; it has myristic acid, a 14-carbon fatty acid `tail', attached to it. We set out to test the hypothesis that the binding of the myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1 to lipid membranes changes the mechanical properties of the membrane, in ways that myristic acid alone or amphipathic peptides alone do not. We use three reporter molecules embedded in vesicles, whose fluorescence emission spectrum depends on the properties of the environment in which they are found, to measure three distinct aspects of membrane fluidity: Bispyrene is sensitive to lateral motion along the membrane, Prodan's emission gives a measure of the packing of the head groups, and DPH polarization reflects the packing of the hydrophobic tails. We will present effects found for four molecules (myristic acid, myristoylated and non-myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1, and the ALPS domain of KES) in a concentration-dependent manner, and discuss the importance of these results in the vesicle-trafficking picture.

  4. Membrane fluidity and the radiosensitivity of E. coli K1060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alper, T.; Cramp, W.A.; George, A.; Lunec, J.

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1060 is deficient in ability to synthesize unsaturated fatty acids, so that the composition of the membrane, and therefore its fluidity, can be changed. A discussion is presented of the results of George et al (1980) concerning the relation of radiosensitivity to membrane fluidity. The following speculations are made: 1) At ice temperatures the membrane of oleic grown bacteria is in the 'gel' state, whereas in elaidic grown bacteria the membrane is in an even more rigid configuration. As a result, lesions produced during irradiation in the presence of oxygen are more lethal than in the more fluid conditions prevailing at room temperature. 2) At room temperature it may be that the bacteria are conditioned by pre-irradiation anoxia so that they become more able to repair damage. When the temperature is decreased to ice levels in bacteria modified by growth in oleic and elaidic acid, reduced membrane fluidity may impair the metabolic activity required for this pre-irradiation conditioning. 3) The lack of temperature effects with the linoleic grown bacteria, that is, no sensitization under aerated conditions and no loss in shoulder under anoxic conditions, is consistent with the lower membrane transitions temperature (fluid to gel) associated with this fatty acid. (U.K.)

  5. Shear rheology of lipid monolayers and insights on membrane fluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Gabriel; López-Montero, Iván; Monroy, Francisco; Langevin, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The concept of membrane fluidity usually refers to a high molecular mobility inside the lipid bilayer which enables lateral diffusion of embedded proteins. Fluids have the ability to flow under an applied shear stress whereas solids resist shear deformations. Biological membranes require both properties for their function: high lateral fluidity and structural rigidity. Consequently, an adequate account must include, in addition to viscosity, the possibility for a nonzero shear modulus. This knowledge is still lacking as measurements of membrane shear properties have remained incomplete so far. In the present contribution we report a surface shear rheology study of different lipid monolayers that model distinct biologically relevant situations. The results evidence a large variety of mechanical behavior under lateral shear flow. PMID:21444777

  6. Assessment of Membrane Fluidity Fluctuations during Cellular Development Reveals Time and Cell Type Specificity

    KAUST Repository

    Noutsi, Pakiza

    2016-06-30

    Cell membrane is made up of a complex structure of lipids and proteins that diffuse laterally giving rise to what we call membrane fluidity. During cellular development, such as differentiation cell membranes undergo dramatic fluidity changes induced by proteins such as ARC and Cofilin among others. In this study we used the generalized polarization (GP) property of fluorescent probe Laurdan using two-photon microscopy to determine membrane fluidity as a function of time and for various cell lines. A low GP value corresponds to a higher fluidity and a higher GP value is associated with a more rigid membrane. Four different cell lines were monitored such as hN2, NIH3T3, HEK293 and L6 cells. Membrane fluidity was measured at 12h, 72h and 92 h. Our results show significant changes in membrane fluidity among all cell types at different time points. GP values tend to increase significantly within 92 h in hN2 cells and 72 h in NIH3T3 cells and only at 92 h in HEK293 cells. L6 showed a marked decrease in membrane fluidity at 72 h and starts to increase at 92 h. As expected, NIH3T3 cells have more rigid membrane at earlier time points. On the other hand, neurons tend to have the highest membrane fluidity at early time points emphasizing its correlation with plasticity and the need for this malleability during differentiation. This study sheds light on the involvement of membrane fluidity during neuronal differentiation and development of other cell lines.

  7. Alterations in lipid composition and fluidity of liver plasma membranes in copper-deficient rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, K.Y.; Rosenstein, F.; Shi, F.; Hassel, C.A.; Carr, T.P.; Zhang, J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1988-07-01

    In view of the importance of membrane fluidity on cell functions, the influence of phospholipid acyl groups on membrane fluidity, and the changes in lipid metabolism induced by copper (Cu) deficiency, this study was designed to examine the influence of dietary Cu on the lipid composition and fluidity of liver plasma membranes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two dietary treatments, namely Cu deficient and Cu adequate. After 8 weeks of treatment, liver plasma membranes were isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The lipid fluidity of plasma membranes, as assessed by the intramolecular eximer fluorescence of 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl) propane, was significantly depressed by Cu deficiency. In addition, Cu deficiency significantly reduced the content of arachidonic and palmitoleic acids but increased the docosatetraenoic acids of membrane phospholipids. This alteration in unsaturated phospholipid fatty acid composition, especially the large reduction in arachidonic acid, may have contributed to the depressed membrane fluidity. Furthermore, Cu deficiency also markedly altered the fatty acid composition of the triacylglycerols associated with the plasma membranes. Thus, the lipid composition and fluidity of liver plasma membranes are responsive to the animal's Cu status.

  8. Suicidal behaviour is associated with decreased esterified cholesterol in plasma and membrane fluidity of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Boby; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Pradeep, Johnson; Thomas, Tinku; Mandal, Amit Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Altered cholesterol levels in body fluids and brain tissues have been shown to be associated with suicidal behaviour, violence and aggression. But the biological underpinnings of this association in the pathophysiology of suicide are not clear. Cholesterol plays a crucial role in maintaining the cellular membrane fluidity and alterations in cellular membrane fluidity may impair serotonergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. We measured plasma esterified cholesterol and platelet membrane fluidity using fluorescence anisotropy and estimated flow activation energy which is a measure of order of membrane lipid bilayer in patients with recent suicidal attempt and compared with age and gender matched controls. The plasma esterified cholesterol, platelet membrane fluidity and flow activation energy was found to be significantly lower in patients with recent suicidal attempts compared to controls. Altered levels of plasma esterified cholesterol which is in equilibrium with membrane cholesterol might have resulted in decreased membrane fluidity and an increase in the order of membrane lipid bilayer. This might impair the serotonergic neurotransmission, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of suicide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of membrane fluidity on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Shinji; Yusa, Keisuke; Monde, Kazuaki; Akaike, Takaaki; Maeda, Yosuke

    2005-01-01

    For penetration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), formation of fusion-pores might be required for accumulating critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41, followed by multiple-site binding of gp120 with receptors, with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. Correlation between HIV-1 infectivity and fluidity was observed by treatment of fluidity-modulators, indicating that infectivity was dependent on fluidity. A 5% decrease in fluidity suppressed the HIV-1 infectivity by 56%. Contrarily, a 5% increase in fluidity augmented the infectivity by 2.4-fold. An increased temperature of 40 deg C or treatment of 0.2% xylocaine after viral adsorption at room temperature enhanced the infectivity by 2.6- and 1.5-fold, respectively. These were inhibited by anti-CXCR4 peptide, implying that multiple-site binding was accelerated at 40 deg C or by xylocaine. Thus, fluidity of both the plasma membrane and viral envelope was required to form the fusion-pore and to complete the entry of HIV-1

  10. Subcellular membrane fluidity of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus under cold and osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghel, Julie; Passot, Stéphanie; Cenard, Stéphanie; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Jamme, Frédéric; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2017-09-01

    Cryopreservation of lactic acid bacteria may lead to undesirable cell death and functionality losses. The membrane is the first target for cell injury and plays a key role in bacterial cryotolerance. This work aimed at investigating at a subcellular resolution the membrane fluidity of two populations of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus when subjected to cold and osmotic stresses associated to freezing. Cells were cultivated at 42 °C in mild whey medium, and they were exposed to sucrose solutions of different osmolarities (300 and 1800 mOsm L -1 ) after harvest. Synchrotron fluorescence microscopy was used to measure membrane fluidity of cells labeled with the cytoplasmic membrane probe 1-[4 (trimethylamino) phenyl]-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH). Images were acquired at 25 and 0 °C, and more than a thousand cells were individually analyzed. Results revealed that a bacterial population characterized by high membrane fluidity and a homogeneous distribution of fluidity values appeared to be positively related to freeze-thaw resistance. Furthermore, rigid domains with different anisotropy values were observed and the occurrence of these domains was more important in the freeze-sensitive bacterial population. The freeze-sensitive cells exhibited a broadening of existing highly rigid lipid domains with osmotic stress. The enlargement of domains might be ascribed to the interaction of sucrose with membrane phospholipids, leading to membrane disorganization and cell degradation.

  11. Alteration in Fluidity of Cell Plasma Membrane in Huntington Disease Revealed by Spectral Phasor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameni, Sara; Malacrida, Leonel; Tan, Zhiqun; Digman, Michelle A

    2018-01-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is a late-onset genetic neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) trinucleotide in the exon 1 of the gene encoding the polyglutamine (polyQ). It has been shown that protein degradation and lipid metabolism is altered in HD. In many neurodegenerative disorders, impaired lipid homeostasis is one of the early events in the disease onset. Yet, little is known about how mutant huntingtin may affect phospholipids membrane fluidity. Here, we investigated how membrane fluidity in the living cells (differentiated PC12 and HEK293 cell lines) are affected using a hyperspectral imaging of widely used probes, LAURDAN. Using phasor approach, we characterized the fluorescence of LAURDAN that is sensitive to the polarity of the immediate environment. LAURDAN is affected by the physical order of phospholipids (lipid order) and reports the membrane fluidity. We also validated our results using a different fluorescent membrane probe, Nile Red (NR). The plasma membrane in the cells expressing expanded polyQ shows a shift toward increased membrane fluidity revealed by both LAURDAN and NR spectral phasors. This finding brings a new perspective in the understanding of the early stages of HD that can be used as a target for drug screening.

  12. Effect of oxidative stress on plasma membrane fluidity of THP-1 induced macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Martínez, Paz; Morros, Antoni

    2013-02-01

    Plasma membrane is one of the preferential targets of reactive oxygen species which cause lipid peroxidation. This process modifies membrane properties such as membrane fluidity, a very important physical feature known to modulate membrane protein localization and function. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on plasma membrane fluidity regionalization of single living THP-1 macrophages. These cells were oxidized with H(2)O(2) at different concentrations, and plasma membrane fluidity was analyzed by two-photon microscopy in combination with the environment-sensitive probe Laurdan. Results show a significant H(2)O(2) concentration dependent increase in the frequency of rigid lipid regions, mainly attributable to lipid rafts, at the expense of the intermediate fluidity regions. A novel statistical analysis evaluated changes in size and number of lipid raft domains under oxidative stress conditions, as lipid rafts are platforms aiding cell signaling and are thought to have relevant roles in macrophage functions. It is shown that H(2)O(2) causes an increase in the number, but not the size, of raft domains. As macrophages are highly resistant to H(2)O(2), these new raft domains might be involved in cell survival pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. LPS-Induced Macrophage Activation and Plasma Membrane Fluidity Changes are Inhibited Under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz; Palacio, José R

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage activation is essential for a correct and efficient response of innate immunity. During oxidative stress membrane receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics can be altered, leading to dysfunctional cell responses. Our aim is to analyze membrane fluidity modifications and cell function under oxidative stress in LPS-activated macrophages. Membrane fluidity of individual living THP-1 macrophages was evaluated by the technique two-photon microscopy. LPS-activated macrophage function was determined by TNFα secretion. It was shown that LPS activation causes fluidification of macrophage plasma membrane and production of TNFα. However, oxidative stress induces rigidification of macrophage plasma membrane and inhibition of cell activation, which is evidenced by a decrease of TNFα secretion. Thus, under oxidative conditions macrophage proinflammatory response might develop in an inefficient manner.

  14. Membrane fluidity adjustments in ethanol-stressed Oenococcus oeni cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silveira, da M.G.; Golovina, E.A.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on the cytoplasmic membrane of Oenococcus oeni cells and the role of membrane changes in the acquired tolerance to ethanol were investigated. Membrane tolerance to ethanol was defined as the resistance to ethanol-induced leakage of preloaded carboxyfluorescein (cF) from cells.

  15. Characterization of membrane lipid fluidity in human embryo cells malignantly transfer med post 238Pu α irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zirong; Sun Ling; Liu Guolian; Shen Zhiyuan

    1992-01-01

    The membrane lipid fluidity of malignantly transformed human embryo cells following 238 Pu α particlce irradiation in vitro has been studied. The results indicate that the ontogenesis depends on irradiation dose (Gy) and the membrane lipid fluidity in malignantly transformed cells is higher than that in normal embryo cells. With the microviscosity (η) of cells plotted against the cell counts, the correlation coefficient (γ) is calculated to be between 0.9936 and 0.9999. Since the malignant transformation of irradiated embryo cells is manifested early on cell membrane lipid, the fluidity of membrane lipid can be used as an oncologic marker

  16. Even a Chronic Mild Hyperglycemia Affects Membrane Fluidity and Lipoperoxidation in Placental Mitochondria in Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-García, María del Consuelo; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; Martinez-Montes, Federico; Palomar-Morales, Martín; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    It is known the deleterious effects of diabetes on embryos, but the effects of diabetes on placenta and its mitochondria are still not well known. In this work we generated a mild hyperglycemia model in female wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 48 hours-old rats. The sexual maturity onset of the female rats was delayed around 6–7 weeks and at 16 weeks-old they were mated, and sacrificed at day 19th of pregnancy. In placental total tissue and isolated mitochondria, the fatty acids composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and lipoperoxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Membrane fluidity in mitochondria was measured with the excimer forming probe dipyrenylpropane and mitochondrial function was measured with a Clark-type electrode. The results show that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia increases lipoperoxidation and decreases mitochondrial function in placenta. Simultaneously, placental fatty acids metabolism in total tissue is modified but in a different way than in placental mitochondria. Whereas the chronic mild hyperglycemia induced a decrease in unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) in placental total tissue, the ratio increased in placental mitochondria. The measurements of membrane fluidity showed that fluidity of placenta mitochondrial membranes increased with hyperglycemia, showing consistency with the fatty acids composition through the U/S index. The thermotropic characteristics of mitochondrial membranes were changed, showing lower transition temperature and activation energies. All of these data together demonstrate that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy of early reproductive Wistar rats, generates an increment of lipoperoxidation, an increase of placental mitochondrial membrane fluidity apparently derived from changes in fatty acids composition and consequently, mitochondrial malfunction. PMID:26630275

  17. The Effect of Alcohols on Red Blood Cell Mechanical Properties and Membrane Fluidity Depends on Their Molecular Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Melda; Ince, Huseyin Yavuz; Yalcin, Ozlem; Ajdžanović, Vladimir; Spasojević, Ivan; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Baskurt, Oguz K.

    2013-01-01

    The role of membrane fluidity in determining red blood cell (RBC) deformability has been suggested by a number of studies. The present investigation evaluated alterations of RBC membrane fluidity, deformability and stability in the presence of four linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol) using ektacytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. All alcohols had a biphasic effect on deformability such that it increased then decreased with increasing concentration; the critical concentration for reversal was an inverse function of molecular size. EPR results showed biphasic changes of near-surface fluidity (i.e., increase then decrease) and a decreased fluidity of the lipid core; rank order of effectiveness was butanol > propanol > ethanol > methanol, with a significant correlation between near-surface fluidity and deformability (r = 0.697; palcohol enhanced the impairment of RBC deformability caused by subjecting cells to 100 Pa shear stress for 300 s, with significant differences from control being observed at higher concentrations of all four alcohols. The level of hemolysis was dependent on molecular size and concentration, whereas echinocytic shape transformation (i.e., biconcave disc to crenated morphology) was observed only for ethanol and propanol. These results are in accordance with available data obtained on model membranes. They document the presence of mechanical links between RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity, chain length-dependence of the ability of alcohols to alter RBC mechanical behavior, and the biphasic response of RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity to increasing alcohol concentrations. PMID:24086751

  18. Reorganization of Azospirillum brasilense cell membrane is mediated by lipid composition adjustment to maintain optimal fluidity during water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, A B; Paulucci, N S; Biasutti, M A; Reguera, Y B; Gallarato, L A; Kilmurray, C; Dardanelli, M S

    2016-01-01

    We study the Azospirillum brasilense tolerance to water deficit and the dynamics of adaptive process at the level of the membrane. Azospirillum brasilense was exposed to polyethylene glycol (PEG) growth and PEG shock. Tolerance, phospholipids and fatty acid (FA) composition and membrane fluidity were determined. Azospirillum brasilense was able to grow in the presence of PEG; however, its viability was reduced. Cells grown with PEG showed membrane fluidity similar to those grown without, the lipid composition was modified, increasing phosphatidylcholine and decreasing phosphatidylethanolamine amounts. The unsaturation FAs degree was reduced. The dynamics of the adaptive response revealed a decrease in fluidity 20 min after the addition of PEG, indicating that the PEG has a fluidizing effect on the hydrophobic region of the cell membrane. Fluidity returned to initial values after 60 min of PEG exposure. Azospirillum brasilense is able to perceive osmotic changes by changing the membrane fluidity. This effect is offset by changes in the composition of membrane phospholipid and FA, contributing to the homeostasis of membrane fluidity under water deficit. This knowledge can be used to develop new Azospirillum brasilense formulations showing an adapted membrane to water deficit. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Decreased fluidity of cell membranes causes a metal ion deficiency in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peitong; Sun, Liang; Sun, Yuxia; Shang, Fei; Yan, Guoliang

    2016-04-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional responses of S. cerevisiae to heterologous carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The results show that the genes involved in metal ion transport were specifically up-regulated in the recombinant strain, and metal ions, including Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+), were deficient in the recombinant strain compared to the ion content of the parent strain. The decrease in metal ions was ascribed to a decrease in cell membrane (CM) fluidity caused by lower levels of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol. This was confirmed by the observation that metal ion levels were restored when CM fluidity was increased by supplying linoleic acid. In addition, a 24.3 % increase in the β-carotene concentration was observed. Collectively, our results suggest that heterologous production of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae can induce cellular stress by rigidifying the CM, which can lead to a deficiency in metal ions. Due to the importance of CM fluidity in cellular physiology, maintaining normal CM fluidity might be a potential approach to improving carotenoid production in genetically engineered S. cerevisiae.

  20. Alteration in Fluidity of Cell Plasma Membrane in Huntington Disease Revealed by Spectral Phasor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sameni, Sara; Malacrida, Leonel; Tan, Zhiqun; Digman, Michelle A.

    2018-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a late-onset genetic neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) trinucleotide in the exon 1 of the gene encoding the polyglutamine (polyQ). It has been shown that protein degradation and lipid metabolism is altered in HD. In many neurodegenerative disorders, impaired lipid homeostasis is one of the early events in the disease onset. Yet, little is known about how mutant huntingtin may affect phospholipids membrane fluidity. Here...

  1. [The effects of electromagnetic pulse on fluidity and lipid peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changzhen; Cong, Jianbo; Xian, Hong; Cao, Xiaozhe; Sun, Cunpu; Wu, Ke

    2002-08-01

    To study the effects of intense electromagnetic pulse(EMP) on the biological effects of mitochondrial membrane. Rat liver mitochondrial suspension was exposed to EMP at 60 kV/m level. The changes of membrane lipid fluidity and membrane protein mobility were detected by ESR and spin label technique. Malondialdehyde(MDA) was detected by spectrophotometer. The mobility of membrane protein decreased significantly(P < 0.05). Correlation time (tau c) of control group was (0.501 +/- 0.077) x 10(-9)s, and tau c of EMP group was (0.594 +/- 0.049) x 10(-9)s, indicating that the mobility of protein was restricted. The fluidity of mitochondrial membrane increased significantly(P < 0.05) at the same time. Order parameter(S) of mitochondrial membrane lipid in control group was 0.63 +/- 0.01, while S of EMP group was 0.61 +/- 0.01(P < 0.05). MDA decreased significantly. The mobility and lipid peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane may be disturbed after EMP exposure.

  2. Influence of membrane fatty acid composition and fluidity on airborne survival of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Chan, Wing Lam; Lai, Ka Man

    2018-04-01

    Finding ways to predict and control the survival of bacterial aerosols can contribute to the development of ways to alleviate a number of crucial microbiological problems. Significant damage in the membrane integrity of Escherichia coli during aerosolization and airborne suspension has been revealed which has prompted the question of how the membrane fatty acid composition and fluidity influence the survival of airborne bacteria. Two approaches of using isogenic mutants and different growth temperatures were selected to manipulate the membrane fatty acid composition of E. coli before challenging the bacteria with different relative humidity (RH) levels in an aerosol chamber. Among the mutants (fabR - , cfa. fadA - ), fabR - had the lowest membrane fluidity index (FI) and generally showed a higher survival than the parental strain. Surprisingly, its resistance to airborne stress was so strong that its viability was fully maintained even after airborne suspension at 40% RH, a harsh RH level to bacterial survival. Moreover, E. coli cultured at 20 °C with a higher FI than that at 30 and 37 °C generally had a lower survival after aerosolization and airborne suspension. Unlike FI, individual fatty acid and cyclopropane fatty acid composition did not relate to the bacterial survival. Lipid peroxidation of the membrane was undetected in all the bacteria. Membrane fluidity plays a stronger role in determining the bacteria survival during airborne suspension than during aerosolization. Certain relationships between FI and bacteria survival were identified, which could help predict the transmission of bacteria under different conditions.

  3. [Fluorescence polarization used to investigate the cell membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by pulsed electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zeng, Xin-An; Wen, Qi-Biao; Li, Lin

    2008-01-01

    To know the lethal mechanism of microorganisms under pulsed electric field treatment, the relationship between the inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CICC1308) cell and the permeability and fluidity changes of its cell membrane treated by pulsed electric field (0-25 kV x cm(-1), 0-266 ms) was investigated. With 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) used as a probe, the cell membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by pulsed electric field was expressed by fluorescence polarization. Results showed that the cell membrane fluidity decreases when the electric flied strength is up to 5 kV x cm(-1), and decreases with the increase in electric field strength and treatment time. The plate counting method and ultraviolet spectrophotometer were used to determine the cell viability and to investigate the cell membrane permeability, respectively, treated by pulsed electric field. Results showed that the lethal ratio and the content of protein and nucleic acid leaked from intracellular plasma increased with the increase in the electric field strength and the extension of treatment time. Even in a quite lower electric field of 5 kV x cm(-1) with a tiny microorganism lethal level, the increase in UV absorption value and the decrease in fluidity were significant. It was demonstrated that the cell membrane fluidity decreases with the increase in lethal ratio and cell membrane permeability. The viscosity of cell membrane increases with the decrease in fluidity. These phenomena indicated that cell membrane is one of the most key sites during the pulsed electric field treatment, and the increased membrane permeability and the decreased cell membrane fluidity contribute to the cell death.

  4. Membrane Fluidity Changes, A Basic Mechanism of Interaction of Gravity with Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Florian; Hauslage, Jens; Hanke, Wolfgang

    2017-10-01

    All life on earth has been established under conditions of stable gravity of 1g. Nevertheless, in numerous experiments the direct gravity dependence of biological processes has been shown on all levels of organization, from single molecules to humans. According to the underlying mechanisms a variety of questions, especially about gravity sensation of single cells without specialized organelles or structures for gravity sensing is being still open. Biological cell membranes are complex structures containing mainly lipids and proteins. Functional aspects of such membranes are usually attributed to membrane integral proteins. This is also correct for the gravity dependence of cells and organisms which is well accepted since long for a wide range of biological systems. However, it is as well established that parameters of the lipid matrix are directly modifying the function of proteins. Thus, the question must be asked, whether, and how far plain lipid membranes are affected by gravity directly. In principle it can be said that up to recently no real basic mechanism for gravity perception in single cells has been presented or verified. However, it now has been shown that as a basic membrane parameter, membrane fluidity, is significantly dependent on gravity. This finding might deliver a real basic mechanism for gravity perception of living organisms on all scales. In this review we summarize older and more recent results to demonstrate that the finding of membrane fluidity being gravity dependent is consistent with a variety of published laboratory experiments. We additionally point out to the consequences of these recent results for research in the field life science under space condition.

  5. Lipid engineering reveals regulatory roles for membrane fluidity in yeast flocculation and oxygen-limited growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degreif, Daniel [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany); de Rond, Tristan [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bertl, Adam [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany); Keasling, Jay D. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Budin, Itay [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-03-18

    Cells modulate lipid metabolism in order to maintain membrane homeostasis. In this paper, we use a metabolic engineering approach to manipulate the stoichiometry of fatty acid unsaturation, a regulator of cell membrane fluidity, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, reduced lipid unsaturation triggered cell-cell adhesion (flocculation), a phenomenon characteristic of industrial yeast but uncommon in laboratory strains. We find that ER lipid saturation sensors induce expression of FLO1 – encoding a cell wall polysaccharide binding protein – independently of its canonical regulator. In wild-type cells, Flo1p-dependent flocculation occurs under oxygen-limited growth, which reduces unsaturated lipid synthesis and thus serves as the environmental trigger for flocculation. Transcriptional analysis shows that FLO1 is one of the most highly induced genes in response to changes in lipid unsaturation, and that the set of membrane fluidity-sensitive genes is globally activated as part of the cell's long-term response to hypoxia during fermentation. Finally, our results show how the lipid homeostasis machinery of budding yeast is adapted to carry out a broad response to an environmental stimulus important in biotechnology.

  6. Mitochondrial ATPase activity and membrane fluidity changes in rat liver in response to intoxication with Buckthorn (Karwinskia humboldtiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Cid-Hernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh is a poisonous plant of the rhamnacea family. To elucidate some of the subcellular effects of Kh toxicity, membrane fluidity and ATPase activities as hydrolytic and as proton-pumping activity were assessed in rat liver submitochondrial particles. Rats were randomly assigned into control non-treated group and groups that received 1,1.5 and 2 g/Kg body weight of dry powder of Kh fruit, respectively. Rats were euthanized at day 1 and 7 after treatment RESULTS: Rats under Kh treatment at all dose levels tested, does not developed any neurologic symptoms. However, we detected alterations in membrane fluidity and ATPase activity. Lower dose of Kh on day 1 after treatment induced higher mitochondrial membrane fluidity than control group. This change was strongly correlated with increased ATPase activity and pH gradient driven by ATP hydrolysis. On the other hand, membrane fluidity was hardly affected on day 7 after treatment with Kh. Surprisingly, the pH gradient driven by ATPase activity was significantly higher than controls despite an diminution of the hydrolytic activity of ATPase CONCLUSIONS: The changes in ATPase activity and pH gradient driven by ATPase activity suggest an adaptive condition whereby the fluidity of the membrane is altered

  7. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by the tricyclic coumarin GUT-70 through the modification of membrane fluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Kouki; Hattori, Shinichiro; Kariya, Ryusho [Division of Hematopoiesis, Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Komizu, Yuji [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Sojo University, 4-22-1 Ikeda, Nishi-ku, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Kudo, Eriko; Goto, Hiroki; Taura, Manabu [Division of Hematopoiesis, Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Ueoka, Ryuichi [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Sojo University, 4-22-1 Ikeda, Nishi-ku, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Kimura, Shinya [Division of Hematology, Respiratory Medicine and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Okada, Seiji, E-mail: okadas@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Hematopoiesis, Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan)

    2015-02-13

    Membrane fusion between host cells and HIV-1 is the initial step in HIV-1 infection, and plasma membrane fluidity strongly influences infectivity. In the present study, we demonstrated that GUT-70, a natural product derived from Calophyllum brasiliense, stabilized plasma membrane fluidity, inhibited HIV-1 entry, and down-regulated the expression of CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4. Since GUT-70 also had an inhibitory effect on viral replication through the inhibition of NF-κB, it is expected to be used as a dual functional and viral mutation resistant reagent. Thus, these unique properties of GUT-70 enable the development of novel therapeutic agents against HIV-1 infection.

  8. The effect of alcohols on red blood cell mechanical properties and membrane fluidity depends on their molecular size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Sonmez

    Full Text Available The role of membrane fluidity in determining red blood cell (RBC deformability has been suggested by a number of studies. The present investigation evaluated alterations of RBC membrane fluidity, deformability and stability in the presence of four linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol using ektacytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. All alcohols had a biphasic effect on deformability such that it increased then decreased with increasing concentration; the critical concentration for reversal was an inverse function of molecular size. EPR results showed biphasic changes of near-surface fluidity (i.e., increase then decrease and a decreased fluidity of the lipid core; rank order of effectiveness was butanol > propanol > ethanol > methanol, with a significant correlation between near-surface fluidity and deformability (r = 0.697; p<0.01. The presence of alcohol enhanced the impairment of RBC deformability caused by subjecting cells to 100 Pa shear stress for 300 s, with significant differences from control being observed at higher concentrations of all four alcohols. The level of hemolysis was dependent on molecular size and concentration, whereas echinocytic shape transformation (i.e., biconcave disc to crenated morphology was observed only for ethanol and propanol. These results are in accordance with available data obtained on model membranes. They document the presence of mechanical links between RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity, chain length-dependence of the ability of alcohols to alter RBC mechanical behavior, and the biphasic response of RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity to increasing alcohol concentrations.

  9. Dietary Selenium or Zinc Supplementation Restores Brain Lipid Composition and Membrane Fluidity in Protein-Undernourished Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Salau, Bamidele A; Sandhir, Rajat; Adenuga, Gbenga A

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that protein undernutrition (PU) modifies the membrane lipid composition in the intestine and liver, as well as in plasma and other areas. However, there is limited information on the effect of PU on synaptosomal membrane lipid composition and fluidity and the protective role of selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), which is a major focus of the present study. For 10 weeks, rats were fed diets containing 16% casein, which constituted the adequate protein diet, or 5% casein, representing the PU diet. The animals were supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15 and 227 mg L-1, respectively, in drinking water for 3 weeks. The results showed a significant increase in total lipids, glycolipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, and the cholesterol/phospholipid (Chol/PL) ratio, and a significant reduction in phospholipids and membrane fluidity. Se and Zn supplementation to PU rats, however, significantly lowered total lipids, glycolipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, and the Chol/PL ratio, while phospholipids and membrane fluidity were significantly restored. It is concluded that a perturbed lipid composition induced by PU affects the membrane structure and fluidity, which in turn influences membrane functions. The study suggests that Se and Zn supplementation might be beneficial in restoring the lipid dyshomeostasis associated with PU. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; pacids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Increase of radiation damage to potassium-ion permeability in E. coli cells with decrease in membrane fluidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.

    1980-01-01

    Membrane lipids of an auxotroph of E. coli requiring unsaturated fatty acid were manipulated by supplementing the growth medium with unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths and/or configurations, and the radiation damage to K + -permeability of the resulting modified cells was investigated in relation with factors influencing membrane fluidity, such as temperature and procaine. Radiation had greater effects on membranes supplemented with unsaturated fatty acids of the trans configuration with a longer chain than on those of the cis configuration with a shorter chain. Radiation damage also increased with decrease in temperature. Furthermore, procaine-treated membranes showed increased resistance to radiation. All these results indicate that the damage was affected by the physical character of membrane lipids and that it was greater in membranes with decreased fluidity. (author)

  12. Increased Lipiodol uptake in hepatocellular carcinoma possibly due to increased membrane fluidity by dexamethasone and tamoxifen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Stephanie, E-mail: stephanie.becker@rouen.fnclcc.f [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre E. Marquis, F-35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U 991, Rennes, F-35033 France (France); European University of Brittany, F-35000 Rennes (France); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre H. Becquerel, F-76038 Rouen (France); Ardisson, Valerie; Lepareur, Nicolas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre E. Marquis, F-35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U 991, Rennes, F-35033 France (France); European University of Brittany, F-35000 Rennes (France); Sergent, Odile [European University of Brittany, F-35000 Rennes (France); UPRES EA SeRAIC, IFR 140, University of Rennes 1, F-35043 Rennes (France); Bayat, Sahar [INSERM U936 Department of Biostatistics, CHRU Pontchaillou, F-35033 Rennes (France); Noiret, Nicolas [European University of Brittany, F-35000 Rennes (France); Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes, UMR CNRS 6226, F-35708 Rennes (France); Gaboriau, Francois; Clement, Bruno [INSERM U 991, Rennes, F-35033 France (France); Boucher, Evelyne [INSERM U 991, Rennes, F-35033 France (France); Department of Medical Oncology, Centre E. Marquis, F-35042 Rennes (France); Raoul, Jean-Luc [INSERM U 991, Rennes, F-35033 France (France); European University of Brittany, F-35000 Rennes (France); Department of Medical Oncology, Centre E. Marquis, F-35042 Rennes (France); Garin, Etienne [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre E. Marquis, F-35042 Rennes (France); INSERM U 991, Rennes, F-35033 France (France); European University of Brittany, F-35000 Rennes (France)

    2010-10-15

    Introduction: Lipiodol is used as a vector for chemoembolization or internal radiotherapy in unresectable hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). The aim of this study is to improve the tumoral uptake of Lipiodol by modulating membrane fluidizing agents to optimize the effectiveness of Lipiodol vectorized therapy. Methods: The effect of dexamethasone and tamoxifen on membrane fluidity was studied in vitro by electron paramagnetic resonance applied to rat hepatocarcinoma cell line N1S1. The tumoral uptake of Lipiodol was studied in vivo on rats with HCC, which had been previously treated by dexamethasone and/or tamoxifen, after intra-arterial administration of {sup 99m}Tc-SSS-Lipiodol. Results: The two molecules studied here exhibit a fluidizing effect in vitro which appears dependent on time and dose, with a maximum fluidity obtained after 1 hr at concentrations of 20 {mu}M for dexamethasone and 200 nM for tamoxifen. In vivo, while the use of dexamethasone or tamoxifen alone tends to lead to increased tumoral uptake of Lipiodol, this effect does not reach levels of significance. On the other hand, there is a significant increase in the tumoral uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-SSS-Lipiodol in rats pretreated by both dexamethasone and tamoxifen, with a tumoral uptake (expressed in % of injected activity per g of tumor) of 13.57{+-}3.65% after treatment, as against 9.45{+-}4.44% without treatment (P<.05). Conclusions: Dexamethasone and tamoxifen fluidify the N1S1 cells membrane, leading to an increase in the tumoral uptake of Lipiodol. These drugs could be combined with chemo-Lipiodol-embolization or radiolabeled Lipiodol, with a view to improving the effectiveness of HCCs therapy.

  13. Effects of intense noise exposure on the outer hair cell plasma membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Di; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2007-04-01

    Outer hair cells (OHCs) play an important role in cochlear amplification via their length changes (electromotility). A noise-induced cochlear amplification loss leading to a permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed without a significant hair cell loss in rats [Chen, G.D., Liu, Y., 2005. Mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss potentiation by hypoxia. Hear. Res. 200, 1-9.]. Since motor proteins are inserted in the OHC lateral membrane, any change in the OHC plasma membrane may result in a loss of OHC electromotility, leading to a loss of cochlear amplification. In this study, the lateral diffusion in the OHC plasma membrane was determined in vitro in guinea pigs by fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) after an in vivo noise exposure. The lateral diffusion in the OHC plasma membrane demonstrated a length-dependence, which increased as OHC length increased. A reduction in the lateral diffusion was observed in those OHCs with lengths of 50-70 microm after exposure to an 8-kHz octave band noise at 110 dB SPL for 3h. This membrane fluidity change was associated with the selective PTS at frequencies around 8 kHz. The reduction of the lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall indicated that noise could impair the micromechanics of the OHC lateral wall and might consequently impair OHC electromotility to induce threshold shift.

  14. Smoking and fluidity of erythrocyte membranes: a high resolution scanning electron and atomic force microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia; du Plooy, Jeanette N; Soma, Prashilla; Keyser, Ina; Buys, Antoinette V

    2013-11-30

    Smoking affects the general health of an individual, however, the red blood cells (RBCs) and their architecture are particularly vulnerable to inhaled toxins related to smoking. Smoking is one of the lifestyle diseases that are responsible for the most deaths worldwide and an individual who smokes is exposed to excessive amounts of oxidants and toxins which generate up to 10(18) free radicals in the human body. Recently, it was reported that smoking decreases RBC membrane fluidity. Here we confirm this and we show changes visible in the topography of RBC membranes, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RBC membranes show bubble formation of the phospholipid layer, as well as balloon-like smooth areas; while their general discoid shapes are changed to form pointed extensions. We also investigate membrane roughness using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and these results confirm SEM results. Due to the vast capability of RBCs to be adaptable, their state of well-being is a major indication for the general health status of an individual. We conclude that these changes, using an old technique in a novel application, may provide new insights and new avenues for future improvements in clinical medicine pertaining to conditions like COPD. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Osmoelastic coupling in biological structures: decrease in membrane fluidity and osmophobic association of phospholipid vesicles in response to osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, M; Ohnishi, S; Ito, T

    1989-05-02

    Poly(ethylene glycol)- (PEG-) induced change in membrane fluidity and aggregation of phospholipid vesicles were studied. A threshold concentration of PEG was required to induce the aggregation. This concentration increased with a decrease in the molecular weight of PEG, e.g., from 5% (w/w) with PEG 6000 (PEG with an average molecular weight of 7500) to more than 30% (w/w) with PEG 200. The aggregation was reversible upon dilution of PEG if the initial PEG concentration was smaller than a certain value, e.g., 22% (w/w) for PEG 6000. Addition of PEG caused a decrease in membrane fluidity of the vesicles detected by fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene and by electron spin resonance of a spin-labeled fatty acid. The anisotropy change of diphenylhexatriene fluidity change had an inflection point at approximately 5% (w/w) of PEG 6000, which might suggest that the aggregation would make the decrease of membrane fluidity smaller. Transfer of lipid molecules between phospholipid vesicles was enhanced by the PEG-induced aggregation. The enhancement occurred not only upon direct addition of PEG to the suspending medium, but also upon dialysis of the vesicle suspension against a high concentration of PEG. All these features are consistent with osmoelastic coupling in the phospholipid membranes and the subsequent osmophobic association of the vesicles. The imbalance of osmolarity between the region adjacent to the vesicle surface (exclusion layer) and the bulk aqueous phase, which results from the preferential exclusion of PEG from the exclusion layer in the case of direct addition of PEG, exerts an osmotic stress on the vesicles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Connecting membrane fluidity and surface charge to pore-forming antimicrobial peptides resistance by an ANN-based predictive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehla, Jitender; Sood, S K

    2013-05-01

    Efficiency of antibacterial chemotherapy is gradually more challenged by the emergence of pathogenic strains exhibiting high levels of antibiotic resistance. Pore-forming antimicrobial peptides (PF-AMPs) such as alamethicin (Alm) are therefore in the focus of extensive research efforts. In the present study, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (SAR) modeling of membrane phospholipids vs. PF-AMPs, in context to membrane fluidity and surface charge, was carried out. We observed that the potency of PF-AMPs depends on the fatty acyl chain and polar head group of phospholipids. Alm showed surface interactions with zwitterionic phospholipids however could penetrate deeper inside the hydrophobic core of anionic membranes. Here, the resistance developed in bacterial cells was coupled to membrane fluidity and surface charge, and simultaneously, these principles could be applied for combating resistance against PF-AMPs. The correlation coefficient between observed CR and predicted CR using ANN was found to be 0.757. Thus, ANN could be used as a reliable modeling method for predicting CR, given the structure of the biomimetic membrane in terms of membrane fluidity and surface charge. Fully explored mechanisms of resistance, a forward modeling step in the design cycle of AMPs, can be cross-linked to the inward modeling using ANN to complete the peptide design cycle. The SAR between membrane phospholipids and PF-AMPs could furnish valuable information regarding their design to provide us efficacious peptides against premier pathogens. So far, this is the only report available to predict and quantify interactions of PF-AMPs with membrane phospholipids.

  17. Aniracetam restores the effects of amyloid-beta protein or ageing on membrane fluidity and intracellular calcium concentration in mice synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Wang, J-J; Cai, J-X

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we observed the in vitro effect of aniracetam on membrane fluidity and free calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) of frontal cortical (FC) and hippocampal (HP) synaptosomes of aged mice and young mice treated with amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) Membrane fluidity was measured by using fluorescence anisotropy of the lipophilic probe, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). [Ca(2+)]i was measured by using Fura 2-AM fluorescent spectrophotometry. We found that membrane fluidity of the FC and HP synaptosomes was decreased in 14 months old mice compared with that in 3 months old mice. Similarly, Abeta25-35 (1 microM) decreased the membrane fluidity in 3 months old mice. These effects of ageing and Abeta25-35 on membrane fluidity were restored by aniracetam in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, Abeta25-35 (1 microM) largely increased [Ca(2+)]i in FC and HP synaptosomes in 3 months old mice, but this effect on HP synaptosomes was effectively reversed by aniracetam (1-4 mM). The present findings suggest that aniracetam restores age- and Abeta-induced alterations in membrane fluidity or Abeta-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i, demonstrating a possible beneficial role of aniracetam in the clinic treatment for senile dementia or Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Age-dependent effects of He-Ne laser irradiation on the membrane fluidity of human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Eugenia; Savopol, Tudor; Pologea-Moraru, Roxana; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    1997-12-01

    The low power He-Ne laser radiation has been extensively used in past decades as medical device to relieve pain, accelerate wound healing as well as aiming beam in invisible laser beam in invisible laser beam applications. It is not known however if there are any secondary, undesirable effects of He-Ne laser radiation on the irradiated tissue. In this paper we investigate the changes induced in membrane fluidity of human erythrocyte during/upon the interaction with the He-Ne laser beam having the parameters currently used for target aiming in laser surgery.

  19. Fluidity evaluation of cell membrane model formed on graphene oxide with single particle tracking using quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Motegi, Toshinori; Iwasa, Seiji; Sandhu, Adarsh; Tero, Ryugo

    2015-04-01

    The lipid bilayer is the fundamental structure of plasma membranes, and artificial lipid bilayer membranes are used as model systems of cell membranes. Recently we reported the formation of a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on graphene oxide (GO) by the vesicle fusion method. In this study, we conjugated a quantum dot (Qdot) on the SLB surface as a fluorescence probe brighter than dye-labeled lipid molecules, to qualitatively evaluate the fluidity of the SLB on GO by the single particle tracking method. We obtained the diffusion coefficient of the Qdot-conjugated lipids in the SLB on GO. We also performed the Qdot conjugation on the SLB containing a lipid conjugated with polyethylene glycol, to prevent the nonspecific adsorption of Qdots. The difference in the diffusion coefficients between the SLBs on the GO and the bare SiO2 regions was evaluated from the trajectory of single Qdot-conjugated lipid diffusing between the two regions.

  20. [Study on the effects of two kinds of cactus polysaccharide on erythrocyte membrane protein and fluidity of the lipid in S180 mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu-bin; Ji, Chen-feng; Zou, Xiang; Gao, Shi-yong

    2004-10-01

    To study the effects of two kinds of cactus polysaccharide on Band 3 protein, cross-linking protein and lipid fluidity of erythrocyte membrane in S180 mice. The membrane protein content was analysed by SDS-PAGE. Lipid fluidity was measured by Skinitzky method. The two kinds of cactus polysaccharide increased the content of Band 3 protein and decreased the content of cross-linking protein, raised the lipid fluidity. While the effect of median dose group of medical cactus polysaccharide is very remarkable (P cactus polysaccharide is very remarkable (P < 0.01). By improving the erythrocyte membrane function of tumor-mice, they enhanced the immune function, which may be one of anti-tumor mechanisms.

  1. Age-related changes in membrane fluidity and fluorescence intensity by tachykinin neuropeptide NKB and Aβ (25-35 with 17β estradiol in female rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Jha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available      Changes in the fluidity of membrane lipids are known to occur during aging and by lipid peroxidation. It is well documented that the fluidity state of the lipid phase in a membrane is important for the activity of intrinsic membrane proteins. Oxidants and fluidity of membrane lipids play a significant role in aging and age related neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of tachykinin neuropeptide, Neurokinin B (NKB and Amyloid beta fragment Aβ (25-35 on 17β estradiol (E2 treated aging female rat synaptosomes of different age groups. Aging brain functions were measured by membrane fluidity and fluorescent intensity with neuropeptides. An in-vitro incubation of Aβ (25-35 in E2 treated brain synaptosomes showed toxic effects on all the parameters. These effects of aging and Aβ (25–35 on membrane fluidity were restored by NKB and combined NKB and Aβ (25–35 with E2. Furthermore, we measured the Tryptophan (Trp fluorescence to monitor changes in proteins and to make inferences regarding structure and dynamics. Trp is a sensitive marker of protein oxidation and its fluorescence significantly increased in E2 treated synaptosomes of aging rats. Furthermore, to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on the membrane and protein conformation, fluorescent probe 1-Anilino-8-Naphthalenesulfonate (ANS were used. An increase in ANS fluorescence in E2 treated synaptosomes of aging rats indicated that E2 is associated with significant conformational changes and surface hydrophobicity of membranes and proteins.

  2. Membrane fatty acid composition and fluidity are involved in the resistance to freezing of Lactobacillus buchneri R1102 and Bifidobacterium longum R0175.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louesdon, Séverine; Charlot-Rougé, Séverine; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle; Bouix, Marielle; Béal, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Determinations of membrane fatty acid composition and fluidity were used together with acidification activity and viability measurements to characterize the physiological state after freezing of Lactobacillus buchneri R1102 and Bifidobacterium longum R0175 cells harvested in the exponential and stationary growth phases. For both strains, lower membrane fluidity was achieved in cells harvested in the stationary growth phase. This change was linked to a lower unsaturated-to-saturated fatty acid ratio for both strains and a higher cyclic-to-saturated fatty acid ratio for L. buchneri R1102 alone. These membrane properties were linked to survival and to maintenance of acidification activity of the cells after freezing, which differed according to the strain and the growth phase. Survival of B. longum R0175 was increased by 10% in cells with low membrane fluidity and high relative saturated fatty acid contents, without any change in acidification activity. Acidification activity was more degraded (70 min) in L. buchneri R1102 cells displaying low membrane fluidity and high saturated and cyclic fatty acid levels. Finally, this study showed that membrane modifications induced by the growth phase differed among bacterial strains in terms of composition. By lowering membrane fluidity, these modifications could be beneficial for survival of B. longum R0175 during the freezing process but detrimental for maintenance of acidification activity of L. buchneri R1102. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Hyperthermic potentiation of cisplatin by magnetic nanoparticle heaters is correlated with an increase in cell membrane fluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Berríos, Merlis P; Castillo, Amalchi; Mendéz, Janet; Soto, Orlando; Rinaldi, Carlos; Torres-Lugo, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia as a cancer treatment method is an attractive alternative to other forms of hyperthermia. It is based on the heat released by magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field. Recent studies have shown that magnetic fluid hyperthermia-treated cells respond significantly better to chemotherapeutic treatment compared with cells treated with hot water hyperthermia under the same temperature conditions. We hypothesized that this synergistic effect is due to an additional stress on the cellular membrane, independent of the thermal heat dose effect that is induced by nanoparticles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. This would result in an increase in Cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II) (cDDP, cisplatin) uptake via passive transport. To test this hypothesis, we exposed cDDP-treated cells to extracellular copper in order to hinder the human cell copper transporter (hCTR1)-mediated active transport of cDDP. This, in turn, can increase the passive transport of the drug through the cell membrane. Our results did not show statistically significant differences in surviving fractions for cells treated concomitantly with magnetic fluid hyperthermia and cDDP, in the presence or absence of copper. Nonetheless, significant copper-dependent variations in cell survival were observed for samples treated with combined cDDP and hot water hyperthermia. These results correlated with platinum uptake studies, which showed that cells treated with magnetic fluid hyperthermia had higher platinum uptake than cells treated with hot water hyperthermia. Changes in membrane fluidity were tested through fluorescence anisotropy measurements using trimethylamine-diphenylhexatriene. Additional uptake studies were conducted with acridine orange and measured by flow cytometry. These studies indicated that magnetic fluid hyperthermia significantly increases cell membrane fluidity relative to hot water hyperthermia and untreated cells, and hence this could

  4. Growth and membrane fluidity of food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of weak acid preservatives and hydrochloric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis eDiakogiannis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses a major issue in microbial food safety, the elucidation of correlations between acid stress and changes in membrane fluidity of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to assess the possible role that membrane fluidity changes play in L. monocytogenes tolerance to antimicrobial acids (acetic, lactic, hydrochloric acid at low pH or benzoic acid at neutral pH, the growth of the bacterium and the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature point (Tm of cellular lipids of each adapted culture was measured and compared with unexposed cells. The Tm of extracted lipids was measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. A trend of increasing Tm values but not of equal extent was observed upon acid tolerance for all samples and this increase is not directly proportional to each acid antibacterial action. The smallest increase in Tm value was observed in the presence of lactic acid, which presented the highest antibacterial action. In the presence of acids with high antibacterial action such as acetic, hydrochloric acid or low antibacterial action such as benzoic acid, increased Tm values were measured. The Tm changes of lipids were also correlated with our previous data about fatty acid changes to acid adaptation. The results imply that the fatty acid changes are not the sole adaptation mechanism for decreased membrane fluidity (increased Tm. Therefore, this study indicates the importance of conducting an in-depth structural study on how acids commonly used in food systems affect the composition of individual cellular membrane lipid molecules.

  5. A role for protein kinase C in the regulation of membrane fluidity and Ca²(+) flux at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes of HEK293 and Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Meng, Qingli; Jing, Xian; Xu, Pingxiang; Luo, Dali

    2011-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a prominent role in the regulation of a variety of cellular functions, including Ca²(+) signalling. In HEK293 and Jurkat cells, the Ca²(+) release and Ca²(+) uptake stimulated by several different activators were attenuated by activation of PKC with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) and potentiated by PKC inhibition with Gö6983 or knockdown of PKCα or PKCβ using shRNA. Immunostaining and Western blotting analyses revealed that PKCα and PKCβII accumulated at the plasma membrane (PM) and that these isoforms, along with PKCβI, also translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) upon activation with PMA. Measurements of membrane fluidity showed that, like the cell membrane stabilizers bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ursodeoxycholate (UDCA), PMA and OAG significantly reduced the fluidity of both the PM and ER membranes; these effects were blocked in PKC-knockdown cells. Interestingly, both BSA and UDCA inhibited the Ca²(+) responses to agonists to the same extent as PMA, whereas Tween 20, which increases membrane fluidity, raised the internal Ca²(+) concentration. Thus, activation of PKC induces both translocation of PKC to the PM and ER membranes and downregulation of membrane fluidity, thereby negatively modulating Ca²(+) flux. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  7. F2α-isoprostane, Na+-K+ ATPase and membrane fluidity of placental syncytiotrophoblast cell in preeclamptic women with vitamin E supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciscus D. Suyatna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of our study was to analyze F2α-isoprostane level, Na+-K+ ATPase activity and placental syncytiotrophoblast cell membrane fluidity in preeclamptic women who received vitamin E supplementation.Methods: The study was conducted between September 2003 and February 2005 at Budi Kemuliaan Maternity Hospital, Central Jakarta. Samples were 6 preeclamptic women with vitamin E supplementation, 6 preeclamptic women without vitamin E supplementation and 6 normal pregnant women. The dose of vitamin E was 200 mg daily. F2α-isoprostane was measured with ELISA reader at λ of 450 nm. Cell membrane fluidity was measured by comparing the molar ratio of total cholesterol and cell membrane phospholipid concentration. The cholesterol was measured by Modular C800 using Roche reagent. Phospholipid was measured by Shimadzu RF5301PC spectrofluorometer (excitation 267 nm, emission 307 nm. Na+-K+ ATPase activity was inhibited by ouabain. Pi production was measured with Fiske and Subbarow method using spectrophotometer at λ of 660 nm. Data was analyzed using F test with one-way ANOVA.Results: Vitamin E supplementation in preeclamptic women decreased the oxidative stress, indicated by significantly lower level of F2α-isoprostane compared to those without vitamin E (26.72 ± 11.21 vs 41.85 ± 7.09 ng/mL, respectively, p = 0.017. Membrane fluidity in syncytiotrophoblast cell of preeclampsia with vitamin E group was maintained at 0.39 ± 0.08 while in those without vitamin E was 0.53 ± 0.14 (p = 0.04. Na+-K+ ATPase activity in syncytiotrophoblast cell membrane was not affected by vitamin E (p = 0.915.Conclusion: Vitamin E supplementation in preeclamptic women decreases F2α-isoprostane level and maintains cell membrane fluidity of syncytiotrophoblast cells; however, it does not increase Na+-K+ ATPase enzyme activity. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:225-9Keywords: F2α-isoprostane, membrane fluidity, Na+-K+ ATPase, preeclampsia, vitamin E

  8. Variations in daily intakes of myristic and alpha-linolenic acids in sn-2 position modify lipid profile and red blood cell membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabadie, Henry; Motta, Claude; Peuchant, Evelyne; LeRuyet, Pascale; Mendy, François

    2006-08-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of moderate intakes of myristic acid (MA), at 1.2% and 1.8% of total energy (TE), associated with a 0.9% TE intake of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) on lipid and fatty acid profiles and red blood cell membrane fluidity. Twenty-nine monks without dyslipidaemia were enrolled in a 1-year nutritional study in which two experimental diets were tested for 3 months each: diet 1, MA 1.2 % and ALA 0.9%; diet 2, MA 1.8% and ALA 0.9%. A control diet (MA 1.2%, ALA 0.4%) was given 3 months before diets 1 and 2. Thus, two different levels of MA (1.2%, 1.8%) and ALA (0.4%, 0.9%) were tested. Intakes of other fatty acids were at recommended levels. Samples were obtained on completion of all three diets. For fluidity analysis, the red blood cells were labelled with 16-doxylstearate and the probe incorporated the membrane where relaxation-correlation time was calculated. Diet 1 was associated with a decrease in total cholesterol, in LDL-cholesterol, in triacylglycerols and in the ratio of total to HDL-cholesterol; ALA and EPA levels were increased in both phospholipids and cholesterol esters. Diet 2 was associated with a decrease in triacylglycerols and in the ratios of total to HDL-cholesterol and of triacylglycerols to HDL-cholesterol, and with an increase in HDL-cholesterol; EPA levels were decreased in phospholipids and cholesterol esters. Red blood cell membrane fluidity was increased in both diets (Pdiet 1, mainly in the oldest subjects. Intakes of myristic acid (1.2%TE) and ALA (0.9%TE), both mainly in the sn-2 position, were associated with favourable lipid and n-3 long-chain fatty acid profiles. These beneficial effects coexisted with particularly high membrane fluidity, especially among the oldest subjects.

  9. Quality control of Photosystem II: the mechanisms for avoidance and tolerance of light and heat stresses are closely linked to membrane fluidity of the thylakoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasusi Yamamoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available When oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are exposed to excessive light and/or heat, Photosystem II is damaged and electron transport is blocked. In these events, reactive oxygen species, endogenous radicals and lipid peroxidation products generated by photochemical reaction and/or heat cause the damage. Regarding light stress, plants first dissipate excessive light energy captured by light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complexes as heat to avoid the hazards, but once light stress is unavoidable, they tolerate the stress by concentrating damage in a particular protein in photosystem II, i.e. the reaction-center binding D1 protein of Photosystem II. The damaged D1 is removed by specific proteases and replaced with a new copy produced through de novo synthesis (reversible photoinhibition. When light intensity becomes extremely high, irreversible aggregation of D1 occurs and thereby D1 turnover is prevented. Once the aggregated products accumulate in Photosystem II complexes, removal of them by proteases is difficult, and irreversible inhibition of Photosystem II takes place (irreversible photoinhibition. Important is that various aspects of both the reversible and irreversible photoinhibition are highly dependent on the membrane fluidity of the thylakoids. Heat stress-induced inactivation of photosystem II is an irreversible process, which may be also affected by the fluidity of the thylakoid membranes. Here I describe why the membrane fluidity is a key to regulate the avoidance and tolerance of Photosystem II on environmental stresses.

  10. C-reactive protein increases membrane fluidity and distorts lipid lateral organization of pulmonary surfactant. Protective role of surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saenz, Alejandra; Lopez-Sanchez, Almudena; Mojica-Lazaro, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    intratracheal instillation of CRP into rat lungs. Insertion of CRP into surfactant membranes was investigated through monolayer techniques. The effect of CRP on membrane structure was studied through differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy using large and giant unilamellar......The purpose of this study was to investigate how surfactant membranes can be perturbed by C-reactive protein (CRP) and whether surfactant protein A (SP-A) might overcome CRP-induced surfactant membrane alterations. The effect of CRP on surfactant surface adsorption was evaluated in vivo after...... vesicles. Our results indicate that CRP inserts into surfactant membranes and drastically increases membrane fluidity, resulting in surfactant inactivation. At 10% CRP/phospholipid weight ratio, CRP causes disappearance of liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase coexistence distinctive of surfactant...

  11. Oligomerization of Bacillus subtilis DesR is required for fine tuning regulation of membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najle, Sebastián R; Inda, María E; de Mendoza, Diego; Cybulski, Larisa E

    2009-10-01

    The DesK-DesR two-component system regulates the order of membrane lipids in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis by controlling the expression of the des gene coding for the delta 5-acyl-lipid desaturase. To activate des transcription, the membrane-bound histidine kinase DesK phosphorylates the response regulator DesR. This covalent modification of the regulatory domain of dimeric DesR promotes, in a cooperative fashion, the hierarchical occupation of two adjacent, non-identical, DesR-P binding sites, so that there is a shift in the equilibrium toward the tetrameric active form of the response regulator. However, the mechanism of regulation of DesR activity by phosphorylation and oligomerization is not well understood. We employed deletion analysis and reporter fusions to study the role of the N-terminal domain on DesR activity. In addition, electromobility shift assays were used to analyze the binding capacity of the transcription factor to deletion mutants of the des promoter. We show that DesR lacking the N-terminal domain is still able to bind to the des promoter. We also demonstrate that if the RA site is moved closer to the -35 region of Pdes, the adjacent site RB is dispensable for activation. Our results indicate that the unphosphorylated regulatory domain of DesR obstructs the access of the recognition helix of DesR to its DNA target. In addition, we present evidence showing that RB is physiologically relevant to control the activation of the des gene when the levels of DesR-P reach a critical threshold.

  12. Alteration in membrane fluidity and lipid composition, and modulation of H(+)-ATPase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae caused by decanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, H; Mathieu, B; Charpentier, C

    1996-03-01

    Decanoic acid, a lipophilic agent, inhibited in vitro the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in YPD medium. Conversely, when decanoic acid (35 microM) was present in the growth medium, the measured H(+)-ATPase activity was four times higher than that of control cells. Km, and pH and orthovanadate sensitivity were the same for the two growth conditions, which indicated that H(+)-ATPase activation was not due to conformational changes in the enzyme. The activation process was not entirely reversible which showed that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activation is due to several mechanisms. 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene anisotropy performed on protoplasts from cells grown in YPD revealed that as decanoic acid concentration was increased, anisotropy significantly decreased, i.e. membrance fluidity increased. Cells grown in media containing decanoic acid exhibited greater membrane fluidity compared with control cells. Furthermore, these cells did not show any fluidifying effect when increased concentrations of decanoic acid were added. Chemical analysis of cell membrane lipid composition revealed a modification in the distribution of the phospholipid fatty acids and sterols in cells grown in the presence of 35 microM decanoic acid compared with control cells. Our results support the view that the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activation induced by decanoic acid is correlated with an alteration in membrane lipid constituents.

  13. Growth and membrane fluidity of food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the presence of weak acid preservatives and hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Berberi, Anita; Siapi, Eleni; Arkoudi-Vafea, Angeliki; Giannopoulou, Lydia; Mastronicolis, Sofia K

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a major issue in microbial food safety, the elucidation of correlations between acid stress and changes in membrane fluidity of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In order to assess the possible role that membrane fluidity changes play in L. monocytogenes tolerance to antimicrobial acids (acetic, lactic, hydrochloric acid at low pH or benzoic acid at neutral pH), the growth of the bacterium and the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature point (T m) of cellular lipids of each adapted culture was measured and compared with unexposed cells. The T m of extracted lipids was measured by differential scanning calorimetry. A trend of increasing T m values but not of equal extent was observed upon acid tolerance for all samples and this increase is not directly proportional to each acid antibacterial action. The smallest increase in T m value was observed in the presence of lactic acid, which presented the highest antibacterial action. In the presence of acids with high antibacterial action such as acetic, hydrochloric acid or low antibacterial action such as benzoic acid, increased T m values were measured. The T m changes of lipids were also correlated with our previous data about fatty acid changes to acid adaptation. The results imply that the fatty acid changes are not the sole adaptation mechanism for decreased membrane fluidity (increased T m). Therefore, this study indicates the importance of conducting an in-depth structural study on how acids commonly used in food systems affect the composition of individual cellular membrane lipid molecules.

  14. 7-ketocholesterol inhibits Na,K-ATPase activity by decreasing expression of its α1-subunit and membrane fluidity in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, M J; Pierre, S V; Lesnik, P; Pieroni, G; Bourdeaux, M; Dignat-Georges, F; Sampol, J; Maixent, J M

    2010-11-09

    As cholesterol, oxysterols, can insert the cell membrane and thereby modify the functions of membrane-bound proteins. The Na,K-ATPase is very sensitive to its lipid environment, seems to be involved in important endothelial functions as the regulation of nitric oxide (NO) release. The effects of 7-ketocholesterol , an oxysterol present in oxidized LDL, was investigated on Na,K-ATPase in isolated human endothelial cells. Cells were incubated 24h with lecithin-, cholesterol- or 7-ketocholesterol liposomes (6 μg/ml). K+-stimulated paranitrophenyl phosphatase activity, reflecting Na,K-ATPase activity, was evaluated as well as cell viability and lipoperoxidation. The expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits mRNAs and membrane fluidity were also investigated. As Na,K-ATPase and nitric oxide seem to be related, we determined the production of NO and the expression of endothelial NO synthase mRNAs. Na,K-ATPase activity was strongly decreased by 7-ketocholesterol. This decrease, not related to lipoperoxidation, was correlated with a decreased expression of the Na,K-ATPase α1-subunit messengers and with rigidity of plasma membranes. Cholesterol induced similar effects but was less potent than 7-ketocholesterol. Basal NO production and expression of endothelial NO synthase mRNAs were not modified by 7-ketocholesterol. Our new findings demonstrate that 7-ketocholesterol, used at non toxic doses, was very potent to disrupt the transport of ions by Na,K-ATPase and perturb membrane structure. These data demonstrate that 7-ketocholesterol induces endothelial dysfunction without cell death that may contribute to early events in atherosclerosis.

  15. Type-1 cannabinoid receptors reduce membrane fluidity of capacitated boar sperm by impairing their activation by bicarbonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Barboni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian spermatozoa acquire their full fertilizing ability (so called capacitation within the female genital tract, where they are progressively exposed to inverse gradients of inhibiting and stimulating molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present research, the effect on this process of anandamide, an endocannabinoid that can either activate or inhibit cannabinoid receptors depending on its concentration, and bicarbonate, an oviductal activatory molecule, was assessed, in order to study the role exerted by the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R in the process of lipid membrane remodeling crucial to complete capacitation. To this aim, boar sperm were incubated in vitro under capacitating conditions (stimulated by bicarbonate in the presence or in the absence of methanandamide (Met-AEA, a non-hydrolysable analogue of anandamide. The CB1R involvement was studied by using the specific inhibitor (SR141716 or mimicking its activation by adding a permeable cAMP analogue (8Br-cAMP. By an immunocytochemistry approach it was shown that the Met-AEA inhibits the bicarbonate-dependent translocation of CB1R from the post-equatorial to equatorial region of sperm head. In addition it was found that Met-AEA is able to prevent the bicarbonate-induced increase in membrane disorder and the cholesterol extraction, both preliminary to capacitation, acting through a CB1R-cAMP mediated pathway, as indicated by MC540 and filipin staining, EPR spectroscopy and biochemical analysis on whole membranes (CB1R activity and on membrane enriched fraction (C/P content and anisotropy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, these data demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system strongly inhibits the process of sperm capacitation, acting as membrane stabilizing agent, thus increasing the basic knowledge on capacitation-related signaling and potentially opening new perspectives in diagnostics and therapeutics of male infertility.

  16. Restoring effect of selenium on the molecular content, structure and fluidity of diabetic rat kidney brush border cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbanov, Rafig; Bilgin, Mehmet; Severcan, Feride

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a dominant factor standing for kidney impairments during diabetes. In this study, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was used to disclose the diabetes-induced structural changes in the kidney and evaluate the effects of selenium on diabetes. The increase in the area of the olefinic band indicated increased amount of lipid peroxidation end products in diabetic kidney brush border cell membrane. Moreover, saturated lipid content of this cell membrane considerably diminished. DKD was found to disrupt lipid order and cause a decrease in membrane dynamics. However, the administration of selenium at low and medium doses was shown to improve these conditions by changing the lipid contents toward control values, restoring the ordered structure of the lipids and membrane dynamics. Curve-fitting and artificial neural network (ANN) analyses of secondary structures of proteins demonstrated a relative increase in α-helix and reduction in the β-sheet during diabetes in comparison to the control group, which were ameliorated following selenium treatment at low and medium doses. These findings were further confirmed by applying hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). A clear separation of the experimental groups was obtained with high heterogeneity in the lipid and protein regions. These chemometric analyses showed that the low and medium doses of selenium-treated diabetic groups are successfully segregated from the diabetic group and clustered closer to the control. The study suggests that medium and, more predominantly, low-dose selenium treatment can be efficient in eliminating diabetes-induced structural alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  17. The decrease of cell membrane fluidity by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug Licofelone inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and triggers apoptosis in HCA-7 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavolari, Simona; Munarini, Alessandra; Storci, Gianluca; Laufer, Stefan; Chieco, Pasquale; Guarnieri, Tiziana

    2012-08-28

    The ability to induce changes in cell membrane properties is nowadays considered an additional mechanism to explain the pharmacological effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We previously demonstrated that the NSAID Licofelone, a dual cyclooxygenase/5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, triggers apoptosis in HCA-7 colon cancer cells independently from the inhibition of these enzymes. Here, we provide evidence that, in HCA-7 cells, the pro-apoptotic effect of this drug relies, at least in part, on its ability to inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling by a decrease of cell membrane fluidity. Indeed, Licofelone induced a relevant change in the relative proportions of some saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids constituting HCA-7 phospholipid fraction and significantly increased the levels of cholesterol in HCA-7 cell membrane. All of these changes resulted in a remarkable decrease of membrane fluidity. Such phenomenon was associated with the block of EGFR kinase activity and of its downstream targets, the p44-42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and AKT cascades, whose inhibitions were found to induce apoptosis in HCA-7 cells. Overall, these findings provide a new additional mechanism by which NSAIDs are effective toward colon cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential Adaptations of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Serial In Vitro Passage in Daptomycin: Evolution of Daptomycin Resistance and Role of Membrane Carotenoid Content and Fluidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra N. Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed serial 20 d in vitro passage of MRSA strain MW2 in sublethal daptomycin (DAP resulted in diverse perturbations in both cell membrane (CM and cell wall (CW characteristics, including increased CM rigidity; increased CW thickness; “gain-in-function” single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the mprF locus (i.e., increased synthesis and translocation of lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (L-PG; progressive accumulation of SNPs in yyc and rpo locus genes; reduced carotenoid production; cross-resistance to innate host defense peptides. The current study was designed to characterize the reproducibility of these phenotypic and genotypic modifications following in vitro serial passages of the same parental strain. After a second 20d serial in vitro passage of parental MW2, emergence of DAP-R was associated with evolution of several phenotypes closely mirroring previous passage outcomes. However, in contrast to the initial serial passage strain set, we observed (i only modest increase in L-PG synthesis and no increase in L-PG outer CM translocation; (ii significantly increased carotenoid synthesis (P<0.05; (iii a different order of SNP accumulations (mprF≫rpoB≫yycG; (iv a different cadre and locations of such SNPs. Thus, MRSA strains are not “pre-programmed” to phenotypically and/or genotypically adapt in an identical manner during induction of DAP resistance.

  19. Membrane fluidity and lipid composition of fluconazole resistant and susceptible strains of Candida albicans isolated from diabetic patients Fluidez e composição lipídica da membrana de cepas de Candida albicans resistentes e sensíveis ao fluconazol, isoladas de pacientes diabéticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra N. Mishra

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten clinical isolates of Candida albicans, five strains belonging to each of fluconazole resistant and susceptible groups isolated from diabetic patients, were studied for the membrane fluidity and lipid composition. Compared to fluconazole susceptible strains, fluconazole resistant ones exhibited enhanced membrane fluidity as measured by fluorescence polarization technique. The increased membrane fluidity was reflected in the decreased p-values exhibited by the resistant strains. On the other hand, susceptible isolates contained higher amount of ergosterol, almost twice as compared to resistant isolates which might have contributed to their lower membrane fluidity. However, no significant alteration was observed in the phospholipid and fatty acid composition of these isolates. Labeling experiments with fluorescamine dye revealed that the percentage of the exposed aminophospholipid, phosphatidylethanolamine was highest in the resistant strains as compared to the susceptible strains, indicating a possible overexpression of CDR1 and CDR2 genes in resistant strains. The results presented here suggest that the changes in the ergosterol content and overexpression of ABC transporter genes CDR1 and CDR2 could contributeto fluconazole resistance in C. albicans isolated from diabetic patients.Dez isolados clínicos, sendo cinco resistentes e cinco sensíveis ao fluconazol, obtidos de pacientes diabéticos, foram estudados quanto à fluidez e composição química da membrana. Quando comparados aos isolados sensíveis ao fluconazol, os isolados resistentes apresentaram fluidez de membrana aumentada, conforme mensurado pela técnica de polarização fluorescente. A fluidez de membrana aumentada refletiu-se pelos valores mais baixos de p. Por outro lado, os isolados sensíveis continham quantidades mais elevadas de ergosterol, quase o dobro dos isolados resistentes, o que pode ter contribuído para a fluidez de membrana mais baixa. Entretanto, não se

  20. Fluidity in the networked society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2011-01-01

    , and therefore also eLearning are characterized by fluidity and the key competence for social actors in this ever changing e-permeated environment is the ability to cope with change - or Castells’ conceptualisation self-programming. Castells’ theory has influenced international definitions of future key...... nothing about how we may get there. In the educational system ICT and e-learning are becoming an everyday condition and the basic challenge for the educational system is twofold: 1) The actually making of digital literate and self-programming social actors – students and teachers; and 2) How to develop...... adequate designs for teaching and learning for that purpose. We need research that aims to describe the phenomenology of acquiring digital literacy and self-programming in order to be able to identify relevant learning objectives and scaffolding. Findings from such studies are expected to be relevant for eLearning...

  1. Effects of oxidative stress on plasma membrane fluidity: biological consequences

    OpenAIRE

    de la Haba Fonteboa, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    El estrés oxidativo (OS) es característico de muchas enfermedades y se produce cuando hay un desequilibrio entre oxidantes y antioxidantes, lo cual favorece un estado oxidativo que genera especies reactivas de oxígeno y de nitrógeno. Los lípidos de la membrana plasmática son dianas preferentes del OS y ello tiene como consecuencia la peroxidación lipídica. Este proceso modifica propiedades de la membrana tales como su fluidez, característica física muy importante conocida por modular la local...

  2. Rooster sperm plasma membrane protein and phospholipid organization and reorganization attributed to cooling and cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol to phospholipid ratio is used as a representation for membrane fluidity, and predictor of cryopreservation success but results are not consistent across species and ignore the impact of membrane proteins. Therefore, this research explored the modulation of membrane fluidity and protein ...

  3. Vibration improved the fluidity of aluminum alloys in thin wall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Keywords: Vibration casting, heat transfer coefficient, investment casting, flowability, fillability, surface roughness. 1. Introduction ... The developed model taking into account the effect of both mould surface roughness and vibration. 2. .... thus reducing the attribution of the heat of solidification to the total fluidity length. This is ...

  4. Lipid compositions modulate fluidity and stability of bilayers: characterization by surface pressure and sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhuguang; Fu, Li; Leblanc, Roger M; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2013-12-03

    Cell membranes are crucial to many biological processes. Because of their complexity, however, lipid bilayers are often used as model systems. Lipid structures influence the physical properties of bilayers, but their interplay, especially in multiple-component lipid bilayers, has not been fully explored. Here, we used the Langmuir-Blodgett method to make mono- and bilayers of 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DPPG), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (POPG), and 1-hexadecanoyl-2-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (POPS) as well as their 1:1 binary mixtures. We studied the fluidity, stability, and rigidity of these structures using sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy combined with analyses of surface pressure-area isotherms, compression modulus, and stability. Our results show that single-component bilayers, both saturated and unsaturated, may not be ideal membrane mimics because of their low fluidity and/or stability. However, the binary saturated and unsaturated DPPG/POPG and DPPG/POPS systems show not only high stability and fluidity but also high resistance to changes in surface pressure, especially in the range of 25-35 mN/m, the range typical of cell membranes. Because the ratio of saturated to unsaturated lipids is highly regulated in cells, our results underline the possibility of modulating biological properties using lipid compositions. Also, our use of flat optical windows as solid substrates in SFG experiments should make the SFG method more compatible with other techniques, enabling more comprehensive future surface characterizations of bilayers.

  5. Effect of Growth Medium pH of Aeropyrum pernix on Structural Properties and Fluidity of Archaeosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Ota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of pH (6.0; 7.0; 8.0 of the growth medium of Aeropyrum pernix K1 on the structural organization and fluidity of archaeosomes prepared from a polar-lipid methanol fraction (PLMF was investigated using fluorescence anisotropy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. Fluorescence anisotropy of the lipophilic fluorofore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and empirical correlation time of the spin probe methylester of 5-doxylpalmitate revealed gradual changes with increasing temperature for the pH. A similar effect has been observed by using the trimethylammonium-6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, although the temperature changes were much smaller. As the fluorescence steady-state anisotropy and the empirical correlation time obtained directly from the EPR spectra alone did not provide detailed structural information, the EPR spectra were analysed by computer simulation. This analysis showed that the archaeosome membranes are heterogeneous and composed of several regions with different modes of spin-probe motion at temperatures below 70°C. At higher temperatures, these membranes become more homogeneous and can be described by only one spectral component. Both methods indicate that the pH of the growth medium of A. pernix does not significantly influence its average membrane fluidity. These results are in accordance with TLC analysis of isolated lipids, which show no significant differences between PLMF isolated from A. pernix grown in medium with different pH.

  6. Effect of temperature on fluidity of irrigation fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Fonseca, M; Andrade, C M; de Mello, M J E; Crispi, C P

    2011-01-01

    Fluid overload is a major complication during surgical hysteroscopy and transurethral resection of the prostate. We evaluated the role of temperature on absorption of the irrigation solution (IRRSOL) in endoscopic surgery when warm fluids are used to minimize hypothermia. We measured the density and dynamic fluidity of five IRRSOLs (0.9% saline, Ringer's lactate, 1.5% glycine, 5% dextrose, and 2.5/0.54% sorbitol/mannitol) at three different temperatures (17°C, 27°C, and 37°C). Next, a hypothetical typical endoscopic resection surgery was defined as the reference: total IRRSOL absorption (750 ml), resection time (30 min), and IRRSOL temperature (17°C). On the basis of Poiseuille's law, we calculated new values for intravasation using the predetermined dynamic fluidity values at 27°C and 37°C to assess the influence of the IRRSOL temperature on intravascular absorption (under identical conditions) and then estimated the time to reach fluid overload at each temperature with both electrolyte and non-electrolyte IRRSOLs. Density and fluidity varied with temperature. In these specific conditions, when the temperature of the IRRSOL was increased from 17°C to 37°C, the mean absorption rate was predicted to increase about 54% and the theoretical 'safe' duration of surgery decreased by ∼65%, for both electrolyte and non-electrolyte IRRSOLs. The reduction in the 'safe' duration of surgery averaged 21.1 min for non-electrolyte IRRSOL (reduced from 60.0 to 38.9 min) and 35.2 min when electrolyte IRRSOLs were used (reduced from 100.0 to 64.8 min). Compared with cold fluids, isothermic IRRSOL may increase the risk of fluid overload because dynamic viscosity decreases at higher temperatures.

  7. The fluidities of digital learning environments and resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    2012-01-01

    The research project “Educational cultures and serious games on a global market place” (2009-2011) dealt with the challenge of the digital learning environment and hence it’s educational development space always existing outside the present space and hence scope of activities. With a reference...... and establishments of the virtual universe called Mingoville.com, the research shows a need to include in researchers’ conceptualizations of digital learning environments and resources, their shifting materialities and platformations and hence emerging (often unpredictable) agencies and educational development...... spaces. Keywords: Fluidity, digital learning environment, digital learning resource, educational development space...

  8. Effect of Ring Size in ω-Alicyclic Fatty Acids on the Structural and Dynamical Properties Associated with Fluidity in Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poger, David; Mark, Alan E

    2015-10-27

    Fatty acids containing a terminal cyclic group such as cyclohexyl and cycloheptyl are commonly found in prokaryotic membranes, especially in those of thermo-acidophilic bacteria. These so-called ω-alicyclic fatty acids have been proposed to stabilize the membranes of bacteria by reducing the fluidity in membranes and increasing lipid packing and lipid chain order. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine the effect of 3- to 7-membered cycloalkyl saturated and unsaturated (cyclopent-2-enyl and phenyl) rings in ω-alicyclic fatty acyl chains on the structure (lipid packing, lipid chain order, and fraction of gauche defects in the chains) and dynamics (lateral lipid diffusion) of a model lipid bilayer. It was found that ω-alicyclic chains in which the ring was saturated reduced lipid condensation and lowered chain order which would be associated with enhanced fluidity. However, this effect was limited. The lateral diffusion of the lipids diminished as the ring size increased. In particular, ω-cyclohexyl and ω-cycloheptyl acyl tails led to a decrease in lipid diffusion. In contrast, ω-alicyclic acyl chains that contain an unsaturated ring promoted membrane fluidity both in terms of changes in membrane structure and lipid diffusion. This may indicate that saturated and unsaturated terminal rings in ω-alicyclic fatty acids fulfill alternative functions within membranes. Overall, the simulations suggest that ω-alicyclic fatty acids in which the terminal ring is saturated might protect the membrane of thermo-acidophilic bacteria from high-temperature and low-pH conditions through a "dynamical barrier" that would limit lipid diffusion and transmembrane diffusion of undesired ions and molecules.

  9. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Ryuta; Inui, Masafumi; Hayashi, Yohei; Sedohara, Ayako [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Okabayashi, Koji [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kohnuma@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto, E-mail: asashi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Organ Development Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. {yields} Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  10. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether

  11. On Stickers and Communicative Fluidity in Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Sun Lim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Social media platforms provide the key affordance of “communicative fluidity”, where communication can be more seamless because of the multiple channels users can tap to express themselves. Besides just text therefore, users can communicate via photographs, videos, emoji, and stickers, on top of voice and video calls. The visual richness of social media enables users to make explicit feelings that cannot be articulated in words, while graphical representations such as stickers can lend messages an air of interpretability. Users can strategically and dynamically choose the best means by which to express their emotions, opinions, and intentions to attain communicative fluidity. However, the rigid scripting that underpins the vocabulary of social media can also compel users to communicate in ways that they find forced and inauthentic.

  12. Age-related changes in petal membranes from attached and detached rose flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, H; Borochov, A; Mayak, S

    1990-11-01

    Changes in petal membrane properties during aging were studied in cut and in attached rose flowers (Rosa hybrida L., cv Mercedes). Both cut and attached flowers exhibited a growth phase characterized by an increase in fresh weight and an accumulation of membrane components. The growth phase, which was more pronounced in the attached than in the cut flowers, was followed by a senescence phase, characterized by a decrease in fresh weight and a decline in membrane components. In cut flowers, both the growth and the senescence phases were accompanied by a decrease in membrane fluidity and in the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, but the ratio of sterol to phospholipid increased. In attached flowers, while both the membrane fluidity and the sterol-to-phospholipid ratio remained unchanged during the growth phase, the senescence phase was accompanied (as in cut flowers) by a decrease in membrane fluidity and an increase in the sterol-to-phospholipid ratio. Unlike in cut flowers, however, the age-related changes in the ratio of unsaturation of fatty acids were not correlated with those of fluidity. Changes in the saturation of phospholipid acyl chains are commonly thought to influence membrane fluidity. Our observations question this view and suggest instead that the ratio of sterol to phospholipid may play the major role in maintaining membrane lipid fluidity.

  13. Study on fluidity of squeeze cast AZ91D magnesium alloy with different wall thicknesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rectangular cross-section specimens with different section thicknesses were prepared to study the influences of pouring temperature, mould temperature and squeeze velocity on the fluidity of squeeze cast AZ91D magnesium alloy by means of orthogonal test design method. The results show that pouring temperature, mould temperature and squeeze velocity can significantly affect the fluidity of magnesium alloy specimens with wall thickness no more than 4 mm, and the pouring temperature is the most influential factor on the fluidity of specimens with wall thickness of 1, 2 and 3 mm, while mould temperature is the one for specimens with wall thickness of 4 mm. Increasing pouring temperature between 700 °C and 750 °C is beneficial to the fluidity of AZ91D magnesium alloy, and increasing mould temperature significantly enhances the filling ability of thick (3 and 4 mm section castings. The fluidity of squeeze cast magnesium alloy increases with the increase of wall thickness. It is not recommended to produce magnesium alloy casting with wall thickness of smaller than 3 mm by squeeze cast process due to the poor fluidity. The software DPS was used to generate the regression model, and linear regression equations of the fluidity of squeeze cast AZ91D with different wall thicknesses are obtained using the test results.

  14. Implementing hybrid MPI/OpenMP parallelism in Fluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Gerard; Lange, Michael; Avdis, Alexandros; Guo, Xiaohu; Mitchell, Lawrence; Weiland, Michele

    2014-05-01

    Parallelising finite element codes using domain decomposition methods and MPI has nearly become routine at the application code level. This has been helped in no small part by the development of an eco-system of open source libraries to provide key functionality, for example SCOTCH for graph partitioning or PETSc for sparse iterative solvers. As we move to an era where pure MPI no longer suffices, application developers cannot only focus on the application code, but must consider the full software stack. In the case of Fluidity (an open source control volume/finite element general purpose fluid dynamics code) the decision to improve parallel efficiency by moving to a hybrid MPI/OpenMP programming model it became necessary to get involved in extending 3rd party open source libraries, specifically PETSc, in addition to the application code itself. The effort involved in re-engineering a large application code highlights the fact that as computing platforms continue their advance towards low power many core processors, the software stack must also develop at a similar pace or application codes will suffer. In this presentation we will illustrate the steps required to re-engineer Fluidity to achieve good parallel efficiency when using MPI/OpenMP. We identify performance pitfalls when using Fortran features such as automatic arrays in a multi-threaded context, as well as poor data locality on NUMA platforms. A significant proportion of the computational cost is in the sparse iterative solvers. For this we collaborated with the development team at Argonne National Laboratory to add OpenMP support to PETSc. We will present performance results for both the application as a whole, as well as for key individual components such as matrix assembly and the solvers. We also show that while we did not explicitly target I/O for optimisation here, its performance is nonetheless greatly improved because of fewer processes accessing the file system. One of the main remaining

  15. Protein separations using enhanced-fluidity liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Raffeal; Olesik, Susan V

    2017-11-10

    Enhanced-fluidity liquid chromatography (EFLC) methods using methanol/H 2 O/CO 2 and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) were explored for the separation of proteins and peptides. EFLC is a separation mode that uses a mobile phase made of conventional solvents combined with liquid carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in subcritical conditions. The addition of liquid CO 2 enhances diffusivity and decreases viscosity while maintaining mixture polarity, which typically results in reduced time of analysis. TFA additive and elevated temperature were leveraged as key factors in the separation of a 13-analyte intact protein mixture in under 5min. Under these conditions EFLC showed modest improvement in terms of peak asymmetry and analysis time over the competing ACN/H 2 O separation. Protein analytes detected by electrospray ionization - quadrupole time of flight, were shown to be unaffected by the addition of CO 2 in the mobile phase. Herein, the feasibility of separating hydrophilic proteins up to 80kDa (with transferrin) is demonstrated for CO 2 -containing mobile phases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of grain refinement on the fluidity of two commercial Al-Si foundry alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, A. K.; Tøndel, P. A.; Paradies, C. J.; Arnberg, L.

    1996-08-01

    The effect of grain refinement on the fluidity of AlSi7Mg and AlSi11Mg has been investigated by spiral tests. Two different types of grain refiners have been evaluated. An AlTi5Bl master alloy was added to different Ti contents. Since the commercial alloys had a high initial content of titanium, model alloys were made to investigate the fluidity at low grain refiner additions. Commercial alloys grain refined only by boron additions have also been investigated. The results from the fluidity measurements have been verified by measuring the dendrite coherency point of the different cast alloys. Although different, the two methods show similar trends. The spirals from each fraction grain refiner cast were subsequently investigated metallographically at the tip of the spirals and at a reference point a distance behind, but no obvious difference in structure was observed. For both alloys, an increase in fluidity is observed as the content of grain refiner increases above 0.12 pct Ti, while the fluidity is impaired with increased grain refinement below 0.12 pct Ti. The alloys grain refined with ~0.015 pct B show the highest fraction solid at dendrite coherency, the smallest grain size, and the best fluidity.

  17. A Study on the Evaluation of Field Application of High-Fluidity Concrete Containing High Volume Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wang Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent concrete industry, high-fluidity concrete is being widely used for the pouring of dense reinforced concrete. Normally, in the case of high-fluidity concrete, it includes high binder contents, so it is necessary to replace part of the cement through admixtures such as fly ash to procure economic feasibility and durability. This study shows the mechanical properties and field applicability of high-fluidity concrete using mass of fly ash as alternative materials of cement. The high-fluidity concrete mixed with 50% fly ash was measured to manufacture concrete that applies low water/binder ratio to measure the mechanical characteristics as compressive strength and elastic modulus. Also, in order to evaluate the field applicability, high-fluidity concrete containing high volume fly ash was evaluated for fluidity, compressive strength, heat of hydration, and drying shrinkage of concrete.

  18. A Study on the Evaluation of Field Application of High-Fluidity Concrete Containing High Volume Fly Ash

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yun-Wang; Park, Man-Seok; Choi, Byung-Keol; Oh, Sung-Rok

    2015-01-01

    In the recent concrete industry, high-fluidity concrete is being widely used for the pouring of dense reinforced concrete. Normally, in the case of high-fluidity concrete, it includes high binder contents, so it is necessary to replace part of the cement through admixtures such as fly ash to procure economic feasibility and durability. This study shows the mechanical properties and field applicability of high-fluidity concrete using mass of fly ash as alternative materials of cement. The high...

  19. [Effect of extracted ZG from gardenia on Hep-2 cell membrane post infected with parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV-1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shan-Shan; Huang, Yang; Zhao, Ye; Gao, Ying-Jie; Gong, Wen-Feng; Cui, Xiao-Lan

    2007-09-01

    In order to study the anti-viral mechanism of extracted ZG from Gardenia, the effect of extracted ZG on Hep-2 cell membrane potential, Na -K+-ATPase activity and membrane fluidity post infected with parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV-1) was observed. Acetylcholine which was fluorescent labeled with DiBAC4 (3) was taken as positive control to observe the changes of membrane potential and was measured by flow cytometer. The phosphorus determination method and spectrophotometer were used to measure the Na+-K+-ATPase activity of Hep-2 cell membrane post PIV-1 infection. Hep-2 cell membrane phospholipids was labeled with fluorescent NBD-C6-HPC and membrane fluidity was measured by confocal laser scanning microscope. The results demonstated that after PIV-1 infection the Hep-2 cell membrane potential decreased significantly and the membrane was in the state of hyperpolarization, Na+-K+-ATPase activity increased and membrane fluidity decreased significantly. There was no apparent interferring effect of extracted ZG on the changes of membrane potential and Na+-K+-ATPase activity post PIV-1 infection, while membrane fluidity was improved significantly. Acetylcholine improved the state of hyperpolarization. The changes of membrane potential, Na -K+-ATPase activity and membrane fluidity might be the biomechanism of PIV-1 infectoin. The extracted ZG improved membrane fluidity to prevent from PIV-1 infection by protecting the cell membrane, which was probably the mechanism of anti-PIV-1 activity of the extracted ZG, but ZG probably had nothing to do with membrane potential and Na+-K+-ATPase activity.

  20. Differences in Sexual Orientation Diversity and Sexual Fluidity in Attractions Among Gender Minority Adults in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Wise, Sabra L; Reisner, Sari L; Hughto, Jaclyn White; Keo-Meier, Colton L

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized sexual orientation identities and sexual fluidity in attractions in a community-based sample of self-identified transgender and gender-nonconforming adults in Massachusetts. Participants were recruited in 2013 using bimodel methods (online and in person) to complete a one-time, Web-based quantitative survey that included questions about sexual orientation identity and sexual fluidity. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) to examine the correlates of self-reported changes in attractions ever in lifetime among the whole sample (n = 452) and after transition among those who reported social gender transition (n = 205). The sample endorsed diverse sexual orientation identities: 42.7% queer, 19.0% other nonbinary, 15.7% bisexual, 12.2% straight, and 10.4% gay/lesbian. Overall, 58.2% reported having experienced changes in sexual attractions in their lifetime. In adjusted models, trans masculine individuals were more likely than trans feminine individuals to report sexual fluidity in their lifetime (aRR = 1.69; 95% CI = 1.34, 2.12). Among those who transitioned, 64.6% reported a change in attractions posttransition, and trans masculine individuals were less likely than trans feminine individuals to report sexual fluidity (aRR = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.28, 0.69). Heterogeneity of sexual orientation identities and sexual fluidity in attractions are the norm rather than the exception among gender minority people.

  1. Terahertz dielectric relaxation of biological water confined in model membranes made of lyotropic phospholipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paparo, D.; Tielrooij, K.J.; Bakker, H.J.; Bonn, M.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding water-membrane interactions is a fundamental issue in biophysics since these interactions are at the basis of many key molecular processes occurring in membranes. The hydrogen-bond network of water molecules is highly dynamic and its dynamical structure influences membrane fluidity and

  2. Probing simultaneously membrane dynamics and protein activity in suspended bilayers in a microfluidic format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze Greiving-Stimberg, Verena Carolin; Bomer, Johan G.; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2014-01-01

    Membrane dynamics affect the structure and function of ion channels, a point that deserves more attention while studying membrane proteins. One important factor in the local lipidic environment of the ion channels, is the membrane fluidity which is directly connected to the free diffusion and

  3. Metabolic control of the membrane fluidity in .i.Bacillus subtilis./i. during cold adaptation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beranová, J.; Jemiola-Rzeminska, M.; Elhottová, Dana; Strzalka, K.; Konopásek, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1778, č. 2 (2008), s. 445-453 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066 Grant - others:Karlova univerzita Praha(CZ) 189/2005/B-Bio/PrF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Bacillus * fatty acid synthesis regulation * cold shock Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.180, year: 2008

  4. Lipid engineering reveals regulatory roles for membrane fluidity in yeast flocculation and oxygen-limited growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degreif, Daniel; de Rond, Tristan; Bertl, Adam

    2017-01-01

    cell-cell adhesion (flocculation), a phenomenon characteristic of industrial yeast but uncommon in laboratory strains. We find that ER lipid saturation sensors induce expression of FLO1 - encoding a cell wall polysaccharide binding protein - independently of its canonical regulator. In wild-type cells...

  5. Lipophilic Contaminants Influence Cold Tolerance of Invertebrates through Changes in Cell Membrane Fluidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, M.; Bouvrais, Hélène; Westh, P.

    2014-01-01

    Contaminants taken up by living organisms in the environment as a result of anthropogenic contamination can reduce the tolerance of natural stressors, e.g., low temperatures, but the physiological mechanisms behind these interactions of effects are poorly understood. The tolerance to low temperat...

  6. Homeoviscous adaptation and the regulation of membrane lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Robert; Ejsing, Christer S; Antonny, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex and dynamic assemblies of lipids and proteins. Poikilothermic organisms including bacteria, fungi, reptiles, and fish do not control their body temperature and must adapt their membrane lipid composition in order to maintain membrane fluidity in the cold. This ada......Biological membranes are complex and dynamic assemblies of lipids and proteins. Poikilothermic organisms including bacteria, fungi, reptiles, and fish do not control their body temperature and must adapt their membrane lipid composition in order to maintain membrane fluidity in the cold...... such as neurons maintain unique lipid compositions with specific physicochemical properties. To date little is known about the sensory mechanisms regulating the acyl chain profile in such specialized cells or during adaptive responses. Here we summarize our current understanding of lipid metabolic networks...

  7. Relational and sexual fluidity in females partnered with male-to-female transsexual persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramburu Alegría, C

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on a study examining sexuality in females who remain partnered with male-to-female transsexual persons. Participants' self-view and sexual fluidity following their partners' transition from man to woman is examined. Sixteen females participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews. An inductive process of data analysis was conducted, using the constant comparative method, an iterative process by which data are compared within and across subjects. Data were collected until thematic saturation was achieved. Four themes related to sexuality emerged: (1) questioning of sexual orientation; (2) sexual orientation categorization; (3) relational fluidity without sexual relations; and (4) relational fluidity with sexual relations. Participants maintained a heterosexual identity, yet modified their self-view to include an identity that reflected their reformed relationship. The majority of the respondents reported sexual lives that were active or evolving. Others remained in relationships that no longer included sexual activity. The study findings highlight the potential fluidity within the sexual and relational lives of females, and can enhance healthcare providers' preparedness and efficacy with diverse populations. Providers are in a unique position to offer resources to patients who identify as sexually or gender-diverse, or who are in relationships with sexually or gender-diverse persons. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  8. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Paris, Alan M.; Vought, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  9. Trends in educational fluidity after the fall of socialism in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katrňák, T.; Simonová, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2016), s. 49-69 ISSN 1802-4637 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36154G Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : educational fluidity * cohort analysis * educational inequality Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography OBOR OECD: Sociology

  10. Development of laboratory test methods to replace the simulated high-temperature grout fluidity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report contains a summary of the research performed to develop a replacement for the high-temperature grout : fluidity (HTGF) test. The HTGF test was employed in the past by FDOT to qualify post-tensioning (PT) grouts for use in : post-tensioned...

  11. Sucrose delays membrane deterioration of chrysanthemum flowers induced by gamma-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, O. K.; Todoriki, S.; Hayashi, T.

    1998-06-01

    Fluidity of the flower membranes of cut chrysanthemums ( Dendranthema grandiflorum Kitamura) decreased soon after gamma-irradiation at 750Gy and continued to decrease during storage following irradiation. Holding chrysanthemum cut inflorescence in 2% sucrose suppressed the decrease. The results suggest that sugars reduce radiation-induced physiological deterioration of chrysanthemum flower membranes.

  12. Amelioration of altered antioxidant status and membrane linked ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    membrane fluidity have been implicated in disease process and diabetic complications (Hong et al 2004). ... decreased fluid and food intake and loss in body weight. (Brichard et al 1988; Domingo et al 1991). ...... lesterolaemic effect of fenugreek seeds in dogs; Atheroscle- rosis 50 105–111. Vizi E S and Oberfrank F 1992 ...

  13. Lactobacillus casei combats acid stress by maintaining cell membrane functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-07-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains have traditionally been recognized as probiotics and frequently used as adjunct culture in fermented dairy products where lactic acid stress is a frequently encountered environmental condition. We have investigated the effect of lactic acid stress on the cell membrane of L. casei Zhang [wild type (WT)] and its acid-resistant mutant Lbz-2. Both strains were grown under glucose-limiting conditions in chemostats; following challenge by low pH, the cell membrane stress responses were investigated. In response to acid stress, cell membrane fluidity decreased and its fatty acid composition changed to reduce the damage caused by lactic acid. Compared with the WT, the acid-resistant mutant exhibited numerous survival advantages, such as higher membrane fluidity, higher proportions of unsaturated fatty acids, and higher mean chain length. In addition, cell integrity analysis showed that the mutant maintained a more intact cellular structure and lower membrane permeability after environmental acidification. These results indicate that alteration in membrane fluidity, fatty acid distribution, and cell integrity are common mechanisms utilized by L. casei to withstand severe acidification and to reduce the deleterious effect of lactic acid on the cell membrane. This detailed comparison of cell membrane responses between the WT and mutant add to our knowledge of the acid stress adaptation and thus enable new strategies to be developed aimed at improving the industrial performance of this species under acid stress.

  14. Radiation-Induced Fluidity and Glass-Liquid Transition in Irradiated Amorphous Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the fluidity behaviour of continuously irradiated glasses using the Congruent Bond Lattice model in which broken bonds 'configurons' facilitate the flow. Irradiation breaks the bonds creating configurons which at high concentrations provide the transition of material from the glassy to liquid state. An explicit equation of viscosity has been derived which gives results in agreement with experimental data. This equation provides correct viscosity data for non-irradiated materials and shows a significant increase of fluidity in radiation fields. It demonstrates a decrease of activation energy of flow for irradiated glasses. A simple equation for glass-transition temperature was also obtained which shows that irradiated glasses have lower glass transition temperatures and are readily transformed from glassy to liquid state e.g. fluidized in strong radiation fields. (authors)

  15. Assessment and optimization of thermal and fluidity properties of high strength concrete via genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Şimşek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a Response Surface Methodology (RSM based Genetic Algorithm (GA using MATLAB® to assess and optimize the thermal and fluidity of high strength concrete (HSC. The overall heat transfer coefficient, slump-spread flow and T50 time was defined as thermal and fluidity properties of high strength concrete. In addition to above mentioned properties, a 28-day compressive strength of HSC was also determined. Water to binder ratio, fine aggregate to total aggregate ratio and the percentage of super-plasticizer content was determined as effective factors on thermal and fluidity properties of HSC. GA based multi-objective optimization method was carried out by obtaining quadratic models using RSM. Having excessive or low ratio of water to binder provides lower overall heat transfer coefficient. Moreover, T50 time of high strength concrete decreased with the increasing of water to binder ratio and the percentage of superplasticizer content. Results show that RSM based GA is effective in determining optimal mixture ratios of HSC.

  16. High Cholesterol/Low Cholesterol: Effects in Biological Membranes: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold K; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija

    2017-12-01

    Lipid composition determines membrane properties, and cholesterol plays a major role in this determination as it regulates membrane fluidity and permeability, as well as induces the formation of coexisting phases and domains in the membrane. Biological membranes display a very diverse lipid composition, the lateral organization of which plays a crucial role in regulating a variety of membrane functions. We hypothesize that, during biological evolution, membranes with a particular cholesterol content were selected to perform certain functions in the cells of eukaryotic organisms. In this review, we discuss the major membrane properties induced by cholesterol, and their relationship to certain membrane functions.

  17. Fluorescence polarization study of lipids and membranes prepared from brain hemispheres of a hibernating mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaudon, D; Robert, J; Canguilhem, B

    1984-02-29

    The physical behavior of total lipids, microsomes and microsomal lipids prepared from brain hemispheres of European Hamsters (Cricetus cricetus) was approached by the measure of the fluorescence polarization of the probe 1,6-diphenyl 1,3,5-hexatriene. We compare in this study the results obtained for two critical periods for a hibernator: winter (torpid state) and summer (active state). An increase in fluidity was noticed in the winter lipid and membrane preparations. The difference was however of very low magnitude, suggesting that only the microenvironment of some proteins was involved, rather than the bulk membrane fluidity.

  18. Polymalic Acid Tritryptophan Copolymer Interacts with Lipid Membrane Resulting in Membrane Solubilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anionic polymers with membrane permeation functionalities are highly desirable for secure cytoplasmic drug delivery. We have developed tritryptophan containing copolymer (P/WWW of polymalic acid (PMLA that permeates membranes by a mechanism different from previously described PMLA copolymers of trileucine (P/LLL and leucine ethyl ester (P/LOEt that use the “barrel stave” and “carpet” mechanism, respectively. The novel mechanism leads to solubilization of membranes by forming copolymer “belts” around planar membrane “packages.” The formation of such packages is supported by results obtained from studies including size-exclusion chromatography, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence energy transfer. According to this “belt” mechanism, it is hypothesized that P/WWW first attaches to the membrane surface. Subsequently the hydrophobic tryptophan side chains translocate into the periphery and insert into the lipid bilayer thereby cutting the membrane into packages. The reaction is driven by the high affinity between the tryptophan residues and lipid side chains resulting in a stable configuration. The formation of the membrane packages requires physical agitation suggesting that the success of the translocation depends on the fluidity of the membrane. It is emphasized that the “belt” mechanism could specifically function in the recognition of abnormal cells with high membrane fluidity and in response to hyperthermia.

  19. Water droplets' internal fluidity during horizontal motion on a superhydrophobic surface with an external electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Munetoshi; Kono, Hiroki; Nakajima, Akira; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Fujishima, Akira

    2010-02-02

    On a superhydrophobic surface, the internal fluidity of water droplets with different volumes (15, 30 microL) and their horizontal motion in an external electric field were evaluated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). For driving of water droplets on a superhydrophobic coating between parallel electrodes, it was important to place them at appropriate positions. Droplets moved with slipping. Small droplets showed deformation that is more remarkable. Results show that the dielectrophoretic force induced the initial droplet motion and that the surface potential gradient drove the droplets after reaching the middle point between electrodes.

  20. Numerical analysis of the thermal and fluid flow phenomena of the fluidity test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sowa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, two mathematical and numerical models of the metals alloy solidification in the cylindrical channel of fluidity test, which take into account the process of filling the mould cavity with molten metal, has been proposed. Velocity and pressure fields were obtained by solving the momentum equations and the continuity equation, while the thermal fields were obtained by solving the heat conduction equation containing the convection term. Next, the numerical analysis of the solidification process of metals alloy in the cylindrical mould channel has been made. In the models one takes into account interdependence of the thermal and dynamical phenomena. Coupling of the heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena has been taken into consideration by the changes of the fluidity function and thermophysical parameters of alloy with respect to the temperature. The influence of the velocity or the pressure and the temperature of metal pouring on the solid phase growth kinetics were estimated. The problem has been solved by the finite element method.

  1. Religion and Sexual Identity Fluidity in a National Three-Wave Panel of U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitle, Christopher P; Wolf, Julia Kay

    2017-03-29

    Research has shown that cross-sectional estimates of sexual identities overlook fluidity in those identities. Research has also shown that social factors, such as competing identities, can influence sexual identity fluidity. We contributed to this literature in two ways. First, we utilized a representative panel of US adults (N = 1034) surveyed in 2010, 2012, and 2014 by the General Social Survey. The addition of a third observation allowed us to examine more complexity in sexual identity fluidity. We found that 2.40% of US adults reported at least one change in sexual identity across the 4 years, with 1.59% reporting one change and 0.81% reporting two changes. Our second contribution came from examining the role of religion, as past research has suggested that religion can destabilize and prolong sexual identity development. We found that lesbian or gay individuals (N = 17), bisexuals (N = 15), and females (N = 585) showed more sexual identity fluidity compared to heterosexuals (N = 1003) and males (N = 450), respectively. Marital status, age, race, and education did not have significant associations with sexual identity fluidity. Regarding the role of religion, we found that participants identifying as more religious in Wave 1 showed more fluidity in sexual identity across later observations. Further analysis showed that higher levels of religiosity make it more likely that lesbian or gay individuals will be fluid in sexual identity, but this is not the case for heterosexual individuals. This finding reinforces past qualitative research that has suggested that religion can extend or complicate sexual minorities' identity development.

  2. The Effect of Highly Hydroxylated Fullerenol C60(OH36 on Human Erythrocyte Membrane Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Grebowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the interaction of highly hydroxylated fullerenol C60(OH36 with erythrocyte membranes was studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR of stearic acid derivatives labeled with a nitroxyl radical at C-12 or C-16 and with a nitroxyl derivative of maleimide covalently attached to sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. A significant increase in membrane fluidity in the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer was observed for 12-doxylstearic acid at fullerenol concentrations of 100 mg/L or 150 mg/L, while for 16-doxylstearic acid significant increase in fluidity was only observed at 150 mg/L. Fullerenol at 100 mg/L or 150 mg/L caused conformational changes in membrane proteins, expressed as an increase in the hw/hs parameter, when fullerenol was added before the maleimide spin label (MSL to the membrane suspension. The increase of the hw/hs parameter may be caused by changes in lipid-protein or protein-protein interactions which increase the mobility of the MSL label and as a result increase the membrane fluidity. Incubation of the membranes with the MSL before the addition of fullerenol blocked the available membrane protein –SH groups and minimized the interaction of fullerenol with them. This confirms that fullerenol interacts with erythrocyte membrane proteins via available protein –SH groups.

  3. Assessing the nature of lipid raft membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Ollila, Samuli; Hyvönen, Marja T

    2007-01-01

    The paradigm of biological membranes has recently gone through a major update. Instead of being fluid and homogeneous, recent studies suggest that membranes are characterized by transient domains with varying fluidity. In particular, a number of experimental studies have revealed the existence...... of highly ordered lateral domains rich in sphingomyelin and cholesterol (CHOL). These domains, called functional lipid rafts, have been suggested to take part in a variety of dynamic cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the activity of membrane proteins...... evidence that the presence of PSM and CHOL in raft-like membranes leads to strongly packed and rigid bilayers. We also find that the simulated raft bilayers are characterized by nanoscale lateral heterogeneity, though the slow lateral diffusion renders the interpretation of the observed lateral...

  4. Dynamics of Membrane Proteins within Synthetic Polymer Membranes with Large Hydrophobic Mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itel, Fabian; Najer, Adrian; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2015-06-10

    The functioning of biological membrane proteins (MPs) within synthetic block copolymer membranes is an intriguing phenomenon that is believed to offer great potential for applications in life and medical sciences and engineering. The question why biological MPs are able to function in this completely artificial environment is still unresolved by any experimental data. Here, we have analyzed the lateral diffusion properties of different sized MPs within poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-containing amphiphilic block copolymer membranes of membrane thicknesses between 9 and 13 nm, which results in a hydrophobic mismatch between the membrane thickness and the size of the proteins of 3.3-7.1 nm (3.5-5 times). We show that the high flexibility of PDMS, which provides membrane fluidities similar to phospholipid bilayers, is the key-factor for MP incorporation.

  5. Sphingolipid levels crucially modulate lateral microdomain organization of plasma membrane in living yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večeř, J.; Veselá, Petra; Malínský, Jan; Herman, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 588, č. 3 (2014), s. 443-449 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0720 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : membrane microdomain * lipid order * fluidity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2014

  6. Exploring lipid dynamics in photosensitive membranes by quasielastic neutron scattering techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Peters, Judith; Pieper, Jörg

    Cholesterol (chol) is a passive molecular effector on membrane structure, and hence on fluidity and elasticity. Its chemical variety azobenzene-cholesterol (azo-chol) can be considered an active effector since it carries the photosensitive as a hedgroup. It is identical to cholesterol in its...

  7. The radioinduced membranes injuries as biological dose indicators: mechanisms of studies and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent-Genod, Lucie

    2001-10-01

    After an accidental overexposure, the assessment of the received dose in biological dosimetry is performed by a method based on the effects of irradiation on the DNA molecule. But this technique shows some limitations; therefore we tried to find new bio-sensors of radiation exposure. We have pointed out that membrane is a critical target of ionising radiation after an in vitro and in vivo overexposure. In vitro, these modifications were involved in the radio-induced apoptotic pathway. The measure of membrane fluidity allowed us to obtain an overall view of cellular membrane. Moreover, in vivo, by changing the lipid nutritional status of animals, our results displayed the important role played by membrane lipid composition in radio-induced membrane alterations. Besides, membrane effects were adjusted by the extracellular physiological control, and in particular by the damages on membrane fatty acid pattern. Finally, we have tested the use of membrane fluidity index as a bio-sensor of radiation exposure on in vivo models and blood samples from medical total body irradiated patients. The results achieved on animal models suggested that the membrane fluidity index was a bio-sensor of radiation exposure. Nevertheless, the observations realised on patients highlight that the effect of the first dose fraction of the radiotherapy treatment had some difficulties to be noticed. Indeed, the combined treatment: chemotherapy and radiotherapy disturbed the membrane fluidity index measures. To conclude, whereas this parameter was not a bio-sensor of irradiation exposure usable in biological dosimetry, it may allow us to assess the radio-induced damages and their cellular but also tissue impacts. (author)

  8. Alterations in the properties of the cell membrane due to glycosphingolipid accumulation in a model of Gaucher disease

    OpenAIRE

    Batta, Gyula; Soltész, Lilla; Kovács, Tamás; Bozó, Tamás; Mészár, Zoltán; Kellermayer, Miklós; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by the malfunction of glucocerebrosidase resulting in the accumulation of glucosylceramide and other sphingolipids in certain cells. Although the disease symptoms are usually attributed to the storage of undigested substrate in lysosomes, here we show that glycosphingolipids accumulating in the plasma membrane cause profound changes in the properties of the membrane. The fluidity of the sphingolipid-enriched membrane decreased accom...

  9. Macroscopic domain formation during cooling in the platelet plasma membrane: an issue of low cholesterol content

    OpenAIRE

    Bali, Rachna; Savino, Laura; Ramirez, Diego A.; Tsvetkova, Nelly M.; Bagatolli, Luis; Tablin, Fern; Crowe, John H.; Leidy, Chad

    2009-01-01

    There has been ample debate on whether cell membranes can present macroscopic lipid domains as predicted by three-component phase diagrams obtained by fluorescence microscopy. Several groups have argued that membrane proteins and interactions with the cytoskeleton inhibit the formation of large domains. In contrast, some polarizable cells do show large regions with qualitative differences in lipid fluidity. It is important to ask more precisely, based on the current phase diagrams, under what...

  10. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field on Membrane Lipids and Oxidative Injury of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ou; Zeng, Xin-An; Brennan, Charles S; Han, Zhong

    2016-08-22

    Salmonella typhimurium cells were subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at 25 kV/cm for 0-4 ms to investigate the effect of PEF on the cytoplasmic membrane lipids and oxidative injury of cells. Results indicated that PEF treatment induced a decrease of membrane fluidity of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimuriumi), possibly due to the alterations of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated gene expressions (down-regulation of cfa and fabA gene expressions and the up-regulation of fabD gene expression), which, in turn, modified the composition of membrane lipid (decrease in the content ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids). In addition, oxidative injury induced by PEF treatment was associated with an increase in the content of malondialdehyde. The up-regulation of cytochrome bo oxidase gene expressions (cyoA, cyoB, and cyoC) indicated that membrane damage was induced by PEF treatment, which was related to the repairing mechanism of alleviating the oxidative injury caused by PEF treatment. Based on these results, we achieved better understanding of microbial injury induced by PEF, suggesting that micro-organisms tend to decrease membrane fluidity in response to PEF treatment and, thus, a greater membrane fluidity might improve the efficiency of PEF treatment to inactivate micro-organisms.

  11. Cytotoxic Lipopeptide Muscotoxin A, Isolated from Soil Cyanobacterium Desmonostoc muscorum, Permeabilizes Phospholipid Membranes by Reducing Their Fluidity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomek, P.; Hrouzek, Pavel; Kuzma, Marek; Sýkora, Jan; Fišer, R.; Černý, J.; Novák, Petr; Bártová, Simona; Šimek, Petr; Hof, Martin; Kavan, Daniel; Kopecký, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2015), s. 216-224 ISSN 0893-228X R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP503/12/P614; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11129; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61388955 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : BLUE-GREEN-ALGA * CYCLIC-PEPTIDES * LYNGBYA SP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; EE - Microbiology, Virology (UFCH-W); EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 3.025, year: 2015

  12. Loss of membrane fluidity and endocytosis inhibition are involved in rapid aluminum-induced root growth cessation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krtková, J.; Havelková, L.; Křepelová, A.; Fišer, R.; Vosolsobě, S.; Novotná, Z.; Martinec, Jan; Schwarzerová, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, Nov 2012 (2012), s. 88-97 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/05/0340 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GPP207/12/P890 Program:GP Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Aluminum toxicity * Arabidopsis thaliana * Cortical microtubules Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.775, year: 2012

  13. Trans-cis isomerization of lipophilic dyes probing membrane microviscosity in biological membranes and in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmyrov, Volodymyr; Spielmann, Thiemo; Hevekerl, Heike; Widengren, Jerker

    2015-06-02

    Membrane environment and fluidity can modulate the dynamics and interactions of membrane proteins and can thereby strongly influence the function of cells and organisms in general. In this work, we demonstrate that trans-cis isomerization of lipophilic dyes is a useful parameter to monitor packaging and fluidity of biomembranes. Fluorescence fluctuations, generated by trans-cis isomerization of the thiocarbocyanine dye Merocyanine 540 (MC540), were first analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) in different alcohol solutions. Similar isomerization kinetics of MC540 in lipid vesicles could then also be monitored, and the influence of lipid polarity, membrane curvature, and cholesterol content was investigated. While no influence of membrane curvature and lipid polarity could be observed, a clear decrease in the isomerization rates could be observed with increasing cholesterol contents in the vesicle membranes. Finally, procedures to spatially map photoinduced and thermal isomerization rates on live cells by transient state (TRAST) imaging were established. On the basis of these procedures, MC540 isomerization was studied on live MCF7 cells, and TRAST images of the cells at different temperatures were found to reliably detect differences in the isomerization parameters. Our studies indicate that trans-cis isomerization is a useful parameter for probing membrane dynamics and that the TRAST imaging technique can provide spatial maps of photoinduced isomerization as well as both photoinduced and thermal back-isomerization, resolving differences in local membrane microviscosity in live cells.

  14. Recycling of tailings from Korea Molybdenum Corporation as admixture for high-fluidity concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Moon Young; Choi, Yun Wang; Jeong, Jae Gwon

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop an eco-friendly and a large recycling technique of flotation Tailings from korea (TK) from metal mines as construction materials such as admixtures for high-fluidity concrete (HFC). TK used in this study was obtained from the Korea Molybdenum Corporation in operation. TK was used as the alternative material to adjust flowability and viscosity of HFC in the form of powder agent which enables adjustment of concrete compressive strength. In this study, we have performed concrete rheological tests and concrete flowability tests to obtain the quality characteristics of TK for using as the admixture in producing HFC. The results indicated that the adequate mix ratio of cement to TK should be 8:2 (vol%). It is more effective to use the TK as admixture to control flowability, viscosity and strength of HFC than the normal concrete. It was found that TK could be recycled construction materials in bulk such as admixture for HFC, in terms of the economic and eco-friendly aspects.

  15. Agarose gel electrophoresis reveals structural fluidity of a phage T3 DNA packaging intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwer, Philip; Wright, Elena T

    2012-01-01

    We find a new aspect of DNA packaging-associated structural fluidity for phage T3 capsids. The procedure is (i) glutaraldehyde cross-linking of in vivo DNA packaging intermediates for the stabilization of structure and then (ii) determining effective radius by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis (2D-AGE). The intermediates are capsids with incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA) and without an external DNA segment; these intermediates are called ipDNA-capsids. We initially increase the production of ipDNA-capsids by raising NaCl concentration during in vivo DNA packaging. By 2D-AGE, we find a new state of contracted shell for some particles of one previously identified ipDNA-capsid. The contracted shell-state is found when the ipDNA length/mature DNA length (F) is above 0.17, but not at lower F. Some contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids have the phage tail; others do not. The contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids are explained by premature DNA maturation cleavage that makes accessible a contracted-shell intermediate of a cycle of the T3 DNA packaging motor. The analysis of ipDNA-capsids, rather than intermediates with uncleaved DNA, provides a simplifying strategy for a complete biochemical analysis of in vivo DNA packaging. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Enhanced fluidity liquid chromatography of inulin fructans using ternary solvent strength and selectivity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Raffeal; Olesik, Susan V

    2018-01-25

    The value of exploring selectivity and solvent strength ternary gradients in enhanced fluidity liquid chromatography (EFLC) is demonstrated for the separation of inulin-type fructans from chicory. Commercial binary pump systems for supercritical fluid chromatography only allow for the implementation of ternary solvent strength gradients which can be restrictive for the separation of polar polymeric analytes. In this work, a custom system was designed to extend the capability of EFLC to allow tuning of selectivity or solvent strength in ternary gradients. Gradient profiles were evaluated using the Berridge function (RF 1 ), normalized resolution product (NRP), and gradient peak capacity (P c ). Selectivity gradients provided the separation of more analytes over time. The RF 1 function showed favor to selectivity gradients with comparable P c to that of solvent strength gradients. NRP did not strongly correlate with P c or RF 1 score. EFLC with the hydrophilic interaction chromatography, HILIC, separation mode was successfully employed to separate up to 47 fructan analytes in less than 25 min using a selectivity gradient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison on Heat of Hydration between Current Concrete for NPP and High Fluidity Concrete including Pozzolan Powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Jea Myoung; Cho, Myung Sug

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) concrete structures are exposed to many construction factors that lower the quality of concrete due to densely packed reinforcements and heat of hydration since they are mostly constructed with mass concrete. The concrete currently being used in Korean NPPs is mixed with Type I cement and fly ash. However, there is a demand to improve the performance of concrete with reduced heat of hydration and superior constructability. Many advantages such as improving workability and durability of concrete and decreasing heat of hydration are introduced by replacing cement with pozzolan binders. Therefore, the manufacturing possibility of high fluidity concrete should be investigated through applying multi-component powders blended with pozzolan binders to the concrete structure of NPPs, while the researches on properties, characteristic of hydration, durability and long-term behavior of high fluidity concrete using multi-component cement should be carried out. High fluidity concrete which is made using portland cement and pozzlonan powders such as fly ash and blast furnace slag has better properties on heat of hydration than the concrete currently in use for NPPs

  18. Effect of reinforcement amount, mold temperature, superheat, and mold thickness on fluidity of in-situ Al-Mg2Si composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Vatankhah Barenji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effects of mold temperature, superheat, mold thickness, and Mg2Si amount on the fluidity of the Al-Mg2Si as-cast in-situ composites were investigated using the mathematical models. Composites with different amounts of Mg2Si were fabricated, and the fluidity and microstructure of each were then analyzed. For this purpose, the experiments were designed using a central composite rotatable design, and the relationship between parameters and fluidity were developed using the response surface method. In addition, optical and scanning electron microscopes were used for microstructural observation. The ANOVA shows that the mathematical models can predict the fluidity accurately. The results show that by increasing the mold temperature from 25 °C to 200 °C, superheat from 50 °C to 250 °C, and thickness from 3 mm to 12 mm, the fluidity of the composites decreases, where the mold thickness is more effective than other factors. In addition, the higher amounts of Mg2Si in the range from 15wt.% to 25wt.% lead to the lower fluidity of the composites. For example, when the mold temperature, superheat, and thickness are respectively 100 °C, 150 °C, and 7 mm, the fluidity length is changed in the range of 11.9 cm to 15.3 cm. By increasing the amount of Mg2Si, the morphology of the primary Mg2Si becomes irregular and the size of primary Mg2Si is increased. Moreover, the change of solidification mode from skin to pasty mode is the most noticeable microstructural effect on the fluidity.

  19. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(p<0.001 among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. The development of an assay based on Phase separation of the plasma membrane of the Red Blood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  20. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  1. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Cordelli, Ermanno; Rizzi, Alessandro; De Leva, Francesca; Papi, Massimiliano; Ciasca, Gabriele; Samengo, Daniela; Pani, Giovambattista; Pitocco, Dario; Soda, Paolo; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Iannello, Giulio; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC) membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS) able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(pBlood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  2. Evaluation of ionizing radiation effects on recycled polyamide-6 by infrared spectroscopy and measures of fluidity index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evora, Maria Cecilia; Goncalez, Odair Lelis

    2000-01-01

    In this work are presented partial results from a set of experiments and analyses performed at CTA and IPEN laboratories for the characterization of the polyamide-6, recycled and irradiated with a 1.5 MeV electron beam with a 500 kGy dose. The experimental determinations were carried out using infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform (FTIR), in the medium infrared region (MIR) and in the far infrared region (FAR), to evaluate if exist significant changes in the infrared absorption region of the amide groups due to the polyamide irradiation. Characteristics relative to the measured fluidity index were used to evaluate the irradiated material crosslinking. (author)

  3. Determination of composition and fluidity of an alloy for impregnating hard alloys on the basis of titanium carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Issagulov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper optimum compositions of a metal bond of Cr – Ni - Co system are determined by mathematical planning methods. As a response function, value of bending strength at a temperature of 800 °C was used. On the basis of the developed planning matrix samples of required composition were made, bending strength and long-term strength are measured. A certain composition of alloy-bond and its quantity is found. Spiral tests were conducted to determine fluidity.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on membranes of normal and pathological erythrocytes (beta-thalassemia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, L.; Bonincontro, A.; Cametti, C.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome

    1987-01-01

    The influence of ionizing radiation on the membrane of human normal erythrocytes has extensively been studied and a variety of effects including changes in the cation fluxes or in non-electrolytes permeability, in membrane fluidity, in peroxidation of unsaturated lipids as well as chemical composition or structural modifications has been observed. However, only few studies deal with the effects of ionizing radiation on pathological red blood cells. In this work, we have investigated by means of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy the effects of 60 Co γ-radiation on the normal and homozygous β-thalassemic human erythrocyte membranes. (orig.)

  5. Effect of Breast Milk Calcium and Fluidity on Breast Cancer Cells: An In Vitro Cell Culture Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Recep; Yavuz, Muhsine Zeynep; Benek, Bedri Selim; Aydoğar Bozkurt, Ayşenur; Ucbek, Ali; Özünal, Zeynep Güneş; Gepdiremen, Akçahan

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of calcium at the same concentration as that found in human milk on the viability, proliferation, and adhesion of MCF-7 human breast ductal carcinoma cells by exposing them to calcium at the same frequency as in breastfeeding. High-concentration calcium was applied for 30 minutes every 4 hours for 24, 48, and 72 hours. Cell proliferation and viability were measured using a hemocytometer and the MTT cell viability assay. The effects of calcium treatment were evaluated by a comparison among a multiple-, single-dose calcium treatment, and a control group. We show that calcium at the same concentration as that in milk caused a decrease in the number of cells but did not affect cell viability. The results of this study suggest that calcium caused a lowering of the number of cells from the luminal surface of the breast by triggering proliferation under the condition of fluidity. Calcium and fluidity together serve to eliminate breast cancer stem cells during the lactation period. Effects of the other components of milk can be analyzed by the new method developed in this study.

  6. Influence of Cation Size on the Ionicity, Fluidity, and Physiochemical Properties of 1,2,4-Triazolium Based Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharmendra; Gardas, Ramesh L

    2016-06-02

    Interpreting the physiochemical properties and structure-property correlations of ionic liquids (ILs) is a key to the enlargement of their optimized structures for specific applications. In this work, a series of ILs based on 1-alkyl-1,2,4-triazolium cation with trifluoromethanesulfonate anion were synthesized and the effect of cation and temperature on physiochemical properties such as density, viscosity, speed of sound, conductivity, and rheology was studied. Temperature dependence densities were correlated with the densities estimated by the Gardas and Coutinho model, whereas viscosity and molar conductivity have been found to satisfy the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) equation over the studied temperature range 293.15-343.15 K. Further, to explore the wide range of applications, ionicity has been tested by correlating the fluidity with molar conductivity and it was found that synthesized ILs can be referred to as "good ILs". Furthermore, the fluidity behavior describing the interactions between the cation and anion of ILs was investigated through their rheological properties, and the Newtonian behavior of ILs has been examined by varying the effect of shear rate on viscosity. Finally, the impact of structure variants in terms of the N-1 functionalized 1,2,4-triazole ring has been analyzed over the studied properties.

  7. Increased fluidity and oxidation of malarial lipoproteins: relation with severity and induction of endothelial expression of adhesion molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looareesuwan Sornchai

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oxidative stress has been demonstrated in malaria. The potential oxidative modification of lipoproteins derived from malaria patients was studied. These oxidized lipids may have role in pathogenesis of malaria. Method The plasma lipid profile and existence of oxidized forms of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL were investigated in malaria (17 mild and 24 severe patients and 37 control subjects. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs, conjugated dienes, tryptophan fluorescence and fluidity of lipoproteins were determined as markers of oxidation. The biological effect of malarial lipoproteins was assessed by the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. Results Malarial lipoproteins had decreased cholesterol (except in VLDL and phospholipid. The triglyceride levels were unchanged. The cholesterol/phospholipid ratio of LDL was decreased in malaria, but increased in VLDL and HDL. TBARs and conjugate dienes were increased in malarial lipoproteins, while the tryptophan fluorescence was decreased. The fluidity of lipoproteins was increased in malaria. These indicated the presence of oxidized lipoproteins in malaria by which the degree of oxidation was correlated with severity. Of three lipoproteins from malarial patients, LDL displayed the most pronounced oxidative modification. In addition, oxidized LDL from malaria patients increased endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. Conclusion In malaria, the lipoproteins are oxidatively modified, and the degree of oxidation is related with severity. Oxidized LDL from malarial patients increases the endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. These suggest the role of oxidized lipoproteins, especially LDL, on the pathogenesis of disease.

  8. We’re Here and We’re Queer: Sexual Orientation and Sexual Fluidity Differences Between Bisexual and Queer Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereish, Ethan H.; Katz-Wise, Sabra L.; Woulfe, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Theorists and researchers have noted an overlap between bisexually-identified and queer-identified individuals. Whereas early definitions of bisexuality may have been predominantly binary (i.e., attracted to women and men), in recent years there has been a move toward a more “queer” understanding of bisexuality (e.g., attraction to more than one gender beyond female and male). The purpose of this study was to examine similarities and differences between bisexually-identified and queer-identified adult women, ages 18–66 years, on sociodemographic characteristic, two dimensions of sexual orientation (sexual behaviors and attractions), fluidity in attractions and sexual orientation identity, and identity centrality and affirmation in an online sample (N = 489), which was mostly from the United States (73.5%). Our results indicated that bisexual and queer women were similar in terms of sociodemographic characteristics, with the exception of education; queer women were more educated than bisexual women. Queer women were also more likely than bisexual women to report variability in their sexual behaviors and attractions and more fluidity in their sexual orientation identity. Additionally, queer women reported higher levels of identity centrality and affirmation than bisexual women. Considerations for sexual minority women’s health research are discussed. PMID:29249909

  9. Effects of the in vitro administered ethanol and lipopolysaccharide toxin on membrane properties, intracellular free calcium and phagocytic function of isolated rat kupffer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victorov, A.; Smith, T.; Abril, E.; Hamlin, E.; Earnest, D. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Low concentrations of ethanol slightly stimulated phagocytosis of cultured Kupffer cells (KC), producing practically no effect on membrane microviscosity and cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. On the contrary, high concentrations of ethanol significantly suppressed phagocytic function, increased fluidity of membrane lipids and caused a sustained rise in (Ca{sup 2}){sub i}; above the resting level of 41-85 nM. Treatment of KC with colchicine and cytochalasin B dramatically destructurized the plasma membrane lipids. Short term preincubation of KC with high doses of alcohol stimulated the disordering effects of both drugs, suggesting direct interaction of ethanol with microtubule and microfilament structures. The authors hypothesize that ethanol impairs phagocytosis of KC by concerted actions on membrane lipid fluidity, cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} and functioning of cytoskeleton. On the other hand, incubation of KC with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced no changes in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}; or plasma membrane fluidity but reduced by several fold the fluidizing effect of subsequently added ethanol. They suggested that low doses of LPS, by activating second messengers other than Ca{sup 2+}, alter the functioning of the cytoskeleton and cause reorganization of the plasma membrane thus making KC membranes more resistent to the fluidizing action of ethanol and partially restoring the phagocytic function.

  10. Vitamin E supplementation protects erythrocyte membranes from oxidative stress in healthy Chinese middle-aged and elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongye; Ma, Aiguo; Li, Yong; Han, Xiuxia; Wang, Qiuzhen; Liang, Hui

    2012-05-01

    Elderly people are subject to higher levels of oxidative stress than are young people. Vitamin E, as a powerful antioxidant residing mainly in biomembranes, may provide effective protection against oxidative membrane damage and resultant age-related deterioration, especially in the elderly. We hypothesized that appropriate levels of vitamin E supplementation would protect erythrocyte membranes from oxidative stress and thus improve membrane fluidity in healthy middle-aged and elderly people. To test this, we conducted a 4-month double-blind, randomized trial in which 180 healthy subjects (55-70 years old) were randomly divided into 4 groups: group C (control), and 3 treatment groups in which daily doses of 100 mg (VE1), 200 mg (VE2), and 300 mg (VE3) dl-α-tocopheryl acetate were administered. We measured plasma α-tocopherol concentration, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase levels, erythrocyte hemolysis, and erythrocyte membrane fluidity at the beginning and end of the trial. After 4 months supplementation, plasma α-tocopherol concentrations in the 3 treatment groups had increased by 71%, 78%, and 95%, respectively (all P stress in healthy middle-aged to elderly people, at least in part by improving erythrocyte membrane fluidity and reducing erythrocyte hemolysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Membrane properties of Enchytraeus albidus originating from contrasting environments: a comparative analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fisker, K. V.; Bouvrais, H.; Overgaard, J.; Schöttner, Konrad; Ipsen, J. H.; Holmstrup, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 4 (2015), s. 389-400 ISSN 0174-1578 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : membrane fluidity * fluorescence anisotropy * bending rigidity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.884, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00360-015-0895-7

  12. Redistribution of Cholesterol in Model Lipid Membranes in Response to the Membrane-Active Peptide Alamethicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    The cellular membrane is a heterogeneous, dynamic mixture of molecules and macromolecules that self-assemble into a tightly-regulated functional unit that provides a semipermeable barrier between the cell and its environment. Among the many compositional differences between mammalian and bacterial cell membranes that impact its physical properties, one key difference is cholesterol content, which is more prevalent in mammals. Cholesterol is an amphiphile that associates with membranes and serves to maintain its fluidity and permeability. Membrane-active peptides, such as the alpha-helical peptide alamethicin, interact with membranes in a concentration- and composition-dependent manner to form transmembrane pores that are responsible for the lytic action of the peptide. Through the use of small-angle neutron scattering and deuterium labeling, it was possible to observe a redistribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles in response to the presence of alamethicin at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1/200. The results demonstrate that the membrane remodeling powers of alamethicin reach beyond the membrane thinning effect to altering the localization of specific components in the bilayer, complementing the accepted two-state mechanism of pore formation. Research was supported by U. S. DOE-OBER (CSMB; FWP ERKP291) and the U. S. DOE-BES Scientific User Facilities Division (ORNL's SNS and HFIR).

  13. The radioinduced membranes injuries as biological dose indicators: mechanisms of studies and practical applications; Les dommages membranaires radio-induits comme bio-indicateurs de dose: etudes des mecanismes et applications pratiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent-Genod, Lucie

    2001-10-15

    After an accidental overexposure, the assessment of the received dose in biological dosimetry is performed by a method based on the effects of irradiation on the DNA molecule. But this technique shows some limitations; therefore we tried to find new bio-sensors of radiation exposure. We have pointed out that membrane is a critical target of ionising radiation after an in vitro and in vivo overexposure. In vitro, these modifications were involved in the radio-induced apoptotic pathway. The measure of membrane fluidity allowed us to obtain an overall view of cellular membrane. Moreover, in vivo, by changing the lipid nutritional status of animals, our results displayed the important role played by membrane lipid composition in radio-induced membrane alterations. Besides, membrane effects were adjusted by the extracellular physiological control, and in particular by the damages on membrane fatty acid pattern. Finally, we have tested the use of membrane fluidity index as a bio-sensor of radiation exposure on in vivo models and blood samples from medical total body irradiated patients. The results achieved on animal models suggested that the membrane fluidity index was a bio-sensor of radiation exposure. Nevertheless, the observations realised on patients highlight that the effect of the first dose fraction of the radiotherapy treatment had some difficulties to be noticed. Indeed, the combined treatment: chemotherapy and radiotherapy disturbed the membrane fluidity index measures. To conclude, whereas this parameter was not a bio-sensor of irradiation exposure usable in biological dosimetry, it may allow us to assess the radio-induced damages and their cellular but also tissue impacts. (author)

  14. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...

  15. Seasonal changes in the composition of storage and membrane lipids in overwintering larvae of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsypal, Jan; Koštál, Vladimír; Berková, Petra; Zahradníčková, Helena; Simek, Petr

    2014-10-01

    The codling moth (Cydia pomonella) is a major insect pest of apples worldwide. It overwinters as a diapausing fifth instar larva. The overwintering is often a critical part of the insect life-cycle in temperate zone. This study brings detailed analysis of seasonal changes in lipid composition and fluidity in overwintering larvae sampled in the field. Fatty acid composition of triacylglycerol (TG) depots in the fat body and relative proportions of phospholipid (PL) molecular species in biological membranes were analyzed. In addition, temperature of melting (Tm) in TG depots was assessed by using differential scanning calorimetry and the conformational order (fluidity) of PL membranes was analyzed by measuring the anisotropy of fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene probe in membrane vesicles. We observed a significant increase of relative proportion of linoleic acid (C18:2n6) at the expense of palmitic acid (C16:0) in TG depots during the larval transition to diapause accompanied with decreasing melting temperature of total lipids, which might increase the accessibility of depot fats for enzymatic breakdown during overwintering. The fluidity of membranes was maintained very high irrespective of developmental mode or seasonally changing acclimation status of larvae. The seasonal changes in PL composition were relatively small. We discuss these results in light of alternative survival strategies of codling moth larvae (supercooling vs. freezing), variability and low predictability of environmental conditions, and other cold tolerance mechanisms such as extending the supercooling capacity and massive accumulation of cryoprotective metabolites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tension Independence of Lipid Diffusion and Membrane Viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Vincent L; Hormel, Tristan T; Reyer, Matthew A; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2017-10-31

    The diffusion of biomolecules at lipid membranes is governed by the viscosity of the underlying two-dimensionally fluid lipid bilayer. For common three-dimensional fluids, viscosity can be modulated by hydrostatic pressure, and pressure-viscosity data have been measured for decades. Remarkably, the two-dimensional analogue of this relationship, the dependence of molecular mobility on tension, has to the best of our knowledge never been measured for lipid bilayers, limiting our understanding of cellular mechanotransduction as well as the fundamental fluid mechanics of membranes. Here we report both molecular-scale and mesoscopic measures of fluidity in giant lipid vesicles as a function of mechanical tension applied using micropipette aspiration. Both molecular-scale data, from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and micron-scale data, from tracking the diffusion of phase-separated domains, show a surprisingly weak dependence of viscosity on tension, in contrast to predictions of recent molecular dynamics simulations, highlighting fundamental gaps in our understanding of membrane fluidity.

  17. Changes in markers of oxidative stress and membrane properties in synaptosomes from rats exposed prenatally to toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelfors, Sven; Hass, Ulla; Hougaard, Karin S.

    2002-01-01

    for the experiments, Synaptosomes from rats exposed prenatally to toluene exhibited an increased level of oxidative stress when incubated with toluene in vitro compared to synaptosomes from unexposed offspring. Also the cell membrane was affected, as the calcium leakage was more increased from exposed synaptosomes......The present study was undertaken in order to investigate if toluene induced oxidative stress in brains from rats exposed prenatally to 1800 ppm toluene 6 hr/day at days 7-20 during the pregnancy. 35-42 days after birth the rats were killed and synaptosomal fractions were prepared...... than from unexposed. The membrane fluidity increased significantly when synaptosomes were incubated with toluene for 10 min. in vitro but the change in fluidity was identical in both groups of offspring. The results indicate that prenatal exposure to toluene induces long-lasting changes in oxidative...

  18. Influence of phospholipid environment on the phosphatidylethanolamine: ceramide-phosphorylethanolamine transferase activity in rat liver plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, M N; Petkova, D H; Koumanov, K S

    1992-03-01

    1. Plasma membranes were treated with phospholipase A2, phospholipase C or phospholipase D. The phosphatidylethanolamine:ceramide-phosphorylethanolamine transferase was deactivated by phospholipase C treatment, whereas phospholipase A2 and phospholipase D did not affect the enzyme. 2. Incorporation of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol into partially delipidated plasma membranes resulted in significant stimulation of the transferase, whereas inclusion of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylserine suppressed the enzyme activity. Our results suggest that phosphatidylserine is a regulator of sphingomyelin level in membranes. 3. The activity of phosphatidylethanolamine:ceramide-phosphorylethanolamine transferase was not influenced by the fluidity of its lipid environment.

  19. Differential mesenteric fat deposition in bovines fed on silage or concentrate is independent of glycerol membrane permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Ana Paula; Lopes, Paula A.; Costa, Ana Sofia H.; Martins, Susana V.; Santos, Nuno C.; Prates, José A. M.; Moura, Teresa F.; Soveral, Graça

    2011-01-01

    © The Animal Consortium 2011 In the meat industry, the manipulation of fat deposition in cattle is of pivotal importance to improve production efficiency, carcass composition and ultimately meat quality. There is an increasing interest in the identification of key factors and molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of specific fat depots. This study aimed at elucidating the influence of breed and diet on adipose tissue membrane permeability and fluidity and their interplay on ...

  20. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  1. Biobased Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.A.B.; Zlopasa, J.; Picken, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane applicable to building material, such as concrete, cement, etc., to a meth od of applying said composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane, a biocompatible membrane, use of said membrane for various

  2. The lipid organisation of the cell membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladha, S.

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipids and proteins in biological membranes are arranged in a mosaic of domains in the membrane. These domains represent small-scale heterogeneities in composition, shape and fluidity within the plane of the membrane, over the range of hundreds of nanometers to a few micrometers. They arise from the complex interactions of the heterogeneous mixtures of phospholipids, sterols, and proteins that make up all biological membranes.Los lípidos y las proteínas en las membranas biológicas están dispuestos en un mosaico de campos en la membrana. Estos campos representan heterogeneidades a pequeña escala en la composición, forma y fluidez dentro del plano de la membrana, en un rango que va de los cientos de nanómetros a los pocos micrómetros. Estos campos se originan de las complejas interacciones de las mezclas heterogéneas de fosfolípidos, esteroles y proteínas de las que están hechas todas y cada una de las membranas biológicas.

  3. FLUIDITY SPEECH FORMATION AS A QUALITATIVE CHARACTERISTIC OF THE ORAL STATEMENT OF PRESCHOOL AGE CHILDREN WITH STUTTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Borisova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to disclose the subject matter of speech therapy work focused on fluidity speech formation of preschool age children, suffering stutter. Stutter is a difficult disorder of articulation organs suchthat the tempo-rhythmical organisation of statements is distressed that leads to defects and failures of dialogue system, negatively influences on individual development of the child; more specifically it generates the mental stratifications, specific features of emotional-volitional sphere, and causes undesirable qualities ofcharacter such as shyness, indecision, isolation, negativism. The author notes that the problem of early stutter correction among junior preschool-aged children considered as topical and immediate issue. Methods. Concerning the clinical, physiological, psychological and psychologic-pedagogical positions, the author summarizes theoretical framework; an experimentally-practical approbation of an author's method of speech fluidity and stutter abolition of preschool children is described. Stage-by-stage process of correction,spontaneous and non-convulsive speech formation: 1. restraint mode application in order to decrease incorrect verbal output; 2. training exercises to long phonatory and speech expiration; 3. development of coordination and movements rhythm helping to pronounce words and phrases; 4. formation of situational speech, at first consisted of short sentences, then passing to long ones; 5. training to coherent text statements. The research demonstrates data analyses of postexperimental diagnostic examination of stuttering preschool children, proving the efficiency of the author’s applied method. Scientific novelty. The research findings demonstrate a specific approach to correction and stutter abolition of preschool children. Proposed author’s approach consists of complementary to each other directions of speech therapy work which are combines in the following way: coherent speech

  4. Reprint of: Seasonal changes in the composition of storage and membrane lipids in overwintering larvae of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsypal, Jan; Koštál, Vladimír; Berková, Petra; Zahradníčková, Helena; Šimek, Petr

    2015-12-01

    The codling moth (Cydia pomonella) is a major insect pest of apples worldwide. It overwinters as a diapausing fifth instar larva. The overwintering is often a critical part of the insect life-cycle in temperate zone. This study brings detailed analysis of seasonal changes in lipid composition and fluidity in overwintering larvae sampled in the field. Fatty acid composition of triacylglycerol (TG) depots in the fat body and relative proportions of phospholipid (PL) molecular species in biological membranes were analyzed. In addition, temperature of melting (Tm) in TG depots was assessed by using differential scanning calorimetry and the conformational order (fluidity) of PL membranes was analyzed by measuring the anisotropy of fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene probe in membrane vesicles. We observed a significant increase of relative proportion of linoleic acid (C18:2n6) at the expense of palmitic acid (C16:0) in TG depots during the larval transition to diapause accompanied with decreasing melting temperature of total lipids, which might increase the accessibility of depot fats for enzymatic breakdown during overwintering. The fluidity of membranes was maintained very high irrespective of developmental mode or seasonally changing acclimation status of larvae. The seasonal changes in PL composition were relatively small. We discuss these results in light of alternative survival strategies of codling moth larvae (supercooling vs. freezing), variability and low predictability of environmental conditions, and other cold tolerance mechanisms such as extending the supercooling capacity and massive accumulation of cryoprotective metabolites. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... check for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis Complement levels Cryoglobulin test Treatment The goal of treatment ... not as helpful for people with membranous nephropathy. Medicines used treat membranous nephropathy include: Angiotensin-converting enzyme ( ...

  6. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  7. Remodelling of primary human CD4+ T cell plasma membrane order by n-3 PUFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Fuentes, Natividad R; Hou, Tim Y; Barhoumi, Rola; Li, Xian C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Engelen, Marielle P K J; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2018-01-01

    Cell membrane fatty acids influence fundamental properties of the plasma membrane, including membrane fluidity, protein functionality, and lipid raft signalling. Evidence suggests that dietary n-3 PUFA may target the plasma membrane of immune cells by altering plasma membrane lipid dynamics, thereby regulating the attenuation of immune cell activation and suppression of inflammation. As lipid-based immunotherapy might be a promising new clinical strategy for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments to examine the effects of n-3 PUFA on CD4+ T cell membrane order, mitochondrial bioenergetics and lymphoproliferation. n-3 PUFA were incorporated into human primary CD4+ T cells phospholipids in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a reduction in whole cell membrane order, oxidative phosphorylation and proliferation. At higher doses, n-3 PUFA induced unique phase separation in T cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles. Similarly, in a short-term human pilot study, supplementation of fish oil (4 g n-3 PUFA/d) for 6 weeks in healthy subjects significantly elevated EPA (20 : 5n-3) levels in CD4+ T cell membrane phospholipids, and reduced membrane lipid order. These results demonstrate that the dynamic reshaping of human CD4+ T cell plasma membrane organisation by n-3 PUFA may modulate down-stream clonal expansion.

  8. Systematical characterization of phase behaviors and membrane properties of fatty acid/didecyldimethylammonium bromide vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Keishi; Yokoi, Tomoya; Kondo, Dai; Hayashi, Keita; Morita, Seiichi; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2014-11-04

    Fatty acids (FAs) are known to form vesicle structures, depending on the surrounding pH conditions. In this study, we prepared vesicles by mixing FAs and a cationic surfactant, and then investigated their physicochemical properties using fluorescence spectroscopy and dielectric dispersion analysis (DDA). The assemblies formed from oleic acid (OA) and linoleic acid (LA) were modified by adding didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The phase state of FA/DDAB mixtures was investigated with pH titration curves and turbidity measurements. The trigonal diagram of FA/ionized FA/DDAB was successfully drawn to understand the phase behaviors of FA/DDAB systems. The analysis of fluidities in the interior of the membrane with use of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) indicated that the membrane fluidities of OA/DDAB and LA/DDAB at pH 8.5 slightly decreased in proportion to the molar ratio of DDAB in FA/DDAB systems. The fluorescent probe 6-lauroyl-2-dimethylamino naphthalene (Laurdan) indicated that the LA vesicle possessed a dehydrated surface, while the OA vesicle surface was hydrated. Modification of LA vesicles with DDAB induced the hydration of membrane surfaces, whereas modification of OA vesicles by DDAB had the opposite effect. DDA analysis indicated that the membrane surfaces were hydrated in the presence of DDAB, suggesting that the surface properties of FA vesicles are tunable by DDAB modification.

  9. Biosynthesis of omega-alicyclic fatty acids induced by cyclic precursors and change of membrane fluidity in thermophilic bacteria Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Meiothermus ruber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siřišťová, L.; Luhový, R.; Sigler, Karel; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2011), 423-429 ISSN 1431-0651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Thermophilic bacteria * Geobacillus * Meiothermus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2011

  10. Lessons in Fluidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobusch, Leonhard; Schoeneborn, Dennis

    Most research on organizational identity tends to take an essentialist perspective, differentiating between an identity construed internally by members of the organization and an image construed by external actors. However, the duality of identity and image struggles with capturing more fluid, op...

  11. Fluidity, Identity, and Organizationality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobusch, Leonhard; Schoeneborn, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    that the organizationality of a social collective is accomplished through “identity claims”—i.e., speech acts that concern what the social collective is or does—and negotiations on whether or not these claims have been made on the collective's behalf. We empirically examine the case of the hacker collective Anonymous......This paper examines how fluid social collectives, where membership is latent, contested, or unclear, achieve “organizationality”, that is, how they achieve organizational identity and actorhood. Drawing on the “communicative constitution of organizations” perspective, we argue...... and analyze relevant identity claims to investigate two critical episodes in which the organizationality of Anonymous was contested. Our study contributes to organization studies by showing that fluid social collective are able to temporarily reinstate organizational actorhood through the performance...

  12. Relationship between the fluidity of heat-treated coals and molecular weight distributions of their solvent-soluble component; Netsushoritan no yobai kayo seibun no bunshiryo bunpu to ryudosei no kanren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Takanohashi, T.; Iino, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Chemical Reaction Science; Kato, K. [Nippon Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Fukada, K. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    In order to improve the coke manufacturing process, considerations were given on fluidity manifestation mechanism of heat-treated coals from molecular weight distributions of extracts of a solvent mixed with CS2-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (CS2-NMP). The heat treatment was performed in an autoclave under nitrogen atmosphere at a rate of 3{degree}C/min to settings of 200 to 550{degree}C. The resultant heat-treated coal was quenched, and then extracted by using the CS2-NMP mixed solvent. The fluidity was measured by using a Gieseler plastometer. Maximum extraction rate and the highest fluidity are in linear relationship, which suggests that the extracts govern the fluidity. Since heavy caking coal has no difference in the extraction rates due to heat treatment temperature, and its molecular weight distribution trend does not change, the extracted components which have existed primarily in the original coal govern the fluidity. In semi-caking coals, polymer molecular components are extracted in a large quantity at the softening starting temperature, but the quantity decreases as the temperature rises. However, low-molecular components present no quantitative change, while polymer molecular components decompose, decrease in molecular weight, get solubilized with rising temperature, and act as a binder to cause a flow. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Membrane paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Thorne, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane paradigm is a modified frozen star approach to modeling black holes, with particles and fields assuming a complex, static, boundary-layer type structure (membrane) near the event horizon. The membrane has no effects on the present or future evolution of particles and fields above itself. The mathematical representation is a combination of a formalism containing terms for the shear and bulk viscosity, surface pressure, momentum, temperature, entropy, etc., of the horizon and the 3+1 formalism. The latter model considers a family of three-dimensional spacelike hypersurfaces in one-dimensional time. The membrane model considers a magnetic field threading the hole and undergoing torque from the hole rotation. The field is cleaned by the horizon and distributed over the horizon so that ohmic dissipation is minimized. The membrane paradigm is invalid inside the horizon, but is useful for theoretically probing the properties of slowly evolving black holes

  14. Membrane processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    The membrane processes have played important role in the industrial separation process. These technologies can be found in all industrial areas such as food, beverages, metallurgy, pulp and paper, textile, pharmaceutical, automotive, biotechnology and chemical industry, as well as in water treatment for domestic and industrial application. Although these processes are known since twentieth century, there are still many studies that focus on the testing of new membranes' materials and determining of conditions for optimal selectivity, i. e. the optimum transmembrane pressure (TMP) or permeate flux to minimize fouling. Moreover the researchers proposed some calculation methods to predict the membrane processes properties. In this article, the laboratory scale experiments of membrane separation techniques, as well their validation by calculation methods are presented. Because membrane is the "heart" of the process, experimental and computational methods for its characterization are also described.

  15. Characterization of procoagulant extracellular vesicles and platelet membrane disintegration in DMSO-cryopreserved platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseday Z. Tegegn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Freezing is promising for extended platelet (PLT storage for transfusion. 6% DMSO cryopreserved PLTs (CPPs are currently in clinical development. CPPs contain significant amount of platelet membrane vesicles (PMVs. PLT-membrane changes and PMV release in CPP are poorly understood, and haemostatic effects of CPP PMVs are not fully elucidated. This study aims to investigate PLT-membrane alterations in CPPs and provide comprehensive characterization of CPP PMVs, and their contribution to procoagulant activity (PCA of CPPs. Methods: CPPs and corresponding liquid-stored PLTs (LSPs were characterized by flow cytometry (FC, fluorescence polarization (FP, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA, electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and thrombin-generation (TG test. Results: SEM and TEM revealed disintegration and vesiculation of the PLT-plasma membrane and loss of intracellular organization in 60% PLTs in CPPs. FP demonstrated that 6% DMSO alone and with freezing–thawing caused marked increase in PLT-membrane fluidity. The FC counts of annexin V-binding PMVs and CD41a+ PMVs were 68- and 56-folds higher, respectively, in CPPs than in LSPs. The AFM and NTA size distribution of PMVs in CPPs indicated a peak diameter of 100 nm, corresponding to exosome-size vesicles. TG-based PCA of CPPs was 2- and 9-folds higher per PLT and per volume, respectively, compared to LSPs. Differential centrifugation showed that CPP supernatant contributed 26% to CPP TG-PCA, mostly by the exosome-size PMVs and their TG-PCA was phosphatidylserine dependent. Conclusions: Major portion of CPPs does not show activation phenotype but exhibits grape-like membrane disintegration with significant increase of membrane fluidity induced by 6% DMSO alone and further aggravated by freezing–thawing process. DMSO cryopreservation of PLTs is associated with the release of PMVs and marked increase of TG-PCA, as compared to LSPs. Exosome-size PMVs have

  16. On the Unusual Homeoviscous Adaptation of the Membrane Fatty Acyl Components against the Thermal Stress in RhiΖobium meliloti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seb Yung; Jung, Seun Ho; Choi, Yong Hoon; Yang, Chul Hak; Kim, Hyun Won

    1999-01-01

    In order to maintain the optimal fluidity in membrane, microorganism genetically regulates the ratio of the unsaturated fatty acids (Ufos) to saturated ones of its biological membrane in response to external perturbing condition such as the change of temperature. The remodelling of fatty acyl chain composition is the most frequently observed response to altered growth temperature. It is reflected in the elevated proportions of unsaturated fatty acid (UFAs) at low temperature. Because cis double bonds, normally positioned at the middle of fatty acyl chains, introduce a kink of approximately 30 .deg. into acyl chain, UFAs pack less compactly and exhibit lower melting points than their saturated homologues. Thus, enrichment of membranes with UFAs offsets, to a significant degree, the increase in membrane order caused by a drop in temperature. This is so called homeoviscous adaptation of the membrane fatty acyl chains against thermal stress. Membrane maintains the optimal viscosity using homeoviscous adaptation.

  17. On the Unusual Homeoviscous Adaptation of the Membrane Fatty Acyl Components against the Thermal Stress in Rhi{Zeta}obium meliloti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seb Yung; Jung, Seun Ho [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong Hoon; Yang, Chul Hak [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Won [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-15

    In order to maintain the optimal fluidity in membrane, microorganism genetically regulates the ratio of the unsaturated fatty acids (Ufos) to saturated ones of its biological membrane in response to external perturbing condition such as the change of temperature. The remodelling of fatty acyl chain composition is the most frequently observed response to altered growth temperature. It is reflected in the elevated proportions of unsaturated fatty acid (UFAs) at low temperature. Because cis double bonds, normally positioned at the middle of fatty acyl chains, introduce a kink of approximately 30 .deg. into acyl chain, UFAs pack less compactly and exhibit lower melting points than their saturated homologues. Thus, enrichment of membranes with UFAs offsets, to a significant degree, the increase in membrane order caused by a drop in temperature. This is so called homeoviscous adaptation of the membrane fatty acyl chains against thermal stress. Membrane maintains the optimal viscosity using homeoviscous adaptation.

  18. Testosterone replacement therapy improves erythrocyte membrane lipid composition in hypogonadal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Petya; Momchilova, Albena; Petkova, Diana; Staneva, Galya; Pankov, Roumen; Kamenov, Zdravko

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) on erythrocyte membrane (EM) lipid composition and physico-chemical properties in hypogonadal men. EM isolated from three patients before and after TRT with injectable testosterone undecanoate or testosterone gel were used for analysis of the phospholipid and fatty acid composition, cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, membrane fluidity, ceramide level and enzyme activities responsible for sphingomyelin metabolism. TRT induced increase of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the EMs and sphingomyelin. Reduction of the relative content of the saturated palmitic and stearic fatty acids and a slight increase of different unsaturated fatty acids was observed in phosphatidylcholine (PC). TRT also induced decrease of the cholesterol/total phospholipids ratio and fluidization of the EM. The TRT induced increase of PE content and the reduction of saturation in the PC acyl chains induced alterations in the structure of EM could result in higher flexibility of the erythrocytes. The increase of the SM-metabolizing enzyme neutral sphingomyelinase, which regulates the content of ceramide in membranes has a possible impact on the SM signaling pathway. We presume that the observed effect of TRT on the composition and fluidity of the EM contributes for improvement of blood rheology and may diminish the thrombosis risk. Larger studies are needed to confirm the findings of this pilot study.

  19. Impact of embedded endocannabinoids and their oxygenation by lipoxygenase on membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainese, Enrico; Sabatucci, Annalaura; Angelucci, Clotilde B; Barsacchi, Daniela; Chiarini, Marco; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-05-16

    N-Arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol are the best characterized endocannabinoids. Their biological activity is subjected to metabolic control whereby a dynamic equilibrium among biosynthetic, catabolic, and oxidative pathways drives their intracellular concentrations. In particular, lipoxygenases can generate hydroperoxy derivatives of endocannabinoids, endowed with distinct activities within cells. The in vivo interaction between lipoxygenases and endocannabinoids is likely to occur within cell membranes; thus, we sought to ascertain whether a prototypical enzyme like soybean (Glycine max) 15-lipoxygenase-1 is able to oxygenate endocannabinoids embedded in synthetic vesicles and how these substances could affect the binding ability of the enzyme to different lipid bilayers. We show that (i) embedded endocannabinoids increase membrane fluidity; (ii) 15-lipoxygenase-1 preferentially binds to endocannabinoid-containing bilayers; and that (iii) 15-lipoxygenase-1 oxidizes embedded endocannabinoids and thus reduces fluidity and local hydration of membrane lipids. Together, the present findings reveal further complexity in the regulation of endocannabinoid signaling within the central nervous system, disclosing novel control by oxidative pathways.

  20. Mechanisms of membrane binding of small GTPase K-Ras4B farnesylated hypervariable region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J; Chavan, Tanmay S; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-04-10

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Mechanisms of Membrane Binding of Small GTPase K-Ras4B Farnesylated Hypervariable Region*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J.; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. PMID:25713064

  2. Heat stress causes spatially-distinct membrane re-modelling in K562 leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Balogh

    Full Text Available Cellular membranes respond rapidly to various environmental perturbations. Previously we showed that modulations in membrane fluidity achieved by heat stress (HS resulted in pronounced membrane organization alterations which could be intimately linked to the expression and cellular distribution of heat shock proteins. Here we examine heat-induced membrane changes using several visualisation methods. With Laurdan two-photon microscopy we demonstrate that, in contrast to the enhanced formation of ordered domains in surface membranes, the molecular disorder is significantly elevated within the internal membranes of cells preexposed to mild HS. These results were compared with those obtained by anisotropy, fluorescence lifetime and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. All probes detected membrane changes upon HS. However, the structurally different probes revealed substantially distinct alterations in membrane heterogeneity. These data call attention to the careful interpretation of results obtained with only a single label. Subtle changes in membrane microstructure in the decision-making of thermal cell killing could have potential application in cancer therapy.

  3. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during...... the various evolutionary stages that led from inanimate to living matter. It is also likely that primitive membranes played a similar role in protocell 'physiology'. The composition of such ancestral membranes has been proposed as mixtures of single hydrocarbon chain amphiphiles, which are simpler versions...

  4. Solid Character of Membrane Ceramides: A Surface Rheology Study of Their Mixtures with Sphingomyelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Elisa R.; Arriaga, Laura R.; Espinosa, Gabriel; Monroy, Francisco; Langevin, Dominique; López-Montero, Iván

    2011-01-01

    The compression and shear viscoelasticities of egg-ceramide and its mixtures with sphingomyelin were investigated using oscillatory surface rheology performed on Langmuir monolayers. We found high values for the compression and shear moduli for ceramide, compatible with a solid-state membrane, and extremely high surface viscosities when compared to typical fluid lipids. A fluidlike rheological behavior was found for sphingomyelin. Lateral mobilities, measured from particle tracking experiments, were correlated with the monolayer viscosities through the usual hydrodynamic relationships. In conclusion, ceramide increases the solid character of sphingomyelin-based membranes and decreases their fluidity, thus drastically decreasing the lateral mobilities of embedded objects. This mechanical behavior may involve important physiological consequences in biological membranes containing ceramides. PMID:22261061

  5. Effects of membrane lipid composition and antibacterial drugs on the rigidity of Escherichia coli: Different contributions of various bacterial substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Gan, Chaoye; Shao, Wenxiang; Yu, Chuan; Wang, Xingguo; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The rigidity/stiffness is an important biomechanical property of bacteria and potentially correlated with many bacterial activities. While the rigidity or fluidity of the bacterial membrane has been extensively studied, the contributions of different bacterial substructures to the bacterial rigidity are less investigated. Here, we utilized four Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains with different membrane lipid compositions and three antibacterial drugs (EDTA, lysozyme, and streptomycin) to specifically alter bacterial substructures. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that the average height and Young's modulus of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-deficient E. coli strains were larger than those of PE(+) strains and that EDTA, EDTA plus lysozyme instead of lysozyme alone, and streptomycin all caused significant decreases in height and Young's modulus of the four E. coli strains. Our data imply that membrane lipid composition, the integrated outer membrane, the cell wall, and the cytoplasmic content are all responsible for bacterial rigidity but to different extents. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The use of HOS test to evaluate membrane functionality of boar sperm capacitated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechniak, D; Kedzierski, A; Stanislawski, D

    2002-12-01

    The functional and structural integrity of sperm membrane are crucial for the viability of spermatozoa. The commonly used staining test (eosin + nigrosin) for assessing sperm membrane measures only its structural integrity. The hypoosmotic swelling test (HOS) originally developed for human sperm (Jeyendran et al. 1984) has been also applied to several species of domestic animals (bull, pig, horse, dog). The test enables to evaluate the functional status of the sperm membrane. The principle of HOS is based on water transport across the sperm tail membrane under hypoosmotic conditions. It has previously been used to assess the semen quality (Revell and Mrode 1994), to analyse fertilizing capacity (Rota et al. 2000; Perez-Llano et al. 2001) and also to detect viable, immotile cells for ICSI (Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection) in human (Zeyneloglu et al. 2000). There are two procedures commonly used for sperm capacitation in the pig-sperm washing and incubation before insemination (Nagai 1994). Capacitation involves several changes like removing molecules coating the sperm head membrane, changes in membrane fluidity and intracellular ion concentration (Green and Watson 2001). Thus the membrane integrity as well as functionality may be affected as shown by Harrison (1996). The aim of the present study was to analyse changes in sperm membrane integrity after in vitro capacitation by use of the HOS test.

  7. Biomimetic interfaces based on S-layer proteins, lipid membranes and functional biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2014-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state-of-the-art survey of how S-layer proteins, lipids and polymers may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer-supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and, thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas in the (lab-on-a-) biochip technology are combining composite S-layer membrane systems involving specific membrane functions with the silicon world. Thus, it might become possible to create artificial noses or tongues, where many receptor proteins have to be exposed and read out simultaneously. Moreover, S-layer-coated liposomes and emulsomes copying virus envelopes constitute promising nanoformulations for the production of novel targeting, delivery, encapsulation and imaging systems. PMID:24812051

  8. Mercury-Supported Biomimetic Membranes for the Investigation of Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Becucci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs consist of a lipid bilayer interposed between an aqueous solution and a hydrophilic “spacer” anchored to a gold or mercury electrode. There is great potential for application of these biomimetic membranes for the elucidation of structure-function relationships of membrane peptides and proteins. A drawback in the use of mercury-supported tBLMs with respect to gold-supported ones is represented by the difficulty in applying surface sensitive, spectroscopic and scanning probe microscopic techniques to gather information on the architecture of these biomimetic membranes. Nonetheless, mercury-supported tBLMs are definitely superior to gold-supported biomimetic membranes for the investigation of the function of membrane peptides and proteins, thanks to a fluidity and lipid lateral mobility comparable with those of bilayer lipid membranes interposed between two aqueous phases (BLMs, but with a much higher robustness and resistance to electric fields. The different features of mercury-supported tBLMs reconstituted with functionally active membrane proteins and peptides of bacteriological or pharmacological interest may be disclosed by a judicious choice of the most appropriate electrochemical techniques. We will describe the way in which electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potential-step chronocoulometry, cyclic voltammetry and phase-sensitive AC voltammetry are conveniently employed to investigate the structure of mercury-supported tBLMs and the mode of interaction of antimicrobial peptides reconstituted into them.

  9. High efficiency penetration of antibody-immobilized nanoneedle thorough plasma membrane for in situ detection of cytoskeletal proteins in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, R; Shimizu, K; Matsumoto, Y; Yamagishi, A; Silberberg, Y R; Iijima, M; Kuroda, S; Fukazawa, K; Ishihara, K; Nakamura, C

    2016-11-03

    The field of structural dynamics of cytoskeletons in living cells is gathering wide interest, since better understanding of cytoskeleton intracellular organization will provide us with not only insights into basic cell biology but may also enable development of new strategies in regenerative medicine and cancer therapy, fields in which cytoskeleton-dependent dynamics play a pivotal role. The nanoneedle technology is a powerful tool allowing for intracellular investigations, as it can be directly inserted into live cells by penetrating through the plasma membrane causing minimal damage to cells, under the precise manipulation using atomic force microscope. Modifications of the nanoneedles using antibodies have allowed for accurate mechanical detection of various cytoskeletal components, including actin, microtubules and intermediate filaments. However, successful penetration of the nanoneedle through the plasma membrane has been shown to vary greatly between different cell types and conditions. In an effort to overcome this problem and improve the success rate of nanoneedle insertion into the live cells, we have focused here on the fluidity of the membrane lipid bilayer, which may hinder nanoneedle penetration into the cytosolic environment. We aimed to reduce apparent fluidity of the membrane by either increasing the approach velocity or reducing experimental temperatures. Although changes in approach velocity did not have much effect, lowering the temperature was found to greatly improve the detection of unbinding forces, suggesting that alteration in the plasma membrane fluidity led to increase in nanoneedle penetration. Operation at a lower temperature of 4 °C greatly improved the success rate of nanoneedle insertion to live cells at an optimized approach velocity, while it did not affect the binding of antibodies immobilized on the nanoneedle to vimentins for mechanical detection. As these experimental parameters can be applied to various cell types, these

  10. Reorganization of plasma membrane lipid domains during conidial germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Filipa C; Fernandes, Andreia S; Antunes, Catarina A C; Moreira, Filipe P; Videira, Arnaldo; Marinho, H Susana; de Almeida, Rodrigo F M

    2017-02-01

    Neurospora crassa, a filamentous fungus, in the unicellular conidial stage has ideal features to study sphingolipid (SL)-enriched domains, which are implicated in fundamental cellular processes ranging from antifungal resistance to apoptosis. Several changes in lipid metabolism and in the membrane composition of N. crassa occur during spore germination. However, the biophysical impact of those changes is unknown. Thus, a biophysical study of N. crassa plasma membrane, particularly SL-enriched domains, and their dynamics along conidial germination is prompted. Two N. crassa strains, wild-type (WT) and slime, which is devoid of cell wall, were studied. Conidial growth of N. crassa WT from a dormancy state to an exponential phase was accompanied by membrane reorganization, namely an increase of membrane fluidity, occurring faster in a supplemented medium than in Vogel's minimal medium. Gel-like domains, likely enriched in SLs, were found in both N. crassa strains, but were particularly compact, rigid and abundant in the case of slime cells, even more than in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In N. crassa, our results suggest that the melting of SL-enriched domains occurs near growth temperature (30°C) for WT, but at higher temperatures for slime. Regarding biophysical properties strongly affected by ergosterol, the plasma membrane of slime conidia lays in between those of N. crassa WT and S. cerevisiae cells. The differences in biophysical properties found in this work, and the relationships established between membrane lipid composition and dynamics, give new insights about the plasma membrane organization and structure of N. crassa strains during conidial growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fermentation temperature modulates phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol levels in the cell membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Clark M; Zeno, Wade F; Lerno, Larry A; Longo, Marjorie L; Block, David E

    2013-09-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to a host of environmental and physiological stresses. Extremes of fermentation temperature have previously been demonstrated to induce fermentation arrest under growth conditions that would otherwise result in complete sugar utilization at "normal" temperatures and nutrient levels. Fermentations were carried out at 15°C, 25°C, and 35°C in a defined high-sugar medium using three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with diverse fermentation characteristics. The lipid composition of these strains was analyzed at two fermentation stages, when ethanol levels were low early in stationary phase and in late stationary phase at high ethanol concentrations. Several lipids exhibited dramatic differences in membrane concentration in a temperature-dependent manner. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a tool to elucidate correlations between specific lipid species and fermentation temperature for each yeast strain. Fermentations carried out at 35°C exhibited very high concentrations of several phosphatidylinositol species, whereas at 15°C these yeast strains exhibited higher levels of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine species with medium-chain fatty acids. Furthermore, membrane concentrations of ergosterol were highest in the yeast strain that experienced stuck fermentations at all three temperatures. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements of yeast cell membrane fluidity during fermentation were carried out using the lipophilic fluorophore diphenylhexatriene. These measurements demonstrate that the changes in the lipid composition of these yeast strains across the range of fermentation temperatures used in this study did not significantly affect cell membrane fluidity. However, the results from this study indicate that fermenting S. cerevisiae modulates its membrane lipid composition in a temperature-dependent manner.

  12. Interaction study between maltose-modified PPI dendrimers and lipidic model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Dominika; Appelhans, Dietmar; Signorelli, Marco; Wiesner, Brigitte; Fessas, Dimitrios; Scheler, Ulrich; Voit, Brigitte; Maly, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The influence of maltose-modified poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPC/DMPG) (3%) liposomes was studied. Fourth generation (G4) PPI dendrimers with primary amino surface groups were partially (open shell glycodendrimers - OS) or completely (dense shell glycodendrimers - DS) modified with maltose residues. As a model membrane, two types of 100nm diameter liposomes were used to observe differences in the interactions between neutral DMPC and negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers. Interactions were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate the membrane fluidity of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the lipid bilayer and using differential scanning calorimetry to investigate thermodynamic parameter changes. Pulsed-filed gradient NMR experiments were carried out to evaluate common diffusion coefficient of DMPG and DS PPI in D2O when using below critical micelle concentration of DMPG. Both OS and DS PPI G4 dendrimers show interactions with liposomes. Neutral DS dendrimers exhibit stronger changes in membrane fluidity compared to OS dendrimers. The bilayer structure seems more rigid in the case of anionic DMPC/DMPG liposomes in comparison to pure and neutral DMPC liposomes. Generally, interactions of dendrimers with anionic DMPC/DMPG and neutral DMPC liposomes were at the same level. Higher concentrations of positively charged OS dendrimers induced the aggregation process with negatively charged liposomes. For all types of experiments, the presence of NaCl decreased the strength of the interactions between glycodendrimers and liposomes. Based on NMR diffusion experiments we suggest that apart from electrostatic interactions for OS PPI hydrogen bonds play a major role in maltose-modified PPI dendrimer interactions with anionic and neutral model membranes where a contact surface is needed for undergoing multiple H-bond interactions between

  13. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    , Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  14. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  15. Membrane Interactions of Phytochemicals as Their Molecular Mechanism Applicable to the Discovery of Drug Leads from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Tsuchiya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In addition to interacting with functional proteins such as receptors, ion channels, and enzymes, a variety of drugs mechanistically act on membrane lipids to change the physicochemical properties of biomembranes as reported for anesthetic, adrenergic, cholinergic, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antitumor, antiplatelet, antimicrobial, and antioxidant drugs. As well as these membrane-acting drugs, bioactive plant components, phytochemicals, with amphiphilic or hydrophobic structures, are presumed to interact with biological membranes and biomimetic membranes prepared with phospholipids and cholesterol, resulting in the modification of membrane fluidity, microviscosity, order, elasticity, and permeability with the potencies being consistent with their pharmacological effects. A novel mechanistic point of view of phytochemicals would lead to a better understanding of their bioactivities, an insight into their medicinal benefits, and a strategic implication for discovering drug leads from plants. This article reviews the membrane interactions of different classes of phytochemicals by highlighting their induced changes in membrane property. The phytochemicals to be reviewed include membrane-interactive flavonoids, terpenoids, stilbenoids, capsaicinoids, phloroglucinols, naphthodianthrones, organosulfur compounds, alkaloids, anthraquinonoids, ginsenosides, pentacyclic triterpene acids, and curcuminoids. The membrane interaction’s applicability to the discovery of phytochemical drug leads is also discussed while referring to previous screening and isolating studies.

  16. Membrane cholesterol modulates the cytolytic mechanism of myotoxin II, a Lys49 phospholipase A2 homologue from the venom of Bothrops asper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, José; Quesada, Orestes; Gutiérrez, José María; Angulo, Yamileth; Lomonte, Bruno

    2011-07-01

    Lys49 phospholipase A2 (PLA2) homologues present in crotalid snake venoms lack enzymatic activity, yet they induce skeletal muscle necrosis by a membrane permeabilizing mechanism whose details are only partially understood. The present study evaluated the effect of altering the membrane cholesterol content on the cytolytic activity of myotoxin II, a Lys49 PLA2 isolated from the venom of Bothrops asper, using the myogenic cell line C2C12 as a model target. Cell membrane cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) treatment enhanced the cytolytic action of myotoxin II, as well as of its bioactive C-terminal synthetic peptide p(115-129) . Conversely, cell membrane cholesterol enrichment by preformed cholesterol-MβCD complexes reduced the cytolytic effect of myotoxin II. The toxic actions of myotoxin I, a catalytically active PLA2 from the same venom, as well as of the cytolytic peptide melittin from bee venom, also increased in cholesterol-depleted cells. Although physical and functional changes resulting from variations in membrane cholesterol are complex, these findings suggest that membrane fluidity could be a relevant parameter to explain the observed modulation of the cytolytic mechanism of myotoxin II, possibly influencing bilayer penetration. In concordance, the cytolytic effect of myotoxin II decreased in direct proportion to lower temperature, a physical factor that affects membrane fluidity. In conclusion, physicochemical properties that depend on membrane cholesterol content significantly influence the cytolytic mechanism of myotoxin II, reinforcing the concept that the primary site of action of Lys49 PLA2 myotoxins is the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effects of clary sage oil and its main components, linalool and linalyl acetate, on the plasma membrane of Candida albicans: an in vivo EPR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskó, Ágnes; Gazdag, Zoltán; Gróf, Pál; Máté, Gábor; Sárosi, Szilvia; Krisch, Judit; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Makszin, Lilla; Pesti, Miklós

    2017-02-01

    The effects of clary sage (Salvia sclarea L.) oil (CS-oil), and its two main components, linalool (Lol) and linalyl acetate (LA), on cells of the eukaryotic human pathogen yeast Candida albicans were studied. Dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the plasma membrane were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, with 5-doxylstearic acid (5-SASL) and 16-SASL as spin labels. The monitoring of the head group regions with 5-SASL revealed break-point frequency decrease in a temperature dependent manner of the plasma membrane between 9.55 and 13.15 °C in untreated, in CS-oil-, Lol- and LA-treated membranes. The results suggest a significant increase in fluidity of the treated plasma membranes close to the head groups. Comparison of the results observed with the two spin labels demonstrated that CS-oil and LA induced an increased level of fluidization at both depths of the plasma membrane. Whereas Lol treatment induced a less (1 %) ordered bilayer organization in the superficial regions and an increased (10 %) order of the membrane leaflet in deeper layers. Acute toxicity tests and EPR results indicated that both the apoptotic and the effects exerted on the plasma membrane fluidity depended on the composition and chemical structure of the examined materials. In comparison with the control, treatment with CS-oil, Lol or LA induced 13.0, 12.3 and 26.4 % loss respectively, of the metabolites absorbing at 260 nm, as a biological consequence of the plasma membrane fluidizing effects. Our results confirmed that clary sage oil causes plasma membrane perturbations which leads to cell apoptosis process.

  18. Vesicle fusion with bilayer lipid membrane controlled by electrostatic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Oshima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of proteoliposomes is a promising approach for incorporating membrane proteins in artificial lipid membranes. In this study, we employed an electrostatic interaction between vesicles and supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs to control the fusion process. We combined large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs containing anionic lipids, which we used instead of proteoliposomes, and s-BLMs containing cationic lipids to control electrostatic interaction. Anionic LUVs were never adsorbed or ruptured on the SiO2 substrate with a slight negative charge, and selectively fused with cationic s-BLMs. The LUVs can be fused effectively to the target position. Furthermore, as the vesicle fusion proceeds and some of the positive charges are neutralized, the attractive interaction weakens and finally the vesicle fusion saturates. In other words, we can control the number of LUVs fused with s-BLMs by controlling the concentration of the cationic lipids in the s-BLMs. The fluidity of the s-BLMs after vesicle fusion was confirmed to be sufficiently high. This indicates that the LUVs attached to the s-BLMs were almost completely fused, and there were few intermediate state vesicles in the fusion process. We could control the position and amount of vesicle fusion with the s-BLMs by employing an electrostatic interaction.

  19. The role of the membrane-initiated Heat Shock Response in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohar eBromberg

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The heat shock response (HSR is a cellular response to diverse environmental and physiological stressors resulting in the induction of genes encoding molecular chaperones, proteases and other proteins that are essential for protection and recovery from cellular damage. Since different perturbations cause accumulation of misfolded proteins, cells frequently encounter fluctuations in the environment which alter proteostasis. Since tumor cells use their natural adaptive mechanism of coping with stress and misfolded proteins, in recent years, the proteostasis network became a promising target for anti-tumor therapy. The membrane is the first to be affected by heat shock and therefore may be the first one to sense heat shock. The membrane also connects between the extracellular and the intracellular signals. Hence, there is a cross talk between the HSR and the membranes since heat shock can induce changes in the fluidity of membranes, leading to membrane lipid remodeling that occurs in several diseases such as cancer. During the last decade, a new possible therapy has emerged in which an external molecule is used that could induce membrane lipid re-organization. Since at the moment there are very few substances that regulate the HSR effectively, an alternative way has been searched to modulate chaperone activities through the plasma membrane. Recently, we suggested that the use of the membrane Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 modulators regulated the HSR in cancer cells. However, the primary targets of the signal transduction pathway are yet un-known. This review provides an overview of the current literature regarding the role of HSR in membrane remodeling in cancer since a deep understanding of the membrane biology in cancer and the membrane heat sensing pathway is essential to design novel efficient therapies.

  20. Membrane engineering via trans unsaturated fatty acids production improves Escherichia coli robustness and production of biorenewables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zaigao; Yoon, Jong Moon; Nielsen, David R; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Jarboe, Laura R

    2016-05-01

    Constructing microbial biocatalysts that produce biorenewables at economically viable yields and titers is often hampered by product toxicity. For production of short chain fatty acids, membrane damage is considered the primary mechanism of toxicity, particularly in regards to membrane integrity. Previous engineering efforts in Escherichia coli to increase membrane integrity, with the goal of increasing fatty acid tolerance and production, have had mixed results. Herein, a novel approach was used to reconstruct the E. coli membrane by enabling production of a novel membrane component. Specifically, trans unsaturated fatty acids (TUFA) were produced and incorporated into the membrane of E. coli MG1655 by expression of cis-trans isomerase (Cti) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While the engineered strain was found to have no increase in membrane integrity, a significant decrease in membrane fluidity was observed, meaning that membrane polarization and rigidity were increased by TUFA incorporation. As a result, tolerance to exogenously added octanoic acid and production of octanoic acid were both increased relative to the wild-type strain. This membrane engineering strategy to improve octanoic acid tolerance was found to require fine-tuning of TUFA abundance. Besides improving tolerance and production of carboxylic acids, TUFA production also enabled increased tolerance in E. coli to other bio-products, e.g. alcohols, organic acids, aromatic compounds, a variety of adverse industrial conditions, e.g. low pH, high temperature, and also elevated styrene production, another versatile bio-chemical product. TUFA permitted enhanced growth due to alleviation of bio-product toxicity, demonstrating the general effectiveness of this membrane engineering strategy towards improving strain robustness. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Properties of Fiber Cell Plasma Membranes Isolated from the Cortex and Nucleus of the Porcine Eye Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2012-01-01

    The organization and physical properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from the eyes lenses of two-year-old pigs were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, and the oxygen transport parameter (OTP) were assessed from the EPR spectra of precisely positioned spin labels. Intact cortical and nuclear membranes, which include membrane proteins, were found to contain three distinct lipid environments. These lipid environments were termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain (lipids in protein aggregates). The amount of boundary and trapped lipids was greater in intact nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. The properties of intact membranes were compared with the organization and properties of lens lipid membranes made of the total lipid extracts from the lens cortex or nucleus. In cortical lens lipid membranes, only one homogenous environment was detected, which was designated as a bulk lipid domain (phospholipid bilayer saturated with cholesterol). Lens lipid membranes prepared from the lens nucleus possessed two domains, assigned as a bulk lipid domain and a cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD). In intact nuclear membranes, it was difficult to discriminate the CBD, which was clearly detected in nuclear lens lipid membranes because the OTP measured in the CBD is the same as in the domain formed by trapped lipids. The two domains unique to intact membranes—namely, the domain formed by boundary lipids and the domain formed by trapped lipids—were most likely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins. It is concluded that formation of rigid and practically impermeable domains is enhanced in the lens nucleus, indicating changes in membrane composition that may help to maintain low oxygen concentration in this lens region. PMID:22326289

  2. Effects of pyrenebutyrate on the translocation of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides through artificial membranes: recruiting peptides to the membranes, dissipating liquid-ordered phases, and inducing curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Sayaka; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Yano, Yoshiaki; Murayama, Tomo; Nakata, Yasushi; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Futaki, Shiroh

    2013-09-01

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, including octaarginine (R8) and HIV-1 TAT peptides, have the ability to translocate through cell membranes and transport exogenous bioactive molecules into cells. Hydrophobic counteranions such as pyrenebutyrate (PyB) have been reported to markedly promote the membrane translocation of these peptides. In this study, using model membranes having liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases, we explored the effects of PyB on the promotion of R8 translocation. Confocal microscopic observations of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) showed that PyB significantly accelerated the accumulation of R8 on membranes containing negatively charged lipids, leading to the internalization of R8 without collapse of the GUV structures. PyB displayed an alternative activity, increasing the fluidity of the negatively charged membranes, which diminished the distinct Lo/Ld phase separation on GUVs. This was supported by the decrease in fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Additionally, PyB induced membrane curvature, which has been suggested as a possible mechanism of membrane translocation for R8. Taken together, our results indicate that PyB may have multiple effects that promote R8 translocation through cell membranes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Melatonin and Cholesterol on the Structure of DOPC and DPPC Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drolle, E [University of Waterloo, Canada; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Hoopes, M I [University of Waterloo, Canada; Choi, Y [University of Waterloo, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Karttunen, M [University of Waterloo, Canada; Leonenko, Z [University of Waterloo, Canada

    2013-01-01

    The cell membrane plays an important role in the molecular mechanism of amyloid toxicity associated with Alzheimer's disease. The membrane's chemical composition and the incorporation of small molecules, such as melatonin and cholesterol, can alter its structure and physical properties, thereby affecting its interaction with amyloid peptides. Both melatonin and cholesterol have been recently linked to amyloid toxicity. Melatonin has been shown to have a protective role against amyloid toxicity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of this protection is still not well understood, and cholesterol's role remains controversial. We used small-angle neutron diffraction (SAND) from oriented lipid multi-layers, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from unilamellar vesicles experiments andMolecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to elucidate non-specific interactions of melatonin and cholesterol with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) model membranes. We conclude that melatonin decreases the thickness of both model membranes by disordering the lipid hydrocarbon chains, thus increasing membrane fluidity. This result is in stark contrast to the much accepted ordering effect induced by cholesterol, which causes membranes to thicken.

  4. New insights into the regulation of cholesterol efflux from the sperm membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Leahy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential component of the mammalian plasma membrane because it promotes membrane stability without comprising membrane fluidity. Given this important cellular role, cholesterol levels are tightly controlled at multiple levels. It has been clearly shown that cholesterol redistribution and depletion from the sperm membrane is a key part of the spermatozoon′s preparation for fertilization. Some factors that regulate these events are described (e.g., bicarbonate, calcium but the mechanisms underlying cholesterol export are poorly understood. How does a hydrophobic cholesterol molecule inserted in the sperm plasma membrane enter the energetically unfavorable aqueous surroundings? This review will provide an overview of knowledge in this area and highlight our gaps in understanding. The overall aim is to better understand cholesterol redistribution in the sperm plasma membrane, its relation to the possible activation of a cholesterol transporter and the role of cholesterol acceptors. Armed with such knowledge, sperm handling techniques can be adapted to better prepare spermatozoa for in vitro and in vivo fertilization.

  5. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP. MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  6. Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor: Molecular Details of the Protein-Membrane Complex from SPR Binding Studies and Neutron Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Siddharth; Shekhar, Prabhanshu; Heinrich, Frank; Daou, Marie-Claire; Gericke, Arne; Ross, Alonzo H.; Lösche, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The structure and function of the PTEN phosphatase is investigated by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act pronouncedly synergistic in pulling the enzyme to the membrane surface. The equilibrium dissociation constants for the binding of wild type (wt) PTEN to PS and PI(4,5)P2 were determined to be Kd∼12 µM and 0.4 µM, respectively, and Kd∼50 nM if both lipids are present. Membrane affinities depend critically on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. The PTEN mutations C124S and H93R show binding affinities that deviate strongly from those measured for the wt protein. Both mutants bind PS more strongly than wt PTEN. While C124S PTEN has at least the same affinity to PI(4,5)P2 and an increased apparent affinity to PI(3,4,5)P3, due to its lack of catalytic activity, H93R PTEN shows a decreased affinity to PI(4,5)P2 and no synergy in its binding with PS and PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase “scoots" along the membrane surface (penetration protein, ∼60 Å away from the bilayer surface, in a rather compact structure. The combination of binding studies and neutron reflection allows us to distinguish between PTEN mutant proteins and ultimately may identify the structural features required for membrane binding and activation of PTEN. PMID:22505997

  7. Biophysical characterization of the Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus membrane during cold and osmotic stress and its relevance for cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghel, Julie; Passot, Stéphanie; Dupont, Sébastien; Fonseca, Fernanda

    2017-02-01

    Freezing lactic acid bacteria often leads to cell death and loss of technological properties. Our objective was to provide an in-depth characterization of the biophysical properties of the Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus membrane in relation to its freeze resistance. Freezing was represented as a combination of cold and osmotic stress. This work investigated the relative incidence of increasing sucrose concentrations coupled or not with subzero temperatures without ice nucleation on the biological and biophysical responses of two strains with different membrane fatty acid compositions and freeze resistances. Following exposure of bacterial cells to the highest sucrose concentration, the sensitive strain exhibited a survival rate of less than 10 % and 5 h of acidifying activity loss. Similar biological activity losses were observed upon freeze-thawing and after osmotic treatment for each strain thus highlighting osmotic stress as the main source of cryoinjury. The direct measurement of membrane fluidity by fluorescence anisotropy was linked to membrane lipid organization characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. Both approaches made it possible to investigate the specific contributions of the membrane core and the bilayer external surface to cell degradation caused by cold and osmotic stress. Cold-induced membrane rigidification had no significant implication on bacterial freeze-thaw resistance. Interactions between extracellular sucrose and membrane phospholipid headgroups under osmotic stress were also observed. Such interactions were more evident in the sensitive strain and when increasing sucrose concentration, thus suggesting membrane permeabilization. The relevance of biophysical properties for elucidating mechanisms of cryoinjury and cryoprotection is discussed.

  8. Cyclopropanation of unsaturated fatty acids and membrane rigidification improve the freeze-drying resistance of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velly, H; Bouix, M; Passot, S; Penicaud, C; Beinsteiner, H; Ghorbal, S; Lieben, P; Fonseca, F

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the biochemical and biophysical properties of the membrane of Lactococcus lactis TOMSC161 cells during fermentation at different temperatures, in relation to their freeze-drying and storage resistance. Cells were cultivated at two different temperatures (22 and 30 °C) and were harvested at different growth phases (from the middle exponential phase to the late stationary phase). Bacterial membranes were characterized by determining the fatty acid composition, the lipid phase transition, and the membrane fluidity. Cultivability and acidification activity losses of L. lactis were quantified after freezing, drying, and 3 months of storage. The direct measurement of membrane fluidity by fluorescence anisotropy was linked to lipid composition, and it was established that the cyclopropanation of unsaturated fatty acids with concomitant membrane rigidification during growth led to an increase in the freeze-drying and storage resistance of L. lactis. As expected, cultivating cells at a lower fermentation temperature than the optimum growth temperature induced a homeoviscous adaptation that was demonstrated by a lowered lipid phase transition temperature but that was not related to any improvement in freeze-drying resistance. L. lactis TOMSC161 was therefore able to develop a combined biochemical and biophysical response at the membrane level during fermentation. The ratio of cyclic fatty acids to unsaturated fatty acids (CFA/UFA) appeared to be the most relevant parameter associated with membrane rigidification and cell resistance to freeze-drying and storage. This study increased our knowledge about the physiological mechanisms that explain the resistance of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to freeze-drying and storage stresses and demonstrated the relevance of complementary methods of membrane characterization.

  9. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The lipid matrix of biomembranes is an in-plane fluid, thermally and compositionally disordered leaflet of 5 nm thickness and notoriously difficult to characterize in structural terms. Yet, biomembranes are ubiquitous in the cell, and membrane-bound proteins are implicated in a variety of signaling pathways and intra-cellular transport. We developed methodology to study proteins associated with model membranes using neutron reflection measurements and showed recently that this approach can resolve the penetration depth and orientation of membrane proteins with ångstrom resolution if their crystal or NMR structure is known. Here we apply this technology to determine the membrane bindung and unravel functional details of the PTEN phosphatase, a key player in the PI3K apoptosis pathway. PTEN is an important regulatory protein and tumor suppressor that performs its phosphatase activity as an interfacial enzyme at the plasma membrane-cytoplasm boundary. Acting as an antagonist to phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cell signaling, it is deleted in many human cancers. Despite its importance in regulating the levels of the phosphoinositoltriphosphate PI(3,4,5)P3, there is little understanding of how PTEN binds to membranes, is activated and then acts as a phosphatase. We investigated the structure and function of PTEN by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act synergetically in attracting the enzyme to the membrane surface. Membrane affinities depend strongly on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase ``scoots'' along the membrane surface (penetration PTEN's regulatory C-terminal tail is displaced from the membrane and

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of lipid and protein membrane components of erythrocytes oxidized with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendanha, S.A.; Anjos, J.L.V.; Silva, A.H.M.; Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin labels was used to monitor membrane dynamic changes in erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The lipid spin label, 5-doxyl stearic acid, responded to dramatic reductions in membrane fluidity, which was correlated with increases in the protein content of the membrane. Membrane rigidity, associated with the binding of hemoglobin (Hb) to the erythrocyte membrane, was also indicated by a spin-labeled maleimide, 5-MSL, covalently bound to the sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. At 2% hematocrit, these alterations in membrane occurred at very low concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 µM) after only 5 min of incubation at 37°C in azide phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Lipid peroxidation, suggested by oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde formation, started at 300 µM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (for incubation of 3 h), which is a concentration about six times higher than those detected with the probes. Ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol protected the membrane against lipoperoxidation, but did not prevent the binding of proteins to the erythrocyte membrane. Moreover, the antioxidant (+)-catechin, which also failed to prevent the cross-linking of cytoskeletal proteins with Hb, was very effective in protecting erythrocyte ghosts from lipid peroxidation induced by the Fenton reaction. This study also showed that EPR spectroscopy can be useful to assess the molecular dynamics of red blood cell membranes in both the lipid and protein domains and examine oxidation processes in a system that is so vulnerable to oxidation.

  11. Lipid domains in intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of human eye lenses of donors from different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-03-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors' age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors' age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  12. [Changes in Na+, K+-adenosinetriphosphatase and 5'-nucleotidase activities in cell membrane isolated from rat liver after acute white phosphorus poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribotta, P B; Parola, M; Barrera, G; Carasso, M C; Bosia, B; Paradisi, L

    1982-12-15

    Na+, K+-ATPase and 5'-Nucleotidase activities in rat liver plasmamembranes after "in vivo" intoxication with a single dose of white phosphorus (10 mg/kg b.w. "per os") are investigated. Na+, K+-ATPase activity is significantly increased 1 hour and inhibited 12 hours after intoxication. 5'-Nucleotidase is strongly increased at 1, 2 and 4 hours after poisoning and is significantly decreased at 12 hours. The enhancement of both the enzymatic activities is evident prior to triglyceride accumulation in rat liver. Our results suggest that lipid fluidity of cell membrane is early and mildly affected during white phosphorus poisoning.

  13. From biological membranes to biomimetic model membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes play an essential role in the cellular protection as well as in the control and the transport of nutrients. Many mechanisms such as molecular recognition, enzymatic catalysis, cellular adhesion and membrane fusion take place into the biological membranes. In 1972, Singer et al. provided a membrane model, called fluid mosaic model, in which each leaflet of the bilayer is formed by a homogeneous environment of lipids in a fluid state including globular assembling of proteins and glycoproteins. Since its conception in 1972, many developments were brought to this model in terms of composition and molecular organization. The main development of the fluid mosaic model was made by Simons et al. (1997 and Brown et al. (1997 who suggested that membrane lipids are organized into lateral microdomains (or lipid rafts with a specific composition and a molecular dynamic that are different to the composition and the dynamic of the surrounding liquid crystalline phase. The discovery of a phase separation in the plane of the membrane has induced an explosion in the research efforts related to the biology of cell membranes but also in the development of new technologies for the study of these biological systems. Due to the high complexity of biological membranes and in order to investigate the biological processes that occur on the membrane surface or within the membrane lipid bilayer, a large number of studies are performed using biomimicking model membranes. This paper aims at revisiting the fundamental properties of biological membranes in terms of membrane composition, membrane dynamic and molecular organization, as well as at describing the most common biomimicking models that are frequently used for investigating biological processes such as membrane fusion, membrane trafficking, pore formation as well as membrane interactions at a molecular level.

  14. NMR studies of the relationship between the changes of membrane lipids and the cisplatin-resistance of A549/DDP cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Youguo

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes of membrane lipids in cisplatin-sensitive A549 and cisplatin-resistant A549/DDP cells during the apoptotic process induced by a clinical dose of cisplatin (30 μM were detected by 1H and 31P-NMR spectroscopy and by membrane fluidity measurement. The apoptotic phenotypes of the two cell lines were monitored with flow cytometry. The assays of apoptosis showed that significant apoptotic characteristics of the A549 cells were induced when the cells were cultured for 24 hours after treatment with cisplatin, while no apoptotic characteristic could be detected for the resistant A549/DDP cells even after 48 hours. The results of 1H-NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the CH2/CH3 and Glu/Ct ratios of the membrane of A549 cells increased significantly, but those in A549/DDP cell membranes decreased. In addition, the Chol/CH3 and Eth/Ct ratios decreased for the former but increased for the latter cells under the same conditions. 31P-NMR spectroscopy indicated levels of phosphomonoesters (PME and ATP decreased in A549 but increased in A549/DDP cells after being treated with cisplatin. These results were supported with the data obtained from 1H-NMR measurements. The results clearly indicated that components and properties of membrane phospholipids of the two cell lines were significantly different during the apoptotic process when they were treated with a clinical dose of cisplatin. Plasma membrane fluidity changes during cisplatin treatment as detected with the fluorescence probe TMA-DPH also indicate marked difference between the two cell lines. We provided evidence that there are significant differences in plasma membrane changes during treatment of cisplatin sensitive A549 and resistant A549/DDP cells.

  15. Association between radioinhibition process and membrane phase properties in bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Monica B.; Curzio, Osvaldo A.; Croci, Clara A.

    1997-01-01

    Garlic bulbs were irradiated 30 days after harvest with a dose of 60.0 Gy of 60 Co gamma rays, Along 270 days of storage phase properties of rough and smooth microsomal membranes isolated from storage leaf of garlic cloves were examined by wide angle X-ray diffraction. The diffractograms features peaks at Bragg spacing of 4.15 A and 3.75 A, revealing the presence of a gel (crystalline) phase, while the characteristics peak of the liquid-crystalline phase (4.6 A) was not observed in the studied membranes. Data from rough microsomal membranes were erratic and unreliable. The intensity of phase gel peaks decreased up to 30 days of the tratment in the smooth microsomal membranes. Radiation-induced inhibition of sprout growth became evident in about 60 days and was synchronous with a marked increase in the intensity of phase gel peaks. The presence of a greater proportion of lipids in crystalline state in irradiated samples 60 days after treatment suggest a decrease in the average fluidity in smooth microsomal menbranes. These results are discussed in relation to the use of wide angle X-ray diffraction of smooth microsomal membranes as a possible indicator of irradiation treatment of garlic bulbs. (author). 16 refs., 3 figs

  16. Model lipid bilayers mimic non-specific interactions of gold nanoparticles with macrophage plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montis, Costanza; Generini, Viola; Boccalini, Giulia; Bergese, Paolo; Bani, Daniele; Berti, Debora

    2018-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between nanomaterials and biological interfaces is a key unmet goal that still hampers clinical translation of nanomedicine. Here we investigate and compare non-specific interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with synthetic lipid and wild type macrophage membranes. A comprehensive data set was generated by systematically varying the structural and physicochemical properties of the AuNPs (size, shape, charge, surface functionalization) and of the synthetic membranes (composition, fluidity, bending properties and surface charge), which allowed to unveil the matching conditions for the interaction of the AuNPs with macrophage plasma membranes in vitro. This effort directly proved for the first time that synthetic bilayers can be set to mimic and predict with high fidelity key aspects of nanoparticle interaction with macrophage eukaryotic plasma membranes. It then allowed to model the experimental observations according to classical interface thermodynamics and in turn determine the paramount role played by non-specific contributions, primarily electrostatic, Van der Waals and bending energy, in driving nanoparticle-plasma membrane interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Age-related changes on platelet membrane: a study on elderly and centenarian monozygotic twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanetti, Laura; Laura, Nanetti; Moroni, Cinzia; Cinzia, Moroni; Vignini, Arianna; Arianna, Vignini; Vannini, Patrizia; Patrizia, Vannini; Franceschi, Claudio; Claudio, Franceschi; Mazzanti, Laura; Laura, Mazzanti

    2005-06-01

    Cellular senescence is a biological process associated with aging and longevity. Successful aging is believed to be related to the ability to cope with different environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to investigate if cellular senescence is associated with platelet membrane modifications on subjects of different age, in particular on monozygotic twins and if these changes might be affected by both genetic components and environmental factors. The work was performed on 81 monozygotic twin pairs of different age. Platelet membranes from centenarian twins showed: decreased both basal lipid peroxide levels and membrane fluidity compared with elderly subjects; Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and SA content are similar to those evaluated in young group, suggesting one of their important roles in the successful aging. We concluded that platelet membranes from centenarians show deeper structural and functional modifications than in elderly subjects and that these changes might play a protective role against oxidative damage. No statistical difference in biochemical parameters was observed between two sibpairs in each twin pair highlighting that environmental factors (diet, life-style) affect age-related platelet membrane changes less than their common genetic component. Thus genetic factors might play an important role in the mechanisms at the basis of successful aging.

  18. The Mechanism by Which Luteolin Disrupts the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Qiu, Yunguang; Luo, Qichao; Zhao, Lifen; Yan, Xin; Ding, Qiaoce; Jiang, Hualiang; Yang, Huaiyu

    2018-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most versatile human pathogens. Luteolin (LUT) has anti-MRSA activity by disrupting the MRSA cytoplasmic membrane. However, the mechanism by which luteolin disrupts the membrane remains unclear. Here, we performed differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and all-atomic molecular dynamics (AA-MD) simulations to investigate the interactions and effects of LUT on model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We detected the transition thermodynamic parameters of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) liposomes, and liposomes composed of both DPPC and DPPG at different LUT concentrations and showed that LUT molecules were located between polar heads and the hydrophobic region of DPPC/DPPG. In the MD trajectories, LUT molecules ranging from 5 to 50 had different effects on the membranes thickness, fluidity and ordered property of lipids, and lateral pressure of lipid bilayers composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG). Also, most LUT molecules were distributed in the region between the phosphorus atoms and C9 atoms of DOPC and DOPG. On the basis of the combination of these results, we conclude that the distinct effects of LUT on lipid bilayers composed of PCs and PGs may elucidate the mechanism by which LUT disrupts the cytoplasmic membrane of MRSA.

  19. Particle-based membrane model for mesoscopic simulation of cellular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mohsen; Weikl, Thomas R.; Noé, Frank

    2018-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient coarse-grained and solvent-free model for simulating lipid bilayer membranes. In order to be used in concert with particle-based reaction-diffusion simulations, the model is purely based on interacting and reacting particles, each representing a coarse patch of a lipid monolayer. Particle interactions include nearest-neighbor bond-stretching and angle-bending and are parameterized so as to reproduce the local membrane mechanics given by the Helfrich energy density over a range of relevant curvatures. In-plane fluidity is implemented with Monte Carlo bond-flipping moves. The physical accuracy of the model is verified by five tests: (i) Power spectrum analysis of equilibrium thermal undulations is used to verify that the particle-based representation correctly captures the dynamics predicted by the continuum model of fluid membranes. (ii) It is verified that the input bending stiffness, against which the potential parameters are optimized, is accurately recovered. (iii) Isothermal area compressibility modulus of the membrane is calculated and is shown to be tunable to reproduce available values for different lipid bilayers, independent of the bending rigidity. (iv) Simulation of two-dimensional shear flow under a gravity force is employed to measure the effective in-plane viscosity of the membrane model and show the possibility of modeling membranes with specified viscosities. (v) Interaction of the bilayer membrane with a spherical nanoparticle is modeled as a test case for large membrane deformations and budding involved in cellular processes such as endocytosis. The results are shown to coincide well with the predicted behavior of continuum models, and the membrane model successfully mimics the expected budding behavior. We expect our model to be of high practical usability for ultra coarse-grained molecular dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion simulations of biological systems.

  20. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A

    2008-01-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property

  1. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Technische Mikrobiologie, Weihenstephaner Steig 16, 85350 Freising (Germany)], E-mail: rudi.vogel@wzw.tum.de

    2008-07-15

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  2. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  3. Drug binding and mobility relating to the thermal fluctuation in fluid lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Emiko; Yoshii, Noriyuki

    2008-12-01

    Drug binding and mobility in fluid lipid bilayer membranes are quantified in situ by using the multinuclear solution NMR combined with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. One-dimensional and pulsed-field-gradient F19 and H1 NMR signals of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) are analyzed at 283-313 K in the presence of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) as model cell membranes. The simultaneous observation of the membrane-bound and free 5FU signals enables to quantify in what amount of 5FU is bound to the membrane and how fast 5FU is moving within the membrane in relation to the thermal fluctuation of the soft, fluid environment. It is shown that the mobility of membrane-bound 5FU is slowed down by almost two orders of magnitude and similar to the lipid movement in the membrane, the movement closely related to the intramembrane fluidity. The mobility of 5FU and EPC is, however, not similar at 313 K; the 5FU movement is enhanced in the membrane as a result of the loose binding of 5FU in the lipid matrices. The membrane-bound fraction of 5FU is ˜0.1 and almost unaltered over the temperature range examined. It is also independent of the 5FU concentration from 2 to 30 mM with respect to the 40-50 mM LUV. The free energy of the 5FU binding is estimated at -4 to -2 kJ/mol, the magnitude always close to the thermal fluctuation, 2.4-2.6 kJ/mol.

  4. Targeting proteins to liquid-ordered domains in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Hayden, Carl C; Sanchez, Mari Angelica A; Wang, Julia; Bunker, Bruce C; Voigt, James A; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2011-02-15

    We demonstrate the construction of novel protein-lipid assemblies through the design of a lipid-like molecule, DPIDA, endowed with tail-driven affinity for specific lipid membrane phases and head-driven affinity for specific proteins. In studies performed on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) with varying mole fractions of dipalymitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and diphytanoylphosphatidyl choline (DPhPC), DPIDA selectively partitioned into the more ordered phases, either solid or liquid-ordered (L(o)) depending on membrane composition. Fluorescence imaging established the phase behavior of the resulting quaternary lipid system. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy confirmed the fluidity of the L(o) phase containing DPIDA. In the presence of CuCl(2), the iminodiacetic acid (IDA) headgroup of DPIDA forms the Cu(II)-IDA complex that exhibits a high affinity for histidine residues. His-tagged proteins were bound specifically to domains enriched in DPIDA, demonstrating the capacity to target protein binding selectively to both solid and L(o) phases. Steric pressure from the crowding of surface-bound proteins transformed the domains into tubules with persistence lengths that depended on the phase state of the lipid domains.

  5. ATP-Mediated Compositional Change in Peripheral Myelin Membranes: A Comparative Raman Spectroscopy and Time-Of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kutuzov

    Full Text Available In the present paper we addressed a mechanism of the myelin reorganization initiated by extracellular ATP and adenosine in sciatic nerves of the frog Rana temporaria. In combination with Raman microspectroscopy, allowing noninvasive live-cell measurements, we employed time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS to follow the underlying changes in chemical composition of myelin membranes triggered by the purinergic agents. The simultaneous increase in lipid ordering degree, decrease in membrane fluidity and the degree of fatty acid unsaturation were induced by both ATP and adenosine. Mass spectrometry measurements revealed that ATP administration also led to the marked elevation of membrane cholesterol and decrease of phosphotidylcholine amounts. Vesicular lipid transport pathways are considered as possible mechanisms of compositional and structural changes of myelin.

  6. ATP-Mediated Compositional Change in Peripheral Myelin Membranes: A Comparative Raman Spectroscopy and Time-Of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuzov, Nikolay; Gulin, Alexander; Lyaskovskiy, Vladimir; Nadtochenko, Victor; Maksimov, Georgy

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we addressed a mechanism of the myelin reorganization initiated by extracellular ATP and adenosine in sciatic nerves of the frog Rana temporaria. In combination with Raman microspectroscopy, allowing noninvasive live-cell measurements, we employed time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to follow the underlying changes in chemical composition of myelin membranes triggered by the purinergic agents. The simultaneous increase in lipid ordering degree, decrease in membrane fluidity and the degree of fatty acid unsaturation were induced by both ATP and adenosine. Mass spectrometry measurements revealed that ATP administration also led to the marked elevation of membrane cholesterol and decrease of phosphotidylcholine amounts. Vesicular lipid transport pathways are considered as possible mechanisms of compositional and structural changes of myelin.

  7. Molecular Interactions at Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagalski, Vivien

    Biological membranes are essential and complex structures in every living cell consisting of a fluid lipid bilayer sheet and membrane proteins. Its significance makes biological membranes not only interesting for medical research, but also has made it a target for toxins in the course of evolution....... Today, we know more than ever before about the properties of biological membranes. Advanced biophysical techniques and sophisticated membrane models allow us to answer specific questions about the structure of the components within membranes and their interactions. However, many detailed structural...... mechanisms of membrane compounds, including compounds associated with membranes, are still unknown due to the challenges that arise when probing the hydrophobic nature of the membrane's interior. For integral membrane proteins that span through the entire membrane, the amphiphilic environment is essential...

  8. Plasma 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and mineralocorticoid receptor testicular expression during rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss spermiation: implication with 17alpha, 20beta-dihydroxyprogesterone on the milt fluidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Sylvain; Terrien, Xavier; Sturm, Armin; Ibrahim, Fidaa; Giton, Franck; Fiet, Jean; Prunet, Patrick; Le Gac, Florence

    2008-05-19

    In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the endocrine control of spermiation is not fully understood. Besides 11ketotestosterone (11KT) and 17alpha, 20beta-dihydroxyprogesterone (MIS), the potential physiological ligand of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), is a credible candidate in O. mykiss spermiation regulation as spermiation is accompanied with changes in aqueous and ionic flows. In this study, we investigated potential roles of DOC during spermiation 1) by describing changes in blood plasma DOC level, MR mRNA abundance during the reproductive cycle and MR localization in the reproductive tract 2) by investigating and comparing the effects of DOC (10 mg/kg) and MIS (5 mg/kg) supplementations on sperm parameters 3) by measuring the in vitro effect of DOC on testis MIS production. The plasma concentration of DOC increased rapidly at the end of the reproductive cycle to reach levels that were 10-50 fold higher in mature males than in immature fish. MR mRNA relative abundance was lower in maturing testes when compared to immature testes, but increased rapidly during the spermiation period, immediately after the plasma rise in DOC. At this stage, immunohistochemistry localized MR protein to cells situated at the periphery of the seminiferous tubules and in the efferent ducts. Neither DOC nor MIS had significant effects on the mean sperm volume, although MIS treatment significantly increased the percentage of males producing milt. However, a significant reduction in the spermatocrit was observed when DOC and MIS were administrated together. Finally, we detected an inhibitory effect of DOC on testis MIS production in vitro. These results are in agreement with potential roles of DOC and MR during spermiation and support the hypothesis that DOC and MIS mechanisms of action are linked during this reproductive stage, maybe controlling milt fluidity. They also confirm that in O. mykiss MIS is involved in spermiation induction.

  9. Terpenes increase the lipid dynamics in the Leishmania plasma membrane at concentrations similar to their IC50 values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heverton Silva Camargos

    Full Text Available Although many terpenes have shown antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic activity, the mechanism of action is not well established. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy of the spin-labeled 5-doxyl stearic acid revealed remarkable fluidity increases in the plasma membrane of terpene-treated Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes. For an antiproliferative activity assay using 5×10(6 parasites/mL, the sesquiterpene nerolidol and the monoterpenes (+-limonene, α-terpineol and 1,8-cineole inhibited the growth of the parasites with IC50 values of 0.008, 0.549, 0.678 and 4.697 mM, respectively. The IC50 values of these terpenes increased as the parasite concentration used in the cytotoxicity assay increased, and this behavior was examined using a theoretical treatment of the experimental data. Cytotoxicity tests with the same parasite concentration as in the EPR experiments revealed a correlation between the IC50 values of the terpenes and the concentrations at which they altered the membrane fluidity. In addition, the terpenes induced small amounts of cell lysis (4-9% at their respective IC50 values. For assays with high cell concentrations (2×10(9 parasites/mL, the incorporation of terpene into the cell membrane was very fast, and the IC50 values observed for 24 h and 5 min-incubation periods were not significantly different. Taken together, these results suggest that terpene cytotoxicity is associated with the attack on the plasma membrane of the parasite. The in vitro cytotoxicity of nerolidol was similar to that of miltefosine, and nerolidol has high hydrophobicity; thus, nerolidol might be used in drug delivery systems, such as lipid nanoparticles to treat leishmaniasis.

  10. Study of rabbit erythrocytes membrane solubilization by sucrose monomyristate using laurdan and phasor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, German; Herlax, Vanesa; Lillo, M Pilar; Sandoval-Altamirano, Catalina; Belmar, Libnny N; Sánchez, Susana A

    2018-01-01

    The study of surfactant and bio membranes interaction is particularly complex due to the diversity in lipid composition and the presence of proteins in natural membranes. Even more difficult is the study of this interaction in vivo since cellular damage may complicate the interpretation of the results, therefore for most of the studies in this field either artificial or model systems are used. One of the model system most used to study biomembranes are erythrocytes due to their relatively simple structure (they lack nuclei and organelles having only the plasma membrane), their convenient experimental manipulation and availability. In this context, we used rabbit erythrocytes as a model membrane and Laurdan (6-lauroyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) as the fluorescent probe to study changes promoted in the membrane by the interaction with the sucrose monoester of myristic acid, β-d-fructofuranosyl-6-O-myristoyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (MMS). Surfactant and erythrocytes interaction was studied by measuring hemoglobin release and the changes in water content in the membrane sensed by Laurdan. Using two-photon excitation, three types of measurements were performed: Generalized Polarization (analyzed as average GP values), Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging, FLIM (analyzed using phasor plots) and Spectral imaging (analyzed using spectral phasor). Our data indicate that at sublytical concentration of surfactant (20μM MMS), there is a decrease of about 35% in erythrocytes size, without changes in Laurdan lifetime or emission spectra. We also demonstrate that as hemolysis progress, Laurdan lifetime increased due to the decrease in hemoglobin (strong quencher of Laurdan emission) content inside the erythrocytes. Under these conditions, Laurdan spectral phasor analyses can extract the information on the water content in the membrane in the presence of hemoglobin. Our results indicate an increase in membrane fluidity in presence of MMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Magnetically controlled permeability membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-10-31

    A bioactive material delivery system can include a thermoresponsive polymer membrane and nanowires distributed within the thermoresponsive polymer membrane. Magnetic activation of a thermoresponsive polymer membrane can take place via altering the magnetization or dimensions of nanowires dispersed or ordered within the membrane matrix.

  12. Thermal adaptation of cellular membranes in natural populations ofDrosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Brandon S; Hammad, Loubna A; Montooth, Kristi L

    2014-08-01

    Changes in temperature disrupt the fluidity of cellular membranes, which can negatively impact membrane integrity and cellular processes. Many ectotherms, including Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), adjust the glycerophospholipid composition of their membranes to restore optimal fluidity when temperatures change, a type of trait plasticity termed homeoviscous adaptation.Existing data suggest that plasticity in the relative abundances of the glycerophospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) underlies cellular adaptation to temporal variability in the thermal environment. For example, laboratory populations of D. melanogaster evolved in the presence of temporally variable temperatures have greater developmental plasticity of the ratio of PE to PC (PE/PC) and greater fecundity than do populations evolved at constant temperatures.Here, we extend this work to natural populations of D. melanogaster by evaluating thermal plasticity of glycerophospholipid composition at different life stages, in genotypes isolated from Vermont, Indiana and North Carolina, USA. We also quantify the covariance between developmental and adult (reversible) plasticity, and between adult responses of the membrane to cool and warm thermal shifts.As predicted by physiological models of homeoviscous adaptation, flies from all populations decrease PE/PC and the degree of lipid unsaturation in response to warm temperatures. Furthermore, these populations have diverged in their degree of membrane plasticity. Flies from the most variable thermal environment (Vermont, USA) decrease PE/PC to a greater extent than do other populations when developed at a warm temperature, a pattern that matches our previous observation in laboratory-evolved populations. We also find that developmental plasticity and adult plasticity of PE/PC covary across genotypes, but that adult responses to cool and warm thermal shifts do not.When combined with our previous observations of laboratory

  13. Polymeric Membrane Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    José M. Sousa; Luís M. Madeira; João C. Santos; Adélio Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is the study of membrane reactors with polymeric membranes, particularly catalytic polymeric membranes. After an introduction where the main advantages and disadvantages of the use of polymeric membranes are summarised, a review of the main areas where they have been applied, integrated in chemical reactors, is presented. This excludes the field of bio-membranes processes, which is analysed in a specific chapter of this book. Particular attention is then given to model...

  14. Mediterranean-style diet effect on the structural properties of the erythrocyte cell membrane of hypertensive patients: the Prevencion con Dieta Mediterranea Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Francisca; Perona, Javier S; Prades, Jesús; Funari, Sérgio S; Gomez-Gracia, Enrique; Conde, Manuel; Estruch, Ramon; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina

    2009-11-01

    A currently ongoing randomized trial has revealed that the Mediterranean diet, rich in virgin olive oil or nuts, reduces systolic blood pressure in high-risk cardiovascular patients. Here, we present a structural substudy to assess the effect of a Mediterranean-style diet supplemented with nuts or virgin olive oil on erythrocyte membrane properties in 36 hypertensive participants after 1 year of intervention. Erythrocyte membrane lipid composition, structural properties of reconstituted erythrocyte membranes, and serum concentrations of inflammatory markers are reported. After the intervention, the membrane cholesterol content decreased, whereas that of phospholipids increased in all of the dietary groups; the diminishing cholesterol:phospholipid ratio could be associated with an increase in the membrane fluidity. Moreover, reconstituted membranes from the nuts and virgin olive oil groups showed a higher propensity to form a nonlamellar inverted hexagonal phase structure that was related to an increase in phosphatidylethanolamine lipid class. These data suggest that the Mediterranean-style diet affects the lipid metabolism that is altered in hypertensive patients, influencing the structural membrane properties. The erythrocyte membrane modulation described provides insight in the structural bases underlying the beneficial effect of a Mediterranean-style diet in hypertensive subjects.

  15. Macroscopic domain formation during cooling in the platelet plasma membrane: an issue of low cholesterol content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Rachna; Savino, Laura; Ramirez, Diego A; Tsvetkova, Nelly M; Bagatolli, Luis; Tablin, Fern; Crowe, John H; Leidy, Chad

    2009-06-01

    There has been ample debate on whether cell membranes can present macroscopic lipid domains as predicted by three-component phase diagrams obtained by fluorescence microscopy. Several groups have argued that membrane proteins and interactions with the cytoskeleton inhibit the formation of large domains. In contrast, some polarizable cells do show large regions with qualitative differences in lipid fluidity. It is important to ask more precisely, based on the current phase diagrams, under what conditions would large domains be expected to form in cells. In this work we study the thermotropic phase behavior of the platelet plasma membrane by FTIR, and compare it to a POPC/Sphingomyelin/Cholesterol model representing the outer leaflet composition. We find that this model closely reflects the platelet phase behavior. Previous work has shown that the platelet plasma membrane presents inhomogeneous distribution of DiI18:0 at 24 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C, which suggests the formation of macroscopic lipid domains at low temperatures. We show by fluorescence microscopy, and by comparison with published phase diagrams, that the outer leaflet model system enters the macroscopic domain region only at the lower temperature. In addition, the low cholesterol content in platelets ( approximately 15 mol%), appears to be crucial for the formation of large domains during cooling.

  16. The effect of propofol on plasma membrane ultrastructure in the intact cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weixiang; Pralle, Arnd

    The mechanism of general anesthesia is still unknown. One drug used for human anesthesia, propofol, has been shown to interact with some ligand gated ion-channels, but also easily dissolves in the lipid bilayer and alters fluidity. Which mechanism dominates or even how anesthesia arises are unclear. We study the influence of propofol on plasma membrane (PM) ultrastructure in intact cells. In the PM, transient submicroscopic nanodomains form by interactions between lipid-acyl-chains or lipid head groups, stabilized by cholesterol. In addition, membrane cytoskeleton further regulates the nanodomains, which then regulate signaling. We study transient propofol effects on these domains from low to clinically relevant propofol concentrations by analyzing diffusion of GFP-tagged outer leaflet/inner leaflet membrane proteins. Using bimFCS we measure diffusion on multiple length scales simultaneously. We observe that at low propofol concentrations, the nanodomains trap GPI-mGFP less, consistent with studies showing that propofol decreases the phase transition temperature of membrane derived vesicles. Interestingly, at clinical relevant concentrations of propofol, the nanodomains trap GPI-mGFP more strongly. This is only observed at 37C. By inhibiting myosin activity or actin filaments (de-)polymerization, we find that the activity of actin filaments further alters the behavior of cholesterol nanodomains due to propofol. We compare the effect of propofol and its analog confirming specificity.

  17. The Role of Membrane Fluidization in the Gel-Assisted Formation of Giant Polymersomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne C Greene

    Full Text Available Polymersomes are being widely explored as synthetic analogs of lipid vesicles based on their enhanced stability and potential uses in a wide variety of applications in (e.g., drug delivery, cell analogs, etc.. Controlled formation of giant polymersomes for use in membrane studies and cell mimetic systems, however, is currently limited by low-yield production methodologies. Here, we describe for the first time, how the size distribution of giant poly(ethylene glycol-poly(butadiene (PEO-PBD polymersomes formed by gel-assisted rehydration may be controlled based on membrane fluidization. We first show that the average diameter and size distribution of PEO-PBD polymersomes may be readily increased by increasing the temperature of the rehydration solution. Further, we describe a correlative relationship between polymersome size and membrane fluidization through the addition of sucrose during rehydration, enabling the formation of PEO-PBD polymersomes with a range of diameters, including giant-sized vesicles (>100 μm. This correlative relationship suggests that sucrose may function as a small molecule fluidizer during rehydration, enhancing polymer diffusivity during formation and increasing polymersome size. Overall the ability to easily regulate the size of PEO-PBD polymersomes based on membrane fluidity, either through temperature or fluidizers, has broadly applicability in areas including targeted therapeutic delivery and synthetic biology.

  18. Sheet Membrane Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis; Zapata, Felipe; Dillion, Paul; Castillo, Juan; Vonau, Walter; Wilkes, Robert; Vogel, Matthew; Frodge, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    A document describes a sheet membrane spacesuit water membrane evaporator (SWME), which allows for the use of one common water tank that can supply cooling water to the astronaut and to the evaporator. Test data showed that heat rejection performance dropped only 6 percent after being subjected to highly contaminated water. It also exhibited robustness with respect to freezing and Martian atmospheric simulation testing. Water was allowed to freeze in the water channels during testing that simulated a water loop failure and vapor backpressure valve failure. Upon closing the backpressure valve and energizing the pump, the ice eventually thawed and water began to flow with no apparent damage to the sheet membrane. The membrane evaporator also serves to de-gas the water loop from entrained gases, thereby eliminating the need for special degassing equipment such as is needed by the current spacesuit system. As water flows through the three annular water channels, water evaporates with the vapor flowing across the hydrophobic, porous sheet membrane to the vacuum side of the membrane. The rate at which water evaporates, and therefore, the rate at which the flowing water is cooled, is a function of the difference between the water saturation pressure on the water side of the membrane, and the pressure on the vacuum side of the membrane. The primary theory is that the hydrophobic sheet membrane retains water, but permits vapor pass-through when the vapor side pressure is less than the water saturation pressure. This results in evaporative cooling of the remaining water.

  19. The effects of oral acetylsalicylic acid on blood fluidity and infusion speed in the cancer patients with PICC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lili; Xia, Chunfang; Sun, Xin; Zuo, Yulan; Zhao, Liping

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the influence of oral acetylsalicylic acid on blood fluidity and infusion speed in the cancer patients with Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC). PICC is placed for prolonged chemotherapy of cancer patients. The fibrin sheaths, which consist of cellular substance and non-cellular substance, generate at the place of insertion and grow down all over the catheter. Finally they cover the vent of the catheter and lead to catheter dysfunctions such as the decrease of infusion speed. In addition, the high viscosity status of cancer patients could lead to acute embolization, which adds to the high risk of death. Randomized controlled trial. This research was carried out between April 2013 and January 2014 in the second hospital of Xiangya, Central South University in Changsha, China. Initially 96 cancer participants with PICC were chosen and randomly allocated to experimental and control group. The participants of the experimental group were conducted route PICC maintain technique and took acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg per day after dinner, while the control group received route PICC maintain technique only. The infusion speed and hemorheology indexes of the two groups were tested before our study and at the end of the 2nd and 4th months with several instruments. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that taking acetylsalicylic acid orally had significant main effect on high shear blood viscosity and red blood cell deformability index (P < 0.05), and it also had significant main effect as well as time effect on plasma viscosity (P < 0.05); and time had significant main effect as well as interaction effect with oral acetylsalicylic acid on low shear blood viscosity and red blood cell aggregation index (P < 0.05). Repeated measures ANOVA also showed that taking acetylsalicylic acid orally had significant main effect, time effect and interaction effect on infusion speed (P < 0.01). Oral acetylsalicylic acid could

  20. Amyloid-β and the failure to form mitochondrial cristae: a biomimetic study involving artificial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifat, Nada; Puff, Nicolas; Dliaa, Mariam; Angelova, Miglena I

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system which causes irreversible damage to neuron structure and function. The main hypothesis concerning the cause of AD is excessive accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ). There has recently been a surge in studies on neuronal morphological and functional pathologies related to Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions and morphological alternations. What is the relation between the accumulation of Aβ in mitochondria, decreased production of ATP, and the large number of mitochondria with broken or scarce cristae observed in AD patients' neurons? The problem is complex, as it is now widely recognized that mitochondria function determines mitochondrial inner membrane (IM) morphology and, conversely, that IM morphology can influence mitochondrial functions. In our previous work, we designed an artificial mitochondrial IM, a minimal model system (giant unilamellar vesicle) mimicking the IM. We showed experimentally that modulation of the local pH gradient at the membrane level of cardiolipin-containing vesicles induces dynamic membrane invaginations similar to the mitochondrial cristae. In the present work we show, using our artificial IM, that Aβ renders the membrane unable to support the formation of cristae-like structures when local pH gradient occurs, leading to the failure of this cristae-like morphology. Fluorescent probe studies suggest that the dramatic change of membrane mechanical properties is due to Aβ-induced lipid bilayer dehydration, increased ordering of lipids, loss of membrane fluidity, and possibly to Aβ-induced changes in dynamic friction between the two leaflets of the lipid membrane.

  1. Rationalization of reduced penetration of drugs through ceramide gel phase membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloncýová, Markéta; DeVane, Russell H; Murch, Bruce P; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-11-25

    Since computing resources have advanced enough to allow routine molecular simulation studies of drug molecules interacting with biologically relevant membranes, a considerable amount of work has been carried out with fluid phospholipid systems. However, there is very little work in the literature on drug interactions with gel phase lipids. This poses a significant limitation for understanding permeation through the stratum corneum where the primary pathway is expected to be through a highly ordered lipid matrix. To address this point, we analyzed the interactions of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and its ethyl (benzocaine) and butyl (butamben) esters with two membrane bilayers, which differ in their fluidity at ambient conditions. We considered a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer in a fluid state and a ceramide 2 (CER2, ceramide NS) bilayer in a gel phase. We carried out unbiased (100 ns long) and biased z-constraint molecular dynamics simulations and calculated the free energy profiles of all molecules along the bilayer normal. The free energy profiles converged significantly slower for the gel phase. While the compounds have comparable affinities for both membranes, they exhibit penetration barriers almost 3 times higher in the gel phase CER2 bilayer. This elevated barrier and slower diffusion in the CER2 bilayer, which are caused by the high ordering of CER2 lipid chains, explain the low permeability of the gel phase membranes. We also compared the free energy profiles from MD simulations with those obtained from COSMOmic. This method provided the same trends in behavior for the guest molecules in both bilayers; however, the penetration barriers calculated by COSMOmic did not differ between membranes. In conclusion, we show how membrane fluid properties affect the interaction of drug-like molecules with membranes.

  2. Athermal alterations in the structure in the canalicular membrane and ATPase activity induced by thermal levels of microwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelan, A.M.; Neubauer, C.F.; Timm, R.; Neirenberg, J.; Lange, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were exposed 30 min/day for 4 days to thermogenic levels (rectal temperature increase of 2.2 degrees C) of microwave radiation [2.45 GHz, 80 mW/cm 2 , continuous-wave mode (CW)] or to a radiant heat source resulting in an equivalent increase in body temperature of 2.2 degrees C. On the fifth day the animals were sacrificed and their livers removed. The canalicular membranes were isolated and evaluated for adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity, total fatty acid composition and membrane fluidity characteristics. Mg ++ -ATPase activity (V max ) decreased by 48.5% in the group exposed to microwave radiation, with no significant change in the group exposed to radiant heat. The decrease in Mg ++ -ATPase was partially compensated by a concomitant increase in Na + /K + -ATPase activity (170% increase in V max over control) in animals exposed to microwave radiation, while no change occurred in the group exposed to radiant heat. This alteration in ATPase activity in the group exposed to microwave radiation is associated with a large decrease in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. Conversely, the group exposed to radiant heat had an increase in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. The most dramatic changes were found in the levels of arachidonic acid. Finally, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin label technique used to measure the fluidity of the canalicular membranes of the animals in the three groups (sham, microwave radiation and radiant heat) indicated that the results were different in the three groups, reflecting the changes found in their fatty acid composition. The physiological response to open-quotes equivalentclose quotes thermal loads in rats is expressed differently for different types of energy sources. Possible mechanisms producing these divergent thermogenic responses are discussed. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Synthetic Biological Membrane (SBM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ultimate goal of the Synthetic Biological Membrane project is to develop a new type of membrane that will enable the wastewater treatment system required on...

  4. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  5. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  6. Premature rupture of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000512.htm Premature rupture of membranes To use the sharing features on this page, ... water that surrounds your baby in the womb. Membranes or layers of tissue hold in this fluid. ...

  7. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  8. Response Mechanisms of Bacterial Degraders to Environmental Contaminants on the Level of Cell Walls and Cytoplasmic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomíra Murínová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial strains living in the environment must cope with the toxic compounds originating from humans production. Surface bacterial structures, cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, surround each bacterial cell and create selective barriers between the cell interior and the outside world. They are a first site of contact between the cell and toxic compounds. Organic pollutants are able to penetrate into cytoplasmic membrane and affect membrane physiological functions. Bacteria had to evolve adaptation mechanisms to counteract the damage originated from toxic contaminants and to prevent their accumulation in cell. This review deals with various adaptation mechanisms of bacterial cell concerning primarily the changes in cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall. Cell adaptation maintains the membrane fluidity status and ratio between bilayer/nonbilayer phospholipids as well as the efflux of toxic compounds, protein repair mechanisms, and degradation of contaminants. Low energy consumption of cell adaptation is required to provide other physiological functions. Bacteria able to survive in toxic environment could help us to clean contaminated areas when they are used in bioremediation technologies.

  9. Response mechanisms of bacterial degraders to environmental contaminants on the level of cell walls and cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murínová, Slavomíra; Dercová, Katarína

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial strains living in the environment must cope with the toxic compounds originating from humans production. Surface bacterial structures, cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, surround each bacterial cell and create selective barriers between the cell interior and the outside world. They are a first site of contact between the cell and toxic compounds. Organic pollutants are able to penetrate into cytoplasmic membrane and affect membrane physiological functions. Bacteria had to evolve adaptation mechanisms to counteract the damage originated from toxic contaminants and to prevent their accumulation in cell. This review deals with various adaptation mechanisms of bacterial cell concerning primarily the changes in cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall. Cell adaptation maintains the membrane fluidity status and ratio between bilayer/nonbilayer phospholipids as well as the efflux of toxic compounds, protein repair mechanisms, and degradation of contaminants. Low energy consumption of cell adaptation is required to provide other physiological functions. Bacteria able to survive in toxic environment could help us to clean contaminated areas when they are used in bioremediation technologies.

  10. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin induces heterogeneity in lipid membranes: potential implication for its diverse biological action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, indomethacin (Indo, has a large number of divergent biological effects, the molecular mechanism(s for which have yet to be fully elucidated. Interestingly, Indo is highly amphiphilic and associates strongly with lipid membranes, which influence localization, structure and function of membrane-associating proteins and actively regulate cell signaling events. Thus, it is possible that Indo regulates diverse cell functions by altering micro-environments within the membrane. Here we explored the effect of Indo on the nature of the segregated domains in a mixed model membrane composed of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl-choline (di16:0 PC, or DPPC and dioleoyl phosphatidyl-choline (di18:1 PC or DOPC and cholesterol that mimics biomembranes.Using a series of fluorescent probes in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET study, we found that Indo induced separation between gel domains and fluid domains in the mixed model membrane, possibly by enhancing the formation of gel-phase domains. This effect originated from the ability of Indo to specifically target the ordered domains in the mixed membrane. These findings were further confirmed by measuring the ability of Indo to affect the fluidity-dependent fluorescence quenching and the level of detergent resistance of membranes.Because the tested lipids are the main lipid constituents in cell membranes, the observed formation of gel phase domains induced by Indo potentially occurs in biomembranes. This marked Indo-induced change in phase behavior potentially alters membrane protein functions, which contribute to the wide variety of biological activities of Indo and other NSAIDs.

  11. Optimizing Liposomal Cisplatin Efficacy through Membrane Composition Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisman, Natalia; Dos Santos, Nancy; Johnstone, Sharon; Tsang, Alan; Bermudes, David; Mayer, Lawrence; Tardi, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The first liposomal formulation of cisplatin to be evaluated clinically was SPI-077. Although the formulation demonstrated enhanced cisplatin tumor accumulation in preclinical models it did not enhance clinical efficacy, possibly due to limited cisplatin release from the formulation localized within the tumor. We have examined a series of liposomal formulations to address the in vivo relationship between cisplatin release rate and formulation efficacy in the P388 murine leukemia model. The base formulation of phosphatidylcholine: phosphatidylglycerol: cholesterol was altered in the C18 and C16 phospholipid content to influence membrane fluidity and thereby impacting drug circulation lifetime and drug retention. Phase transition temperatures (Tm) ranged from 42–55°C. The high Tm formulations demonstrated enhanced drug retention properties accompanied by low antitumor activity while the lowest Tm formulations released the drug too rapidly in the plasma, limiting drug delivery to the tumor which also resulted in low antitumor activity. A formulation composed of DSPC : DPPC : DSPG : Chol; (35 : 35 : 20 : 10) with an intermediate drug release rate and a cisplatin plasma half-life of 8.3 hours showed the greatest antitumor activity. This manuscript highlights the critical role that drug release rates play in the design of an optimized drug delivery vehicle. PMID:22312548

  12. Idiopathic epiretinal membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roelof; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M M; Los, Leonoor I

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is a fibrocellular membrane that proliferates on the inner surface of the retina at the macular area. Membrane contraction is an important sight-threatening event and is due to fibrotic remodeling. Methods: Analysis of the current literature

  13. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  14. Membrane contactor applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, R.; Feron, P.H.M.; Jansen, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a membrane contactor the membrane separation is completely integrated with an extraction or absorption operation in order to exploit the benefits of both technologies fully. Membrane contactor applications that have been developed can be found in both water and gas treatment. Several recently

  15. On "spinning" membrane models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; Sezgin, E.; Townsend, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Several alternative actions for a bosonic membrane have recently been proposed. We show that a linearly realized locally world-volume-supersymmetric (spinning membrane) extension of any of these actions implies an analogous extension of the standard Dirac membrane action. We further show that a

  16. Meniscus Membranes For Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2005-09-20

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  17. Meniscus membranes for separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C [Irvine, CA; Jorgensen, Betty [Jemez Springs, NM; Pesiri, David R [Aliso Viejo, CA

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  18. Plasma membrane ATPases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Bækgaard, Lone; Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    2011-01-01

    membrane include ABC transporters, vacuolar (V-type) H+ pumps, and P-type pumps. These pumps all utilize ATP as a fuel for energizing pumping. This review focuses on the physiological roles of plasma membrane P-type pumps, as they represent the major ATP hydrolytic activity in this membrane....

  19. Antibacterial Activity and Membrane-Disruptive Mechanism of 3-p-trans-Coumaroyl-2-hydroxyquinic Acid, a Novel Phenolic Compound from Pine Needles of Cedrus deodara, against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported that a novel phenolic compound isolated from Cedrus deodara, 3-p-trans-coumaroyl-2-hydroxyquinic acid (CHQA, exhibits a potent antioxidant activity. The present study aimed to evaluate the antibacterial activity of CHQA against eleven food-borne pathogens and to elucidate its mechanism of action against Staphylococcus aureus. The results from minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC determinations showed that CHQA exhibited moderate inhibitory effects on all of the tested pathogens with MIC values ranging from 2.5–10 mg/mL. Membrane potential measurements and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that CHQA damaged the cytoplasmic membrane of S. aureus, causing a significant membrane hyperpolarization with a loss of membrane integrity. Moreover, CHQA induced an increase in membrane fluidity and conformational changes in membrane protein of S. aureus, suggesting that CHQA probably acts on the cell membrane by interactions with membrane lipid and protein. Transmission electron microscopic observations further confirmed that CHQA disrupted the cell membrane of S. aureus and caused severe morphological changes, which even led to leakage of intracellular constituents. These findings indicated that CHQA could have the potential to serve as a natural antibacterial agent to control and prevent the growth of pathogens in food and in food-processing environments.

  20. Reporte de Investigación: El Efecto de ser Observado Sobre el Rendimiento en una Tarea de Fluidez Verbal Research Report: The Effect of Being Observed on a Verbal Fluidity Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Chaigneau

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Para estudiar cómo ser observado afecta el rendimiento cognitivo, generalmente se han usado experimentos de laboratorio en los que la tarea predominante ha sido la aritmética mental (por ejemplo, sumar mentalmente números de dos dígitos. Con el fin de aumentar la generalidad de estos efectos, usamos una tarea de fluidez verbal en un ambiente de mayor validez ecológica. Dos grupos de estudiantes (básicos y secundarios participaron en condiciones con o sin obsevadores. Los resultados mostraron que ser observado reduce la fluidez verbal. El patrón de resultados obtenido muestra que los efectos sociales sobre el rendimiento se extienden a una amplia gama de tareas cognitivas. Sugerimos la necesidad de tomar en cuenta estos efectos en el ámbito de la educación.To investigate how being observed influences cognitive performance, researchers have typically used laboratory experiments with mental math as the predominant task (e.g., doing double digit additions in one's mind. In order to increase the generalizability of these effects, we used a verbal fluidity task in a more ecologically valid setting. Elementary and secondary school students performed the task with or without observers. Data showed that being observed reduces verbal fluidity. The pattern of results is consistent with the effect of social factors on cognitive performance extending to a wide range of cognitive tasks. We suggest the need to take these effects into account in educational contexts.

  1. Plasma lipid pattern and red cell membrane structure in β-thalassemia patients in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seruni K.U. Freisleben

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last 10 years, we have investigated thalassemia patients in Jakarta to obtain a comprehensive picture of iron overload, oxidative stress, and cell damage.Methods: In blood samples from 15 transfusion-dependent patients (group T, 5 non-transfused patients (group N and 10 controls (group C, plasma lipids and lipoproteins, lipid-soluble vitamin E, malondialdehyde (MDA and thiol status were measured. Isolated eryhtrocyte membranes were investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy using doxyl-stearic acid and maleimido-proxyl spin lables. Data were analyzed statistically with ANOVA.Results: Plasma triglycerides were higher and cholesterol levels were lower in thalassemic patients compared to controls. Vitamin E, group C: 21.8 vs T: 6.2 μmol/L and reactive thiols (C: 144 vs. T: 61 μmol/L were considerably lower in transfused patients, who exert clear signs of oxidative stress (MDA, C: 1.96 vs T: 9.2 μmol/L and of tissue cell damage, i.e., high transaminases plasma levels. Non-transfused thalassemia patients have slight signs of oxidative stress, but no significant indication of cell damage. Erythrocyte membrane parameters from EPR spectroscopy differ considerably between all groups. In transfusion-dependent patients the structure of the erythrocyte membrane and the gradients of polarity and fluidity are destroyed in lipid domains; binding capacity of protein thiols in the membrane is lower and immobilized.Conclusion: In tranfusion-dependent thalassemic patients, plasma lipid pattern and oxidative stress are associated with structural damage of isolated erythrocyte membranes as measured by EPR spectroscopy with lipid and proteinthiol spin labels. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:178-84Keywords: electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, erythrocyte membrane, lipoproteins, oxidative stress, thalassemia, plasma lipids.

  2. Bacillus subtilis alters the proportion of major membrane phospholipids in response to surfactin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttlová, Petra; Pinkas, Dominik; Bechyňková, Olga; Fišer, Radovan; Svobodová, Jaroslava; Seydlová, Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Surfactin, an anionic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis, is an antimicrobial that targets the cytoplasmic membrane. Nowadays it appears increasingly apparent that the mechanism of resistance against these types of antibiotics consists of target site modification. This prompted us to investigate whether the surfactin non-producing strain B. subtilis 168 changes its membrane composition in response to a sublethal surfactin concentration. Here we show that the exposure of B. subtilis to surfactin at concentrations of 350 and 650 μg/ml (designated as SF350 and SF650, respectively) leads to a concentration-dependent growth arrest followed by regrowth with an altered growth rate. Analysis of the membrane lipid composition revealed modifications both in the polar head group and the fatty acid region. The presence of either surfactin concentration resulted in a reduction in the content of the major membrane phospholipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and increase in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), which was accompanied by elevated levels of phosphatidic acid (PA) in SF350 cultures. The fatty acid analysis of SF350 cells showed a marked increase in non-branched high-melting fatty acids, which lowered the fluidity of the membrane interior measured as the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of DPH. The liposome leakage of carboxyfluorescein-loaded vesicles resembling the phospholipid composition of surfactin-adapted cells showed that the susceptibility to surfactin-induced leakage is strongly reduced when the PG/PE ratio decreases and/or PA is included in the target bilayer. We concluded that the modifications of the phospholipid content of B. subtilis cells might provide a self-tolerance of the membrane active surfactin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative Effects of α-, β-, and γ-Carbolines on Platelet Aggregation and Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Tsuchiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption possibly affect platelet functions. To verify the hypothesis that some α-, β-, and γ-carboline components in cigarette smoke and alcoholic beverages may change platelet aggregability, their effects on human platelets were determined by aggregometry together with investigating their membrane effects by turbidimetry. Carbolines inhibited platelet aggregation induced by five agents with the potency being 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole > 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole > 1-methyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole. The most potent 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole showed 50% aggregation-inhibitory concentrations of 6–172 μM. Both γ-carbolines interacted with phosphatidylcholine membranes to lower the lipid phase transition temperature with the potency correlating to the antiplatelet activity, suggesting that the interaction with platelet membranes to increase their fluidity underlies antiplatelet effects. Given their possible concentration and accumulation in platelets, γ- and β-carbolines would provide cigarette smokers and alcohol drinkers with reduced platelet aggregability, and they may be responsible for the occurrence of hemorrhagic diseases associated with heavy smoking and alcoholics.

  4. Interactions of Borneol with DPPC Phospholipid Membranes: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Yin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Borneol, known as a “guide” drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol’s penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol’s presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol’s penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol.

  5. Microporous silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability is a crucial factor for the application of microporous silica-based membranes in industrial processes. Indeed, it is well established that steam exposure may cause densification and defect formation in microporous silica membranes, which are detrimental to both membrane...... permeability and selectivity. Numerous previous studies show that microporous transition metal doped-silica membranes are hydrothermally more stable than pure silica membranes, but less permeable. Here we present a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions...... on the microporous structure, stability and permeability of amorphous silica-based membranes, providing information on how to design chemical compositions and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile microporous structure....

  6. Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezeshkian, Weria; Ipsen, John H

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of extracellular ligands and proteins on the plasma membrane is required to perform specific cellular functions, such as signaling and endocytosis. Attractive forces that originate in perturbations of the membrane's physical properties contribute to this clustering, in addition to direct...... protein-protein interactions. However, these membrane-mediated forces have not all been equally considered, despite their importance. In this review, we describe how line tension, lipid depletion, and membrane curvature contribute to membrane-mediated clustering. Additional attractive forces that arise...... from protein-induced perturbation of a membrane's fluctuations are also described. This review aims to provide a survey of the current understanding of membrane-mediated clustering and how this supports precise biological functions....

  7. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  8. Influence of the bilayer composition on the binding and membrane disrupting effect of Polybia-MP1, an antimicrobial mastoparan peptide with leukemic T-lymphocyte cell selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Gorjão, Renata; Leite, Natália Bueno; de Souza, Bibiana Monson; Curi, Rui; Procopio, Joaquim; Ruggiero Neto, João; Palma, Mario Sérgio

    2012-06-19

    This study shows that MP-1, a peptide from the venom of the Polybia paulista wasp, is more toxic to human leukemic T-lymphocytes than to human primary lymphocytes. By using model membranes and electrophysiology measurements to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this selective action, the porelike activity of MP-1 was identified with several bilayer compositions. The highest average conductance was found in bilayers formed by phosphatidylcholine or a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (70:30). The presence of cholesterol or cardiolipin substantially decreases the MP-1 pore activity, suggesting that the membrane fluidity influences the mechanism of selective toxicity. The determination of partition coefficients from the anisotropy of Trp indicated higher coefficients for the anionic bilayers. The partition coefficients were found to be 1 order of magnitude smaller when the bilayers contain cholesterol or a mixture of cholesterol and sphingomyelin. The blue shift fluorescence, anisotropy values, and Stern-Volmer constants are indications of a deeper penetration of MP-1 into anionic bilayers than into zwitterionic bilayers. Our results indicate that MP-1 prefers to target leukemic cell membranes, and its toxicity is probably related to the induction of necrosis and not to DNA fragmentation. This mode of action can be interpreted considering a number of bilayer properties like fluidity, lipid charge, and domain formation. Cholesterol-containing bilayers are less fluid and less charged and have a tendency to form domains. In comparison to healthy cells, leukemic T-lymphocyte membranes are deprived of this lipid, resulting in decreased peptide binding and lower conductance. We showed that the higher content of anionic lipids increases the level of binding of the peptide to bilayers. Additionally, the absence of cholesterol resulted in enhanced pore activity. These findings may drive the selective toxicity of MP-1 to Jurkat cells.

  9. Supported ionic liquid membrane in membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    Membrane reactor is a device that integrates membrane based separation and (catalytic) chemical reaction vessel in a single device. Ionic liquids, considered to be a relatively recent magical chemical due to their unique properties, have a large variety of applications in all areas of chemical industries. Moreover, the ionic liquid can be used as membrane separation layer and/or catalytically active site. This paper will review utilization of ionic liquid in membrane reactor related applications especially Fischer-Tropsch, hydrogenation, and dehydrogenation reaction. This paper also reviews about the capability of ionic liquid in equilibrium reaction that produces CO2 product so that the reaction will move towards the product. Water gas shift reaction in ammonia production also direct Dimethyl Ether (DME) synthesis that produces CO2 product will be discussed. Based on a review of numerous articles on supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) indicate that ionic liquids have the potential to support the process of chemical reaction and separation in a membrane reactor.

  10. Grape tannin catechin and ethanol fluidify oral membrane mimics containing moderate amounts of cholesterol: Implications on wine tasting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Aurélien L; Saad, Ahmad; Dufourc, Erick J; Géan, Julie

    2016-11-01

    Wine tasting results in interactions of tannin-ethanol solutions with proteins and lipids of the oral cavity. Among the various feelings perceived during tasting, astringency and bitterness most probably result in binding events with saliva proteins, lipids and receptors. In this work, we monitored the conjugated effect of the grape polyphenol catechin and ethanol on lipid membranes mimicking the different degrees of keratinization of oral cavity surfaces by varying the amount of cholesterol present in membranes. Both catechin and ethanol fluidify the membranes as evidenced by solid-state 2 H NMR of perdeuterated lipids. The effect is however depending on the cholesterol proportion and may be very important and cumulative in the absence of cholesterol or presence of 18 mol % cholesterol. For 40 mol % cholesterol, mimicking highly keratinized membranes, both ethanol and catechin can no longer affect membrane dynamics. These observations can be accounted for by phase diagrams of lipid-cholesterol mixtures and the role played by membrane defects for insertion of tannins and ethanol when several phases coexist. These findings suggest that the behavior of oral membranes in contact with wine should be different depending of their cholesterol content. Astringency and bitterness could be then affected; the former because of a potential competition between the tannin-lipid and the tannin-saliva protein interaction, and the latter because of a possible fluidity modification of membranes containing taste receptors. The lipids that have been up to now weakly considered in oenology may be become a new actor in the issue of wine tasting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Emulsification using microporous membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran T. Vladisavljević

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Membrane emulsification is a process of injecting a pure dispersed phase or pre-emulsion through a microporous membrane into the continuous phase. As a result of the immiscibility of the two phases, droplets of the dispersed phase are formed at the outlets of membrane pores. The droplets formed in the process are removed from the membrane surface by applying cross-flow or stirring of the continuous phase or using a dynamic (rotating or vibrating membrane. The most commonly used membrane for emulsification is the Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG membrane, fabricated through spinodal decomposition in a melt consisting of Japanese volcanic ash (Shirasu, boric acid and calcium carbonate. Microsieve membranes are increasingly popular as an alternative to highly tortuous glass and ceramic membranes. Microsieves are usually fabricated from nickel by photolithography and electroplating or they can be manufactured from silicon nitride via Reactive Ion Etching (RIE. An advantage of microsieves compared to the SPG membrane is in much higher transmembrane fluxes and higher tolerance to fouling by the emulsion ingredients due to the existence of short, straight through pores. Unlike conventional emulsification devices such as high-pressure valve homogenisers and rotor-stator devices, membrane emulsification devices permit a precise control over the mean pore size over a wide range and during the process insignificant amount of energy is dissipated as heat. The drop size is primarily determined by the pore size, but it depends also on other parameters, such as membrane wettability, emulsion formulation, shear stress on the membrane surface, transmembrane pressure, etc.

  12. Ion-conducting membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Sajjad, Syed Dawar; Gao, Yan; Liu, Zengcai; Chen, Qingmei

    2017-12-26

    An anion-conducting polymeric membrane comprises a terpolymer of styrene, vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x. R.sub.s is a positively charged cyclic amine group. R.sub.x is at least one constituent selected from the group consisting Cl, OH and a reaction product between an OH or Cl and a species other than a simple amine or a cyclic amine. The total weight of the vinylbenzyl-R.sub.x groups is greater than 0.3% of the total weight of the membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  13. Gas separation with membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, G.; Michele, H.; Werner, U.

    1982-01-01

    Gas separation with membranes has already been tested in numerous fields of application, e.g. uranium enrichment of H 2 separation. In many of these processes the mass transfer units, so-called permeators, have to be connected in tandem in order to achieve high concentrations. A most economical operating method provides for each case an optimization of the cascades with regard to the membrane materials, construction and design of module. By utilization of the concentration gradient along the membrane a new process development has been accomplished - the continuously operating membrane rectification unit. Investment and operating costs can be reduced considerably for a number of separating processes by combining a membrane rectification unit with a conventional recycling cascade. However, the new procedure requires that the specifications for the module construction, flow design, and membrane properties be reconsidered. (orig.) [de

  14. Evidence for a temperature acclimation mechanism in bacteria: an empirical test of a membrane-mediated trade-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward K.; Singer, Gabriel A.; Kainz, Martin J.; Lennon, Jay T.

    2010-01-01

    1. Shifts in bacterial community composition along temporal and spatial temperature gradients occur in a wide range of habitats and have potentially important implications for ecosystem functioning. However, it is often challenging to empirically link an adaptation or acclimation that defines environmental niche or biogeography with a quantifiable phenotype, especially in micro-organisms. 2. Here we evaluate a possible mechanistic explanation for shifts in bacterioplankton community composition in response to temperature by testing a previously hypothesized membrane mediated trade-off between resource acquisition and respiratory costs. 3. We isolated two strains of Flavobacterium sp. at two temperatures (cold isolate and warm isolate) from the epilimnion of a small temperate lake in North Central Minnesota. 4. Compared with the cold isolate the warm isolate had higher growth rate, higher carrying capacity, lower lag time and lower respiration at the high temperature and lower phosphorus uptake at the low temperature. We also observed significant differences in membrane lipid composition between isolates and between environments that were consistent with adjustments necessary to maintain membrane fluidity at different temperatures. 5. Our results suggest that temperature acclimation in planktonic bacteria is, in part, a resource-dependent membrane-facilitated phenomenon. This study provides an explicit example of how a quantifiable phenotype can be linked through physiology to competitive ability and environmental niche.

  15. Effect of Structure on the Interactions between Five Natural Antimicrobial Compounds and Phospholipids of Bacterial Cell Membrane on Model Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella W. Nowotarska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of the naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde, and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms. The lipid monolayers consist of 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE, 1,2-dihexa- decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol (DPPG, and 1,1',2,2'-tetratetradecanoyl cardiolipin (cardiolipin. Surface pressure–area (π-A and surface potential–area (Δψ-A isotherms were measured to monitor changes in the thermodynamic and physical properties of the lipid monolayers. Results of the study indicated that the five compounds modified the three lipid monolayer structures by integrating into the monolayer, forming aggregates of antimicrobial –lipid complexes, reducing the packing effectiveness of the lipids, increasing the membrane fluidity, and altering the total dipole moment in the monolayer membrane model. The interactions of the five antimicrobial compounds with bacterial phospholipids depended on both the structure of the antimicrobials and the composition of the monolayers. The observed experimental results provide insight into the mechanism of the molecular interactions between naturally-occurring antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of the bacterial cell membrane that govern activities.

  16. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-01-22

    The present application offers a solution to the current problems associated with recovery and recycling of precious metals from scrap material, discard articles, and other items comprising one or more precious metals. The solution is premised on a microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  17. Polyarylether composition and membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Joyce; Brunelle, Daniel Joseph; Harmon, Marianne Elisabeth; Moore, David Roger; Stone, Joshua James; Zhou, Hongyi; Suriano, Joseph Anthony

    2010-11-09

    A composition including a polyarylether copolymer is provided. The copolymer includes a polyarylether backbone; and a sulfonated oligomeric group bonded to the polyarylether suitable for use as a cation conducting membrane. Method of bonding a sulfonated oligomeric group to the polyarylether backbone to form a polyarylether copolymer. The membrane may be formed from the polyarylether copolymer composition. The chain length of the sulfonated oligomeric group may be controlled to affect or control the ion conductivity of the membrane.

  18. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Gas separation membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    A dry, fabric supported, polymeric gas separation membrane, such as cellulose acetate, is prepared by casting a solution of the polymer onto a shrinkable fabric preferably formed of synthetic polymers such as polyester or polyamide filaments before washing, stretching or calendering (so called griege goods). The supported membrane is then subjected to gelling, annealing, and drying by solvent exchange. During the processing steps, both the fabric support and the membrane shrink a preselected, controlled amount which prevents curling, wrinkling or cracking of the membrane in flat form or when spirally wound into a gas separation element.

  20. Staphylococcal phenotypes induced by naturally occurring and synthetic membrane-interactive polyphenolic β-lactam resistance modifiers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Palacios

    Full Text Available Galloyl catechins, in particular (--epicatechin gallate (ECg, have the capacity to abrogate β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; they also prevent biofilm formation, reduce the secretion of a large proportion of the exoproteome and induce profound changes to cell morphology. Current evidence suggests that these reversible phenotypic traits result from their intercalation into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We have endeavoured to potentiate the capacity of ECg to modify the MRSA phenotype by stepwise removal of hydroxyl groups from the B-ring pharmacophore and the A:C fused ring system of the naturally occurring molecule. ECg binds rapidly to the membrane, inducing up-regulation of genes responsible for protection against cell wall stress and maintenance of membrane integrity and function. Studies with artificial membranes modelled on the lipid composition of the staphylococcal bilayer indicated that ECg adopts a position deep within the lipid palisade, eliciting major alterations in the thermotropic behaviour of the bilayer. The non-galloylated homolog (--epicatechin enhanced ECg-mediated effects by facilitating entry of ECg molecules into the membrane. ECg analogs with unnatural B-ring hydroxylation patterns induced higher levels of gene expression and more profound changes to MRSA membrane fluidity than ECg but adopted a more superficial location within the bilayer. ECg possessed a high affinity for the positively charged staphylococcal membrane and induced changes to the biophysical properties of the bilayer that are likely to account for its capacity to disperse the cell wall biosynthetic machinery responsible for β-lactam resistance. The ability to enhance these properties by chemical modification of ECg raises the possibility that more potent analogs could be developed for clinical evaluation.

  1. Staphylococcal Phenotypes Induced by Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Membrane-Interactive Polyphenolic β-Lactam Resistance Modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Lucia; Rosado, Helena; Micol, Vicente; Rosato, Adriana E.; Bernal, Patricia; Arroyo, Raquel; Grounds, Helen; Anderson, James C.; Stabler, Richard A.; Taylor, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Galloyl catechins, in particular (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECg), have the capacity to abrogate β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); they also prevent biofilm formation, reduce the secretion of a large proportion of the exoproteome and induce profound changes to cell morphology. Current evidence suggests that these reversible phenotypic traits result from their intercalation into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We have endeavoured to potentiate the capacity of ECg to modify the MRSA phenotype by stepwise removal of hydroxyl groups from the B-ring pharmacophore and the A:C fused ring system of the naturally occurring molecule. ECg binds rapidly to the membrane, inducing up-regulation of genes responsible for protection against cell wall stress and maintenance of membrane integrity and function. Studies with artificial membranes modelled on the lipid composition of the staphylococcal bilayer indicated that ECg adopts a position deep within the lipid palisade, eliciting major alterations in the thermotropic behaviour of the bilayer. The non-galloylated homolog (-)-epicatechin enhanced ECg-mediated effects by facilitating entry of ECg molecules into the membrane. ECg analogs with unnatural B-ring hydroxylation patterns induced higher levels of gene expression and more profound changes to MRSA membrane fluidity than ECg but adopted a more superficial location within the bilayer. ECg possessed a high affinity for the positively charged staphylococcal membrane and induced changes to the biophysical properties of the bilayer that are likely to account for its capacity to disperse the cell wall biosynthetic machinery responsible for β-lactam resistance. The ability to enhance these properties by chemical modification of ECg raises the possibility that more potent analogs could be developed for clinical evaluation. PMID:24699700

  2. Complex interplay between the P-glycoprotein multidrug efflux pump and the membrane: its role in modulating protein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Jane Sharom

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance in cancer is linked to expression of the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter (Pgp, ABCB1, which exports many structurally diverse compounds from cells. Substrates first partition into the bilayer and then interact with a large flexible binding pocket within the transporter’s transmembrane regions. Pgp has been described as a hydrophobic vacuum cleaner or an outwardly-directed drug/lipid flippase. Recent X-ray crystal structures have shed some light on the nature of the drug-binding pocket and suggested routes by which substrates can enter it from the membrane. Detergents have profound effects on Pgp function, and several appear to be substrates. Biochemical and biophysical studies in vitro, some using purified reconstituted protein, have explored the effects of the membrane environment. They have demonstrated that Pgp is involved in a complex relationship with its lipid environment, which modulates the behaviour of its substrates, as well as various functions of the protein, including ATP hydrolysis, drug binding and drug transport. Membrane lipid composition and fluidity, phospholipid headgroup and acyl chain length all influence Pgp function. Recent studies focusing on thermodynamics and kinetics have revealed some important principles governing Pgp-lipid and substrate-lipid interactions, and how these affect drug binding and transport. In some cells, Pgp is associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains which may modulate its functions. The relationship between Pgp and cholesterol remains an open question; however it clearly affects several aspects of its function in addition to substrate-membrane partitioning. The action of Pgp modulators appears to depend on their membrane permeability, and membrane fluidizers and surfactants reverse drug resistance, likely via an indirect mechanism. A detailed understanding of how the membrane affects Pgp substrates and Pgp’s catalytic cycle may lead to new strategies to combat

  3. Enantioseparation with liquid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gössi, Angelo; Riedl, Wolfgang; Schuur, Boelo

    Chiral resolution of racemic products is a challenging and important task in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, flavor, polymer and fragrances industries. One of the options for these challenging separations is to use liquid membranes. Although liquid membranes have been known for almost four decades

  4. Porous ceramic membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten

    2000-01-01

    Synthetic membranes are increasingly used for energy-efficient separation of liquid and gaseous mixtures in household applications, environmental technology and the chemical and energy industry. Besides, membranes are used in component-specific sensors in gas and liquid streams, preferably combined

  5. Polymide gas separation membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Bikson, Benjamin; Nelson, Joyce Katz

    2004-09-14

    Soluble polyamic acid salt (PAAS) precursors comprised of tertiary and quaternary amines, ammonium cations, sulfonium cations, or phosphonium cations, are prepared and fabricated into membranes that are subsequently imidized and converted into rigid-rod polyimide articles, such as membranes with desirable gas separation properties. A method of enhancing solubility of PAAS polymers in alcohols is also disclosed.

  6. Membrane module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschemekat, Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    A membrane module assembly adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation.

  7. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Membrane projection lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Davids, Paul S; Resnick, Paul J; Draper, Bruce L

    2015-03-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a three dimensional manufacturing technique for application with semiconductor technologies. A membrane layer can be formed over a cavity. An opening can be formed in the membrane such that the membrane can act as a mask layer to the underlying wall surfaces and bottom surface of the cavity. A beam to facilitate an operation comprising any of implantation, etching or deposition can be directed through the opening onto the underlying surface, with the opening acting as a mask to control the area of the underlying surfaces on which any of implantation occurs, material is removed, and/or material is deposited. The membrane can be removed, a new membrane placed over the cavity and a new opening formed to facilitate another implantation, etching, or deposition operation. By changing the direction of the beam different wall/bottom surfaces can be utilized to form a plurality of structures.

  9. Membrane technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, F.H.

    1997-01-01

    The main purpose of this dissertation is to prepare and characterize some synthetic membranes obtained by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of and A Am unitary and binary system onto nylon-6 films. The optimum conditions at which the grafting process proceeded homogeneously were determined. Some selected properties of the prepared membranes were studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), mechanical properties and U.V./vis, instruments and techniques were used to characterize the prepared membranes. The use of such membranes for the decontamination of radioactive waste and some heavy metal ions as water pollutants were investigated. These grafted membranes showed good cation exchange properties and may be of practical interest in waste water treatment whether this water was radioactive or not. 4 tabs., 68 figs., 146 refs

  10. Modification of membrane properties and fatty acids biosynthesis-related genes in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus: Implications for the antibacterial mechanism of naringenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Zeng, Xin-An; Wang, Man-Sheng; Brennan, Charles S; Gong, Deming

    2018-02-01

    In this work, modifications of cell membrane fluidity, fatty acid composition and fatty acid biosynthesis-associated genes of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 (S. aureus), during growth in the presence of naringenin (NAR), one of the natural antibacterial components in citrus plants, was investigated. Compared to E. coli, the growth of S. aureus was significantly inhibited by NAR in low concentrations. Combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with fluorescence polarization analysis revealed that E. coli and S. aureus cells increased membrane fluidity by altering the composition of membrane fatty acids after exposure to NAR. For example, E. coli cells produced more unsaturated fatty acids (from 18.5% to 43.3%) at the expense of both cyclopropane and saturated fatty acids after growth in the concentrations of NAR from 0 to 2.20mM. For S. aureus grown with NAR at 0 to 1.47mM, the relative proportions of anteiso-branched chain fatty acids increased from 37.2% to 54.4%, whereas iso-branched and straight chain fatty acids decreased from 30.0% and 33.1% to 21.6% and 23.7%, respectively. Real time q-PCR analysis showed that NAR at higher concentrations induced a significant down-regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated genes in the bacteria, with the exception of an increased expression of fabA gene. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of NAR against these two bacteria was determined, and both of bacteria underwent morphological changes after exposure to 1.0 and 2.0 MIC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antifungal activity of alkanols against Zygosaccharomyces bailii and their effects on fungal plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Fujita, Tomoko; Kubo, Isao

    2008-10-01

    A series of aliphatic primary alkanols from C(6) to C(13) were tested for antifungal activity against a food spoilage fungus Zygosaccharomyces bailii using a broth dilution method and were compared for their effects against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Z. rouxii. Decanol (C(10)) was found to be the most potent fungicide against Z. bailii at a minimum fungicidal concentration of 50 microg/ml (0.31 mM), whereas undecanol (C(11)) was found to be the most potent fungistatic at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 25 microg/ml (0.14 mM). The time-kill curve study showed that decanol was fungicidal against Z. bailii at any growth stage. Octanol (C(8)) increased plasma membrane fluidity in the spheroplast cells of S. cerevisiae. The primary antifungal action of alkanols comes from their ability to disrupt the native membrane-associated function of integral proteins nonspecifically as nonionic surface-active agents (surfactants). The antifungal activity of decanol against Z. bailii was slightly enhanced in combination with anethole. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Determination of the Fatty Acid Content of Biological Membranes: A Highly Versatile GC-MS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Emeric; Pugh, Michael Eugene

    2001-07-01

    The experiment involves the GC-MS of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) obtained from bacterial membranes. It takes about 2 h, from cell harvest to injection. This experiment is done in a lab course for non-science majors and in biochemistry. For non-science majors the focus is on GC-MS as a technique for fingerprinting and on the underlying basis of that fingerprinting. In biochemistry the focus is on the composition of membranes and how this changes with temperature--specifically how the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids changes to maintain constant cell fluidity. Combined with a parallel DNA experiment, the two major types of intermolecular forces important for the structure and function of biomolecules are compared. How this versatile experiment could be adapted in other chemistry courses is presented. The experiment has obvious appeal to biology majors, can be used to develop several important chemistry concepts, involves teamwork, and employs an important instrument. It could be used in the laboratory portion of a course other than biochemistry to fulfill the new ACS biochemistry requirement.

  13. Characteristics of fatty acid composition of lipids in higher plant vacuolar membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, S P; Konenkina, T A; Salyaev, R K

    2000-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of vacuolar membrane lipids from plant storage tissues and their genesis have been studied. A high content of unsaturated fatty acids (up to 77%) was observed in lipids of these membranes. Linoleic acid prevailed in vacuolar lipids of carrot and red beet (54.2 and 44.2%, respectively). Linolenic acid prevailed in vacuolar lipids of garden radish and turnip (39.7 and 33.9%, respectively). Regarding saturated fatty acids, vacuolar lipids of garden radish, carrot, and red beet contained predominantly palmitic acid (up to 20-24%). Unsaturated fatty acids, petroselinic (C18: 1omega12), cis-vaccenic (C18: 1omega7), hexatrien-7,-10,-13-oic (C16:3omega3) and others, were observed in vacuolar lipids of roots. These acids are usually synthesized in chloroplasts, and their presence in vacuolar lipids can be associated either with the transport of metabolites to the vacuole, or with endocytosis during vacuolar formation in the plant cell. The specific features of fatty acid composition of tonoplast lipids apparently are closely related to the tonoplast unique fluidity and mobility required for running osmotic processes in the cell and for forming transport protein assemblies.

  14. Free-radicals and advanced chemistries involved in cell membrane organization influence oxygen diffusion and pathology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2017-01-01

    A breakthrough has been discovered in pathology chemistry related to increasing molecular structure that can interfere with oxygen diffusion through cell membranes. Free radicals can crosslink unsaturated low-viscosity fatty acid oils by chain-growth polymerization into more viscous liquids and even solids. Free radicals are released by mitochondria in response to intermittent hypoxia that can increase membrane molecular organization to reduce fluidity and oxygen diffusion in a possible continuing vicious cycle toward pathological disease. Alternate computational chemistry demonstrates molecular bond dynamics in free energy for cell membrane physiologic movements. Paired electrons in oxygen and nitrogen atoms require that oxygen bonds rotate and nitrogen bonds invert to seek polar nano-environments and hide from nonpolar nano-environments thus creating fluctuating instability at a nonpolar membrane and polar biologic fluid interface. Subsequent mechanomolecular movements provide free energy to increase diffusion by membrane transport of molecules and oxygen into the cell, cell-membrane signaling/recognition/defense in addition to protein movements for enzyme mixing. In other chemistry calcium bonds to membrane phosphates primarily on the outer plasma cell membrane surface to influence the membrane firing threshold for excitability and better seal out water permeation. Because calcium is an excellent metal conductor and membrane phosphate headgroups form a semiconductor at the biologic fluid interface, excess electrons released by mitochondria may have more broad dissipation potential by safe conduction through calcium atomic-sized circuits on the outer membrane surface. Regarding medical conditions, free radicals are known to produce pathology especially in age-related disease in addition to aging. Because cancer cell membranes develop extreme polymorphism that has been extensively followed in research, accentuated easily-visualized free-radical models are

  15. Effect of acetone accumulation on structure and dynamics of lipid membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posokhov, Yevgen O; Kyrychenko, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The modulation of the properties and function of cell membranes by small volatile substances is important for many biomedical applications. Despite available experimental results, molecular mechanisms of action of inhalants and organic solvents, such as acetone, on lipid membranes remain not well understood. To gain a better understanding of how acetone interacts with membranes, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a POPC bilayer in aqueous solution in the presence of acetone, whose concentration was varied from 2.8 to 11.2 mol%. The MD simulations of passive distribution of acetone between a bulk water phase and a lipid bilayer show that acetone favors partitioning into the water-free region of the bilayer, located near the carbonyl groups of the phospholipids and at the beginning of the hydrocarbon core of the lipid membrane. Using MD umbrella sampling, we found that the permeability barrier of ~0.5 kcal/mol exists for acetone partitioning into the membrane. In addition, a Gibbs free energy profile of the acetone penetration across a bilayer demonstrates a favorable potential energy well of -3.6 kcal/mol, located at 15-16Å from the bilayer center. The analysis of the structural and dynamics properties of the model membrane revealed that the POPC bilayer can tolerate the presence of acetone in the concentration range of 2.8-5.6 mol%. The accumulation of the higher acetone concentration of 11.2 mol% results, however, in drastic disordering of phospholipid packing and the increase in the membrane fluidity. The acetone molecules push the lipid heads apart and, hence, act as spacers in the headgroup region. This effect leads to the increase in the average headgroup area per molecule. In addition, the acyl tail region of the membrane also becomes less dense. We suggest, therefore, that the molecular mechanism of acetone action on the phospholipid bilayer has many common features with the effects of short chain alcohols, DMSO, and

  16. Cadmium induces changes in sucrose partitioning, invertase activities, and membrane functionality in roots of Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia L. Osbeck).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podazza, G; Rosa, M; González, J A; Hilal, M; Prado, F E

    2006-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) uptake effects on sucrose content, invertase activities, and plasma membrane functionality were investigated in Rangpur lime roots ( CITRUS LIMONIA L. Osbeck). Cadmium accumulation was significant in roots but not in shoots and leaves. Cadmium produced significant reduction in roots DW and increment in WC. Leaves and shoots did not show significant differences on both parameters. Sucrose content was higher in control roots than in Cd-exposed ones. Apoplastic sucrose content was much higher in Cd-exposed roots than in control ones. Cd-exposed roots showed a significant decrease in both cell wall-bound and cytoplasmic (neutral) invertase activities; while the vacuolar isoform did not show any change. Alterations in lipid composition and membrane fluidity of Cd-exposed roots were also observed. In Cd-exposed roots phospholipid and glycolipid contents decreased about 50 %, while sterols content was reduced about 22 %. Proton extrusion was inhibited by Cd. Lipid peroxidation and proton extrusion inhibition were also detected by histochemical analysis. This work's findings demonstrate that Cd affects sucrose partitioning and invertase activities in apoplastic and symplastic regions in Rangpur lime roots as well as the plasma membrane functionality and H (+)-ATPase activity.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of cholesterol-rich membranes using a coarse-grained force field for cyclic alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDermaid, Christopher M., E-mail: chris.macdermaid@temple.edu; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.fiorin@temple.edu [Institute for Computational Molecular Science, Temple University, 1925 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122-1801 (United States); Kashyap, Hemant K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); DeVane, Russell H. [Modeling and Simulation, Corporate Research and Development, The Procter and Gamble Company, West Chester, Ohio 45069 (United States); Shinoda, Wataru [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Klauda, Jeffery B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The architecture of a biological membrane hinges upon the fundamental fact that its properties are determined by more than the sum of its individual components. Studies on model membranes have shown the need to characterize in molecular detail how properties such as thickness, fluidity, and macroscopic bending rigidity are regulated by the interactions between individual molecules in a non-trivial fashion. Simulation-based approaches are invaluable to this purpose but are typically limited to short sampling times and model systems that are often smaller than the required properties. To alleviate both limitations, the use of coarse-grained (CG) models is nowadays an established computational strategy. We here present a new CG force field for cholesterol, which was developed by using measured properties of small molecules, and can be used in combination with our previously developed force field for phospholipids. The new model performs with precision comparable to atomistic force fields in predicting the properties of cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers, including area per lipid, bilayer thickness, tail order parameter, increase in bending rigidity, and propensity to form liquid-ordered domains in ternary mixtures. We suggest the use of this model to quantify the impact of cholesterol on macroscopic properties and on microscopic phenomena involving localization and trafficking of lipids and proteins on cellular membranes.

  18. Effects of cholesterol on plasma membrane lipid order in MCF-7 cells by two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yixiu; Chen, Jianling; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipids- enriched microdomains on plasma membrane surface of mammal cells, involved in a variety of cellular processes. Depleting cholesterol from the plasma membrane by drugs influences the trafficking of lipid raft markers. Optical imaging techniques are powerful tools to study lipid rafts in live cells due to its noninvasive feature. In this study, breast cancer cells MCF-7 were treated with different concentrations of MβCD to deplete cholesterol and an environmentally sensitive fluorescence probe, Laurdan was loaded to image lipid order by two-photon microscopy. The generalized polarization (GP) values were calculated to distinguish the lipid order and disorder phase. GP images and GP distributions of native and cholesterol-depleted MCF-7 cells were obtained. Our results suggest that even at low concentration (0.5 mM) of MβCD, the morphology of the MCF-7 cells changes. Small high GP areas (lipid order phase) decrease more rapidly than low GP areas (lipid disorder phase), indicating that lipid raft structure was altered more severely than nonraft domains. The data demonstrates that cholesterol dramatically affect raft coverage and plasma membrane fluidity in living cells.

  19. Interaction of Soybean 7S Globulin Peptide with Cell Membrane Model via ITC, QCM-D and Langmuir Monolayer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan; Pan, Run-Ting; Ruan, Qi-Jun; Wan, Zhili; Guo, Jian; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2018-04-10

    To understand an underlying molecular mechanism on the cholesterol-lowering effect of soybean 7S globulins, the interactions of their pepsin-released peptides (7S-peptides) with cell membrane models consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (CHOL) were systematically studied. The results showed that 7S-peptides were bound to DPPC/DOPC/CHOL liposomes mainly through Van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds, and the presence of higher CHOL concentrations enhanced the binding affinity (e.g. DPPC/DOPC/CHOL = 1:1:0, binding ratio = 0.114; DPPC/DOPC/CHOL = 1:1:1, binding ratio = 2.02). Compression isotherms indicated that the incorporation of 7S-peptides increased the DPPC/DOPC/CHOL monolayer fluidity and the lipid raft size. The presence of CHOL accelerated the 7S-peptide accumulation on lipid rafts, which could serve as platforms for peptides to develop into β-sheet rich structures. These results allow us to hypothesize that 7S-peptides may indirectly influence membrane protein functions via altering the membrane organization in enterocyte.

  20. PERSISTENT PUPILLARY MEMBRANE OR ACCESSORY IRIS MEMBRANE?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriş, Monica; Horge, Ioan; Avram, Elena; Belicioiu, Roxana; Olteanu, Ioana Alexandra; Kedves, Hanga

    2015-01-01

    Frequently, in literature and curent practice, accessory iris membrane (AIM) and persistant pupillary membrane (PPM) are confused. Both AIM and PPM are congenital iris anomalies in which fine or thick iris strands arrise form the collarette and obscure the pupil. AIM, which is also called iris duplication, closely resembles the normal iris tissue in color and thickness and presents a virtual second pseudopupil aperture in the centre while PPM even in its extreme forms presents as a translucent or opaque membranous structure that extends across the pupil and has no pseudopupil. Mydriatiscs, laser treatment or surgery is used to clear the visual axis and optimize visual development. Surgical intervention is reserved for large, dense AIMs and PPMs. Our patient, a 29 year old male, has come with bilateral dense AIM, bilateral compound hyperopic astigmatism, BCVA OD = 0.6, BCVA OS = 0.4, IOP OU = 17 mmHg. To improve the visual acuity of the patient we decided to do a bilateral membranectomy, restoring in this way transparency of the visual axis. After surgery, the visual acuity improved to BCVA OD= 0.8, BCVA OS=0.8.

  1. Fuel cell membrane humidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1999-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell assembly has an anode side and a cathode side separated by the membrane and generating electrical current by electrochemical reactions between a fuel gas and an oxidant. The anode side comprises a hydrophobic gas diffusion backing contacting one side of the membrane and having hydrophilic areas therein for providing liquid water directly to the one side of the membrane through the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing are formed by sewing a hydrophilic thread through the backing. Liquid water is distributed over the gas diffusion backing in distribution channels that are separate from the fuel distribution channels.

  2. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a treatment that uses a pump to circulate blood through an artificial lung back into the bloodstream of a very ill baby. This system provides heart-lung bypass support ...

  3. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that will focus on the development and application of nonporous high gas flux perfluoro membranes with high temperature rating and excellent chemical resistance.

  4. Inverse colloidal crystal membranes for hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anh T; Wang, Xinying; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Yu, Bing; Yuan, Hua; Cong, Hailin; Luo, Yongli; Tang, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has gained interest due to its excellent performance in the purification of humanized monoclonal antibodies. The membrane material used in hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography has typically been commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride. In this contribution, newly developed inverse colloidal crystal membranes that have uniform pores, high porosity and, therefore, high surface area for protein binding are used as hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography membranes for humanized monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G purification. The capacity of the inverse colloidal crystal membranes developed here is up to ten times greater than commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride membranes with a similar pore size. This work highlights the importance of developing uniform pore size high porosity membranes in order to maximize the capacity of hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Fabrication of electrospun nanofibrous membranes for membrane distillation application

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2013-02-01

    Nanofibrous membranes of Matrimid have been successfully fabricated using an electrospinning technique under optimized conditions. Nanofibrous membranes are found to be highly hydrophobic with a high water contact angle of 130°. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and pore size distribution analysis revealed the big pore size structure of electrospun membranes to be greater than 2 μm and the pore size distribution is found to be narrow. Flat sheet Matrimid membranes were fabricated via casting followed by phase inversion. The morphology, pore size distribution, and water contact angle were measured and compared with the electrospun membranes. Both membranes fabricated by electrospinning and phase inversion techniques were tested in a direct contact membrane distillation process. Electrospun membranes showed high water vapor flux of 56 kg/m2-h, which is very high compared to the casted membrane as well as most of the fabricated and commercially available highly hydrophobic membranes. ©2013 Desalination Publications.

  6. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  7. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  8. Biomimetic membranes and methods of making biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, David Michael; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Yang, Shaorong

    2016-11-08

    The present disclosure is directed to biomimetic membranes and methods of manufacturing such membranes that include structural features that mimic the structures of cellular membrane channels and produce membrane designs capable of high selectivity and high permeability or adsorptivity. The membrane structure, material and chemistry can be selected to perform liquid separations, gas separation and capture, ion transport and adsorption for a variety of applications.

  9. Daptomycin resistance in enterococci is associated with distinct alterations of cell membrane phospholipid content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra N Mishra

    Full Text Available The lipopeptide antibiotic, daptomycin (DAP interacts with the bacterial cell membrane (CM. Development of DAP resistance during therapy in a clinical strain of Enterococcus faecalis was associated with mutations in genes encoding enzymes involved in cell envelope homeostasis and phospholipid metabolism. Here we characterized changes in CM phospholipid profiles associated with development of DAP resistance in clinical enterococcal strains.Using two clinical strain-pairs of DAP-susceptible and DAP-resistant E. faecalis (S613 vs. R712 and E. faecium (S447 vs. R446 recovered before and after DAP therapy, we compared four distinct CM profiles: phospholipid content, fatty acid composition, membrane fluidity and capacity to be permeabilized and/or depolarized by DAP. Additionally, we characterized the cell envelope of the E. faecium strain-pair by transmission electron microscopy and determined the relative cell surface charge of both strain-pairs.Both E. faecalis and E. faecium mainly contained four major CM PLs: phosphatidylglycerol (PG, cardiolipin, lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (L-PG and glycerolphospho-diglycodiacylglycerol (GP-DGDAG. In addition, E. faecalis CMs (but not E. faecium also contained: i phosphatidic acid; and ii two other unknown species of amino-containing PLs. Development of DAP resistance in both enterococcal species was associated with a significant decrease in CM fluidity and PG content, with a concomitant increase in GP-DGDAG. The strain-pairs did not differ in their outer CM translocation (flipping of amino-containing PLs. Fatty acid content did not change in the E. faecalis strain-pair, whereas a significant decrease in unsaturated fatty acids was observed in the DAP-resistant E. faecium isolate R446 (vs S447. Resistance to DAP in E. faecium was associated with distinct structural alterations of the cell envelope and cell wall thickening, as well as a decreased ability of DAP to depolarize and permeabilize the CM

  10. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated by an arti...... by an artificial liquid membrane. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction is a modification of hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction, where the hollow fibers are replaced by flat membranes in a 96-well plate format....

  11. Smart membranes for monitoring membrane based desalination processes

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-10-12

    Various examples are related to smart membranes for monitoring membrane based process such as, e.g., membrane distillation processes. In one example, a membrane, includes a porous surface and a plurality of sensors (e.g., temperature, flow and/or impedance sensors) mounted on the porous surface. In another example, a membrane distillation (MD) process includes the membrane. Processing circuitry can be configured to monitor outputs of the plurality of sensors. The monitored outputs can be used to determine membrane degradation, membrane fouling, or to provide an indication of membrane replacement or cleaning. The sensors can also provide temperatures or temperature differentials across the porous surface, which can be used to improve modeling or control the MD process.

  12. Polyurethane Nanofiber Membranes for Waste Water Treatment by Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jiříček

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-sustained electrospun polyurethane nanofiber membranes were manufactured and tested on a direct-contact membrane distillation unit in an effort to find the optimum membrane thickness to maximize flux rate and minimize heat losses across the membrane. Also salt retention and flux at high salinities up to 100 g kg−1 were evaluated. Even though the complex structure of nanofiber layers has extreme specific surface and porosity, membrane performance was surprisingly predictable; the highest flux was achieved with the thinnest membranes and the best energy efficiency was achieved with the thickest membranes. All membranes had salt retention above 99%. Nanotechnology offers the potential to find modern solutions for desalination of waste waters, by introducing new materials with revolutionary properties, but new membranes must be developed according to the target application.

  13. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Buonomenna, M. G.

    2012-06-24

    Membrane reactors are generally applied in high temperature reactions (>400 °C). In the field of fine chemical synthesis, however, much milder conditions are generally applicable and polymeric membranes were applied without their damage. The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane is to be used in. In this chapter a review of up to date literature about polymers and configuration catalyst/ membranes used in some recent polymeric membrane reactors is given. The new emerging concept of polymeric microcapsules as catalytic microreactors has been proposed. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of static magnetic fields on growth and membrane lipid composition of Salmonella typhimurium wild-type and dam mutant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihoub, Mouadh; El May, Alya; Aloui, Amine; Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2012-07-02

    This study was carried out to explore the adaptive mechanisms of S. typhimurium particularly, the implication of the Dam methyltransferase in the remodelling of membrane lipid composition to overcome magnetic field stress. With this aim, we focused our analyses on the increase in viable numbers and membrane lipid modifications of S. typhimurium wild-type and dam mutant cells exposed for 10h to static magnetic fields (SMF; 200 mT). For the wild-type strain, exposure to SMF induced a significant decrease (pdam mutant was significantly affected (pdam mutant strains. SMF significantly affected the phospholipid proportions in the two strains. The most affected were those of the acidic phospholipids, cardiolipins (CL). In the dam strain the phospholipid response to SMF followed a globally similar trend as in the wild-type with however lower effects, leading mainly to an unusual accumulation of CL. This would in part explain the different behavior of the wild-type and the dam strain. Results showed a significant increase of membrane cyclic fatty acids Cyc17 and Cyc19 in the wild-type strain but only the Cyc17 in the dam strain and a meaningful increase of the total unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) to total saturated fatty acids (SFAs) ratios of the exposed cells compared to controls from 3 to 9h (pdam mutants to maintain an optimum level of membrane fluidity under SMF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Physics of biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.

    The biological membrane is a complex system consisting of an aqueous biomolecular planar aggregate of predominantly lipid and protein molecules. At physiological temperatures, the membrane may be considered a thin (˜50Å) slab of anisotropic fluid characterized by a high lateral mobility of the various molecular components. A substantial fraction of biological activity takes place in association with membranes. As a very lively piece of condensed matter, the biological membrane is a challenging research topic for both the experimental and theoretical physicists who are facing a number of fundamental physical problems including molecular self-organization, macromolecular structure and dynamics, inter-macromolecular interactions, structure-function relationships, transport of energy and matter, and interfacial forces. This paper will present a brief review of recent theoretical and experimental progress on such problems, with special emphasis on lipid bilayer structure and dynamics, lipid phase transitions, lipid-protein and lipid-cholesterol interactions, intermembrane forces, and the physical constraints imposed on biomembrane function and evolution. The paper advocates the dual point of view that there are a number of interesting physics problems in membranology and, at the same time, that the physical properties of biomembranes are important regulators of membrane function.

  16. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence spectrosc......Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...... spectroscopy approaches provide very valuable structurally and dynamically related information on membranes, they generally produce mean parameters from data collected on bulk solutions of many vesicles and lack direct information on the spatial organization at the level of single membranes, a quality that can...... be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  17. Biopores/membrane proteins in synthetic polymer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garni, Martina; Thamboo, Sagana; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2017-04-01

    Mimicking cell membranes by simple models based on the reconstitution of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers represents a straightforward approach to understand biological function of these proteins. This biomimetic strategy has been extended to synthetic membranes that have advantages in terms of chemical and mechanical stability, thus providing more robust hybrid membranes. We present here how membrane proteins and biopores have been inserted both in the membrane of nanosized and microsized compartments, and in planar membranes under various conditions. Such bio-hybrid membranes have new properties (as for example, permeability to ions/molecules), and functionality depending on the specificity of the inserted biomolecules. Interestingly, membrane proteins can be functionally inserted in synthetic membranes provided these have appropriate properties to overcome the high hydrophobic mismatch between the size of the biomolecule and the membrane thickness. Functional insertion of membrane proteins and biopores in synthetic membranes of compartments or in planar membranes is possible by an appropriate selection of the amphiphilic copolymers, and conditions of the self-assembly process. These hybrid membranes have new properties and functionality based on the specificity of the biomolecules and the nature of the synthetic membranes. Bio-hybrid membranes represent new solutions for the development of nanoreactors, artificial organelles or active surfaces/membranes that, by further gaining in complexity and functionality, will promote translational applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Liver plasma membranes: an effective method to analyze membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Liang, Songping

    2012-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are critical for the maintenance of biological systems and represent important targets for the treatment of disease. The hydrophobicity and low abundance of plasma membrane proteins make them difficult to analyze. The protocols given here are the efficient isolation/digestion procedures for liver plasma membrane proteomic analysis. Both protocol for the isolation of plasma membranes and protocol for the in-gel digestion of gel-embedded plasma membrane proteins are presented. The later method allows the use of a high detergent concentration to achieve efficient solubilization of hydrophobic plasma membrane proteins while avoiding interference with the subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis.

  19. Membranes and pathophysiological mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowska, Monika; Strzelecka-Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Bessueille, Laurence

    Vascular calcification accompanies the pathological process of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Artery calcification results from trans-differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into cells resembling mineralization-competent cells such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes. The activity of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), a GPI-anchored enzyme necessary for physiological mineralization, is induced in VSMCs in response to inflammation. TNAP achieves its mineralizing function being anchored to plasma membrane of mineralizing cells and to the surface of their derived matrix vesicles (MVs), and numerous important reports indicate that membranes play a crucial role in initiating the crystal formation. In this review, we would like to highlight various functions of lipids and proteins associated to membranes at different stages of both physiological mineralization and vascular calcification, with an emphasis on the pathological process of atherosclerotic plaque formation.

  20. Characterization of graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, Sean; Lee, Jongho; Jain, Tarun; Karnik, Rohit; Idrobo, Juan; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Motaz

    2011-11-01

    Graphene, which exhibits very high breaking strength, atomistic thickness, and the ability to maintain stable nanometer-scale pores, has the potential to be a superior membrane material in both liquid- and gas-phase separation processes. We have recently demonstrated high-quality transfer of ~1 cm2 LPCVD graphene from copper foil to 200 nm polycarbonate track etch membranes with less than 0.3% of the area constituting holes or tears in the graphene, which is essential for characterizing transport through graphene. Through gallium ion bombardment we have introduced nanometer-scale pores in the transferred graphene and will report on the molecular and ionic transport through these membranes. Funded by the Center for Clean Energy and Water at MIT and KFUPM.

  1. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of

  2. Membrane adsorber for endotoxin removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Moita de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The surface of flat-sheet nylon membranes was modified using bisoxirane as the spacer and polyvinyl alcohol as the coating polymer. The amino acid histidine was explored as a ligand for endotoxins, aiming at its application for endotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. Characterization of the membrane adsorber, analysis of the depyrogenation procedures and the evaluation of endotoxin removal efficiency in static mode are discussed. Ligand density of the membranes was around 7 mg/g dry membrane, allowing removal of up to 65% of the endotoxins. The performance of the membrane adsorber prepared using nylon coated with polyvinyl alcohol and containing histidine as the ligand proved superior to other membrane adsorbers reported in the literature. The lack of endotoxin adsorption on nylon membranes without histidine confirmed that endotoxin removal was due to the presence of the ligand at the membrane surface. Modified membranes were highly stable, exhibiting a lifespan of approximately thirty months.

  3. Fouling resistant membrane spacers

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2017-10-12

    Disclosed herein are spacers having baffle designs and perforations for efficiently and effectively separating one or more membrane layers a membrane filtration system. The spacer (504) includes a body (524) formed at least in part by baffles (520) that are interconnected, and the baffles define boundaries of openings or apertures (525) through a thickness direction of the body of the spacer. Alternatively or additionally, passages or perforations (526A, 526B) may be present in the spacer layer or baffles for fluid flow there through, with the passages and baffles having a numerous different shapes and sizes.

  4. Mitigating leaks in membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnik, Rohit N.; Bose, Suman; Boutilier, Michael S.H.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Jain, Tarun Kumar; O' Hern, Sean C.; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Muataz A.; Jang, Doojoon

    2018-02-27

    Two-dimensional material based filters, their method of manufacture, and their use are disclosed. In one embodiment, a membrane may include an active layer including a plurality of defects and a deposited material associated with the plurality of defects may reduce flow therethrough. Additionally, a majority of the active layer may be free from the material. In another embodiment, a membrane may include a porous substrate and an atomic layer deposited material disposed on a surface of the porous substrate. The atomic layer deposited material may be less hydrophilic than the porous substrate and an atomically thin active layer may be disposed on the atomic layer deposited material.

  5. Organic separations with membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of present and emerging applications of membrane technology for the separation and purification of organic materials. This technology is highly relevant for programs aimed at minimizing waste in processing and in the treatment of gaseous and liquid effluents. Application of membranes for organic separation is growing rapidly in the petrochemical industry to simplify processing and in the treatment of effluents, and it is expected that this technology will be useful in numerous other industries including the processing of nuclear waste materials

  6. Membrane order in the plasma membrane and endocytic recycling compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaea, David B; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2017-01-01

    The cholesterol content of membranes plays an important role in organizing membranes for signal transduction and protein trafficking as well as in modulating the biophysical properties of membranes. While the properties of model or isolated membranes have been extensively studied, there has been little evaluation of internal membranes in living cells. Here, we use a Nile Red based probe, NR12S, and ratiometric live cell imaging, to analyze the membrane order of the plasma membrane and endocytic recycling compartment. We find that after a brief incubation to allow endocytosis, NR12S is distributed between the plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment. The NR12S reports that the endocytic recycling compartment is more highly ordered than the plasma membrane. We also find that the plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment are differentially affected by altering cellular cholesterol levels. The membrane order of the plasma membrane, but not the endocytic recycling compartment, is altered significantly when cellular cholesterol content is increased or decreased by 20%. These results demonstrate that changes in cellular cholesterol differentially alter membrane order within different organelles.

  7. Dimensional analysis of membrane distillation flux through fibrous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauter, Meagan

    We developed a dimensional-analysis-based empirical modeling method for membrane distillation (MD) flux that is adaptable for novel membrane structures. The method makes fewer simplifying assumptions about membrane pore geometry than existing theoretical (i.e. mechanistic) models, and allows selection of simple, easily-measureable membrane characteristics as structural parameters. Furthermore, the model does not require estimation of membrane surface temperatures; it accounts for convective heat transfer to the membrane surface without iterative fitting of mass and heat transfer equations. The Buckingham-Pi dimensional analysis method is tested for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) using non-woven/fibrous structures as the model membrane material. Twelve easily-measured variables to describe DCMD operating conditions, fluid properties, membrane structures, and flux were identified and combined into eight dimensionless parameters. These parameters were regressed using experimentally-collected data for multiple electrospun membrane types and DCMD system conditions, achieving R2 values >95%. We found that vapor flux through isotropic fibrous membranes can be estimated using only membrane thickness, solid fraction, and fiber diameter as structural parameters. Buckingham-Pi model DCMD flux predictions compare favorably with previously-developed empirical and theoretical models, and suggest this simple yet theoretically-grounded empirical modeling method can be used practically for predicting MD vapor flux from membrane structural parameters.

  8. Fouling in Membrane Distillation, Osmotic Distillation and Osmotic Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Laqbaqbi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Various membrane separation processes are being used for seawater desalination and treatment of wastewaters in order to deal with the worldwide water shortage problem. Different types of membranes of distinct morphologies, structures and physico-chemical characteristics are employed. Among the considered membrane technologies, membrane distillation (MD, osmotic distillation (OD and osmotic membrane distillation (OMD use porous and hydrophobic membranes for production of distilled water and/or concentration of wastewaters for recovery and recycling of valuable compounds. However, the efficiency of these technologies is hampered by fouling phenomena. This refers to the accumulation of organic/inorganic deposits including biological matter on the membrane surface and/or in the membrane pores. Fouling in MD, OD and OMD differs from that observed in electric and pressure-driven membrane processes such electrodialysis (ED, membrane capacitive deionization (MCD, reverse osmosis (RO, nanofiltration (NF, ultrafiltration (UF, microfiltration (MF, etc. Other than pore blockage, fouling in MD, OD and OMD increases the risk of membrane pores wetting and reduces therefore the quantity and quality of the produced water or the concentration efficiency of the process. This review deals with the observed fouling phenomena in MD, OD and OMD. It highlights different detected fouling types (organic fouling, inorganic fouling and biofouling, fouling characterization techniques as well as various methods of fouling reduction including pretreatment, membrane modification, membrane cleaning and antiscalants application.

  9. Antioxidant effect of 4-nerolidylcatechol and α-tocopherol in erythrocyte ghost membranes and phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, K.S.; Silva, A.H.M.; Mendanha, S.A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Rezende, K.R. [Laboratório de Biofarmácia e Farmacocinética de Substâncias Bioativas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2013-09-06

    4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) is found in Pothomorphe umbellata root extracts and is reported to have a topical protective effect against UVB radiation-induced skin damage, toxicity in melanoma cell lines, and antimalarial activity. We report a comparative study of the antioxidant activity of 4-NC and α-tocopherol against lipid peroxidation initiated by two free radical-generating systems: 2,2′-azobis(2-aminopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and FeSO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in red blood cell ghost membranes and in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Lipid peroxidation was monitored by membrane fluidity changes assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of a spin-labeled lipid and by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. When lipoperoxidation was initiated by the hydroxyl radical in erythrocyte ghost membranes, both 4-NC and α-tocopherol acted in a very efficient manner. However, lower activities were observed when lipoperoxidation was initiated by the peroxyl radical; and, in this case, the protective effect of α-tocopherol was lower than that of 4-NC. In egg PC vesicles, malondialdehyde formation indicated that 4-NC was effective against lipoperoxidation initiated by both AAPH and FeSO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, whereas α-tocopherol was less efficient in protecting against lipoperoxidation by AAPH, and behaved as a pro-oxidant for FeSO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical assay indicated that two free radicals were scavenged per 4-NC molecule, and one free radical was scavenged per α-tocopherol molecule. These data provide new insights into the antioxidant capacity of 4-NC, which may have therapeutic applications for formulations designed to protect the skin from sunlight irradiation.

  10. Interaction Study of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Cyclosporin A in Poly-Alpha-Cyclodextrin with Model Membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31P-NMR and Electron Spin Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Debouzy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of an amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A (ASD prepared with the copolymer alpha cyclodextrin (POLYA and cyclosporine A (CYSP were investigated by 1H-NMR in solution and its membrane interactions were studied by 1H-NMR in small unilamellar vesicles and by 31P 2H NMR in phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine in comparison with those of POLYA and CYSP alone. 1H-NMR chemical shift variations showed that CYSP really interacts with POLYA, with possible adduct formation, dispersion in the solid matrix of the POLYA, and also complex formation. A coarse approach to the latter mechanism was tested using the continuous variations method, indicating an apparent 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Calculations gave an apparent association constant of log Ka = 4.5. A study of the interactions with phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC showed that only limited interactions occurred at the polar head group level (31P. Conversely, by comparison with the expected chain rigidification induced by CYSP, POLYA induced an increase in the fluidity of the layer while ASD formation led to these effects almost being overcome at 298 K. At higher temperature, while the effect of CYSP seems to vanish, a resulting global increase in chain fluidity was found in the presence of ASD.

  11. Microencapsulation within crosslinked polyethyleneimine membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncelet, D; Alexakis, T; Poncelet de Smet, B; Neufeld, R J

    1994-01-01

    A microencapsulation technique is proposed involving the formation of a polyethyleneimine (PEI) membrane crosslinked by an acid dichloride. The membranes were formed at pH 8 in a non-polar solvent, conditions which are better suited for the encapsulation of biocatalysts or fragile biochemicals than those using polyamide membranes. The mean diameter and size distribution of the PEI microcapsules were similar to that observed with nylon membranes. The resultant microcapsules were spherical, free-flowing with a strong membrane. The mass of membrane was seen to be independent of the reaction time (1-4 min), insensitive to the PEI concentration and proportional to the concentration of crosslinking agent.

  12. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adaptive silicone-membrane lenses: planar vs. shaped membrane

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schneider, F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors compare the performance and optical quality of two types of adaptive fluidic silicone-membrane lenses. The membranes feature either a homogeneous thickness, or it is shaped resulting in an inhomogeneous cross...

  14. Hydrogen-selective membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

  15. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    small hemifusion diaphragm. To obtain a direct view of the fusion process, we have carried out extensive simulations of two bilayers, composed of block copolymers, which are immersed in a solvent which favors one of the blocks. As in the biological case, the membranes are placed under tension. This is essential as fusion ...

  16. Cell Membrane Coating Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronnie H; Kroll, Ashley V; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2018-03-27

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutic, prevention, and detection modalities have the potential to greatly impact how diseases are diagnosed and managed in the clinic. With the wide range of nanomaterials available, the rational design of nanocarriers on an application-specific basis has become increasingly commonplace. Here, a comprehensive overview is provided on an emerging platform: cell-membrane-coating nanotechnology. As a fundamental unit of biology, cells carry out a wide range of functions, including the remarkable ability to interface and interact with their surrounding environment. Instead of attempting to replicate such functions via synthetic techniques, researchers are now directly leveraging naturally derived cell membranes as a means of bestowing nanoparticles with enhanced biointerfacing capabilities. This top-down technique is facile, highly generalizable, and has the potential to greatly augment existing nanocarriers. Further, the introduction of a natural membrane substrate onto nanoparticles surfaces has enabled additional applications beyond those traditionally associated with nanomedicine. Despite its relative youth, there exists an impressive body of literature on cell membrane coating, which is covered here in detail. Overall, there is still significant room for development, as researchers continue to refine existing workflows while finding new and exciting applications that can take advantage of this developing technology. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 64; Issue 6. Fusion of biological ... The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in ...

  18. Bioelectrochemistry II membrane phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, M

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the lectures of the second course devoted to bioelectro­ chemistry, held within the framework of the International School of Biophysics. In this course another very large field of bioelectrochemistry, i. e. the field of Membrane Phenomena, was considered, which itself consists of several different, but yet related subfields. Here again, it can be easily stated that it is impossible to give a complete and detailed picture of all membrane phenomena of biological interest in a short course of about one and half week. Therefore the same philosophy, as the one of the first course, was followed, to select a series of lectures at postgraduate level, giving a synthesis of several membrane phenomena chosen among the most'important ones. These lectures should show the large variety of membrane-regulated events occurring in living bodies, and serve as sound interdisciplinary basis to start a special­ ized study of biological phenomena, for which the investigation using the dual approach, physico-che...

  19. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simu- lation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by tran- sient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified.

  20. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being employed in South African intensive care units for the management of patients with refractory hypoxaemia and for haemodynamic support, particularly following cardiothoracic procedures. ECMO is expensive, however, and there is a danger that this ...

  1. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by transient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified. Self-consistent ...

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  4. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Marty, Michael T.; Wilcox, Kyle C.; Klein, William L.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membr...

  5. Membrane fission by protein crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, Wilton T; Hayden, Carl C; Gadok, Avinash K; Zhao, Chi; Lafer, Eileen M; Rangamani, Padmini; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2017-04-18

    Membrane fission, which facilitates compartmentalization of biological processes into discrete, membrane-bound volumes, is essential for cellular life. Proteins with specific structural features including constricting rings, helical scaffolds, and hydrophobic membrane insertions are thought to be the primary drivers of fission. In contrast, here we report a mechanism of fission that is independent of protein structure-steric pressure among membrane-bound proteins. In particular, random collisions among crowded proteins generate substantial pressure, which if unbalanced on the opposite membrane surface can dramatically increase membrane curvature, leading to fission. Using the endocytic protein epsin1 N-terminal homology domain (ENTH), previously thought to drive fission by hydrophobic insertion, our results show that membrane coverage correlates equally with fission regardless of the hydrophobicity of insertions. Specifically, combining FRET-based measurements of membrane coverage with multiple, independent measurements of membrane vesiculation revealed that fission became spontaneous as steric pressure increased. Further, fission efficiency remained equally potent when helices were replaced by synthetic membrane-binding motifs. These data challenge the view that hydrophobic insertions drive membrane fission, suggesting instead that the role of insertions is to anchor proteins strongly to membrane surfaces, amplifying steric pressure. In line with these conclusions, even green fluorescent protein (GFP) was able to drive fission efficiently when bound to the membrane at high coverage. Our conclusions are further strengthened by the finding that intrinsically disordered proteins, which have large hydrodynamic radii yet lack a defined structure, drove fission with substantially greater potency than smaller, structured proteins.

  6. Dialysis membranes for blood purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K

    2000-01-01

    All of the artificial membranes in industrial use, such as a reverse-osmosis membrane, dialysis membrane, ultrafiltration membrane, microfiltration membrane and gas separation membrane, also have therapeutic applications. The most commonly used artificial organ is the artificial kidney, a machine that performs treatment known as hemodialysis. This process cleanses the body of a patient with renal failure by dialysis and filtration, simple physicochemical processes. Hemodialysis membranes are used to remove accumulated uremic toxins, excess ions and water from the patient via the dialysate, and to supply (deficit) insufficient ions from the dialysate. Dialysis membranes used clinically in the treatment of patients with renal failure account for by far the largest volume of membranes used worldwide; more than 70 million square meters are used a year. Almost all dialyzers now in use are of the hollow-fiber type. A hollow-fiber dialyzer contains a bundle of approximately 10000 hollow fibers, each with an inner diameter of about 200 microm when wet. The membrane thickness is about 20-45 microm, and the length is 160-250 mm. The walls of the hollow fibers function as the dialysis membrane. Various materials, including cellulose-based materials and synthetic polymers, are used for dialysis membranes. This paper reviews blood purification, hemodialysis and dialysis membranes.

  7. Autophagosomal membranes assemble at ER-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Codogno, Patrice; Morel, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    The biogenesis of autophagosome, the double membrane bound organelle related to macro-autophagy, is a complex event requiring numerous key-proteins and membrane remodeling events. Our recent findings identify the extended synaptotagmins, crucial tethers of Endoplasmic Reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites, as key-regulators of this molecular sequence.

  8. Alternative energy efficient membrane bioreactor using reciprocating submerged membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J; Smith, S; Roh, H K

    2014-01-01

    A novel membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot system, using membrane reciprocation instead of air scouring, was operated at constant high flux and daily fluctuating flux to demonstrate its application under peak and diurnal flow conditions. Low and stable transmembrane pressure was achieved at 40 l/m(2)/h (LMH) by use of repetitive membrane reciprocation. The results reveal that the inertial forces acting on the membrane fibers effectively propel foulants from the membrane surface. Reciprocation of the hollow fiber membrane is beneficial for the constant removal of solids that may build up on the membrane surface and inside the membrane bundle. The membrane reciprocation in the reciprocating MBR pilot consumed less energy than coarse air scouring used in conventional MBR systems. Specific energy consumption for the membrane reciprocation was 0.072 kWh/m(3) permeate produced at 40 LMH flux, which is 75% less than for a conventional air scouring system as reported in literature without consideration of energy consumption for biological aeration (0.29 kWh/m(3)). The daily fluctuating flux test confirmed that the membrane reciprocation is effective to handle fluctuating flux up to 50 LMH. The pilot-scale reciprocating MBR system successfully demonstrated that fouling can be controlled via 0.43 Hz membrane reciprocation with 44 mm or higher amplitude.

  9. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Michael T; Wilcox, Kyle C; Klein, William L; Sligar, Stephen G

    2013-05-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membrane proteins and have been used to study a wide variety of purified membrane proteins. This report details the incorporation of an unbiased population of membrane proteins from Escherichia coli membranes into Nanodiscs. This solubilized membrane protein library (SMPL) forms a soluble in vitro model of the membrane proteome. Since Nanodiscs contain isolated proteins or small complexes, the SMPL is an ideal platform for interactomics studies and pull-down assays of membrane proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the protein population before and after formation of the Nanodisc library indicates that a large percentage of the proteins are incorporated into the library. Proteomic identification of several prominent bands demonstrates the successful incorporation of outer and inner membrane proteins into the Nanodisc library.

  10. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    surface-linked ligands to diffuse freely in two dimensions. Ligands can become reorganized beneath cells, by reaction-diffusion processes, and may also adopt spatial configurations reflecting those of their cognate receptors on the cell surface (Figure 1B). This provides a significant benefit over conventional cell signaling and culturing systems that present inflexible distributions of signaling molecules. In this study, we observe marked differences in the response of cells to membrane surface displayed soluble ligands as a function of membrane fluidity. Tethering of soluble signaling molecules to fluid supported membranes opens up opportunities to use already developed membrane fabrication technologies to present soluble components within a surface array format.

  11. Membrane Cells for Brine Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, M.

    1982-01-01

    Membrane cells were developed as alternatives to mercury and diaphragm cells for the electrolysis of brine. Compares the three types of cells, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of membrane cells. (JN)

  12. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  13. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  14. Fundamentals of membrane bioreactors materials, systems and membrane fouling

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical, carefully researched, up-to-date summary of membranes for membrane bioreactors. It presents a comprehensive and self-contained outline of the fundamentals of membrane bioreactors, especially their relevance as an advanced water treatment technology. This outline helps to bring the technology to the readers’ attention, and positions the critical topic of membrane fouling as one of the key impediments to its more widescale adoption. The target readership includes researchers and industrial practitioners with an interest in membrane bioreactors.

  15. Cheap Thin Film Oxygen Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a membrane, comprising a porous support layer a gas tight electronically and ionically conducting membrane layer and a catalyst layer, characterized in that the electronically and ionically conducting membrane layer is formed from a material having a crystallite...

  16. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    . In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...... fractionation, such as removal of a side activity from the main enzyme activity. As a proof-of-concept, amino acids were used as model solution to test the feasibility of EMF in the application of amphoteric molecule separation. A single amino acid was used to illustrate the effect of an electric field...... on the separation performance were very small in the investigated range. The mass transport of each enzyme can be well explained by the Extended-Nernst-Planck equation. Better separation was observed at lower feed concentration, higher solution pH in the investigated range and with a polysulfone (PS) MF membrane...

  17. Building membrane nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Membrane nanopores--hollow nanoscale barrels that puncture biological or synthetic membranes--have become powerful tools in chemical- and biosensing, and have achieved notable success in portable DNA sequencing. The pores can be self-assembled from a variety of materials, including proteins, peptides, synthetic organic compounds and, more recently, DNA. But which building material is best for which application, and what is the relationship between pore structure and function? In this Review, I critically compare the characteristics of the different building materials, and explore the influence of the building material on pore structure, dynamics and function. I also discuss the future challenges of developing nanopore technology, and consider what the next-generation of nanopore structures could be and where further practical applications might emerge.

  18. Aquaporin-2 membrane targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma T B; Fenton, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) to the apical plasma membrane of kidney collecting duct principal cells is regulated mainly by the antidiuretic peptide hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). This process is of crucial importance for the maintenance of body water homeostasis....... In this brief review we assess the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and discuss the emerging concept that type 2 AVP receptor (V2R)-mediated AQP2 trafficking is cAMP-independent. the ability of the kidney to concentrate the urine and thereby maintain body water homeostasis depends on targeting....... For example, 1) stimulation with the nonspecific AC activator forskolin increases AQP2 membrane accumulation in a mouse cortical collecting duct cell line [e.g., Norregaard et al. (16)]; 2) cAMP increases CD water permeability (15); 3) the cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) can phosphorylate AQP2 on its...

  19. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  20. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become more attractive and feasible, due to advantages provided by the combination with regard to developments for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. The major drawbacks of MBR technology are related w...

  1. Pulse radiolysis studies of model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijman, M.G.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis the influence of the structure of membranes on the processes in cell membranes were examined. Different models of the membranes were evaluated. Pulse radiolysis was used as the technique to examine the membranes. (R.B.)

  2. Electrochemical polymer electrolyte membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Jianhua; Wilkinson, David P

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical Polymer Electrolyte Membranes covers PEMs from fundamentals to applications, describing their structure, properties, characterization, synthesis, and use in electrochemical energy storage and solar energy conversion technologies. Featuring chapters authored by leading experts from academia and industry, this authoritative text: Discusses cutting-edge methodologies in PEM material selection and fabricationPoints out important challenges in developing PEMs and recommends mitigation strategies to improve PEM performanceAnalyzes the cur

  3. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  4. Physiological and Transcriptional Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to d-Limonene Show Changes to the Cell Wall but Not to the Plasma Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Timothy C. R.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2013-01-01

    Monoterpenes can, upon hydrogenation, be used as light-fraction components of sustainable aviation fuels. Fermentative production of monoterpenes in engineered microorganisms, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has gained attention as a potential route to deliver these next-generation fuels from renewable biomass. However, end product toxicity presents a formidable problem for microbial synthesis. Due to their hydrophobicity, monoterpene inhibition has long been attributed to membrane interference, but the molecular mechanism remains largely unsolved. In order to gain a better understanding of the mode of action, we analyzed the composition and structural integrity of the cell envelope as well as the transcriptional response of yeast cells treated with an inhibitory amount of d-limonene (107 mg/liter). We found no alterations in membrane fluidity, structural membrane integrity, or fatty acid composition after the solvent challenge. A 4-fold increase in the mean fluorescence intensity per cell (using calcofluor white stain) and increased sensitivity to cell wall-degrading enzymes demonstrated that limonene disrupts cell wall properties. Global transcript measurements confirmed the membrane integrity observations by showing no upregulation of ergosterol or fatty acid biosynthesis pathways, which are commonly overexpressed in yeast to reinforce membrane rigidity during ethanol exposure. Limonene shock did cause a compensatory response to cell wall damage through overexpression of several genes (ROM1, RLM1, PIR3, CTT1, YGP1, MLP1, PST1, and CWP1) involved with the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. This is the first report demonstrating that cell wall, rather than plasma membrane, deterioration is the main source of monoterpene inhibition. We show that limonene can alter the structure and function of the cell wall, which has a clear effect on cytokinesis. PMID:23542628

  5. Novicidin interactions with phospholipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balakrishnan, Vijay Shankar

    Antimicrobial peptides target bacterial cell membranes and are considered as potential antibiotics. Their interactions with cell membranes are studied using different approaches. This thesis comprises of the biophysical investigations on the antimicrobial peptide Novicidin, interacting...... with liposomes. The lipid-induced changes in the peptide due to membrane binding, and the peptide-induced changes in the membrane properties were investigated using various spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, and the structural and thermodynamic aspects of peptide-lipid interactions are discussed. This helps...... in understanding not only the antimicrobial nature of Novicidin, but also sheds light on the membrane-peptide interactions....

  6. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Ruben; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efrain

    2011-01-01

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  7. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  8. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  9. Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horster, M

    2000-12-01

    Embryonic epithelial membrane transporters are organized into transporter families that are functional in several epithelial organs, namely, in kidney, lung, pancreas, intestine, and salivary gland. Family members (subtypes) are developmentally expressed in plasma membranes in temporospatial patterns that are 1) similar for one subtype within different organs, like aquaporin-1 (AQP1) in lung and kidney; 2) different between subtypes within the same organ, like the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in lung; and 3) apparently matched among members of different transporter families, as alpha-ENaC with AQP1 and -4 in lung and with AQP2 in kidney. Finally, comparison of temporal expression patterns in early embryonic development of transporters from different families [e.g., cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), ENaC, and outer medullary potassium channel] suggests regulatory activating or inactivating interactions in defined morphogenic periods. This review focuses on embryonic patterns, at the mRNA and immunoprotein level, of the following transporter entities expressed in epithelial cell plasma membranes: ENaC; the chloride transporters CFTR, ClC-2, bumetanide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter, Cl/OH, and Cl/HCO(3); the sodium glucose transporter-glucose transporter; the sodium/hydrogen exchanger; the sodium-phosphate cotransporter; the ATPases; and AQP. The purpose of this article is to relate temporal and spatial expression patterns in embryonic and in early postnatal epithelia to developmental changes in organ structure and function.

  10. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas Zac. (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: amolgado@fisica.uaz.edu.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-03-21

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  11. Neutrons and model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragneto, G.

    2012-11-01

    Current research in membrane protein biophysics highlights the emerging role of lipids in shaping membrane protein function. Cells and organisms have developed sophisticated mechanisms for controlling the lipid composition and many diseases are related to the failure of these mechanisms. One of the recent advances in the field is the discovery of the existence of coexisting micro-domains within a single membrane, important for regulating some signaling pathways. Many important properties of these domains remain poorly characterized. The characterization and analysis of bio-interfaces represent a challenge. Performing measurements on these few nanometer thick, soft, visco-elastic and dynamic systems is close to the limits of the available tools and methods. Neutron scattering techniques including small angle scattering, diffraction, reflectometry as well as inelastic methods are rapidly developing for these studies and are attracting an increasing number of biologists and biophysicists at large facilities. This manuscript will review some recent progress in the field and provide perspectives for future developments. It aims at highlighting neutron reflectometry as a versatile method to tackle questions dealing with the understanding and function of biomembranes and their components. The other important scattering methods are only briefly introduced.

  12. The Single Transmembrane Segment of Minimal Sensor DesK Senses Temperature via a Membrane-Thickness Caliper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria E; Oliveira, Rafael G; de Mendoza, Diego; Cybulski, Larisa E

    2016-11-01

    as a consequence of temperature changes and activates a pathway to restore membrane fluidity at low temperature. Here, we demonstrated that membrane thickness variations do occur at physiological temperatures by directly measuring Bacillus lipid membrane thickness. We also dissected the N-terminal sensing motif of MS-DesK at the molecular-biophysical level and found that the dyad phenylalanine-lysine at the water-lipid phase is critical for achievement of a fine-tuned sensitivity to temperature. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. In vivo and in vitro effect of imipramine and fluoxetine on Na+,K+-ATPase activity in synaptic plasma membranes from the cerebral cortex of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Zanatta

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of in vivo chronic treatment and in vitro addition of imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, or fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on the cortical membrane-bound Na+,K+-ATPase activity were studied. Adult Wistar rats received daily intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of imipramine or fluoxetine for 14 days. Twelve hours after the last injection rats were decapitated and synaptic plasma membranes (SPM from cerebral cortex were prepared to determine Na+,K+-ATPase activity. There was a significant decrease (10% in enzyme activity after imipramine but fluoxetine treatment caused a significant increase (27% in Na+,K+-ATPase activity compared to control (P<0.05, ANOVA; N = 7 for each group. When assayed in vitro, the addition of both drugs to SPM of naive rats caused a dose-dependent decrease in enzyme activity, with the maximal inhibition (60-80% occurring at 0.5 mM. We suggest that a imipramine might decrease Na+,K+-ATPase activity by altering membrane fluidity, as previously proposed, and b stimulation of this enzyme might contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of fluoxetine, since brain Na+,K+-ATPase activity is decreased in bipolar patients.

  14. Solid-state membrane module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John Howard [Salt Lake City, UT; Taylor, Dale M [Murray, UT

    2011-06-07

    Solid-state membrane modules comprising at least one membrane unit, where the membrane unit has a dense mixed conducting oxide layer, and at least one conduit or manifold wherein the conduit or manifold comprises a dense layer and at least one of a porous layer and a slotted layer contiguous with the dense layer. The solid-state membrane modules may be used to carry out a variety of processes including the separating of any ionizable component from a feedstream wherein such ionizable component is capable of being transported through a dense mixed conducting oxide layer of the membrane units making up the membrane modules. For ease of construction, the membrane units may be planar.

  15. Flux Enhancement in Membrane Distillation Using Nanofiber Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jiříček

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation (MD is an emerging separation technology, whose largest application potential lies in the desalination of highly concentrated solutions, which are out of the scope of reverse osmosis. Despite many attractive features, this technology is still awaiting large industrial application. The main reason is the lack of commercially available membranes with fluxes comparable to reverse osmosis. MD is a thermal separation process driven by a partial vapour pressure difference. Flux, distillate purity, and thermal efficiency are always in conflict, all three being strictly connected with pore size, membrane hydrophobicity, and thickness. The world has not seen the ideal membrane yet, but nanofibers may offer a solution to these contradictory requirements. Membranes of electrospun PVDF were tested under various conditions on a direct contact (DCMD unit, in order to determine the optimum conditions for maximum flux. In addition, their performance was compared to commonly available PTFE, PE, and PES membranes. It was confirmed that thinner membranes have higher fluxes and a lower distillate purity and also higher energy losses via conduction across the membrane. As both mass and heat transfer are connected, it is best to develop new membranes with a target application in mind, for the specific membrane module and operational conditions.

  16. Protection of DPPC phospholipid liposomal membrane against radiation oxidative damage by antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marathe, D.L.; Pandey, B.N.; Mishra, K.P [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2000-05-01

    Investigations in our laboratory on egg lecithin liposomes have recently showed a marked protection against damage by gamma radiation when cholesterol was present in the composition of vesicles suggesting a role of bilayer molecular architecture in the mechanism of free radical mediated lipid peroxidation. Present study was designed to determine the changes in bilayer permeability in DPPC unilamelar vesicles after exposure to gamma radiation by monitoring the leakage of pre-loaded carboxyfluorescein (CF), a marker loaded in aqueous interior of vesicle and fluidity alterations in the bilayer using fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), a membrane bilayer probe. It was found that radiation doses of an order of magnitude higher were required to produce detectable changes in vesicles of DPPC than in the vesicles of egg lecithin suggesting a modulating role of chemical nature of composition in the membrane radiation sensitivity. It was significant to find that the leakage of CF from and incorporation of DPH into vesicle bilayer showed similar response pattern to radiation doses (0.1-6 kGy) which was also found to be dose rate dependent. Presence of antioxidants; alpha-tocopherol (0.15 mole %) in the bilayer membrane or ascorbic acid (0.1 mM) in the aqueous region significantly protected DPPC vesicles from radiation damage as determined from DPH uptake kinetics suggesting involvement of reactive free radicals of lipids as well as water radicals in the mechanism of membrane peroxidative damage. The magnitude of protection was found to increase with the increasing concentration of both these antioxidants but comparisons showed that {alpha}-tocopherol was far more effective in protecting the vesicles than ascorbic acid. These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of radiation oxidative damage and its modification by radical scavenging and/or organizational modulation which emphasize the importance of structure and composition of

  17. Membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of separating gases using membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, W. S. Winston

    2012-10-02

    Membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of separating gases using membranes are provided. The membranes can include at least one hydrophilic polymer, at least one cross-linking agent, at least one base, and at least one amino compound. The methods of separating gases using membranes can include contacting a gas stream containing at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl with one side of a nonporous and at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl selectively permeable membrane such that at least one of CO.sub.2, H.sub.2S, and HCl is selectively transported through the membrane.

  18. Polyazole hollow fiber membranes for direct contact membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Maab, Husnul

    2013-08-07

    Porous hollow fiber membranes were fabricated from fluorinated polyoxadiazole and polytriazole by a dry-wet spinning method for application in desalination of Red Sea water by direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD). The data were compared with commercially available hollow fiber MD membranes prepared from poly(vinylidene fluoride). The membranes were characterized by electron microscopy, liquid entry pressure (LEP), and pore diameter measurements. Finally, the hollow fiber membranes were tested for DCMD. Salt selectivity as high as 99.95% and water fluxes as high as 35 and 41 L m -2 h-1 were demonstrated, respectively, for polyoxadiazole and polytriazole hollow fiber membranes, operating at 80 C feed temperature and 20 C permeate. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A method for preparing polybenzimidazole or polybenzimidazole blend membranes and fabricating gas diffusion electrodes and membrane-electrode assemblies is provided for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Blend polymer electrolyte membranes based on PBI and various thermopl......A method for preparing polybenzimidazole or polybenzimidazole blend membranes and fabricating gas diffusion electrodes and membrane-electrode assemblies is provided for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Blend polymer electrolyte membranes based on PBI and various...... thermoplastic polymers for high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells have also been developed. Miscible blends are used for solution casting of polymer membranes (solid electrolytes). High conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength were obtained for the blend polymer solid electrolytes...... electrolyte membrane by hot-press. The fuel cell can operate at temperatures up to at least 200 °C with hydrogen-rich fuel containing high ratios of carbon monoxide such as 3 vol% carbon monoxide or more, compared to the carbon monoxide tolerance of 10-20 ppm level for Nafion$m(3)-based polymer electrolyte...

  20. Freezing point depression of water in phospholipid membranes: a solid-state NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, Byung Soo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2008-12-02

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to + 10 degrees C were obtained from fully (2)H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0 degrees C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of is 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37.

  1. Amodiaquine polymeric membrane electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malongo, T Kimbeni; Blankert, B; Kambu, O; Amighi, K; Nsangu, J; Kauffmann, J-M

    2006-04-11

    The construction and electrochemical response characteristics of two types of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane sensors for the determination of amodiaquine hydrochloride (ADQ.2HCl) are described. The sensing membrane comprised an ion-pair formed between the cationic drug and sodium tetraphenyl borate (NaTPB) or potassium tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl) borate (KTCPB) in a plasticized PVC matrix. Eight PVC membrane ion-selective electrodes were fabricated and studied. Several plasticizers were studied namely, dioctyl phthalate (DOP), 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE), dioctyl phenylphosphonate (DOPP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (EHA). The sensors display a fast, stable and near-Nernstian response over a relative wide ADQ concentration range (3.2 x 10(-6) to 2.0 x 10(-2) M), with slopes comprised between 28.5 and 31.4 mV dec(-1) in a pH range comprised between pH 3.7 and 5.5. The assay of amodiaquine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms using one of the proposed sensors gave average recoveries of 104.3 and 99.9 with R.S.D. of 0.3 and 0.6% for tablets (Malaritab) and a reconstituted powder containing ADQ.2HCl, respectively. The sensor was also used for dissolution profile studies of two drug formulations. The sensor proved to have a good selectivity for ADQ.2HCl over some inorganic and organic compounds, however, berberine chloride interfered significantly. The results were validated by comparison with a spectrophotometric assay according to the USP pharmacopoeia.

  2. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  3. [Juvenile idiopathic epiretinal membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopoulou, K; Krause, S; Fili, S; Hayvazov, S; Schilling, H; Kohlhaas, M

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is very rare in adolescent patients. The pathogenesis remains unclear although the role of hyalocytes is of major importance. The clinical features in young patients are different from those in older patients. We describe a case of iERM in a 15-year-old girl who presented with metamorphopsia of the right eye. This case report presents the basis for the decision for surgical treatment as well as the clinical features at follow-up examination 9 months after surgery.

  4. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  5. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared

  6. Gas separations using inorganic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egan, B.Z.; Singh, S.P.N. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a research and development program to develop, fabricate, and evaluate inorganic membranes for separating gases at high temperatures and pressures in hostile process environments encountered in fossil energy conversion processes such as coal gasification. The primary emphasis of the research was on the separation and recovery of hydrogen from synthesis gas. Major aspects of the program included assessment of the worldwide research and development activity related to gas separations using inorganic membranes, identification and selection of candidate membrane materials, fabrication and characterization of membranes using porous membrane technology developed at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, and evaluation of the separations capability of the fabricated membranes in terms of permeabilities and fluxes of gases.

  7. Membrane fouling and wetting in membrane distillation and their mitigation by novel membranes with special wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhangxin; Lin, Shihong

    2017-04-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) has been identified as a promising technology to desalinate the hypersaline wastewaters from fracking and other industries. However, conventional hydrophobic MD membranes are highly susceptible to fouling and/or wetting by the hydrophobic and/or amphiphilic constituents in these wastewaters of complex compositions. This study systematically investigates the impact of the surface wetting properties on the membrane wetting and/or fouling behaviors in MD. Specifically, we compare the wetting and fouling resistance of three types of membranes of different wetting properties, including hydrophobic and omniphobic membranes as well as composite membranes with a hydrophobic substrate and a superhydrophilic top surface. We challenged the MD membranes with hypersaline feed solutions that contained a relatively high concentration of crude oil with and without added synthetic surfactants, Triton X-100. We found that the composite membranes with superhydrophilic top surface were robustly resistant to oil fouling in the absence of Triton X-100, but were subject to pore wetting in the presence of Triton X-100. On the other hand, the omniphobic membranes were easily fouled by oil-in-water emulsion without Triton X-100, but successfully sustained stable MD performance with Triton X-100 stabilized oil-in-water emulsion as the feed solution. In contrast, the conventional hydrophobic membranes failed readily regardless whether Triton X-100 was present, although via different mechanisms. These findings are corroborated by contact angle measures as well as oil-probe force spectroscopy. This study provides a holistic picture regarding how a hydrophobic membrane fails in MD and how we can leverage membranes with special wettability to prevent membrane failure in MD operations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell invasion through basement membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Sherwood, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is an essential part of normal development and physiology, and occurs during the pathological progression of human inflammatory diseases and cancer. F-actin-rich membrane protrusions, called invadopodia, have been hypothesized to be the “drill bits” of invasive cells, mediating invasion through the dense, highly cross-linked basement membrane matrix. Though studied in vitro for over 30 y, invadopodia function in vivo has remained elusive. We have recent...

  9. Inorganic membranes and catalytic reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Maria do Carmo

    1997-01-01

    Membrane reactors are reviewed with emphasis in their applications in catalysis field. The basic principles of these systems are presented as well as a historical development. The several kinds of catalytic membranes and their preparations are discussed including the problems, needs and challenges to be solved in order to use these reactors in commercial processes. Some applications of inorganic membrane reactors are also shown. It was concluded that these systems have a great potential for i...

  10. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  11. Conical Nanopore PC Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clochard, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    Template synthesis can be considered an alternative to conventional lithography methods. It is one way of providing a panel of nanoscale metallic wires, tubes or organic polymeric devices. Our interest is focused on track-etched membranes produced from swift heavy ions bombardment of polymer films. In comparison with self-assembly of block copolymers, this bottom-up approach has the advantage of being economic, it is not time-consuming and it allows track formation of diverse geometries. Tailoring of the conical nanopore tip opening would have a tremendous impact on sensing domain, as well as on fundamental understanding of perpendicular giant magneto Resistance properties observed in metallic multilayered cylindrical nanowires. By combining low-energy heavy ion beam radiation effects with asymmetric etching, the etching temperature and time can be tuned to prepare conical nanopores of controlled geometry from 0.5 to 1μm at the base to a few nanometers at the top. Asymmetric etching onto PC films was pH-monitored at various temperatures in the range of 65 degree to 80 degree. Fluence impact onto track etch pores was also investigated. The pore shape characterization was achieved by electronic microscopy measurements on membrane surfaces and on electrodeposited nanowires. We have also observed a difference in the conical shape of replicated nanowires. Some showed sting shapes and others displayed shell shapes depending on whether a neutralizing agent was used during etching or not

  12. Characterization of Polymeric Nanofiltration Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoncic, B.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As membrane processes are increasingly used in industrial applications, there is a growing interest in methods of membrane characterization. Traditional membrane characteristics, such as cut-off value and pore size distribution, are being supplemented by membrane surface characteristics, such as charge density or zeta potential and hydrophobicity. This study, therefore, characterizes the three different polymeric membranes used (NFT-50, DL and DK. The molecular mass cut-off (MMCO value was determined using a set of reference solutes within the molecular range 150-600 Da, whereas streaming potential measurements enabled quantification of the surface charge characteristics. Hydrophobicity was studied using contact angle measurements. The results indicated that even though all three membranes had very similar layer compositions which consisted of poly(piperazneamide, as top layers they showed different values of measured quantitive. The NFT-50 membrane had the lowest MMCO value and the most hydrophilic membrane surface, followed by DK and DL. Membrane fouling as measured by flux reduction was determined by streaming potential measurements and accompanied by a positive change in zeta potential.

  13. Track membranes, production, properties, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesjan, Yu.Ts.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of producing track membranes on heavy ion beams of the Flerov Laboratory are considered. The parameters of the running accelerators and equipment for the irradiation of polymer foils are presented. The process of production of track membranes based on different polymeric materials and various applications of the membranes are described. Special attention is given to the principally new applications and devices developed at the Laboratory. This report presents the results obtained by a big group of scientists and engineers working in the field of elaboration, investigation and application of track membranes (author). 21 refs, 20 figs, 1 tab

  14. Amniotic membrane for burn trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamaluddin Zainol; Hasim Mohammad

    1999-01-01

    Amniotic membranes are derived from human placentae at birth. They have two layers mainly the amniotic and the chorionic surfaces which are separated by a thin layer of connective tissues. The two layers are separated during procurement, the placenta and the chorionic side are discarded and the amnion membranes are then further processed. Amnion membranes are normally procured from placentae which are normally free of infections, i.e; the mothers are antenatally screened for sexually transmitted diseases or AlDs related diseases. Intrapartum the mother should not be having chorioamnionitis or jaundice. Sometimes the amniotic membranes are acquired from fresh elective caeserian sections. After processing, the amniotic membranes are packed in two layers of polypropylene and radiated with cobalt 60 at a dose of about 25 kGy. The amniotic membranes are clinically used to cover burn surfaces especially effective for superficial or partial thickness burns. The thin membranes adhered well to the trauma areas and peeled off automatically by the second week. No change of dressing were necessary during these times because of the close adherence, there were less chance of external contamination or infections of these wounds. Due to their flexibility they are very useful to cover difference contours of the human body for example the face, body, elbows or knees. However our experience revealed that amniotic membranes are not useful for third degree bums because the membranes dissolves by the enzymes present in the wounds

  15. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  16. Challenges in commercializing biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine Elkjær

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One...... of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments...... relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes....

  17. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  18. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  19. Composite membrane with integral rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

    2015-01-27

    Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

  20. Ethanol enhances neutrophil membrane tether growth and slows rolling on P-selectin but reduces capture from flow and firm arrest on IL-1-treated endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hana; Diamond, Scott L

    2008-08-15

    The effects of ethanol at physiological concentrations on neutrophil membrane tether pulling, adhesion lifetime, rolling, and firm arrest behavior were studied in parallel-plate flow chamber assays with adherent 1-microm-diameter P-selectin-coated beads, P-selectin-coated surfaces, or IL-1-stimulated human endothelium. Ethanol (0.3% by volume) had no effect on P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), L-selectin, or CD11b levels but caused PSGL-1 redistribution. Also, ethanol prevented fMLP-induced CD11b up-regulation. During neutrophil collisions with P-selectin-coated beads at venous wall shear rates of 25-100 s(-1), ethanol increased membrane tether length and membrane growth rate by 2- to 3-fold but reduced the adhesion efficiency (detectable bonding per total collisions) by 2- to 3-fold, compared with untreated neutrophils. Without ethanol treatment, adhesion efficiency and adhesion lifetime declined as wall shear rate was increased, whereas ethanol caused the adhesion lifetime over all events to increase from 0.1 s to 0.5 s as wall shear rate was increased, an example of pharmacologically induced hydrodynamic thresholding. Consistent with this increased membrane fluidity and reduced capture, ethanol reduced rolling velocity by 37% and rolling flux by 55% on P-selectin surfaces at 100 s(-1), compared with untreated neutrophils. On IL-1-stimulated endothelium, rolling velocity was unchanged by ethanol treatment, but the fraction of cells converting to firm arrest was reduced from 35% to 24% with ethanol. Overall, ethanol caused competing biophysical and biochemical effects that: 1) reduced capture due to PSGL-1 redistribution, 2) reduced rolling velocity due to increased membrane tether growth, and 3) reduced conversion to firm arrest.

  1. Metrolingualism: Fixity, Fluidity and Language in Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuji, Emi; Pennycook, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    By extending the notion of metroethnicity, this paper proposes the notion of metrolingualism, creative linguistic practices across borders of culture, history and politics. Metrolingualism gives us a way to move beyond current terms such as "multilingualism" and "multiculturalism". It is a product of modern and often urban interaction, describing…

  2. Comparison and analysis of membrane fouling between flocculent sludge membrane bioreactor and granular sludge membrane bioreactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing-Feng

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of inoculating granules on reducing membrane fouling. In order to evaluate the differences in performance between flocculent sludge and aerobic granular sludge in membrane reactors (MBRs, two reactors were run in parallel and various parameters related to membrane fouling were measured. The results indicated that specific resistance to the fouling layer was five times greater than that of mixed liquor sludge in the granular MBR. The floc sludge more easily formed a compact layer on the membrane surface, and increased membrane resistance. Specifically, the floc sludge had a higher moisture content, extracellular polymeric substances concentration, and negative surface charge. In contrast, aerobic granules could improve structural integrity and strength, which contributed to the preferable permeate performance. Therefore, inoculating aerobic granules in a MBR presents an effective method of reducing the membrane fouling associated with floc sludge the perspective of from the morphological characteristics of microbial aggregates.

  3. Degradation of Polypropylene Membranes Applied in Membrane Distillation Crystallizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Gryta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The studies on the resistance to degradation of capillary polypropylene membranes assembled in a membrane crystallizer were performed. The supersaturation state of salt was achieved by evaporation of water from the NaCl saturated solutions using membrane distillation process. A high feed temperature (363 K was used in order to enhance the degradation effects and to shorten the test times. Salt crystallization was carried out by the application of batch or fluidized bed crystallizer. A significant membrane scaling was observed regardless of the method of realized crystallization. The SEM-EDS, DSC, and FTIR methods were used for investigations of polypropylene degradation. The salt crystallization onto the membrane surface accelerated polypropylene degradation. Due to a polymer degradation, the presence of carbonyl groups on the membranes’ surface was identified. Besides the changes in the chemical structure a significant mechanical damage of the membranes, mainly caused by the internal scaling, was also found. As a result, the membranes were severely damaged after 150 h of process operation. A high level of salt rejection was maintained despite damage to the external membrane surface.

  4. Effect of temperature shocks on membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den P.; Satpradit, O.A.; Bentem, van A.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Temmink, B.G.; Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature is known to influence the biological performance of conventional activated sludge systems. In membrane bioreactors (MBRs), temperature not only affects the bioconversion process but is also shown to have an effect on the membrane performance. Four phenomena are generally reported to

  5. Taming Membranes : Functional Immobilization of Biological Membranes in Hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Ilja; Mukherjee, Nobina; de Jong, Menno R.; Tans, Sander; Kocer, Armagan; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Single molecule studies on membrane proteins embedded in their native environment are hampered by the intrinsic difficulty of immobilizing elastic and sensitive biological membranes without interfering with protein activity. Here, we present hydrogels composed of nano-scaled fibers as a generally

  6. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  7. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  8. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  9. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  10. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-12-31

    Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

    2006-06-30

    A non-agglomerated and nanocrystalline-sized powder was successfully produced using ethylene glycol nitrate methods. The LSFT powder prepared using this method exhibits well dispersed and nano-sized particles about 100-200 nm. The density of LSFT sintered at 1300 C was about 90% of the theoretical density at which is 100 C less than that of the previous LSFT which was sintered at 1400 C. The sample sintered at 1400 C exhibited the evidence of a liquid phase at the grain boundaries and 2nd phase formation which probably caused low mechanical stability. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient were measured as a function of temperature. The LSFT-CGO specimens were cut from the as sintered bars and used for the evaluation of Mechanical Properties after polishing. The effect of strain rate on the flexural strength of the LSFT-CGO test specimens was studied. Three strain rates 6, 60 and 600 {micro}m/ min were chosen for this study. It is observed from the results that with increasing cross head speed the membrane takes higher loads to fail. A reduction in the strength of the membrane was observed at 1000 C in N{sub 2}. Two different routes were investigated to synthesis GDC using either formate or carbonate precursors. The precursor and CGO particle morphologies were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The thermal decomposition behaviors of Ce(Gd)(HCOO){sub 3} and Ce(Gd)(CO{sub 3})(OH) were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at a rate of 3 C/min in air. The X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the precursor and CGO were collected and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were measured. Conductivity measurements were made by AC impedance spectroscopy on sintered disks in air using platinum electrodes.

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  13. Electro-catalytic membrane reactors and the development of bipolar membrane technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balster, J.H.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Membrane reactors are currently under extensive research and development. Hardly any concept, however, is realized yet in practice. Frequently, forgotten as membrane reactors are electro-catalytic membrane reactors where electrodes perform chemical conversations and membranes separate the locations

  14. Biogenesis of plasma membrane cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A striking feature of the molecular organization of eukaryotic cells is the singular enrichment of their plasma membranes in sterols. The authors studies are directed at elucidating the mechanisms underlying this inhomogeneous disposition. Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of plasma membrane cholesterol in intact cells, leaving intracellular cholesterol pools untouched. With this technique, the plasma membrane was shown to contain 95% of the unesterified cholesterol of cultured human fibroblasts. Cholesterol synthesized from [ 3 H] acetate moved to the plasma membrane with a half-time of 1 h at 37 0 C. They used equilibrium gradient centrifugation of homogenates of biosynthetically labeled, cholesterol oxidase treated cells to examine the distribution of newly synthesized sterols among intracellular pools. Surprisingly, lanosterol, a major precursor of cholesterol, and intracellular cholesterol both peaked at much lower buoyant density than did 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. This suggests that cholesterol biosynthesis is not taken to completion in the endoplasmic reticulum. The cholesterol in the buoyant fraction eventually moved to the plasma membrane. Digitonin treatment increased the density of the newly synthesized cholesterol fractions, indicating that nascent cholesterol in transit is associated with cholesterol-rich membranes. The authors are testing the hypothesis that the pathway of cholesterol biosynthesis is spatially organized in various intracellular membranes such that the sequence of biosynthetic steps both concentrates the sterol and conveys it to the plasma membrane

  15. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...

  16. Fabrication of green polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2017-06-16

    Provided herein are methods of fabricating membranes using polymers with functionalized groups such as sulfone (e.g., PSf and PES), ether (e.g., PES), acrylonitrile (e.g., PAN), fluoride(e.g., pvdf and other fluoropolymers), and imide (e.g., extem) and ionic liquids. Also provided are membranes made by the provided methods.

  17. Inorganic membranes for pervaporation technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sekulic, J.; Luiten-Olieman, Maria W.J.; Luiten, M.W.J.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Keizer, Klaas

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is the development of inorganic membranes that will enable broad application of pervaporation/vapour permeation technology in the chemical industry. This can be achieved by improvement of the existing microporous membranes and the development of new types with enhanced

  18. Mathematical modelling of membrane separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank

    This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate mathemat......This thesis concerns mathematical modelling of membrane separation. The thesis consists of introductory theory on membrane separation, equations of motion, and properties of dextran, which will be the solute species throughout the thesis. Furthermore, the thesis consist of three separate...... mathematical models, each with a different approach to membrane separation. The first model is a statistical model investigating the interplay between solute shape and the probability of entering the membrane. More specific the transition of solute particles from being spherical to becoming more elongated...... and the rejection coefficient. The second model is a stationary model for the flux of solvent and solute in a hollow fibre membrane. In the model we solve the time independent equations for transport of solvent and solute within the hollow fibre. Furthermore, the flux of solute and solvent through the membrane...

  19. Membranes and Films from Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Avrom A.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on polymeric films and membranes including production methods, special industrial and medical applications, laboratory preparation, and an experimental investigation of a porous cellulose acetate membrane. Presents a demonstration to distinguish between high- and low-density polyethylene. (JM)

  20. Nitrocellulose Membrane: The New Canvas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Jasmin R; Kurien, Bianca A

    2015-01-01

    The use of nitrocellulose membranes for invisible ink-messaging or marking for orientation purposes has been carried out with diluted alkaline phosphatase, followed by development with nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate and chemiluminescence detection systems. Here, we show that nitrocellulose membrane can serve as a canvas for art using alkaline phosphatase and NBT/BCIP detection method.

  1. Gas separation membranes current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    Membrane-based gas separation systems are now widely accepted and employed as unit operation in industrial gas, chemical and allied industries. Following their successful commercialization in the late Seventies to recover hydrogen from ammonia purge gas streams, membrane-based systems have gained acceptance in a wide variety of applications

  2. Membranes for Enhanced Emulsification Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güell, Carme; Ferrando, Montse; Schroen, C.G.P.H.

    2016-01-01

    The use of membrane technology for the production of single and double emulsions has been proven feasible for a wide range of systems. The low energy requirements and mild process conditions (shear stress and temperature) of membrane emulsification (ME) compared to conventional processes makes it of

  3. Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapatsis, Michael [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Daoutidis, Prodromos [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Elyassi, Bahman [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Lima, Fernando [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Iyer, Aparna [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Agrawal, Kumar [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Sabnis, Sanket [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    2015-04-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate an innovative membrane technology at process conditions that would be representative of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) advanced power generation with pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). This research focused on hydrogen (H2)-selective zeolite membranes that could be utilized to separate conditioned syngas into H2-rich and CO2-rich components. Both experiments and process design and optimization calculations were performed to evaluate the concept of ultra-thin membranes made from zeolites nanosheets. In this work, efforts in the laboratory were made to tackle two fundamental challenges in application of zeolite membranes in harsh industrial environments, namely, membrane thickness and membrane stability. Conventional zeolite membranes have thicknesses in the micron range, limiting their performance. In this research, we developed a method for fabrication of ultimately thin zeolite membranes based on zeolite nanosheets. A range of layered zeolites (MWW, RWR, NSI structure types) suitable for hydrogen separation was successfully exfoliated to their constituent nanosheets. Further, membranes were made from one of these zeolites, MWW, to demonstrate the potential of this group of materials. Moreover, long-term steam stability of these zeolites (up to 6 months) was investigated in high concentrations of steam (35 mol% and 95 mole%), high pressure (10 barg), and high temperatures (350 °C and 600 °C) relevant to conditions of water-gas-shift and steam methane reforming reactions. It was found that certain nanosheets are stable, and that stability depends on the concentration of structural defects. Additionally, models that represent a water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor equipped with the zeolite membrane were developed for systems studies. These studies had the aim of analyzing the effect of the membrane reactor integration into IGCC plants

  4. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  5. Drug-model membrane interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Usha K.

    1994-01-01

    In the present day world, drugs play a very important role in medicine and it is necessary to understand their mode of action at the molecular level, in order to optimise their use. Studies of drug-biomembrane interactions are essential for gaining such as understanding. However, it would be prohibitively difficult to carry out such studies, since biomembranes are highly complex systems. Hence, model membranes (made up of these lipids which are important components of biomembranes) of varying degrees of complexity are used to investigate drug-membrane interactions. Bio- as well as model-membranes undergo a chain melting transition when heated, the chains being in a disordered state above the transition point, T CM . This transition is of physiological importance since biomembranes select their components such that T CM is less than the ambient temperature but not very much so, so that membrane flexibility is ensured and porosity, avoided. The influence of drugs on the transition gives valuable clues about various parameters such as the location of the drug in the membrane. Deep insights into drug-membrane interactions are obtained by observing the effect of drugs on membrane structure and the mobilities of the various groups in lipids, near T CM . Investigation of such changes have been carried out with several drugs, using techniques such as DSC, XRD and NMR. The results indicate that the drug-membrane interaction not only depends on the nature of drug and lipids but also on the form of the model membrane - stacked bilayer or vesicles. The light that these results shed on the nature of drug-membrane interactions is discussed. (author). 13 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  6. Nanoporous Membrane Technologies for Pathogen Collection, Separation, and Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Sang W; Shang, Hao; Lee, Gil U; Griffin, Matthew T; Fulton, Jack

    2003-01-01

    Partial contents: Nanoporous Membranes, Membrane Chemistries, Characterization of Membrane Chemistries,Protein Fouling, Collector,Gas and Liquid Permeabilities, Membrane Permeabilities in the Presence of Water...

  7. Membranes and theoretical modeling of membrane distillation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayet, Mohamed

    2011-05-11

    Membrane distillation (MD) is one of the non-isothermal membrane separation processes used in various applications such desalination, environmental/waste cleanup, food, etc. It is known since 1963 and is still being developed at laboratory stage for different purposes and not fully implemented in industry. An abrupt increase in the number of papers on MD membrane engineering (i.e. design, fabrication and testing in MD) is seen since only 6 years ago. The present paper offers a comprehensive MD state-of-the-art review covering a wide range of commercial membranes, MD membrane engineering, their MD performance, transport mechanisms, experimental and theoretical modeling of different MD configurations as well as recent developments in MD. Improved MD membranes with specific morphology, micro- and nano-structures are highly demanded. Membranes with different pore sizes, porosities, thicknesses and materials as well as novel structures are required in order to carry out systematic MD studies for better understanding mass transport in different MD configurations, thereby improving the MD performance and looking for MD industrialization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrospun superhydrophobic membranes with unique structures for membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Loh, Chun-Heng; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-09-24

    With modest temperature demand, low operating pressure, and high solute rejection, membrane distillation (MD) is an attractive option for desalination, waste treatment, and food and pharmaceutical processing. However, large-scale practical applications of MD are still hindered by the absence of effective membranes with high hydrophobicity, high porosity, and adequate mechanical strength, which are important properties for MD permeation fluxes, stable long-term performance, and effective packing in modules without damage. This study describes novel design strategies for highly robust superhydrophobic dual-layer membranes for MD via electrospinning. One of the newly developed membranes comprises a durable and ultrathin 3-dimensional (3D) superhydrophobic skin and porous nanofibrous support whereas another was fabricated by electrospinning 3D superhydrophobic layers on a nonwoven support. These membranes exhibit superhydrophobicity toward distilled water, salty water, oil-in-water emulsion, and beverages, which enables them to be used not only for desalination but also for other processes. The superhydrophobic dual-layer membrane #3S-N with nanofibrous support has a competitive permeation flux of 24.6 ± 1.2 kg m(-2) h(-1) in MD (feed and permeate temperate were set as 333 and 293 K, respectively) due to the higher porosity of the nanofibrous scaffold. Meanwhile, the membranes with the nonwoven support exhibit greater mechanical strength due to this support combined with better long-term performance because of the thicker 3D superhydrophobic layers. The morphology, pore size, porosity, mechanical properties, and liquid enter pressure of water of these superhydrophobic composite membranes with two different structures are reported and compared with commercial polyvinylidene fluoride membranes.

  9. Universal Behavior of Membranes with Sterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Rowat, Amy C.; Brief, E.

    2006-01-01

    ) is obtained from deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance. We compare these results, along with data for membrane-bending rigidity, to explore the relationship between membrane hydrophobic thickness and elastic properties. Together, such diverse approaches demonstrate that membrane properties are affected...

  10. Membrane species mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shu-Kai; Huang, Ling-Ting; Chao, Ling

    2016-08-17

    Processing and managing cell membrane proteins for characterization while maintaining their intact structure is challenging. Hydrodynamic flow has been used to transport membrane species in supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) where the hydrophobic cores of the membrane species can be protected during processing. However, the forced convection mechanism of species embedded in lipid bilayers is still unclear. Developing a controlled SLB platform with a practical model to predict the membrane species mobility in the platform under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is imperative to ensure the practical applicability of SLBs in processing and managing membrane species with various geometrical properties. The mobility of membrane species is affected by the driving force from the aqueous environment in addition to the frictions from the lipid bilayer, in which both lipid leaflets may exhibit different speeds relative to that of the moving species. In this study, we developed a model, based on the applied driving force and the possible frictional resistances that the membrane species encounter, to predict how the mobility under in-lipid-membrane forced convection is influenced by the sizes of the species' hydrophilic portion in the aqueous environment and the hydrophobic portion embedded in the membrane. In addition, we used a microfluidic device for controlling the flow to arrange the lipid membrane and the tested membrane species in the desirable locations in order to obtain a SLB platform which can provide clear mobility responses of the species without disturbance from the species dispersion effect. The model predictions were consistent with the experimental observations, with the sliding friction coefficient between the upper leaflet and the hydrophilic portion of the species as the only regressed parameter. The result suggests that not only the lateral drag frictions from the lipid layers but also the sliding frictions between the species and the lipid layer planes

  11. Artificial membranes for membrane protein purification, functionality and structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Mayuriben J; Lousa, Carine De Marcos; Muench, Stephen P; Goldman, Adrian; Postis, Vincent L G

    2016-06-15

    Membrane proteins represent one of the most important targets for pharmaceutical companies. Unfortunately, technical limitations have long been a major hindrance in our understanding of the function and structure of such proteins. Recent years have seen the refinement of classical approaches and the emergence of new technologies that have resulted in a significant step forward in the field of membrane protein research. This review summarizes some of the current techniques used for studying membrane proteins, with overall advantages and drawbacks for each method. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  13. Cell invasion through basement membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Sherwood, David R

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is an essential part of normal development and physiology, and occurs during the pathological progression of human inflammatory diseases and cancer. F-actin-rich membrane protrusions, called invadopodia, have been hypothesized to be the “drill bits” of invasive cells, mediating invasion through the dense, highly cross-linked basement membrane matrix. Though studied in vitro for over 30 y, invadopodia function in vivo has remained elusive. We have recently discovered that invadopodia breach basement membrane during anchor cell invasion in C. elegans, a genetically and visually tractable in vivo invasion event. Further, we found that the netrin receptor DCC localizes to the initial site of basement membrane breach and directs invasion through a single gap in the matrix. In this commentary, we examine how the dynamics and structure of AC-invadopodia compare with in vitro invadopodia and how the netrin receptor guides invasion through a single basement membrane breach. We end with a discussion of our surprising result that the anchor cell pushes the basement membrane aside, instead of completely dissolving it through proteolysis, and provide some ideas for how proteases and physical displacement may work together to ensure efficient and robust invasion. PMID:24778942

  14. Membrane bioreactors: present and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H N; Furusaki, S

    1991-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors have a very handy in-situ separation capability lacking in other types of bioreactors. Combining various functions of membrane separations and biocatalyst characteristics of enzymes, microbial cells, organelles, animal and plant tissues can generate quite a number of membrane bioreactor systems. The cell retaining property of membranes and selective removal of inhibitory byproducts makes high cell density culture possible and utilizes enzyme catalytic activity better, which leads to high productivity of bioreactors. Enzyme reactions utilizing cofactors and hydrolysis of macromolecules are advantageous in membrane bioreactors. Anaerobic cell culture may be efficiently carried out in membrane cell recycle systems, while aerobic cultures work well in dual hollow fiber reactors. Animal and plant cells have much a better chance of success in membrane reactors because of the protective environment of the reactor and the small oxygen uptake rate of these cells. Industrial use of these reactors are still in its infancy and limited to enzyme and animal tissue culture, but applications will expand as existing problems are resolved.

  15. Membrane manufacture for peptide separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2016-06-07

    Nanostructured polymeric membranes are key tools in biomedical applications such as hemodialysis, protein separations, in the food industry, and drinking water supply from seawater. Despite of the success in different separation processes, membrane manufacture itself is at risk, since the most used solvents are about to be banned in many countries due to environmental and health issues. We propose for the first time the preparation of polyethersulfone membranes based on dissolution in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DEP). We obtained a series of membranes tailored for separation of solutes with molecular weight of 30, 5, 1.3, and 1.25 kg mol-1 with respective water permeances of 140, 65, 30 and 20 Lm-2h-1bar-1. We demonstrate their superior efficiency in the separation of complex mixtures of peptides with molecular weights in the range of 800 to 3500 gmol-1. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation leading to the pore formation in the membranes were investigated. The rheology of the solutions and the morphology of the prepared membranes were examed and compared to those of polyethersulfone in organic solvents currently used for membrane manufacture.

  16. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  17. Ultrastructure of Reissner's membrane in the rabbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K.; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P.

    1994-01-01

    Anatomy, Reissner's membrane, electron microscopy, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, subsurface cisterns, rabbit......Anatomy, Reissner's membrane, electron microscopy, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, subsurface cisterns, rabbit...

  18. Isolation of plasma membrane-associated membranes from rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suski, Jan M; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Wojtala, Aleksandra; Duszynski, Jerzy; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic interplay between intracellular organelles requires a particular functional apposition of membrane structures. The organelles involved come into close contact, but do not fuse, thereby giving rise to notable microdomains; these microdomains allow rapid communication between the organelles. Plasma membrane-associated membranes (PAMs), which are microdomains of the plasma membrane (PM) interacting with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, are dynamic structures that mediate transport of proteins, lipids, ions and metabolites. These structures have gained much interest lately owing to their roles in many crucial cellular processes. Here we provide an optimized protocol for the isolation of PAM, PM and ER fractions from rat liver that is based on a series of differential centrifugations, followed by the fractionation of crude PM on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The procedure requires ∼8-10 h, and it can be easily modified and adapted to other tissues and cell types.

  19. Diffusion of Integral Membrane Proteins in Protein-Rich Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javanainen, Matti; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Metzler, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    -like dependence D ∝ 1/R. We propose that this 1/R law mainly arises due to geometrical factors: smaller proteins are able to avoid confinement effects much better than their larger counterparts. The results highlight that the lateral dynamics in the crowded setting found in native membranes is radically different......The lateral diffusion of embedded proteins along lipid membranes in protein-poor conditions has been successfully described in terms of the Saffman-Delbrück (SD) model, which predicts that the protein diffusion coefficient D is weakly dependent on its radius R as D ∝ ln(1/R). However, instead...... of being protein-poor, native cell membranes are extremely crowded with proteins. On the basis of extensive molecular simulations, we here demonstrate that protein crowding of the membrane at physiological levels leads to deviations from the SD relation and to the emergence of a stronger Stokes...

  20. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  1. Development of silica RO membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Ayumi; Kawamoto, Takashi; Matsuyama, Emi; Utsumi, Keisuke; Nomura, Mikihiro; Sugimoto, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Silica based membranes have been developed by using a counter diffusion CVD method. Effects of alkyl groups in the silica precursors and deposition temperatures had investigated in order to control pore sizes of the silica membranes. In this study, this type of a silica membrane was applied for RO separation. Effects of silica sources, deposition temperatures and post treatments had been investigated. Tetramethoxysilane (TMOS), Ethyltrimethoxysilane (ETMOS) and Phenyltrimethoxysilane (PhTMOS) were used as silica precursors. A counter diffusion CVD method was carried out for 90 min at 270 - 600degC on γ-alumina capillary substrates (effective length: 50 mm, φ: 4 nm: NOK Co.). O 3 or O 2 was introduced into the inside of the substrate at the O 2 rate of 0.2 L min -1 . Ion beam irradiation was carried out for a post treatment using Os at 490 MeV for 1.0 x 10 10 ions cm -2 or 3.0 x 10 10 ions cm -2 . Single gas permeance was measured by using H 2 , N 2 and SF 6 . RO tests were employed at 3.0 or 5.4 MPa for 100 mg L -1 of feed NaCl solution. First, effects of the silica sources were investigated. The total fluxes increased by increasing N 2 permeance through the silica membrane deposited by ETMOS. The maximum NaCl rejection was 28.2% at 12.2 kg m -2 h -1 of the total flux through the membrane deposited at 270degC. N 2 permeance was 9.6 x 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 . While, total fluxes through the membrane deposited by using PhTMOS were smaller than those through the ETMOS membranes. The phenyl groups for the PhTMOS membrane must be important for the hydrophobic properties through the membrane. Next, effects of ion beam irradiation were tested for the TMOS membranes. Water is difficult to permeate through the TMOS membranes due to the low N 2 permeance through the membrane (3.1 x 10 -11 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 ). N 2 permeance increased to 7.3 x 10 -9 mol m -2 s -1 Pa -1 by the irradiation. Irradiation amounts had little effects on N 2 permeance. However, NaCl rejections

  2. Vacuum membrane distillation of liquid desiccants Utilizing Hollow Fiber Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan

    2018-01-31

    This paper documents the testing of a vacuum membrane distillation system intended for use with liquid desiccants. Liquid desiccants offer the possibility for low-energy, ambient temperature dehumidification. Effective desalination and purification of diluted desiccants outputs two important products: a concentrated desiccant for reuse in dehumidification and fresh water. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation was used in the laboratory to purify diluted liquid desiccants. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were the desiccants selected for testing. Desiccant solutions were pumped through the lumens of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes at varying feed inlet temperatures, solution velocity rates and vacuum set points during membrane distillation. An average flux of 8 kg m-2 h-1 was obtained using 30 wt% magnesium chloride solution at a temperature of 50 °C while applying vacuum to achieve 25 mbar absolute pressure on the air side of the membrane. The results are promising for the development of a full-scale vacuum membrane distillation process for desiccant solution regeneration and fresh water recovery. In addition, the recovered condensate was of sufficient quality for use in agricultural irrigation or drinking water.

  3. The Role of Ion Exchange Membranes in Membrane Capacitive Deionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanvand, Armineh; Wei, Kajia; Talebi, Sahar; Chen, George Q; Kentish, Sandra E

    2017-09-14

    Ion-exchange membranes (IEMs) are unique in combining the electrochemical properties of ion exchange resins and the permeability of a membrane. They are being used widely to treat industrial effluents, and in seawater and brackish water desalination. Membrane Capacitive Deionisation (MCDI) is an emerging, energy efficient technology for brackish water desalination in which these ion-exchange membranes act as selective gates allowing the transport of counter-ions toward carbon electrodes. This article provides a summary of recent developments in the preparation, characterization, and performance of ion exchange membranes in the MCDI field. In some parts of this review, the most relevant literature in the area of electrodialysis (ED) is also discussed to better elucidate the role of the ion exchange membranes. We conclude that more work is required to better define the desalination performance of the proposed novel materials and cell designs for MCDI in treating a wide range of feed waters. The extent of fouling, the development of cleaning strategies, and further techno-economic studies, will add value to this emerging technique.

  4. Omniphobic Hollow-Fiber Membranes for Vacuum Membrane Distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kang Jia; Zuo, Jian; Chang, Jian; Kuan, Hong Nan; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2018-04-03

    Management of produced water from shale gas production is a global challenge. Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) is considered a promising solution because of its various advantages. However, low-surface-tension species in produced water can easily deposit on the membrane surface and cause severe fouling or wetting problems. To solve the problems, an omniphobic polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) hollow-fiber membrane has been developed via silica nanoparticle deposition followed by a Teflon AF 2400 coating in this study. The resultant membrane shows good repellency toward various liquids with different surface tensions and chemistries, including water, ethylene glycol (EG), cooking oil, and ethanol. It also exhibits stable performance in 7 h VMD tests with a feed solution containing up to 0.6 mM of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In addition, the effects of surface energy and surface morphology as well as nanoparticle size on membrane omniphobicity have been systematically investigated. This work may provide valuable guidance to molecularly design omniphobic VMD membranes for produced water treatment.

  5. The impact of auxins used in assisted phytoextraction of metals from the contaminated environment on the alterations caused by lead(II) ions in the organization of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Sroka, Aleksandra; Jabłońska, Klaudia

    2016-07-01

    Auxins are successfully used to improve phytoextraction efficiency of metal ions from the contaminated environment, however, the mechanism of their activity in this field is not explained. Auxins are known to exert various biochemical alterations in the plant membranes and cells, but their activity involves also direct interactions with lipids leading to changes in membrane organization. Following the suggestion that the auxins-induced modifications in membrane properties alleviate toxic effect of metal ions in this paper we have undertaken the comparative studies on the effect of metal ions and metal ions/auxins mixtures on model membrane systems. The experiments were done on lipid monolayers differing in their composition spread on water subphase and on Pb(2+), Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and Pb(2+)/IAA and Pb(2+)/NAA water solutions. The analysis of the collected data suggests that metal ions and auxins can change fluidity of the lipid systems and weaken the interactions between monolayer components. This manifested in the increase of the mean area per molecule and the excess area per molecule values for the films on Pb(2+), auxins as well as Pb(2+)/auxin solutions as compared to the values on pure water subphase. However, the presence of auxin in the mixture with lead(II) ions makes the alterations induced by sole metal ions weaker. This effect was more pronounced for the membranes of a higher packing. Thus it was proposed that auxins may enhance phytoextraction of metal ions by weakening their destabilizing effect on membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High Efficacy but Low Potency of δ-Opioid Receptor-G Protein Coupling in Brij-58-Treated, Low-Density Plasma Membrane Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubalova, Lenka; Vosahlikova, Miroslava; Brejchova, Jana; Sykora, Jan; Rudajev, Vladimir; Svoboda, Petr

    2015-01-01

    HEK293 cells stably expressing PTX-insensitive δ-opioid receptor-Gi1α (C351I) fusion protein were homogenized, treated with low concentrations of non-ionic detergent Brij-58 at 0°C and fractionated by flotation in sucrose density gradient. In optimum range of detergent concentrations (0.025-0.05% w/v), Brij-58-treated, low-density membranes exhibited 2-3-fold higher efficacy of DADLE-stimulated, high-affinity [32P]GTPase and [35S]GTPγS binding than membranes of the same density prepared in the absence of detergent. The potency of agonist DADLE response was significantly decreased. At high detergent concentrations (>0.1%), the functional coupling between δ-opioid receptors and G proteins was completely diminished. The same detergent effects were measured in plasma membranes isolated from PTX-treated cells. Therefore, the effect of Brij-58 on δ-opioid receptor-G protein coupling was not restricted to the covalently bound Gi1α within δ-opioid receptor-Gi1α fusion protein, but it was also valid for PTX-sensitive G proteins of Gi/Go family endogenously expressed in HEK293 cells. Characterization of the direct effect of Brij-58 on the hydrophobic interior of isolated plasma membranes by steady-state anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) fluorescence indicated a marked increase of membrane fluidity. The time-resolved analysis of decay of DPH fluorescence by the "wobble in cone" model of DPH motion in the membrane indicated that the exposure to the increasing concentrations of Brij-58 led to a decreased order and higher motional freedom of the dye. Limited perturbation of plasma membrane integrity by low concentrations of non-ionic detergent Brij-58 results in alteration of δ-OR-G protein coupling. Maximum G protein-response to agonist stimulation (efficacy) is increased; affinity of response (potency) is decreased. The total degradation plasma membrane structure at high detergent concentrations results in diminution of functional coupling between

  7. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, in situ neutron diffraction was used to characterize the chemical and structural properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} (here after as L2SF55T) specimen, which was subject to measurements of neutron diffraction from room temperature to 900 C in N{sub 2}. Space group of R3c was found to result in a better refinement and is used in this study. The difference for crystal structure, lattice parameters and local crystal chemistry for LSFT nearly unchanged when gas environment switched from air to N{sub 2}. Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at room temperature in air. A bridge-compression fixture was fabricated to achieve stable pre-cracks from Vickers indents. Post fracture evaluation indicated stable crack growth from the indent and a regime of fast fracture. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. The thermal and chemical expansion of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} were studied at 800 {le} T {le} 1000 C and at {approx} 1 x 10{sup -15} {le} pO{sub 2} {le} 0.21 atm. The thermal expansion coefficient of the sample was calculated from the dilatometric analysis in the temperature range between room temperature and 1200 C in air. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of

  8. Characterization of polyacrylonitrile ultrafiltration membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germic, J.; Germic, J.; Ebert, K.; Ebert, K.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Bouma, R.H.B.; Borneman, Zandrie; Mulder, M.H.V.; Strathmann, H.

    1997-01-01

    Various methods have been used to characterize ultrafiltration membranes, such as gas flux measurements, (field emission) scanning electron microscopy, permporometry and liquid-liquid displacement. Significant differences in the pore size distributions determined from permporometry and liquid-liquid

  9. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    hemophagocytic syndrome) and metabolic (diabe- tes) disorders [2, 23, 33]. Mutations in the genes of the basic secretory protein machinery lead to a number of membrane trafficking diseases such as Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, Cohen.

  10. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  11. Lipid, membrane, and mitochondrial characteristics of Ustilago maydis following exposure to ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterfield, W.F. III

    1986-01-01

    Pencoazole at 0.5 ..mu..g/ml inhibited ergosterol biosynthesis in U. maydis. Polar lipids of sporidia grown with 0.5 ..mu..g/ml penconazole for 7.5 or 22 hr or 1.0 ..mu..g/ml fenarimol for 7.5 hr contained more 18:2 than 18:1 fatty acids. There was usually more 18:1 than 18:2 fatty acids in polar lipids of untreated sporidia but this ratio was influenced by culture cell density. The high 18:2 to 18:1 ratio in the polar lipids from penconazole grown cells was unaffected by cell density. There was an increase in free fatty acids and these were enriched with 18:2 members in cells grown with 0.5 ..mu..g/ml penconazole for 22 hr. Unsaturation of triglycerides fatty acids did not differ appreciably from that of untreated sporidia. Untreated WT U. maydis protoplasts lysed more slowly in 0.3 M sorbitol than those prepared from WT sporidia grown for 16 hr with 1.0 ..mu..g/ml penconazole or 2.0 ..mu..g/ml fenarimol or from untreated erg-40 sporidia. Protoplasts were more permeable to crystal violet than were those from untreated WT sporidia. Mitochondria from untreated WT sporidia oxidizing pyruvate plus malate or succinate yielded higher ADP/O rations than mitochondria from erg-40 or penconazole grown WT sporidia. The mitochondrial ATPase of control cells had a Km of 0.8 mM ATP whereas the mitochondrial ATPase of penconazole grown WT and erg-40 had a Km value of 3.7 and 3.2 mM ATP, respectively. When the mitochondrial catalytic subunit of the ATPase from these mitochondria were solubilized, the Km did not differ. These studies suggest that changes in sterols and membrane fatty acids resulting from treatments with EBI fungicides cause increased membrane fluidity which affects membrane stability, permeability and activity of the mitochondrial ATPase.

  12. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Hou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed.

  13. Static and Dynamic Membrane Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Ivanov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While originally P systems were defined to contain multiset rewriting rules, it turned out that considering different types of rules may produce important results, such as increasing the computational power of the rules. This paper focuses on factoring out the concept of a membrane structure out of various P system models with the goal of providing useful formalisations. Both static and dynamic membrane structures are considered.

  14. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Nicholas P [Palo Alto, CA; Fulton, Donald A [Fairfield, CA

    2009-03-31

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  15. Hybrid membranes for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkareva, S. S.; Shashkina, S. S.

    2018-01-01

    Fuel cells are a very efficient, reliable, durable, and environmentally friendly energy source. Membranes for fuel cells were developed based on nitrogen-containing high-molecular compounds and organic–inorganic composites. Their electrical conductivities were measured. The influence of a silicon block of composites on the proton exchange properties of membranes was proved.The comparative characterization of the studied materials was performed.

  16. Membrane structure in disease and drug therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zimmer, G

    2000-01-01

    ...) interaction with membranous transport systems (opening or closing of ion or substrate channels); (2) reaction with receptors; (3) activation or inhibition of membrane enzymes; or (4) cytosolic membranous signaling and exchange. These consequences within the membrane influence intracellular wellbeing: life is possible only if a bala...

  17. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  18. Nanomaterial-enabled membranes for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogensues, Adam Roy

    Incorporating engineered nanomaterials as components of synthetic membranes can improve their separation performance and endow membranes with additional functions. This work explores two approaches to the design of membranes modified with nanomaterials. In the first chapter, exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) decorated with gold nanoparticles were embedded in a polysulfone matrix to fabricate phase inversion nanocomposite membranes. The cast membranes were evaluated as flow-through membrane reactors in experiments on the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The nanocomposite membranes were not as catalytically efficient as those fabricated by modifying anodized alumina membranes polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) containing gold nanoparticles. However, because of the facility of membrane casting by phase inversion and new opportunities enabled by the demonstrated hierarchy-based approach to nanocomposite membrane design, such membrane may hold commercial promise. In the second part of the study, the practicability of PEM-based nanofiltration was evaluated under conditions of precipitative fouling (i.e. scaling) by calcium sulfate. Polyelectrolytes were deposited onto 50 kDa polyethersulfone membranes to create PEM-based nanofiltration membranes. The prepared membranes were compared with the commercial NF270 membrane in terms of flux and rejection performance, as well as the morphology of gypsum crystals formed on the membrane surface. None of the PEM coatings tested inhibited scale formation.

  19. Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

    2012-07-24

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

  20. Inflation and Failure of Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Neergaard, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    We consider the inflation of an axisymmetric polymeric membrane.Some membranes composed of viscoelastic materialsdescribed by a Mooney-Rivlin model show a monotone increasingpressure during inflation. These materialsdevelop a homogeneous membrane thickness in agreement with the Considere...... is found to stabilize the inflated polymer membrane....

  1. Insight into NSAID-induced membrane alterations, pathogenesis and therapeutics: characterization of interaction of NSAIDs with phosphatidylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Zhou, Yong; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Doyen, Janice R; O'Neil, Roger G; Dial, Elizabeth J; Volk, David E; Gorenstein, David G; Boggara, Mohan Babu; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2012-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most widely consumed pharmaceuticals, yet both the mechanisms involved in their therapeutic actions and side-effects, notably gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration/bleeding, have not been clearly defined. In this study, we have used a number of biochemical, structural, computational and biological systems including; Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR). Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, and cell culture using a specific fluorescent membrane probe, to demonstrate that NSAIDs have a strong affinity to form ionic and hydrophobic associations with zwitterionic phospholipids, and specifically phosphatidylcholine (PC), that are reversible and non-covalent in nature. We propose that the pH-dependent partition of these potent anti-inflammatory drugs into the phospholipid bilayer, and possibly extracellular mono/multilayers present on the luminal interface of the mucus gel layer, may result in profound changes in the hydrophobicity, fluidity, permeability, biomechanical properties and stability of these membranes and barriers. These changes may not only provide an explanation of how NSAIDs induce surface injury to the GI mucosa as a component in the pathogenic mechanism leading to peptic ulceration and bleeding, but potentially an explanation for a number of (COX-independent) biological actions of this family of pharmaceuticals. This insight also has proven useful in the design and development of a novel class of PC-associated NSAIDs that have reduced GI toxicity while maintaining their essential therapeutic efficacy to inhibit pain and inflammation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cyclopropanation of membrane unsaturated fatty acids is not essential to the acid stress response of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Thi Mai Huong; Grandvalet, Cosette; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle

    2011-05-01

    Cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) are synthetized in situ by the transfer of a methylene group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to a double bond of unsaturated fatty acid chains of membrane phospholipids. This conversion, catalyzed by the Cfa synthase enzyme, occurs in many bacteria and is recognized to play a key role in the adaptation of bacteria in response to a drastic perturbation of the environment. The role of CFAs in the acid tolerance response was investigated in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. A mutant of the cfa gene was constructed by allelic exchange. The cfa gene encoding the Cfa synthase was cloned and introduced into the mutant to obtain the complemented strain for homologous system studies. Data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) validated that the mutant could not produce CFA. The CFA levels in both the wild-type and complemented strains increased upon their entry to stationary phase, especially with acid-adapted cells or, more surprisingly, with ethanol-adapted cells. The results obtained by performing quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments showed that transcription of the cfa gene was highly induced by acidity (by 10-fold with cells grown at pH 5.0) and by ethanol (by 9-fold with cells grown with 6% ethanol) in comparison with that in stationary phase. Cell viability experiments were performed after an acidic shock on the mutant strain, the wild-type strain, and the complemented strain, as a control. The higher viability level of the acid-adapted cells of the three strains after 3 h of shock proved that the cyclopropanation of unsaturated fatty acids is not essential for L. lactis subsp. cremoris survival under acidic conditions. Moreover, fluorescence anisotropy data showed that CFA itself could not maintain the membrane fluidity level, particularly with ethanol-grown cells.

  3. Cyclopropanation of Membrane Unsaturated Fatty Acids Is Not Essential to the Acid Stress Response of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Thi Mai Huong; Grandvalet, Cosette; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) are synthetized in situ by the transfer of a methylene group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to a double bond of unsaturated fatty acid chains of membrane phospholipids. This conversion, catalyzed by the Cfa synthase enzyme, occurs in many bacteria and is recognized to play a key role in the adaptation of bacteria in response to a drastic perturbation of the environment. The role of CFAs in the acid tolerance response was investigated in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. A mutant of the cfa gene was constructed by allelic exchange. The cfa gene encoding the Cfa synthase was cloned and introduced into the mutant to obtain the complemented strain for homologous system studies. Data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) validated that the mutant could not produce CFA. The CFA levels in both the wild-type and complemented strains increased upon their entry to stationary phase, especially with acid-adapted cells or, more surprisingly, with ethanol-adapted cells. The results obtained by performing quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments showed that transcription of the cfa gene was highly induced by acidity (by 10-fold with cells grown at pH 5.0) and by ethanol (by 9-fold with cells grown with 6% ethanol) in comparison with that in stationary phase. Cell viability experiments were performed after an acidic shock on the mutant strain, the wild-type strain, and the complemented strain, as a control. The higher viability level of the acid-adapted cells of the three strains after 3 h of shock proved that the cyclopropanation of unsaturated fatty acids is not essential for L. lactis subsp. cremoris survival under acidic conditions. Moreover, fluorescence anisotropy data showed that CFA itself could not maintain the membrane fluidity level, particularly with ethanol-grown cells. PMID:21421775

  4. Membrane properties for permeability testing: Skin versus synthetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Anika; Dorrani, Mania; Goodyear, Benjamin; Joshi, Vivek; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena

    2018-03-25

    Synthetic membranes that are utilized in diffusion studies for topical and transdermal formulations are usually porous thin polymeric sheets for example cellulose acetate (CA) and polysulfones. In this study, the permeability of human skin was compared using two synthetic membranes: cellulose acetate and Strat-M® membrane and lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds either as saturated or formulated solutions as well as marketed dosage forms. Our data suggests that hydrophilic compounds have higher permeation in Strat-M membranes compared with lipophilic ones. High variation in permeability values, a typical property of biological membranes, was not observed with Strat-M. In addition, the permeability of Strat-M was closer to that of human skin than that of cellulose acetate (CA > Strat-M > Human skin). Our results suggest that Strat-M with little or no lot to lot variability can be applied in pilot studies of diffusion tests instead of human skin and is a better substitute than a cellulose acetate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor for Acid Gas Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiqotul Himma, Nurul; Gede Wenten, I.

    2017-07-01

    Gas-liquid membrane contactor has gained a great attention as an alternative to conventional absorption columns in acid gas removal from natural gas or post-combustion. The membrane contactor offers high mass transfer area and excellent operational flexibility. However, hydrophobic microporous membranes commonly used are still susceptible to wetting by liquid absorbents, leading to the deterioration of absorption performance in long-term operation. Therefore, many studies were recently directed to improve the membrane wetting resistant by endowing superhydrophobicity. This article then presents a review on superhydrophobic membrane development and its application for acid gas removal using membrane contactor. An overview of gas-liquid membrane contactor is firstly presented, followed by the preparation of superhydrophobic membranes. The performances of superhydrophobic membranes in acid gas absorption are then discussed, and the recommendation for future research is finally outlined. This review may provide an insight into the further development of superhydrophobic membrane contactor.

  6. Modeling electrically active viscoelastic membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Roy

    Full Text Available The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism.

  7. Reconstitutions of mitochondrial inner membrane remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Mariam; Meinecke, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Biological membranes exhibit function-related shapes, leading to a plethora of complex and beautiful cell and cell organellar morphologies. Most if not all of these structures have evolved for a particular physiological reason. The shapes of these structures are formed by physical forces that operate on membranes. To create particular shaped cells and cell organelles, membranes must undergo deformations which are determined by the structure and elasticity of the membrane and this process is most probable driven by proteins, lipids and/or interplay of both Zimmerberg and Kozlov (2006). Therefore, an important question of current cell biology in conjunction with physics and mathematics is to elucidate the functional cause for these different membrane morphologies as well as how they are formed. One of the most peculiar membrane shapes is observed in mitochondria. These organelles are surrounded by two membranes and especially the convoluted inner membrane displays a complex ultra-structure. A molecular understanding of how this membrane is shaped is missing to a large extent. Unlike membrane remodeling in classical curvature-dependent processes like clathrin-mediated endocytosis, mitochondria are most likely shaped by integral membrane proteins. Following, we will review the current knowledge of inner mitochondrial membrane architecture and discuss recent findings and advances in understanding the factors that shape this membrane. We will address pending questions especially with regard to the experimentally challenging nature of investigating membrane bending by hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gas transmission through microporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turel, Tacibaht

    2008-10-01

    An ideal protective clothing material should be a good barrier against harmful gases or vapor while allowing moisture vapor and air passage through the material. In the study and design of barrier materials, one of the critical issues is to balance these requirements, which may sometimes be mutually exclusive. Therefore it is critical to understand the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the attack mechanisms as well as the barrier materials and the transport phenomena in such systems. In this study, air and gas transmission through barrier systems consisting of porous membranes was investigated experimentally and a molecular-level probabilistic model was constructed to evaluate the effect of various parameters on the gas flow. The effect of membrane parameters such as porosity, pore size distribution, thickness as well as gas parameters such as molecule diameters were examined at single layer as well as multiple layers. To understand the gas behavior for harmful chemicals and to ensure safety during experimental studies, mimics of such gases were obtained which were comparable to the actual gases in shape, molecular weight and other chemical properties. Air, ammonia and several mimic gases of harmful chemical agents were studied. Beta-pinene was used as a mimic of sarin and prenol was used as a mimic of nitrogen mustard. Gas transmission experiments were conducted on polyester, nylon and polypropylene membranes each of which had different porosity and pore size distributions. Experiments were done at different pressure values and a comparison was made between permeability testing machines based on volumetric and manometric principles as to their ability to accommodate high permeability membranes. Physical and chemical adsorption of such gases on porous membranes was also investigated after the addition of active elements on the membrane surfaces which can interact with the gas molecules. An experimental setup was developed to measure concentration changes

  9. Impact of sludge flocs on membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Niessen, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup

    of divalent ions such as calcium and iron. Furthermore, it was shown that the ratio between cations and EPS was important for the fouling potential of the sludge. A high ratio between divalent ions and EPS reduced membrane fouling as soluble EPS were adsorbed and bound within the sludge flocs. Strong compact...... flocs reduced membrane fouling, and more compact and strong flocs were formed if the concentration of divalent ions were high. Sludge was fractionated by centrifugation providing supernatant with soluble EPS and colloidal particles but without flocs. Filtration test on untreated sludge and supernatant...

  10. Zwitterionic materials for antifouling membrane surface construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingrui; Gao, Kang; Zhou, Linjie; Jiao, Zhiwei; Wu, Mengyuan; Cao, Jialin; You, Xinda; Cai, Ziyi; Su, Yanlei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-08-01

    Membrane separation processes are often perplexed by severe and ubiquitous membrane fouling. Zwitterionic materials, keeping electric neutrality with equivalent positive and negative charged groups, are well known for their superior antifouling properties and have been broadly utilized to construct antifouling surfaces for medical devices, biosensors and marine coatings applications. In recent years, zwitterionic materials have been more and more frequently utilized for constructing antifouling membrane surfaces. In this review, the antifouling mechanisms of zwitterionic materials as well as their biomimetic prototypes in cell membranes will be discussed, followed by the survey of common approaches to incorporate zwitterionic materials onto membrane surfaces including surface grafting, surface segregation, biomimetic adhesion, surface coating and so on. The potential applications of these antifouling membranes are also embedded. Finally, we will present a brief perspective on the future development of zwitterionic materials modified antifouling membranes. Membrane fouling is a severe problem hampering the application of membrane separation technology. The properties of membrane surfaces play a critical role in membrane fouling and antifouling behavior/performance. Antifouling membrane surface construction has evolved as a hot research issue for the development of membrane processes. Zwitterionic modification of membrane surfaces has been recognized as an effective strategy to resist membrane fouling. This review summarizes the antifouling mechanisms of zwitterionic materials inspired by cell membranes as well as the popular approaches to incorporate them onto membrane surfaces. It can help form a comprehensive knowledge about the principles and methods of modifying membrane surfaces with zwitterionic materials. Finally, we propose the possible future research directions of zwitterionic materials modified antifouling membranes. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc

  11. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktycz, Mitchel J [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  12. Experimental approaches to membrane thermodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Thermodynamics describes a system on the macroscopic scale, yet it is becoming an important tool for the elucidation of many specific molecular aspects of membrane properties. In this note we discuss this application of thermodynamics, and give a number of examples on how thermodynamic measuremen...... have contributed to the understanding of specific membrane phenomena. We mainly focus on non-specific interactions of bilayers and small molecules (water and solutes) in the surrounding solvent, and the changes in membrane properties they bring about. Differences between thermodynamic...... and stoichiometric (structural) definitions of non-specific binding or partitioning are emphasized, and it is concluded that this distinction is important for weak, but not for strong, interactions....

  13. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations......, as model systems to understand the fundamental properties of biomembranes. The properties of lipid bilayers can be studied at different time and length scales. For some properties it is sufficient to envision a membrane as an elastic sheet, while for others it is important to take into account the details...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  14. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sangram K.; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L.; Dediu, V. Alek

    2016-01-01

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial–magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  15. Membrane interaction of retroviral Gag proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Alfred Dick

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of an infectious retroviral particle relies on multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The three domains of Gag common to all retroviruses-- MA, CA, and NC-- provide the signals for membrane binding, assembly, and viral RNA packaging, respectively. These signals do not function independently of one another. For example, Gag multimerization enhances membrane binding and is more efficient when NC is interacting with RNA. MA binding to the plasma membrane is governed by several principles, including electrostatics, recognition of specific lipid head groups, hydrophobic interactions, and membrane order. HIV-1 uses many of these principles while Rous sarcoma virus (RSV appears to use fewer. This review describes the principles that govern Gag interactions with membranes, focusing on RSV and HIV-1 Gag. The review also defines lipid and membrane behavior, and discusses the complexities in determining how lipid and membrane behavior impact Gag membrane binding.

  16. Synthetic Biomimetic Membranes and Their Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Rok Kim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biomimetic membranes provide biological environments to membrane proteins. By exploiting the central roles of biological membranes, it is possible to devise biosensors, drug delivery systems, and nanocontainers using a biomimetic membrane system integrated with functional proteins. Biomimetic membranes can be created with synthetic lipids or block copolymers. These amphiphilic lipids and polymers self-assemble in an aqueous solution either into planar membranes or into vesicles. Using various techniques developed to date, both planar membranes and vesicles can provide versatile and robust platforms for a number of applications. In particular, biomimetic membranes with modified lipids or functional proteins are promising platforms for biosensors. We review recent technologies used to create synthetic biomimetic membranes and their engineered sensors applications.

  17. Uranium preconcentration from seawater using adsorptive membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Manchanda, V.K.; Athawale, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium recovery from bio-aggressive but lean feed like seawater is a challenging problem as it requires in situ preconcentration of uranium in presence of huge excess of competing ions with fast sorption kinetics. In our laboratory, widely used amidoxime membrane (AO-membrane) was evaluated for uranium sorption under seawater conditions. This study indicated that AO-membrane was inherently slow because of the complexation chemistry involved in transfer of U(VI) from (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4 - to AO sites in membrane. In order to search better options, several chemical compositions of membrane were scanned for their efficacy for uranium preconcentration from seawater, and concluded that EGMP-membrane offers several advantages over AO-membrane. In this paper, the comparison of EGMP-membrane with AO-membrane for uranium sorption under seawater conditions has been reviewed. (author)

  18. Membrane bending by protein-protein crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Schmid, Eva M; Ryan, Christopher J; Ann, Hyoung Sook; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Sherman, Michael B; Geissler, Phillip L; Fletcher, Daniel A; Hayden, Carl C

    2012-09-01

    Curved membranes are an essential feature of dynamic cellular structures, including endocytic pits, filopodia protrusions and most organelles. It has been proposed that specialized proteins induce curvature by binding to membranes through two primary mechanisms: membrane scaffolding by curved proteins or complexes; and insertion of wedge-like amphipathic helices into the membrane. Recent computational studies have raised questions about the efficiency of the helix-insertion mechanism, predicting that proteins must cover nearly 100% of the membrane surface to generate high curvature, an improbable physiological situation. Thus, at present, we lack a sufficient physical explanation of how protein attachment bends membranes efficiently. On the basis of studies of epsin1 and AP180, proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, we propose a third general mechanism for bending fluid cellular membranes: protein-protein crowding. By correlating membrane tubulation with measurements of protein densities on membrane surfaces, we demonstrate that lateral pressure generated by collisions between bound proteins drives bending. Whether proteins attach by inserting a helix or by binding lipid heads with an engineered tag, protein coverage above ~20% is sufficient to bend membranes. Consistent with this crowding mechanism, we find that even proteins unrelated to membrane curvature, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP), can bend membranes when sufficiently concentrated. These findings demonstrate a highly efficient mechanism by which the crowded protein environment on the surface of cellular membranes can contribute to membrane shape change.

  19. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  20. Robust mixed conducting membrane structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a membrane structure, comprising in said order a first electronically conducting layer, an ionically conducting layer, and a second electronically conducting layer, characterized in that the first and second electronically conducting layers are internally short...... circuited. The present invention further provides a method of producing the above membrane structure, comprising the steps of : providing a ionically conducting layer; applying at least one layer of electronically conducting material on each side of said ionically conducting layer; sintering the multilayer...... structure; and impregnating the electronically conducting layers with a catalyst material or catalyst precursor material....

  1. Membrane processes in nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of radioactive wastes is necessary taking into account the potential hazard of radioactive substances to human health and surrounding environment. The choice of appropriate technology depends on capital and operational costs, wastes amount and their characteristics, appointed targets of the process, e.g. the values of decontamination factors and volume reduction coefficients. The conventional technologies applied for radioactive waste processing, such as precipitation coupled with sedimentation, ion exchange and evaporation have many drawbacks. These include high energy consumption and formation of secondary wastes, e.g. the sludge from sediment tanks, spent ion exchange adsorbents and regeneration solutions. There are also many limitations of such processes, i.e. foaming and drop entrainment in evaporators, loses of solvents and production of secondary wastes in solvent extraction or bed clogging in ion exchange columns. Membrane processes as the newest achievement of the process engineering can successfully supersede many non-effective, out-of-date methods. But in some instances they can also complement these methods whilst improving the parameters of effluents and purification economy. This monograph presents own research data on the application of recent achievements in the area of membrane processes for solving selected problems in nuclear technology. Relatively big space was devoted to the use of membrane processing of low and intermediate radioactive liquid wastes because of numerous applications of these processes in nuclear centres over the world and also because of the interests of the author that was reflected by her recent research projects and activity. This work presents a review on the membrane methods recently introduced into the nuclear technology against the background of the other, commonly applied separation techniques, with indications of the possibilities and prospects for their further developments. Particular attention was paid

  2. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO2 laser micro...... peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays...

  3. Polymeric and Lipid Membranes-From Spheres to Flat Membranes and vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveleva, Mariia S; Lengert, Ekaterina V; Gorin, Dmitry A; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan V; Skirtach, Andre G

    2017-08-15

    Membranes are important components in a number of systems, where separation and control of the flow of molecules is desirable. Controllable membranes represent an even more coveted and desirable entity and their development is considered to be the next step of development. Typically, membranes are considered on flat surfaces, but spherical capsules possess a perfect "infinite" or fully suspended membranes. Similarities and transitions between spherical and flat membranes are discussed, while applications of membranes are also emphasized.

  4. Membrane potentials of membranes with fixed ionic sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; van der Wal, P.D.; van der Wal, P.D.; Skowronska-ptasinska, M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Sudholter, Ernst; Bergveld, Piet; Reinhoudt, David

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed to simulate the formation of a membrane potential as a function of physically accessible parameters. The description is an extension of the well-known Teorell-Meyer-Sievers (TMS) model, now including free and fixed ionic sites and free and fixed neutral

  5. Efficient preparation and analysis of membrane and membrane protein systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Martinez-Seara, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1858, č. 10 (2016), s. 2468-2482 ISSN 0005-2736 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : tools and software * membrane building * protein insertion * molecular dynamics * lipid bilayer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  6. STUDI MEMBRAN KITOSAN DARI KULIT LOBSTER BAMBU SEBAGAI MEMBRAN FILTRASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Putri Windari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of the extraction and characterization of chitosan from skin waste of Bamboo Lobster (Panulirus versicolor has been done. Chitosan is extracted using conventional method, namely the initial process: cleaning and drying (pretreatment, demineralization, deproteination, and deacetylation. The chitosan obtained has been used to prepare chitosan membrane 2% with acetic acid 1% as solvent. The membrane prepared by phase inversion method withprecipitation through solvent evaporation. The prepared membranes were characterized by FTIR spectrophotometer, Nova 1200e by BJH method and filtration method. The results obtained that degree of deacetylation (DD of chitosan is 70.016%. The thickness of the membrane is 0.361 mm. The FTIR spectra show that functional groups obtained are -NH, -CH, C=O, C-O and -CN. From BJH method obtained that the pore radius is 1.69 nm and pore density is 8.95 x 105pores/m3. From the filtration method obtained that at each pressure, 80-85 kPa and 90-100 kPa, the PWF values are 381.232 and 454.545 L/m2.h, respectively.

  7. Membrane distillation : a new approach using composite membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Antonius Christianus Maria

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects of the membrane distillation process and the thermally driven pervaporation process have been described. Both processes differ essentially from each other as far as their mechanism of separation and their applicability is concerned. From a practical point of view,

  8. Diffusion of Integral Membrane Proteins in Protein-Rich Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Metzler, R.; Vattulainen, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 17 (2017), s. 4308-4313 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : giant unilamellar vesicles * single-molecule tracking * lipid bilayer membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 9.353, year: 2016

  9. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Warren K.; McCray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.

    1998-01-01

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  10. 3D Membrane Imaging and Porosity Visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2016-03-03

    Ultrafiltration asymmetric porous membranes were imaged by two microscopy methods, which allow 3D reconstruction: Focused Ion Beam and Serial Block Face Scanning Electron Microscopy. A new algorithm was proposed to evaluate porosity and average pore size in different layers orthogonal and parallel to the membrane surface. The 3D-reconstruction enabled additionally the visualization of pore interconnectivity in different parts of the membrane. The method was demonstrated for a block copolymer porous membrane and can be extended to other membranes with application in ultrafiltration, supports for forward osmosis, etc, offering a complete view of the transport paths in the membrane.

  11. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  12. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion: Post-Palade Era Researchers Win the Nobel Prize. Riddhi Atul Jani Subba Rao Gangi Setty. General Article Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 421-445 ...

  13. Stability of supported liquid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neplenbroek, Antonius Maria

    1989-01-01

    This thesis deals with the stability of supported liquid membranes (SLMs). The use of SLMs, in which an extraction liquid containing a carrier is immobilized in the pores of a microporous support, has recently been introduced as a promising new separation technique. Some advantages ascribed to this

  14. Membrane adsorbers : development and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avramescu, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Bioaffinity separation principally asks for membranes that show a good compatibility to the targeted biological fluids, provide coupling sites for (bio)ligands and posses a hydrophilic surface to reduce non-specific adsorption caused by hydrophobic atraction. Due to its good blood compatibility and

  15. Preparation of gas selective membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    Gas separation membranes which possess improved characteristics as exemplified by selectivity and flux may be prepared by coating a porous organic polymer support with a solution or emulsion of a plasticizer and an organic polymer, said coating being effected at subatmospheric pressures in order to increase the penetration depth of the coating material.

  16. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  17. Guanidinium Pairing Facilitates Membrane Translocation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allolio, Christoph; Baxová, Katarína; Vazdar, M.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 1 (2016), s. 143-153 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06181S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ab initio molecular dynamics * guanidinium * like charge pairing * membrane Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.177, year: 2016

  18. Comparative antioxidant capacity, membrane stabilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative antioxidant capacity, membrane stabilization, polyphenol composition and cytotoxicity of the leaf and stem of Cissus multistriata. ... standard anti-inflammatory drug (Indomethacin) used. The extracts are less toxic to the cell (Arthenia salina) with their LC/EC50 higher than that of standard potassium dichromate ...

  19. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine; Braekevelt, Sylvie; Lauritzen, Karsten; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2015-11-05

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins-aquaporins-has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market-in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes.

  20. PREMATURE RUPTURE OF THE MEMBRANES*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In patients presenting with premature rupture of the membranes there are two factors which influence the foetal morbidity and mortality. These factors are prema- turity and intra-uterine infection. The purpose of this analysis was to elucidate which factor carried the greater risk to the foetus. Recently there has been a spate of.

  1. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) | Richards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being employed in South African intensive care units for the management of patients with refractory hypoxaemia and for haemodynamic support, particularly following cardiothoracic procedures. ECMO is expensive, however, and there is a danger that this ...

  2. Basement membrane proteoglycans and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Abrahamson, D R; McCarthy, K J

    1993-01-01

    -CSPG was only strongly expressed in the vasculature invading late comma stage glomeruli, and later in presumptive and mature Bowman's capsule. Over the first six to eight weeks, the capillary basement membranes contained BM-CSPG, but in gradually decreasing amounts until it became completely undetectable...

  3. Osmosis and the Marvelous Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocanour, Barbara; Bruce, Alease S.

    1985-01-01

    Shows how the natural membrane of a decalcified chicken egg can demonstrate the principle of osmosis within a single class period. Various glucose and saline solutions used, periods of time, physiological effects experiments, and correction for differences in initial weights are noted. (DH)

  4. Intelligent Membranes: Dream or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliuzza, Annarosa

    2013-07-15

    Intelligent materials are claimed to overcome current drawbacks associated with the attainment of high standards of life, health, security and defense. Membrane-based sensors represent a category of smart systems capable of providing a large number of benefits to different markets of textiles, biomedicine, environment, chemistry, agriculture, architecture, transport and energy. Intelligent membranes can be characterized by superior sensitivity, broader dynamic range and highly sophisticated mechanisms of autorecovery. These prerogatives are regarded as the result of multi-compartment arrays, where complementary functions can be accommodated and well-integrated. Based on the mechanism of "sense to act", stimuli-responsive membranes adapt themselves to surrounding environments, producing desired effects such as smart regulation of transport, wetting, transcription, hydrodynamics, separation, and chemical or energy conversion. Hopefully, the design of new smart devices easier to manufacture and assemble can be realized through the integration of sensing membranes with wireless networks, looking at the ambitious challenge to establish long-distance communications. Thus, the transfer of signals to collecting systems could allow continuous and real-time monitoring of data, events and/or processes.

  5. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Perry

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market—in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes.

  6. Comparative antioxidant capacity, membrane stabilization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... In this present study, a comparative evaluation of the antioxidant capacities, phenol and polyphenol composition, membrane stabilization, and cytotoxicity to brine shrimps (Arthemia salina) of the leaf and stem extracts of Cissus multistriata were carried out. 2,2- Diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical.

  7. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    investigators were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or. Medicine in 2013. Introduction. Membrane Transport: In the eukaryotic cell, a majority of proteins are made in the cytosol. But the transmembrane and secretory proteins are synthesized in an organelle called the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These proteins ...

  8. Membrane microdomains in immunoreceptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hořejší, Václav; Hrdinka, Matouš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 588, č. 15 (2014), s. 2392-2397 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : membrane raft * microdomain * immunoreceptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2014

  9. Intelligent Membranes: Dream or Reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarosa Gugliuzza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent materials are claimed to overcome current drawbacks associated with the attainment of high standards of life, health, security and defense. Membrane-based sensors represent a category of smart systems capable of providing a large number of benefits to different markets of textiles, biomedicine, environment, chemistry, agriculture, architecture, transport and energy. Intelligent membranes can be characterized by superior sensitivity, broader dynamic range and highly sophisticated mechanisms of autorecovery. These prerogatives are regarded as the result of multi-compartment arrays, where complementary functions can be accommodated and well-integrated. Based on the mechanism of “sense to act”, stimuli-responsive membranes adapt themselves to surrounding environments, producing desired effects such as smart regulation of transport, wetting, transcription, hydrodynamics, separation, and chemical or energy conversion. Hopefully, the design of new smart devices easier to manufacture and assemble can be realized through the integration of sensing membranes with wireless networks, looking at the ambitious challenge to establish long-distance communications. Thus, the transfer of signals to collecting systems could allow continuous and real-time monitoring of data, events and/or processes.

  10. Dense ceramic catalytic membranes and membrane reactors for energy and environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping; Li, Kang

    2011-10-21

    Catalytic membrane reactors which carry out separation and reaction in a single unit are expected to be a promising approach to achieve green and sustainable chemistry with less energy consumption and lower pollution. This article presents a review of the recent progress of dense ceramic catalytic membranes and membrane reactors, and their potential applications in energy and environmental areas. A basic knowledge of catalytic membranes and membrane reactors is first introduced briefly, followed by a short discussion on the membrane materials including their structures, composition and strategies for material development. The configuration of catalytic membranes, the design of membrane reaction processes and the high temperature sealing are also discussed. The performance of catalytic membrane reactors for energy and environmental applications are summarized and typical catalytic membrane reaction processes are presented and discussed. Finally, current challenges and difficulties related to the industrialization of dense ceramic membrane reactors are addressed and possible future research is also outlined.

  11. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  12. Ceramic membranes for gas separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincente-Mingarro, I.M. de; Pitarch, J.A. [Tecnologia y Gestion de la Innovacion, Madrid (Spain)

    1998-11-01

    The project is being carried out jointly by TGI, S.A., CIEMAT and CSIC-ICM to develop and evaluate new inorganic membranes of a ceramic type, with nanometric pore size for separation of contaminants and fuel enrichment, in gas mixtures from coal gasification. In order to achieve both the highest active and selective surface, a candle (150 mm length and 60 mm in diameter), with 30-40 % porosity and pore sizes of {lt}1 {mu}m was developed. The processing steps include the slip-casting of the first layer (porous support) in a way than after thermal treatment (1400-1600{degree}C) the desirable shape dimensions, strength, porosity and pore size were obtained. Then the support was dipped successively (colloidal filtration over the casting porous piece) in an appropriate suspension of alumina with lower grain size. The top layer was obtained by the sol-gel process so that through successive setting and heat treatment the pores were reduced to the nanometre size. CVD and CVI techniques were set up to develop membranes for gas separation with a high selectivity level. Experimental chemical infiltration `Membranes Development` on porous substrates has been achieved on disk and candle-shaped materials. Characterisation was by spectrophotometry (IRS). Kinetic studies of coating in order to find out reproducible conditions at low temperature were also carried out. Uniform recovery over the whole membrane surface is wanted. The CIEMAT`s Hot Gas Separation Plant (HGSP) works with gas mixtures at a maximum design temperature 773 K and pressures up to 50 bar. It comprises: a gas supply unit equipped with flow, temperature and pressure measuring and control systems; a heating system within the membrane which must be leak proof for high pressures; and an in-line gas chromatography system thus allowing the chemical composition of the gas entering, permeated and retained to be measured. 7 figs.

  13. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

    2013-09-30

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  14. Micro-and/or nano-scale patterned porous membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of using membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xianbin

    2015-01-22

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for materials that include a pre-designed patterned, porous membrane (e.g., micro- and/or nano-scale patterned), structures or devices that include a pre-designed patterned, porous membrane, methods of making pre-designed patterned, porous membranes, methods of separation, and the like.

  15. Membrane fouling mechanism of biofilm-membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR): Pore blocking model and membrane cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Wenxiang; Tang, Bing; Ding, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zhien

    2018-02-01

    Biofilm membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR) is considered as an important wastewater treatment technology that incorporates advantages of both biofilm and MBR process, as well as can alleviate membrane fouling, with respect to the conventional activated sludge MBR. But, to be efficient, it necessitates the establishment of proper methods for the assessment of membrane fouling. Four Hermia membrane blocking models were adopted to quantify and evaluate the membrane fouling of BF-MBR. The experiments were conducted with various operational conditions, including membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure (TMP). Good agreement between cake formation model and experimental data was found, confirming the validity of the Hermia models for assessing the membrane fouling of BF-MBR and that cake layer deposits on membrane. Moreover, the influences of membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure on the Hermia pore blocking coefficient of cake layer were investigated. In addition, the permeability recovery after membrane cleaning at various operational conditions was studied. This work confirms that, unlike conventional activated sludge MBR, BF-MBR possesses a low degree of membrane fouling and a higher membrane permeability recovery after cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma membrane ordering agent pluronic F-68 (PF-68) reduces neurotransmitter uptake and release and produces learning and memory deficits in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M. S.; Prendergast, M. A.; Terry, A. V. Jr

    1999-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence indicates that aged-related changes in the fluidity and lipid composition of the plasma membrane contribute to cellular dysfunction in humans and other mammalian species. In the CNS, reductions in neuronal plasma membrane order (PMO) (i.e., increased plasma membrane fluidity) have been attributed to age as well as the presence of the beta-amyloid peptide-25-35, known to play an important role in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These PMO increases may influence neurotransmitter synthesis, receptor binding, and second messenger systems as well as signal transduction pathways. The effects of neuronal PMO on learning and memory processes have not been adequately investigated, however. Based on the hypothesis that an increase in PMO may alter a number of aspects of synaptic transmission, we investigated several neurochemical and behavioral effects of the membrane ordering agent, PF-68. In cell culture, PF-68 (nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein) reduced [3H]norepinephrine (NE) uptake into differentiated PC-12 cells as well as reduced nicotine stimulated [3H]NE release. The compound (800-2400 microg/kg, i.p., resulting in nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein in the brain) decreased step-through latencies and increased the frequencies of crossing into the unsafe side of the chamber in inhibitory avoidance training. In the Morris water maze, PF-68 increased the latencies and swim distances required to locate a hidden platform and reduced the time spent and distance swam in the previous target quadrant during transfer (probe) trials. PF-68 did not impair performance of a well-learned working memory task, the rat delayed stimulus discrimination task (DSDT), however. Studies with 14C-labeled PF-68 indicated that significant (pmoles/mg wet tissue) levels of the compound entered the brain from peripheral (i.p.) injection. No PF-68 related changes were observed in swim speeds or in visual acuity tests in water maze experiments, rotorod

  17. Self-assembled Block Copolymer Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2012-12-20

    Embodiments of the invention include methods for the production of porous membranes. In certain aspects the methods are directed to producing polymeric porous membranes having a narrow pore size distribution.

  18. Fuel-Cell Structure Prevents Membrane Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, J.

    1986-01-01

    Embossed plates direct flows of reactants and coolant. Membrane-type fuel-cell battery has improved reactant flow and heat removal. Compact, lightweight battery produces high current and power without drying of membranes.

  19. Characterisation of adaptive fluidic silicone membrane lenses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schneider, F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the auhtors compare the performance and optical quality of two types of adaptive fluidic silicone-membrane lenses. The membranes feature either a homogeneous thickness, or they are shaped resulting in an inhomogeneous cross...

  20. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.