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Sample records for membrane anchoring mechanism

  1. A unifying mechanism accounts for sensing of membrane curvature by BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Hatzakis, Nikos; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    itself. We thus anticipate that membrane curvature will promote the redistribution of proteins that are anchored in membranes through any type of hydrophobic moiety, a thesis that broadens tremendously the implications of membrane curvature for protein sorting, trafficking and signaling in cell biology....

  2. BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins use the same mechanism to sense membrane curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Bhatia, V K; Gether, U

    2010-01-01

    /ensemble liposome samples of different mean diameter. Next, we describe two different MCS protein motifs (amphipathic helices and BAR domains) and suggest that in both cases curvature sensitive membrane binding results from asymmetric insertion of hydrophobic amino acids in the lipid membrane. This mechanism can...

  3. Membrane curvature enables N-Ras lipid anchor sorting to liquid-ordered membrane phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik Bruun; Jensen, Martin Borch; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller

    2015-01-01

    Trafficking and sorting of membrane-anchored Ras GTPases are regulated by partitioning between distinct membrane domains. Here, in vitro experiments and microscopic molecular theory reveal membrane curvature as a new modulator of N-Ras lipid anchor and palmitoyl chain partitioning. Membrane...

  4. Spontaneous insertion of GPI anchors into cholesterol-rich membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Xiuhua; Tian, Falin; Yue, Tongtao; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2018-05-01

    GPI-Anchored proteins (GPI-APs) can be exogenously transferred onto bilayer membranes both in vivo and in vitro, while the mechanism by which this transfer process occurs is unknown. In this work, we used atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to characterize the essential influence of cholesterol on insertion of the GPI anchors into plasma membranes. We demonstrate, both dynamically and energetically, that in the presence of cholesterol, the tails of GPI anchors are able to penetrate inside the core of the lipid membrane spontaneously with a three-step mechanism, while in the absence of cholesterol no spontaneous insertion was observed. We ascribe the failure of insertion to the strong thermal fluctuation of lipid molecules in cholesterol-free bilayer, which generates a repulsive force in entropic origin. In the presence of cholesterol, however, the fluctuation of lipids is strongly reduced, thus decreasing the barrier for the anchor insertion. Based on this observation, we propose a hypothesis that addition of cholesterol creates vertical creases in membranes for the insertion of acyl chains. Moreover, we find that the GPI anchor could also spontaneously inserted into the boundary between cholesterol-rich and cholesterol-depleted domains. Our results shed light on the mechanism of cholesterol-mediated interaction between membrane proteins with acyl chain and plasma membranes in living cells.

  5. Spontaneous insertion of GPI anchors into cholesterol-rich membrane domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available GPI-Anchored proteins (GPI-APs can be exogenously transferred onto bilayer membranes both in vivo and in vitro, while the mechanism by which this transfer process occurs is unknown. In this work, we used atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to characterize the essential influence of cholesterol on insertion of the GPI anchors into plasma membranes. We demonstrate, both dynamically and energetically, that in the presence of cholesterol, the tails of GPI anchors are able to penetrate inside the core of the lipid membrane spontaneously with a three-step mechanism, while in the absence of cholesterol no spontaneous insertion was observed. We ascribe the failure of insertion to the strong thermal fluctuation of lipid molecules in cholesterol-free bilayer, which generates a repulsive force in entropic origin. In the presence of cholesterol, however, the fluctuation of lipids is strongly reduced, thus decreasing the barrier for the anchor insertion. Based on this observation, we propose a hypothesis that addition of cholesterol creates vertical creases in membranes for the insertion of acyl chains. Moreover, we find that the GPI anchor could also spontaneously inserted into the boundary between cholesterol-rich and cholesterol-depleted domains. Our results shed light on the mechanism of cholesterol-mediated interaction between membrane proteins with acyl chain and plasma membranes in living cells.

  6. Method and apparatus for dismantling mechanical anchors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovskiy, Yu P; Chendev, F S; Gritsayuk, B I; Gubin, N I; Osipov, S P

    1982-01-01

    This apparatus is designed to reduce the amount of labor required to dismantle mechanical anchors while at the same time lowering expenditures for lumber. Longwall beams and timber skips are used to support the cap and any fractured rock faces. The apparatus itself has grooves, vertical guides, and a drive system to position the longwall beams.

  7. Analysis of Anchoring Mechanism of Fully Grouted Prestressed Anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEN Zhi-jie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some researchers have been carried out on analysis of the influence of the full grouted prestressed anchor shape of borehole wall on its carrying capacity. Based on the self-affine fractal feature of anchor borehole wall structural plane, the relation equation among structural plane shear strength, liquid injection pressure, tensile load and structural plane fractal dimension D was built, the instability judgment criterion of anchoring bearing strata and rock structural plane was determined, the solving equations of disintegrated rock support density were derived. Based on the experimental results, the theoretical basis of support design under the disintegrated rock condition was offered.

  8. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms...... to humans. GPI-APs confer important cellular functions as receptors, enzymes and scaffolding molecules. Specific enzymes and detergent extraction methods combined with separation technologies and mass spectrometry permit proteomic analysis of GPI-APs from plasma membrane preparations to reveal cell...

  9. Direct visualization of membrane architecture of myelinating cells in transgenic mice expressing membrane-anchored EGFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yaqi; Kim, BongWoo; He, Xuelian; Kim, Sunja; Lu, Changqing; Wang, Haibo; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Hou, Yiping; Li, Jianrong; Zhao, Xianghui; Lu, Q Richard

    2014-04-01

    Myelinogenesis is a complex process that involves substantial and dynamic changes in plasma membrane architecture and myelin interaction with axons. Highly ramified processes of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) make axonal contact and then extrapolate to wrap around axons and form multilayer compact myelin sheathes. Currently, the mechanisms governing myelin sheath assembly and axon selection by myelinating cells are not fully understood. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse line expressing the membrane-anchored green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) in myelinating cells, which allow live imaging of details of myelinogenesis and cellular behaviors in the nervous systems. mEGFP expression is driven by the promoter of 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) that is expressed in the myelinating cell lineage. Robust mEGFP signals appear in the membrane processes of oligodendrocytes in the CNS and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), wherein mEGFP expression defines the inner layers of myelin sheaths and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures in adult sciatic nerves. In addition, mEGFP expression can be used to track the extent of remyelination after demyelinating injury in a toxin-induced demyelination animal model. Taken together, the membrane-anchored mEGFP expression in the new transgenic line would facilitate direct visualization of dynamic myelin membrane formation and assembly during development and process remodeling during remyelination after various demyelinating injuries.

  10. Proteomic analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Nühse, Thomas S; Foster, Leonard J

    2003-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse family of post-translationally modified membrane proteins found mostly in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane in a variety of eukaryotic cells. Although the general role of GPI-APs remains...... unclear, they have attracted attention because they act as enzymes and receptors in cell adhesion, differentiation, and host-pathogen interactions. GPI-APs may represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in humans and are interesting in plant biotechnology because of their key role in root...... and 44 GPI-APs in an Arabidopsis thaliana membrane preparation, representing the largest experimental dataset of GPI-anchored proteins to date....

  11. Toward the Structure of Dynamic Membrane-Anchored Actin Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Igor

    2007-01-01

    In the cortex of a motile cell, membrane-anchored actin filaments assemble into structures of varying shape and function. Filopodia are distinguished by a core of bundled actin filaments within finger-like extensions of the membrane. In a recent paper by Medalia et al1 cryo-electron tomography has been used to reconstruct, from filopodia of Dictyostelium cells, the 3-dimensional organization of actin filaments in connection with the plasma membrane. A special arrangement of short filaments converging toward the filopod's tip has been called a “terminal cone”. In this region force is applied for protrusion of the membrane. Here we discuss actin organization in the filopodia of Dictyostelium in the light of current views on forces that are generated by polymerizing actin filaments, and on the resistance of membranes against deformation that counteracts these forces. PMID:19262130

  12. HKUST-1 Membranes Anchored on Porous Substrate by Hetero MIL-110 Nanorod Array Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yiyin; Cao, Wei; Li, Junwei; Sun, Luwei; Peng, Xinsheng

    2013-09-02

    Great anchors and seeds: Hetero-seeding growth processes and anchored nanorod arrays were successfully utilized in the synthesis of HKUST-1 membranes. These arrays were firmly anchored on porous substrates by using a MIL-110 nanorod array as both the anchor and seed. The resulting HKUST-1 membranes demonstrated good separation factors for binary gases exceeding the Knudson selectivity. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Enhanced vapor transport in membrane distillation via functionalized carbon nanotubes anchored into electrospun nanofibres

    KAUST Repository

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Lee, Eui-Jong; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Jung Gil; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2017-01-01

    To ascertain membrane distillation (MD) as an emerging desalination technology to meet the global water challenge, development of membranes with ideal material properties is crucial. Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were anchored to nanofibres of electrospun membranes. Covalent modification and fluorination of CNTs improved their dispersibility and interfacial interaction with the polymer membrane, resulting in well-aligned CNTs inside crystalline fibres with superhydrophobicity. Consideration for the chemical/physical properties of the CNT composite membranes and calculation of their theoretical fluxes revealed the mechanism of MD: CNTs facilitated the repulsive force for Knudsen and molecular diffusions, reduced the boundary-layer effect in viscous flow, and assisted surface diffusion, allowing for fast vapor transport with anti-wetting. This study shows that the role of CNTs and an optimal composite ratio can be used to reduce the gap between theoretical and experimental approaches to desalination.

  14. Enhanced vapor transport in membrane distillation via functionalized carbon nanotubes anchored into electrospun nanofibres

    KAUST Repository

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin

    2017-01-30

    To ascertain membrane distillation (MD) as an emerging desalination technology to meet the global water challenge, development of membranes with ideal material properties is crucial. Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were anchored to nanofibres of electrospun membranes. Covalent modification and fluorination of CNTs improved their dispersibility and interfacial interaction with the polymer membrane, resulting in well-aligned CNTs inside crystalline fibres with superhydrophobicity. Consideration for the chemical/physical properties of the CNT composite membranes and calculation of their theoretical fluxes revealed the mechanism of MD: CNTs facilitated the repulsive force for Knudsen and molecular diffusions, reduced the boundary-layer effect in viscous flow, and assisted surface diffusion, allowing for fast vapor transport with anti-wetting. This study shows that the role of CNTs and an optimal composite ratio can be used to reduce the gap between theoretical and experimental approaches to desalination.

  15. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed

  16. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jimin, E-mail: jimin.wang@yale.edu; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo, E-mail: yorgo.modis@yale.edu

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  17. Characterization of the C-terminal ER membrane anchor of PTP1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderie, Ines; Schulz, Irene; Schmid, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of cell function. In living cells PTP1B activity is restricted to the vicinity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by post-translational C-terminal attachment of PTP1B to the ER membrane network. In our study we investigated the membrane anchor of PTP1B by use of EGFP fusion proteins. We demonstrate that the membrane anchor of PTP1B cannot be narrowed down to a unique amino acid sequence with a defined start and stop point but rather is moveable within several amino acids. Removal of up to seven amino acids from the C-terminus, as well as exchange of single amino acids in the putative transmembrane sequence did not influence subcellular localization of PTP1B. With the method of bimolecular fluorescence complementation we could demonstrate dimerization of PTP1B in vivo. Homodimerization was, in contrast to other tail-anchored proteins, not dependent on the membrane anchor. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal membrane anchor of PTP1B is formed by a combination of a single stretch transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by a tail. TMD and tail length are variable and there are no sequence-specific features. Our data for PTP1B are consistent with a concept that explains the ER membrane anchor of tail-anchored proteins as a physicochemical structure

  18. Plant glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored proteins at the plasma membrane-cell wall nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeats, Trevor H; Bacic, Antony; Johnson, Kim L

    2018-04-18

    Approximately 1% of plant proteins are predicted to be post-translationally modified with a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that tethers the polypeptide to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. While the synthesis and structure of GPI anchors is largely conserved across eukaryotes, the repertoire of functional domains present in the GPI-anchored proteome has diverged substantially. In plants, this includes a large fraction of the GPI-anchored proteome being further modified with plant-specific arabinogalactan (AG) O-glycans. The importance of the GPI-anchored proteome to plant development is underscored by the fact that GPI biosynthetic null mutants exhibit embryo lethality. Mutations in genes encoding specific GPI-anchored proteins (GAPs) further supports their contribution to diverse biological processes occurring at the interface of the plasma membrane and cell wall, including signaling, cell wall metabolism, cell wall polymer cross-linking, and plasmodesmatal transport. Here, we review the literature concerning plant GPI-anchored proteins in the context of their potential to act as molecular hubs that mediate interactions between the plasma membrane and the cell wall and their potential to transduce the signal into the protoplast and thereby activate signal transduction pathways. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Membrane Curvature and Lipid Composition Synergize To Regulate N-Ras Anchor Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik B.; Kennard, Celeste; Pedersen, Søren L.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins anchored to membranes through covalently linked fatty acids and/or isoprenoid groups play crucial roles in all forms of life. Sorting and trafficking of lipidated proteins has traditionally been discussed in the context of partitioning to membrane domains of different lipid composition. We...

  20. Structure of the membrane anchor of pestivirus glycoprotein E(rns, a long tilted amphipathic helix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Aberle

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available E(rns is an essential virion glycoprotein with RNase activity that suppresses host cellular innate immune responses upon being partially secreted from the infected cells. Its unusual C-terminus plays multiple roles, as the amphiphilic helix acts as a membrane anchor, as a signal peptidase cleavage site, and as a retention/secretion signal. We analyzed the structure and membrane binding properties of this sequence to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. CD spectroscopy in different setups, as well as Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the helical folding and showed that the helix is accommodated in the amphiphilic region of the lipid bilayer with a slight tilt rather than lying parallel to the surface. This model was confirmed by NMR analyses that also identified a central stretch of 15 residues within the helix that is fully shielded from the aqueous layer, which is C-terminally followed by a putative hairpin structure. These findings explain the strong membrane binding of the protein and provide clues to establishing the E(rns membrane contact, processing and secretion.

  1. Structure of the Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns, a Long Tilted Amphipathic Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Daniel; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Bürck, Jochen; Wolf, Moritz; Reißer, Sabine; Luy, Burkhard; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Anne S.; Meyers, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Erns is an essential virion glycoprotein with RNase activity that suppresses host cellular innate immune responses upon being partially secreted from the infected cells. Its unusual C-terminus plays multiple roles, as the amphiphilic helix acts as a membrane anchor, as a signal peptidase cleavage site, and as a retention/secretion signal. We analyzed the structure and membrane binding properties of this sequence to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. CD spectroscopy in different setups, as well as Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the helical folding and showed that the helix is accommodated in the amphiphilic region of the lipid bilayer with a slight tilt rather than lying parallel to the surface. This model was confirmed by NMR analyses that also identified a central stretch of 15 residues within the helix that is fully shielded from the aqueous layer, which is C-terminally followed by a putative hairpin structure. These findings explain the strong membrane binding of the protein and provide clues to establishing the Erns membrane contact, processing and secretion. PMID:24586172

  2. Structure of the membrane anchor of pestivirus glycoprotein E(rns), a long tilted amphipathic helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Daniel; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Bürck, Jochen; Wolf, Moritz; Reißer, Sabine; Luy, Burkhard; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Anne S; Meyers, Gregor

    2014-02-01

    E(rns) is an essential virion glycoprotein with RNase activity that suppresses host cellular innate immune responses upon being partially secreted from the infected cells. Its unusual C-terminus plays multiple roles, as the amphiphilic helix acts as a membrane anchor, as a signal peptidase cleavage site, and as a retention/secretion signal. We analyzed the structure and membrane binding properties of this sequence to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. CD spectroscopy in different setups, as well as Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the helical folding and showed that the helix is accommodated in the amphiphilic region of the lipid bilayer with a slight tilt rather than lying parallel to the surface. This model was confirmed by NMR analyses that also identified a central stretch of 15 residues within the helix that is fully shielded from the aqueous layer, which is C-terminally followed by a putative hairpin structure. These findings explain the strong membrane binding of the protein and provide clues to establishing the E(rns) membrane contact, processing and secretion.

  3. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. PMID:24725935

  4. Tritium labelling of a cholesterol amphiphile designed for cell membrane anchoring of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Balázs; Orbán, Erika; Kele, Zoltán; Tömböly, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane association of proteins can be achieved by the addition of lipid moieties to the polypeptide chain, and such lipid-modified proteins have important biological functions. A class of cell surface proteins contains a complex glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) glycolipid at the C-terminus, and they are accumulated in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains, that is, lipid rafts. Semisynthetic lipoproteins prepared from recombinant proteins and designed lipids are valuable probes and model systems of the membrane-associated proteins. Because GPI-anchored proteins can be reinserted into the cell membrane with the retention of the biological function, they are appropriate candidates for preparing models via reduction of the structural complexity. A synthetic headgroup was added to the 3β-hydroxyl group of cholesterol, an essential lipid component of rafts, and the resulting cholesterol derivative was used as a simplified GPI mimetic. In order to quantitate the membrane integrated GPI mimetic after the exogenous addition to live cells, a tritium labelled cholesterol anchor was prepared. The radioactive label was introduced into the headgroup, and the radiolabelled GPI mimetic anchor was obtained with a specific activity of 1.37 TBq/mmol. The headgroup labelled cholesterol derivative was applied to demonstrate the sensitive detection of the cell membrane association of the anchor under in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A legged anchoring mechanism for capsule endoscopes using micropatterned adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Paul; Cheung, Eugene; Sitti, Metin

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a new concept for an anchoring mechanism to enhance existing capsule endoscopes. The mechanism consists of three actuated legs with compliant feet lined with micropillar adhesives to be pressed into the intestine wall to anchor the device at a fixed location. These adhesive systems are inspired by gecko and beetle foot hairs. Single-leg and full capsule mathematical models of the forces generated by the legs are analyzed to understand capsule performance. Empirical friction models for the interaction of the adhesives with an intestinal substrate were experimentally determined in vitro using dry and oil-coated elastomer micropillar arrays with 140 microm pillar diameter, 105 microm spacing between pillars, and an aspect ratio of 1:1 on fresh porcine small intestine specimens. Capsule prototypes were also tested in a simulated intestine environment and compared with predicted peristaltic loads to assess the viability of the proposed design. The experimental results showed that a deployed 10 gr capsule robot can withstand axial peristaltic loads and anchor reliably when actuation forces are greater than 0.27 N using dry micropillars. Required actuation forces may be reduced significantly by using micropillars coated with a thin silicone oil layer.

  6. Lipid transfer proteins do their thing anchored at membrane contact sites… but what is their thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Louise H; Levine, Tim P

    2016-04-15

    Membrane contact sites are structures where two organelles come close together to regulate flow of material and information between them. One type of inter-organelle communication is lipid exchange, which must occur for membrane maintenance and in response to environmental and cellular stimuli. Soluble lipid transfer proteins have been extensively studied, but additional families of transfer proteins have been identified that are anchored into membranes by transmembrane helices so that they cannot diffuse through the cytosol to deliver lipids. If such proteins target membrane contact sites they may be major players in lipid metabolism. The eukaryotic family of so-called Lipid transfer proteins Anchored at Membrane contact sites (LAMs) all contain both a sterol-specific lipid transfer domain in the StARkin superfamily (related to StART/Bet_v1), and one or more transmembrane helices anchoring them in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), making them interesting subjects for study in relation to sterol metabolism. They target a variety of membrane contact sites, including newly described contacts between organelles that were already known to make contact by other means. Lam1-4p target punctate ER-plasma membrane contacts. Lam5p and Lam6p target multiple contacts including a new category: vacuolar non-NVJ cytoplasmic ER (VancE) contacts. These developments confirm previous observations on tubular lipid-binding proteins (TULIPs) that established the importance of membrane anchored proteins for lipid traffic. However, the question remaining to be solved is the most difficult of all: are LAMs transporters, or alternately are they regulators that affect traffic more indirectly? © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  7. Lipid Binding of the Amphipathic Helix Serving as Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Daniel; Oetter, Kay-Marcus; Meyers, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Pestiviruses express a peculiar protein named Erns representing envelope glycoprotein and RNase, which is important for control of the innate immune response and persistent infection. The latter functions are connected with secretion of a certain amount of Erns from the infected cell. Retention/secretion of Erns is most likely controlled by its unusual membrane anchor, a long amphipathic helix attached in plane to the membrane. Here we present results of experiments conducted with a lipid vesicle sedimentation assay able to separate lipid-bound from unbound protein dissolved in the water phase. Using this technique we show that a protein composed of tag sequences and the carboxyterminal 65 residues of Erns binds specifically to membrane vesicles with a clear preference for compositions containing negatively charged lipids. Mutations disturbing the helical folding and/or amphipathic character of the anchor as well as diverse truncations and exchange of amino acids important for intracellular retention of Erns had no or only small effects on the proteins membrane binding. This result contrasts the dramatically increased secretion rates observed for Erns proteins with equivalent mutations within cells. Accordingly, the ratio of secreted versus cell retained Erns is not determined by the lipid affinity of the membrane anchor.

  8. Lipid Binding of the Amphipathic Helix Serving as Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Aberle

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses express a peculiar protein named Erns representing envelope glycoprotein and RNase, which is important for control of the innate immune response and persistent infection. The latter functions are connected with secretion of a certain amount of Erns from the infected cell. Retention/secretion of Erns is most likely controlled by its unusual membrane anchor, a long amphipathic helix attached in plane to the membrane. Here we present results of experiments conducted with a lipid vesicle sedimentation assay able to separate lipid-bound from unbound protein dissolved in the water phase. Using this technique we show that a protein composed of tag sequences and the carboxyterminal 65 residues of Erns binds specifically to membrane vesicles with a clear preference for compositions containing negatively charged lipids. Mutations disturbing the helical folding and/or amphipathic character of the anchor as well as diverse truncations and exchange of amino acids important for intracellular retention of Erns had no or only small effects on the proteins membrane binding. This result contrasts the dramatically increased secretion rates observed for Erns proteins with equivalent mutations within cells. Accordingly, the ratio of secreted versus cell retained Erns is not determined by the lipid affinity of the membrane anchor.

  9. Mechanical Characteristics Analysis of Surrounding Rock on Anchor Bar Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuan-cheng; Zhou, Pan; Huang, Rong-bin

    2018-03-01

    Through the homogenization method, the composite of rock and anchor bar is considered as the equivalent material of continuous, homogeneous, isotropic and strength parameter enhancement, which is defined as reinforcement body. On the basis of elasticity, the composite and the reinforcement are analyzed, Based on strengthening theory of surrounding rock and displacement equivalent conditions, the expression of reinforcement body strength parameters and mechanical parameters is deduced. The example calculation shows that the theoretical results are close to the results of the Jia-mei Gao[9], however, closer to the results of FLAC3D numerical simulation, it is proved that the model and surrounding rock reinforcement body theory are reasonable. the model is easy to analyze and calculate, provides a new way for determining reasonable bolt support parameters, can also provides reference for the stability analysis of underground cavern bolting support.

  10. Aspartate tightens the anchoring of staphylococcal lipoproteins to the cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Nimerta; Götz, Friedrich; Nguyen, Minh-Thu

    2017-12-01

    In gram-negative bacteria, the ABC transporter LolCDE complex translocates outer membrane-specific lipoproteins (Lpp) from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. Lpp possessing aspartate (Asp) at position +2 are not translocated because it functions as a LolCDE avoidance signal. In gram-positive bacteria, lacking an outer membrane and the Lol system, Lpp are only anchored at the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane. However, the release of Lpp particularly in pathogenic or commensal species is crucial for immune modulation. Here, we provide evidence that in Staphylococcus aureus Asp at position +2 plays a role in withholding Lpp to the cytoplasmic membrane. Screening of published exoproteomic data of S. aureus revealed that Lpp mainly with Gly or Ser at position +2 were found in exoproteome, but there was no Lpp with Asp+2. The occurrence of Lpp with Asp+2 is infrequent in gram-positive bacteria. In S. aureus USA300 only seven of the 67 Lpp possess Asp+2; among them five Lpp represented Lpl lipoproteins involved in host cell invasion. Our study demonstrated that replacing the Asp+2 present in Lpl8 with a Ser enhances its release into the supernatant. However, there is no different release of Asp+2 and Ser+2 in mprF mutant that lacks the positive charge of lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (Lys-PG). Moreover, substitution of Ser+2 by Asp in SitC (MntC) did not lead to a decreased release indicating that in staphylococci positions +3 and +4 might also be important for a tighter anchoring of Lpp. Here, we show that Asp in position +2 and adjacent amino acids contribute in tightening the anchoring of Lpp by interaction of the negative charged Asp with the positive charged Lys-PG. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Decay accelerating factor (DAF) is anchored to membranes by a C-terminal glycolipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medof, M.E.; Haas, R.; Walter, E.I.; Rosenberry, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    Purified 70 kDa membrane (m) DAF incorporates into cells when added in vitro. A 2 kDa smaller DAF form which functions extrinsically like C4bp but is unable to incorporate can be isolated from urine (u). Because of common deficits of mDAF and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in erythrocytes (E) of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), mDAF was analyzed for a O-terminal glycolipid membrane anchor similar to that in E AChE. Incubation of E with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme which cleaves a similar glycolipid anchor in trypanosome variant surface glycoproteins (mfVSGs), released 20% of the DAF antigen. The released DAF species resembled uDAF in size, extrinsic model of C4b2a decay, and lack of hydrophobicity. Reductive radiomethylation of mDAF with [ 14 C]HCHO and NaCNBH 3 revealed ethanolamine and glucosamine in proportions similar to those in the E AChE glycolipid anchor. Papain cleavage of radiomethylated mDAF released the labeled ethanolamine and glucosamine in small O-terminal fragments from the residual DAF that retained N-terminal Asp. Following labeling of the anchors of mDAF and E AChE with the lipophilic photoreagent 3-trifluoromethyl-3-(m-[ 125 I]iodophenyl)diazirine, cleavage at the glucosamine residue by deamination quantitatively released the label from both proteins. Biosynthetic labeling of Hela cells with [ 3 H]ethanolamine resulted in rapid 3 H incorporation into both 48 kDa proDAF and 70 kDa mDAF. These data indicate that mDAF is anchored by a glycolipid similar to that in E AChE, mfVSGs and Thy-1 antigen and raise the possibility that a defect in the assembly or attachment of this structure could account for the deficits of mDAF and E AChE in PNH

  12. Electron cryomicroscopy structure of a membrane-anchored mitochondrial AAA protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sukyeong; Augustin, Steffen; Tatsuta, Takashi; Gerdes, Florian; Langer, Thomas; Tsai, Francis T F

    2011-02-11

    FtsH-related AAA proteases are conserved membrane-anchored, ATP-dependent molecular machines, which mediate the processing and turnover of soluble and membrane-embedded proteins in eubacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. Homo- and hetero-oligomeric proteolytic complexes exist, which are composed of homologous subunits harboring an ATPase domain of the AAA family and an H41 metallopeptidase domain. Mutations in subunits of mitochondrial m-AAA proteases have been associated with different neurodegenerative disorders in human, raising questions on the functional differences between homo- and hetero-oligomeric AAA proteases. Here, we have analyzed the hetero-oligomeric yeast m-AAA protease composed of homologous Yta10 and Yta12 subunits. We combined genetic and structural approaches to define the molecular determinants for oligomer assembly and to assess functional similarities between Yta10 and Yta12. We demonstrate that replacement of only two amino acid residues within the metallopeptidase domain of Yta12 allows its assembly into homo-oligomeric complexes. To provide a molecular explanation, we determined the 12 Å resolution structure of the intact yeast m-AAA protease with its transmembrane domains by electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and atomic structure fitting. The full-length m-AAA protease has a bipartite structure and is a hexamer in solution. We found that residues in Yta12, which facilitate homo-oligomerization when mutated, are located at the interface between neighboring protomers in the hexamer ring. Notably, the transmembrane and intermembrane space domains are separated from the main body, creating a passage on the matrix side, which is wide enough to accommodate unfolded but not folded polypeptides. These results suggest a mechanism regarding how proteins are recognized and degraded by m-AAA proteases.

  13. Membrane skeletal proteins and their integral membrane protein anchors are targets for tyrosine and threonine kinases in Euglena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, M J; Da Silva, A C; Rosiere, T K; Bouck, G B

    1995-01-01

    Proteins of the membrane skeleton of Euglena gracilis were extensively phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro after incubation with [32P]-orthophosphate or gamma-[32P] ATP. Endogenous protein threonine/serine activity phosphorylated the major membrane skeletal proteins (articulins) and the putative integral membrane protein (IP39) anchor for articulins. The latter was also the major target for endogenous protein tyrosine kinase activity. A cytoplasmic domain of IP39 was specifically phosphorylated, and removal of this domain with papain eliminated the radiolabeled phosphoamino acids and eliminated or radically shifted the PI of the multiple isoforms of IP39. In gel kinase assays IP39 autophosphorylated and a 25 kDa protein which does not autophosphorylate was identified as a threonine/serine (casein) kinase. Plasma membranes from the membrane skeletal protein complex contained threonine/serine (casein) kinase activity, and cross-linking experiments suggested that IP39 was the likely source for this membrane activity. pH optima, cation requirements and heparin sensitivity of the detergent solubilized membrane activity were determined. Together these results suggest that protein kinases may be important modulators of protein assembly and function of the membrane skeleton of these protistan cells.

  14. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: A general theory corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    Adhesion processes of biological membranes that enclose cells and cellular organelles are essential for immune responses, tissue formation, and signaling. These processes depend sensitively on the binding constant K2D of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, which is difficult to measure in the "two-dimensional" (2D) membrane environment of the proteins. An important problem therefore is to relate K2D to the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in three dimensions (3D). In this article, we present a general theory for the binding constants K2D and K3D of rather stiff proteins whose main degrees of freedom are translation and rotation, along membranes and around anchor points "in 2D," or unconstrained "in 3D." The theory generalizes previous results by describing how K2D depends both on the average separation and thermal nanoscale roughness of the apposing membranes, and on the length and anchoring flexibility of the receptors and ligands. Our theoretical results for the ratio K2D/K3D of the binding constants agree with detailed results from Monte Carlo simulations without any data fitting, which indicates that the theory captures the essential features of the "dimensionality reduction" due to membrane anchoring. In our Monte Carlo simulations, we consider a novel coarse-grained model of biomembrane adhesion in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic surfaces, and the receptors and ligands as anchored molecules that diffuse continuously along the membranes and rotate at their anchor points.

  15. Reinforcing mechanism of anchors in slopes: a numerical comparison of results of LEM and FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Fei; Ugai, Keizo

    2003-06-01

    This paper reports the limitation of the conventional Bishop's simplified method to calculate the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors, and proposes a new approach to considering the reinforcing effect of anchors on the safety factor. The reinforcing effect of anchors can be explained using an additional shearing resistance on the slip surface. A three-dimensional shear strength reduction finite element method (SSRFEM), where soil-anchor interactions were simulated by three-dimensional zero-thickness elasto-plastic interface elements, was used to calculate the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors to verify the reinforcing mechanism of anchors. The results of SSRFEM were compared with those of the conventional and proposed approaches for Bishop's simplified method for various orientations, positions, and spacings of anchors, and shear strengths of soil-grouted body interfaces. For the safety factor, the proposed approach compared better with SSRFEM than the conventional approach. The additional shearing resistance can explain the influence of the orientation, position, and spacing of anchors, and the shear strength of soil-grouted body interfaces on the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors.

  16. Mechanics of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Thomas R.

    All cells have membranes. The plasma membrane encapsulates the cell's interior, acting as a barrier against the outside world. In cells with nuclei (eukaryotic cells), membranes also form internal compartments (organelles) which carry out specialized tasks, such as protein modification and sorting in the case of the Golgi apparatus, and ATP production in the case of mitochondria. The main components of membranes are lipids and proteins. The proteins can be channels, carriers, receptors, catalysts, signaling molecules, or structural elements, and typically contribute a substantial fraction of the total membrane dry weight. The equilibrium properties of pure lipid membranes are relatively well-understood, and will be the main focus of this article. The framework of elasticity theory and statistical mechanics that we will develop will serve as the foundation for understanding biological phenomena such as the nonequilibrium behavior of membranes laden with ion pumps, the role of membrane elasticity in ion channel gating, and the dynamics of vesicle fission and fusion. Understanding the mechanics of lipid membranes is also important for drug encapsulation and delivery.

  17. Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins that facilitate ER-to-Golgi transport of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, W P; Walter, P

    1999-04-01

    Many eukaryotic cell surface proteins are anchored in the lipid bilayer through glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). GPI anchors are covalently attached in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The modified proteins are then transported through the secretory pathway to the cell surface. We have identified two genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LAG1 and a novel gene termed DGT1 (for "delayed GPI-anchored protein transport"), encoding structurally related proteins with multiple membrane-spanning domains. Both proteins are localized to the ER, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Deletion of either gene caused no detectable phenotype, whereas lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells displayed growth defects and a significant delay in ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that LAG1 and DGT1 encode functionally redundant or overlapping proteins. The rate of GPI anchor attachment was not affected, nor was the transport rate of several non-GPI-anchored proteins. Consistent with a role of Lag1p and Dgt1p in GPI-anchored protein transport, lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells deposit abnormal, multilayered cell walls. Both proteins have significant sequence similarity to TRAM, a mammalian membrane protein thought to be involved in protein translocation across the ER membrane. In vivo translocation studies, however, did not detect any defects in protein translocation in lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells, suggesting that neither yeast gene plays a role in this process. Instead, we propose that Lag1p and Dgt1p facilitate efficient ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins.

  18. Msp1 Is a Membrane Protein Dislocase for Tail-Anchored Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Mateja, Agnieszka; McGilvray, Philip T; Day, Kasey J; Keenan, Robert J

    2017-07-20

    Mislocalized tail-anchored (TA) proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane are cleared by a newly identified quality control pathway involving the conserved eukaryotic protein Msp1 (ATAD1 in humans). Msp1 is a transmembrane AAA-ATPase, but its role in TA protein clearance is not known. Here, using purified components reconstituted into proteoliposomes, we show that Msp1 is both necessary and sufficient to drive the ATP-dependent extraction of TA proteins from the membrane. A crystal structure of the Msp1 cytosolic region modeled into a ring hexamer suggests that active Msp1 contains a conserved membrane-facing surface adjacent to a central pore. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the pore residues shows that they are critical for TA protein extraction in vitro and for functional complementation of an msp1 deletion in yeast. Together, these data provide a molecular framework for Msp1-dependent extraction of mislocalized TA proteins from the outer mitochondrial membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Discovery of dual-action membrane-anchored modulators of incretin receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Fortin

    Full Text Available The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP and the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptors are considered complementary therapeutic targets for type 2 diabetes. Using recombinant membrane-tethered ligand (MTL technology, the present study focused on defining optimized modulators of these receptors, as well as exploring how local anchoring influences soluble peptide function.Serial substitution of residue 7 in membrane-tethered GIP (tGIP led to a wide range of activities at the GIP receptor, with [G(7]tGIP showing enhanced efficacy compared to the wild type construct. In contrast, introduction of G(7 into the related ligands, tGLP-1 and tethered exendin-4 (tEXE4, did not affect signaling at the cognate GLP-1 receptor. Both soluble and tethered GIP and GLP-1 were selective activators of their respective receptors. Although soluble EXE4 is highly selective for the GLP-1 receptor, unexpectedly, tethered EXE4 was found to be a potent activator of both the GLP-1 and GIP receptors. Diverging from the pharmacological properties of soluble and tethered GIP, the newly identified GIP-R agonists, (i.e. [G(7]tGIP and tEXE4 failed to trigger cognate receptor endocytosis. In an attempt to recapitulate the dual agonism observed with tEXE4, we conjugated soluble EXE4 to a lipid moiety. Not only did this soluble peptide activate both the GLP-1 and GIP receptors but, when added to receptor expressing cells, the activity persists despite serial washes.These findings suggest that conversion of a recombinant MTL to a soluble membrane anchored equivalent offers a means to prolong ligand function, as well as to design agonists that can simultaneously act on more than one therapeutic target.

  20. Curcumin Protects Neurons from Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity by Membrane Anchored AKAP79-PKA Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Now stimulation of AMPA receptor as well as its downstream pathways is considered as potential central mediators in antidepressant mechanisms. As a signal integrator which binds to AMPA receptor, A-kinase anchoring protein 79-(AKAP79- PKA complex is regarded as a potential drug target to exert neuroprotective effects. A well-tolerated and multitarget drug curcumin has been confirmed to exert antidepressant-like effects. To explore whether AKAP79-PKA complex is involved in curcumin-mediated antiexcitotoxicity, we detected calcium signaling, subcellular location of AKAP79-PKA complex, phosphorylation of glutamate receptor, and ERK and AKT cascades. In this study, we found that curcumin protected neurons from glutamate insult by reducing Ca2+ influx and blocking the translocation of AKAP79 from cytomembrane to cytoplasm. In parallel, curcumin enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPA receptor and its downstream pathways in PKA-dependent manner. If we pretreated cells with PKA anchoring inhibitor Ht31 to disassociate PKA from AKAP79, no neuroprotective effects were observed. In conclusion, our results show that AKAP79-anchored PKA facilitated the signal relay from AMPA receptor to AKT and ERK cascades, which may be crucial for curcumin-mediated antiexcitotoxicity.

  1. Experimental Study On Lateral Load Capacity of Bamboo RC Beam Column Joints Strengthened By Bamboo Mechanical Anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Umniati B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the prospective of bamboos which available abundantly especially in Indonesia as rebars and mechanical anchors are studied. And also the endurance of the bamboos mechanical anchors to withstand cyclic loading were observed. Nine classes of bamboos bar were evaluated: consist of 3 different anchors (0, 4 and 8 anchors and 3 different compressive strength (19.19 MPa, 29.61 MPa and 37.96 MPa means 3 × 3 parameters. The results show that the lateral load capacity increased significantly with the present of bamboo anchors specimens: 26.04 % for 4 anchors specimens (C2 and 25 % for the 8 anchors specimens (C3 compared to zero anchor specimens (C1. On the other hand, the compressive strength of concrete have no significant effects to the lateral load capacity. Overall it can be concluded that, bamboo can be used as mechanical anchorage to strengthen beam column joint.

  2. Structural basis of sterol recognition and nonvesicular transport by lipid transfer proteins anchored at membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junsen; Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Im, Young Jun

    2018-01-30

    Membrane contact sites (MCSs) in eukaryotic cells are hotspots for lipid exchange, which is essential for many biological functions, including regulation of membrane properties and protein trafficking. Lipid transfer proteins anchored at membrane contact sites (LAMs) contain sterol-specific lipid transfer domains [StARkin domain (SD)] and multiple targeting modules to specific membrane organelles. Elucidating the structural mechanisms of targeting and ligand recognition by LAMs is important for understanding the interorganelle communication and exchange at MCSs. Here, we determined the crystal structures of the yeast Lam6 pleckstrin homology (PH)-like domain and the SDs of Lam2 and Lam4 in the apo form and in complex with ergosterol. The Lam6 PH-like domain displays a unique PH domain fold with a conserved N-terminal α-helix. The Lam6 PH-like domain lacks the basic surface for phosphoinositide binding, but contains hydrophobic patches on its surface, which are critical for targeting to endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrial contacts. Structures of the LAM SDs display a helix-grip fold with a hydrophobic cavity and a flexible Ω1-loop as a lid. Ergosterol is bound to the pocket in a head-down orientation, with its hydrophobic acyl group located in the tunnel entrance. The Ω1-loop in an open conformation is essential for ergosterol binding by direct hydrophobic interaction. Structural comparison suggested that the sterol binding mode of the Lam2 SD2 is likely conserved among the sterol transfer proteins of the StARkin superfamily. Structural models of full-length Lam2 correlated with the sterol transport function at the membrane contact sites.

  3. Effect of anchor positioning on binding and diffusion of elongated 3D DNA nanostructures on lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khmelinskaia, Alena; Franquelim, Henri G; Petrov, Eugene P; Schwille, Petra

    2016-01-01

    DNA origami is a state-of-the-art technology that enables the fabrication of nano-objects with defined shapes, to which functional moieties, such as lipophilic anchors, can be attached with a nanometre scale precision. Although binding of DNA origami to lipid membranes has been extensively demonstrated, the specific requirements necessary for membrane attachment are greatly overlooked. Here, we designed a set of amphipathic rectangular-shaped DNA origami structures with varying placement and number of chol-TEG anchors used for membrane attachment. Single- and multiple-cholesteryl-modified origami nanostructures were produced and studied in terms of their membrane localization, density and dynamics. We show that the positioning of at least two chol-TEG moieties near the corners is essential to ensure efficient membrane binding of large DNA nanostructures. Quantitative fluorescence correlation spectroscopy data further confirm that increasing the number of corner-positioned chol-TEG anchors lowers the dynamics of flat DNA origami structures on freestanding membranes. Taken together, our approach provides the first evidence of the importance of the location in addition to the number of hydrophobic moieties when rationally designing minimal DNA nanostructures with controlled membrane binding. (paper)

  4. Evidence that a glycolipid tail anchors antigen 117 to the plasma membrane of Dictyostelium discoideum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, H.; Da Silva, A.M.; Klein, C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe the biochemical features of the putative cell cohesion molecule antigen 117, indicating that it is anchored to the plasma membrane by a glycolipid tail. Antigen 117 can be radiolabeled with [ 3 H]myristate, [ 3 H]palmitate, and [ 14 C]ethanolamine. The fatty acid label is removed by periodate oxidation and nitrous acid deamination, indicating that the fatty acid is attached to the protein by a structure containing carbohydrate and an unsubstituted glucosamine. As cells develop aggregation competence, the antigen is released from the cell surface in a soluble form that can still be radiolabeled with [ 14 C]ethanolamine but not with [ 3 H]myristate of [ 3 H]-palmitate. The molecular weight of the released antigen is similar to that found in the plasma membrane, but it preferentially partitions in Triton X-114 as a hydrophilic, as opposed to a hydrophobic, protein. Plasma membranes contain the enzyme activity responsible for the release of the antigen in a soluble form

  5. Phosphatidylkojibiosyl Diglyceride: metabolism and function as an anchor in bacterial cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieringer, R A

    1975-07-01

    The recently discovered phosphoglycolipid, phosphatidylkojibiosyl diglyceride (PKD), was first observed as a biosynthetic by-product of glycosyl diglyceride metabolism in Streptococcus faecalis (faecium) ATCC 9790. Its structure is 1, 2-diacyl-3-O-alpha-Dglucopyranosyl-6'-O-phosphoryl- [1'', 2''-diacyl-3''-O-sn-glycerol]-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol. The biosynthesis of phosphatidyl-kojibiosyl diglyceride occurs by a novel transphosphatidylation reaction in which a phosphatidyl glycerol to the primary alcohol function at the 6 position of the internal glucose of kojibiosyl diglyceride. The reaction is catalyzed by a membrane-derived enzyme. Phosphatidyl-kojibiosyl diglyceride is bound covalently through a phosphodiester bond to the polyglycerol phosphate moiety of membrane lipoteichoic acid from S. faecalis. Phosphatidylkojibiosyl diglyceride has four nonpolar long chain fatty acyl groups and appears to have the necessary physico-chemical properties to anchor the long hydrophilic glycerol phosphate polymer of lipoteichoic acid to the hydrophobic enviroment of the membrane of S. faecalis and probably other gram-positive bacteria as well.

  6. Unimpeded permeation of water through biocidal graphene oxide sheets anchored on to 3D porous polyolefinic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S.; Jain, Shubham; Kumar, Sachin; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-04-01

    3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and hot-pressed samples revealed a clear picture as to how the morphology develops and coarsens over a function of time during post-processing operations like compression molding. The coarsening of PE/PEO blends was traced using X-ray micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of annealed blends at different times. It is now understood from X-ray micro-computed tomography that by the addition of a compatibilizer (here lightly maleated PE), a stable morphology can be visualized in 3D. In order to anchor biocidal graphene oxide sheets onto these 3D porous membranes, the PE membranes were chemically modified with acid/ethylene diamine treatment to anchor the GO sheets which were further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface Raman mapping. The transport properties through the membrane clearly reveal unimpeded permeation of water which suggests that anchoring GO on to the membranes does not clog the pores. Antibacterial studies through the direct contact of bacteria with GO anchored PE membranes resulted in 99% of bacterial inactivation. The possible bacterial inactivation through physical disruption of the bacterial cell wall and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed herein. Thus this study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin based antibacterial 3D porous membranes for water purification.3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and

  7. Convenient synthesis and application of versatile nucleic acid lipid membrane anchors in the assembly and fusion of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ries, Oliver; Löffler, Philipp M. G.; Vogel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    or the construction of DNA origami structures. We herein present the synthesis and applications of versatile lipid membrane anchor building blocks suitable for solid phase oligonucleotide synthesis. These are readily synthesized in bulk in five to seven steps from commercially available precursors and can...

  8. Binding equilibrium and kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands in cell adhesion: Insights from computational model systems and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Thomas R.; Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adhesion of cell membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. In this article, we review recent results from simulations and theory that lead to novel insights on how the binding equilibrium and kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring and molecular properties of the proteins. Simulations and theory both indicate that the binding equilibrium constant K2D and the on- and off-rate constants of anchored receptors and ligands in their 2-dimensional (2D) membrane environment strongly depend on the membrane roughness from thermally excited shape fluctuations on nanoscales. Recent theory corroborated by simulations provides a general relation between K2D and the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in 3 dimensions (3D). PMID:27294442

  9. Roles of the Protruding Loop of Factor B Essential for the Localization of Lipoproteins (LolB) in the Anchoring of Bacterial Triacylated Proteins to the Outer Membrane*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  10. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Electro-Mechanical Impedance Response in Cable-Anchor Connection Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Khac Duy; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a finite element(FE) analysis on electro-mechanical impedance response of cable-anchor connection interface under various anchor force is presented. In order to achieve the objective, the following approaches are implemented. Firstly, an interface washer coupled with piezoelectric(PZT) material is designed for monitoring cable-force loss. The interface washer is a small aluminum plate on which a PZT patch is surface-bonded. Cable-force loss could be monitored by installing the interface washer between the anchor plate and the anchorage of cable-anchor connection and examining the changes of impedance of the interface washer. Secondly, a FE model for cable-anchor connection is established to examine the effect of cable-force on impedance response of interface washer. Also, the effects of geometrical and material properties of the interface washer on impedance responses under various cable-forces are investigated. Finally, validation of the FE analysis is experimentally evaluated by a lab-scale cable-anchor connection

  12. A Tenebrio molitor GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is involved in binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa to brush border membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Gómez, Isabel; Peña, Guadalupe; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins recognizes their target cells in part by the binding to glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) anchored proteins such as aminopeptidase-N (APN) or alkaline phosphatases (ALP). Treatment of Tenebrio molitor brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) with phospholipase C that cleaves out GPI-anchored proteins from the membranes, showed that GPI-anchored proteins are involved in binding of Cry3Aa toxin to BBMV. A 68 kDa GPI-anchored ALP was shown to bind Cry3Aa by toxin overlay assays. The 68 kDa GPI-anchored ALP was preferentially expressed in early instar larvae in comparison to late instar larvae. Our work shows for the first time that GPI-anchored ALP is important for Cry3Aa binding to T. molitor BBMV suggesting that the mode of action of Cry toxins is conserved in different insect orders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Studies on the mechanical behavior of rock anchors. ; Results of in-situ pull-out tests. Rock anchor no rikigaku kyodo ni kansuru kenkyu. ; Gen prime ichi shiken ni okeru anchor no kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto, K.; Ebisu, S.; Nakagawa, M.; Usui, M.; Someya, T.; Machida, N. (Okumura Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-31

    The rock anchor method is planned to apply to some permanent structures but since this method was developed for temporary structures, the clarification of the transferring mechanism of force from an anchor to a rockmass, the fracture mechanism and the development of the dynamic model have not been established. This paper arranged the data obtained by a full-scale, in-situ pulling out test of a rock anchor as the first step to understand the dynamic behavior and analyzed by paying attetion to the modulus of deformation of the rockmass where the anchor was embedded to elucidate the affecting degree of rockmass modulus of deformation, the embedded length and the tendon diameter on the dynamic behavior of the anchor. The rock anchor behavior could be expressed accurately by applying a theoretical solution derived by the balancing condition of forces at the boundary face. Especially, when the rockmass is uniform and the fracture occurrs at the interface between the tendon and grout, this approach can express the fracture with the accuracy similar to that made by the finite element method. 6 refs., 11 figs.,1 tab.

  14. Enhancement of tendon–bone healing via the combination of biodegradable collagen-loaded nanofibrous membranes and a three-dimensional printed bone-anchoring bolt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou YC

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ying-Chao Chou,1,2 Wen-Lin Yeh,2 Chien-Lin Chao,1 Yung-Heng Hsu,1,2 Yi-Hsun Yu,1,2 Jan-Kan Chen,3 Shih-Jung Liu1,2 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang Gung University, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Abstract: A composite biodegradable polymeric model was developed to enhance tendon graft healing. This model included a biodegradable polylactide (PLA bolt as the bone anchor and a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanofibrous membrane embedded with collagen as a biomimic patch to promote tendon–bone interface integration. Degradation rate and compressive strength of the PLA bolt were measured after immersion in a buffer solution for 3 months. In vitro biochemical characteristics and the nanofibrous matrix were assessed using a water contact angle analyzer, pH meter, and tetrazolium reduction assay. In vivo efficacies of PLGA/collagen nanofibers and PLA bolts for tendon–bone healing were investigated on a rabbit bone tunnel model with histological and tendon pullout tests. The PLGA/collagen-blended nanofibrous membrane was a hydrophilic, stable, and biocompatible scaffold. The PLA bolt was durable for tendon–bone anchoring. Histology showed adequate biocompatibility of the PLA bolt on a medial cortex with progressive bone ingrowth and without tissue overreaction. PLGA nanofibers within the bone tunnel also decreased the tunnel enlargement phenomenon and enhanced tendon–bone integration. Composite polymers of the PLA bolt and PLGA/collagen nanofibrous membrane can effectively promote outcomes of tendon reconstruction in a rabbit model. The composite biodegradable polymeric system may be useful in humans for tendon reconstruction. Keywords: polylactide–polyglycolide nanofibers, PLGA, collagen, 3D printing, polylactide, PLA, bone-anchoring bolts, tendon healing

  15. Diffusion of lipids and GPI-anchored proteins in actin-free plasma membrane vesicles measured by STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Falk; Waithe, Dominic; Clausen, Mathias P

    2017-01-01

    (STED-FCS) to access and compare the diffusion characteristics of fluorescent lipid analogues and GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) in the live cell plasma membrane and in actin cytoskeleton-free cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs). Hindered diffusion of phospholipids and sphingolipids......Diffusion and interaction dynamics of molecules at the plasma membrane play an important role in cellular signalling, and they are suggested to be strongly associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we utilise super-resolution STED microscopy combined with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy...... forming immobile clusters, both of which disappear in GPMVs. Our data underline the crucial role of the actin cortex in maintaining hindered diffusion modes of many but not all of the membrane molecules, and highlight a powerful experimental approach to decipher specific influences on molecular plasma...

  16. A 39-kD plasma membrane protein (IP39) is an anchor for the unusual membrane skeleton of Euglena gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiere, T.K.; Marrs, J.A.; Bouck, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    The major integral plasma membrane protein (IP39) of Euglena gracilis was radiolabeled, peptide mapped, and dissected with proteases to identify cytoplasmic domains that bind and anchor proteins of the cell surface. When plasma membranes were radioiodinated and extracted with octyl glucoside, 98% of the extracted label was found in IP39 or the 68- and 110-kD oligomers of IP39. The octyl glucoside extracts were incubated with unlabeled cell surface proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (overlays). Radiolabel from the membrane extract bound one (80 kD) of the two (80 and 86 kD) major membrane skeletal protein bands. Resolubilization of the bound label yielded a radiolabeled polypeptide identical in Mr to IP39. Intact plasma membranes were also digested with papain before or after radioiodination, thereby producing a cytoplasmically truncated IP39. The octyl glucoside extract of truncated IP39 no longer bound to the 80-kD membrane skeletal protein in the nitrocellulose overlays. EM of intact or trypsin digested plasma membranes incubated with membrane skeletal proteins under stringent conditions similar to those used in the nitrocellulose overlays revealed a partially reformed membrane skeletal layer. Little evidence of a membrane skeletal layer was found, however, when plasma membranes were predigested with papain before reassociation. A candidate 80-kD binding domain of IP39 has been tentatively identified as a peptide fragment that was present after trypsin digestion of plasma membranes, but was absent after papain digestion in two-dimensional peptide maps of IP39. Together, these data suggest that the unique peripheral membrane skeleton of Euglena binds to the plasma membrane through noncovalent interactions between the major 80-kD membrane skeletal protein and a small, papain sensitive cytoplasmic domain of IP39

  17. Reinforcement mechanism of multi-anchor wall with double wall facing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kouta; Kobayashi, Makoto; Miura, Kinya; Konami, Takeharu; Hayashi, Taketo

    2017-10-01

    The reinforced soil wall has high seismic performance as generally known. However, the seismic behavior has not been clarified accurately yet, especially on multi-anchor wall with double wall facing. Indefinite behavior of reinforced soil wall during earthquake make us complicated in case with adopting to the abutment, because of arrangement of anchor plate as reinforcement often different according to the width of roads. In this study, a series of centrifuge model tests were carried out to investigate the reinforcement mechanism of multi anchor wall with double wall facing from the perspective of the vertical earth pressure. Several types of reinforce arrangement and rigid wall were applied in order to verify the arch function in the reinforced regions. The test results show unique behavior of vertical earth pressure, which was affected by arch action. All the vertical earth pressure placed behind facing panel, are larger than that of middle part between facing panel despite of friction between backfill and facing panel. Similar results were obtained in case using rigid wall. On the other hands, the vertical earth pressure, which were measured at the 3cm high from bottom of model container, shows larger than that of bottom. This results show the existence of arch action between double walls. In addition, it implies that the wall facing of such soil structure confined the backfill as pseudo wall, which is very reason that the multi anchor wall with double wall facing has high seismic performance.

  18. The anchoring mechanism of a bluff-body stabilized laminar premixed flame

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the mechanism of the laminar premixed flame anchoring near a heat-conducting bluff-body. We use unsteady, fully resolved, two-dimensional simulations with detailed chemical kinetics and species transport for methane-air combustion. No artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions were imposed. Simulations show a shear-layer stabilized flame just downstream of the bluff-body, with a recirculation zone formed by the products of combustion. A steel bluff-body resulted in a slightly larger recirculation zone than a ceramic bluff-body; the size of which grew as the equivalence ratio was decreased. A significant departure from the conventional two-zone flame-structure is shown in the anchoring region. In this region, the reaction zone is associated with a large negative energy convection (directed from products to reactants) resulting in a negative flame-displacement speed. It is shown that the premixed flame anchors at an immediate downstream location near the bluff-body where favorable ignition conditions are established; a region associated with (1) a sufficiently high temperature impacted by the conjugate heat exchange between the heat-conducting bluff-body and the hot reacting flow and (2) a locally maximum stoichiometry characterized by the preferential diffusion effects. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  19. A glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is required for membrane localization but dispensable for cell wall association of chitin deacetylase 2 in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nicole M; Baker, Lorina G; Specht, Charles A; Lodge, Jennifer K

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall proteins (CWPs) mediate important cellular processes in fungi, including adhesion, invasion, biofilm formation, and flocculation. The current model of fungal cell wall organization includes a major class of CWPs covalently bound to β-1,6-glucan via a remnant of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. This model was established by studies of ascomycetes more than a decade ago, and relatively little work has been done with other fungi, although the presumption has been that proteins identified in the cell wall which contain a predicted GPI anchor are covalently linked to cell wall glucans. The pathogenic basidiomycete Cryptococcus neoformans encodes >50 putatively GPI-anchored proteins, some of which have been identified in the cell wall. One of these proteins is chitin deacetylase 2 (Cda2), an enzyme responsible for converting chitin to chitosan, a cell wall polymer recently established as a virulence factor for C. neoformans infection of mammalian hosts. Using a combination of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics, we show that Cda2 is GPI anchored to membranes but noncovalently associated with the cell wall by means independent of both its GPI anchor and β-1,6-glucan. We also show that Cda2 produces chitosan when localized to the plasma membrane, but association with the cell wall is not essential for this process, thereby providing insight into the mechanism of chitosan biosynthesis. These results increase our understanding of the surface of C. neoformans and provide models of cell walls likely applicable to other undercharacterized basidiomycete pathogenic fungi. The surface of a pathogenic microbe is a major interface with its host. In fungi, the outer surface consists of a complex matrix known as the cell wall, which includes polysaccharides, proteins, and other molecules. The mammalian host recognizes many of these surface molecules and mounts appropriate responses to combat the microbial infection. Cryptococcus neoformans is a

  20. Electrical properties and mechanical stability of anchoring groups for single-molecule electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Frisenda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental investigation of transport through single molecules, trapped between two gold nano-electrodes fabricated with the mechanically controlled break junction (MCBJ technique. The four molecules studied share the same core structure, namely oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE3, while having different aurophilic anchoring groups: thiol (SAc, methyl sulfide (SMe, pyridyl (Py and amine (NH2. The focus of this paper is on the combined characterization of the electrical and mechanical properties determined by the anchoring groups. From conductance histograms we find that thiol anchored molecules provide the highest conductance; a single-level model fit to current–voltage characteristics suggests that SAc groups exhibit a higher electronic coupling to the electrodes, together with better level alignment than the other three groups. An analysis of the mechanical stability, recording the lifetime in a self-breaking method, shows that Py and SAc yield the most stable junctions while SMe form short-lived junctions. Density functional theory combined with non-equlibrium Green’s function calculations help in elucidating the experimental findings.

  1. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  2. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markley, F.W.

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  3. Tat proteins as novel thylakoid membrane anchors organize a biosynthetic pathway in chloroplasts and increase product yield 5-fold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriques de Jesus, Maria Perestrello Ramos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck

    2017-01-01

    to their complex structures. Some of the crucial enzymes catalyzing their biosynthesis are the cytochromes P450 (P450s) situated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), powered by electron transfers from NADPH. Dhurrin is a cyanogenic glucoside and its biosynthesis involves a dynamic metabolon formed by two P450s....... Nevertheless, translocation of the pathway from the ER to the chloroplast creates other difficulties, such as the loss of metabolon formation and intermediate diversion into other metabolic pathways. We show here that co-localization of these enzymes in the thylakoid membrane leads to a significant increase...... in product formation, with a concomitant decrease in off-pathway intermediates. This was achieved by exchanging the membrane anchors of the dhurrin pathway enzymes to components of the Twin-arginine translocation pathway, TatB and TatC, which have self-assembly properties. Consequently, we show 5-fold...

  4. Anchoring tick salivary anti-complement proteins IRAC I and IRAC II to membrane increases their immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Laurent; Schroeder, Hélène; Mast, Jan; Thirion, Muriel; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Dewals, Benjamin; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Tick salivary proteins are promising targets for the development of anti-tick vaccines. Recently, we described two paralogous anti-complement proteins, called Ixodes ricinus anti-complement (IRAC) proteins I and II, that are co-expressed in tick I. ricinus salivary glands. However, our previous attempts to immunize rabbits against IRAC via infection with recombinant Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors invariably failed although both recombinants expressed high levels of functional IRAC proteins in vitro. As IRAC are soluble monovalent antigens, one of the possible explanations is that monovalent ligation of the B-cell receptor induces receptor activation but fails to promote antigen presentation, a phenomenon that is thought to induce a state of B-cell tolerance. In the present study, we tried to increase IRAC immunogenicity by expressing them as oligovalent antigens. To this end, IRAC were fused to membrane anchors and BoHV-4 vectors expressing these recombinant forms were produced. The immunization potentials of recombinant viruses expressing either secreted or transmembrane IRAC proteins were then compared. While the former did not induce a detectable immune response against IRAC, the latter led to high titres of anti-IRAC antibodies that only marginally affected tick blood feeding. All together, the data presented in this study demonstrate that the immunogenicity of a soluble antigen can be greatly improved by anchoring it in membrane.

  5. Anchoring in Destination-Therapy Left Ventricular Assist Device Decision Making: A Mechanical Turk Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Arcadia M; Allen, Larry A; Thompson, Jocelyn S; McIlvennan, Colleen K; Jenkins, Amy; Hammes, Andrew; Kroehl, Miranda; Matlock, Daniel D

    2016-11-01

    People with end-stage heart failure may have to decide about destination-therapy left ventricular assist device (DT-LVAD). Individuals facing difficult decisions often rely on heuristics, such as anchoring, which predictably bias decision outcomes. We aimed to investigate whether showing a larger historical Heartmate XVE creates an anchoring effect, making the smaller Heartmate II (HMII) appear more favorable. With the use of Amazon Mechanical Turk, participants watched videos asking them to imagine themselves dying of end-stage heart failure, then were presented the option of LVAD as potentially life-prolonging therapy. Participants were randomized to a control group who were only shown the HMII device, and the intervention group who saw the XVE device before the HMII. Participants then completed surveys. A total of 487 participants completed the survey (control = 252; intervention = 235); 79% were affect likelihood of accepting the LVAD, it did affect device perception. This article highlights an important point with clinical implications: factors such as anchoring have the potential to inappropriately influence perceptions and decisions and should be carefully considered in research and practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Wood cell-wall structure requires local 2D-microtubule disassembly by a novel plasma membrane-anchored protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yoshihisa; Iida, Yuki; Kondo, Yuki; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2010-07-13

    Plant cells have evolved cortical microtubules, in a two-dimensional space beneath the plasma membrane, that regulate patterning of cellulose deposition. Although recent studies have revealed that several microtubule-associated proteins facilitate self-organization of transverse cortical microtubules, it is still unknown how diverse patterns of cortical microtubules are organized in different xylem cells, which are the major components of wood. Using our newly established in vitro xylem cell differentiation system, we found that a novel microtubule end-tracking protein, microtubule depletion domain 1 (MIDD1), was anchored to distinct plasma membrane domains and promoted local microtubule disassembly, resulting in pits on xylem cell walls. The introduction of RNA interference for MIDD1 resulted in the failure of local microtubule depletion and the formation of secondary walls without pits. Conversely, the overexpression of MIDD1 reduced microtubule density. MIDD1 has two coiled-coil domains for the binding to microtubules and for the anchorage to plasma membrane domains, respectively. Combination of the two coils caused end tracking of microtubules during shrinkage and suppressed their rescue events. Our results indicate that MIDD1 integrates spatial information in the plasma membrane with cortical microtubule dynamics for determining xylem cell wall pattern. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A membrane-anchored E-type endo-1,4-beta-glucanase is localized on Golgi and plasma membranes of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, D A; Catala, C; Lashbrook, C C; Bennett, A B

    1997-04-29

    Endo-1,4-beta-D-glucanases (EGases, EC 3.2.1.4) are enzymes produced in bacteria, fungi, and plants that hydrolyze polysaccharides possessing a 1,4-beta-D-glucan backbone. All previously identified plant EGases are E-type endoglucanases that possess signal sequences for endoplasmic reticulum entry and are secreted to the cell wall. Here we report the characterization of a novel E-type plant EGase (tomato Cel3) with a hydrophobic transmembrane domain and structure typical of type II integral membrane proteins. The predicted protein is composed of 617 amino acids and possesses seven potential sites for N-glycosylation. Cel3 mRNA accumulates in young vegetative tissues with highest abundance during periods of rapid cell expansion, but is not hormonally regulated. Antibodies raised to a recombinant Cel3 protein specifically recognized three proteins, with apparent molecular masses of 93, 88, and 53 kDa, in tomato root microsomal membranes separated by sucrose density centrifugation. The 53-kDa protein comigrated in the gradient with plasma membrane markers, the 88-kDa protein with Golgi membrane markers, and the 93-kDa protein with markers for both Golgi and plasma membranes. EGase enzyme activity was also found in regions of the density gradient corresponding to both Golgi and plasma membranes, suggesting that Cel3 EGase resides in both membrane systems, the sites of cell wall polymer biosynthesis. The in vivo function of Cel3 is not known, but the only other known membrane-anchored EGase is present in Agrobacterium tumefaciens where it is required for cellulose biosynthesis.

  8. DRAGON, a GPI-anchored membrane protein, inhibits BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2009-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts via binding to cell surface receptors. Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) have been identified as BMP co-receptors. We report here that DRAGON/RGMb, a member of the RGM family, suppressed BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts via a novel mechanism. All RGMs were expressed in C2C12 cells that were differentiated into myocytes and osteoblastic cells, but RGMc was not detected in immature cells. In C2C12 cells, only DRAGON suppressed ALP and Id1 promoter activities induced by BMP-4 or by constitutively activated BMP type I receptors. This inhibition by DRAGON was dependent on the secretory form of the von Willbrand factor type D domain. DRAGON even suppressed BMP signaling induced by constitutively activated Smad1. Over-expression of neogenin did not alter the inhibitory capacity of DRAGON. Taken together, these findings indicate that DRAGON may be an inhibitor of BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts. We also suggest that a novel molecule(s) expressed on the cell membrane may mediate the signal transduction of DRAGON in order to suppress BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

  9. Transforming p21 ras protein: flexibility in the major variable region linking the catalytic and membrane-anchoring domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Hubbert, N

    1985-01-01

    or increasing it to 50 amino acids has relatively little effect on the capacity of the gene to induce morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. Assays of GTP binding, GTPase and autophosphorylating activities of such mutant v-rasH-encoded proteins synthesized in bacteria indicated that the sequences...... that is required for post-translational processing, membrane localization and transforming activity of the proteins. We have now used the viral oncogene (v-rasH) of Harvey sarcoma virus to study the major variable region by deleting or duplicating parts of the gene. Reducing this region to five amino acids...... that encode these biochemical activities are located upstream from the major variable region. In the context of transformation, we propose that the region of sequence heterogeneity serves principally to connect the N-terminal catalytic domain with amino acids at the C terminus that are required to anchor...

  10. The Membrane-anchored Serine Protease Prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) Supports Epidermal Development and Postnatal Homeostasis Independent of Its Enzymatic Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Diane E; Szabo, Roman; Friis, Stine

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored serine protease prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) is part of a cell surface proteolytic cascade that is essential for epithelial barrier formation and homeostasis. Here, we report the surprising finding that prostasin executes these functions independent of its own enzymatic activity. ...

  11. Apical sorting of lysoGPI-anchored proteins occurs independent of association with detergent-resistant membranes but dependent on their N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillon, Guillaume Alain; Michon, Laetitia; Watanabe, Reika

    2013-06-01

    Most glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are located at the apical surface of epithelial cells. The apical delivery of GPI-APs is believed to result from their association with lipid rafts. We find that overexpression of C-terminally tagged PGAP3 caused predominant production of lysoGPI-APs, an intermediate precursor in the GPI lipid remodeling process in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In these cells, produced lysoGPI-APs are not incorporated into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) but still are delivered apically, suggesting that GPI-AP association with DRMs is not necessary for apical targeting. In contrast, apical transport of both fully remodeled and lyso forms of GPI-APs is dependent on N-glycosylation, confirming a general role of N-glycans in apical protein transport. We also find that depletion of cholesterol causes apical-to-basolateral retargeting not only of fully remodeled GPI-APs, but also of lysoGPI-APs, as well as endogenous soluble and transmembrane proteins that would normally be targeted to the apical membrane. These findings confirm the essential role for cholesterol in the apical protein targeting and further demonstrate that the mechanism of cholesterol-dependent apical sorting is not related to DRM association of GPI-APs.

  12. Not all nutrition claims are perceived equal: anchoring effects and moderating mechanisms in food advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Hye Jin; Hove, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Despite the increased use of health claims in food advertising, few studies have investigated how specific nutrition claims have differential effects depending on how they are presented. In this context, the current study tests the anchoring hypothesis. Anchoring refers to a common human tendency to evaluate information differently depending on the presence or absence of a numerical "anchor" or reference point. Two (pilot and main) experimental studies explore anchoring effects on audience response to food advertising both directly and moderated by cognitive, motivational, and message factors. The pilot study finds that food product ads employing nutrition claims with an anchor rather than without an anchor generate two results: First, participants perceive the product to have lower fat/lower calorie contents (anchoring hypothesis); second, they prefer the messages with an anchor over those without an anchor. The main study reports that when anchoring is successfully evoked, it produces favorable attitudes toward the ad, favorable attitudes toward the brand, and purchase intention-but only when moderated by health orientation, claim believability, and nutrition knowledge. Practical implications are provided with respect to regulatory guidelines and effective communication strategies for promoting low-fat and low-calorie products in food advertising.

  13. Drainage characteristics of the 3F MicroStent using a novel film occlusion anchoring mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Dirk; Hoag, Nathan A; Poh, Beow Kiong; Chew, Ben H

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether the overall ureteral flow through an obstructed ureter using the 3F MicroStent™ that uses a novel film occlusion anchoring mechanism is comparable to the flow using a conventional 3F and 4.7F Double-J stent. An in vitro silicone ureter model and an ex vivo porcine urinary model (kidney and ureter) were used to measure the overall flow through obstructed and unobstructed ureters with either a 3F Double-J stent (Cook), 3F MicroStent (PercSys), or 4.7F Double-J stent (Cook). Mean flow rates were compared with descriptive statistics. Mean flow rates through the obstructed silicone ureter (12-mm stone) for the 3F MicroStent, 3F Double-J stent, and 4.7F Double-J stent were 326.7±13.3  mL/min, 283.3±19.2  mL/min, and 356.7±14.1  mL/min, respectively. In the obstructed ex vivo porcine ureter model, the flow as a percentage of free flow was 60%, 53%, and 50 %, respectively. In both ureteral models, flow rates of the 3F MicroStent and 4.7F Double-J stents were not statistically different. The 3F MicroStent demonstrated drainage equivalent to a 4.7F Double-J stent, in both in vitro silicone and ex vivo porcine obstructed urinary models. We have demonstrated the crucial first step that this 3F stent, using a novel film occlusion anchoring mechanism, has equivalent, if not slightly improved, drainage rates when compared with its larger counterpart.

  14. A mechanical impact of coatings on membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Søren; Reus, Roger De; Eriksen, Gert Friis

    2001-01-01

    The mechanical impact of coatings containing residual stress on membranes is investigated. Closed-form formulas describing this impact are presented and verified using both finite element modeling and physical experiments. Theory and experiments are in good agreement. Thus, a simple tool for design...... of coated pressure sensors is provided....

  15. Glycolipid precursors for the membrane anchor of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins. II. Lipid structures of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C sensitive and resistant glycolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayor, S.; Menon, A.K.; Cross, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    A common diagnostic feature of glycosylinositol phospholipid (GPI)-anchored proteins is their release from the membrane by a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). However, some GPI-anchored proteins are resistant to this enzyme. The best characterized example of this subclass is the human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase, where the structural basis of PI-PLC resistance has been shown to be the acylation of an inositol hydroxyl group(s). Both PI-PLC-sensitive and resistant GPI-anchor precursors (P2 and P3, respectively) have been found in Trypanosoma brucei, where the major surface glycoprotein is anchored by a PI-PLC-sensitive glycolipid anchor. The accompanying paper shows that P2 and P3 have identical glycans, indistinguishable from the common core glycan found on all the characterized GPI protein anchors. This paper shows that the single difference between P2 and P3, and the basis for the PI-PLC insusceptibility of P3, is a fatty acid, ester-linked to the inositol residue in P3. The inositol-linked fatty acid can be removed by treatment with mild base to restore PI-PLC sensitivity. Biosynthetic labeling experiments with [3H]palmitic acid and [3H]myristic acid show that [3H]palmitic acid specifically labels the inositol residue in P3 while [3H]myristic acid labels the diacylglycerol portion. Possible models to account for the simultaneous presence of PI-PLC-resistant and sensitive glycolipids are discussed in the context of available information on the biosynthesis of GPI-anchors

  16. Membrane Anchoring and Ion-Entry Dynamics in P-type ATPase Copper Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Christina; Sitsel, Oleg; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Cu(+)-specific P-type ATPase membrane protein transporters regulate cellular copper levels. The lack of crystal structures in Cu(+)-binding states has limited our understanding of how ion entry and binding are achieved. Here, we characterize the molecular basis of Cu(+) entry using molecular-dynamics...... simulations, structural modeling, and in vitro and in vivo functional assays. Protein structural rearrangements resulting in the exposure of positive charges to bulk solvent rather than to lipid phosphates indicate a direct molecular role of the putative docking platform in Cu(+) delivery. Mutational analyses...... and simulations in the presence and absence of Cu(+) predict that the ion-entry path involves two ion-binding sites: one transient Met148-Cys382 site and one intramembranous site formed by trigonal coordination to Cys384, Asn689, and Met717. The results reconcile earlier biochemical and x-ray absorption data...

  17. Mechanism of Shiga Toxin Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Gao, Haifei; Arumugam, Senthil

    2017-01-01

    between them. The precise mechanism by which this clustering occurs remains poorly defined. Here, we used vesicle and cell systems and computer simulations to show that line tension due to curvature, height, or compositional mismatch, and lipid or solvent depletion cannot drive the clustering of Shiga...... toxin molecules. By contrast, in coarse-grained computer simulations, a correlation was found between clustering and toxin nanoparticle-driven suppression of membrane fluctuations, and experimentally we observed that clustering required the toxin molecules to be tightly bound to the membrane surface...... molecules (several nanometers), and persist even beyond. This force is predicted to operate between manufactured nanoparticles providing they are sufficiently rigid and tightly bound to the plasma membrane, thereby suggesting a route for the targeting of nanoparticles to cells for biomedical applications....

  18. Geometric stability, electronic structure, and intercalation mechanism of Co adatom anchors on graphene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yanan; Chen, Weiguang; Li, Chenggang; Dai, Xianqi; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We perform a systematic study of the adsorption of Co adatom on monolayer and bilayer graphene sheets, and the calculated results are compared through the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) and the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke and Ernzernhof (GGA + PBE) methods. For the single Co adatom, its adsorption energy at vacancy site was found to be larger than at the high-symmetry adsorption sites. For the different vdW corrections, the calculated adsorption energies of Co adatom on graphene substrates are slightly changed to some extent, but they do not affect the most preferable adsorption configurations. NEB calculations prove that the Co adatom has smaller energy barrier within pristine bilayer graphene (PBG) than that on the upper layer, indicating the high mobility of Co atom anchors at overlayer and easily aggregates. For the PBG substrate, the Co adatom intercalates into graphene sheets with a large energy barrier (9.29 eV). On the bilayer graphene with a single-vacancy (SV), the Co adatom can easily be trapped at the SV site and intercalates into graphene sheets with a much lower energy barrier (2.88 eV). These results provide valuable information on the intercalation reaction and the formation mechanism of metal impurity in graphene sheets. (paper)

  19. Mechanical collapse of confined fluid membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Jee E; Purohit, Prashant K; Klug, William S

    2014-11-01

    Compact cylindrical and spherical invaginations are common structural motifs found in cellular and developmental biology. To understand the basic physical mechanisms that produce and maintain such structures, we present here a simple model of vesicles in confinement, in which mechanical equilibrium configurations are computed by energy minimization, balancing the effects of curvature elasticity, contact of the membrane with itself and the confining geometry, and adhesion. For cylindrical confinement, the shape equations are solved both analytically and numerically by finite element analysis. For spherical confinement, axisymmetric configurations are obtained numerically. We find that the geometry of invaginations is controlled by a dimensionless ratio of the adhesion strength to the bending energy of an equal area spherical vesicle. Larger adhesion produces more concentrated curvatures, which are mainly localized to the "neck" region where the invagination breaks away from its confining container. Under spherical confinement, axisymmetric invaginations are approximately spherical. For extreme confinement, multiple invaginations may form, bifurcating along multiple equilibrium branches. The results of the model are useful for understanding the physical mechanisms controlling the structure of lipid membranes of cells and their organelles, and developing tissue membranes.

  20. Design and Vibration Sensitivity Analysis of a MEMS Tuning Fork Gyroscope with an Anchored Diamond Coupling Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Guan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new micromachined tuning fork gyroscope (TFG with an anchored diamond coupling mechanism is proposed while the mode ordering and the vibration sensitivity are also investigated. The sense-mode of the proposed TFG was optimized through use of an anchored diamond coupling spring, which enables the in-phase mode frequency to be 108.3% higher than the anti-phase one. The frequencies of the in- and anti-phase modes in the sense direction are 9799.6 Hz and 4705.3 Hz, respectively. The analytical solutions illustrate that the stiffness difference ratio of the in- and anti-phase modes is inversely proportional to the output induced by the vibration from the sense direction. Additionally, FEM simulations demonstrate that the stiffness difference ratio of the anchored diamond coupling TFG is 16.08 times larger than the direct coupling one while the vibration output is reduced by 94.1%. Consequently, the proposed new anchored diamond coupling TFG can structurally increase the stiffness difference ratio to improve the mode ordering and considerably reduce the vibration sensitivity without sacrificing the scale factor.

  1. Antioxidants, mechanisms, and recovery by membrane processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Laurent; Doyen, Alain

    2017-03-04

    Antioxidants molecules have a great interest for bio-food and nutraceutical industries since they play a vital role for their capacity to reduce oxidative processes. Consequently, these molecules, generally present in complex matrices, have to be fractionated and purified to characterize them and to test their antioxidant activity. However, as natural or synthetics antioxidant molecules differ in terms of structural composition and physico-chemical properties, appropriate separation technologies must be selected. Different fractionation technologies are available but the most commonly used are filtration processes. Indeed, these technologies allow fractionation according to molecular size (pressure-driven processes), charge, or both size and charge (electrically driven processes). In this context, and after summarizing the reaction mechanisms of the different classes and nature of antioxidants as well as membrane fractionation technologies, this manuscript presents the specific applications of these membranes processes for the recovery of antioxidant molecules.

  2. Elongated membrane tethers, individually anchored by high affinity α4β1/VCAM-1 complexes, are the quantal units of monocyte arrests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin Chu

    Full Text Available The α4β1 integrin facilitates both monocyte rolling and adhesion to the vascular endothelium and is physiologically activated by monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1. The current study investigated the initial events in the adhesion of THP-1 cells to immobilized Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM-1. Using AFM force measurements, cell adhesion was shown to be mediated by two populations of α4β1/VCAM-1 complexes. A low affinity form of α4β1 was anchored to the elastic elements of the cytoskeleton, while a higher affinity conformer was coupled to the viscous elements of the cell membrane. Within 100 ms of contact, THP-1 cells, stimulated by co-immobilized MCP-1, exhibited a tremendous increase in adhesion to VCAM-1. Enhanced cell adhesion was accompanied by a local decoupling of the cell membrane from the cytoskeleton and the formation of long membrane tethers. The tethers were individually anchored by multiple α4β1/VCAM-1 complexes that prolonged the extension of the viscous tethers. In vivo, the formation of these membrane tethers may provide the quantal structural units for the arrest of rolling monocytes within the blood vessels.

  3. Non-Hookean Mechanics of Crystalline Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, Ryan J. T.

    The goal of the thesis is to explore the effect of crumpling on the mechanics of graphene--the ultimate thin membrane. The effect due to crumpling on the mechanical response of 2D materials is almost universally ignored in prior experiments. This is because the most widely used measurement schemes require high and non-uniform applied stress that suppresses crumpling. Experiments that do probe the interplay between crumpling and graphene mechanics remain highly challenging. To measure the mechanical effects of crumpling we need to develop a new measurement scheme which can apply low and uniform stress, allow non-invasive topography measurements, and be applicable at cryogenic temperatures. The motivating questions of this thesis are the following: • How does out-of plane crumpling affect the mechanical constants of 2D materials? • How do we implement measurement techniques sensitive to crumpling? • Can we identify sources of crumpling and distinguish between static and dynamic crumpling? • Can we tune the mechanical properties of 2D materials by controlling crumpling?

  4. Determining the mechanical properties of electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers using AFM and a novel fiber anchoring technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Stephen R.; Banerjee, Soham; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin, E-mail: gutholdm@wfu.edu

    2016-02-01

    Due to its low cost, biocompatibility and slow bioresorption, poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) continues to be a suitable material for select biomedical engineering applications. We used a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)/optical microscopy technique to determine key mechanical properties of individual electrospun PCL nanofibers with diameters between 440–1040 nm. Compared to protein nanofibers, PCL nanofibers showed much lower adhesion, as they slipped on the substrate when mechanically manipulated. We, therefore, first developed a novel technique to anchor individual PCL nanofibers to micrometer-sized ridges on a substrate, and then mechanically tested anchored nanofibers. When held at constant strain, tensile stress relaxed with fast and slow relaxation times of 1.0 ± 0.3 s and 8.8 ± 3.1 s, respectively. The total tensile modulus was 62 ± 26 MPa, the elastic (non-relaxing) component of the tensile modulus was 53 ± 36 MPa. Individual PCL fibers could be stretched elastically (without permanent deformation) to strains of 19–23%. PCL nanofibers are rather extensible; they could be stretched to a strain of at least 98%, and a tensile strength of at least 12 MPa, before they slipped off the AFM tip. PCL nanofibers that had aged for over a month at ambient conditions became stiffer and less elastic. Our technique provides accurate nanofiber mechanical data, which are needed to guide construction of scaffolds for cells and other biomedical devices. - Highlights: • Developed technique to anchor single nanofibers on microridges • Determined mechanical properties of e-spun PCL fibers • E-spun PCL fibers have similar mechanical properties as wet fibrin fibers. • E-spun PCL fiber total elastic modulus is ~ 60 MPa. • E-spun PCL fiber extensibility is > 100%.

  5. Mechanical ventilation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthieu; Pellegrino, Vincent; Combes, Alain; Scheinkestel, Carlos; Cooper, D Jamie; Hodgson, Carol

    2014-01-21

    The timing of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) initiation and its outcome in the management of respiratory and cardiac failure have received considerable attention, but very little attention has been given to mechanical ventilation during ECMO. Mechanical ventilation settings in non-ECMO studies have been shown to have an effect on survival and may also have contributed to a treatment effect in ECMO trials. Protective lung ventilation strategies established for non-ECMO-supported respiratory failure patients may not be optimal for more severe forms of respiratory failure requiring ECMO support. The influence of positive end-expiratory pressure on the reduction of the left ventricular compliance may be a matter of concern for patients receiving ECMO support for cardiac failure. The objectives of this review were to describe potential mechanisms for lung injury during ECMO for respiratory or cardiac failure, to assess the possible benefits from the use of ultra-protective lung ventilation strategies and to review published guidelines and expert opinions available on mechanical ventilation-specific management of patients requiring ECMO, including mode and ventilator settings. Articles were identified through a detailed search of PubMed, Ovid, Cochrane databases and Google Scholar. Additional references were retrieved from the selected studies. Growing evidence suggests that mechanical ventilation settings are important in ECMO patients to minimize further lung damage and improve outcomes. An ultra-protective ventilation strategy may be optimal for mechanical ventilation during ECMO for respiratory failure. The effects of airway pressure on right and left ventricular afterload should be considered during venoarterial ECMO support of cardiac failure. Future studies are needed to better understand the potential impact of invasive mechanical ventilation modes and settings on outcomes.

  6. The coronavirus spike protein : mechanisms of membrane fusion and virion incorporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    The coronavirus spike protein is a membrane-anchored glycoprotein responsible for virus-cell attachment and membrane fusion, prerequisites for a successful virus infection. In this thesis, two aspects are described regarding the molecular biology of the coronavirus spike protein: its membrane fusion

  7. Determining the mechanical properties of electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers using AFM and a novel fiber anchoring technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephen R; Banerjee, Soham; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Due to its low cost, biocompatibility and slow bioresorption, poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) continues to be a suitable material for select biomedical engineering applications. We used a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)/optical microscopy technique to determine key mechanical properties of individual electrospun PCL nanofibers with diameters between 440-1040nm. Compared to protein nanofibers, PCL nanofibers showed much lower adhesion, as they slipped on the substrate when mechanically manipulated. We, therefore, first developed a novel technique to anchor individual PCL nanofibers to micrometer-sized ridges on a substrate, and then mechanically tested anchored nanofibers. When held at constant strain, tensile stress relaxed with fast and slow relaxation times of 1.0±0.3s and 8.8±3.1s, respectively. The total tensile modulus was 62±26MPa, the elastic (non-relaxing) component of the tensile modulus was 53±36MPa. Individual PCL fibers could be stretched elastically (without permanent deformation) to strains of 19-23%. PCL nanofibers are rather extensible; they could be stretched to a strain of at least 98%, and a tensile strength of at least 12MPa, before they slipped off the AFM tip. PCL nanofibers that had aged for over a month at ambient conditions became stiffer and less elastic. Our technique provides accurate nanofiber mechanical data, which are needed to guide construction of scaffolds for cells and other biomedical devices. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MECHANISM OF LIQUID MEMBRANES AND APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Nuran ACAR

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been considerably studied on the recycling of waste materials in the source besides of wastewater treatment in the last years. It has been important developments on the using of semiconductor membranes in the recycling of toxic materials such as heavy metals, intensifying the environment protection measures especially in the west countries. Wastewater treatment has been achieved with liquid membranes as it has been achieved with polymeric membrane systems such as ultrafiltration, microfiltration, electrodialysis. At the same time, liquid membranes are used for removal of metal ions in hydrometallurgy. Liquid membranes are also used in biotechnology, medical areas and gas separation process.

  9. Fouling mechanisms of dairy streams during membrane distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, A.; Sanciolo, P.; Vasiljevic, T.; Weeks, M.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Gray, S.; Duke, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on fouling mechanisms of skim milk and whey during membrane distillation (MD) using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes. Structural and elemental changes along the fouling layer from the anchorpoint at the membrane to the topsurface of the fouling layer have been investigated

  10. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane association of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP4 glycoprotein and its co-localization with CD163 in lipid rafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yijun [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Shandong Key Laboratory of Animal Disease Control and Breeding, Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Jinan (China); Pattnaik, Asit K. [School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and the Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0900 (United States); Song, Cheng [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Li, Gang, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Ave, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-03-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoprotein 4 (GP4) resembles a typical type I membrane protein in its structure but lacks a hydrophilic tail at the C-terminus, suggesting that GP4 may be a lipid-anchored membrane protein. Using the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), a known glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, chimeric constructs were made to substitute the GPI-anchor domain of DAF with the putative lipid-anchor domain of GP4, and their membrane association and lipase cleavage were determined in cells. The DAF-GP4 fusion protein was transported to the plasma membrane and was cleaved by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), indicating that the C-terminal domain of GP4 functions as a GPI anchor. Mutational studies for residues adjacent to the GPI modification site and characterization of respective mutant viruses generated from infectious cDNA clones show that the ability of GP4 for membrane association corresponded to virus viability and growth characteristics. The residues T158 ({omega} - 2, where {omega} is the GPI moiety at E160), P159 ({omega} - 1), and M162 ({omega} + 2) of GP4 were determined to be important for virus replication, with M162 being of particular importance for virus infectivity. The complete removal of the peptide-anchor domain in GP4 resulted in a complete loss of virus infectivity. The depletion of cholesterol from the plasma membrane of cells reduced the virus production, suggesting a role of lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. Remarkably, GP4 was found to co-localize with CD163 in the lipid rafts on the plasma membrane. Since CD163 has been reported as a cellular receptor for PRRSV and GP4 has been shown to interact with this receptor, our data implicates an important role of lipid rafts during entry of the virus.

  11. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane association of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP4 glycoprotein and its co-localization with CD163 in lipid rafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yijun; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Song, Cheng; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Gang

    2012-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoprotein 4 (GP4) resembles a typical type I membrane protein in its structure but lacks a hydrophilic tail at the C-terminus, suggesting that GP4 may be a lipid-anchored membrane protein. Using the human decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), a known glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored protein, chimeric constructs were made to substitute the GPI-anchor domain of DAF with the putative lipid-anchor domain of GP4, and their membrane association and lipase cleavage were determined in cells. The DAF-GP4 fusion protein was transported to the plasma membrane and was cleaved by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), indicating that the C-terminal domain of GP4 functions as a GPI anchor. Mutational studies for residues adjacent to the GPI modification site and characterization of respective mutant viruses generated from infectious cDNA clones show that the ability of GP4 for membrane association corresponded to virus viability and growth characteristics. The residues T158 (ω − 2, where ω is the GPI moiety at E160), P159 (ω − 1), and M162 (ω + 2) of GP4 were determined to be important for virus replication, with M162 being of particular importance for virus infectivity. The complete removal of the peptide–anchor domain in GP4 resulted in a complete loss of virus infectivity. The depletion of cholesterol from the plasma membrane of cells reduced the virus production, suggesting a role of lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. Remarkably, GP4 was found to co-localize with CD163 in the lipid rafts on the plasma membrane. Since CD163 has been reported as a cellular receptor for PRRSV and GP4 has been shown to interact with this receptor, our data implicates an important role of lipid rafts during entry of the virus.

  12. Loss of covalently linked lipid as the mechanism for radiation-induced release of membrane-bound polysaccharide and exonuclease from Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of γ-radiation-induced release of polysaccharide and exonuclease from the midwall membrane of Micrococcus radiodurans has been examined. These two components appear to be released independently, but by very similar processes. Direct analysis of radiation-released polysaccharide indicated the absence of an alkali-labile neutral lipid normally present in the native material. Radiation-induced release therefore probably results from the radiolytic cleavage of a covalently linked lipid which normally serves to anchor these substances to the membrane. The absence of a natural membrane-bound carotenoid had no effect on the rate of release of these components. Likewise, the absence of exonuclease in an exonuclease minus mutant did not influence the release of polysaccharide. It is suggested that the major pathway of radical transfer from the initiating .OH and culminating in the cleavage of the neutral lipid anchor may not be via the membrane

  13. Characterization of the immersion properties of the peripheral membrane anchor of the FATC domain of the kinase "target of rapamycin" by NMR, oriented CD spectroscopy, and MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Lisa A M; Janke, J Joel; Bennett, W F Drew; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S; Tieleman, D Peter; Dames, Sonja A

    2014-05-08

    The multidomain ser/thr kinase "target of rapamycin" (TOR) centrally controls eukaryotic growth and metabolism. The C-terminal FATC domain is important for TOR regulation and was suggested to directly mediate TOR-membrane interactions. Here, we present a detailed characterization of the membrane immersion properties of the oxidized and reduced yeast TOR1 FATC domain (2438-2470 = y1fatc). The immersion depth was characterized by NMR-monitored interaction studies with DPC micelles containing paramagnetically tagged 5- or 16-doxyl stearic acid (5-/16-SASL) and by analyzing the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) from Mn(2+) in the solvent. Complementary MD-simulations of micellar systems in the absence and presence of protein showed that 5-/16-SASL can move in the micelle and that 16-SASL can bend such that the doxyl group is close to the headgroup region and not deep in the interior as commonly assumed. Based on oriented CD (OCD) data, the single α-helix of oxidized/reduced y1fatc has an angle to the membrane normal of ∼30-60°/∼35-65° in neutral and ∼5-35°/∼0-30° in negatively charged bilayers. The presented experimentally well-founded models help to better understand how this redox-sensitive peripheral membrane anchor may be part of a network of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions regulating TOR localization at different cellular membranes. Moreover, the presented work provides a good methodological reference for the structural characterization of other peripherally membrane associating proteins.

  14. Mechanics of nonplanar membranes with force-dipole activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2006-01-01

    A study is made of how active membrane proteins can modify the long wavelength mechanics of fluid membranes. The activity of the proteins is modelled as disturbing the protein surroundings through nonlocal force distributions of which a force-dipole distribution is the simplest example. An analytic...... contributions to mechanical properties such as tension and bending moments become apparent. It is also explained how the activity can induce a hydrodynamic attraction between the active proteins in the membrane....

  15. In-situcross-linked PVDF membranes with enhanced mechanical durability for vacuum membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Zuo, Jian; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2016-01-01

    A novel and effective one-step method has been demonstrated to fabricate cross-linked polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes with better mechanical properties and flux for seawater desalination via vacuum membrane distillation (VMD). This method involves the addition of two functional nonsolvent additives; namely, water and ethylenediamine (EDA), into the polymer casting solution. The former acts as a pore forming agent, while the latter performs as a cross-linking inducer. The incorporation of water tends to increase membrane flux via increasing porosity and pore size but sacrifices membrane mechanical properties. Conversely, the presence of EDA enhances membrane mechanical properties through in-situ cross-linking reaction. Therefore, by synergistically combining the effects of both functional additives, the resultant PVDF membranes have shown good MD performance and mechanical properties simultaneously. The parameters that affect the cross-link reaction and membrane mechanical properties such as reaction duration and EDA concentration have been systematically studied. The membranes cast from an optimal reaction condition comprising 0.8 wt % EDA and 3-hour reaction not only shows a 40% enhancement in membrane Young's Modulus compared to the one without EDA but also achieves a good VMD flux of 43.6 L/m2-h at 60°C. This study may open up a totally new approach to design next-generation high performance MD membranes. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 62: 4013–4022, 2016

  16. In-situcross-linked PVDF membranes with enhanced mechanical durability for vacuum membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Zuo, Jian

    2016-05-12

    A novel and effective one-step method has been demonstrated to fabricate cross-linked polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes with better mechanical properties and flux for seawater desalination via vacuum membrane distillation (VMD). This method involves the addition of two functional nonsolvent additives; namely, water and ethylenediamine (EDA), into the polymer casting solution. The former acts as a pore forming agent, while the latter performs as a cross-linking inducer. The incorporation of water tends to increase membrane flux via increasing porosity and pore size but sacrifices membrane mechanical properties. Conversely, the presence of EDA enhances membrane mechanical properties through in-situ cross-linking reaction. Therefore, by synergistically combining the effects of both functional additives, the resultant PVDF membranes have shown good MD performance and mechanical properties simultaneously. The parameters that affect the cross-link reaction and membrane mechanical properties such as reaction duration and EDA concentration have been systematically studied. The membranes cast from an optimal reaction condition comprising 0.8 wt % EDA and 3-hour reaction not only shows a 40% enhancement in membrane Young\\'s Modulus compared to the one without EDA but also achieves a good VMD flux of 43.6 L/m2-h at 60°C. This study may open up a totally new approach to design next-generation high performance MD membranes. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 62: 4013–4022, 2016

  17. Expression of membrane anchored cytokines and B7-1 alters tumor microenvironment and induces protective antitumor immunity in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Erica N; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Machiah, Deepa K; Patel, Jaina M; Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Tien, Linda; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2013-05-07

    Many studies have shown that the systemic administration of cytokines or vaccination with cytokine-secreting tumors augments an antitumor immune response that can result in eradication of tumors. However, these approaches are hampered by the risk of systemic toxicity induced by soluble cytokines. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of 4TO7, a highly tumorigenic murine mammary tumor cell line, expressing glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form of cytokine molecules alone or in combination with the costimulatory molecule B7-1 as a model for potential cell or membrane-based breast cancer vaccines. We observed that the GPI-anchored cytokines expressed on the surface of tumor cells greatly reduced the overall tumorigenicity of the 4TO7 tumor cells following direct live cell challenge as evidenced by transient tumor growth and complete regression within 30 days post challenge. Tumors co-expressing B7-1 and GPI-IL-12 grew the least and for the shortest duration, suggesting that this combination of immunostimulatory molecules is most potent. Protective immune responses were also observed following secondary tumor challenge. Further, the 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-2 and 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 transfectants were capable of inducing regression of a wild-type tumor growing at a distant site in a concomitant tumor challenge model, suggesting the tumor immunity elicited by the transfectants can act systemically and inhibit the tumor growth at a distant site. Additionally, when used as irradiated whole cell vaccines, 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 led to a significant inhibition in tumor growth of day 7 established tumors. Lastly, we observed a significant decrease in the prevalence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T-cells in the tumor microenvironment on day 7 post challenge with 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 cells, which provides mechanistic insight into antitumor efficacy of the tumor-cell membrane expressed IL-12. These studies have implications in designing membrane

  18. Mechanics and dynamics of triglyceride-phospholipid model membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Duelund, Lars; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate here that triolein alters the mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes and induces extraordinary conformational dynamics. Triolein containing membranes exhibit fluctuations up to size range of 100µm and with the help of these are e.g. able to squeeze through narrow passages...... with larger lamellar distances observed in the TOPOPC membranes. These findings suggest repulsion between adjacent membranes. We provide a comprehensive discussion on the possible explanations for the observed mechanics and dynamics in the TOPOPC system and on their potential cellular implications....

  19. Antifouling membranes for sustainable water purification: strategies and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runnan; Liu, Yanan; He, Mingrui; Su, Yanlei; Zhao, Xueting; Elimelech, Menachem; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2016-10-24

    One of the greatest challenges to the sustainability of modern society is an inadequate supply of clean water. Due to its energy-saving and cost-effective features, membrane technology has become an indispensable platform technology for water purification, including seawater and brackish water desalination as well as municipal or industrial wastewater treatment. However, membrane fouling, which arises from the nonspecific interaction between membrane surface and foulants, significantly impedes the efficient application of membrane technology. Preparing antifouling membranes is a fundamental strategy to deal with pervasive fouling problems from a variety of foulants. In recent years, major advancements have been made in membrane preparation techniques and in elucidating the antifouling mechanisms of membrane processes, including ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis and forward osmosis. This review will first introduce the major foulants and the principal mechanisms of membrane fouling, and then highlight the development, current status and future prospects of antifouling membranes, including antifouling strategies, preparation techniques and practical applications. In particular, the strategies and mechanisms for antifouling membranes, including passive fouling resistance and fouling release, active off-surface and on-surface strategies, will be proposed and discussed extensively.

  20. Evidence for Amino Acid Snorkeling from a High-Resolution, In Vivo Analysis of Fis1 Tail-Anchor Insertion at the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Abdurrahman; Akdoğan, Emel; Dunn, Cory D

    2017-02-01

    Proteins localized to mitochondria by a carboxyl-terminal tail anchor (TA) play roles in apoptosis, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitochondrial protein import. To reveal characteristics of TAs that may be important for mitochondrial targeting, we focused our attention upon the TA of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fis1 protein. Specifically, we generated a library of Fis1p TA variants fused to the Gal4 transcription factor, then, using next-generation sequencing, revealed which Fis1p TA mutations inhibited membrane insertion and allowed Gal4p activity in the nucleus. Prompted by our global analysis, we subsequently analyzed the ability of individual Fis1p TA mutants to localize to mitochondria. Our findings suggest that the membrane-associated domain of the Fis1p TA may be bipartite in nature, and we encountered evidence that the positively charged patch at the carboxyl terminus of Fis1p is required for both membrane insertion and organelle specificity. Furthermore, lengthening or shortening of the Fis1p TA by up to three amino acids did not inhibit mitochondrial targeting, arguing against a model in which TA length directs insertion of TAs to distinct organelles. Most importantly, positively charged residues were more acceptable at several positions within the membrane-associated domain of the Fis1p TA than negatively charged residues. These findings, emerging from the first high-resolution analysis of an organelle targeting sequence by deep mutational scanning, provide strong, in vivo evidence that lysine and arginine can "snorkel," or become stably incorporated within a lipid bilayer by placing terminal charges of their side chains at the membrane interface. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Mechanics of membrane-cytoskeleton attachment in Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, C.; Jerber, J.; Fisch, C.; Simoes-Betbeder, M.; Dupuis-Williams, P.; Nassoy, P.; Sykes, C.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we assess the role of the protein MKS1 (Meckel syndrome type 1) in the cortical membrane mechanics of the ciliated protist Paramecium. This protein is known to be crucial in the process of cilium formation, and we investigate its putative role in membrane-cytoskeleton attachment. Therefore, we compare cells where the gene coding for MKS1 is silenced to wild-type cells. We found that scanning electron microscopy observation of the cell surface reveals a cup-like structure in wild-type cells that is lost in silenced cells. Since this structure is based on the underlying cytoskeleton, one hypothesis to explain this observation is a disruption of membrane attachment to the cytoskeleton in the absence of MKS1 that should affect plasma membrane mechanics. We test this by probing the mechanics of wild-type and silenced cells by micropipette aspiration. Strikingly, we observe that, at the same aspiration pressure, the membrane of silenced cells is easily aspirated by the micropipette whereas that of wild-type cells enters only at a moderate velocity, an effect that suggests a detachment of the membrane from the underlying cytoskeleton in silenced cells. We quantify this detachment by measuring the deformation of the cell cortex and the rate of cell membrane entry in the micropipette. This study offers a new perspective for the characterization of membrane-cytoskeleton attachment in protists and paves the way for a better understanding of the role of membrane-cortex attachment in cilium formation.

  2. Cell Membrane Transport Mechanisms: Ion Channels and Electrical Properties of Cell Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbacka, Julita; Choromańska, Anna; Rossowska, Joanna; Weżgowiec, Joanna; Saczko, Jolanta; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Cellular life strongly depends on the membrane ability to precisely control exchange of solutes between the internal and external (environmental) compartments. This barrier regulates which types of solutes can enter and leave the cell. Transmembrane transport involves complex mechanisms responsible for passive and active carriage of ions and small- and medium-size molecules. Transport mechanisms existing in the biological membranes highly determine proper cellular functions and contribute to drug transport. The present chapter deals with features and electrical properties of the cell membrane and addresses the questions how the cell membrane accomplishes transport functions and how transmembrane transport can be affected. Since dysfunctions of plasma membrane transporters very often are the cause of human diseases, we also report how specific transport mechanisms can be modulated or inhibited in order to enhance the therapeutic effect.

  3. Characterization of biofoulants illustrates different membrane fouling mechanisms for aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yanghui; Harb, Moustapha; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-01-01

    efficiency, the fouling mechanisms were different. Molecular weight (MW) fingerprint profiles showed that a majority of fragments in anaerobic soluble microbial products (SMP) were retained by the membrane and some fragments were present in both SMP

  4. Release of Glycoprotein (GP1 from the Tegumental Surface of Taenia solium by Phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens Suggests a Novel Protein-Anchor to Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Landa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore how molecules are linked to the membrane surface in larval Taenia solium, whole cysticerci were incubated in the presence of phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens (PLC. Released material was collected and analyzed in polyacrylamide gels with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Two major bands with apparent molecular weights of 180 and 43 kDa were observed. Western blot of released material and localization assays in cysticerci tissue sections using antibodies against five known surface glycoproteins of T. solium cysticerci indicated that only one, previously called GP1, was released. Similar localization studies using the lectins wheat-germ-agglutinin and Concanavalin A showed that N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetylneuraminic, sialic acid, αmethyl-D-mannoside, D-manose/glucose, and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues are abundantly present on the surface. On the other hand, we find that treatment with PLC releases molecules from the surface; they do not reveal Cross Reacting Determinant (CRD, suggesting a novel anchor to the membrane for the glycoprotein GP1.

  5. Auditory Mechanics of the Tectorial Membrane and the Cochlear Spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavara, Núria; Manoussaki, Daphne; Chadwick, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This review is timely and relevant since new experimental and theoretical findings suggest that cochlear mechanics from the nanoscale to the macroscale are affected by mechanical properties of the tectorial membrane and the spiral shape. Recent findings Main tectorial membrane themes covered are i) composition and morphology, ii) nanoscale mechanical interactions with the outer hair cell bundle, iii) macroscale longitudinal coupling, iv) fluid interaction with inner hair cell bundles, v) macroscale dynamics and waves. Main cochlear spiral themes are macroscale low-frequency energy focusing and microscale organ of Corti shear gain. Implications Findings from new experimental and theoretical models reveal exquisite sensitivity of cochlear mechanical performance to tectorial membrane structural organization, mechanics, and its positioning with respect to hair bundles. The cochlear spiral geometry is a major determinant of low frequency hearing. Suggestions are made for future research directions. PMID:21785353

  6. G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) forms a plasma membrane complex with membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) and protein kinase A-anchoring protein 5 (AKAP5) that constitutively inhibits cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broselid, Stefan; Berg, Kelly A; Chavera, Teresa A; Kahn, Robin; Clarke, William P; Olde, Björn; Leeb-Lundberg, L M Fredrik

    2014-08-08

    GPR30, or G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, is a G protein-coupled receptor reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2), couple to the G proteins Gs and Gi/o, and mediate non-genomic estrogenic responses. However, controversies exist regarding the receptor pharmacological profile, effector coupling, and subcellular localization. We addressed the role of the type I PDZ motif at the receptor C terminus in receptor trafficking and coupling to cAMP production in HEK293 cells and CHO cells ectopically expressing the receptor and in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing the native receptor. GPR30 was localized both intracellularly and in the plasma membrane and subject to limited basal endocytosis. E2 and G-1, reported GPR30 agonists, neither stimulated nor inhibited cAMP production through GPR30, nor did they influence receptor localization. Instead, GPR30 constitutively inhibited cAMP production stimulated by a heterologous agonist independently of Gi/o. Moreover, siRNA knockdown of native GPR30 increased cAMP production. Deletion of the receptor PDZ motif interfered with inhibition of cAMP production and increased basal receptor endocytosis. GPR30 interacted with membrane-associated guanylate kinases, including SAP97 and PSD-95, and protein kinase A-anchoring protein (AKAP) 5 in the plasma membrane in a PDZ-dependent manner. Knockdown of AKAP5 or St-Ht31 treatment, to disrupt AKAP interaction with the PKA RIIβ regulatory subunit, decreased inhibition of cAMP production, and St-Ht31 increased basal receptor endocytosis. Therefore, GPR30 forms a plasma membrane complex with a membrane-associated guanylate kinase and AKAP5, which constitutively attenuates cAMP production in response to heterologous agonists independently of Gi/o and retains receptors in the plasma membrane. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Chemical Reactive Anchoring Lipids with Different Performance for Cell Surface Re-engineering Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbilisetty, Pratima; Boron, Mallorie; Nie, Huan; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Sun, Xue-Long

    2018-02-28

    Introduction of selectively chemical reactive groups at the cell surface enables site-specific cell surface labeling and modification opportunity, thus facilitating the capability to study the cell surface molecular structure and function and the molecular mechanism it underlies. Further, it offers the opportunity to change or improve a cell's functionality for interest of choice. In this study, two chemical reactive anchor lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene glycol)-dibenzocyclooctyne (DSPE-PEG 2000 -DBCO) and cholesterol-PEG-dibenzocyclooctyne (CHOL-PEG 2000 -DBCO) were synthesized and their potential application for cell surface re-engineering via lipid fusion were assessed with RAW 264.7 cells as a model cell. Briefly, RAW 264.7 cells were incubated with anchor lipids under various concentrations and at different incubation times. The successful incorporation of the chemical reactive anchor lipids was confirmed by biotinylation via copper-free click chemistry, followed by streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. In comparison, the cholesterol-based anchor lipid afforded a higher cell membrane incorporation efficiency with less internalization than the phospholipid-based anchor lipid. Low cytotoxicity of both anchor lipids upon incorporation into the RAW 264.7 cells was observed. Further, the cell membrane residence time of the cholesterol-based anchor lipid was evaluated with confocal microscopy. This study suggests the potential cell surface re-engineering applications of the chemical reactive anchor lipids.

  8. Chemical Reactive Anchoring Lipids with Different Performance for Cell Surface Re-engineering Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Introduction of selectively chemical reactive groups at the cell surface enables site-specific cell surface labeling and modification opportunity, thus facilitating the capability to study the cell surface molecular structure and function and the molecular mechanism it underlies. Further, it offers the opportunity to change or improve a cell’s functionality for interest of choice. In this study, two chemical reactive anchor lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine–poly(ethylene glycol)–dibenzocyclooctyne (DSPE–PEG2000–DBCO) and cholesterol–PEG–dibenzocyclooctyne (CHOL–PEG2000–DBCO) were synthesized and their potential application for cell surface re-engineering via lipid fusion were assessed with RAW 264.7 cells as a model cell. Briefly, RAW 264.7 cells were incubated with anchor lipids under various concentrations and at different incubation times. The successful incorporation of the chemical reactive anchor lipids was confirmed by biotinylation via copper-free click chemistry, followed by streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. In comparison, the cholesterol-based anchor lipid afforded a higher cell membrane incorporation efficiency with less internalization than the phospholipid-based anchor lipid. Low cytotoxicity of both anchor lipids upon incorporation into the RAW 264.7 cells was observed. Further, the cell membrane residence time of the cholesterol-based anchor lipid was evaluated with confocal microscopy. This study suggests the potential cell surface re-engineering applications of the chemical reactive anchor lipids. PMID:29503972

  9. Characterization of biofoulants illustrates different membrane fouling mechanisms for aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yanghui

    2015-11-17

    This study compares the membrane fouling mechanisms of aerobic (AeMBR) and anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) of the same reactor configuration at similar operating conditions. Although both the AeMBR and AnMBR achieved more than 90% COD removal efficiency, the fouling mechanisms were different. Molecular weight (MW) fingerprint profiles showed that a majority of fragments in anaerobic soluble microbial products (SMP) were retained by the membrane and some fragments were present in both SMP and in soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), suggesting that the physical retention of SMP components contributed to the AnMBR membrane fouling. One of the dominant fragments was comprised of glycoliproprotein (size 630-640 kD) and correlated in abundance in AnMBR-EPS with the extent of anaerobic membrane fouling. In contrast, all detected AeMBR-SMP fragments permeated through the membrane. Aerobic SMP and soluble EPS also showed very different fingerprinting profiles. A large amount of adenosine triphosphate was present in the AeMBR-EPS, suggesting that microbial activity arising from certain bacterial populations, such as unclassified Comamonadaceae and unclassified Chitinophagaceae, may play a role in aerobic membrane fouling. This study underlines the differences in fouling mechanisms between AeMBR and AnMBR systems and can be applied to facilitate the development of appropriate fouling control strategies.

  10. Mechanical properties of 3D printed warped membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Xiao, Kechao; Weaver, James C.; Vlassak, Joost J.; Nelson, David R.

    2015-03-01

    We explore how a frozen background metric affects the mechanical properties of solid planar membranes. Our focus is a special class of ``warped membranes'' with a preferred random height profile characterized by random Gaussian variables h (q) in Fourier space with zero mean and variance q-m . It has been shown theoretically that in the linear response regime, this quenched random disorder increases the effective bending rigidity, while the Young's and shear moduli are reduced. Compared to flat plates of the same thickness t, the bending rigidity of warped membranes is increased by a factor hv / t while the in-plane elastic moduli are reduced by t /hv , where hv =√{ } describes the frozen height fluctuations. Interestingly, hv is system size dependent for warped membranes characterized with m > 2 . We present experimental tests of these predictions, using warped membranes prepared via high resolution 3D printing.

  11. Techniques for anchoring concepts in mechanics at the FET/HET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The particular area of study was Newtonian Mechanics. The sample consisted of an intact group of 130 SFYP students registered at UNITRA, 58 in 2000 and 72 in 2001. The standardized assessment test given prior to selection was used as an indicator of entry level competence. The intervention consisted of visualization, ...

  12. Incorporation of membrane-anchored flagellin or Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit enhances the immunogenicity of rabies virus-like particles in mice and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglin eQi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies remains an important worldwide public health threat, so safe, effective and affordable vaccines are still being sought. Virus-like particle (VLP-based vaccines targeting various viral pathogens have been successfully produced, licensed and commercialized. Here, we designed and constructed two chimeric rabies virus-like particles (cRVLPs containing rabies virus (RABV glycoprotein (G, matrix (M protein, and membrane-anchored flagellin (EVLP-F or Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (EVLP-L as molecular adjuvants to enhance the immune response against rabies. The immunogenicity and potential of cRVLPs as novel rabies vaccine were evaluated by intramuscular vaccination in mouse and dog models. Mouse studies demonstrated that both EVLP-F and EVLP-L induced faster and larger virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNA responses and elicited greater numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting IFN-γ or IL-4 compared with a standard rabies VLP (sRVLP containing only G and M. Moreover, cRVLPs recruited and/or activated more B cells and dendritic cells in inguinal lymph nodes. EVLP-F induced a strong, specific IgG2a response but not an IgG1 response, suggesting the activation of Th1 class immunity; in contrast, Th2 class immunity was observed with EVLP-L. The significantly enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses induced by cRVLPs provided complete protection against lethal challenge with RABV. Most importantly, dogs vaccinated with EVLP-F or EVLP-L exhibited increased VNA titers in sera and enhanced IFN-γ and IL-4 secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Taken together, these results illustrate that when incorporated into sRVLP, membrane-anchored flagellin and LTB possess strong adjuvant activity. EVLP-F and EVLP-L induce significantly enhanced RABV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in both mouse and dog. Therefore, these cRVLPs may be developed as safe and more efficacious rabies vaccine candidate for animals.

  13. Ion transport restriction in mechanically strained separator membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannarella, John; Arnold, Craig B.

    2013-03-01

    We use AC impedance methods to investigate the effect of mechanical deformation on ion transport in commercial separator membranes and lithium-ion cells as a whole. A Bruggeman type power law relationship is found to provide an accurate correlation between porosity and tortuosity of deformed separators, which allows the impedance of a separator membrane to be predicted as a function of deformation. By using mechanical compression to vary the porosity of the separator membranes during impedance measurements it is possible to determine both the α and γ parameters from the modified Bruggeman relation for individual separator membranes. From impedance testing of compressed pouch cells it is found that separator deformation accounts for the majority of the transport restrictions arising from compressive stress in a lithium-ion cell. Finally, a charge state dependent increase in the impedance associated with charge transfer is observed with increasing cell compression.

  14. Membrane transport mechanism 3D structure and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a molecular view of membrane transport by means of numerous biochemical and biophysical techniques. The rapidly growing number of atomic structures of transporters in different conformations and the constant progress in bioinformatics have recently added deeper insights.   The unifying mechanism of energized solute transport across membranes is assumed to consist of the conformational cycling of a carrier protein to provide access to substrate binding sites from either side of a cellular membrane. Due to the central role of active membrane transport there is considerable interest in deciphering the principles of one of the most fundamental processes in nature: the alternating access mechanism.   This book brings together particularly significant structure-function studies on a variety of carrier systems from different transporter families: Glutamate symporters, LeuT-like fold transporters, MFS transporters and SMR (RND) exporters, as well as ABC-type importers.   The selected examples im...

  15. Two-Step Mechanism of Membrane Disruption by Aβ through Membrane Fragmentation and Pore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacca, Michele F.M.; Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Jennifer; Lee, Dong-kuk; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of cell membranes by Aβ is believed to be one of the key components of Aβ toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that membrane disruption by Aβ occurs by a two-step process, with the initial formation of ion-selective pores followed by nonspecific fragmentation of the lipid membrane during amyloid fiber formation. Immediately after the addition of freshly dissolved Aβ1–40, defects form on the membrane that share many of the properties of Aβ channels originally reported from single-channel electrical recording, such as cation selectivity and the ability to be blockaded by zinc. By contrast, subsequent amyloid fiber formation on the surface of the membrane fragments the membrane in a way that is not cation selective and cannot be stopped by zinc ions. Moreover, we observed that the presence of ganglioside enhances both the initial pore formation and the fiber-dependent membrane fragmentation process. Whereas pore formation by freshly dissolved Aβ1–40 is weakly observed in the absence of gangliosides, fiber-dependent membrane fragmentation can only be observed in their presence. These results provide insights into the toxicity of Aβ and may aid in the design of specific compounds to alleviate the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22947931

  16. A hydrophobic anchor mechanism defines a deacetylase family that suppresses host response against YopJ effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Marco; Willige, Björn C; Chory, Joanne

    2017-12-19

    Several Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas species are plant pathogens that infect the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana and important crops such as Brassica. Resistant plants contain the infection by rapid cell death of the infected area through the hypersensitive response (HR). A family of highly related α/β hydrolases is involved in diverse processes in all domains of life. Functional details of their catalytic machinery, however, remained unclear. We report the crystal structures of α/β hydrolases representing two different clades of the family, including the protein SOBER1, which suppresses AvrBsT-incited HR in Arabidopsis. Our results reveal a unique hydrophobic anchor mechanism that defines a previously unknown family of protein deacetylases. Furthermore, this study identifies a lid-loop as general feature for substrate turnover in acyl-protein thioesterases and the described family of deacetylases. Furthermore, we found that SOBER1's biological function is not restricted to Arabidopsis thaliana and not limited to suppress HR induced by AvrBsT.

  17. Anchoring plant metallothioneins to the inner face of the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells leads to heavy metal accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Liliana Ruta

    Full Text Available In this study we engineered yeast cells armed for heavy metal accumulation by targeting plant metallothioneins to the inner face of the yeast plasma membrane. Metallothioneins (MTs are cysteine-rich proteins involved in the buffering of excess metal ions, especially Cu(I, Zn(II or Cd(II. The cDNAs of seven Arabidopsis thaliana MTs (AtMT1a, AtMT1c, AtMT2a, AtMT2b, AtMT3, AtMT4a and AtMT4b and four Noccaea caerulescens MTs (NcMT1, NcMT2a, NcMT2b and NcMT3 were each translationally fused to the C-terminus of a myristoylation green fluorescent protein variant (myrGFP and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The myrGFP cassette introduced a yeast myristoylation sequence which allowed directional targeting to the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane along with direct monitoring of the intracellular localization of the recombinant protein by fluorescence microscopy. The yeast strains expressing plant MTs were investigated against an array of heavy metals in order to identify strains which exhibit the (hyperaccumulation phenotype without developing toxicity symptoms. Among the transgenic strains which could accumulate Cu(II, Zn(II or Cd(II, but also non-canonical metal ions, such as Co(II, Mn(II or Ni(II, myrGFP-NcMT3 qualified as the best candidate for bioremediation applications, thanks to the robust growth accompanied by significant accumulative capacity.

  18. Anchoring plant metallothioneins to the inner face of the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells leads to heavy metal accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruta, Lavinia Liliana; Lin, Ya-Fen; Kissen, Ralph; Nicolau, Ioana; Neagoe, Aurora Daniela; Ghenea, Simona; Bones, Atle M; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    In this study we engineered yeast cells armed for heavy metal accumulation by targeting plant metallothioneins to the inner face of the yeast plasma membrane. Metallothioneins (MTs) are cysteine-rich proteins involved in the buffering of excess metal ions, especially Cu(I), Zn(II) or Cd(II). The cDNAs of seven Arabidopsis thaliana MTs (AtMT1a, AtMT1c, AtMT2a, AtMT2b, AtMT3, AtMT4a and AtMT4b) and four Noccaea caerulescens MTs (NcMT1, NcMT2a, NcMT2b and NcMT3) were each translationally fused to the C-terminus of a myristoylation green fluorescent protein variant (myrGFP) and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The myrGFP cassette introduced a yeast myristoylation sequence which allowed directional targeting to the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane along with direct monitoring of the intracellular localization of the recombinant protein by fluorescence microscopy. The yeast strains expressing plant MTs were investigated against an array of heavy metals in order to identify strains which exhibit the (hyper)accumulation phenotype without developing toxicity symptoms. Among the transgenic strains which could accumulate Cu(II), Zn(II) or Cd(II), but also non-canonical metal ions, such as Co(II), Mn(II) or Ni(II), myrGFP-NcMT3 qualified as the best candidate for bioremediation applications, thanks to the robust growth accompanied by significant accumulative capacity.

  19. Membrane selectivity and disordering mechanism of antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, Yuji

    Protegrin-1 (PG-1) is a beta-sheet antimicrobial peptide (AMP), a class of peptides innate to various organisms and functions as a defense agent against harmful microorganisms by means of membrane disordering. Characteristic chemical and structural properties of AMPs allow selective interaction against invaders' cell membranes. Despite their enormous biomedical potential, progress towards developing them into therapeutic agents has been hampered by a lack of insight into their mechanism of action. AMP insertion assays using Langmuir monolayers reveal that both electrostatic properties of the lipid head group as well as the packing density of the lipid tail group play important roles in determining the membrane selectivity of AMPs. These results help elucidate how the AMP selectively targets the cell membrane of microorganisms over the cell membrane of the host. In addition, these results also explain the higher hemolytic ability of PG-1 against human red blood cells (RBCs) compared to the hemolytic ability of PG-1 against sheep and pig RBCs. Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity shows that PG-1 penetrates into the lipid layer. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and fluorescence microscopy indicate that the insertion of PG-1 disorders tail group packing. Membrane selectivity and insertion location information of AMPs with different primary sequence and secondary structure have been obtained by using a truncated version of PG-1: PC-17, and an alpha-helical AMP, LL-37, respectively. The similarity of the membrane disordering process across these various peptides motivated us to test the membrane disordering effect of molecules designed to mimic these peptides. Peptide-mimics based on meta-phenylene ethynylenes demonstrate similar membrane disordering effects, showing that the potency of AMPs is derived from their overall chemical and structural properties, rather than exact peptide sequence. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to directly image first, the PG-1

  20. Mechanism of membranous tunnelling nanotube formation in viral genome delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Peralta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In internal membrane-containing viruses, a lipid vesicle enclosed by the icosahedral capsid protects the genome. It has been postulated that this internal membrane is the genome delivery device of the virus. Viruses built with this architectural principle infect hosts in all three domains of cellular life. Here, using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, we investigate bacteriophage PRD1, the best understood model for such viruses, to unveil the mechanism behind the genome translocation across the cell envelope. To deliver its double-stranded DNA, the icosahedral protein-rich virus membrane transforms into a tubular structure protruding from one of the 12 vertices of the capsid. We suggest that this viral nanotube exits from the same vertex used for DNA packaging, which is biochemically distinct from the other 11. The tube crosses the capsid through an aperture corresponding to the loss of the peripentonal P3 major capsid protein trimers, penton protein P31 and membrane protein P16. The remodeling of the internal viral membrane is nucleated by changes in osmolarity and loss of capsid-membrane interactions as consequence of the de-capping of the vertices. This engages the polymerization of the tail tube, which is structured by membrane-associated proteins. We have observed that the proteo-lipidic tube in vivo can pierce the gram-negative bacterial cell envelope allowing the viral genome to be shuttled to the host cell. The internal diameter of the tube allows one double-stranded DNA chain to be translocated. We conclude that the assembly principles of the viral tunneling nanotube take advantage of proteo-lipid interactions that confer to the tail tube elastic, mechanical and functional properties employed also in other protein-membrane systems.

  1. Mechanical performance of laminated composites incorporated with nanofibrous membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Huang, Z.-M.; He, C.L.; Han, X.J.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of non-woven nanofibrous membranes as interlaminar interfaces on the mechanical performance of laminated composites was investigated experimentally. The nanofibrous membranes are porous, thin and lightweight, and exhibit toughness and strength to some extent. They give little increase in weight and thickness when incorporated into a laminate. More important, they can be used as a functional agent carrier for the laminate. The nanofiber membranes used in this paper were prepared by electrospinning of Nylon-6 (PA6), Epoxy 609 (EPO 1691-410) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), with a thickness ranging from 20 to 150 μm. The non-woven fabrics were attached to one side of a glass/epoxy fabric lamina prior to lamination and each fabric was arranged in between two adjacent plies of the laminate. The nanofibrous membranes were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile testing, whereas the mechanical properties of the laminate were understood in terms of three-point bending and short-beam shear tests. Results have shown that the nanofibrous membranes in the ply interfaces with a proper thickness did not affect the mechanical performance of the composite laminates significantly

  2. Membrane-anchored MucR mediates nitrate-dependent regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yajie

    2015-04-29

    Alginates exhibit unique material properties suitable for medical and industrial applications. However, if produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, it is an important virulence factor in infection of cystic fibrosis patients. The alginate biosynthesis machinery is activated by c-di-GMP imparted by the inner membrane protein, MucR. Here, it was shown that MucR impairs alginate production in response to nitrate in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent site-specific mutagenesis of MucR revealed that the second MHYT sensor motif (MHYT II, amino acids 121–124) of MucR sensor domain was involved in nitrate sensing. We also showed that both c-di-GMP synthesizing and degrading active sites of MucR were important for alginate production. Although nitrate and deletion of MucR impaired alginate promoter activity and global c-di-GMP levels, alginate yields were not directly correlated with alginate promoter activity or c-di-GMP levels, suggesting that nitrate and MucR modulate alginate production at a post-translational level through a localized pool of c-di-GMP. Nitrate increased pel promoter activity in the mucR mutant while in the same mutant the psl promoter activity was independent of nitrate. Nitrate and deletion of mucR did not impact on swarming motility but impaired attachment to solid surfaces. Nitrate and deletion of mucR promoted the formation of biofilms with increased thickness, cell density, and survival. Overall, this study provided insight into the functional role of MucR with respect to nitrate-mediated regulation of alginate biosynthesis. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  3. Two homologous genes, DCW1 (YKL046c) and DFG5, are essential for cell growth and encode glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane proteins required for cell wall biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Wu, Hong; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Ito, Kiyoshi

    2002-11-01

    The cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of glucan, chitin and various kinds of mannoproteins. Major parts of mannoproteins are synthesized as glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and are then transferred to cell wall beta-1,6-glucan. A glycosyltransferase has been hypothesized to catalyse this transfer reaction. A database search revealed that the products of YKL046c and DFG5 are homologous to bacterial mannosidase. These genes are homologous to each other and have primary structures characteristic of GPI-anchored proteins. Although single disruptants of ykl046c and dfg5 were viable, ykl046cDelta was hypersensitive to a cell wall-digesting enzyme (zymolyase), suggesting that this gene is involved in cell wall biosynthesis. We therefore designated this gene as DCW1 (defective cell wall). A double disruptant of dcw1 and dfg5 was synthetically lethal, indicating that the functions of these gene products are redundant, and at least one of them is required for cell growth. Cells deficient in both Dcw1p and Dfg5p were round and large, had cell walls that contained an increased amount of chitin and secreted a major cell wall protein, Cwp1p, into the medium. Biochemical analyses showed that epitope-tagged Dcw1p is an N-glycosylated, GPI-anchored membrane protein and is localized in the membrane fraction including the cell surface. These results suggest that both Dcw1p and Dfg5p are GPI-anchored membrane proteins and are required for normal biosynthesis of the cell wall.

  4. Mechanisms of recognition and binding of α-TTP to the plasma membrane by multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos eLamprakis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We used multiple sets of simulations both at the atomistic and coarse-grained level of resolution, to investigate interaction and binding of α-tochoperol transfer protein (α-TTP to phosphatidylinositol phosphate lipids (PIPs. Our calculations indicate that enrichment of membranes with such lipids facilitate membrane anchoring. Atomistic models suggest that PIP can be incorporated into the binding cavity of α-TTP and therefore confirm that such protein can work as lipid exchanger between the endosome and the plasma membrane. Comparison of the atomistic models of the α-TTP / PIPs complex with membrane-bound α-TTP revealed different roles for the various basic residues composing the basic patch that is key for the protein / ligand interaction. Such residues are of critical importance as several point mutations at their position lead to severe forms of ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED phenotypes. Specifically, R221 is main residue responsible for the stabilisation of the complex. R68 and R192 exchange strong interactions in the protein or in the membrane complex only, suggesting that the two residues alternate contact formation, thus facilitating lipid flipping from the membrane into the protein cavity during the lipid exchange process. Finally, R59 shows weaker interactions with PIPs anyway with a clear preference for specific phosphorylation positions, hinting a role in early membrane selectivity for the protein. Altogether, our simulations reveal significant aspects at the atomistic scale of interactions of α-TTP with the plasma membrane and with PIP, providing clarifications on the mechanism of intracellular vitamin E trafficking and helping establishing the role of key residue for the functionality of α-TTP.

  5. Mechanics, morphology, and mobility in stratum corneum membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Peter; Das, Chinmay; Noro, Massimo

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of skin, and serves as a protective barrier against external agents, and to control moisture. It comprises keratin bodies (corneocytes) embedded in a matrix of lipid bilayers. Unlike the more widely studied phospholipid bilayers, the SC bilayers are typically in a gel-like state. Moreover, the SC membrane composition is radically different from more fluid counterparts: it comprises single tailed fatty acids, ceramides, and cholesterol; with many distinct ceramides possessing different lengths of tails, and always with two tails of different lengths. I will present insight from computer simulations into the morphology, mechanical properties, and diffusion (barrier) properties of these highly heterogeneous membranes. Our results provide some clue as to the design principles for the SC membrane, and is an excellent example of the use of wide polydispersity by natural systems.

  6. CFD study of the thermal transfer of a non-Newtonian fluid within a tank mechanically stirred by an anchor-shaped impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, L.; Seghier, O.; Benmoussa, A.; Draoui, B.

    2018-06-01

    The most of operations of chemical, biochemical or petrochemical industries are carried out in tanks or in reactors which are mechanically-controlled. The optimum mode of operation of these devices requires a finalized knowledge of the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior induced by the agitator. In the present work, the characterization of the incompressible hydrodynamic and thermal fields of a non-Newtonian fluid (Bingham) in a flat, non-baffled cylindrical vessel fitted with anchor agitator was undertaken by numerical simulation, using the CFD code Fluent (6.3.26) based on the finite volume discretization method of the energy equation and the Navier-Stokes equations which are formulated in (U.V.P) variables. We have summarized this simulated system by comparing of the consumed power and the Nusselt number for this type of mobile (Anchor agitator).

  7. Membrane fouling mechanism transition in relation to feed water composition

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Darli Theint

    2014-12-01

    . Extended laboratory filtration is required to understand fouling of low pressure membranes as it relates to commercial applications, as the initial rate of fouling for new membranes can include pore constriction mechanisms from humic substances which diminish in significance as filtration continues. Filtration for >24h was required before the HIFI values became constant.

  8. Structure-based membrane dome mechanism for Piezo mechanosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yusong R; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2017-12-12

    Mechanosensitive ion channels convert external mechanical stimuli into electrochemical signals for critical processes including touch sensation, balance, and cardiovascular regulation. The best understood mechanosensitive channel, MscL, opens a wide pore, which accounts for mechanosensitive gating due to in-plane area expansion. Eukaryotic Piezo channels have a narrow pore and therefore must capture mechanical forces to control gating in another way. We present a cryo-EM structure of mouse Piezo1 in a closed conformation at 3.7Å-resolution. The channel is a triskelion with arms consisting of repeated arrays of 4-TM structural units surrounding a pore. Its shape deforms the membrane locally into a dome. We present a hypothesis in which the membrane deformation changes upon channel opening. Quantitatively, membrane tension will alter gating energetics in proportion to the change in projected area under the dome. This mechanism can account for highly sensitive mechanical gating in the setting of a narrow, cation-selective pore. © 2017, Guo et al.

  9. Thermal stability of nafion membranes under mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintilii, M; Struis, R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of adequately modified fluoro-ionomer membranes (NAFION{sup R}) is demonstrated for the selective separation of methanol synthesis products from the raw reactor gas at temperatures around 200{sup o}C. For an economically relevant application of this concept on a technical scale the Nafion membranes should be thin ({approx_equal}10 {mu}m) and thermally stable over a long period of time (1-2 years). In cooperation with industry (Methanol Casale SA, Lugano (CH)), we test the thermal stability of Nafion hollow fibers and supported Nafion thin sheet membranes at temperatures between 160 and 200{sup o}C under mechanical stress by applying a gas pressure difference over the membrane surface ({Delta}P{<=} 40 bar). Tests with the hollow fibers revealed that Nafion has visco-elastic properties. Tests with 50 {mu}m thin Nafion sheets supported by a porous metal carrier at 200{sup o}C and {Delta}P=39 bar showed no mechanical defects over a period of 92 days. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  10. A Novel Plasma Membrane-Anchored Protein Regulates Xylem Cell-Wall Deposition through Microtubule-Dependent Lateral Inhibition of Rho GTPase Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Fukuda, Hiroo; Oda, Yoshihisa

    2017-08-21

    Spatial control of cell-wall deposition is essential for determining plant cell shape [1]. Rho-type GTPases, together with the cortical cytoskeleton, play central roles in regulating cell-wall patterning [2]. In metaxylem vessel cells, which are the major components of xylem tissues, active ROP11 Rho GTPases form oval plasma membrane domains that locally disrupt cortical microtubules, thereby directing the formation of oval pits in secondary cell walls [3-5]. However, the regulatory mechanism that determines the planar shape of active Rho of Plants (ROP) domains is still unknown. Here we show that IQD13 associates with cortical microtubules and the plasma membrane to laterally restrict the localization of ROP GTPase domains, thereby directing the formation of oval secondary cell-wall pits. Loss and overexpression of IQD13 led to the formation of abnormally round and narrow secondary cell-wall pits, respectively. Ectopically expressed IQD13 increased the presence of parallel cortical microtubules by promoting microtubule rescue. A reconstructive approach revealed that IQD13 confines the area of active ROP domains within the lattice of the cortical microtubules, causing narrow ROP domains to form. This activity required the interaction of IQD13 with the plasma membrane. These findings suggest that IQD13 positively regulates microtubule dynamics as well as their linkage to the plasma membrane, which synergistically confines the area of active ROP domains, leading to the formation of oval secondary cell-wall pits. This finding sheds light on the role of microtubule-plasma membrane linkage as a lateral fence that determines the planar shape of Rho GTPase domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding ozone mechanisms to alleviate ceramic membrane fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Irma Giovanna Llamosas

    Ceramic membranes are a strong prospect as an advanced treatment in the drinking water domain. But their high capital cost and the lack of specific research on their performance still discourage their application in this field. Thus, knowing that fouling is the main drawback experienced in filtration processes, this bench-scale study was aimed to assess the impact of an ozonation pre-treatment on the alleviation of the fouling of UF ceramic membranes. Preozonation and filtration steps were performed under two different pH and ozone doses. Chosen pH values were at the limits of natural surface waters range (6.5 and 8.5) to keep practicability. Raw water from the Thousand Isle's river at Quebec-Canada was used for the tests. The filtration setup involved an unstirred dead-end filtration cell operated at constant flux. Results showed that pre-oxidation by ozone indeed reduced the fouling degree of the membranes according to the dose applied (up to 60 and 85% for membranes 8 and 50 kDa, respectively). Direct NOM oxidation was found responsible for this effect as the presence of molecular ozone was not essential to achieve these results. In the context of this experiment, however, pH showed to be more effective than the ozonation pre-treatment to keep fouling at low levels: 70% lower at pH 6.5 than at pH 8.5 for un-ozonated waters, which was contrary to most of the literature found on the topic (Changwon, 2013; De Angelis & Fidalgo, 2013; Karnik et al., 2005; S. Lee & Kim, 2014). This behaviour results mainly from the operation mode used in the experiment, the electrical repulsions between MON molecules at basic pH that led to the accumulation of material on the feed side of the membranes (concentration polarisation) and ulterior cake formation. In addition, solution pH showed an influence in the definition of fouling mechanisms. At solution pH 6.5, which was precisely the isoelectric point of the membranes (+/-6.5), the blocking fouling mode was frequently detected

  12. Mechanism for translocation of fluoroquinolones across lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, O.; Rog, T.; Javanainen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Classical atom-scale molecular dynamics simulations, constrained free energy calculations, and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are employed to study the diffusive translocation of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) across lipid membranes. CPFX is considered here as a representative of the fluoroquinolone...... antibiotics class. Neutral and zwitterionic CPFX coexist at physiological pH, with the latter being predominant. Simulations reveal that only the neutral form permeates the bilayer, and it does so through a novel mechanism that involves dissolution of concerted stacks of zwitterionic ciprofloxacins....... Subsequent QM analysis of the observed molecular stacking shows the important role of partial charge neutralization in the stacks, highlighting how the zwitterionic form of the drug is neutralized for translocation. The findings propose a translocation mechanism in which zwitterionic CPFX molecules approach...

  13. Control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plants

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Eleiwi, Fadi; Karam, Ayman M.

    2017-01-01

    Various examples are provided that are related to boundary control in membrane distillation (MD) processes. In one example, a system includes a membrane distillation (MD) process comprising a feed side and a permeate side separated by a membrane

  14. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-07-13

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. © Crown copyright 2015.

  15. Mechanical ventilation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. An international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhong, Jonathan D; Telesnicki, Teagan; Munshi, Laveena; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Detsky, Michael; Fan, Eddy

    2014-07-01

    In patients with severe, acute respiratory failure undergoing venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO), the optimal strategy for mechanical ventilation is unclear. Our objective was to describe ventilation practices used in centers registered with the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO). We conducted an international cross-sectional survey of medical directors and ECMO program coordinators from all ELSO-registered centers. The survey was distributed using a commercial website that collected information on center characteristics, the presence of a mechanical ventilator protocol, ventilator settings, and weaning practices. E-mails were sent out to medical directors or coordinators at each ELSO center and their responses were pooled for analysis. We analyzed 141 (50%) individual responses from the 283 centers contacted across 28 countries. Only 27% of centers reported having an explicit mechanical ventilation protocol for ECMO patients. The majority of these centers (77%) reported "lung rest" to be the primary goal of mechanical ventilation, whereas 9% reported "lung recruitment" to be their ventilation strategy. A tidal volume of 6 ml/kg or less was targeted by 76% of respondents, and 58% targeted a positive end-expiratory pressure of 6-10 cm H2O while ventilating patients on VV-ECMO. Centers prioritized weaning VV-ECMO before mechanical ventilation. Although ventilation practices in patients supported by VV-ECMO vary across ELSO centers internationally, the majority of centers used a strategy that targeted lung-protective thresholds and prioritized weaning VV-ECMO over mechanical ventilation.

  16. Beer Clarification with polysulfone membrane and study on fouling mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cardoso de Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present work were to study the relationship between the fluxes, permeate quality, and fouling mechanism. A polysulfone membrane with 100 KDa and 0.12 m² of surface area was used. Permeate fluxes were measured for different pressures (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 bar at the same temperature of 8 ºC. The fluxes measured for each pressure ranged from 22, 24, 27 and 30 kg h-1m-2 at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 bar, respectively. Samples of the feed and permeate were analyzed for pH, color, turbidity, sugar, bitterness, and proteins. The fouling mechanisms observed were cake filtration, partial pore blocking, and complete pore blocking.

  17. Study of the Mechanical Behavior of a Hyperelastic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourbaba Houaria

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The benefits in emloying plastics material in microfluidic devices manufactures are extremely attractive that include reduced cost and simplified manufacturing procedures, particularly when compared to silicon. An additional benefit is the wide range of available plastic materials which allow the manufacturer to choose materials' properties suitable for their specific application. The Polydimethylsiloxane is commonly used in a wide range of microfluidic applications due to its flexibility and low cost. In addition the properties of the Polymethyl methacrylate such as the low cost, high transparency, and good chemical properties are needed in microfluidics applications. In this paper, we have used Finit Elements method to simulate the mechanical behavior of Polydimethylsiloxane and Polymethylmethacrylate using hyper elastic and linear elastic model. Sevral parameters have been studied; such as, thickness and number of mesh in order to optimize the dimension of the membrane. Also, we have studied the impact of the mesh form on the membrane’s displacement.

  18. The Ogden Anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, W E; Cerniglia, M W; Carro, A

    1998-06-01

    Many procedures performed by podiatric surgeons today require the use of a soft-tissue anchoring device. In recent years, many new anchoring devices have become available for use in the foot and ankle. The authors introduce a new soft-tissue anchoring device that has yet to be described in the podiatric literature and present two cases in which the new anchor was used.

  19. Membrane fouling mechanism of biofilm-membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR): Pore blocking model and membrane cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Wenxiang; Tang, Bing; Ding, Jie; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zhien

    2018-02-01

    Biofilm membrane bioreactor (BF-MBR) is considered as an important wastewater treatment technology that incorporates advantages of both biofilm and MBR process, as well as can alleviate membrane fouling, with respect to the conventional activated sludge MBR. But, to be efficient, it necessitates the establishment of proper methods for the assessment of membrane fouling. Four Hermia membrane blocking models were adopted to quantify and evaluate the membrane fouling of BF-MBR. The experiments were conducted with various operational conditions, including membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure (TMP). Good agreement between cake formation model and experimental data was found, confirming the validity of the Hermia models for assessing the membrane fouling of BF-MBR and that cake layer deposits on membrane. Moreover, the influences of membrane types, agitation speeds and transmembrane pressure on the Hermia pore blocking coefficient of cake layer were investigated. In addition, the permeability recovery after membrane cleaning at various operational conditions was studied. This work confirms that, unlike conventional activated sludge MBR, BF-MBR possesses a low degree of membrane fouling and a higher membrane permeability recovery after cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  1. Descriptions of membrane mechanics from microscopic and effective two-dimensional perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomholt, Michael A; Miao Ling

    2006-01-01

    Mechanics of fluid membranes may be described in terms of the concepts of mechanical deformations and stresses or in terms of mechanical free-energy functions. In this paper, each of the two descriptions is developed by viewing a membrane from two perspectives: a microscopic perspective, in which the membrane appears as a thin layer of finite thickness and with highly inhomogeneous material and force distributions in its transverse direction, and an effective, two-dimensional perspective, in which the membrane is treated as an infinitely thin surface, with effective material and mechanical properties. A connection between these two perspectives is then established. Moreover, the functional dependence of the variation in the mechanical free energy of the membrane on its mechanical deformations is first studied in the microscopic perspective. The result is then used to examine to what extent different, effective mechanical stresses and forces can be derived from a given, effective functional of the mechanical free energy

  2. Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric proteins contribute to cytoadherence and anchor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 to the host cell cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oberli, Alexander; Zurbrügg, Laura; Rusch, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    is anchored to the cytoskeleton, and the Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric (PHIST) gene family plays a role in many host cell modifications including binding the intracellular domain of PfEMP1. Here, we show that conditional reduction of the PHIST protein PFE1605w strongly reduces adhesion...... interacts with both the intracellular segment of PfEMP1 and with cytoskeletal components. This is the first report of a PHIST protein interacting with key molecules of the cytoadherence complex and the host cytoskeleton, and this functional role seems to play an essential role in the pathology of P...

  3. Changes in lipid membrane mechanics induced by di- and tri-phenyltins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Przybyło, Magda; Drabik, Dominik; Szostak, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    properties of biological membranes. It was found that the membrane/water partition coefficient equals 4, a value significantly higher than octanol/water partition coefficient. In addition, the effect of di- and tri-phenyltin chlorides on the mechanics of model lipid membranes was measured for the first time...

  4. Control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plants

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-05

    Various examples are provided that are related to boundary control in membrane distillation (MD) processes. In one example, a system includes a membrane distillation (MD) process comprising a feed side and a permeate side separated by a membrane boundary layer; and processing circuitry configured to control a water production rate of the MD process based at least in part upon a distributed heat transfer across the membrane boundary layer. In another example, a method includes determining a plurality of estimated temperature states of a membrane boundary layer separating a feed side and a permeate side of a membrane distillation (MD) process; and adjusting inlet flow rate or inlet temperature of at least one of the feed side or the permeate side to maintain a difference temperature along the membrane boundary layer about a defined reference temperature based at least in part upon the plurality of estimated temperature states.

  5. Confinement of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocyte-like H9c2 cells is mediated by selective interactions with PDZ domain and A-kinase anchoring proteins but not caveolae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Cathleen D.; Haggie, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system regulates cardiac output by activating adrenergic receptors (ARs) in cardiac myocytes. The predominant cardiac ARs, β1- and β2AR, are structurally similar but mediate distinct signaling responses. Scaffold protein–mediated compartmentalization of ARs into discrete, multiprotein complexes has been proposed to dictate differential signaling responses. To test the hypothesis that βARs integrate into complexes in live cells, we measured receptor diffusion and interactions by single-particle tracking. Unstimulated β1- and β2AR were highly confined in the membrane of H9c2 cardiomyocyte-like cells, indicating that receptors are tethered and presumably integrated into protein complexes. Selective disruption of interactions with postsynaptic density protein 95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)–domain proteins and A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) increased receptor diffusion, indicating that these scaffold proteins participate in receptor confinement. In contrast, modulation of interactions between the putative scaffold caveolae and β2AR did not alter receptor dynamics, suggesting that these membrane domains are not involved in β2AR confinement. For both β1- and β2AR, the receptor carboxy-terminus was uniquely responsible for scaffold interactions. Our data formally demonstrate that distinct and stable protein complexes containing β1- or β2AR are formed in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocyte-like cells and that selective PDZ and AKAP interactions are responsible for the integration of receptors into complexes. PMID:21680711

  6. Confinement of β(1)- and β(2)-adrenergic receptors in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocyte-like H9c2 cells is mediated by selective interactions with PDZ domain and A-kinase anchoring proteins but not caveolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Cathleen D; Haggie, Peter M

    2011-08-15

    The sympathetic nervous system regulates cardiac output by activating adrenergic receptors (ARs) in cardiac myocytes. The predominant cardiac ARs, β(1)- and β(2)AR, are structurally similar but mediate distinct signaling responses. Scaffold protein-mediated compartmentalization of ARs into discrete, multiprotein complexes has been proposed to dictate differential signaling responses. To test the hypothesis that βARs integrate into complexes in live cells, we measured receptor diffusion and interactions by single-particle tracking. Unstimulated β(1)- and β(2)AR were highly confined in the membrane of H9c2 cardiomyocyte-like cells, indicating that receptors are tethered and presumably integrated into protein complexes. Selective disruption of interactions with postsynaptic density protein 95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)-domain proteins and A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) increased receptor diffusion, indicating that these scaffold proteins participate in receptor confinement. In contrast, modulation of interactions between the putative scaffold caveolae and β(2)AR did not alter receptor dynamics, suggesting that these membrane domains are not involved in β(2)AR confinement. For both β(1)- and β(2)AR, the receptor carboxy-terminus was uniquely responsible for scaffold interactions. Our data formally demonstrate that distinct and stable protein complexes containing β(1)- or β(2)AR are formed in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocyte-like cells and that selective PDZ and AKAP interactions are responsible for the integration of receptors into complexes.

  7. The influence of hydrodynamic factors, membrane surface properties and channel geometries on membrane performance and fouling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervov Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern theoretical understanding of colloidal and suspended matter membrane fouling mechanisms are presented and discussed. State-of-the-art simulation models of concentration polarization calculations for different channel conditions are described and influence of the fouling layers on the flux and rejection decrease are evaluated. Results of experimental investigations are presented that suggest a quantitative evaluation of fouling rates and membrane flux prognosis due to colloidal fouling with time. The influence of channel geometry on fouling is demonstrated and discussed. The main disadvantage of spiral wounded membrane modules which is attributed to the presence of a separation spacer mesh in the feed channel is discussed.

  8. Mechanisms of proton conductance in polymer electrolyte membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikerling, M.; Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.

    2001-01-01

    We provide a phenomenological description of proton conductance in polymer electrolyte membranes, based on contemporary views of proton transfer processes in condensed media and a model for heterogeneous polymer electrolyte membrane structure. The description combines the proton transfer events...... in a single pore with the total pore-network performance and, thereby, relates structural and kinetic characteristics of the membrane. The theory addresses specific experimentally studied issues such as the effect of the density of proton localization sites (equivalent weight) of the membrane material...

  9. Descriptions of membrane mechanics from microscopic and effective two-dimensional perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Miao, L.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanics of fluid membranes may be described in terms of the concepts of mechanical deformations and stresses or in terms of mechanical free-energy functions. In this paper, each of the two descriptions is developed by viewing a membrane from two perspectives: a microscopic perspective, in which...... the membrane appears as a thin layer of finite thickness and with highly inhomogeneous material and force distributions in its transverse direction, and an effective, two-dimensional perspective, in which the membrane is treated as an infinitely thin surface, with effective material and mechanical properties....... A connection between these two perspectives is then established. Moreover, the functional dependence of the variation in the mechanical free energy of the membrane on its mechanical deformations is first studied in the microscopic perspective. The result is then used to examine to what extent different...

  10. Mechanical ventilation in patients subjected to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Sanchez, M

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is a crucial element in the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), because there is high level evidence that a low tidal volume of 6ml/kg (protective ventilation) improves survival. In these patients with refractory respiratory insufficiency, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be used. This salvage technique improves oxygenation, promotes CO 2 clearance, and facilitates protective and ultraprotective MV, potentially minimizing ventilation-induced lung injury. Although numerous trials have investigated different ventilation strategies in patients with ARDS, consensus is lacking on the optimal MV settings during venovenous ECMO. Although the concept of "lung rest" was introduced years ago, there are no evidence-based guidelines on its use in application to MV in patients supported by ECMO. How MV in ECMO patients can promote lung recovery and weaning from ventilation is not clear. The purpose of this review is to describe the ventilation strategies used during venovenous ECMO in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanism of voltage-gated channel formation in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelli, Rolando; Becucci, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Although several molecular models for voltage-gated ion channels in lipid membranes have been proposed, a detailed mechanism accounting for the salient features of experimental data is lacking. A general treatment accounting for peptide dipole orientation in the electric field and their nucleation and growth kinetics with ion channel formation is provided. This is the first treatment that explains all the main features of the experimental current-voltage curves of peptides forming voltage-gated channels available in the literature. It predicts a regime of weakly voltage-dependent conductance, followed by one of strong voltage-dependent conductance at higher voltages. It also predicts values of the parameters expressing the exponential dependence of conductance upon voltage and peptide bulk concentration for both regimes, in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Most importantly, the only two adjustable parameters involved in the kinetics of nucleation and growth of ion channels can be varied over broad ranges without affecting the above predictions to a significant extent. Thus, the fitting of experimental current-voltage curves stems naturally from the treatment and depends only slightly upon the choice of the kinetic parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypothesis: spring-loaded boomerang mechanism of influenza hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Lukas K

    2003-07-11

    Substantial progress has been made in recent years to augment the current understanding of structures and interactions that promote viral membrane fusion. This progress is reviewed with a particular emphasis on recently determined structures of viral fusion domains and their interactions with lipid membranes. The results from the different structural and thermodynamic experimental approaches are synthesized into a new proposed mechanism, termed the "spring-loaded boomerang" mechanism of membrane fusion, which is presented here as a hypothesis.

  13. Deformation mechanisms of a porous structure of the poly(ethylene terephthalate) nuclear track membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a porous structure of the nuclear track membrane made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) are investigated in the temperature range from 333 to 473 K. It is shown that the pore size of the membrane can both decrease and increase. The analytical equation based on the Alfrey mechanical approach to the relaxation deformation of polymers describes the experimental data satisfactorily over the whole range of temperatures and pore radii of the membranes. 21 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Electrochemical acidification of Kraft black liquor by electrodialysis with bipolar membrane: Ion exchange membrane fouling identification and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Maryam; Mikhaylin, Sergey; Bazinet, Laurent; Savadogo, Oumarou; Paris, Jean

    2017-02-15

    Integrated forest biorefinery offers promising pathways to sustainably diversify the revenue of pulp and paper industry. In this context, lignin can be extracted from a residual stream of Kraft pulping process, called black liquor, and subsequently converted into a wide spectrum of bio-based products. Electrochemical acidification of Kraft black liquor by electrodialysis with bipolar membrane results in lignin extraction and caustic soda production. Even though the implementation of this method requires less chemicals than the chemical acidification process, fouling of the ion exchange membranes and especially bipolar membrane impairs its productivity. Membrane thickness and ash content measurements along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental analysis (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) analysis were performed to identify the nature and mechanisms of the membrane fouling. The results revealed that the fouling layer mostly consisted of organic components and particularly lignin. Based on our proposed fouling mechanisms, throughout the electrodialysis process the pH of the black liquor gradually decreased and as a result more proton ions were available to trigger protonation reaction of lignin phenolic groups and decrease the lignin solubility. Due to the abundance of the proton ions on the surface of the cation exchange layers of the bipolar membrane, destabilized lignin macro-molecules started to self-aggregate and formed lignin clusters on its surface. Over the time, these lignin clusters covered the entire surface of the bipolar membrane and the spaces between the membranes and, eventually, attached to the surface of the cation exchange membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mature clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats RNA (crRNA) length is measured by a ruler mechanism anchored at the precursor processing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Maniv, Inbal; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2011-12-27

    Precise RNA processing is fundamental to all small RNA-mediated interference pathways. In prokaryotes, clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci encode small CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that protect against invasive genetic elements by antisense targeting. CRISPR loci are transcribed as a long precursor that is cleaved within repeat sequences by CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. In many organisms, this primary processing generates crRNA intermediates that are subject to additional nucleolytic trimming to render mature crRNAs of specific lengths. The molecular mechanisms underlying this maturation event remain poorly understood. Here, we defined the genetic requirements for crRNA primary processing and maturation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. We show that changes in the position of the primary processing site result in extended or diminished maturation to generate mature crRNAs of constant length. These results indicate that crRNA maturation occurs by a ruler mechanism anchored at the primary processing site. We also show that maturation is mediated by specific cas genes distinct from those genes involved in primary processing, showing that this event is directed by CRISPR/Cas loci.

  16. Developmental mechanisms of the tympanic membrane in mammals and non-mammalian amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi, Masaki; Kitazawa, Taro; Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Hirai, Tamami; Iseki, Sachiko; Kurihara, Hiroki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    The tympanic membrane is a thin layer that originates from the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesenchyme. Molecular-genetic investigations have revealed that interaction between epithelial and mesenchymal cells in the pharyngeal arches is essential for development of the tympanic membrane. We have recently reported that developmental mechanisms underlying the tympanic membrane seem to be different between mouse and chicken, suggesting that the tympanic membrane evolved independently in mammals and non-mammalian amniotes. In this review, we summarize previous studies of tympanic membrane formation in the mouse. We also discuss its formation in amniotes from an evolutionary point of view. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  17. Mechanisms underlying anomalous diffusion in the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapf, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The plasma membrane is a complex fluid where lipids and proteins undergo diffusive motion critical to biochemical reactions. Through quantitative imaging analyses such as single-particle tracking, it is observed that diffusion in the cell membrane is usually anomalous in the sense that the mean squared displacement is not linear with time. This chapter describes the different models that are employed to describe anomalous diffusion, paying special attention to the experimental evidence that supports these models in the plasma membrane. We review models based on anticorrelated displacements, such as fractional Brownian motion and obstructed diffusion, and nonstationary models such as continuous time random walks. We also emphasize evidence for the formation of distinct compartments that transiently form on the cell surface. Finally, we overview heterogeneous diffusion processes in the plasma membrane, which have recently attracted considerable interest. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Pyroelectricity as a possible mechanism for cell membrane permeabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, Tomás; Muscat, Adeline; Leray, Isabelle; Mir, Lluis M

    2018-02-01

    The effects of pyroelectricity on cell membrane permeability had never been explored. Pyroelectricity consists in the generation of an electric field in the surface of some materials when a change in temperature is produced. In the present study, tourmaline microparticles, which are known to display pyroelectrical properties, were subjected to different changes in temperature upon exposure to cells in order to induce an electric field at their surface. Then, the changes in the permeability of the cell membrane to a cytotoxic agent (bleomycin) were assessed by a cloning efficacy test. An increase in the permeability of the cell membrane was only detected when tourmaline was subjected to a change in temperature. This suggests that the apparition of an induced pyroelectrical electric field on the material could actually be involved in the observed enhancement of the cell membrane permeability as a result of cell electropermeabilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effect of UVC Irradiation on the Mechanical Properties of Chitosan Membrane in Sterilization Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupiasih, N. N.; Sumadiyasa, M.; Putra, I. K.

    2018-04-01

    The present study, we report about the effect of UVC irradiation on the mechanical properties of chitosan membrane in the sterilization process. The membrane used was chitosan membrane 2% which prepared by a casting method using chitosan as matrix and acetic acid 1% as a solvent. The UVC source used was germicidal ultraviolet (UVG) which widely used for sterilization purposes. Variation doses were done by the varying time of irradiation, e.g. 5 min, 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min. Those samples are named as S1, S2, S3, and S4, respectively. Chitosan membrane before irradiation namely S0 also used for comparative study. The effect of UVC irradiation on the mechanical properties of membranes has been examined by different techniques including FTIR, DMA, and the water uptake capability. The results showed that ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and moduli of elasticity (E) were increased by increasing the irradiation time. From FTIR analysis obtained that no new molecules were formed in irradiated membranes. The water uptakes capability of the membranes after irradiation was smaller compared with before irradiation, and among the irradiated membranes, the water uptake capabilities were increased by increasing the exposure time. These observations suggested that more care should be taken during the sterilization process and outdoor used of the membrane. The other side, the UVC irradiation can improve the mechanical properties of the membranes.

  20. The mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes:a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Sheng; Yuan Zheng; Wu Shengwei; Li Wenxin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes. Methods: The mechanics property of carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membranes with different carbon nanotubes contents were tested by universal material testing machine. The surface of the membranes was observed by electron microscope when the stent was bent 90 degree. And its cytotoxicity was tested by cultivating study with 7721 cell. The metallic stent that was covered with carbon nanotubes-polyurethane composite membrane by using dip-coating method was inserted in rabbit esophagus in order to evaluate its biocompatibility in vivo. Results: Composite membranes tensile strength (MPa) and elongation at break (%) were 4.62/900, 6.05/730, 8.26/704 and 5.7/450 when the carbon nanotubes contents were 0%, 0.1%, 0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. If the stent was bent at 90 degree, its surface was still smooth without any fractures when it was scanned by electron microscope.Composite membranes had critical cytotoxicity when its carbon nanotubes content was up to 0.5% and 1.0%. No fissure nor degradation of composite membranes occurred at 30 days after composite membrane covered metallic stent was inserted in rabbit esophagus. Conclusion: When moderate carbon nanotubes are added into polyurethane composite membrane, the mechanics and biocompatibility characteristics of the polyurethane composite membrane can be much improved. (authors)

  1. 19-DEJ-1, a hemidesmosome-anchoring filament complex-associated monoclonal antibody. Definition of a new skin basement membrane antigenic defect in junctional and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fine, J D; Horiguchi, Y; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (19-DEJ-1) was recently produced that recognizes a unique antigenic epitope of human skin basement membrane localized to the midlamina lucida exclusively in those areas bordered by overlying hemidesmosomes. To determine whether the antigen defined by 19-DEJ-1 is norma...

  2. A new insight into membrane fouling mechanism in submerged membrane bioreactor: osmotic pressure during cake layer filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meijia; Peng, Wei; Chen, Jianrong; He, Yiming; Ding, Linxian; Wang, Aijun; Lin, Hongjun; Hong, Huachang; Zhang, Ye; Yu, Haiying

    2013-05-15

    Big gap between experimental filtration resistance of cake layer formed on membrane surface and the hydraulic resistance calculated through the Carman-Kozeny equation, suggested the existence of a new membrane fouling mechanism: osmotic pressure during cake layer filtration in SMBR system. An osmotic pressure model based on chemical potential difference was then proposed. Simulation of the model showed that osmotic pressure accounted for the major fraction of total operation pressure, and pH, applied pressure and ionic strength were the key determining factors for osmosis effect. It was found that, variations of osmotic pressure with pH, applied pressure and added ionic strength were well coincident with perditions of model's simulation, providing the first direct evidences of the real occurrence of osmosis mechanism and the feasibility of the proposed model. These findings illustrate the essential role of osmotic pressure in filtration resistance, and improve fundamental understanding on membrane fouling in SMBR systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The different Li/Na ion storage mechanisms of nano Sb2O3 anchored on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai; Qian, Kun; Qin, Xianying; Liu, Dongqing; Shi, Ruiying; Ran, Aihua; Han, Cuiping; He, Yan-Bing; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Baohua

    2018-05-01

    The antimony oxide/reduced graphene oxide (Sb2O3/rGO) nanocomposites are used as anode of Li-ion and Na-ion batteries (LIBs and NIBs). However, it is unclear about Li-ion and Na-ion storage mechanism in Sb2O3/rGO nanocomposites. Herein, the conversion-alloying mechanisms of Sb2O3/rGO anodes for Na-ion and Li-ion storage are comparatively studied with a combined in-situ XRD and quasi in-situ XPS method. The distinct behaviours are monitored during (de)lithiation and (de)sodiation with respect to crystal structure and chemical composition evolution. It is evidenced that the Na-ion can be easily transported to the inner part of the Sb2O3, where the Li-ion almost cannot reach, leading to a fully transformation during sodiation. In addition, the conversion reaction product of amorphous Na2O display their better chemical stability than amorphous Li2O during electrochemical cycles, which contribute to a stable and long cycling life of NIBs. This work gain insight into the high-capacity anodes with conversation-alloying mechanism for NIBs.

  4. Water Diffusion Mechanism in Carbon Nanotube and Polyamide Nanocomposite Reverse Osmosis Membranes: A Possible Percolation-Hopping Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Takumi; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Tejima, Syogo; Ortiz-Medina, Josue; Morelos-Gomez, Aaron; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2018-02-01

    This paper is a contribution to the Physical Review Applied collection in memory of Mildred S. Dresselhaus. The mechanism of water diffusion across reverse osmosis nanocomposite membranes made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and aromatic polyamide is not completely understood despite its high potential for desalination applications. While most of the groups have proposed that superflow inside the CNT might positively impact the water flow across membranes, here we show theoretical evidence that this is not likely the case in composite membranes because CNTs are usually oriented parallel to the membrane surface, not to mention that sometimes the nanotube cores are occluded. Instead, we propose an oriented diffusion mechanism that explains the high water permeation by decreasing the diffusion path of water molecules across the membranes, even in the presence of CNTs that behave as impermeable objects. Finally, we provide a comprehensive description of the molecular dynamics occurring in water desalination membranes by considering the bond polarizability caused by dynamic charge transfer and explore the use of molecular-dynamics-derived stochastic diffusion simulations. The proposed water diffusion mechanism offers an alternative and most likely explanation for the high permeation phenomena observed in CNTs and PA nanocomposite membranes, and its understanding can be helpful to design the next generation of reverse osmosis desalination membranes.

  5. Integrated investigation approach for determining mechanical properties of poly-silicon membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Brueckner, J.; Dehe, A.; Auerswald, E.; Dudek, R.; Michel, B.; Rzepka, S.

    2014-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining mechanical properties of free-standing thin films such as poly-silicon membranes. The integrated investigation approach comprises test structure development, mechanical testing, and numerical simulation. All membrane test structures developed and manufactured consist of the same material but have different stiffness due to variations in the geometric design. The mechanical tests apply microscopic loads utilizing a nanoindentation tool. Young's modulu...

  6. Preparation, Characterization and Analysis of Fouling Mechanisms of TiO2- Embedded PVDF Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoones Jafarzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2-embedded polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF mixed matrix membranes were prepared through a nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS method. The structure of the membranes was characterized by FESEM, EDX, water drop contact angle measurement, pure water flux and mean pore radius analysis. The results showed that the prepared membranes had asymmetric structures with macro-voids and the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles increased the size of macro-voids. Moreover, pure water flux increased from 41 kg/m2h to 162 kg/m2h the content of TiO2 nanoparticles increased from 1 wt% to 5 wt% as embedded membrane. The contact angle dropped from 100° for 1 wt% TiO2- embedded membrane to 69° for 5 wt% TiO2-embedded membrane, showing that the hydrophilicity of membranes increased by addition of inorganic TiO2 nanoparticles. The fouling behavior oftheprepared mixed matrix membranes was studied in filtration process of 1% humic acid solution. The results showed that fouling resistance of the membranes increased with higher content of TiO2 nanoparticles. The results of classic fouling modeling of membranes showed that for 2 and 5 wt% TiO2-embedded membranes the best fit of the data occurred with the intermediate blockage model whereas cake formation model was the dominant mechanism for other membranes. Moreover, the analysis of fouling mechanisms by combined models showed that cake filtration-intermediate blockage model was in good agreement with the experimental data for all membranes. Finally, the results showed that the rejection of membranes increased with the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles, and then decreased.

  7. Susceptibility to anchoring effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd McElroy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on anchoring has shown this heuristic to be a very robust psychological phenomenon ubiquitous across many domains of human judgment and decision-making. Despite the prevalence of anchoring effects, researchers have only recently begun to investigate the underlying factors responsible for how and in what ways a person is susceptible to them. This paper examines how one such factor, the Big-Five personality trait of openness-to-experience, influences the effect of previously presented anchors on participants' judgments. Our findings indicate that participants high in openness-to-experience were significantly more influenced by anchoring cues relative to participants low in this trait. These findings were consistent across two different types of anchoring tasks providing convergent evidence for our hypothesis.

  8. Dissection of membrane protein degradation mechanisms by reversible inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The degradation of slowly turning over 125I-lactoperoxidase-labeled plasma membrane polypeptides in response to reversible temperature and lysosomotropic inhibitors was studied in rat hepatoma cultures. Cells were radiolabeled and left for 24 h to allow the removal of rapidly degraded proteins. Remaining trichloroacetic acid-precipitable protein was degraded (t 1/2 = 40-68 h) by an apparent first order process 60-86% sensitive to 10 mM NH4Cl or 5 mM methylamine and greater than 95% inhibited by temperature reduction to 18 degrees C. Thus, membrane proteins are selected for degradation in a time-dependent manner by a system which is sensitive to both 18 degrees C and to lysosomotropic amines. When inhibitory conditions were removed after 40-48 h, degradation of 125I-labeled protein resumed at the same rate as that seen in their absence. Since membrane proteins do not exhibit accelerated degradation after removal of inhibitory conditions, there can be no marking or sorting of those proteins destined for degradation during the 40-h exposure to inhibitory conditions. Exposure to amines or 18 degrees C did not affect the position of two-dimensionally resolved labeled polypeptides. Fractionation of labeled cells on Percoll gradients after 40 h of exposure to low temperature or amines showed that labeled protein remained in the plasma membrane fractions of the gradient although shifted to a slightly lower buoyant density in the presence of amines. These results support the notion that selection of plasma membrane proteins for degradation requires their internalization into acidic vesicles. Lysosomotropic amines and reduced temperature interfere with the selection process by preventing membrane fusion events

  9. Puncture mechanics of soft elastomeric membrane with large deformation by rigid cylindrical indenter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Chen, Zhe; Liang, Xueya; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Mao, Guoyong; Hong, Wei; Yu, Honghui; Qu, Shaoxing

    2018-03-01

    Soft elastomeric membrane structures are widely used and commonly found in engineering and biological applications. Puncture is one of the primary failure modes of soft elastomeric membrane at large deformation when indented by rigid objects. In order to investigate the puncture failure mechanism of soft elastomeric membrane with large deformation, we study the deformation and puncture failure of silicone rubber membrane that results from the continuous axisymmetric indentation by cylindrical steel indenters experimentally and analytically. In the experiment, effects of indenter size and the friction between the indenter and the membrane on the deformation and puncture failure of the membrane are investigated. In the analytical study, a model within the framework of nonlinear field theory is developed to describe the large local deformation around the punctured area, as well as to predict the puncture failure of the membrane. The deformed membrane is divided into three parts and the friction contact between the membrane and indenter is modeled by Coulomb friction law. The first invariant of the right Cauchy-Green deformation tensor I1 is adopted to predict the puncture failure of the membrane. The experimental and analytical results agree well. This work provides a guideline in designing reliable soft devices featured with membrane structures, which are present in a wide variety of applications.

  10. MPP1 directly interacts with flotillins in erythrocyte membrane - Possible mechanism of raft domain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernatowska, Agnieszka; Augoff, Katarzyna; Podkalicka, Joanna; Tabaczar, Sabina; Gajdzik-Nowak, Weronika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2017-11-01

    Flotillins are prominent, oligomeric protein components of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane raft domains and are considered to play an important structural role in lateral organization of the plasma membrane. In our previous work on erythroid membranes and giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from them we have shown that formation of functional domains (resting state rafts) depends on the presence of membrane palmitoylated protein 1 (MPP1/p55), pointing to its new physiological role. Exploration of the molecular mechanism of MPP1 function in organizing membrane domains described here, through searching for its molecular partners in RBC membrane by using different methods, led to the identification of the raft-marker proteins, flotillin 1 and flotillin 2, as hitherto unreported direct MPP1 binding-partners in the RBC membrane. These proteins are found in high molecular-weight complexes in native RBC membrane and, significantly, their presence was shown to be separate from the well-known protein 4.1-dependent interactions of MPP1 with membrane proteins. Furthermore, FLIM analysis revealed that loss of the endogenous MPP1-flotillins interactions resulted in significant changes in RBC membrane-fluidity, emphasizing the physiological importance of such interactions in vivo. Therefore, our data establish a new perspective on the role of MPP1 in erythroid cells and suggests that direct MPP1-flotillins interactions could be the major driving-force behind the formation of raft domains in RBC. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intrauterine Defensive Mechanism of Amniotic Fluid and Fetal Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    金山, 尚裕

    1994-01-01

    To determine the intrauterine defensive role of urinary trypsin inhibitor (UTI), we studied the effects of UTI in amniotic fluid, fetal membranes and myometrium. The level of UTI was 94±34U/ml in neonatal urine (compared to adult urine 8.0±6.0U/ml) and 88±37U/ml in amniotic fluid. This may indicate that the main source of UTI in the amniotic fluid is the fetal urine. UTI was found to be concentrated in vernix, fetal intestine, amniotic membranes and uterine myometrium. Immunostaining of term ...

  12. Membrane fouling mechanism transition in relation to feed water composition

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Darli Theint; Mergen, Max R D; Zhao, Oliver; Stewart, Matthew B.; Orbell, John D.; Merle, Tony; Croue, Jean-Philippe; Gray, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    on hydrophobic PP membrane occurred during the first 24h of filtration and contributed to fouling for both raw wastewater and pre-treated wastewaters. However, after the first 24h of filtration the contribution of humic substances to fouling diminished

  13. Modulation of ocular surface glycocalyx barrier function by a galectin-3 N-terminal deletion mutant and membrane-anchored synthetic glycopolymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Mauris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interaction of transmembrane mucins with the multivalent carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-3 is critical to maintaining the integrity of the ocular surface epithelial glycocalyx. This study aimed to determine whether disruption of galectin-3 multimerization and insertion of synthetic glycopolymers in the plasma membrane could be used to modulate glycocalyx barrier function in corneal epithelial cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Abrogation of galectin-3 biosynthesis in multilayered cultures of human corneal epithelial cells using siRNA, and in galectin-3 null mice, resulted in significant loss of corneal barrier function, as indicated by increased permeability to the rose bengal diagnostic dye. Addition of β-lactose, a competitive carbohydrate inhibitor of galectin-3 binding activity, to the cell culture system, transiently disrupted barrier function. In these experiments, treatment with a dominant negative inhibitor of galectin-3 polymerization lacking the N-terminal domain, but not full-length galectin-3, prevented the recovery of barrier function to basal levels. As determined by fluorescence microscopy, both cellobiose- and lactose-containing glycopolymers incorporated into apical membranes of corneal epithelial cells, independently of the chain length distribution of the densely glycosylated, polymeric backbones. Membrane incorporation of cellobiose glycopolymers impaired barrier function in corneal epithelial cells, contrary to their lactose-containing counterparts, which bound to galectin-3 in pull-down assays. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that galectin-3 multimerization and surface recognition of lactosyl residues is required to maintain glycocalyx barrier function at the ocular surface. Transient modification of galectin-3 binding could be therapeutically used to enhance the efficiency of topical drug delivery.

  14. Mechanisms of membrane binding of small GTPase K-Ras4B farnesylated hypervariable region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J; Chavan, Tanmay S; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-04-10

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Mechanisms of Membrane Binding of Small GTPase K-Ras4B Farnesylated Hypervariable Region*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Abraham, Sherwin J.; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Hitchinson, Ben; Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to a family of small GTPases that regulates cell growth, differentiation and survival. K-ras is frequently mutated in cancer. K-Ras4B association with the plasma membrane through its farnesylated and positively charged C-terminal hypervariable region (HVR) is critical to its oncogenic function. However, the structural mechanisms of membrane association are not fully understood. Here, using confocal microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular dynamics simulations, we observed that K-Ras4B can be distributed in rigid and loosely packed membrane domains. Its membrane binding domain interaction with phospholipids is driven by membrane fluidity. The farnesyl group spontaneously inserts into the disordered lipid microdomains, whereas the rigid microdomains restrict the farnesyl group penetration. We speculate that the resulting farnesyl protrusion toward the cell interior allows oligomerization of the K-Ras4B membrane binding domain in rigid microdomains. Unlike other Ras isoforms, K-Ras4B HVR contains a single farnesyl modification and positively charged polylysine sequence. The high positive charge not only modulates specific HVR binding to anionic phospholipids but farnesyl membrane orientation. Phosphorylation of Ser-181 prohibits spontaneous farnesyl membrane insertion. The mechanism illuminates the roles of HVR modifications in K-Ras4B targeting microdomains of the plasma membrane and suggests an additional function for HVR in regulation of Ras signaling. PMID:25713064

  16. Nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control for the temperature difference of a membrane distillation boundary layers. The heat transfer mechanisms inside the process are modeled with a 2D advection-diffusion equation. The model

  17. Investigation of dominant loss mechanisms in low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gerteisen, D.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with the analysis of dominant loss mechanisms in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and hydrogen fed polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEFC) by means of experimental characterization and modeling work.

  18. Evaluation of mechanical and morphologic features of PLLA membranes as supports for perfusion cells culture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montesanto, S., E-mail: salvatore.montesanto1985@gmail.com [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering (DICAM), University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze Ed. 8, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Brucato, V. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering (DICAM), University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze Ed. 8, 90128 Palermo (Italy); La Carrubba, V. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering (DICAM), University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze Ed. 8, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Euro-Mediterranean Institute of Science and Technology (IEMEST), Via Michele Miraglia, 20, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    Porous biodegradable PLLA membranes, which can be used as supports for perfusion cell culture systems were designed, developed and characterized. PLLA membranes were prepared via diffusion induced phase separation (DIPS). A glass slab was coated with a binary PLLA–dioxane solution (8 wt.% PLLA) via dip coating, then pool immersed in two subsequent coagulation baths, and finally dried in a humidity-controlled environment. Surface and mechanical properties were evaluated by measuring pore size, porosity via scanning electron microscopy, storage modulus, loss modulus and loss angle by using a dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Cell adhesion assays on different membrane surfaces were also performed by using a standard count method. Results provide new insights into the foaming methods for producing polymeric membranes and supply indications on how to optimise the fabrication parameters to design membranes for tissue cultures and regeneration. - Highlights: • Design, development and characterization of porous biodegradable PLLA membranes via DIPS technology. • Easy-to-tune processing parameters in terms of surface and volumetric properties and cell adhesion. • Evaluation of the impact of the interconnection degree on membrane's mechanical properties. • Evaluation of cell adhesion on different membrane surface textures.

  19. Evaluation of mechanical and morphologic features of PLLA membranes as supports for perfusion cells culture systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesanto, S.; Brucato, V.; La Carrubba, V.

    2016-01-01

    Porous biodegradable PLLA membranes, which can be used as supports for perfusion cell culture systems were designed, developed and characterized. PLLA membranes were prepared via diffusion induced phase separation (DIPS). A glass slab was coated with a binary PLLA–dioxane solution (8 wt.% PLLA) via dip coating, then pool immersed in two subsequent coagulation baths, and finally dried in a humidity-controlled environment. Surface and mechanical properties were evaluated by measuring pore size, porosity via scanning electron microscopy, storage modulus, loss modulus and loss angle by using a dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Cell adhesion assays on different membrane surfaces were also performed by using a standard count method. Results provide new insights into the foaming methods for producing polymeric membranes and supply indications on how to optimise the fabrication parameters to design membranes for tissue cultures and regeneration. - Highlights: • Design, development and characterization of porous biodegradable PLLA membranes via DIPS technology. • Easy-to-tune processing parameters in terms of surface and volumetric properties and cell adhesion. • Evaluation of the impact of the interconnection degree on membrane's mechanical properties. • Evaluation of cell adhesion on different membrane surface textures.

  20. Mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer fibrous membranes as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juan; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-06-01

    Bilayer fibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning, using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration that resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with fibers aligned across the two parallel disks and a layer with randomly oriented fibers, both layers deposited in a single process step. Membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than single-layer membranes consisting of randomly oriented fibers fabricated with a solid-drum collector. However, despite their higher porosity, bilayer membranes demonstrated generally higher elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness than single-layer membranes with random fibers. Bilayer membrane deformation at relatively high strain rates comprised multiple abrupt microfracture events characterized by discontinuous fiber breakage. Bilayer membrane elongation yielded excessive necking of the layer with random fibers and remarkable fiber stretching (on the order of 400%) in the layer with fibers aligned in the stress direction. In addition, fibers in both layers exhibited multiple localized necking, attributed to the nonuniform distribution of crystalline phases in the fibrillar structure. The high membrane porosity, good mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability of PLLA (demonstrated in previous studies) make the present bilayer membranes good scaffold candidates for a wide range of tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Atomistic study of lipid membranes containing chloroform: looking for a lipid-mediated mechanism of anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Reigada

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of general anesthesia is still a controversial issue. Direct effect by linking of anesthetics to proteins and indirect action on the lipid membrane properties are the two hypotheses in conflict. Atomistic simulations of different lipid membranes subjected to the effect of small volatile organohalogen compounds are used to explore plausible lipid-mediated mechanisms. Simulations of homogeneous membranes reveal that electrostatic potential and lateral pressure transversal profiles are affected differently by chloroform (anesthetic and carbon tetrachloride (non-anesthetic. Simulations of structured membranes that combine ordered and disordered regions show that chloroform molecules accumulate preferentially in highly disordered lipid domains, suggesting that the combination of both lateral and transversal partitioning of chloroform in the cell membrane could be responsible of its anesthetic action.

  2. Anchored but not internalized: shape dependent endocytosis of nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bokai; Feng, Xi; Yin, Hang; Ge, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yanhuan; Chu, Zhiqin; Raabova, Helena; Vavra, Jan; Cigler, Petr; Liu, Renbao; Wang, Yi; Li, Quan

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticle-cell interactions begin with the cellular uptake of the nanoparticles, a process that eventually determines their cellular fate. In the present work, we show that the morphological features of nanodiamonds (NDs) affect both the anchoring and internalization stages of their endocytosis. While a prickly ND (with sharp edges/corners) has no trouble of anchoring onto the plasma membrane, it suffers from difficult internalization afterwards. In comparison, the internalization of a round ND (obtained by selective etching of the prickly ND) is not limited by its lower anchoring amount and presents a much higher endocytosis amount. Molecular dynamics simulation and continuum modelling results suggest that the observed difference in the anchoring of round and prickly NDs likely results from the reduced contact surface area with the cell membrane of the former, while the energy penalty associated with membrane curvature generation, which is lower for a round ND, may explain its higher probability of the subsequent internalization.

  3. Comparison of biofouling mechanisms between cellulose triacetate (CTA) and thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide forward osmosis membranes in osmotic membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhua; Zhao, Yanxiao; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2016-02-01

    There are two types of popular forward osmosis (FO) membrane materials applied for researches on FO process, cellulose triacetate (CTA) and thin film composite (TFC) polyamide. However, performance and fouling mechanisms of commercial TFC FO membrane in osmotic membrane bioreactors (OMBRs) are still unknown. In current study, its biofouling behaviors in OMBRs were investigated and further compared to the CTA FO membrane. The results indicated that β-D-glucopyranose polysaccharides and microorganisms accounted for approximately 77% of total biovolume on the CTA FO membrane while β-D-glucopyranose polysaccharides (biovolume ratio of 81.1%) were the only dominant biofoulants on the TFC FO membrane. The analyses on the biofouling structure implied that a tighter biofouling layer with a larger biovolume was formed on the CTA FO membrane. The differences in biofouling behaviors including biofoulants composition and biofouling structure between CTA and TFC FO membranes were attributed to different membrane surface properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biochar composite membrane for high performance pollutant management: Fabrication, structural characteristics and synergistic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffar, Abdul; Zhu, Xiaoying; Chen, Baoliang

    2018-02-01

    Biochar, a natural sourced carbon-rich material, has been used commonly in particle shape for carbon sequestration, soil fertility and environmental remediation. Here, we report a facile approach to fabricate freestanding biochar composite membranes for the first time. Wood biochars pyrolyzed at 300 °C and 700 °C were blended with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) in three percentages (10%, 30% and 50%) to construct membranes through thermal phase inversion process. The resultant biochar composite membranes possess high mechanical strength and porous structure with uniform distribution of biochar particles throughout the membrane surface and cross-section. The membrane pure water flux was increased with B300 content (4825-5411 ± 21 L m -2 h -1 ) and B700 content (5823-6895 ± 72 L m -2 h -1 ). The membranes with B300 were more hydrophilic with higher surface free energy (58.84-60.31 mJ m -2 ) in comparison to B700 (56.32-51.91 mJ m -2 ). The biochar composite membranes indicated promising adsorption capacities (47-187 mg g -1 ) to Rhodamine B (RhB) dye. The biochar membranes also exhibited high retention (74-93%) for E. coli bacterial suspensions through filtration. After simple physical cleaning, both the adsorption and sieving capabilities of the biochar composite membranes could be effectively recovered. Synergistic mechanisms of biochar/PVdF in the composite membrane are proposed to elucidate the high performance of the membrane in pollutant management. The multifunctional biochar composite membrane not only effectively prevent the problems caused by directly using biochar particle as sorbent but also can be produced in large scale, indicating great potential for practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Ma

    Full Text Available Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants' WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain.

  6. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljona Gaiko-Shcherbak

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  7. Maturation of Mechanical Impedance of the Skin-Covered Skull: Implications for Soft Band Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems Fitted in Infants and Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Allison R; Hodgetts, William E; Scott, Dylan; Small, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the maturational changes in the mechanical properties of the skull and how they might contribute to infant-adult differences in bone conduction hearing sensitivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanical impedance of the skin-covered skull for different skull positions and contact forces for groups of infants, young children, and adults. These findings provide a better understanding of how changes in mechanical impedance might contribute to developmental changes in bone conduction hearing, and might provide insight into how fitting and output verification protocols for bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS) could be adapted for infants and young children. Seventy-seven individuals participated in the study, including 63 infants and children (ages 1 month to 7 years) and 11 adults. Mechanical impedance magnitude for the forehead and temporal bone was collected for contact forces of 2, 4, and 5.4 N using an impedance head, a BAHS transducer, and a specially designed holding device. Mechanical impedance magnitude was determined across frequency using a stepped sine sweep from 100 to 10,000 Hz, and divided into low- and high-frequency sets for analysis. Mechanical impedance magnitude was lowest for the youngest infants and increased throughout maturation in the low frequencies. For high frequencies, the youngest infants had the highest impedance, but only for a temporal bone placement. Impedance increased with increasing contact force for low frequencies for each age group and for both skull positions. The effect of placement was significant for high frequencies for each contact force and for each age group, except for the youngest infants. Our findings show that mechanical impedance properties change systematically up to 7 years old. The significant age-related differences in mechanical impedance suggest that infant-adult differences in bone conduction thresholds may be related, at least in part, to properties of the

  8. Water transport mechanisms across inorganic membranes in rad waste treatment by electro dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andalaft, E.; Labayru, R.

    1992-01-01

    The work described in this paper deals with effects and mechanisms of water transport across an inorganic membrane, as related to some studied on the concentration of caesium, strontium, plutonium and other cations of interest to radioactive waste treatment. Several different water transport mechanisms are analysed and assessed as to their individual contribution towards the total transference of water during electro-dialysis using inorganic membranes. Water transfer assisted by proton jump mechanism, water of hydration transferred along with the ions, water related to thermo-osmotic effect, water transferred by concentration gradient and water transferred electrolytically under zeta potential surface charge drive are some of the different mechanism discussed. (author)

  9. Mechanical, thermal and swelling properties of phosphorylated nanocellulose fibrils/PVA nanocomposite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad Bilal Khan; Jahan, Zaib; Berg, Sigrun Sofie; Gregersen, Øyvind Weiby

    2017-12-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) have strong reinforcing properties when incorporated in a compatible polymer matrix. This work reports the effect of the addition of phosphorylated nanocellulose (PCNF) on the mechanical, thermal and swelling properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite membranes. The incorporation of nanocellulose in PVA reduced the crystallinity at 0%RH. However, when the films were exposed to higher humidities the crystallinity increased. No apparent trend is observed for mechanical properties for dry membranes (0% RH). However, at 93% RH the elastic modulus increased strongly from 0.12MPa to 0.82MPa when adding 6% PCNF. At higher humidities, the moisture uptake has large influence on storage modulus, tan δ and tensile properties. Membranes containing 1% PCNF absorbed most moisture. Swelling, thermal and mechanical properties indicate a good potential for applying of PVA/phosphorylated nanocellulose composite membranes for CO 2 separation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanical Characterization of Anion Exchange Membranes Under Controlled Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-11

    little market penetration has been achieved. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells ( PEMFC ) have struggled primarily due to high cost, driven by the use...and requirements for Pt, Pt-alloy, and non-Pt oxygen reduction catalysts for PEMFCs , Appl. Catal. B Environ. 56 (2005) 9–35. doi:10.1016/j.apcatb...resins for PEMFCs , Electrochim. Acta. 50 (2004) 571–575. doi:10.1016/j.electacta.2004.01.133. [89] S. Bhadra, N.H. Kim, J.S. Choi, K.Y. Rhee, J.H. Lee

  11. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism.

  12. A palmitoylation switch mechanism regulates Rac1 function and membrane organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Lérida, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Perales, Sara; Calvo, María; Rentero, Carles; Zheng, Yi; Enrich, Carlos; Del Pozo, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 plays important roles in many processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, cell-cycle progression and gene expression. The initiation of Rac1 signalling requires at least two mechanisms: GTP loading via the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)/guanosine diphosphate (GDP) cycle, and targeting to cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered plasma membrane microdomains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms governing this specific compartmentalization. We show that Rac1 can incorporate palmitate at cysteine 178 and that this post-translational modification targets Rac1 for stabilization at actin cytoskeleton-linked ordered membrane regions. Palmitoylation of Rac1 requires its prior prenylation and the intact C-terminal polybasic region and is regulated by the triproline-rich motif. Non-palmitoylated Rac1 shows decreased GTP loading and lower association with detergent-resistant (liquid-ordered) membranes (DRMs). Cells expressing no Rac1 or a palmitoylation-deficient mutant have an increased content of disordered membrane domains, and markers of ordered membranes isolated from Rac1-deficient cells do not correctly partition in DRMs. Importantly, cells lacking Rac1 palmitoylation show spreading and migration defects. These data identify palmitoylation as a mechanism for Rac1 function in actin cytoskeleton remodelling by controlling its membrane partitioning, which in turn regulates membrane organization. PMID:22157745

  13. Mechanisms of ER Stress-Mediated Mitochondrial Membrane Permeabilization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gupta, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    During apoptosis, the process of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) represents a point-of-no-return as it commits the cell to death. Here we have assessed the role of caspases, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore on ER stress-induced MOMP and subsequent cell death. Induction of ER stress leads to upregulation of several genes such as Grp78, Edem1, Erp72, Atf4, Wars, Herp, p58ipk, and ERdj4 and leads to caspase activation, release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins and dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from caspase-9, -2 and, -3 knock-out mice were resistant to ER stress-induced apoptosis which correlated with decreased processing of pro-caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with caspase inhibitors (Boc-D.fmk and DEVD.fmk) attenuated ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. However, only deficiency of caspase-9 and -2 could prevent ER stress-mediated loss of DeltaPsim. Bcl-2 overexpression or pretreatment of cells with the cell permeable BH4 domain (BH4-Tat) or the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors, bongkrekic acid or cyclosporine A, attenuated the ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. These data suggest a role for caspase-9 and -2, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential during ER stress-induced apoptosis.

  14. Enzymatic Treatments to Improve Mechanical Properties and Surface Hydrophobicity of Jute Fiber Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixue Dong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber membranes prepared from jute fragments can be valuable, low cost, and renewable. They have broad application prospects in packing bags, geotextiles, filters, and composite reinforcements. Traditionally, chemical adhesives have been used to improve the properties of jute fiber membranes. A series of new laccase, laccase/mediator systems, and multi-enzyme synergisms were attempted. After the laccase treatment of jute fragments, the mechanical properties and surface hydrophobicity of the produced fiber membranes increased because of the cross-coupling of lignins with ether bonds mediated by laccase. The optimum conditions were a buffer pH of 4.5 and an incubation temperature of 60 °C with 0.92 U/mL laccase for 3 h. Laccase/guaiacol and laccase/alkali lignin treatments resulted in remarkable increases in the mechanical properties; in contrast, the laccase/2,2’-azino-bis-(3-ethylthiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS and laccase/2,6-dimethoxyphenol treatments led to a decrease. The laccase/ guaiacol system was favorable to the surface hydrophobicity of jute fiber membranes. However, the laccase/alkali lignin system had the opposite effect. Xylanase/laccase and cellulase/laccase combined treatments were able to enhance both the mechanical properties and the surface hydrophobicity of jute fiber membranes. Among these, cellulase/laccase treatment performed better; compared to mechanical properties, the surface hydrophobicity of the jute fiber membranes showed only a slight increase after the enzymatic multi-step processes.

  15. Membrane Currents in Airway Smooth Muscle: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J Janssen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological and pharmacological techniques were used to characterize the membrane conductance changes underlying spasmogen-evoked depolarization in airway smooth muscle (ASM. Changes included a transient activation of chloride ion channels and prolonged suppression of potassium ion channels; both changes are triggered by release of internally sequestered calcium ion and in turn cause opening of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The resultant influx of calcium ions contributes to contraction as well as to refilling of the internal calcium ion pool. Bronchodilators, on the other hand, act in part through activation of potassium channels, with consequent closure of calcium channels. The tools used to study ion channels in ASM are described, and the investigations of the roles of ion channels in ASM physiology (autacoid-evoked depolarization and hyperpolarization and pathophysiology (airway hyperresponsiveness are summarized. Finally, how the relationship between ion channels and ASM function/dysfunction may relate to the treatment of asthma and related breathing disorders is discussed.

  16. Mechanism of photoinactivation of plant plasma membrane ATPases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbrie, C.W.; Murphy, T.M.

    1984-01-01

    UV radiation at 290 and 365 nm inactivates two forms of the K + -stimulated ATPase associated with the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured cells of Rosa damascena. One form is 15 and 36 times more sensitive than the other to 290 and 365 nm, respectively. For both forms, the inactivation requires oxygen, is inhibited by azide and diazobicyclo(2.2.2.2)octane, but not glycerol, and is enhanced up to 7.5 times in deuterium oxide solvent. Inactivation occurs concomitantly with loss of absorbance at 290 nm. Cs + and NO 3 - , quenchers of tryptophan fluorescence, inhibit inactivation. The results suggest that inactivation involves singlet-oxygen mediated destruction of tryptophans in the ATPases. (author)

  17. Function and failure of the fetal membrane: Modelling the mechanics of the chorion and amnion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaan W Verbruggen

    Full Text Available The fetal membrane surrounds the fetus during pregnancy and is a thin tissue composed of two layers, the chorion and the amnion. While rupture of this membrane normally occurs at term, preterm rupture can result in increased risk of fetal mortality and morbidity, as well as danger of infection in the mother. Although structural changes have been observed in the membrane in such cases, the mechanical behaviour of the human fetal membrane in vivo remains poorly understood and is challenging to investigate experimentally. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop simplified finite element models to investigate the mechanical behaviour and rupture of the fetal membrane, particularly its constituent layers, under various physiological conditions. It was found that modelling the chorion and amnion as a single layer predicts remarkably different behaviour compared with a more anatomically-accurate bilayer, significantly underestimating stress in the amnion and under-predicting the risk of membrane rupture. Additionally, reductions in chorion-amnion interface lubrication and chorion thickness (reported in cases of preterm rupture both resulted in increased membrane stress. Interestingly, the inclusion of a weak zone in the fetal membrane that has been observed to develop overlying the cervix would likely cause it to fail at term, during labour. Finally, these findings support the theory that the amnion is the dominant structural component of the fetal membrane and is required to maintain its integrity. The results provide a novel insight into the mechanical effect of structural changes in the chorion and amnion, in cases of both normal and preterm rupture.

  18. From membrane tension to channel gating: A principal energy transfer mechanism for mechanosensitive channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejun C; Liu, Zhenfeng; Li, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins that play essential roles in multiple cellular processes, including sensing mechanical forces and regulating osmotic pressure. Bacterial MscL and MscS are two prototypes of MS channels. Numerous structural studies, in combination with biochemical and cellular data, provide valuable insights into the mechanism of energy transfer from membrane tension to gating of the channel. We discuss these data in a unified two-state model of thermodynamics. In addition, we propose a lipid diffusion-mediated mechanism to explain the adaptation phenomenon of MscS. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  19. Resolving mixed mechanisms of protein subdiffusion at the T cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Yonatan; Sherman, Eilon

    2017-06-01

    The plasma membrane is a complex medium where transmembrane proteins diffuse and interact to facilitate cell function. Membrane protein mobility is affected by multiple mechanisms, including crowding, trapping, medium elasticity and structure, thus limiting our ability to distinguish them in intact cells. Here we characterize the mobility and organization of a short transmembrane protein at the plasma membrane of live T cells, using single particle tracking and photoactivated-localization microscopy. Protein mobility is highly heterogeneous, subdiffusive and ergodic-like. Using mobility characteristics, we segment individual trajectories into subpopulations with distinct Gaussian step-size distributions. Particles of low-to-medium mobility consist of clusters, diffusing in a viscoelastic and fractal-like medium and are enriched at the centre of the cell footprint. Particles of high mobility undergo weak confinement and are more evenly distributed. This study presents a methodological approach to resolve simultaneous mixed subdiffusion mechanisms acting on polydispersed samples and complex media such as cell membranes.

  20. Fundamental transport mechanisms, fabrication and potential applications of nanoporous atomically thin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael S. H.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Jang, Doojoon; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-06-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional materials offer a new approach to controlling mass transport at the nanoscale. These materials can sustain nanoscale pores in their rigid lattices and due to their minimum possible material thickness, high mechanical strength and chemical robustness, they could be used to address persistent challenges in membrane separations. Here we discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the emerging field of nanoporous atomically thin membranes, focusing on the fundamental mechanisms of gas- and liquid-phase transport, membrane fabrication techniques and advances towards practical application. We highlight potential functional characteristics of the membranes and discuss applications where they are expected to offer advantages. Finally, we outline the major scientific questions and technological challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap from theoretical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to real-world applications.

  1. Fundamental transport mechanisms, fabrication and potential applications of nanoporous atomically thin membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael S H; Kidambi, Piran R; Jang, Doojoon; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-06-06

    Graphene and other two-dimensional materials offer a new approach to controlling mass transport at the nanoscale. These materials can sustain nanoscale pores in their rigid lattices and due to their minimum possible material thickness, high mechanical strength and chemical robustness, they could be used to address persistent challenges in membrane separations. Here we discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the emerging field of nanoporous atomically thin membranes, focusing on the fundamental mechanisms of gas- and liquid-phase transport, membrane fabrication techniques and advances towards practical application. We highlight potential functional characteristics of the membranes and discuss applications where they are expected to offer advantages. Finally, we outline the major scientific questions and technological challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap from theoretical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to real-world applications.

  2. Molecular mechanism of pore creation in bacterial membranes by amyloid proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsigelny, I F; Sharikov, Y; Miller, M A; Masliah, E

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the mechanism of pore creation in cellular membranes by MccE92 bacterial proteins. The results of this study are then compared with the mechanism of alpha-synuclein (aS)-based pore formation in mammalian cells, and its role in Parkinson's disease.

  3. Fluid transportation mechanisms by a coupled system of elastic membranes and magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Sugiura, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The basic properties of the fluid transportation mechanism that is produced by the coupled waves propagating along a thin elastic membrane covering a magnetic fluid layer in a shallow and long rectangular vessel are investigated. It is shown that the progressive magnetic field induced by the rectangular pulses generates sinusoidal vibration of the displacement of elastic membrane and makes the system work more efficiently than the magnetic field induced by the pulse-width-modulation method

  4. Graphene immobilized enzyme/polyethersulfone mixed matrix membrane: Enhanced antibacterial, permeable and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Linlin; Wang, Yuanming; Zhang, Yatao; Liu, Jindun

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lysozyme was immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced GO (RGO). • The novel hybrid membranes based on lysozyme and graphene were fabricated firstly. • These membranes showed good antibacterial and mechanical performance. - Abstract: Enzyme immobilization has been developed to address lots of issues of free enzyme, such as instability, low activity and difficult to retain. In this study, graphene was used as an ideal carrier for lysozyme immobilization, including graphene oxide (GO) immobilized lysozyme (GO-Ly) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) immobilized lysozyme (CRGO-Ly). Herein, lysozyme as a bio-antibacterial agent has excellent antibacterial performance and the products of its catalysis are safety and nontoxic. Then the immobilized lysozyme materials were blended into polyethersulfone (PES) casting solution to prepare PES ultrafiltration membrane via phase inversion method. GO and CRGO were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Ultraviolet–visible spectrum (UV), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the immobilized lysozyme composites were observed by fluorescent microscopy. The results revealed that GO and CRGO were successfully synthesized and lysozyme was immobilized on their surfaces. The morphology, hydrophilicity, mechanical properties, separation properties and antibacterial activity of the hybrid membranes were characterized in detail. The hydrophilicity, water flux and mechanical strength of the hybrid membranes were significantly enhanced after adding the immobilized lysozyme. In the antibacterial experiment, the hybrid membranes exhibited an effective antibacterial performance against Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  5. Investigation of membrane mechanics using spring networks: application to red-blood-cell modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingzhu; Boyle, Fergal J

    2014-10-01

    In recent years a number of red-blood-cell (RBC) models have been proposed using spring networks to represent the RBC membrane. Some results predicted by these models agree well with experimental measurements. However, the suitability of these membrane models has been questioned. The RBC membrane, like a continuum membrane, is mechanically isotropic throughout its surface, but the mechanical properties of a spring network vary on the network surface and change with deformation. In this work spring-network mechanics are investigated in large deformation for the first time via an assessment of the effect of network parameters, i.e. network mesh, spring type and surface constraint. It is found that a spring network is conditionally equivalent to a continuum membrane. In addition, spring networks are employed for RBC modelling to replicate the optical tweezers test. It is found that a spring network is sufficient for modelling the RBC membrane but strain-hardening springs are required. Moreover, the deformation profile of a spring network is presented for the first time via the degree of shear. It is found that spring-network deformation approaches continuous as the mesh density increases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Membrane lipid peroxidation by UV-A: Mechanism and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, B.; Agarwal, S.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    UV-A produced a dose-dependent linear increase of lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane, as detected by the assay of (i) conjugated dienes, (ii) lipid hydroperoxides, (iii) malondialdehydes (MDA), and (iv) the fluorescent adducts formed by the reaction of MDA with glycine and also a linear dose-dependent increase of [ 14 C]glucose efflux from the liposomes. UV-A-induced MDA production could not be inhibited by any significant degree by sodium formate, dimethyl sulfoxide, EDTA, or superoxide dismutase but was very significantly inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene, alpha-tocopherol, sodium azide, L-histidine, dimethylfuran, and beta-carotene. MDA formation increased with an increase in the D 2 O content in water, leading to a maximal amount of nearly 50% enhancement of lipid peroxidation in 100% D 2 O vis-a-vis water used as dispersion medium. The experimental findings indicate the involvement of singlet oxygen as the initiator of the UV-A-induced lipid peroxidation

  7. Fluid Mechanics of the Vascular Basement Membrane in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Hui, Jonathan; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter; Carare, Roxana; McLeod, Kenneth; Schaffer, David

    2013-11-01

    Beta-amyloid is a normal product of brain metabolic function and is found within the interstitial fluid of the brain. Failure of the clearance of beta-amyloid from the aging brain leads to its accumulation within the walls of arteries and to Alzheimer's disease. The vascular basement membrane (VBM) within the walls of cerebral arteries surrounds the spirally arranged smooth muscle cells and represents an essential pathway for removal of beta-amyloid from the brain. This process fails with the stiffening of arterial walls associated with aging. In this study we hypothesize that the deformation of the VBM associated with arterial pulsations drives the interstitial fluid to drain in the direction opposite of the arterial blood flow. This hypothesis is theoretically investigated by modeling the VBM as a thin, coaxial, fluid-filled porous medium surrounding a periodically deforming cylindrical tube. Flow and boundary conditions required to achieve such a backward clearance are derived through a control volume analysis of mass, momentum, and energy.

  8. Concise Review: Plasma and Nuclear Membranes Convey Mechanical Information to Regulate Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzer, Gunes; Fuchs, Robyn K; Rubin, Janet; Thompson, William R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous factors including chemical, hormonal, spatial, and physical cues determine stem cell fate. While the regulation of stem cell differentiation by soluble factors is well-characterized, the role of mechanical force in the determination of lineage fate is just beginning to be understood. Investigation of the role of force on cell function has largely focused on "outside-in" signaling, initiated at the plasma membrane. When interfaced with the extracellular matrix, the cell uses integral membrane proteins, such as those found in focal adhesion complexes to translate force into biochemical signals. Akin to these outside-in connections, the internal cytoskeleton is physically linked to the nucleus, via proteins that span the nuclear membrane. Although structurally and biochemically distinct, these two forms of mechanical coupling influence stem cell lineage fate and, when disrupted, often lead to disease. Here we provide an overview of how mechanical coupling occurs at the plasma and nuclear membranes. We also discuss the role of force on stem cell differentiation, with focus on the biochemical signals generated at the cell membrane and the nucleus, and how those signals influence various diseases. While the interaction of stem cells with their physical environment and how they respond to force is complex, an understanding of the mechanical regulation of these cells is critical in the design of novel therapeutics to combat diseases associated with aging, cancer, and osteoporosis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1455-1463. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Degradation mechanisms of sulfonated poly-aromatic membranes in fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrot, C.

    2006-11-01

    Fuel cell development requires an improvement in the electrode-membrane assembly durability which depends on both the polymer used and the fuel cell operating conditions. The origin of the degradation can be either electrochemical, chemical and/or mechanical. This study deals with the understanding of alternative membranes ageing mechanisms, i.e. non fluorinated membranes, such as sPEEK and sPI. For this kind of membranes, the first process is chemical. Understanding these mechanisms is the first essential step to develop more stable structures. An original approach is developed to overcome the analytical difficulties encountered with polymers. It consists in studying the degradation mechanism on model structures. Ageing are carried out in water, with H 2 O 2 in some cases (identified as a cause of membrane chemical ageing in the fuel cell system), and at different temperatures. The approach consists in separating the different products formed by chromatography. Then they are identified (NMR, IR, MS) and quantified. This method allows us to establish the ageing mechanism. We show that the ageing of a sPEEK structure mainly results from an attack by end chains which spreads to the whole. This mechanism is confirmed on ex-situ and in-situ aged membranes. These two kinds of ageing lead to an important decrease in polymerisation degree (determined by SEC). Formation of the same degradation products is observed. In fuel cells, a heterogeneous degradation is noticed. It takes place mainly on the cathode side. sPI are known for their high sensitivity to hydrolysis. Nevertheless, we highlight a limited degradation at 80 Celsius degrees due to the recombination of hydrolyzed species at this temperature. (author)

  10. A micromachined membrane-based active probe for biomolecular mechanics measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, H.; Sutanto, J.; Sarangapani, K. K.; Joseph, P.; Degertekin, F. L.; Zhu, C.

    2007-04-01

    A novel micromachined, membrane-based probe has been developed and fabricated as assays to enable parallel measurements. Each probe in the array can be individually actuated, and the membrane displacement can be measured with high resolution using an integrated diffraction-based optical interferometer. To illustrate its application in single-molecule mechanics experiments, this membrane probe was used to measure unbinding forces between L-selectin reconstituted in a polymer-cushioned lipid bilayer on the probe membrane and an antibody adsorbed on an atomic force microscope cantilever. Piconewton range forces between single pairs of interacting molecules were measured from the cantilever bending while using the membrane probe as an actuator. The integrated diffraction-based optical interferometer of the probe was demonstrated to have floor for frequencies as low as 3 Hz with a differential readout scheme. With soft probe membranes, this low noise level would be suitable for direct force measurements without the need for a cantilever. Furthermore, the probe membranes were shown to have 0.5 µm actuation range with a flat response up to 100 kHz, enabling measurements at fast speeds.

  11. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  12. Improving the mechanical properties of collagen-based membranes using silk fibroin for corneal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kai; Liu, Yang; Li, Weichang; Wang, Lin; Liu, Sa; Wang, Yingjun; Wang, Zhichong; Ren, Li

    2015-03-01

    Although collagen with outstanding biocompatibility has promising application in corneal tissue engineering, the mechanical properties of collagen-based scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This article describes a toughness reinforced collagen-based membrane using silk fibroin. The collagen-silk fibroin membranes based on collagen [silk fibroin (w/w) ratios of 100:5, 100:10, and 100:20] were prepared by using silk fibroin and cross-linking by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide. These membranes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and their optical property, and NaCl and tryptophan diffusivity had been tested. The water content was found to be dependent on the content of silk fibroin, and CS10 membrane (loading 10 wt % of silk fibroin) performed the optimal mechanical properties. Also the suture experiments have proved CS10 has high suture retention strength, which can be sutured in rabbit eyes integrally. Moreover, the composite membrane proved good biocompatibility for the proliferation of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Lamellar keratoplasty shows that CS10 membrane promoted complete epithelialization in 35 ± 5 days, and their transparency is restored quickly in the first month. Corneal rejection reaction, neovascularization, and keratoconus are not observed. The composite films show potential for use in the field of corneal tissue engineering. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Antimicrobial mechanism of flavonoids against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 by model membrane study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mengying; Wu, Ting; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun, E-mail: xiaoyunxu88@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antimicrobial mechanism of four flavonoids (kaempferol, hesperitin, (+)-catechin hydrate, biochanin A) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was investigated through cell membranes and a liposome model. The release of bacterial protein and images from transmission electron microscopy demonstrated damage to the E. coli ATCC 25922 membrane. A liposome model with dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) (0.6 molar ratio) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) (0.4 molar ratio), representative of the phospholipid membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922, was used to specify the mode of action of four selected flavonoids through Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is suggested that for flavonoids, to be effective antimicrobials, interaction with the polar head-group of the model membrane followed by penetration into the hydrophobic regions must occur. The antimicrobial efficacies of the flavonoids were consistent with liposome interaction activities, kaempferol > hesperitin > (+)-catechin hydrate > biochanin A. This study provides a liposome model capable of mimicking the cell membrane of E. coli ATCC 25922. The findings are important in understanding the antibacterial mechanism on cell membranes.

  14. Development of an in vivo visual robot system with a magnetic anchoring mechanism and a lens cleaning mechanism for laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Haibo; Dong, Dinghui; Ma, Tengfei; Zhuang, Jinlei; Fu, Yili; Lv, Yi; Li, Liyi

    2017-12-01

    Surgical robot systems which can significantly improve surgical procedures have been widely used in laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS). For a relative complex surgical procedure, the development of an in vivo visual robot system for LESS can effectively improve the visualization for surgical robot systems. In this work, an in vivo visual robot system with a new mechanism for LESS was investigated. A finite element method (FEM) analysis was carried out to ensure the safety of the in vivo visual robot during the movement, which was the most important concern for surgical purposes. A master-slave control strategy was adopted, in which the control model was established by off-line experiments. The in vivo visual robot system was verified by using a phantom box. The experiment results show that the robot system can successfully realize the expected functionalities and meet the demands of LESS. The experiment results indicate that the in vivo visual robot with high manipulability has great potential in clinical application. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Peptide-Mediated Liposome Fusion: The Effect of Anchor Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niek S. A. Crone

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A minimal model system for membrane fusion, comprising two complementary peptides dubbed “E” and “K” joined to a cholesterol anchor via a polyethyleneglycol spacer, has previously been developed in our group. This system promotes the fusion of large unilamellar vesicles and facilitates liposome-cell fusion both in vitro and in vivo. Whilst several aspects of the system have previously been investigated to provide an insight as to how fusion is facilitated, anchor positioning has not yet been considered. In this study, the effects of placing the anchor at either the N-terminus or in the center of the peptide are investigated using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence assays. It was discovered that anchoring the “K” peptide in the center of the sequence had no effect on its structure, its ability to interact with membranes, or its ability to promote fusion, whereas anchoring the ‘E’ peptide in the middle of the sequence dramatically decreases fusion efficiency. We postulate that anchoring the ‘E’ peptide in the middle of the sequence disrupts its ability to form homodimers with peptides on the same membrane, leading to aggregation and content leakage.

  16. Large deformation contact mechanics of a pressurized long rectangular membrane. II. Adhesive contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2013-01-01

    In part I of this work, we presented a theory for adhesionless contact of a pressurized neo-Hookean plane-strain membrane to a rigid substrate. Here, we extend our theory to include adhesion using a fracture mechanics approach. This theory is used to study contact hysteresis commonly observed in experiments. Detailed analysis is carried out to highlight the differences between frictionless and no-slip contact. Membrane detachment is found to be strongly dependent on adhesion: for low adhesion, the membrane ‘pinches-off’, whereas for large adhesions, it detaches unstably at finite contact (‘pull-off’). Expressions are derived for the critical adhesion needed for pinch-off to pull-off transition. Above a threshold adhesion, the membrane exhibits bistability, two stable states at zero applied pressure. The condition for bistability for both frictionless and no-slip boundary conditions is obtained explicitly. PMID:24353472

  17. Theoretical description of quantum mechanical permeation of graphene membranes by charged hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, James W.; Haut, Nathaniel K.

    2018-06-01

    It has been recently shown that in the presence of an applied voltage, hydrogen and deuterium nuclei can be separated from one another using graphene membranes as a nuclear sieve, resulting in a 10-fold enhancement in the concentration of the lighter isotope. While previous studies, both experimental and theoretical, have attributed this effect mostly to differences in vibrational zero point energy (ZPE) of the various isotopes near the membrane surface, we propose that multi-dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling of nuclei through the graphene membrane influences this proton permeation process in a fundamental way. We perform ring polymer molecular dynamics calculations in which we include both ZPE and tunneling effects of various hydrogen isotopes as they permeate the graphene membrane and compute rate constants across a range of temperatures near 300 K. While capturing the experimentally observed separation factor, our calculations indicate that the transverse motion of the various isotopes across the surface of the graphene membrane is an essential part of this sieving mechanism. An understanding of the multi-dimensional quantum mechanical nature of this process could serve to guide the design of other such isotopic enrichment processes for a variety of atomic and molecular species of interest.

  18. Theoretical description of quantum mechanical permeation of graphene membranes by charged hydrogen isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, James W; Haut, Nathaniel K

    2018-06-14

    It has been recently shown that in the presence of an applied voltage, hydrogen and deuterium nuclei can be separated from one another using graphene membranes as a nuclear sieve, resulting in a 10-fold enhancement in the concentration of the lighter isotope. While previous studies, both experimental and theoretical, have attributed this effect mostly to differences in vibrational zero point energy (ZPE) of the various isotopes near the membrane surface, we propose that multi-dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling of nuclei through the graphene membrane influences this proton permeation process in a fundamental way. We perform ring polymer molecular dynamics calculations in which we include both ZPE and tunneling effects of various hydrogen isotopes as they permeate the graphene membrane and compute rate constants across a range of temperatures near 300 K. While capturing the experimentally observed separation factor, our calculations indicate that the transverse motion of the various isotopes across the surface of the graphene membrane is an essential part of this sieving mechanism. An understanding of the multi-dimensional quantum mechanical nature of this process could serve to guide the design of other such isotopic enrichment processes for a variety of atomic and molecular species of interest.

  19. Mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 ion channels can be tuned by cellular membrane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amanda H; Grandl, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels mediate the conversion of mechanical forces into electrical signals and are critical for responsiveness to touch in metazoans. The apparent mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1 varies substantially across cellular environments, stimulating methods and protocols, raising the fundamental questions of what precise physical stimulus activates the channel and how its stimulus sensitivity is regulated. Here, we measured Piezo1 currents evoked by membrane stretch in three patch configurations, while simultaneously visualizing and measuring membrane geometry. Building on this approach, we developed protocols to minimize resting membrane curvature and tension prior to probing Piezo1 activity. We find that Piezo1 responds to lateral membrane tension with exquisite sensitivity as compared to other mechanically activated channels and that resting tension can drive channel inactivation, thereby tuning overall mechanical sensitivity of Piezo1. Our results explain how Piezo1 can function efficiently and with adaptable sensitivity as a sensor of mechanical stimulation in diverse cellular contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12088.001 PMID:26646186

  20. Membrane Fluidity Changes, A Basic Mechanism of Interaction of Gravity with Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Florian; Hauslage, Jens; Hanke, Wolfgang

    2017-10-01

    All life on earth has been established under conditions of stable gravity of 1g. Nevertheless, in numerous experiments the direct gravity dependence of biological processes has been shown on all levels of organization, from single molecules to humans. According to the underlying mechanisms a variety of questions, especially about gravity sensation of single cells without specialized organelles or structures for gravity sensing is being still open. Biological cell membranes are complex structures containing mainly lipids and proteins. Functional aspects of such membranes are usually attributed to membrane integral proteins. This is also correct for the gravity dependence of cells and organisms which is well accepted since long for a wide range of biological systems. However, it is as well established that parameters of the lipid matrix are directly modifying the function of proteins. Thus, the question must be asked, whether, and how far plain lipid membranes are affected by gravity directly. In principle it can be said that up to recently no real basic mechanism for gravity perception in single cells has been presented or verified. However, it now has been shown that as a basic membrane parameter, membrane fluidity, is significantly dependent on gravity. This finding might deliver a real basic mechanism for gravity perception of living organisms on all scales. In this review we summarize older and more recent results to demonstrate that the finding of membrane fluidity being gravity dependent is consistent with a variety of published laboratory experiments. We additionally point out to the consequences of these recent results for research in the field life science under space condition.

  1. Physico-mechanical and structural properties of eggshell membrane gelatin- chitosan blend edible films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Reza; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Rouhi, Milad

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the physico-mechanical and structural properties of composite edible films based on eggshell membrane gelatin (G) and chitosan (Ch) (75G:25Ch, 50G:50Ch, 25G:75Ch). The results demonstrated that the addition of Ch increased elongation at break significantly (p< 0.05), but r......This study investigated the physico-mechanical and structural properties of composite edible films based on eggshell membrane gelatin (G) and chitosan (Ch) (75G:25Ch, 50G:50Ch, 25G:75Ch). The results demonstrated that the addition of Ch increased elongation at break significantly (p... interactions introduced by the addition of chitosan to eggshell membrane gelatin as new resources could improve the films’ functional properties....

  2. Mechanical compression of a fibrous membrane surrounding bone causes bone resorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vis, H. M.; Aspenberg, P.; Tigchelaar, W.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    Early micromovement and migration of a prosthesis of a hip or knee predicts late clinical loosening of the prosthesis. Such migration is likely to be associated with mechanical compression of the fibrous membrane interpositioned between bone and prosthesis during movement. Compression of the fibrous

  3. In-plane mechanics of soft architectured fibre-reinforced silicone rubber membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, L; Toungara, M; Orgéas, L; Bertrand, E; Deplano, V; Geindreau, C

    2014-12-01

    Silicone rubber membranes reinforced with architectured fibre networks were processed with a dedicated apparatus, allowing a control of the fibre content and orientation. The membranes were subjected to tensile loadings combined with continuous and discrete kinematical field measurements (DIC and particle tracking). These tests show that the mechanical behaviour of the membranes is hyperelastic at the first order. They highlight the influence of the fibre content and orientation on both the membrane in-plane deformation and stress levels. They also prove that for the considered fibrous architectures and mechanical loadings, the motion and deformation of fibres is an affine function of the macroscale transformation. These trends are fairly well described by the micromechanical model proposed recently in Bailly et al. (JMBBM, 2012). This result proves that these materials are very good candidates for new biomimetic membranes, e.g. to improve aortic analogues used for in vitro experiments, or existing textiles used for vascular (endo)prostheses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A wrinkle in flight: the role of elastin fibres in the mechanical behaviour of bat wing membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Jorn A; Konow, Nicolai; Bearnot, Andrew; Swartz, Sharon M

    2015-05-06

    Bats fly using a thin wing membrane composed of compliant, anisotropic skin. Wing membrane skin deforms dramatically as bats fly, and its three-dimensional configurations depend, in large part, on the mechanical behaviour of the tissue. Large, macroscopic elastin fibres are an unusual mechanical element found in the skin of bat wings. We characterize the fibre orientation and demonstrate that elastin fibres are responsible for the distinctive wrinkles in the surrounding membrane matrix. Uniaxial mechanical testing of the wing membrane, both parallel and perpendicular to elastin fibres, is used to distinguish the contribution of elastin and the surrounding matrix to the overall membrane mechanical behaviour. We find that the matrix is isotropic within the plane of the membrane and responsible for bearing load at high stress; elastin fibres are responsible for membrane anisotropy and only contribute substantially to load bearing at very low stress. The architecture of elastin fibres provides the extreme extensibility and self-folding/self-packing of the wing membrane skin. We relate these findings to flight with membrane wings and discuss the aeromechanical significance of elastin fibre pre-stress, membrane excess length, and how these parameters may aid bats in resisting gusts and preventing membrane flutter. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Anchoring Proteins as Regulators of Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, Alessia; Ghigo, Alessandra; Scott, John D.; Hirsch, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and temporal organization of signal transduction is coordinated through the segregation of signaling enzymes in selected cellular compartments. This highly evolved regulatory mechanism ensures the activation of selected enzymes only in the vicinity of their target proteins. In this context, cAMP-responsive triggering of protein kinase A is modulated by a family of scaffold proteins referred to as A-kinase anchoring proteins. A-kinase anchoring proteins form the core of multiprotein complexes and enable simultaneous but segregated cAMP signaling events to occur in defined cellular compartments. In this review we will focus on the description of A-kinase anchoring protein function in the regulation of cardiac physiopathology. PMID:22859670

  6. Mechanism of the lysosomal membrane enzyme acetyl coenzyme A: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bame, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA:α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase is a lysosomal membrane enzyme, deficient in the genetic disease Sanfilippo C syndrome. The enzyme catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA to terminal α-glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate within the organelle. The reaction mechanism was examined using high purified lysosomal membranes from rat liver and human fibroblasts. The N-acetyltransferase reaction is optimal above pH 5.5 and a 2-3 fold stimulation of activity is observed in the presence of 0.1% taurodeoxycholate. Double reciprocal analysis and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme works by a Di-Iso Ping Pong Bi Bi mechanism. The binding of acetyl-CoA to the enzyme is measured by exchange label from [ 3 H]CoA to acetyl-CoA, and is optimal at pH's above 7.0. The acetyl-enzyme intermediate is formed by incubating membranes with [ 3 H]acetyl-CoA. The acetyl group can be transferred to glucosamine, forming [ 3 H]N-acetylglucosamine; the transfer is optimal between pH 4 and 5. Lysosomal membranes from Sanfilippo C fibroblasts confirm that these half reactions carried out by the N-acetyltransferase. The enzyme is inactivated by N-bromosuccinimide and diethylpyrocarbonate, indicating that a histidine is involved in the reaction. These results suggest that the histidine residue is at the active site of the enzyme. The properties of the N-acetyltransferase in the membrane, the characterization of the enzyme kinetics, the chemistry of a histidine mediated acetylation and the pH difference across the lysosomal membrane all support a transmembrane acetylation mechanism

  7. Pore formation mechanism of porous poly(DL-lactic acid) matrix membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai, E-mail: tphaechamud011@yahoo.com; Chitrattha, Sasiprapa, E-mail: sasi_toey@hotmail.com

    2016-04-01

    Porous PLA structure has been widely used in cell transplantation, drug carrier and wound dressing. The porous structure can be controlled depending on the choice of the polymer, solvent, nonsolvent and preparation parameters. In this study, the porous PLA matrix membranes were prepared by adding PEG 400 in PLA solution using dichloromethane (DCM) as solvent prior to casting. The influence of other liquids as co-solvent on pore formation and the structural change during membrane formation were evaluated. The co-solvents affected both porous topography and mechanical properties of PLA membrane. The porous matrix were produced when the non-solvent of PLA was used as co-solvent. Cryo-SEM micrographs revealed that PEG 400 still remained in the PLA porous matrix membrane. From the tracking of the structural change during film formation, the PLA–PEG solution changed into porous structure by liquid liquid phase separation and solidification processes, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that PLA–PEG in DCM solution exhibited the two-step of weight loss, the first step occurred from DCM evaporation and the second step occurred from the degradation of PLA–PEG matrix. The liquid–liquid phase separation and solidification started when the amount of DCM was higher than PEG 400 for 2.67 folds and DCM amount was equal to that of PEG 400, respectively. These results could clarify the pore formation mechanism of porous PLA membrane and will be useful for the further investigation and application. - Highlights: • Pore formation mechanism of PLA matrix membrane inducing by PEG 400 addition was investigated. • Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed the embedded PEG 400 in matrix membrane. • Tracking of structural change during membrane formation with stereomicroscope and thermogravimetric analysis could explain the pore formation mechanism. • Liquid-liquid phase separation of PLA-PEG 400 solution started when the amount of dichloromethane remained 2

  8. Pore formation mechanism of porous poly(DL-lactic acid) matrix membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Chitrattha, Sasiprapa

    2016-01-01

    Porous PLA structure has been widely used in cell transplantation, drug carrier and wound dressing. The porous structure can be controlled depending on the choice of the polymer, solvent, nonsolvent and preparation parameters. In this study, the porous PLA matrix membranes were prepared by adding PEG 400 in PLA solution using dichloromethane (DCM) as solvent prior to casting. The influence of other liquids as co-solvent on pore formation and the structural change during membrane formation were evaluated. The co-solvents affected both porous topography and mechanical properties of PLA membrane. The porous matrix were produced when the non-solvent of PLA was used as co-solvent. Cryo-SEM micrographs revealed that PEG 400 still remained in the PLA porous matrix membrane. From the tracking of the structural change during film formation, the PLA–PEG solution changed into porous structure by liquid liquid phase separation and solidification processes, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that PLA–PEG in DCM solution exhibited the two-step of weight loss, the first step occurred from DCM evaporation and the second step occurred from the degradation of PLA–PEG matrix. The liquid–liquid phase separation and solidification started when the amount of DCM was higher than PEG 400 for 2.67 folds and DCM amount was equal to that of PEG 400, respectively. These results could clarify the pore formation mechanism of porous PLA membrane and will be useful for the further investigation and application. - Highlights: • Pore formation mechanism of PLA matrix membrane inducing by PEG 400 addition was investigated. • Cryo-scanning electron microscopy revealed the embedded PEG 400 in matrix membrane. • Tracking of structural change during membrane formation with stereomicroscope and thermogravimetric analysis could explain the pore formation mechanism. • Liquid-liquid phase separation of PLA-PEG 400 solution started when the amount of dichloromethane remained 2

  9. Light-activated control of protein channel assembly mediated by membrane mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.; Findlay, Heather E.; Ces, Oscar; Templer, Richard H.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-12-01

    Photochemical processes provide versatile triggers of chemical reactions. Here, we use a photoactivated lipid switch to modulate the folding and assembly of a protein channel within a model biological membrane. In contrast to the information rich field of water-soluble protein folding, there is only a limited understanding of the assembly of proteins that are integral to biological membranes. It is however possible to exploit the foreboding hydrophobic lipid environment and control membrane protein folding via lipid bilayer mechanics. Mechanical properties such as lipid chain lateral pressure influence the insertion and folding of proteins in membranes, with different stages of folding having contrasting sensitivities to the bilayer properties. Studies to date have relied on altering bilayer properties through lipid compositional changes made at equilibrium, and thus can only be made before or after folding. We show that light-activation of photoisomerisable di-(5-[[4-(4-butylphenyl)azo]phenoxy]pentyl)phosphate (4-Azo-5P) lipids influences the folding and assembly of the pentameric bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL. The use of a photochemical reaction enables the bilayer properties to be altered during folding, which is unprecedented. This mechanical manipulation during folding, allows for optimisation of different stages of the component insertion, folding and assembly steps within the same lipid system. The photochemical approach offers the potential to control channel assembly when generating synthetic devices that exploit the mechanosensitive protein as a nanovalve.

  10. The molecular mechanisms of plant plasma membrane intrinsic proteins trafficking and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Ji-long; Feng, Xiu-xiu; Li, Hong-jie; Zhang, Gen-fa

    2017-04-20

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are plant channel proteins located on the plasma membrane. PIPs transfer water, CO 2 and small uncharged solutes through the plasma membrane. PIPs have high selectivity to substrates, suggestive of a central role in maintaining cellular water balance. The expression, activity and localization of PIPs are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, and also affected by environmental factors. Numerous studies indicate that the expression patterns and localizations of PIPs can change in response to abiotic stresses. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of PIP trafficking, transcriptional and post-translational regulations, and abiotic stress responses. Moreover, we also discuss the current research trends and future directions on PIPs.

  11. Infection-Induced Thrombin Production: A Potential Novel Mechanism for Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes (PPROM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liping; Allen, Terrence K; Marinello, William P; Murtha, Amy P

    2018-04-13

    decidua cells was perinuclear and cytoplasmic. Prothrombin mRNA and protein expression in fetal membranes was significantly increased by U. parvum, but not lipopolysaccharide, treatments in a dose-dependent manner. Specifically, U. parvum at a dose of 1x10 7 cfu/ml significantly increased both prothrombin mRNA (fold changes in amnion: 4.1±1.9; chorion: 5.7±4.2; decidua: 10.0±5.4; FM: 9.2±3.0) and protein expression (fold changes in amnion: 138.0±44.0; chorion: 139.6±15.1; decidua: 56.9±29.1; fetal membrane: 133.1±40.0) compared to untreated controls. U. parvum at a dose of 1x10 6 cfu/ml significantly upregulated prothrombin protein expression in chorion cells (fold change: 54.9±5.3) and prothrombin mRNA expression in decidua cells (fold change: 4.4±1.9). Our results demonstrate that prothrombin can be directly produced by fetal membrane amnion, chorion, and decidua cells. Further, prothrombin production can be stimulated by U. parvum exposure in fetal membranes. These findings represent a potential novel underlying mechanism of U. parvum-induced rupture of fetal membranes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The mechanism of uncoupling by picrate in Escherichia coli K-12 membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, M; Bakker, E P

    1981-06-01

    The mechanism of action of the uncoupler picrate on intact cells and everted membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli K-12 was investigated. Like in mitochondria [Hanstein, W. G. and Hatefi, Y. (1974) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 71, 288-292], it was observed that picrate uncoupled energy-linked functions only in everted, but not in intact membrane systems. In the vesicles picrate also decreased the magnitude of the transmembrane proton-motive force at concentrations similar to those at which it caused uncoupling. Experiments with 14C-labelled picrate showed that this compound bound both to deenergized intact cells and everted vesicles. However, upon energization of the membrane, picrate was extruded from the intact cell and taken up to a larger extent by the vesicles. These energy-dependent changes in picrate uptake correlated with the magnitude of the transmembrane electrical potential, delta psi. It is therefore proposed that picrate is a permeant uncoupler, that delta psi is the driving force for picrate movement across biological membranes, and that the uncoupling activity of picrate in everted membrane systems is due to its protonophoric action.

  13. Perturbation of host-cell membrane is a primary mechanism of HIV cytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, M W; Lynn, W S

    1991-04-01

    Cytopathic viruses injure cells by a number of different mechanisms. The mechanism by which HIV-1 injures T cells was studied by temporally examining host-cell macromolecular syntheses, stages of the cell cycle, and membrane permeability following acute infection. T cells cytopathically infected at an m.o.i. of 1-5 grew normally for 24-72 hr, depending on the cell line, followed by the first manifestation of cell injury, slowing of cell division. At that time significant amounts of unintegrated HIV DNA and p24 core protein became detectable, and acridine orange flow cytometric cell cycle studies demonstrated the presence of fewer cells in the G2/M stage of the cell cycle. There was no change in the frequency of cells in the S-stage, and metabolic pulsing with radioactive precursors demonstrated that host-cell DNA, RNA, and protein syntheses were normal at that time and normal up to the time cells started to die (approximately 24 hr later), when all three decreased. Cellular lipid synthesis, however, was perturbed when cell multiplication slowed, with phospholipid synthesis reduced and neutral lipid synthesis enhanced. Permeability of the host-cell membrane to small molecules, such as Ca2+ and sucrose, was slightly enhanced early postinfection, and by the time of slowing of cell division, host membrane permeability was greatly increased to both Ca2+ and sucrose (Stokes radius 5.2 A) but not to inulin (Stokes radium 20 A). These changes in host-cell membrane permeability and phospholipid synthesis were not observed in acutely infected H9 cells, which are not susceptible to HIV cytopathology. Thus, HIV-1 appeared to predominantly injure T cells by perturbing host-cell membrane permeability and lipid synthesis, which is similar to the cytopathic mechanisms of paramyxoviruses.

  14. Development of membrane mechanical function during terminal stages of primitive erythropoiesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Richard E; Huang, Yu-Shan; Arif, Binish J; Bauserman, Richard; Palis, James

    2013-04-01

    During murine embryogenesis, primitive erythroblasts enter the circulation as immature nucleated cells and progressively mature as a semisynchronous cohort, enucleating between E12.5 and E16.5. In this report, we examine the mechanical properties of these cells to determine how their mechanical development differs from that of definitive erythroid cells, which mature extravascularly in protected marrow microenvironments. Primitive erythroid cells acquire normal membrane deformability by E12.5 (i.e., as late stage erythroblasts) and maintain the same level of surface stiffness through E17.5. During this same period, the strength of association between the membrane bilayer and the underlying skeleton increases, as indicated by an approximate doubling of the energy required to separate bilayer from skeleton. At the same time, these cells undergo dramatic changes in surface area and volume, losing 35% of their surface area and 50% of their volume from E14.5 to E17.5. Interestingly, membrane remodeling proceeded regardless of whether the cells completed enucleation. These data suggest that in primitive erythroid cells, unlike their definitive counterparts, the critical maturational processes of membrane remodeling and enucleation are uncoupled. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Solution structure and elevator mechanism of the membrane electron transporter CcdA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunpeng; Bushweller, John H

    2018-02-01

    Membrane oxidoreductase CcdA plays a central role in supplying reducing equivalents from the bacterial cytoplasm to the envelope. It transports electrons across the membrane using a single pair of cysteines by a mechanism that has not yet been elucidated. Here we report an NMR structure of the Thermus thermophilus CcdA (TtCcdA) in an oxidized and outward-facing state. CcdA consists of two inverted structural repeats of three transmembrane helices (2 × 3-TM). We computationally modeled and experimentally validated an inward-facing state, which suggests that CcdA uses an elevator-type movement to shuttle the reactive cysteines across the membrane. CcdA belongs to the LysE superfamily, and thus its structure may be relevant to other LysE clan transporters. Structure comparisons of CcdA, semiSWEET, Pnu, and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters provide insights into membrane transporter architecture and mechanism.

  16. Mechanism of action of anions on the electron transport chain in thylakoid membranes of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Rawal, Pooja; Zsiros, Ottó; Bharti, Sudhakar; Garab, Gyozo; Jajoo, Anjana

    2011-04-01

    With an aim to improve our understanding of the mechanisms behind specific anion effects in biological membranes, we have studied the effects of sodium salts of anions of varying valency in thylakoid membranes. Rates of electron transport of PS II and PS I, 77K fluorescence emission and excitation spectra, cyclic electron flow around PS I and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were measured in thylakoid membranes in order to elucidate a general mechanism of action of inorganic anions on photosynthetic electron transport chain. Re-distribution of absorbed excitation energy has been observed as a signature effect of inorganic anions. In the presence of anions, such as nitrite, sulphate and phosphate, distribution of absorbed excitation energy was found to be more in favor of Photosystem I (PS I). The amount of energy distributed towards PS I depended on the valency of the anion. In this paper, we propose for the first time that energy re-distribution and its valence dependence may not be the effect of anions per se. The entry of negative charge (anion) is accompanied by influx of positive charge (protons) to maintain a balance of charge across the thylakoid membranes. As reflected by the CD spectra, the observed energy re-distribution could be a result of structural rearrangements of the protein complexes of PS II caused by changes in the ionic environment of the thylakoid lumen.

  17. RELATION BETWEEN MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE OF PHENOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN FOR GAS SEPARATION MEMBRANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONIKA ŠUPOVÁ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper has been to characterize the relation between the pyrolysis temperature of phenol-formaldehyde resin, the development of a porous structure, and the mechanical properties for the application of semipermeable membranes for gas separation. No previous study has dealt with this problem in its entirety. Phenol-formaldehyde resin showed an increasing trend toward micropore porosity in the temperature range from 500 till 1000°C, together with closure of mesopores and macropores. Samples cured and pyrolyzed at 1000°C pronounced hysteresis of desorption branch. The ultimate bending strength was measured using a four-point arrangement that is more suitable for measuring of brittle materials. The chevron notch technique was used for determination the fracture toughness. The results for mechanical properties indicated that phenol-formaldehyde resin pyrolyzates behaved similarly to ceramic materials. The data obtained for the material can be used for calculating the technical design of gas separation membranes.

  18. The molecular mechanism of Zinc acquisition by the neisserial outer-membrane transporter ZnuD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmettes, Charles; Ing, Christopher; Buckwalter, Carolyn M.; El Bakkouri, Majida; Chieh-Lin Lai, Christine; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Gray-Owen, Scott D.; Pomès, Régis; Moraes, Trevor F.

    2015-01-01

    Invading bacteria from the Neisseriaceae, Acinetobacteriaceae, Bordetellaceae and Moraxellaceae families express the conserved outer-membrane zinc transporter zinc-uptake component D (ZnuD) to overcome nutritional restriction imposed by the host organism during infection. Here we demonstrate that ZnuD is required for efficient systemic infections by the causative agent of bacterial meningitis, Neisseria meningitidis, in a mouse model. We also combine X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the mechanism of zinc recognition and transport across the bacterial outer-membrane by ZnuD. Because ZnuD is also considered a promising vaccine candidate against N. meningitidis, we use several ZnuD structural intermediates to map potential antigenic epitopes, and propose a mechanism by which ZnuD can maintain high sequence conservation yet avoid immune recognition by altering the conformation of surface-exposed loops. PMID:26282243

  19. Relation between Mechanical Properties and Pyrolysis Temperature of Phenol Formaldehyde Resin for Gas Separation Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šupová, Monika; Svítilová, Jaroslava; Chlup, Zdeněk; Černý, Martin; Weishauptová, Zuzana; Suchý, Tomáš; Machovič, Vladimír; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Žaloudková, Margit

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2012), s. 40-49 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1327 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : glassy carbon * membranes * mechanical properties Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2012 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2012/pdf/2012_01_40.pdf

  20. A novel experimental mechanics method for measuring the light pressure acting on a solar sail membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Aiming; Jiang, Li; Dowell, Earl H.; Qin, Zhixuan

    2017-02-01

    Solar sail is a high potential `sailing craft' for interstellar exploration. The area of the first flight solar sail demonstrator named "IKAROS" is 200 square meters. Future interplanetary missions will require solar sails at least on the order of 10000 square meters (or larger). Due to the limitation of ground facilities, the size of experimental sample should not be large. Furthermore the ground experiments have to be conducted in gravitational field, so the gravity effect must be considered in a ground test. To obtain insight into the solar sail membrane dynamics, a key membrane flutter (or limit cycle oscillations) experiment with light forces acting on it must be done. But one big challenge is calibrating such a tiny light force by as a function of the input power. In this paper, a gravity-based measuring method for light pressure acting on membrane is presented. To explain the experimental principle, an ideal example of a laser beam with expanders and a metal film is studied. Based on calculations, this experimental mechanics method for calibrating light pressure with an accuracy of 0.01 micro-Newton may be realized by making the light force balance the gravity force on the metal films. This gravity-based measuring method could not only be applied to study the dynamics characteristics of solar sail membrane structure with different light forces, but could also be used to determine more accurate light forces/loads acting on solar sail films and hence to enhance the determination of the mechanical properties of the solar sail membrane structure.

  1. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Hameed

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR, however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25 and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7 genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron

  2. Composition, structure and mechanical properties define performance of pulmonary surfactant membranes and films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Perez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    of breathing and avoiding alveolar collapse, especially at the end of expiration. The goal of the present review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the structure, lipid-protein interactions and mechanical features of surfactant membranes and films and how these properties correlate with surfactant...... biological function inside the lungs. Surfactant mechanical properties can be severely compromised by different agents, which lead to surfactant inhibition and ultimately contributes to the development of pulmonary disorders and pathologies in newborns, children and adults. A detailed comprehension...

  3. Silver nanoparticles embedded in zeolite membranes: release of silver ions and mechanism of antibacterial action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Amber; Harrison, Alistair; Sabbani, Supriya; Munson, Robert S; Dutta, Prabir K; Waldman, W James

    2011-01-01

    Background The focus of this study is on the antibacterial properties of silver nanoparticles embedded within a zeolite membrane (AgNP-ZM). Methods and Results These membranes were effective in killing Escherichia coli and were bacteriostatic against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. E. coli suspended in Luria Bertani (LB) broth and isolated from physical contact with the membrane were also killed. Elemental analysis indicated slow release of Ag+ from the AgNP-ZM into the LB broth. The E. coli killing efficiency of AgNP-ZM was found to decrease with repeated use, and this was correlated with decreased release of silver ions with each use of the support. Gene expression microarrays revealed upregulation of several antioxidant genes as well as genes coding for metal transport, metal reduction, and ATPase pumps in response to silver ions released from AgNP-ZM. Gene expression of iron transporters was reduced, and increased expression of ferrochelatase was observed. In addition, upregulation of multiple antibiotic resistance genes was demonstrated. The expression levels of multicopper oxidase, glutaredoxin, and thioredoxin decreased with each support use, reflecting the lower amounts of Ag+ released from the membrane. The antibacterial mechanism of AgNP-ZM is proposed to be related to the exhaustion of antioxidant capacity. Conclusion These results indicate that AgNP-ZM provide a novel matrix for gradual release of Ag+. PMID:21931480

  4. Mechanism underlying the inner membrane retention of Escherichia coli lipoproteins caused by Lol avoidance signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takashi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2003-10-10

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or outer membrane depending on the residue at position 2. The inner membrane retention signal, Asp at position 2 in combination with certain residues at position 3, functions as a Lol avoidance signal, i.e. the signal inhibits the recognition of lipoproteins by LolCDE that releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane. To understand the role of the residue at position 2, outer membrane-specific lipoproteins with Cys at position 2 were subjected to chemical modification followed by the release reaction in reconstituted proteoliposomes. Sulfhydryl-specific introduction of nonprotein molecules or a negative charge to Cys did not inhibit the LolCDE-dependent release. In contrast, oxidation of Cys to cysteic acid resulted in generation of the Lol avoidance signal, indicating that the Lol avoidance signal requires a critical length of negative charge at the second residue. Furthermore, not only modification of the carboxylic acid of Asp at position 2 but also that of the amine of phosphatidylethanolamine abolished the Lol avoidance function. Based on these results, the Lol avoidance mechanism is discussed.

  5. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  6. Degradation mechanisms of sulfonated poly-aromatic membranes in fuel cell; Mecanismes de degradation des membranes polyaromatiques sulfonees en pile a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrot, C

    2006-11-15

    Fuel cell development requires an improvement in the electrode-membrane assembly durability which depends on both the polymer used and the fuel cell operating conditions. The origin of the degradation can be either electrochemical, chemical and/or mechanical. This study deals with the understanding of alternative membranes ageing mechanisms, i.e. non fluorinated membranes, such as sPEEK and sPI. For this kind of membranes, the first process is chemical. Understanding these mechanisms is the first essential step to develop more stable structures. An original approach is developed to overcome the analytical difficulties encountered with polymers. It consists in studying the degradation mechanism on model structures. Ageing are carried out in water, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in some cases (identified as a cause of membrane chemical ageing in the fuel cell system), and at different temperatures. The approach consists in separating the different products formed by chromatography. Then they are identified (NMR, IR, MS) and quantified. This method allows us to establish the ageing mechanism. We show that the ageing of a sPEEK structure mainly results from an attack by end chains which spreads to the whole. This mechanism is confirmed on ex-situ and in-situ aged membranes. These two kinds of ageing lead to an important decrease in polymerisation degree (determined by SEC). Formation of the same degradation products is observed. In fuel cells, a heterogeneous degradation is noticed. It takes place mainly on the cathode side. sPI are known for their high sensitivity to hydrolysis. Nevertheless, we highlight a limited degradation at 80 Celsius degrees due to the recombination of hydrolyzed species at this temperature. (author)

  7. Fiber Temperature Sensor Based on Micro-mechanical Membranes and Optical Interference Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueming; Tian Weijian; Hua Jing

    2011-01-01

    A novel fiber temperature sensor is presented theoretically and experimentally in this paper. Its working principle is based on Optical Fabry-Perot interference structure that is formed between a polished optical fiber end and micro-mechanical Bi-layered membranes. When ambient temperature is varying, Bi-layered membranes will be deflected and the length of Fabry-Perot cavity will be changed correspondingly. By detecting the reflecting optical intensity from the Fabry-Perot cavity, the ambient temperature can be measured. Using finite element software ANSYS, the sensor structure was optimized based on optical Interference theory and Bi-layered membranes thermal expansion theory, and theoretical characteristics was simulated by computer software. In the end, using optical fiber 2x2 coupler and photo-electrical detector, the fabricated sample sensor was tested successfully by experiment that demonstrating above theoretical analysis and simulation results. This sensor has some favorable features, such as: micro size owing to its micro-mechanical structure, high sensitivity owing to its working Fabry-Perot interference cavity structure, and optical integration character by using optical fiber techniques.

  8. Mechanism of blue-light-induced plasma-membrane depolarization in etiolated cucumber hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A large, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane precedes the rapid blue-light (BL)-induced growth suppression in etiolated seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. The mechanism of this voltage transient was investigated by applying inhibitors of ion channels and the plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase, by manipulating extracellular ion concentrations, and by measuring cell input resistance and ATP levels. The depolarizing phase was not affected by Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil, La3+) or by reducing extracellular free Ca2+ by treatment with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). However, these treatments did reduce the rate of repolarization, indicating an inward movement of Ca2+ is involved. No effects of the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA+) were detected. Vanadate and KCN, used to inhibit the H(+)-ATPase, reduced or completely inhibited the BL-induced depolarization. Levels of ATP increased by 11-26% after 1-2 min of BL. Input resistance of trichrome cells, measured with double-barreled microelectrodes, remained constant during the onset of the depolarization but decreased as the membrane voltage became more positive than -90 mV. The results indicate that the depolarization mechanism initially involves inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase with subsequent transient activation of one or more types of ion channels.

  9. Membrane-active mechanism of LFchimera against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthawong, Sakawrat; Puknun, Aekkalak; Bolscher, Jan G M; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; de Soet, Johannes J; Veerman, Enno C I; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol

    2014-10-01

    LFchimera, a construct combining two antimicrobial domains of bovine lactoferrin, lactoferrampin265-284 and lactoferricin17-30, possesses strong bactericidal activity. As yet, no experimental evidence was presented to evaluate the mechanisms of LFchimera against Burkholderia isolates. In this study we analyzed the killing activity of LFchimera on the category B pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei in comparison to the lesser virulent Burkholderia thailandensis often used as a model for the highly virulent B. pseudomallei. Killing kinetics showed that B. thailandensis E264 was more susceptible for LFchimera than B. pseudomallei 1026b. Interestingly the bactericidal activity of LFchimera appeared highly pH dependent; B. thailandensis killing was completely abolished at and below pH 6.4. FITC-labeled LFchimera caused a rapid accumulation within 15 min in the cytoplasm of both bacterial species. Moreover, freeze-fracture electron microscopy demonstrated extreme effects on the membrane morphology of both bacterial species within 1 h of incubation, accompanied by altered membrane permeability monitored as leakage of nucleotides. These data indicate that the mechanism of action of LFchimera is similar for both species and encompasses disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequently leakage of intracellular nucleotides leading to cell dead.

  10. Analysis of flux reduction behaviors of PRO hollow fiber membranes: Experiments, mechanisms, and implications

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jun Ying

    2016-01-15

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a promising technology to harvest renewable osmotic energy using a semipermeable membrane. However, a significant flux reduction has been always observed that severely shrinks the harvestable power to a level only marginally higher or even lower than the economically feasible value. This work focuses on the elucidation of various underlying mechanisms responsible for the flux reduction. First, both inner-selective and outer-selective thin film composite (TFC) hollow fiber membranes are employed to examine how the fundamental internal factors (such as the surface salinity of the selective layer at the feed side (CF,m) and its components) interact with one another under the fixed bulk salinity gradient, resulting in various behaviours of external performance indexes such as water flux, reverse salt flux, and power density. Then, the research is extended to investigate the effects of the growing bulk feed salinity due to the accumulated reverse salt flux along PRO modules. Finally, the insights obtained from the prior two stationary conditions are combined with the advanced nucleation theory to elucidate the dynamic scaling process by visualizing how the multiple fundamental factors (such as local supersaturation, nucleation rate and nuclei size) evolve and interplay with one another in various membrane regimes during the whole scaling process. To our best knowledge, it is the first time that the advanced nucleation theory is applied to study the PRO scaling kinetics in order to provide subtle and clear pictures of the events occurring inside the membrane. This study may provide useful insights to design more suitable TFC hollow fiber membranes and to operate them with enhanced water flux so that the PRO process may become more promising in the near future.

  11. Molecular mechanism for differential recognition of membrane phosphatidylserine by the immune regulatory receptor Tim4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietjen, Gregory T; Gong, Zhiliang; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Vargas, Ernesto; Crooks, James E; Cao, Kathleen D; Heffern, Charles T R; Henderson, J Michael; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Roux, Benot; Schlossman, Mark L; Steck, Theodore L; Lee, Ka Yee C; Adams, Erin J

    2014-04-15

    Recognition of phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids exposed on the extracellular leaflet of plasma membranes is implicated in both apoptotic cell removal and immune regulation. The PS receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing molecule 4 (Tim4) regulates T-cell immunity via phagocytosis of both apoptotic (high PS exposure) and nonapoptotic (intermediate PS exposure) activated T cells. The latter population must be removed at lower efficiency to sensitively control immune tolerance and memory cell population size, but the molecular basis for how Tim4 achieves this sensitivity is unknown. Using a combination of interfacial X-ray scattering, molecular dynamics simulations, and membrane binding assays, we demonstrate how Tim4 recognizes PS in the context of a lipid bilayer. Our data reveal that in addition to the known Ca(2+)-coordinated, single-PS binding pocket, Tim4 has four weaker sites of potential ionic interactions with PS lipids. This organization makes Tim4 sensitive to PS surface concentration in a manner capable of supporting differential recognition on the basis of PS exposure level. The structurally homologous, but functionally distinct, Tim1 and Tim3 are significantly less sensitive to PS surface density, likely reflecting the differences in immunological function between the Tim proteins. These results establish the potential for lipid membrane parameters, such as PS surface density, to play a critical role in facilitating selective recognition of PS-exposing cells. Furthermore, our multidisciplinary approach overcomes the difficulties associated with characterizing dynamic protein/membrane systems to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying Tim4's recognition properties, and thereby provides an approach capable of providing atomic-level detail to uncover the nuances of protein/membrane interactions.

  12. The Holding Power of Anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The efficiency of an anchor may be expressed as the ratio (holding force + weight of anchor). In dry sand .... the market at the beginning of the coming season in three sizes, namely 20, 35 and. 60 lb. These are ... Taylor frozen-flow hypothesis.

  13. Menadione (vitamin K enhances the antibiotic activity of drugs by cell membrane permeabilization mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Menadione, vitamin K3, belongs to the class of lipid-soluble vitamins and lipophilic substances as menadione cause disturbances in the bacterial membrane, resulting in damage to the fundamental elements for the integrity of the membrane, thus allowing increased permeability. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the antibiotic-modifying activity of menadione in multiresistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, with a gradual increase in its subinhibitory concentration. In addition, menadione was compared with cholesterol and ergosterol for similarity in mechanism of drug modulatory action. Antibiotic-modifying activity and antibacterial effect were determined by the broth microdilution assay. Menadione, cholesterol and ergosterol showed modulatory activity at clinically relevant concentrations, characterizing them as modifiers of bacterial drug resistance, since they lowered the MIC of the antibiotics tested. This is the first report of the antibacterial activity of menadione and its potentiation of aminoglycosides against multiresistant bacteria.

  14. Nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control for the temperature difference of a membrane distillation boundary layers. The heat transfer mechanisms inside the process are modeled with a 2D advection-diffusion equation. The model is semi-descretized in space, and a nonlinear state-space representation is provided. The control is designed to force the temperature difference along the membrane sides to track a desired reference asymptotically, and hence a desired flux would be generated. Certain constraints are put on the control law inputs to be within an economic range of energy supplies. The effect of the controller gain is discussed. Simulations with real process parameters for the model, and the controller are provided. © 2015 American Automatic Control Council.

  15. Large deformation and mechanics of flexible isotropic membrane ballooning in three dimensions by differential quadrature method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozaffari, M.; Atai, A. A.; Mostafa, N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a computationally efficient and accurate new methodology in the differential quadrature analysis of structural mechanics for flexible membranes ballooning in three dimensions under a negative air pressure differential. The differential quadrature method is employed to discretize the resulting equations in the axial direction as well as for the solution procedure. The weighting coefficients employed are not exclusive, and any accurate and efficient method such as the generalized differential quadrature method may be used to produce the methods weighting coefficients. A second-order paraboloid of revolution is assumed to describe the ballooning shape. This study asserts the accuracy, convergency, and efficiency of the methodology by solving some typical stability, straining analysis membrane problems, and comparing the results with those of the exact solutions and/or those of physical tests

  16. Large deformation and mechanics of flexible isotropic membrane ballooning in three dimensions by differential quadrature method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozaffari, M.; Atai, A. A.; Mostafa, N. [Islamic Azad University, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents a computationally efficient and accurate new methodology in the differential quadrature analysis of structural mechanics for flexible membranes ballooning in three dimensions under a negative air pressure differential. The differential quadrature method is employed to discretize the resulting equations in the axial direction as well as for the solution procedure. The weighting coefficients employed are not exclusive, and any accurate and efficient method such as the generalized differential quadrature method may be used to produce the methods weighting coefficients. A second-order paraboloid of revolution is assumed to describe the ballooning shape. This study asserts the accuracy, convergency, and efficiency of the methodology by solving some typical stability, straining analysis membrane problems, and comparing the results with those of the exact solutions and/or those of physical tests

  17. Not all Anchors Weigh Equally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Michael; Velazquez, Alexandra

    2017-11-01

    The anchoring bias is a reliable effect wherein a person's judgments are affected by initially presented information, but it is unknown specifically why this effect occurs. Research examining this bias suggests that elements of both numeric and semantic priming may be involved. To examine this, the present research used a phenomenon wherein people treat numeric information presented differently in Arabic numeral or verbal formats. We presented participants with one of many forms of an anchor that represented the same value (e.g., twelve hundred or 1,200). Thus, we could examine how a concept's meaning and its absolute numeric value affect anchoring. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that people respond to Arabic and verbal anchors differently. Experiment 3 showed that these differences occurred largely because people tend to think of numbers in digit format. This suggests that one's conceptual understanding of the anchored information matters more than its strict numeric value.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of membrane impermeability in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae exposed to imipenem selective pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavez, Monica; Vieira, Camila; de Araujo, Maria Rita; Cerda, Alvaro; de Almeida, Lara Mendes; Lincopan, Nilton; Mamizuka, Elsa Masae

    2016-07-01

    Intrinsic mechanisms leading to carbapenem-induced membrane impermeability and multidrug resistance are poorly understood in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, molecular behaviours during the establishment of membrane impermeability in members of the Enterobacteriaceae family under imipenem selective pressure were investigated. Clinical isolates (n = 22) exhibiting susceptibility to multiple antibiotics or characterised as extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- or AmpC-producers were submitted to progressive passages on Mueller-Hinton agar plates containing subclinical concentrations of imipenem [0.5 × the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)]. Changes in outer membrane permeability were evaluated by determination of antimicrobial MICs, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and gene expression analysis related to membrane permeability (i.e. omp35-like, omp36-like and acrA) and regulatory mechanisms (i.e. marA and ompR) by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Following imipenem induction, 73% of isolates showed increased carbapenem MICs by ≥2 doubling dilutions. At an early stage of treatment, imipenem modulated the expression of porins and efflux pump genes, represented by a reduction of 78% in omp36-like and a two-fold increase in acrA expression. Transcriptional factors marA and ompR were also affected by imipenem induction, increasing mRNA expression by 14- and 4-fold, respectively. High marA expression levels were associated with higher values of acrA expression. These results suggest that imipenem is an important factor in the development of an adaptive response to carbapenems by regulating key genes involved in the control of efflux pumps and porins, which could lead to a multidrug-resistant profile in clinical isolates, contributing to possible treatment failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Do anchor investors create value for initial public offerings? An empirical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadev Sahoo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of anchor investors was introduced by the market regulator, Securities Exchange Board of India (SEBI, to bring transparency in the book building mechanism. We examine anchor investors' investment in initial public offerings (IPOs to determine how they create value for issuing firms and participating investors. Using a database of 135 IPOs issued in the Indian market through book building mechanism during 2009–2014, we find that anchor investors' investment in IPOs reduces underpricing. Larger subscription from retail investors for anchor-supported IPOs indicates that anchor investors' participation is viewed as a credible attestation of quality of the issue. We document that anchor-supported IPOs are more liquid and less volatile in the short run. We also find that by controlling for other factors such as offer size, subscription rate and age of the firm, a part of the underpricing is reduced by anchor investors.

  20. Pentiptycene-based polyurethane with enhanced mechanical properties and CO2-plasticization resistance for thin film gas separation membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournaghshband Isfahani, Ali; Sadeghi, Morteza; Wakimoto, Kazuki; Shrestha, Binod Babu; Bagheri, Rouhollah; Sivaniah, Easan; Ghalei, Behnam

    2018-04-30

    Development of thin film composite (TFC) membranes offers an opportunity to achieve the permeability/selectivity requirements for optimum CO2 separation performance. However, the durability and performance of thin film gas separation membranes are mostly challenged by weak mechanical properties and high CO2 plasticization. Here, we designed new polyurethane (PU) structures with bulky aromatic chain extenders that afford preferred mechanical properties for ultra-thin film formation. An improvement of about 1500% in Young's modulus and 600% in hardness was observed for pentiptycene-based PUs compared to typical PU membranes. Single (CO2, H2, CH4, and N2) and mixed (CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4) gas permeability tests were performed on the PU membranes. The resulting TFC membranes showed a high CO2 permeance up to 1400 GPU (10-6 cm3(STP) cm-2s-1 cmHg-1) and the CO2/N2 and CO2/H2 selectivities of about 22 and 2.1, respectively. The enhanced mechanical properties of pentiptycene-based PUs results in high performance thin membranes with the similar selectivity of the bulk polymer. The thin film membranes prepared from pentiptycene-based PUs also showed a two-fold enhanced plasticization resistance compared to non-pentiptycene containing PU membranes.

  1. Comparison of the Mechanical Properties of Early Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin versus PRGF/Endoret Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Khorshidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The mechanical properties of membranes are important factors in the success of treatment and clinical handling. The goal of this study was to compare the mechanical properties of early leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF versus PRGF/Endoret membrane. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, membranes were obtained from 10 healthy male volunteers. After obtaining 20 cc venous blood from each volunteer, 10 cc was used to prepare early L-PRF (group 1 and the rest was used to get a membrane by PRGF-Endoret system (group 2. Tensile loads were applied to specimens using universal testing machine. Tensile strength, stiffness, and toughness of the two groups of membranes were calculated and compared by paired t-test. Results. The mean tensile strength and toughness were higher in group 1 with a significant difference (P0.05. Conclusions. The results showed that early L-PRF membranes had stronger mechanical properties than membranes produced by PRGF-Endoret system. Early L-PRF membranes might have easier clinical handling and could be a more proper scaffold in periodontal regenerative procedures. The real results of the current L-PRF should be in fact much higher than what is reported here.

  2. Comparison of the Mechanical Properties of Early Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin versus PRGF/Endoret Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Hooman; Raoofi, Saeed; Bagheri, Rafat; Banihashemi, Hodasadat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The mechanical properties of membranes are important factors in the success of treatment and clinical handling. The goal of this study was to compare the mechanical properties of early leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) versus PRGF/Endoret membrane. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, membranes were obtained from 10 healthy male volunteers. After obtaining 20 cc venous blood from each volunteer, 10 cc was used to prepare early L-PRF (group 1) and the rest was used to get a membrane by PRGF-Endoret system (group 2). Tensile loads were applied to specimens using universal testing machine. Tensile strength, stiffness, and toughness of the two groups of membranes were calculated and compared by paired t-test. Results. The mean tensile strength and toughness were higher in group 1 with a significant difference (P 0.05). Conclusions. The results showed that early L-PRF membranes had stronger mechanical properties than membranes produced by PRGF-Endoret system. Early L-PRF membranes might have easier clinical handling and could be a more proper scaffold in periodontal regenerative procedures. The real results of the current L-PRF should be in fact much higher than what is reported here.

  3. Superhydrophilic Thin-Film Composite Forward Osmosis Membranes for Organic Fouling Control: Fouling Behavior and Antifouling Mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    2012-10-16

    This study investigates the fouling behavior and fouling resistance of superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes functionalized with surface-tailored nanoparticles. Fouling experiments in both forward osmosis and reverse osmosis modes are performed with three model organic foulants: alginate, bovine serum albumin, and Suwannee river natural organic matter. A solution comprising monovalent and divalent salts is employed to simulate the solution chemistry of typical wastewater effluents. Reduced fouling is consistently observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to control thin-film composite polyamide membranes, in both reverse and forward osmosis modes. The fouling resistance and cleaning efficiency of the functionalized membranes is particularly outstanding in forward osmosis mode where the driving force for water flux is an osmotic pressure difference. To understand the mechanism of fouling, the intermolecular interactions between the foulants and the membrane surface are analyzed by direct force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Lower adhesion forces are observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to the control thin-film composite polyamide membranes. The magnitude and distribution of adhesion forces for the different membrane surfaces suggest that the antifouling properties of the superhydrophilic membranes originate from the barrier provided by the tightly bound hydration layer at their surface, as well as from the neutralization of the native carboxyl groups of thin-film composite polyamide membranes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes for organic fouling control: fouling behavior and antifouling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Kang, Yan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-10-16

    This study investigates the fouling behavior and fouling resistance of superhydrophilic thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes functionalized with surface-tailored nanoparticles. Fouling experiments in both forward osmosis and reverse osmosis modes are performed with three model organic foulants: alginate, bovine serum albumin, and Suwannee river natural organic matter. A solution comprising monovalent and divalent salts is employed to simulate the solution chemistry of typical wastewater effluents. Reduced fouling is consistently observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to control thin-film composite polyamide membranes, in both reverse and forward osmosis modes. The fouling resistance and cleaning efficiency of the functionalized membranes is particularly outstanding in forward osmosis mode where the driving force for water flux is an osmotic pressure difference. To understand the mechanism of fouling, the intermolecular interactions between the foulants and the membrane surface are analyzed by direct force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Lower adhesion forces are observed for the superhydrophilic membranes compared to the control thin-film composite polyamide membranes. The magnitude and distribution of adhesion forces for the different membrane surfaces suggest that the antifouling properties of the superhydrophilic membranes originate from the barrier provided by the tightly bound hydration layer at their surface, as well as from the neutralization of the native carboxyl groups of thin-film composite polyamide membranes.

  5. As(III) Removal from Drinking Water by Carbon Nanotube Membranes with Magnetron-Sputtered Copper: Performance and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hongyan; Zhang, Quan; Cheng, Guo-An; Huang, Haiou

    2018-06-07

    Current approaches for functionalizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) often utilize harsh chemical conditions, and the resulting harmful wastes can cause various environmental and health concerns. In this study, magnetron sputtering technique is facilely employed to functionalize CNT membranes by depositing Cu onto premade CNT membranes without using any chemical treatment. A comparative evaluation of the substrate polymeric membrane (mixed cellulose ester (MCE)), MCE sputtered with copper (Cu/MCE), the pristine CNT membrane (CNT), and CNT membrane sputtered with Cu (Cu/CNT) shows that Cu/CNT possesses mechanically stable structures and similar membrane permeability as MCE. More importantly, Cu/CNT outperforms other membranes with high As(III) removal efficiency of above 90%, as compared to less than 10% by MCE and CNT, and 75% by Cu/MCE from water. The performance of Cu/CNT membranes for As(III) removal is also investigated as a function of ionic strength, sputtering time, co-existing ions, solution pH, and the reusability. Further characterizations of As speciation in the filtrate and on Cu/CNT reveal that arsenite removal by Cu/CNT possibly began with Cu-catalyzed oxidation of arsenite to arsenate, followed by adsorptive filtration of arsenate by the membrane. Overall, this study demonstrates that magnetron sputtering is a promising greener technology for the productions of metal-CNT composite membranes for environmental applications.

  6. A mitochondrially targeted compound delays aging in yeast through a mechanism linking mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism to mitochondrial redox biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Burstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study revealed a mechanism of delaying aging in yeast by a natural compound which specifically impacts mitochondrial redox processes. In this mechanism, exogenously added lithocholic bile acid enters yeast cells, accumulates mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and elicits an age-related remodeling of phospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes. Such remodeling of mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics progresses with the chronological age of a yeast cell and ultimately causes significant changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome. These changes in the composition of membrane phospholipids alter mitochondrial abundance and morphology, thereby triggering changes in the age-related chronology of such longevity-defining redox processes as mitochondrial respiration, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, the preservation of cellular homeostasis of mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species, and the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis.

  7. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Hassan, Almosawy Talib

    2014-01-01

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were...... treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells...... between 700–1800 cm-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased...

  8. Shell and membrane theories in mechanics and biology from macro- to nanoscale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhasev, Gennadi

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest results related to shells  characterize and design shells, plates, membranes and other thin-walled structures, a multidisciplinary approach from macro- to nanoscale is required which involves the classical disciplines of mechanical/civil/materials engineering (design, analysis, and properties) and physics/biology/medicine among others. The book contains contributions of a meeting of specialists (mechanical engineers, mathematicians, physicists and others) in such areas as classical and non-classical shell theories. New trends with respect to applications in mechanical, civil and aero-space engineering, as well as in new branches like medicine and biology are presented which demand improvements of the theoretical foundations of these theories and a deeper understanding of the material behavior used in such structures.

  9. Mechanical Stability of H3PO4-Doped PBI/Hydrophilic-Pretreated PTFE Membranes for High Temperature PEMFCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jaehyung; Wang, Liang; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PBI/PTFE membrane was prepared by porous PTFE with hydrophilic surface pretreatment. • The durability of the prepared PBI/PTFE membrane was compared with pure PBI, PBI with untreated PTFE, and PBI-Nafion with untreated PTFE membranes. • Accelerated durability tests and SEM showed improved durability based the PBI/PTFE membrane with pretreated PTFE. - Abstract: A novel polybenzimidazole (PBI)/poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) composite membrane doped with phosphoric acid was fabricated for high temperature operation in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. A hydrophilic surface pretreatment was applied to the porous PTFE matrix film to improve its interfacial adhesion to the PBI polymer, thereby avoiding the introduction of Nafion ionomer which is traditionally used as a coupling agent. The pretreated PTFE film was embedded within the composite membrane during solution-casting using 5wt% PBI/DMAc solution. The mechanical stability and durability of three types of MEAs assembled with PBI only, PBI with pretreated PTFE, and PBI-Nafion with untreated PTFE membranes were evaluated under an accelerated degradation testing protocol employing extreme temperature cycling. Degradation was characterized by recording polarization curves, hydrogen crossover, and proton resistance. Cross-sections of the membranes were examined before and after thermal cycling by scanning electron microscope. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy verified that the PBI is dispersed homogeneously in the porous PTFE matrix. Results show that the PBI composite membrane with pretreated PTFE has a lower degradation rate than the Nafion/PBI membrane with untreated PTFE. Thus, the hydrophilic pretreatment employed here greatly improved the mechanical stability of the composite membrane, which resulted in improved durability under an extreme thermal cycling regime

  10. Investigating effects of nano-particles infiltration on mechanical properties of cell membrane using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, XiaoYue; Zhang, Yong; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Biao

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce our finding of the effects of C60 nanoparticles (NP) infiltration on mechanical properties of cell and its membrane. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to perform indentation on both normal and C60 infiltrated red blood cells (RBC) to gain data of mechanical characteristics of the membrane. Our results show that the mechanical properties of human RBC membrane seem to be altered due to the presence of C60 NPs. The resistance and ultimate strength of the C60 infiltrated RBC membrane significantly decrease. We also explain the mechanism of how C60 NPs infiltration changes the mechanical properties of the cell membrane by predicting the structural change of the lipid bilayer caused by the C60 infiltration at molecular level and analyze the interactions among molecules in the lipid bilayer. The potential hazards and application of the change in mechanical characteristics of the RBCs membrane are also discussed. Nanotoxicity of C60 NPs may be significant for some biological cells.

  11. Novel cellulose reinforcement for polymer electrolyte membranes with outstanding mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Jijeesh R.; Chiappone, A.; Gerbaldi, C.; Ijeri, Vijaykumar S.; Zeno, E.; Bongiovanni, R.; Bodoardo, S.; Penazzi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► UV-cured methacrylic-based composite gel-polymer electrolyte membranes for rechargeable lithium batteries. ► Excellent mechanical stability by reinforcement with classical cellulose handsheets. ► Fast and environmentally friendly preparation process, green and low cost cellulose reinforcement. ► Good electrochemical behaviour, stable cyclability and long-term performances in real battery configuration. - Abstract: Methacrylic-based thermo-set gel-polymer electrolytes obtained by an easy and reliable free radical photo-polymerisation process demonstrate good behaviour in terms of ionic conductivity, interfacial stability with the Li-metal electrode and cyclability in lithium cells. Though the obtained membranes are flexible, self standing and easy to handle, there is room for improving mechanical strength. In this respect, a novel approach is adopted in this work, in which a cellulose hand-sheet (paper), specifically designed for the specific application, is used as a composite reinforcing agent. To enhance its compatibility with the polymer matrix, cellulose is modified by UV-grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate on it. Excellent mechanical properties are obtained and good overall electrochemical performances are maintained; highlighting that such specific approach would make these hybrid organic, green, cellulose-based composite polymer electrolyte systems a strong contender in the field of thin and flexible Li-based power sources.

  12. Nonlinear observer-based Lyapunov boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms for membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2016-09-19

    This paper presents a nonlinear observer-based Lyapunov control for a membrane distillation (MD) process. The control considers the inlet temperatures of the feed and the permeate solutions as inputs, transforming it to boundary control process, and seeks to maintain the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries around a sufficient level to promote water production. MD process is modeled with advection diffusion equation model in two dimensions, where the diffusion and convection heat transfer mechanisms are best described. Model analysis, effective order reduction and parameters physical interpretation, are provided. Moreover, a nonlinear observer has been designed to provide the control with estimates of the temperature evolution at each time instant. In addition, physical constraints are imposed on the control to have an acceptable range of feasible inputs, and consequently, better energy consumption. Numerical simulations for the complete process with real membrane parameter values are provided, in addition to detailed explanations for the role of the controller and the observer. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anchorage Behaviors of Frictional Tieback Anchors in Silty Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Tsung; Hsiao, Wen-Ta; Chen, Ke-Ting; Hu, Wen-Chi; Wu, Ssu-Yi

    2017-06-01

    Soil anchors are extensively used in geotechnical applications, most commonly serve as tieback walls in deep excavations. To investigate the anchorage mechanisms of this tieback anchor, a constitutive model that considers both strain hardening and softening and volume dilatancy entitled SHASOVOD model, and FLAC3D software are used to perform 3-D numerical analyses. The results from field anchor tests are compared with those calculated by numerical analyses to enhance the applicability of the numerical method. After the calibration, this research carried out the parameter studies by numerical analyses. The numerical results reveal that whether the yield of soil around an anchor develops to ground surface and/or touches the diaphragm wall depending on the overburden depth H and the embedded depth Z of an anchor, this study suggests the minimum overburden and embedded depths to avoid the yield of soils develop to ground surface and/or touch the diaphragm wall. When the embedded depth, overburden depth or fixed length of an anchor increases, the anchorage capacity also increases. Increasing fixed length should be the optimum method to increase the anchorage capacity for fixed length less than 20m. However, when the fixed length of an anchor exceeds 30 m, the increasing rate of anchorage capacity per fixed length decreases, and progressive yield occurs obviously between the fixed length and surrounding soil.

  14. Novel applications for glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in pharmaceutical and industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Günter

    2011-04-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins have been regarded as typical cell surface proteins found in most eukaryotic cells from yeast to man. They are embedded in the outer plasma membrane leaflet via a carboxy-terminally linked complex glycolipid GPI structure. The amphiphilic nature of the GPI anchor, its compatibility with the function of the attached protein moiety and the capability of GPI-anchored proteins for spontaneous insertion into and transfer between artificial and cellular membranes initially suggested their potential for biotechnological applications. However, these expectations have been hardly fulfilled so far. Recent developments fuel novel hopes with regard to: (i) Automated online expression, extraction and purification of therapeutic proteins as GPI-anchored proteins based on their preferred accumulation in plasma membrane lipid rafts, (ii) multiplex custom-made protein chips based on GPI-anchored cell wall proteins in yeast, (iii) biomaterials and biosensors with films consisting of sets of distinct GPI-anchored binding-proteins or enzymes for sequential or combinatorial catalysis, and (iv) transport of therapeutic proteins across or into relevant tissue cells, e.g., enterocytes or adipocytes. Latter expectations are based on the demonstrated translocation of GPI-anchored proteins from plasma membrane lipid rafts to cytoplasmic lipid droplets and eventually further into microvesicles which upon release from donor cells transfer their GPI-anchored proteins to acceptor cells. The value of these technologies, which are all based on the interaction of GPI-anchored proteins with membranes and surfaces, for the engineering, production and targeted delivery of biomolecules for a huge variety of therapeutic and biotechnological purposes should become apparent in the near future.

  15. Protein fouling in carbon nanotubes enhanced ultrafiltration membrane: Fouling mechanism as a function of pH and ionic strength

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jieun; Jeong, Sanghyun; Ye, Yun; Chen, Vicki; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Leiknes, TorOve; Liu, Zongwen

    2016-01-01

    The protein fouling behavior was investigated in the filtration of the multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite membrane and commercial polyethersulfone ultrafiltration (PES-UF) membrane. The effect of solution chemistry such as pH and ionic strength on the protein fouling mechanism was systematically examined using filtration model such as complete pore blocking, intermediate pore blocking and cake layer formation. The results showed that the initial permeate flux pattern and fouling behavior of the MWCNT composite membrane were significantly influenced by pH and ionic strength while the effect of PES-UF membrane on flux was minimal. In a lysozyme (Lys) filtration, the severe pore blocking in the MWCNT membrane was made by the combined effect of intra-foulant interaction (Lys-Lys) and electrostatic repulsion between the membrane surface and the foulant at pH 4.7 and 10.4, and increasing ionic strength where the foulant-foulant interaction and membrane-fouling interaction were weak. In a bovine serum albumin (BSA) filtration, severe pore blocking was reduced by less deposition via the electrostatic interaction between the membrane and foulant at pH 4.7 and 10.4 and increasing ionic strength, at which the interaction between the membrane and BSA became weak. For binary mixture filtration, the protein fouling mechanism was more dominantly affected by foulant-foulant interaction (Lys-BSA, Lys-Lys, and BSA-BSA) at pH 7.0 and increase in ionic strength. This research demonstrates that MWCNT membrane fouling can be alleviated by changing pH condition and ionic strength based on the foulant-foulant interaction and the electrostatic interaction between the membrane and foulant.

  16. Protein fouling in carbon nanotubes enhanced ultrafiltration membrane: Fouling mechanism as a function of pH and ionic strength

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jieun

    2016-11-04

    The protein fouling behavior was investigated in the filtration of the multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite membrane and commercial polyethersulfone ultrafiltration (PES-UF) membrane. The effect of solution chemistry such as pH and ionic strength on the protein fouling mechanism was systematically examined using filtration model such as complete pore blocking, intermediate pore blocking and cake layer formation. The results showed that the initial permeate flux pattern and fouling behavior of the MWCNT composite membrane were significantly influenced by pH and ionic strength while the effect of PES-UF membrane on flux was minimal. In a lysozyme (Lys) filtration, the severe pore blocking in the MWCNT membrane was made by the combined effect of intra-foulant interaction (Lys-Lys) and electrostatic repulsion between the membrane surface and the foulant at pH 4.7 and 10.4, and increasing ionic strength where the foulant-foulant interaction and membrane-fouling interaction were weak. In a bovine serum albumin (BSA) filtration, severe pore blocking was reduced by less deposition via the electrostatic interaction between the membrane and foulant at pH 4.7 and 10.4 and increasing ionic strength, at which the interaction between the membrane and BSA became weak. For binary mixture filtration, the protein fouling mechanism was more dominantly affected by foulant-foulant interaction (Lys-BSA, Lys-Lys, and BSA-BSA) at pH 7.0 and increase in ionic strength. This research demonstrates that MWCNT membrane fouling can be alleviated by changing pH condition and ionic strength based on the foulant-foulant interaction and the electrostatic interaction between the membrane and foulant.

  17. Mechanical ventilation management during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a retrospective international multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthieu; Stewart, Claire; Bailey, Michael; Nieszkowska, Ania; Kelly, Joshua; Murphy, Lorna; Pilcher, David; Cooper, D James; Scheinkestel, Carlos; Pellegrino, Vincent; Forrest, Paul; Combes, Alain; Hodgson, Carol

    2015-03-01

    To describe mechanical ventilation settings in adult patients treated for an acute respiratory distress syndrome with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and assess the potential impact of mechanical ventilation settings on ICU mortality. Retrospective observational study. Three international high-volume extracorporeal membrane oxygenation centers. A total of 168 patients treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome from January 2007 to January 2013. We analyzed the association between mechanical ventilation settings (i.e. plateau pressure, tidal volume, and positive end-expiratory pressure) on ICU mortality using multivariable logistic regression model and Cox-proportional hazards model. We obtained detailed demographic, clinical, daily mechanical ventilation settings and ICU outcome data. One hundred sixty-eight patients (41 ± 14 years old; PaO2/FIO2 67 ± 19 mm Hg) fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Median duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and ICU stay were 10 days (6-18 d) and 28 days (16-42 d), respectively. Lower positive end-expiratory pressure levels and significantly lower plateau pressures during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were used in the French center than in both Australian centers (23.9 ± 1.4 vs 27.6 ± 3.7 and 27.8 ± 3.6; p Protective mechanical ventilation strategies were routinely used in high-volume extracorporeal membrane oxygenation centers. However, higher positive end-expiratory pressure levels during the first 3 days on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support were independently associated with improved survival. Further prospective trials on the optimal mechanical ventilation strategy during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support are warranted.

  18. QAC modified PVDF membranes: Antibiofouling performance, mechanisms, and effects on microbial communities in an MBR treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Zhang, Xingran; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Liang; Wu, Zhichao

    2017-09-01

    Biofouling remains as a critical issue limiting the widespread applications of membrane bioreactors (MBRs). The use of antibiofouling membranes is an emerging method to tackle this issue. In this study, a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane was modified using a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) to create an antibiofouling membrane. The membrane was used in an MBR and the performance, mechanisms, and effects on microbial communities of this membrane were compared to a control operated in parallel. Results showed that the membrane exhibited a significantly reduced transmembrane pressure increase rate of 0.29 kPa/d compared with 0.91 kPa/d of the control. Analysis using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) revealed almost complete lack of living microbes on the antibiofouling membrane in contrast to the control. However, specific oxygen uptake rate and dehydrogenase activity analyses demonstrated no adverse impacts on microbial viability of the bulk activated sludge. Bacterial population analysis using the Illumina Miseq platform added further evidence that the use of antibiofouling membrane did not exert negative influences on richness, diversity and structure of the bacterial community. Effluent quality of the test MBR also exhibited minimal difference from that of the control reactor. The amount of polysaccharides and proteins in the biofouling layer was also significantly reduced. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring suggested that the antibiofouling membrane only allowed organic matter with strong adhesion properties to attach onto the membrane surfaces. These findings highlight the potential of the antibiofouling membrane to be used in MBRs for wastewater treatment and reclamation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Golgin GMAP210/TRIP11 anchors IFT20 to the Golgi complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Follit

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells often use proteins localized to the ciliary membrane to monitor the extracellular environment. The mechanism by which proteins are sorted, specifically to this subdomain of the plasma membrane, is almost completely unknown. Previously, we showed that the IFT20 subunit of the intraflagellar transport particle is localized to the Golgi complex, in addition to the cilium and centrosome, and hypothesized that the Golgi pool of IFT20 plays a role in sorting proteins to the ciliary membrane. Here, we show that IFT20 is anchored to the Golgi complex by the golgin protein GMAP210/Trip11. Mice lacking GMAP210 die at birth with a pleiotropic phenotype that includes growth restriction, ventricular septal defects of the heart, omphalocele, and lung hypoplasia. Cells lacking GMAP210 have normal Golgi structure, but IFT20 is no longer localized to this organelle. GMAP210 is not absolutely required for ciliary assembly, but cilia on GMAP210 mutant cells are shorter than normal and have reduced amounts of the membrane protein polycystin-2 localized to them. This work suggests that GMAP210 and IFT20 function together at the Golgi in the sorting or transport of proteins destined for the ciliary membrane.

  20. On the Mechanism(s of Membrane Permeability Transition in Liver Mitochondria of Lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis L.: Insights from Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Belyaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in its low conductance state is the case in hepatocytes of the Baltic lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis L. during reversible metabolic depression taking place in the period of its prespawning migration when the exogenous feeding is switched off. The depression is observed in the last year of the lamprey life cycle and is conditioned by reversible mitochondrial dysfunction (mitochondrial uncoupling in winter and coupling in spring. To further elucidate the mechanism(s of induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the lamprey liver, we used Cd2+ and Ca2+ plus Pi as the pore inducers. We found that Ca2+ plus Pi induced the high-amplitude swelling of the isolated “winter” mitochondria both in isotonic sucrose and ammonium nitrate medium while both low and high Cd2+ did not produce the mitochondrial swelling in these media. Low Cd2+ enhanced the inhibition of basal respiration rate of the “winter” mitochondria energized by NAD-dependent substrates whereas the same concentrations of the heavy metal evoked its partial stimulation on FAD-dependent substrates. The above changes produced by Cd2+ or Ca2+ plus Pi in the “winter” mitochondria were only weakly (if so sensitive to cyclosporine A (a potent pharmacological desensitizer of the nonselective pore added alone and they were not sensitive to dithiothreitol (a dithiol reducing agent. Under monitoring of the transmembrane potential of the “spring” lamprey liver mitochondria, we revealed that Cd2+ produced its decrease on both types of the respiratory substrates used that was strongly hampered by cyclosporine A, and the membrane potential was partially restored by dithiothreitol. The effects of different membrane permeability modulators on the lamprey liver mitochondria function and the seasonal changes in their action are discussed.

  1. Outcomes of the modified Brostrom procedure using suture anchors for chronic lateral ankle instability--a prospective, randomized comparison between single and double suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byung-Ki; Kim, Yong-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Choi, Eui-Sung; Shon, Hyun-Chul; Park, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The present prospective, randomized study was conducted to compare the clinical outcomes of the modified Brostrom procedure using single and double suture anchors for chronic lateral ankle instability. A total of 50 patients were followed up for more than 2 years after undergoing the modified Brostrom procedure. Of the 50 procedures, 25 each were performed using single and double suture anchors by 1 surgeon. The Karlsson scale had improved significantly to 89.8 points and 90.6 points in the single and double anchor groups, respectively. Using the Sefton grading system, 23 cases (92%) in the single anchor group and 22 (88%) in the double anchor group achieved satisfactory results. The talar tilt angle and anterior talar translation on stress radiographs using the Telos device had improved significantly to an average of 5.7° and 4.6 mm in the single anchor group and 4.5° and 4.3 mm in the double anchor group, respectively. The double anchor technique was superior with respect to the postoperative talar tilt. The single and double suture anchor techniques produced similar clinical and functional outcomes, with the exception of talar tilt as a reference of mechanical stability. The modified Brostrom procedure using both single and double suture anchors appears to be an effective treatment method for chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rate and mechanism of facilitated americium(III) transport through a supported liquid membrane containing a bifunctional organophosphorus mobile carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    The facilitated transport of Am(III) from aqueous nitrate solutions to formic acid aqueous solutions through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) is described. The supported liquid membrane consists of a solution of a new (carbamoylmethyl)phosphine oxide in diethylbenzene (DEB) absorbed into a 48 μm thick microporous polypropylene film. The transport mechanism consists of a diffusion process through an aqueous diffusion film, a fast interfacial chemical reaction, and diffusion through the membrane itself. Equations describing the rate of transport are derived. They correlate the membrane permeability coefficient to diffusional parameters and to the chemical composition of the system. Different rate-controlling processes are shown to control the membrane permeability when the composition of the system is varied and as long as the transport occurs. The experimental data are quantitatively explained with the derived equations. The diffusion coefficient of the permeating species and the equilibrium constant of the fast interfacial reactions are evaluated. 13 figures, 1 table

  3. Pervaporation membrane bioreactor with permeate fractional condensation and mechanical vapor compression for energy efficient ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Senqing; Xiao, Zeyi; Li, Minghai; Li, Sizhong

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Pervaporation membrane bioreactor with permeate partial condensation and mechanical vapor compression is developed for an energy efficient ethanol production. - Highlights: • PVMBR-MVC for energy efficient ethanol production. • Process separation factor of 20–44 for ethanol achieved by fractional condensation. • Energy production of 20.25 MJ and hourly energy production of 56.25 kJ/h achieved. • Over 50% of energy saved in PVMBR-MVC compared with PVMBR-LTC. • Integrated heat pump with COP of 7–9 for the energy recovery of the permeate. - Abstract: Improved process separation factor and heat integration are two key issues to increase the energy efficiency of ethanol production in a pervaporation membrane bioreactor (PVMBR). A PVMBR with permeate fractional condensation and mechanical vapor compression was developed for energy efficient ethanol production. A condensation model based on the mass balance and thermodynamic equilibrium in the partial vacuum condenser was developed for predicting the purification performance of the permeate vapor. Three runs of ethanol fermentation-pervaporation experiment were carried out and ethanol concentration of higher than 50 wt% could be achieved in the final condensate, with the separation factor of the process for ethanol increased to 20. Ethanol production could be enhanced in the bioreactor and 17.1 MJ of the energy could be produced in per liter of fermentation broth, owing to 27.0 MJ/kg heating value of the recovered ethanol. Compared with the traditional pervaporation process with low temperature condensation for ethanol production, 50% of the energy would be saved in the process. The energy consumption would be further reduced, if the available energy of the permeate vapor was utilized by integrating the mechanical vapor compression heat pump.

  4. Cyclic biomechanical testing of biocomposite lateral row knotless anchors in a human cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Bava, Eric D; Spenciner, David B; Piccirillo, Justin

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the mechanical performance of biocomposite knotless lateral row anchors based on both anchor design and the direction of pull. Two lateral row greater tuberosity insertion sites (anterior and posterior) were identified in matched pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) scanned to verify comparability. The humeri were stripped of all soft tissue and 3 different biocomposite knotless lateral row anchors: HEALIX Knotless BR (DePuy Mitek, Raynham MA), BioComposite PushLock (Arthrex, Naples, FL), and Bio-SwiveLock (Arthrex). Fifty-two anchors were distributed among the insertion locations and tested them with either an anatomic or axial pull. A fixed-gauge loop (15 mm) of 2 high-strength sutures from each anchor was created. After a 10-Nm preload, anchors were cycled from 10 to 45 Nm at 0.5 Hz for 200 cycles and tested to failure at 4.23 mm/second. The load to reach 3 mm and 5 mm displacement, ultimate failure load, displacement at ultimate failure, and failure mode were recorded. Threaded anchors (Bio-SwiveLock, P = .03; HEALIX Knotless, P = .014) showed less displacement with anatomic testing than did the nonthreaded anchor (BioComposite PushLock), and the HEALIX Knotless showed less overall displacement than did the other 2 anchors. The Bio-SwiveLock exhibited greater failure loads than did the other 2 anchors (P < .05). Comparison of axial and anatomic loading showed no maximum load differences for all anchors as a whole (P = .1084). Yet, anatomic pulling produced higher failure loads than did axial pulling for the Bio-SwiveLock but not for the BioComposite PushLock or the HEALIX Knotless. The nonthreaded anchor (BioComposite PushLock) displayed lower failure loads than did both threaded anchors with axial pulling. Threaded biocomposite anchors (HEALIX Knotless BR and Bio-SwiveLock) show less anatomic loading displacement and higher axial failure loads than do the nonthreaded

  5. Mechanical frequency selectivity of an artificial basilar membrane using a beam array with narrow supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sangwon; Jang, Jongmoon; Choi, Hongsoo; Song, Won Joon; Jang, Jeong Hun

    2013-01-01

    The study presented in this paper assessed the frequency selectivity of an artificial basilar membrane (ABM) constructed using a piezoelectric beam array with narrow supports. Three ABM samples were constructed. Each ABM contained 16 beams with various lengths in a one-dimensional array. To experimentally assess the frequency selectivity of the ABM, mechanical vibration induced either by an electrical or an acoustic stimulus was measured with a scanning laser-Doppler vibrometer. The electro-mechanical and acousto-mechanical transfer functions were defined for the same purpose. The tonotopy of each beam array was visualized by post-processing the experimental results. Finite element analyses were conducted to numerically compute the resonance frequencies, identify the associated vibrational modes, and evaluate the harmonic responses of the beams. The influence of the residual stresses existing in the beams was reflected in the geometric models by introducing three different levels of arc-shaped lateral deformations in the beams. The harmonic analyses revealed that each beam of the ABM samples presented independent band-pass characteristics. The experiments and simulations commonly showed a frequency selectivity of the fabricated ABMs in the range of 2–20 kHz. Therefore, the device is suitable for development of a totally implantable artificial cochlea, implementing a mechanical frequency analyzer. This work is part of research to develop a prototype of a totally implantable artificial cochlea. (paper)

  6. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna

    2014-12-26

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  7. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna La Rocca

    Full Text Available In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal, depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK cells cytotoxic recognition.

  8. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Distributed Heat Transfer Mechanisms: Application to a Membrane Distillation Module

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable desalination technologies are the smart solution for producing fresh water and preserve the environment and energy by using sustainable renewable energy sources. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology which can be driven by renewable energy. It is an innovative method for desalinating seawater and brackish water with high quality production, and the gratitude is to its interesting potentials. MD includes a transfer of water vapor from a feed solution to a permeate solution through a micro-porous hydrophobic membrane, rejecting other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. The process is driven by the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries. Different control applications and supervision techniques would improve the performance and the efficiency of the MD process, however controlling the MD process requires comprehensive mathematical model for the distributed heat transfer mechanisms inside the process. Our objective is to propose a dynamic mathematical model that accounts for the time evolution of the involved heat transfer mechanisms in the process, and to be capable of hosting intermittent energy supplies, besides managing the production rate of the process, and optimizing its energy consumption. Therefore, we propose the 2D Advection-Diffusion Equation model to account for the heat diffusion and the heat convection mechanisms inside the process. Furthermore, experimental validations have proved high agreement between model simulations and experiments with less than 5% relative error. Enhancing the MD production is an anticipated goal, therefore, two main control strategies are proposed. Consequently, we propose a nonlinear controller for a semi-discretized version of the dynamic model to achieve an asymptotic tracking for a desired temperature difference. Similarly, an observer-based feedback control is used to track sufficient temperature difference for better productivity. The second control strategy

  9. Influence of radiation-induced grafting process on mechanical properties of ETFE-based membranes for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Youcef, H.; Alkan Guersel, S.; Buisson, A.; Gubler, L.; Wokaun, A.; Scherer, G.G. [Electrochemistry Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    The mechanical stability is, in addition to thermal and chemical stability, a primary requirement of polymer electrolyte membranes in fuel cells. In this study, the impact of grafting parameters and preparation steps on stress-strain properties of ETFE-based proton conducting membranes, prepared by radiation-induced grafting and subsequent sulphonation, was studied. No significant change in the mechanical properties of the ETFE base film was observed below an irradiation dose of 50 kGy. It was shown that the elongation at break decreases with increasing both the crosslinker concentration and graft level (GL). However, the tensile strength was positively affected by the crosslinker concentration. Yield strength and modulus of elasticity are almost unaffected by the introduction of crosslinker. Interestingly, yield strength and modulus of elasticity increase gradually with GL without noticeable change of the inherent crystallinity of grafted films. The most brittle membranes are obtained via the combination of high GL and crosslinker concentration. The optimised ETFE-based membrane (GL of {proportional_to}25%, 5% DVB v/v), shows mechanical properties superior to those of Nafion registered 112 membrane. The obtained results were correlated qualitatively to the other ex situ properties, including crystallinity, thermal properties and water uptake of the grafted membranes. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Mechanical properties and osteogenic activity of poly(l-lactide) fibrous membrane synergistically enhanced by chitosan nanofibers and polydopamine layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Li, Wenling; Wen, Wei; Luo, Binghong; Liu, Mingxian; Ding, Shan; Zhou, Changren

    2017-12-01

    To synergistically improve the mechanical properties and osteogenic activity of electrospinning poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) membrane, chitosan (CS) nanofibers were firstly introduced to prepare sub-micro and nanofibers interpenetrated PLLA/CS membrane, which was further surface modified with a polydopamine (PDA) layer to obtain PLLA/CS-PDA. Surface morphology, porosity, surface area and hydrophilicity of the obtained fibrous membranes were studied in detail. As compared to pure PLLA, the significant increase in the mechanical properties of the PLLA/CS, and especially of the PLLA/CS-PDA, was confirmed by tensile testing both in dry and wet states. Cells culture results indicated that both the PLLA/CS and PLLA/CS-PDA membranes, especially the latter, were more beneficial to adhesion, spreading and proliferation, as well as up-regulating alkaline phosphate activity and calcium deposition of MC3T3-E1 cells than PLLA membrane. Results suggested there was a synergistic effect of the CS nanofibers and PDA layer on the mechanical properties and osteogenic activity of PLLA membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interaction between bacterial outer membrane proteins and periplasmic quality control factors: a kinetic partitioning mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Si; Ge, Xi; Lv, Zhixin; Zhi, Zeyong; Chang, Zengyi; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2011-09-15

    The OMPs (outer membrane proteins) of Gram-negative bacteria have to be translocated through the periplasmic space before reaching their final destination. The aqueous environment of the periplasmic space and high permeability of the outer membrane engender such a translocation process inevitably challenging. In Escherichia coli, although SurA, Skp and DegP have been identified to function in translocating OMPs across the periplasm, their precise roles and their relationship remain to be elucidated. In the present paper, by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and single-molecule detection, we have studied the interaction between the OMP OmpC and these periplasmic quality control factors. The results of the present study reveal that the binding rate of OmpC to SurA or Skp is much faster than that to DegP, which may lead to sequential interaction between OMPs and different quality control factors. Such a kinetic partitioning mechanism for the chaperone-substrate interaction may be essential for the quality control of the biogenesis of OMPs.

  12. Mechanism of Aloe Vera extract protection against UVA: shelter of lysosomal membrane avoids photodamage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela; Viotto, Ana Cláudia; Checchia, Robert; Gomide, Andreza; Severino, Divinomar; Itri, Rosangela; Baptista, Maurício S; Martins, Waleska Kerllen

    2016-03-01

    The premature aging (photoaging) of skin characterized by wrinkles, a leathery texture and mottled pigmentation is a well-documented consequence of exposure to sunlight. UVA is an important risk factor for human cancer also associated with induction of inflammation, immunosuppression, photoaging and melanogenesis. Although herbal compounds are commonly used as photoprotectants against the harmful effects of UVA, the mechanisms involved in the photodamage are not precisely known. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis mil) on the protection against UVA-modulated cell killing of HaCaT keratinocytes. Aloe Vera exhibited the remarkable ability of reducing both in vitro and in vivo photodamage, even though it does not have anti-radical properties. Interestingly, the protection conferred by Aloe Vera was associated with the maintenance of membrane integrity in both mimetic membranes and intracellular organelles. The increased lysosomal stability led to a decrease in lipofuscinogenesis and cell death. This study explains why Aloe Vera extracts offer protection against photodamage at a cellular level in both the UV and visible spectra, leading to its beneficial use as a supplement in protective dermatological formulations.

  13. Sterol transfer between cyclodextrin and membranes: similar but not identical mechanism to NPC2-mediated cholesterol transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauliff, Leslie A; Xu, Zhi; Storch, Judith

    2011-08-30

    Niemann--Pick C disease is an inherited disorder in which cholesterol and other lipids accumulate in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Recently, cyclodextrins (CD) have been shown to reduce symptoms and extend lifespan in animal models of the disease. In the present studies we examined the mechanism of sterol transport by CD using in vitro model systems and fluorescence spectroscopy and NPC2-deficient fibroblasts. We demonstrate that cholesterol transport from the lysosomal cholesterol-binding protein NPC2 to CD occurs via aqueous diffusional transfer and is very slow; the rate-limiting step appears to be dissociation of cholesterol from NPC2, suggesting that specific interactions between NPC2 and CD do not occur. In contrast, the transfer rate of the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol (DHE) from CD to phospholipid membranes is very rapid and is directly proportional to the acceptor membrane concentration, as is DHE transfer from membranes to CD. Moreover, CD dramatically increases the rate of sterol transfer between membranes, with rates that can approach those mediated by NPC2. The results suggest that sterol transfer from CD to membranes occurs by a collisional transfer mechanism involving direct interaction of CD with membranes, similar to that shown previously for NPC2. For CD, however, absolute rates are slower compared to NPC2 for a given concentration, and the lysosomal phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) does not stimulate rates of sterol transfer between membranes and CD. As expected from the apparent absence of interaction between CD and NPC2, the addition of CD to NPC2-deficient fibroblasts rapidly rescued the cholesterol accumulation phenotype. Thus, the recent observations of CD efficacy in mouse models of NPC disease are likely the result of CD enhancement of cholesterol transport between membranes, with rapid sterol transfer occurring during CD--membrane interactions.

  14. A review of proton exchange membrane water electrolysis on degradation mechanisms and mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qi; Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Liu, Gaoyang; Wei, Bing; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang

    2017-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE) is an advanced and effective solution to the primary energy storage technologies. A better understanding of performance and durability of PEMWE is critical for the engineers and researchers to further advance this technology for its market penetration, and for the manufacturers of PEM water electrolyzers to implement quality control procedures for the production line or on-site process monitoring/diagnosis. This paper reviews the published works on performance degradations and mitigation strategies for PEMWE. Sources of degradation for individual components are introduced. With degradation causes discussed and degradation mechanisms examined, the review emphasizes on feasible strategies to mitigate the components degradation. To avoid lengthy real lifetime degradation tests and their high costs, the importance of accelerated stress tests and protocols is highlighted for various components. In the end, R&D directions are proposed to move the PEMWE technology forward to become a key element in future energy scenarios.

  15. Impact of the fouling mechanism on enzymatic depolymerization of xylan in different configurations of membrane reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohd Sueb, Mohd Shafiq Bin; Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    In order to maximize enzymatic xylan depolymerization while simultaneously purifying the resulting monosaccharide (xylose), different ultrafiltration (UF) membrane reactor configurations were evaluated. Initial results showed that the two hydrolytic enzymes required for complete depolymerization...... which hindered enzymatic attack in addition to fouling. Reaction with both enzymes followed by UF was found to be the optimal configuration, providing at least 40% higher xylan hydrolysis than the cascade configuration (involving sequential reaction with each of the enzymes separately......) and the simultaneous reaction-filtration with both enzymes, respectively. This study thus confirmed that the reactor configuration has a crucial impact on the performance of both the reaction and the separation process of xylose during enzymatic xylan degradation, and that the type of fouling mechanism varies...

  16. Polar transport in plants mediated by membrane transporters: focus on mechanisms of polar auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramoto, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Directional cell-to-cell transport of functional molecules, called polar transport, enables plants to sense and respond to developmental and environmental signals. Transporters that localize to plasma membranes (PMs) in a polar manner are key components of these systems. PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers, which are the most studied polar-localized PM proteins, are implicated in the polar transport of auxin that in turn regulates plant development and tropic growth. In this review, the regulatory mechanisms underlying polar localization of PINs, control of auxin efflux activity, and PIN abundance at PMs are considered. Up to date information on polar-localized nutrient transporters that regulate directional nutrient movement from soil into the root vasculature is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Current Understanding of Physicochemical Mechanisms for Cell Membrane Penetration of Arginine-rich Cell Penetrating Peptides: Role of Glycosaminoglycan Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

    Arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are very promising drug carriers to deliver membrane-impermeable pharmaceuticals, such as siRNA, bioactive peptides and proteins. CPPs directly penetrate into cells across cell membranes via a spontaneous energy-independent process, in which CPPs appear to interact with acidic lipids in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane. However, acidic lipids represent only 10 to 20% of the total membrane lipid content and in mammalian cell membranes they are predominantly located in the inner leaflet. Alternatively, CPPs favorably bind in a charge density- dependent manner to negatively charged, sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which are abundant on the cell surface and are involved in many biological functions. We have recently demonstrated that the interaction of CPPs with sulfated GAGs plays a critical role in their direct cell membrane penetration: the favorable enthalpy contribution drives the high-affinity binding of arginine-rich CPPs to sulfated GAGs, initiating an efficient cell membrane penetration. The favorable enthalpy gain is presumably mainly derived from a unique property of the guanidino group of arginine residues forming multidentate hydrogen bonding with sulfate and carboxylate groups in GAGs. Such interactions can be accompanied with charge neutralization of arginine-rich CPPs, promoting their partition into cell membranes. This review summarizes the current understanding of the physicochemical mechanism for lipid membrane penetration of CPPs, and discusses the role of the GAG interactions on the cell membrane penetration of CPPs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation.

  19. Influence of graphene oxide on mechanical, morphological, barrier, and electrical properties of polymer membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ammar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper expresses a short review of research on the effects of graphene oxide (GO as a nanocomposite element on polymer morphology and resulting property modifications including mechanical, barrier, and electrical conductivity. The effects on mechanical enhancement related to stress measurements in particular are a focus of this review. To first order, varying levels of aggregation of GO in different polymer matrices as a result of their weak inter-particle attractive interactions mainly affect the nanocomposite mechanical properties. The near surface dispersion of GO in polymer/GO nanocomposites can be investigated by studying the surface morphology of these nanocomposites using scanning probe microscopy such as atomic force microscope (AFM and scanning electron microscope (SEM. In the bulk, GO dispersion can be studied by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXD by analyzing the diffraction peaks corresponding to the undispersed GO fraction in the polymer matrix. In terms of an application, we review how the hydrophilicity of graphene oxide and its hydrogen bonding potential can enhance water flux of these nanocomposite materials in membrane applications. Likewise, the electrical conductivity of polymer films and bulk polymers can be advantageously enhanced via the percolative dispersion of GO nanoparticles, but this typically requires some additional chemical treatment of the GO nanoparticles to transform it to reduced GO.

  20. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation.

  1. Response of the human tympanic membrane to transient acoustic and mechanical stimuli: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Payam; Ravicz, Michael E.; Dobrev, Ivo; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.

    2016-01-01

    The response of the tympanic membrane (TM) to transient environmental sounds and the contributions of different parts of the TM to middle-ear sound transmission were investigated by measuring the TM response to global transients (acoustic clicks) and to local transients (mechanical impulses) applied to the umbo and various locations on the TM. A lightly-fixed human temporal bone was prepared by removing the ear canal, inner ear, and stapes, leaving the incus, malleus, and TM intact. Motion of nearly the entire TM was measured by a digital holography system with a high speed camera at a rate of 42 000 frames per second, giving a temporal resolution of <24 μs for the duration of the TM response. The entire TM responded nearly instantaneously to acoustic transient stimuli, though the peak displacement and decay time constant varied with location. With local mechanical transients, the TM responded first locally at the site of stimulation, and the response spread approximately symmetrically and circumferentially around the umbo and manubrium. Acoustic and mechanical transients provide distinct and complementary stimuli for the study of TM response. Spatial variations in decay and rate of spread of response imply local variations in TM stiffness, mass, and damping. PMID:26880098

  2. Mechanisms of action of particles used for fouling mitigation in membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loulergue, P; Weckert, M; Reboul, B; Cabassud, C; Uhl, W; Guigui, C

    2014-12-01

    Adding chemicals to the biofluid is an option to mitigate membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors. In particular, previous studies have shown that the addition of particles could enhance activated sludge filterability. Nevertheless, the mechanisms responsible for the improved filtration performance when particles are added are still unclear. Two main mechanisms might occur: soluble organic matter adsorption onto the particles and/or cake structure modification. To date, no studies have clearly dissociated the impact of these two phenomena as a method was needed for the in-line characterization of the cake structure during filtration. The objective of this study was thus to apply, for the first time, an optical method for in-situ, non-invasive, characterization of cake structure during filtration of a real biofluid in presence of particles. This method was firstly used to study local cake compressibility during the biofluid filtration. It was found that the first layers of the cake were incompressible whereas the cake appeared to be compressible at global scale. This questions the global scale analysis generally used to study cake compressibility and highlights the interest of coupling local characterization with overall process performance analysis. Secondly, the impact of adding submicronic melamine particles into the biofluid was studied. It appears that particles added into the biofluid strongly influence the cake properties, making it thicker and more permeable. Furthermore, by using liquid chromatography with an organic carbon detector to determine the detailed characteristics of the feed and permeate, it was shown that the modification of cake structure also affected the retention of soluble organic compounds by the membrane and thus the cake composition. Simultaneous use of a method for in-situ characterization of the cake structure with a detailed analysis of the fluid composition and monitoring of the global performance is thus a powerful method for

  3. Multi-protein assemblies underlie the mesoscale organization of the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Sinem K.; Honigmann, Alf; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; Lang, Thorsten; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-01-01

    Most proteins have uneven distributions in the plasma membrane. Broadly speaking, this may be caused by mechanisms specific to each protein, or may be a consequence of a general pattern that affects the distribution of all membrane proteins. The latter hypothesis has been difficult to test in the past. Here, we introduce several approaches based on click chemistry, through which we study the distribution of membrane proteins in living cells, as well as in membrane sheets. We found that the plasma membrane proteins form multi-protein assemblies that are long lived (minutes), and in which protein diffusion is restricted. The formation of the assemblies is dependent on cholesterol. They are separated and anchored by the actin cytoskeleton. Specific proteins are preferentially located in different regions of the assemblies, from their cores to their edges. We conclude that the assemblies constitute a basic mesoscale feature of the membrane, which affects the patterning of most membrane proteins, and possibly also their activity. PMID:25060237

  4. Brittle stalk 2 encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that affects mechanical strength of maize tissues by altering the composition and structure of secondary cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Ada; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Appenzeller, Laura; Meeley, Robert; Bourett, Timothy M; Howard, Richard J; Rafalski, Antoni

    2006-10-01

    A spontaneous maize mutant, brittle stalk-2 (bk2-ref), exhibits dramatically reduced tissue mechanical strength. Reduction in mechanical strength in the stalk tissue was highly correlated with a reduction in the amount of cellulose and an uneven deposition of secondary cell wall material in the subepidermal and perivascular sclerenchyma fibers. Cell wall accounted for two-thirds of the observed reduction in dry matter content per unit length of the mutant stalk in comparison to the wildtype stalk. Although the cell wall composition was significantly altered in the mutant in comparison to the wildtype stalks, no compensation by lignin and cell wall matrix for reduced cellulose amount was observed. We demonstrate that Bk2 encodes a Cobra-like protein that is homologous to the rice Bc1 protein. In the bk2-ref gene, a 1 kb transposon-like element is inserted in the beginning of the second exon, disrupting the open reading frame. The Bk2 gene was expressed in the stalk, husk, root, and leaf tissues, but not in the embryo, endosperm, pollen, silk, or other tissues with comparatively few or no secondary cell wall containing cells. The highest expression was in the isolated vascular bundles. In agreement with its role in secondary wall formation, the expression pattern of the Bk2 gene was very similar to that of the ZmCesA10, ZmCesA11, and ZmCesA12 genes, which are known to be involved in secondary wall formation. We have isolated an independent Mutator-tagged allele of bk2, referred to as bk2-Mu7, the phenotype of which is similar to that of the spontaneous mutant. Our results demonstrate that mutations in the Bk2 gene affect stalk strength in maize by interfering with the deposition of cellulose in the secondary cell wall in fiber cells.

  5. Data for identification of GPI-anchored peptides and ω-sites in cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Masuishi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present data obtained using a focused proteomics approach to identify the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored peptides in 19 human cancer cell lines. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs, which localize to the outer leaflet of the membrane microdomains commonly referred to as lipid rafts play important roles in diverse biological processes. Due to the complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety, it has been difficult to identify GPI-anchored peptide sequences on the proteomic scale by database searches using tools such as MASCOT. Here we provide data from 73 ω-sites derived from 49 GPI-APs in 19 human cancer cell lines. This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and ω-sites using TiO2-based affinity purification followed by hydrogen fluoride treatment” (Masuishi et al., 2016 [1].

  6. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  7. Translocation mechanism of C{sub 60} and C{sub 60} derivations across a cell membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Lijun, E-mail: michael.lijunl@gmail.com [Hangzhou Dianzi University, College of Life Information Science and Instrument Engineering (China); Kang, Zhengzhong [Zhejiang University, Department of Chemistry (China); Shen, Jia-Wei, E-mail: shen.jiawei@hotmail.com [Hangzhou Normal University, School of Medicine (China)

    2016-11-15

    Carbon-based nanoparticles (NPs) such as fullerenes and nanotubes have been extensively studied for drug delivery in recent years. The permeation process of fullerene and its derivative molecules through membrane is essential to the utilization of fullerene-based drug delivery system, but the mechanism and the dynamics of permeation through cell membrane are still unclear. In this study, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the permeation process of functionalized fullerene molecules (ca. 0.72 nm) through the membrane. Our results show that single functionalized fullerene molecule in such nanoscale could permeate the lipid membrane in micro-second time scale. Pristine C{sub 60} molecules prefer to aggregate into several small clusters while C{sub 60}OH{sub 15} molecules could aggregate into one big cluster to permeate through the lipid membrane. After permeation of C{sub 60} or its derivatives into membrane, all C{sub 60} and C{sub 60}OH{sub 15} molecules disaggregated and monodispersed in the lipid membrane.

  8. Thermo-mechanical properties of mixed ion-electron conducting membrane materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bingxin

    2011-07-01

    The thesis presents thermo-mechanical properties of La{sub 0.58}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF) and Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF) perovskite materials, which are considered as oxygen transport membranes (OTM) for gas separation units. Ring-on-ring bending test with disk-shaped samples and depth-sensitive micro-indentation have been used as macroscopic and microscopic tests, respectively. In addition, the thermo-mechanical properties of a third OTM candidate material La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} (LNO) were investigated. The results of the thermo-mechanical measurements with the BSCF revealed an anomaly between 200 C and 400 C. In particular, the temperature dependence of Young's modulus shows a minimum at {proportional_to} 200 C. Fracture stress and toughness exhibit a qualitatively similar behavior with a minimum between 200 C and 400 C, before recovering between 500 C and 800 C. X-ray diffraction analyses verified that BSCF remains cubic in the relevant temperature range. Hence the anomalies were assumed to be related to the transition of Co{sup 3+} spin states reported for other Co-containing perovskites. This assumption could be experimentally confirmed by magnetic susceptibility measurements. The fracture surfaces of the specimens are not affected by the mechanical anomalies at intermediate temperatures, since only a transgranular fracture mode has been observed. Complementary to the mechanical characterization of BSCF, also the temperature dependency of fracture stress and elastic behavior of LSCF have been determined. Phase compositions of LSCF have been studied by in-situ high temperature XRD. Changes in phase composition with temperature are observed. At ambient temperature the LSCF perovskite material comprises two phases: rhombohedral and cubic symmetry. The ratio of the two phases depends on both cooling rate and atmosphere. The transition of rhombohedral to cubic occurs between 700 C and

  9. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMONLEZUN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved Outer Membrane Factor (OMF protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications, such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional post-translational modification could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In E. coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X ray structure at 3.8Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitylated cysteine.

  10. An Adaptable Spectrin/Ankyrin-Based Mechanism for Long-Range Organization of Plasma Membranes in Vertebrate Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Vann; Lorenzo, Damaris N

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrins are membrane-associated proteins that together with their spectrin partners are responsible for micron-scale organization of vertebrate plasma membranes, including those of erythrocytes, excitable membranes of neurons and heart, lateral membrane domains of columnar epithelial cells, and striated muscle. Ankyrins coordinate functionally related membrane transporters and cell adhesion proteins (15 protein families identified so far) within plasma membrane compartments through independently evolved interactions of intrinsically disordered sequences with a highly conserved peptide-binding groove formed by the ANK repeat solenoid. Ankyrins are coupled to spectrins, which are elongated organelle-sized proteins that form mechanically resilient arrays through cross-linking by specialized actin filaments. In addition to protein interactions, cellular targeting and assembly of spectrin/ankyrin domains also critically depend on palmitoylation of ankyrin-G by aspartate-histidine-histidine-cysteine 5/8 palmitoyltransferases, as well as interaction of beta-2 spectrin with phosphoinositide lipids. These lipid-dependent spectrin/ankyrin domains are not static but are locally dynamic and determine membrane identity through opposing endocytosis of bulk lipids as well as specific proteins. A partnership between spectrin, ankyrin, and cell adhesion molecules first emerged in bilaterians over 500 million years ago. Ankyrin and spectrin may have been recruited to plasma membranes from more ancient roles in organelle transport. The basic bilaterian spectrin-ankyrin toolkit markedly expanded in vertebrates through gene duplications combined with variation in unstructured intramolecular regulatory sequences as well as independent evolution of ankyrin-binding activity by ion transporters involved in action potentials and calcium homeostasis. In addition, giant vertebrate ankyrins with specialized roles in axons acquired new coding sequences by exon shuffling. We speculate that

  11. Knotless single-row rotator cuff repair: a comparative biomechanical study of 2 knotless suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Chad; Traub, Shaun; Baldini, Todd; Rioux-Forker, Dana; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana; Hawkins, Monica; McCarty, Eric

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the gap formation during cyclic loading, maximum repair strength, and failure mode of single-row full-thickness supraspinatus repairs performed using 2 knotless suture anchors with differing internal suture-retention mechanisms in a human cadaver model. Nine matched pairs of cadaver shoulders were used. Full-thickness tears were induced by detaching the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity. Single-row repairs were performed with either type I (Opus Magnum PI; ArthroCare, Austin, Texas) or type II (ReelX STT; Stryker, Mahwah, New Jersey) knotless suture anchors. The repaired tendon was cycled from 10 to 90 N for 500 cycles, followed by load to failure. Gap formation was measured at 5, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 cycles with a video digitizing system. Anchor type or location (anterior or posterior) had no effect on gap formation during cyclic loading regardless of position (anterior, P=.385; posterior, P=.389). Maximum load to failure was significantly greater (P=.018) for repairs performed with type II anchors (288±62 N) compared with type I anchors (179±39 N). Primary failure modes were anchor pullout and tendon tearing for type II anchors and suture slippage through the anchor for type I anchors. The internal ratcheting suture-retention mechanism of type II anchors may have helped this anchor outperform the suture-cinching mechanism of type I anchors by supporting significantly higher loads before failure and minimizing suture slippage, potentially leading to stronger repairs clinically. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Mechanisms of bacterial membrane permeabilization by crotalicidin (Ctn) and its fragment Ctn(15-34), antimicrobial peptides from rattlesnake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Peinado, Clara; Dias, Susana Almeida; Domingues, Marco M; Benfield, Aurélie H; Freire, João Miguel; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; Gaspar, Diana; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Craik, David J; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David

    2018-02-02

    Crotalicidin (Ctn), a cathelicidin-related peptide from the venom of a South American rattlesnake, possesses potent antimicrobial, antitumor, and antifungal properties. Previously, we have shown that its C-terminal fragment, Ctn(15-34), retains the antimicrobial and antitumor activities but is less toxic to healthy cells and has improved serum stability. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of action of Ctn and Ctn(15-34) against Gram-negative bacteria. Both peptides were bactericidal, killing ∼90% of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells within 90-120 and 5-30 min, respectively. Studies of ζ potential at the bacterial cell membrane suggested that both peptides accumulate at and neutralize negative charges on the bacterial surface. Flow cytometry experiments confirmed that both peptides permeabilize the bacterial cell membrane but suggested slightly different mechanisms of action. Ctn(15-34) permeabilized the membrane immediately upon addition to the cells, whereas Ctn had a lag phase before inducing membrane damage and exhibited more complex cell-killing activity, probably because of two different modes of membrane permeabilization. Using surface plasmon resonance and leakage assays with model vesicles, we confirmed that Ctn(15-34) binds to and disrupts lipid membranes and also observed that Ctn(15-34) has a preference for vesicles that mimic bacterial or tumor cell membranes. Atomic force microscopy visualized the effect of these peptides on bacterial cells, and confocal microscopy confirmed their localization on the bacterial surface. Our studies shed light onto the antimicrobial mechanisms of Ctn and Ctn(15-34), suggesting Ctn(15-34) as a promising lead for development as an antibacterial/antitumor agent. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Rheological, mechanical and membrane penetration properties of novel dual drug systems for percutaneous delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, A D; Malcolm, R K; Campbell, K; Jones, D S; Russell, J A

    2000-07-03

    In this study it has been demonstrated that mixtures of two solid drugs, ibuprofen and methyl nicotinate, with different but complementary pharmacological activities and which exist as a single liquid phase over a wide composition range at skin temperature, can be formulated as o/w emulsions without the use of an additional hydrophobic carrier. These novel dual drug systems provided significantly enhanced in vitro penetration rates through a model lipophilic barrier membrane compared to conventional individual formulations of each active. Thus, for ibuprofen, drug penetration flux enhancements of three- and 10-fold were observed when compared to an aqueous ibuprofen suspension and a commercial alcohol-based ibuprofen formulation, respectively. Methyl nicotinate penetration rates were shown to be similar for aqueous gels and emulsified systems. Mechanisms explaining these observations are proposed. Novel dual drug formulations of ibuprofen and methyl nicotinate, formulated within the liquid range at skin temperature, were investigated by oscillatory rheology and texture profile analysis, demonstrating the effects of drug and viscosity enhancer concentrations, and disperse phase type upon the rheological, mechanical and drug penetration properties of these systems.

  14. Membrane-traversing mechanism of thyroid hormone transport by monocarboxylate transporter 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protze, Jonas; Braun, Doreen; Hinz, Katrin Manuela; Bayer-Kusch, Dorothea; Schweizer, Ulrich; Krause, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) mediates thyroid hormone (TH) transport across the plasma membrane in many cell types. In order to better understand its mechanism, we have generated three new MCT8 homology models based on sugar transporters XylE in the intracellular opened (PDB ID: 4aj4) and the extracellular partly occluded (PDB ID: 4gby) conformations as well as FucP (PDB ID: 3o7q) and GLUT3 (PDB ID: 4zwc) in the fully extracellular opened conformation. T 3 -docking studies from both sides revealed interactions with His192, His415, Arg445 and Asp498 as previously identified. Selected mutations revealed further transport-sensitive positions mainly at the discontinuous transmembrane helices TMH7 and 10. Lys418 is potentially involved in neutralising the charge of the TH substrate because it can be replaced by charged, but not by uncharged, amino acids. The side chain of Thr503 was hypothesised to stabilise a helix break at TMH10 that undergoes a prominent local shift during the transport cycle. A T503V mutation accordingly affected transport. The aromatic Tyr419, the polar Ser313 and Ser314 as well as the charged Glu422 and Glu423 lining the transport channel have been studied. Based on related sugar transporters, we suggest an alternating access mechanism for MCT8 involving a series of amino acid positions previously and newly identified as critical for transport.

  15. Sensing inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human corneal Descemet's membrane with AFM nano-indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mundo, Rosa; Recchia, Giuseppina; Parekh, Mohit; Ruzza, Alessandro; Ferrari, Stefano; Carbone, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    The paper describes a highly space-resolved characterization of the surface mechanical properties of the posterior human corneal layer (Descemet's membrane). This has been accomplished with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nano-indentation by using a probe with a sharp tip geometry. Results indicate that the contact with this biological tissue in liquid occurs with no (or very low) adhesion. More importantly, under the same operating conditions, a broad distribution of penetration depth can be measured on different x-y positions of the tissue surface, indicating a high inhomogeneity of surface stiffness, not yet clearly reported in the literature. An important contribution to such inhomogeneity should be ascribed to the discontinuous nature of the collagen/proteoglycans fibers matrix tissue, as can be imaged by AFM when the tissue is semi-dry. Using classical contact mechanics calculations adapted to the specific geometry of the tetrahedral tip it has been found that the elastic modulus E of the material in the very proximity of the surface ranges from 0.23 to 2.6 kPa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sphingolipid Organization in the Plasma Membrane and the Mechanisms That Influence It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Mary L

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are structural components in the plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells. Their metabolism produces bioactive signaling molecules that modulate fundamental cellular processes. The segregation of sphingolipids into distinct membrane domains is likely essential for cellular function. This review presents the early studies of sphingolipid distribution in the plasma membranes of mammalian cells that shaped the most popular current model of plasma membrane organization. The results of traditional imaging studies of sphingolipid distribution in stimulated and resting cells are described. These data are compared with recent results obtained with advanced imaging techniques, including super-resolution fluorescence detection and high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Emphasis is placed on the new insight into the sphingolipid organization within the plasma membrane that has resulted from the direct imaging of stable isotope-labeled lipids in actual cell membranes with high-resolution SIMS. Super-resolution fluorescence techniques have recently revealed the biophysical behaviors of sphingolipids and the unhindered diffusion of cholesterol analogs in the membranes of living cells are ultimately in contrast to the prevailing hypothetical model of plasma membrane organization. High-resolution SIMS studies also conflicted with the prevailing hypothesis, showing sphingolipids are concentrated in micrometer-scale membrane domains, but cholesterol is evenly distributed within the plasma membrane. Reductions in cellular cholesterol decreased the number of sphingolipid domains in the plasma membrane, whereas disruption of the cytoskeleton eliminated them. In addition, hemagglutinin, a transmembrane protein that is thought to be a putative raft marker, did not cluster within sphingolipid-enriched regions in the plasma membrane. Thus, sphingolipid distribution in the plasma membrane is dependent on the cytoskeleton, but not on favorable interactions with

  17. A technique to investigate the mechanism of uniform corrosion in the presence of a semi-permeable membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    1987-01-01

    A technique to investigate the mechanism of uniform corrosion in the presence of a semi-permeable membrane is described. For both the anodic and cathodic half-reactions three possible rate-determining steps are considered: transport of species through the bulk solution diffusion layer, transport of species through the membrane and the electrochemical reaction itself. The technique is based on the measurement of the corrosion potential, E CORR , of a rotating disc electrode under steady-state conditions. The variation of E CORR with the oxidant concentration, the thickness of the diffusion layer and the membrane thickness is used to identify the rate-determining step for each half-reaction. This technique should be of use in the study of the corrosion behaviour of candidate materials for nuclear waste disposal containers. An understanding of the mechanism of uniform corrosion will enable confident predictions to be made concerning the long-term behaviour of such containers

  18. The Holding Power of Anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as the chain begins to drag along the ground; and it also serves, by lying flat on the ground, to keep the palm set at the correct angle as it buries itself. In stockless anchors there are two digging blades set on opposite sides of the shank, and hinged to it by a horizontal hinge which allows them to set themselves at the correct.

  19. A Coincidence Detection Mechanism Controls PX-BAR Domain-Mediated Endocytic Membrane Remodeling via an Allosteric Structural Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wen-Ting; Vujičić Žagar, Andreja; Gerth, Fabian; Lehmann, Martin; Puchkov, Dymtro; Krylova, Oxana; Freund, Christian; Scapozza, Leonardo; Vadas, Oscar; Haucke, Volker

    2017-11-20

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis occurs by bending and remodeling of the membrane underneath the coat. Bin-amphiphysin-rvs (BAR) domain proteins are crucial for endocytic membrane remodeling, but how their activity is spatiotemporally controlled is largely unknown. We demonstrate that the membrane remodeling activity of sorting nexin 9 (SNX9), a late-acting endocytic PX-BAR domain protein required for constriction of U-shaped endocytic intermediates, is controlled by an allosteric structural switch involving coincident detection of the clathrin adaptor AP2 and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P 2 ) at endocytic sites. Structural, biochemical, and cell biological data show that SNX9 is autoinhibited in solution. Binding to PI(3,4)P 2 via its PX-BAR domain, and concomitant association with AP2 via sequences in the linker region, releases SNX9 autoinhibitory contacts to enable membrane constriction. Our results reveal a mechanism for restricting the latent membrane remodeling activity of BAR domain proteins to allow spatiotemporal coupling of membrane constriction to the progression of the endocytic pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrospun composite nanofiber membrane of poly(l-lactide) and surface grafted chitin whiskers: Fabrication, mechanical properties and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Liu, Wenjun; Luo, Binghong; Wen, Wei; Liu, Mingxian; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhou, Changren

    2016-08-20

    To improve both the mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA), rod-like chitin whiskers (CHWs) were prepared, and subsequently surface modified with l-lactide to obtain grafted CHWs (g-CHWs). Then, CHWs and g-CHWs were further introduced into PLLA matrix to fabricate CHWs/PLLA and g-CHWs/PLLA nanofiber membranes by electrospinning technique. Morphologies and properties of the CHWs and g-CHWs were characterized. The surface-grafted PLLA chains played an important role in improving interfacial interaction between the whiskers and PLLA matrix. The g-CHWs dispersed more uniformly in matrix than CHWs, and the as-prepared g-CHWs/PLLA nanofiber membrane showed relative smooth and uniform fiber. As a result, the tensile strength and modulus of the g-CHWs/PLLA nanofiber membrane were obviously superior to those of the pure PLLA and CHWs/PLLA nanofiber membranes. Cells culture results indicated that g-CHWs/PLLA nanofiber membrane is more effectively in promoting MC3T3-E1 cells adhesion, spreading and proliferation than pure PLLA and CHWs/PLLA nanofiber membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modulation of erythrocyte membrane mechanical stability by 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in the neonatal poikilocytosis/elliptocytosis syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Mentzer, W C; Iarocci, T A; Mohandas, N; Lane, P A; Smith, B; Lazerson, J; Hays, T

    1987-01-01

    To explain the transient anemia and poikilocytosis seen during infancy in hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), we resealed erythrocyte (RBC) ghosts from affected children or their elliptocytic parents with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) (0-8 mM), a compound that dissociates membrane skeletons, then measured ghost mechanical stability in the ektacytometer. Without added 2,3-DPG, ghost mechanical stability was subnormal in infantile poikilocytosis (IP) and HE but was even more abnormal in hereditary p...

  2. The effect of alcohols on red blood cell mechanical properties and membrane fluidity depends on their molecular size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Melda; Ince, Huseyin Yavuz; Yalcin, Ozlem; Ajdžanović, Vladimir; Spasojević, Ivan; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2013-01-01

    The role of membrane fluidity in determining red blood cell (RBC) deformability has been suggested by a number of studies. The present investigation evaluated alterations of RBC membrane fluidity, deformability and stability in the presence of four linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol) using ektacytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. All alcohols had a biphasic effect on deformability such that it increased then decreased with increasing concentration; the critical concentration for reversal was an inverse function of molecular size. EPR results showed biphasic changes of near-surface fluidity (i.e., increase then decrease) and a decreased fluidity of the lipid core; rank order of effectiveness was butanol > propanol > ethanol > methanol, with a significant correlation between near-surface fluidity and deformability (r = 0.697; palcohol enhanced the impairment of RBC deformability caused by subjecting cells to 100 Pa shear stress for 300 s, with significant differences from control being observed at higher concentrations of all four alcohols. The level of hemolysis was dependent on molecular size and concentration, whereas echinocytic shape transformation (i.e., biconcave disc to crenated morphology) was observed only for ethanol and propanol. These results are in accordance with available data obtained on model membranes. They document the presence of mechanical links between RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity, chain length-dependence of the ability of alcohols to alter RBC mechanical behavior, and the biphasic response of RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity to increasing alcohol concentrations.

  3. Gestational Undernourishment Modifies the Composition of Skeletal Muscle Transverse Tubule Membranes and the Mechanical Properties of Muscles in Newborn Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Tonathiu Ramírez-Oseguera

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud/Aims: Skeletal muscle (SM constitutes more than 40% of the body weight in adulthood. Transports dietary glucose mainly through the insulin-dependent glucose transporter (Glut-4 located in the Transverse tubule membrane system (TT. The TT development ends shortly after birth. The TT membrane hosts the proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling and glucose uptake. Glycaemic regulation through movement is a key function of fully developed skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to characterize the effect of gestational undernourishment (GUN in rats GLUT-4 expression and on the protein/lipid content of the TT membranes. We also examined the effect of GUN on the mechanical properties of muscles as an indication of the metabolic condition of the SM at birth. Methods: Isolated TT membrane from SM of GUN rats were used to study lipid/protein content and protein stability by differential scanning calorimetry. The effect of GUN on the SM mechanical properties was determined in isolated Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL muscle. Results: We demonstrate that compared to control, GUN in the new-born produces; i decreases body weight; ii diminution in SM mass; iii decreases the formation of TT membranes; iv expresses TT membrane proteins with higher thermal stability. The TT membrane expression of GLUT-4 in GUN offspring was twice that of controls. The isolated EDL of GUN offspring was 20% stronger as measured by contractile force and more resistant to fatigue relative to controls. Conclusion; These results provide the first evidence of adaptive changes of the SM in new-borns exposed to severe gestational food restriction. The effects of GUN on muscle at birth are the first step toward detrimental SM metabolic function, contributing to the physiopathology of metabolic diseases in adulthood.

  4. Gestational undernourishment modifies the composition of skeletal muscle transverse tubule membranes and the mechanical properties of muscles in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Oseguera, Ricardo Tonathiu; Jiménez-Garduño, Aura Matilde; Alvarez, Rocío; Heine, Katharina; Pinzón-Estrada, Enrique; Torres-Saldaña, Ismael; Ortega, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    [corrected] Skeletal muscle (SM) constitutes more than 40% of the body weight in adulthood. Transports dietary glucose mainly through the insulin-dependent glucose transporter (Glut-4) located in the Transverse tubule membrane system (TT). The TT development ends shortly after birth. The TT membrane hosts the proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling and glucose uptake. Glycaemic regulation through movement is a key function of fully developed skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to characterize the effect of gestational undernourishment (GUN) in rats GLUT-4 expression and on the protein/lipid content of the TT membranes. We also examined the effect of GUN on the mechanical properties of muscles as an indication of the metabolic condition of the SM at birth. Isolated TT membrane from SM of GUN rats were used to study lipid/protein content and protein stability by differential scanning calorimetry. The effect of GUN on the SM mechanical properties was determined in isolated Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL) muscle. We demonstrate that compared to control, GUN in the new-born produces; i) decreases body weight; ii) diminution in SM mass; iii) decreases the formation of TT membranes; iv) expresses TT membrane proteins with higher thermal stability. The TT membrane expression of GLUT-4 in GUN offspring was twice that of controls. The isolated EDL of GUN offspring was 20% stronger as measured by contractile force and more resistant to fatigue relative to controls. These results provide the first evidence of adaptive changes of the SM in new-borns exposed to severe gestational food restriction. The effects of GUN on muscle at birth are the first step toward detrimental SM metabolic function, contributing to the physiopathology of metabolic diseases in adulthood. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Enhancing the Chemical and Mechanical Durability of Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Andrew M.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are energy conversion devices which generate electricity from the electrochemical reaction of hydrogen and oxygen. Currently, widespread adoption of PEM fuel cell technology is hindered by low component durability and high costs. In this work, strategies were investigated to improve the mechanical and chemical durability of the ion conducting polymer, or ionomer, which comprises the PEM, in order to directly address these limitations. Owing to their exceptional mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated for mechanical reinforcement of the PEM. Because of their electronic conductivity, which diminishes cell performance, two strategies were developed to enable the use of CNTs as PEM reinforcement. These systems result in enhanced mechanical properties without sacrificing performance of the PEM during operation. Further, when coated with ceria (CeO2), which scavenges radicals that are generated during operation and cause PEM chemical degradation by attacking vulnerable chemical groups in the ionomer, MWCNTs further improved PEM chemical durability. During cell fabrication, conditioning, and discharge, Ce rapidly migrates between the PEM and catalyst layers (CLs), which reduces catalyst efficiency and leaves areas of the cell defenseless against radical attacks. Therefore, in order to stabilize Ce and localize it to areas of highest radical generation, it is critical to understand and identify the relative influences of different migration mechanisms. Using a novel elemental analysis technique, Ce migration was characterized due to potential and concentration gradients, water flux, and degradation of Ce-exchanged sulfonic acid groups within the PEM. Additionally, Zr-doped ceria was employed to resist migration due to ionomer degradation which improved cell durability, without reducing performance, resulting in PEM Ce stabilization near its initial concentrations after > 1,400 hours of testing. Ce was

  6. Multiscale Simulations Suggest a Mechanism for the Association of the Dok7 PH Domain with PIP-Containing Membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Buyan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dok7 is a peripheral membrane protein that is associated with the MuSK receptor tyrosine kinase. Formation of the Dok7/MuSK/membrane complex is required for the activation of MuSK. This is a key step in the complex exchange of signals between neuron and muscle, which lead to neuromuscular junction formation, dysfunction of which is associated with congenital myasthenic syndromes. The Dok7 structure consists of a Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain and a Phosphotyrosine Binding (PTB domain. The mechanism of the Dok7 association with the membrane remains largely unknown. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations we have explored the formation of the Dok7 PH/membrane complex. Our simulations indicate that the PH domain of Dok7 associates with membranes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs via interactions of the β1/β2, β3/β4, and β5/β6 loops, which together form a positively charged surface on the PH domain and interact with the negatively charged headgroups of PIP molecules. The initial encounter of the Dok7 PH domain is followed by formation of additional interactions with the lipid bilayer, and especially with PIP molecules, which stabilizes the Dok7 PH/membrane complex. We have quantified the binding of the PH domain to the model bilayers by calculating a density landscape for protein/membrane interactions. Detailed analysis of the PH/PIP interactions reveal both a canonical and an atypical site to be occupied by the anionic lipid. PH domain binding leads to local clustering of PIP molecules in the bilayer. Association of the Dok7 PH domain with PIP lipids is therefore seen as a key step in localization of Dok7 to the membrane and formation of a complex with MuSK.

  7. Quantum statistical mechanics of nonrelativistic membranes: crumpling transition at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, M. E. S.; Kleinert, H.; Schakel, Adriaan M. J.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of quantum fluctuations on a nearly flat, nonrelativistic two-dimensional membrane with extrinsic curvature stiffness and tension is investigated. The renormalization group analysis is carried out in first-order perturbative theory. In contrast to thermal fluctuations, which soften the membrane at large scales and turn it into a crumpled surface, quantum fluctuations are found to stiffen the membrane, so that it exhibits a Hausdorff dimension equal to two. The large-scale behavior of the membrane is further studied at finite temperature, where a nontrivial fixed point is found, signaling a crumpling transition.

  8. SYP73 Anchors the ER to the Actin Cytoskeleton for Maintenance of ER Integrity and Streaming in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengfei; Renna, Luciana; Stefano, Giovanni; Brandizzi, Federica

    2016-12-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential organelle that spreads throughout the cytoplasm as one interconnected network of narrow tubules and dilated cisternae that enclose a single lumen. The ER network undergoes extensive remodeling, which critically depends on membrane-cytoskeleton interactions [1]. In plants, the ER is also highly mobile, and its streaming contributes significantly to the movement of other organelles [2, 3]. The remodeling and motility of the plant ER rely mainly on actin [4] and to a minor extent on microtubules [5]. Although a three-way interaction between the ER, cytosolic myosin-XI, and F-actin mediates the plant ER streaming [6], the mechanisms underlying stable interaction of the ER membrane with actin are unknown. Early electron microscopy studies suggested a direct attachment of the plant ER with actin filaments [7, 8], but it is plausible that yet-unknown proteins facilitate anchoring of the ER membrane with the cytoskeleton. We demonstrate here that SYP73, a member of the plant Syp7 subgroup of SNARE proteins [9] containing actin-binding domains, is a novel ER membrane-associated actin-binding protein. We show that overexpression of SYP73 causes a striking rearrangement of the ER over actin and that, similar to mutations of myosin-XI [4, 10, 11], loss of SYP73 reduces ER streaming and affects overall ER network morphology and plant growth. We propose a model for plant ER remodeling whereby the dynamic rearrangement and streaming of the ER network depend on the propelling action of myosin-XI over actin coupled with a SYP73-mediated bridging, which dynamically anchors the ER membrane with actin filaments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Membrane cholesterol removal changes mechanical properties of cells and induces secretion of a specific pool of lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissa, Barbara; Pontes, Bruno; Roma, Paula Magda S; Alves, Ana Paula; Rocha, Carolina D; Valverde, Thalita M; Aguiar, Pedro Henrique N; Almeida, Fernando P; Guimarães, Allan J; Guatimosim, Cristina; Silva, Aristóbolo M; Fernandes, Maria C; Andrews, Norma W; Viana, Nathan B; Mesquita, Oscar N; Agero, Ubirajara; Andrade, Luciana O

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study we had shown that membrane cholesterol removal induced unregulated lysosomal exocytosis events leading to the depletion of lysosomes located at cell periphery. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol triggered these exocytic events had not been uncovered. In this study we investigated the importance of cholesterol in controlling mechanical properties of cells and its connection with lysosomal exocytosis. Tether extraction with optical tweezers and defocusing microscopy were used to assess cell dynamics in mouse fibroblasts. These assays showed that bending modulus and surface tension increased when cholesterol was extracted from fibroblasts plasma membrane upon incubation with MβCD, and that the membrane-cytoskeleton relaxation time increased at the beginning of MβCD treatment and decreased at the end. We also showed for the first time that the amplitude of membrane-cytoskeleton fluctuation decreased during cholesterol sequestration, showing that these cells become stiffer. These changes in membrane dynamics involved not only rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but also de novo actin polymerization and stress fiber formation through Rho activation. We found that these mechanical changes observed after cholesterol sequestration were involved in triggering lysosomal exocytosis. Exocytosis occurred even in the absence of the lysosomal calcium sensor synaptotagmin VII, and was associated with actin polymerization induced by MβCD. Notably, exocytosis triggered by cholesterol removal led to the secretion of a unique population of lysosomes, different from the pool mobilized by actin depolymerizing drugs such as Latrunculin-A. These data support the existence of at least two different pools of lysosomes with different exocytosis dynamics, one of which is directly mobilized for plasma membrane fusion after cholesterol removal.

  10. Quantum mechanics on the moduli space from the quantum geometrodynamics of the open topological membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogan, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    The quantum geometrodynamics of the open topological membrane is described in terms of 2+1 topologically massive gravity (TMG) where the inverse graviton mass is proportional to the 2D central charge and thus is the measure of the off-criticality. The hamiltonian quantization of TMG on Riemann surfaces is considered and the moduli space appears as the subspace of the quantum-mechanical configuration space containing, besides the moduli, the first-order time derivatives of half of the moduli. The appearance of the first-order time derivatives as coordinates, not momenta, is due to the third-order derivative in the TMG lagrangian. The hamiltonian for the latter leads us to the discrete levels picture which looks like the topologically massive gauge theory (TMGT) case, where we also get the Landau levels picture and the lowest Landau level corresponds to the Hilbert space of the Chern-Simons theory (CST). The connection between the positivity of the energy and the complex structure on the moduli space is discussed. (orig.)

  11. [Expression changes of major outer membrane protein antigens in Leptospira interrogans during infection and its mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linli; Ge, Yumei; Hu, Weilin; Yan, Jie

    2013-03-01

    To determine expression changes of major outer membrane protein(OMP) antigens of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Lai strain Lai during infection of human macrophages and its mechanism. OmpR encoding genes and OmpR-related histidine kinase (HK) encoding gene of L.interrogans strain Lai and their functional domains were predicted using bioinformatics technique. mRNA level changes of the leptospiral major OMP-encoding genes before and after infection of human THP-1 macrophages were detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of the OmpR-encoding genes and HK-encoding gene on the expression of leptospiral OMPs during infection were determined by HK-peptide antiserum block assay and closantel inhibitive assays. The bioinformatics analysis indicated that LB015 and LB333 were referred to OmpR-encoding genes of the spirochete, while LB014 might act as a OmpR-related HK-encoding gene. After the spirochete infecting THP-1 cells, mRNA levels of leptospiral lipL21, lipL32 and lipL41 genes were rapidly and persistently down-regulated (P Expression levels of L.interrogans strain Lai major OMP antigens present notable changes during infection of human macrophages. There is a group of OmpR-and HK-encoding genes which may play a major role in down-regulation of expression levels of partial OMP antigens during infection.

  12. Oestrogen inhibits human colonic motility by a non-genomic cell membrane receptor-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Classical effects of oestrogen involve activation of target genes after binding nuclear receptors. Oestrogenic effects too rapid for DNA transcription (non-genomic) are known to occur. The effect of oestrogen on colonic motility is unknown despite the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in pregnant and premenopausal women. METHODS: Histologically normal colon was obtained from proximal resection margins of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended in organ baths under 1 g of tension. After equilibration, they were exposed to 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8) or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8). Fulvestrant, an oestrogen receptor antagonist, was added to some baths (n = 8). Other strips were exposed to calphostin C or cycloheximide. Carbachol was added in increasing concentrations and contractile activity was recorded isometrically. RESULTS: Oestrogen inhibited colonic contractility (mean difference 19.7 per cent; n = 8, P < 0.001). In keeping with non-genomic, rapid-onset steroid action, the effect was apparent within minutes and reversible. It was observed with both 17beta-oestradiol and BSA-conjugated oestrogen, and was not altered by cycloheximide. Effects were inhibited by fulvestrant, suggesting receptor mediation. CONCLUSION: Oestrogen decreases contractility in human colonic smooth muscle by a non-genomic mechanism involving cell membrane coupling.

  13. Membrane and Nuclear Permeabilization by Polymeric pDNA Vehicles: Efficient Method for Gene Delivery or Mechanism of Cytotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinetti, Giovanna; Smith, Adam E.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the cytotoxicity mechanisms of linear PEI to two analogous polymers synthesized by our group: a hydroxyl-containing poly(L-tartaramidoamine) (T4) and a version containing an alkyl chain spacer poly(adipamidopentaethylenetetramine) (A4) by studying the cellular responses to polymer transfection. We have also synthesized analogues of T4 with different molecular weights (degrees of polymerization of 6, 12, and 43) to examine the role of molecular weight on the cytotoxicity mechanisms. Several mechanisms of polymer-induced cytotoxicity are investigated, including plasma membrane permeabilization, the formation of potentially harmful polymer degradation products during transfection including reactive oxygen species, and nuclear membrane permeabilization. We hypothesized that since cationic polymers are capable of disrupting the plasma membrane, they may also be capable of disrupting the nuclear envelope, which could be a potential mechanism of how the pDNA is delivered into the nucleus (other than nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis). Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we show that the polycations with the highest amount of protein expression and toxicity, PEI and T443, are capable of inducing nuclear membrane permeability. This finding is important for the field of nucleic acid delivery in that not only could direct nucleus permeabilization be a mechanism for pDNA nuclear import but also a potential mechanism of cytotoxicity and cell death. We also show that the production of reactive oxygen species is not a main mechanism of cytotoxicity, and that the presence or absence of hydroxyl groups as well as polymer length plays a role in polyplex size and charge in addition to protein expression efficiency and toxicity. PMID:22175236

  14. Reinforcing the membrane-mediated mechanism of action of the anti-tuberculosis candidate drug thioridazine with molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Thioridazine is a well-known dopamine-antagonist drug with a wide range of pharmacological properties ranging from neuroleptic to antimicrobial and even anticancer activity. Thioridazine is a critical component of a promising multi-drug therapy against M. tuberculosis. Amongst the various propose......-membrane interactions, and reinforce the wider, emerging view of action of many small, bioactive compounds....... mechanisms of action, the cell membrane-mediated one is peculiarly tempting due to the distinctive feature of phenothiazine drug family to accumulate in selected body tissues. In this study, we employ long-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions of three different concentrations...

  15. Translocation of cell penetrating peptides and calcium-induced membrane fusion share same mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Magarkar, Aniket; Allolio, Christoph; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Baxová, Katarína; Šachl, Radek; Horinek, D.; Heinz, V.; Rachel, R.; Ziegler, C.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl 1 (2017), S386 ISSN 0175-7571. [IUPAB congress /19./ and EBSA congress /11./. 16.07.2017-20.07.2017, Edinburgh] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : membrane interactions * membrane fusion * cell penetration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  16. Bobbing of Oxysterols: Molecular Mechanism for Translocation of Tail-Oxidized Sterols through Biological Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulig, W.; Mikkolainen, H.; Olžyńska, Agnieszka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Hof, Martin; Vattulainen, I.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Rog, T.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2018), s. 1118-1123 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : biological membranes * alcohols * cell membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 9.353, year: 2016

  17. Fullerene-based Anchoring Groups for Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christian A.; Ding, Dapeng; Sørensen, Jakob Kryger

    2008-01-01

    We present results on a new fullerene-based anchoring group for molecular electronics. Using lithographic mechanically controllable break junctions in vacuum we have determined the conductance and stability of single-molecule junctions of 1,4-bis(fullero[c]pyrrolidin-1-yl)benzene. The compound can...

  18. The radioinduced membranes injuries as biological dose indicators: mechanisms of studies and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent-Genod, Lucie

    2001-10-01

    After an accidental overexposure, the assessment of the received dose in biological dosimetry is performed by a method based on the effects of irradiation on the DNA molecule. But this technique shows some limitations; therefore we tried to find new bio-sensors of radiation exposure. We have pointed out that membrane is a critical target of ionising radiation after an in vitro and in vivo overexposure. In vitro, these modifications were involved in the radio-induced apoptotic pathway. The measure of membrane fluidity allowed us to obtain an overall view of cellular membrane. Moreover, in vivo, by changing the lipid nutritional status of animals, our results displayed the important role played by membrane lipid composition in radio-induced membrane alterations. Besides, membrane effects were adjusted by the extracellular physiological control, and in particular by the damages on membrane fatty acid pattern. Finally, we have tested the use of membrane fluidity index as a bio-sensor of radiation exposure on in vivo models and blood samples from medical total body irradiated patients. The results achieved on animal models suggested that the membrane fluidity index was a bio-sensor of radiation exposure. Nevertheless, the observations realised on patients highlight that the effect of the first dose fraction of the radiotherapy treatment had some difficulties to be noticed. Indeed, the combined treatment: chemotherapy and radiotherapy disturbed the membrane fluidity index measures. To conclude, whereas this parameter was not a bio-sensor of irradiation exposure usable in biological dosimetry, it may allow us to assess the radio-induced damages and their cellular but also tissue impacts. (author)

  19. Organizing membrane-curving proteins: the emerging dynamical picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Mijo; Bassereau, Patricia; Voth, Gregory A

    2018-03-30

    Lipid membranes play key roles in cells, such as in trafficking, division, infection, remodeling of organelles, among others. The key step in all these processes is creating membrane curvature, typically under the control of many anchored, adhered or included proteins. However, it has become clear that the membrane itself can mediate the interactions among proteins to produce highly ordered assemblies. Computer simulations are ideally suited to investigate protein organization and the dynamics of membrane remodeling at near-micron scales, something that is extremely challenging to tackle experimentally. We review recent computational efforts in modeling protein-caused membrane deformation mechanisms, specifically focusing on coarse-grained simulations. We highlight work that exposed the membrane-mediated ordering of proteins into lines, meshwork, spirals and other assemblies, in what seems to be a very generic mechanism driven by a combination of short and long-ranged forces. Modulating the mechanical properties of membranes is an underexplored signaling mechanism in various processes deserving of more attention in the near future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Finite element method (FEM) model of the mechanical stress on phospholipid membranes from shock waves produced in nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald; Roth, Caleb C.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Beier, Hope; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    The underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation of phospholipid membranes by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsEP) remains unknown. The passage of a high electric field through a conductive medium creates two primary contributing factors that may induce poration: the electric field interaction at the membrane and the shockwave produced from electrostriction of a polar submersion medium exposed to an electric field. Previous work has focused on the electric field interaction at the cell membrane, through such models as the transport lattice method. Our objective is to model the shock wave cell membrane interaction induced from the density perturbation formed at the rising edge of a high voltage pulse in a polar liquid resulting in a shock wave propagating away from the electrode toward the cell membrane. Utilizing previous data from cell membrane mechanical parameters, and nsEP generated shockwave parameters, an acoustic shock wave model based on the Helmholtz equation for sound pressure was developed and coupled to a cell membrane model with finite-element modeling in COMSOL. The acoustic structure interaction model was developed to illustrate the harmonic membrane displacements and stresses resulting from shockwave and membrane interaction based on Hooke's law. Poration is predicted by utilizing membrane mechanical breakdown parameters including cortical stress limits and hydrostatic pressure gradients.

  1. Self-tapping ability of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feerick, Emer M; Wilson, Joanne; Jarman-Smith, Marcus; Ó'Brádaigh, Conchur M; McGarry, J Patrick

    2014-10-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the self-tapping ability of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been conducted. Six CFR-PEEK suture anchor designs were investigated using PEEK-OPTIMA® Reinforced, a medical grade of CFR-PEEK. Experimental tests were conducted to investigate the maximum axial force and torque required for self-taping insertion of each anchor design. Additional experimental tests were conducted for some anchor designs using pilot holes. Computational simulations were conducted to determine the maximum stress in each anchor design at various stages of insertion. Simulations also were performed to investigate the effect of wall thickness in the anchor head. The maximum axial force required to insert a self-tapping CFR-PEEK suture anchor did not exceed 150 N for any anchor design. The maximum torque required to insert a self-tapping CFR-PEEK suture anchor did not exceed 0.8 Nm. Computational simulations reveal significant stress concentrations in the region of the anchor tip, demonstrating that a re-design of the tip geometry should be performed to avoid fracture during self-tapping, as observed in the experimental component of this study. This study demonstrates the ability of PEEK-OPTIMA Reinforced suture anchors to self-tap polyurethane foam bone analogue. This provides motivation to further investigate the self-tapping ability of CFR-PEEK suture anchors in animal/cadaveric bone. An optimised design for CFR-PEEK suture anchors offers the advantages of radiolucency, and mechanical properties similar to bone with the ability to self-tap. This may have positive implications for reducing surgery times and the associated costs with the procedure. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Single-cell mechanics--An experimental-computational method for quantifying the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartibi, M; Liu, Y X; Liu, G-Y; Komvopoulos, K

    2015-11-01

    The membrane-cytoskeleton system plays a major role in cell adhesion, growth, migration, and differentiation. F-actin filaments, cross-linkers, binding proteins that bundle F-actin filaments to form the actin cytoskeleton, and integrins that connect the actin cytoskeleton network to the cell plasma membrane and extracellular matrix are major cytoskeleton constituents. Thus, the cell cytoskeleton is a complex composite that can assume different shapes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based techniques have been used to measure cytoskeleton material properties without much attention to cell shape. A recently developed surface chemical patterning method for long-term single-cell culture was used to seed individual cells on circular patterns. A continuum-based cell model, which uses as input the force-displacement response obtained with a modified AFM setup and relates the membrane-cytoskeleton elastic behavior to the cell geometry, while treating all other subcellular components suspended in the cytoplasmic liquid (gel) as an incompressible fluid, is presented and validated by experimental results. The developed analytical-experimental methodology establishes a framework for quantifying the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity of live cells. This capability may have immense implications in cell biology, particularly in studies seeking to establish correlations between membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity and cell disease, mortality, differentiation, and migration, and provide insight into cell infiltration through nonwoven fibrous scaffolds. The present method can be further extended to analyze membrane-cytoskeleton viscoelasticity, examine the role of other subcellular components (e.g., nucleus envelope) in cell elasticity, and elucidate the effects of mechanical stimuli on cell differentiation and motility. This is the first study to decouple the membrane-cytoskeleton elasticity from cell stiffness and introduce an effective approach for measuring the elastic modulus. The

  3. A membrane actuator based on an ionic polymer network and carbon nanotubes: the synergy of ionic transport and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Chi-An; Hsiao, Chih-Chun; Weng, Shih-Chun; Kao, An-Cheng; Liu, Chien-Pan; Tsai, Wei-Bor; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Liu, Wei-Ming; Shih, Wen-Pin; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of ionic polymer–metal composites (IPMC) as sensors and actuators for biomedical applications due to their large deformation under low driving voltage. In this study, we employed poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PVA/PAMPS) blend membranes as semi-interpenetrating polymer networks for ion exchange in IPMC construction. To improve the mechanical and electrical properties of the IPMC, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were added into PVA/PAMPS membranes. The actuator performance of the membranes was measured as a function of their water uptake, ion exchange capacity, ionic conductivity and the amount of MWNT in the membrane. The dispersion quality of the modified MWNT in the PVA/PAMPS membrane was measured using transmission electron microscopy. The cantilever-type IPMC actuator bends under applied voltage and its bending angle and the generative tip force were measured. Under an applied voltage, IPMC with ∼1 wt% MWNT showed the largest deflection and generated the largest blocking tip force compared with those of IPMC with other various amounts of MWNT. These results show that a small addition of MWNT can optimize the actuation performance of IPMC. The result indicates that IPMC with MWNT shows potential for use as biomimetic artificial muscle

  4. The anti-apoptotic effect of fluid mechanics preconditioning by cells membrane and mitochondria in rats brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shan; Zhu, Fengping; Hu, Ruiping; Tian, Song; Chen, Xingxing; Lou, Dan; Cao, Bing; Chen, Qiulei; Li, Bai; Li, Fang; Bai, Yulong; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Yulian

    2018-01-01

    Exercise preconditioning is a simple and effective way to prevent ischemia. This paper further provided the mechanism in hemodynamic aspects at the cellular level. To study the anti-apoptotic effects of fluid mechanics preconditioning, Cultured rats brain microvascular endothelial cells were given fluid intervention in a parallel plate flow chamber before oxygen glucose deprivation. It showed that fluid mechanics preconditioning could inhibit the apoptosis of endothelial cells, and this process might be mediated by the shear stress activation of Tie-2 on cells membrane surface and Bcl-2 on the mitochondria surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanism of membrane damage by El Tor hemolysin of Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, H; Akatsuka, A; Tsujiyama, H; Nakae, T; Shimamura, T

    1996-08-01

    El Tor hemolysin (ETH; molecular mass, 65 kDa) derived from Vibrio cholerae O1 spontaneously assembled oligomeric aggregates on the membranes of rabbit erythrocyte ghosts and liposomes. Membrane-associated oligomers were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting into two to nine bands with apparent molecular masses of 170 to 350 kDa. ETH assembled oligomers on a liposomal membrane consisting of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, but not on a membrane of phosphatidylcholine alone. Cholesterol could be replaced with diosgenin or ergosterol but not with 5alpha-cholestane-3-one, suggesting that sterol is essential for the oligomerization. The treatment of carboxyfluorescein-encapsulated liposomes with ETH caused a rapid release of carboxyfluorescein into the medium. Because dextrin 20 (molecular mass, 900 Da) osmotically protected ETH-mediated hemolysis, this hemolysis is likely to be caused by pore formation on the membrane. The pore size(s) estimated from osmotic protection assays was in the range of 1.2 to 1.6 nm. The pore formed on a rabbit erythrocyte membrane was confirmed morphologically by electron microscopy. Thus, we provide evidence that ETH damages the target by the assembly of hemolysin oligomers and pore formation on the membrane.

  6. Bile acids modulate signaling by functional perturbation of plasma membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Maxwell, Kelsey N; Sezgin, Erdinc; Lu, Maryia; Liang, Hong; Hancock, John F; Dial, Elizabeth J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Levental, Ilya

    2013-12-13

    Eukaryotic cell membranes are organized into functional lipid and protein domains, the most widely studied being membrane rafts. Although rafts have been associated with numerous plasma membrane functions, the mechanisms by which these domains themselves are regulated remain undefined. Bile acids (BAs), whose primary function is the solubilization of dietary lipids for digestion and absorption, can affect cells by interacting directly with membranes. To investigate whether these interactions affected domain organization in biological membranes, we assayed the effects of BAs on biomimetic synthetic liposomes, isolated plasma membranes, and live cells. At cytotoxic concentrations, BAs dissolved synthetic and cell-derived membranes and disrupted live cell plasma membranes, implicating plasma membrane damage as the mechanism for BA cellular toxicity. At subtoxic concentrations, BAs dramatically stabilized domain separation in Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles without affecting protein partitioning between coexisting domains. Domain stabilization was the result of BA binding to and disordering the nonraft domain, thus promoting separation by enhancing domain immiscibility. Consistent with the physical changes observed in synthetic and isolated biological membranes, BAs reorganized intact cell membranes, as evaluated by the spatial distribution of membrane-anchored Ras isoforms. Nanoclustering of K-Ras, related to nonraft membrane domains, was enhanced in intact plasma membranes, whereas the organization of H-Ras was unaffected. BA-induced changes in Ras lateral segregation potentiated EGF-induced signaling through MAPK, confirming the ability of BAs to influence cell signal transduction by altering the physical properties of the plasma membrane. These observations suggest general, membrane-mediated mechanisms by which biological amphiphiles can produce their cellular effects.

  7. Nominal Anchors in the CIS

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M Keller; Thomas J Richardson

    2003-01-01

    Monetary policy has become increasingly important in the countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) as fiscal adjustment and structural reforms have taken root. Inflation has been brought down to relatively low levels in almost all of these countries, raising the question of what should be the appropriate nominal anchor at this stage. Formally, almost all CIS countries have floating exchange rate regimes, yet in practice they manage their exchange rates very heavily, perhaps be...

  8. On the mechanism of boron transfer through the cation-exchange membrane MK-40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Varvaruk, L.A.; Grebenyuk, V.D.; Trachevskij, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    Proceses of boron electromigration in solutions with different pH values are investigated. It is shown, that boron transfer through ion-exchange membranes is determined by pH of solution. Phenomenon of boron transfer (existing in the solution in the form of boric acid) through cation-exchange membrane MK-40 has been detected and described for the first time. The process of boron (3) complexing with sulfate groups of the membrane by means of competing reversible substitution of hydroxoligands is the basis of the phenomenon

  9. Model-based analysis of the effect of different operating conditions on fouling mechanisms in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Gianpaolo; Ferraris, Marco; Spagni, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a model-based evaluation of the effect of different operating conditions with and without pre-denitrification treatment and applying three different solids retention times on the fouling mechanisms involved in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). A total of 11 fouling models obtained from literature were used to fit the transmembrane pressure variations measured in a pilot-scale MBR treating real wastewater for more than 1 year. The results showed that all the models represent reasonable descriptions of the fouling processes in the MBR tested. The model-based analysis confirmed that membrane fouling started by pore blocking (complete blocking model) and by a reduction of the pore diameter (standard blocking) while cake filtration became the dominant fouling mechanism over long-term operation. However, the different fouling mechanisms occurred almost simultaneously making it rather difficult to identify each one. The membrane "history" (i.e. age, lifespan, etc.) seems the most important factor affecting the fouling mechanism more than the applied operating conditions. Nonlinear regression of the most complex models (combined models) evaluated in this study sometimes demonstrated unreliable parameter estimates suggesting that the four basic fouling models (complete, standard, intermediate blocking and cake filtration) contain enough details to represent a reasonable description of the main fouling processes occurring in MBRs.

  10. Biomimetic Hybridization of Kevlar into Silk Fibroin: Nanofibrous Strategy for Improved Mechanic Properties of Flexible Composites and Filtration Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lili; Han, Xiangsheng; Zong, Lu; Li, Mingjie; You, Jun; Wu, Xiaochen; Li, Chaoxu

    2017-08-22

    Silk, one of the strongest natural biopolymers, was hybridized with Kevlar, one of the strongest synthetic polymers, through a biomimetic nanofibrous strategy. Regenerated silk materials have outstanding properties in transparency, biocompatibility, biodegradability and sustainability, and promising applications as diverse as in pharmaceutics, electronics, photonic devices and membranes. To compete with super mechanic properties of their natural counterpart, regenerated silk materials have been hybridized with inorganic fillers such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, but frequently lose essential mechanic flexibility. Inspired by the nanofibrous strategy of natural biomaterials (e.g., silk fibers, hemp and byssal threads of mussels) for fantastic mechanic properties, Kevlar was integrated in regenerated silk materials by combining nanometric fibrillation with proper hydrothermal treatments. The resultant hybrid films showed an ultimate stress and Young's modulus two times as high as those of pure regenerated SF films. This is not only because of the reinforcing effect of Kevlar nanofibrils, but also because of the increasing content of silk β-sheets. When introducing Kevlar nanofibrils into the membranes of silk nanofibrils assembled by regenerated silk fibroin, the improved mechanic properties further enabled potential applications as pressure-driven nanofiltration membranes and flexible substrates of electronic devices.

  11. Myocardial Oxidative Metabolism and Protein Synthesis during Mechanical Circulatory Support by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priddy, MD, Colleen M.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena; Bouchard, Bertrand; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support essential for survival in infants and children with acute cardiac decompensation. However, ECMO also causes metabolic disturbances, which contribute to total body wasting and protein loss. Cardiac stunning can also occur which prevents ECMO weaning, and contributes to high mortality. The heart may specifically undergo metabolic impairments, which influence functional recovery. We tested the hypothesis that ECMO alters oxidative. We focused on the amino acid leucine, and integration with myocardial protein synthesis. We used a translational immature swine model in which we assessed in heart (i) the fractional contribution of leucine (FcLeucine) and pyruvate (FCpyruvate) to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and (ii) global protein fractional synthesis (FSR) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature mixed breed Yorkshire male piglets (n = 22) were divided into four groups based on loading status (8 hours of normal circulation or ECMO) and intracoronary infusion [13C6,15N]-L-leucine (3.7 mM) alone or with [2-13C]-pyruvate (7.4 mM). ECMO decreased pulse pressure and correspondingly lowered myocardial oxygen consumption (~ 40%, n = 5), indicating decreased overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, FcLeucine was maintained and myocardial protein FSR was marginally increased. Pyruvate addition decreased tissue leucine enrichment, FcLeucine, and Fc for endogenous substrates as well as protein FSR. Conclusion: The heart under ECMO shows reduced oxidative metabolism of substrates, including amino acids, while maintaining (i) metabolic flexibility indicated by ability to respond to pyruvate, and (ii) a normal or increased capacity for global protein synthesis, suggesting an improved protein balance.

  12. Nonlinear observer-based Lyapunov boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms for membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2016-01-01

    , and seeks to maintain the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries around a sufficient level to promote water production. MD process is modeled with advection diffusion equation model in two dimensions, where the diffusion and convection heat

  13. Modeling of the axon membrane skeleton structure and implications for its mechanical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihao Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that, unlike the soma and dendrites, the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under tension. Currently, the structure-function relationship of the axonal structure is unclear. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM to show that the stiffness of the axon plasma membrane is significantly higher than the stiffnesses of dendrites and somata. To examine whether the structure of the axon plasma membrane determines its overall stiffness, we introduced a coarse-grain molecular dynamics model of the axon membrane skeleton that reproduces the structure identified by super-resolution microscopy. Our proposed computational model accurately simulates the median value of the Young's modulus of the axon plasma membrane determined by atomic force microscopy. It also predicts that because the spectrin filaments are under entropic tension, the thermal random motion of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav, which are bound to ankyrin particles, a critical axonal protein, is reduced compared to the thermal motion when spectrin filaments are held at equilibrium. Lastly, our model predicts that because spectrin filaments are under tension, any axonal injuries that lacerate spectrin filaments will likely lead to a permanent disruption of the membrane skeleton due to the inability of spectrin filaments to spontaneously form their initial under-tension configuration.

  14. Modeling of the axon membrane skeleton structure and implications for its mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihao; Abiraman, Krithika; Li, He; Pierce, David M; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Lykotrafitis, George

    2017-02-01

    Super-resolution microscopy recently revealed that, unlike the soma and dendrites, the axon membrane skeleton is structured as a series of actin rings connected by spectrin filaments that are held under tension. Currently, the structure-function relationship of the axonal structure is unclear. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that the stiffness of the axon plasma membrane is significantly higher than the stiffnesses of dendrites and somata. To examine whether the structure of the axon plasma membrane determines its overall stiffness, we introduced a coarse-grain molecular dynamics model of the axon membrane skeleton that reproduces the structure identified by super-resolution microscopy. Our proposed computational model accurately simulates the median value of the Young's modulus of the axon plasma membrane determined by atomic force microscopy. It also predicts that because the spectrin filaments are under entropic tension, the thermal random motion of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), which are bound to ankyrin particles, a critical axonal protein, is reduced compared to the thermal motion when spectrin filaments are held at equilibrium. Lastly, our model predicts that because spectrin filaments are under tension, any axonal injuries that lacerate spectrin filaments will likely lead to a permanent disruption of the membrane skeleton due to the inability of spectrin filaments to spontaneously form their initial under-tension configuration.

  15. Antimicrobial properties and membrane-active mechanism of a potential α-helical antimicrobial derived from cathelicidin PMAP-36.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinfeng Lv

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, which present in the non-specific immune system of organism, are amongst the most promising candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials. The modification of naturally occurring AMPs based on their residue composition and distribution is a simple and effective strategy for optimization of known AMPs. In this study, a series of truncated and residue-substituted derivatives of antimicrobial peptide PMAP-36 were designed and synthesized. The 24-residue truncated peptide, GI24, displayed antimicrobial activity comparable to the mother peptide PMAP-36 with MICs ranging from 1 to 4 µM, which is lower than the MICs of bee venom melittin. Although GI24 displayed high antimicrobial activity, its hemolytic activity was much lower than melittin, suggesting that GI24 have optimal cell selectivity. In addition, the crucial site of GI24 was identified through single site-mutation. An amino acid with high hydrophobicity at position 23 played an important role in guaranteeing the high antimicrobial activity of GI24. Then, lipid vesicles and whole bacteria were employed to investigate the membrane-active mechanisms. Membrane-simulating experiments showed that GI24 interacted strongly with negatively charged phospholipids and weakly with zwitterionic phospholipids, which corresponded well with the data of its biological activities. Membrane permeabilization and flow cytometry provide the evidence that GI24 killed microbial cells by permeabilizing the cell membrane and damaging membrane integrity. GI24 resulted in greater cell morphological changes and visible pores on cell membrane as determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. Taken together, the peptide GI24 may provide a promising antimicrobial agent for therapeutic applications against the frequently-encountered bacteria.

  16. The effect of alcohols on red blood cell mechanical properties and membrane fluidity depends on their molecular size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Sonmez

    Full Text Available The role of membrane fluidity in determining red blood cell (RBC deformability has been suggested by a number of studies. The present investigation evaluated alterations of RBC membrane fluidity, deformability and stability in the presence of four linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol and butanol using ektacytometry and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. All alcohols had a biphasic effect on deformability such that it increased then decreased with increasing concentration; the critical concentration for reversal was an inverse function of molecular size. EPR results showed biphasic changes of near-surface fluidity (i.e., increase then decrease and a decreased fluidity of the lipid core; rank order of effectiveness was butanol > propanol > ethanol > methanol, with a significant correlation between near-surface fluidity and deformability (r = 0.697; p<0.01. The presence of alcohol enhanced the impairment of RBC deformability caused by subjecting cells to 100 Pa shear stress for 300 s, with significant differences from control being observed at higher concentrations of all four alcohols. The level of hemolysis was dependent on molecular size and concentration, whereas echinocytic shape transformation (i.e., biconcave disc to crenated morphology was observed only for ethanol and propanol. These results are in accordance with available data obtained on model membranes. They document the presence of mechanical links between RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity, chain length-dependence of the ability of alcohols to alter RBC mechanical behavior, and the biphasic response of RBC deformability and near-surface membrane fluidity to increasing alcohol concentrations.

  17. Species transport mechanisms governing capacity loss in vanadium flow batteries: Comparing Nafion® and sulfonated Radel membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agar, Ertan; Knehr, K.W.; Chen, D.; Hickner, M.A.; Kumbur, E.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Species transport mechanisms are investigated in Nafion ® and s-Radel for VRFBs. • Unlike diffusion in Nafion ® , crossover in s-Radel is dominated by convection. • In particular, electro-osmotic convection is the dominant mode in s-Radel. • Change in direction of convection causes a lower crossover in s-Radel. • Hydraulic and electrokinetic permeability are as important as vanadium permeability. -- Abstract: In this study, a 2-D, transient vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) model was used to investigate and compare the ion transport mechanisms responsible for vanadium crossover in Nafion ® 117 and sulfonated Radel (s-Radel) membranes. Specifically, the model was used to distinguish the relative contribution of diffusion, migration, osmotic and electro-osmotic convection to the net vanadium crossover in Nafion ® and s-Radel. Model simulations indicate that diffusion is the dominant mode of vanadium transport in Nafion ® , whereas convection dominates the vanadium transport through s-Radel due to the lower vanadium permeability, and thus diffusivity of s-Radel. Among the convective transport modes, electro-osmotic convection (i.e., electro-osmotic drag) is found to govern the species crossover in s-Radel due to its higher fixed acid concentration and corresponding free ions in the membrane. Simulations also show that vanadium crossover in s-Radel changes direction during charge and discharge due to the change in the direction of electro-osmotic convection. This reversal in the direction of crossover during charge and discharge is found to result in significantly lower “net” crossover for s-Radel when compared to Nafion ® . Comparison of these two membranes also provides guidance for minimizing crossover in VRFB systems and underscores the importance of measuring the hydraulic and the electro-kinetic permeability of a membrane in addition to vanadium diffusion characteristics, when evaluating new membranes for VRFB applications

  18. From the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane: mechanisms of CFTR folding and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos M; Canato, Sara

    2017-01-01

    CFTR biogenesis starts with its co-translational insertion into the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum and folding of the cytosolic domains, towards the acquisition of a fully folded compact native structure. Efficiency of this process is assessed by the ER quality control system that allows the exit of folded proteins but targets unfolded/misfolded CFTR to degradation. If allowed to leave the ER, CFTR is modified at the Golgi and reaches the post-Golgi compartments to be delivered to the plasma membrane where it functions as a cAMP- and phosphorylation-regulated chloride/bicarbonate channel. CFTR residence at the membrane is a balance of membrane delivery, endocytosis, and recycling. Several adaptors, motor, and scaffold proteins contribute to the regulation of CFTR stability and are involved in continuously assessing its structure through peripheral quality control systems. Regulation of CFTR biogenesis and traffic (and its dysregulation by mutations, such as the most common F508del) determine its overall activity and thus contribute to the fine modulation of chloride secretion and hydration of epithelial surfaces. This review covers old and recent knowledge on CFTR folding and trafficking from its synthesis to the regulation of its stability at the plasma membrane and highlights how several of these steps can be modulated to promote the rescue of mutant CFTR.

  19. Retractable Robotic Anchor for Hard Rock and Granular Soils, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations proposes to research, develop, and validate an innovative retractable robotic anchoring mechanism that works both in hard rock and granular soils...

  20. The casting and mechanism of formation of semi-permeable polymer membranes in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, I.

    The National Electric Company of Venezuela, C.A.D.A.F.E., is sponsoring the development of this experiment which represents Venezuela's first scientific experiment in space. The apparatus for the automatic casting of polymer thin films will be contained in NASA's payload No. G-559 of the Get Away Special program for a future orbital space flight in the U.S. Space Shuttle. Semi-permeable polymer membranes have important applications in a variety of fields, such as medecine, energy, and pharmaceuticals, and in general fluid separation processes such as reverse osmosis, ultra-filtration, and electro-dialysis. The casting of semi-permeable membranes in space will help to identify the roles of convection in determining the strucutre of these membranes.

  1. Physico-Pathologic Mechanisms Involved in Neurodegeneration: Misfolded Protein-Plasma Membrane Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2017-07-05

    Several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, are characterized by prominent loss of synapses and neurons associated with the presence of abnormally structured or misfolded protein assemblies. Cell-to-cell transfer of misfolded proteins has been proposed for the intra-cerebral propagation of these diseases. When released, misfolded proteins diffuse in the 3D extracellular space before binding to the plasma membrane of neighboring cells, where they diffuse on a 2D plane. This reduction in diffusion dimension and the cell surface molecular crowding promote deleterious interactions with native membrane proteins, favoring clustering and further aggregation of misfolded protein assemblies. These processes open up new avenues for therapeutics development targeting the initial interactions of deleterious proteins with the plasma membrane or the subsequent pathological signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermo-mechanical properties of mixed-matrix membranes encompassing zeolitic imidazolate framework-90 and polyvinylidine difluoride: ZIF-90/PVDF nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyagina, Irina S.; Mahdi, E. M.; Titov, Kirill; Tan, Jin-Chong

    2017-08-01

    Mixed-matrix membranes are contemporary nanocomposite materials with many potential applications, from liquid and gas separations to chemical sensors and biomedicine. We report fabrication of a metal-organic framework (MOF)-based nanocomposite, combining polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) polymer as the matrix and ZIF-90 nanocrystals of up to 30 wt. % filler content. The focus is to establish the processing—microstructure—mechanical property relationships. We reveal the importance for quantifying salient effects of the filler contents: (i) tensile strength degrades beyond 10 wt. % and (ii) mechanical toughness declines due to membrane embrittlement. These are vital mechanical aspects but widely overlooked in the emergent field of MOF membranes and composites.

  3. Model test of anchoring effect on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration.

  4. Model Test of Anchoring Effect on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Guang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration.

  5. New insights into enterocin CRL35: mechanism of action and immunity revealed by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, Daniela E; Ríos Colombo, Natalia S; Galván, Adriana E; Acuña, Leonardo; Minahk, Carlos J; Bellomio, Augusto; Chalón, Miriam C

    2017-09-01

    The role of the class IIa bacteriocin membrane receptor protein remains unclear, and the following two different mechanisms have been proposed: the bacteriocin could interact with the receptor changing it to an open conformation or the receptor might act as an anchor allowing subsequent bacteriocin insertion and membrane disruption. Bacteriocin-producing cells synthesize an immunity protein that forms an inactive bacteriocin-receptor-immunity complex. To better understand the molecular mechanism of enterocin CRL35, the peptide was expressed as the suicidal probe EtpM-enterocin CRL35 in Escherichia coli, a naturally insensitive microorganism since it does not express the receptor. When the bacteriocin is anchored to the periplasmic face of the plasma membrane through the bitopic membrane protein, EtpM , E. coli cells depolarize and die. Moreover, co-expression of the immunity protein prevents the deleterious effect of EtpM-enterocin CRL35. The binding and anchoring of the bacteriocin to the membrane has demonstrated to be a sufficient condition for its membrane insertion. The final step of membrane disruption by EtpM-enterocin CRL35 is independent from the receptor, which means that the mannose PTS might not be involved in the pore structure. In addition, the immunity protein can protect even in the absence of the receptor. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Programmed Fetal Membrane Senescence and Exosome-Mediated Signaling: A Mechanism Associated With Timing of Human Parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Menon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human parturition is an inflammatory process that involves both fetal and maternal compartments. The precise immune cell interactions have not been well delineated in human uterine tissues during parturition, but insights into human labor initiation have been informed by studies in animal models. Unfortunately, the timing of parturition relative to fetal maturation varies among viviparous species—indicative of different phylogenetic clocks and alarms—but what is clear is that important common pathways must converge to control the birth process. Herein, we hypothesize a novel signaling mechanism initiated by human fetal membrane aging and senescence-associated inflammation. Programmed events of fetal membrane aging coincide with fetal growth and organ maturation. Mechanistically, senescence involves in telomere shortening and activation of p38 mitogen-activated signaling kinase resulting in aging-associated phenotypic transition. Senescent tissues release inflammatory signals that are propagated via exosomes to cause functional changes in maternal uterine tissues. In vitro, oxidative stress causes increased release of inflammatory mediators (senescence-associated secretory phenotype and damage-associated molecular pattern markers that can be packaged inside the exosomes. These exosomes traverse through tissues layers, reach maternal tissues to increase overall inflammatory load transitioning them from a quiescent to active state. Animal model studies have shown that fetal exosomes can travel from fetal to the maternal side. Thus, aging fetal membranes and membrane-derived exosomes cargo fetal signals to the uterus and cervix and may trigger parturition. This review highlights a novel hypothesis in human parturition research based on data from ongoing research using human fetal membrane model system.

  7. Sympathetic cooling of a membrane oscillator in a hybrid mechanical-atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöckel, Andreas; Faber, Aline; Kampschulte, Tobias; Korppi, Maria; Rakher, Matthew T.; Treutlein, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling with ultracold atoms and atomic ions enables ultralow temperatures in systems where direct laser or evaporative cooling is not possible. It has so far been limited to the cooling of other microscopic particles, with masses up to 90 times larger than that of the coolant atom. Here, we use ultracold atoms to sympathetically cool the vibrations of a Si3N4 nanomembrane, the mass of which exceeds that of the atomic ensemble by a factor of 1010. The coupling of atomic and membrane vibrations is mediated by laser light over a macroscopic distance and is enhanced by placing the membrane in an optical cavity. We observe cooling of the membrane vibrations from room temperature to 650 ± 230 mK, exploiting the large atom-membrane cooperativity of our hybrid optomechanical system. With technical improvements, our scheme could provide ground-state cooling and quantum control of low-frequency oscillators such as nanomembranes or levitated nanoparticles, in a regime where purely optomechanical techniques cannot reach the ground state.

  8. Effect of cholesterol on structural and mechanical properties of membranes depends on lipid chain saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jianjun; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of cholesterol on membrane bending modulus K C , membrane thickness D HH , the partial and apparent areas of cholesterol and lipid, and the order parameter S xray are shown to depend upon the number of saturated hydrocarbon chains in the lipid molecules. Particularly striking is the result that up to 40% cholesterol does not increase the bending modulus K C of membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine lipids with two cis monounsaturated chains, although it does have the expected stiffening effect on membranes composed of lipids with two saturated chains. The B fluctuational modulus in the smectic liquid crystal theory is obtained and used to discuss the interactions between bilayers. Our K C results motivate a theory of elastic moduli in the high cholesterol limit and they challenge the relevance of universality concepts. Although most of our results were obtained at 30 deg. C, additional data at other temperatures to allow consideration of a reduced temperature variable do not support universality for the effect of cholesterol on all lipid bilayers. If the concept of universality is to be valid, different numbers of saturated chains must be considered to create different universality classes. The above experimental results were obtained from analysis of x-ray scattering in the low angle and wide angle regions.

  9. Investigation of the chemical mechanisms involved in the electropulsation of membranes at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Marie; Mir, Lluis M

    2018-02-01

    The chemical consequences of electropulsation on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), in particular the possible oxidation of unsaturated phospholipids, have been investigated by mass spectrometry, flow cytometry and absorbance methods. Pulse application induced oxidation of the GUV phospholipids and the oxidation level depended on the duration of the pulse. Light and O 2 increased the level of pulse-induced lipid peroxidation whereas the presence of antioxidants either in the membrane or in the solution completely suppressed peroxidation. Importantly, pulse application did not create additional reactive oxygen species (ROS) in GUV-free solution. Lipid peroxidation seems to result from a facilitation of the lipid peroxidation by the ROS already present in the solution before pulsing, not from a direct pulse-induced peroxidation. The pulse would facilitate the entrance of ROS in the core of the membrane, allowing the contact between ROS and lipid chains and provoking the oxidation. Our findings demonstrate that the application of electric pulses on cells could induce the oxidation of the membrane phospholipids since cell membranes contain unsaturated lipids. The chemical consequences of electropulsation will therefore have to be taken into account in future biomedical applications of electropulsation since oxidized phospholipids play a key role in many signaling pathways and diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental testing of anchoring devices for bottom rails in partially anchored timber frame shear walls

    OpenAIRE

    Caprolu, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Källsner and Girhammar have presented a new plastic design method of wood-framed shear walls at ultimate limit state. This method allows the designer to calculate the load-carrying capacity of shear walls partially anchored, where the leading stud is not anchored against the uplift.The anchorage system of shear walls is provided from anchor bolts and hold downs. Anchor bolts provide horizontal shear continuity between the bottom rail and the foundation. Hold downs are directly connected from ...

  11. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such 'spring-pots' exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress–strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues. (perspective)

  12. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2010-01-20

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such 'spring-pots' exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress-strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues.

  13. The Mechanical Properties and Biometrical Effect of 3D Preformed Titanium Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration on Alveolar Bone Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hyoun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of three-dimensional preformed titanium membrane (3D-PFTM to enhance mechanical properties and ability of bone regeneration on the peri-implant bone defect. 3D-PFTMs by new mechanically compressive molding technology and manually shaped- (MS- PFTMs by hand manipulation were applied in artificial peri-implant bone defect model for static compressive load test and cyclic fatigue load test. In 12 implants installed in the mandibular of three beagle dogs, six 3D-PFTMs, and six collagen membranes (CM randomly were applied to 2.5 mm peri-implant buccal bone defect with particulate bone graft materials for guided bone regeneration (GBR. The 3D-PFTM group showed about 7.4 times higher mechanical stiffness and 5 times higher fatigue resistance than the MS-PFTM group. The levels of the new bone area (NBA, %, the bone-to-implant contact (BIC, %, distance from the new bone to the old bone (NB-OB, %, and distance from the osseointegration to the old bone (OI-OB, % were significantly higher in the 3D-PFTM group than the CM group (p<.001. It was verified that the 3D-PFTM increased mechanical properties which were effective in supporting the space maintenance ability and stabilizing the particulate bone grafts, which led to highly efficient bone regeneration.

  14. The Multifaceted Role of SNARE Proteins in Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2017-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a key process in all living organisms that contributes to a variety of biological processes including viral infection, cell fertilization, as well as intracellular transport, and neurotransmitter release. In particular, the various membrane-enclosed compartments in eukaryotic cells need to exchange their contents and communicate across membranes. Efficient and controllable fusion of biological membranes is known to be driven by cooperative action of SNARE proteins, which constitute the central components of the eukaryotic fusion machinery responsible for fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane. During exocytosis, vesicle-associated v-SNARE (synaptobrevin) and target cell-associated t-SNAREs (syntaxin and SNAP-25) assemble into a core trans-SNARE complex. This complex plays a versatile role at various stages of exocytosis ranging from the priming to fusion pore formation and expansion, finally resulting in the release or exchange of the vesicle content. This review summarizes current knowledge on the intricate molecular mechanisms underlying exocytosis triggered and catalyzed by SNARE proteins. Particular attention is given to the function of the peptidic SNARE membrane anchors and the role of SNARE-lipid interactions in fusion. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms by synaptic auxiliary proteins in SNARE-driven membrane fusion are briefly outlined.

  15. The N-terminal amphipathic helix of the topological specificity factor MinE is associated with shaping membrane curvature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ling Shih

    Full Text Available Pole-to-pole oscillations of the Min proteins in Escherichia coli are required for the proper placement of the division septum. Direct interaction of MinE with the cell membrane is critical for the dynamic behavior of the Min system. In vitro, this MinE-membrane interaction led to membrane deformation; however, the underlying mechanism remained unclear. Here we report that MinE-induced membrane deformation involves the formation of an amphipathic helix of MinE(2-9, which, together with the adjacent basic residues, function as membrane anchors. Biochemical evidence suggested that the membrane association induces formation of the helix, with the helical face, consisting of A2, L3, and F6, inserted into the membrane. Insertion of this helix into the cell membrane can influence local membrane curvature and lead to drastic changes in membrane topology. Accordingly, MinE showed characteristic features of protein-induced membrane tubulation and lipid clustering in in vitro reconstituted systems. In conclusion, MinE shares common protein signatures with a group of membrane trafficking proteins in eukaryotic cells. These MinE signatures appear to affect membrane curvature.

  16. Phytochemicals perturb membranes and promiscuously alter protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Thakur, Pratima; Herold, Karl F; Hobart, E Ashley; Ramsey, Nicole B; Periole, Xavier; de Jong, Djurre H; Zwama, Martijn; Yilmaz, Duygu; Hall, Katherine; Maretzky, Thorsten; Hemmings, Hugh C; Blobel, Carl; Marrink, Siewert J; Koçer, Armağan; Sack, Jon T; Andersen, Olaf S

    2014-08-15

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding.

  17. Mechanism of molecular transport in novel reverse-selective nanocomposite membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel, T.C.; Freeman, B.D.; Spontak, R.J.; Meakin, P.; Hill, A.J.; Monash University, VIC

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Polymer nanocomposites continue to receive tremendous attention as organic-inorganic hybrid materials exhibiting a wide range of interesting, as well as technologically relevant, properties. This work reports a novel use of polymer nanocomposites as reverse-selective membranes. We have found that physical dispersion of nonporous fumed silica [FS] into glassy poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] simultaneously enhances membrane permeability (by as much as 240%) and selectivity for large organic molecules over small permanent gases. This surprising observation, in stark contrast to conventional filled polymer systems, reflects silica-induced disruption of local polymer chain packing and, as discerned by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy [PALS], a resulting subtle increase in the size of free volume elements through which molecular transport occurs. Such nanoscale hybridization represents an innovative means of tuning the transport properties of glassy polymeric media through control of molecular ordering

  18. Anchor Bolt Position in Base Plate In Terms Of T and J Anchor Bolt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    b Osman Mohamad Hairi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, L anchor bolt system has been used for a long period of time in construction industry as one of the distributing load structures. However, there are some weaknesses in L anchor bolt which may straighten and pullup when charged with tensile load. Current practices prefer to use other types of anchor bolt systems, such as headed studs anchor bolt system to replace the L anchor bolt design. There has been lack of studies to prove that it is more effective in terms of performance. A new T anchor bolt which was basically modified from headed studs anchor bolt was proposed in this study to compare its performance of tensile loading in concrete failure to typical L design. This study aims to determine whether the T anchor bolt system gives better performance as compared to an L anchor bolt system. The performance was rated based on tensile loading on concrete failure pattern. A pullout test was conducted on two different anchor bolt systems, namely L and T. The anchor bolt embedded depth, h in concrete were varied according to their hook or bend radius. Each sample was repeated twice. There were totally eight samples. The hook or bend radius used were 50 mm and 57.5 mm for sample L1 and L2, respectively. 90-degree bend were used on sample T1 and T2. Based on test results, it can be seen that the performance of concrete failure pattern under tensile load on both L and T anchor bolt design samples with 200 mm embedment depth was better than deeper embedment depth of 230 mm. But the L anchor bolt design gives the best results as compared to T design. Although T anchor bolt design shows higher resistance before first bond failure to the concrete sample. T anchor bolt was analysed and needed deeper embedment depth to allow formation of cone pull-out shape to acquire better performance.

  19. Testing Anchoring effect in CV Data from Dichotomous Choice with a Follow-up Questioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Cheol [Dae-Jin University, Pocheon (Korea)

    1998-09-01

    A questionnaire of dual bisected selection of CVM, which is an induced approach of intended payment, was suggested to overcome statistical inefficiency of a questionnaire of single bisected selection. In spite of several advantages of it, it is doubted that there would be an occurrence of anchoring effect, which is a psychological source of convenient starting point. Therefore, the general intended payment model, which can review the anchoring effect from CV questionnaire of dual bisected selection, was suggested and a mechanism that can review the anchoring effect from the model. This model is combining the dual variation model by Cameron and Quiggin (1994) with the results of bisected selective responses of a firstly presented particular amount as an explanatory variable of the second interior intended payment amount. If the sign of coefficient of the results of bisected selective responses of a firstly presented particular amount was negative and statistically significant, then it can be said that there is an anchoring effect. However, when there is uncertainty of occurrence of anchoring effect from the coefficient review, there is no need to worry about the anchoring effect if the average of estimated values of intended payment amount from two responses were different. As a result of applying this model and mechanism to CV materials on the improvement of water quality of the Han River, there is no need to worry about the anchoring effect. (author). 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Paramyxovirus F1 protein has two fusion peptides: implications for the mechanism of membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisajovich, S G; Samuel, O; Shai, Y

    2000-03-10

    Viral fusion proteins contain a highly hydrophobic segment, named the fusion peptide, which is thought to be responsible for the merging of the cellular and viral membranes. Paramyxoviruses are believed to contain a single fusion peptide at the N terminus of the F1 protein. However, here we identified an additional internal segment in the Sendai virus F1 protein (amino acids 214-226) highly homologous to the fusion peptides of HIV-1 and RSV. A synthetic peptide, which includes this region, was found to induce membrane fusion of large unilamellar vesicles, at concentrations where the known N-terminal fusion peptide is not effective. A scrambled peptide as well as several peptides from other regions of the F1 protein, which strongly bind to membranes, are not fusogenic. The functional and structural characterization of this active segment suggest that the F1 protein has an additional internal fusion peptide that could participate in the actual fusion event. The presence of homologous regions in other members of the same family suggests that the concerted action of two fusion peptides, one N-terminal and the other internal, is a general feature of paramyxoviruses. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Theoretical Analysis on Mechanical Deformation of Membrane-Based Photomask Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Kenji; Aya, Sunao; Yabe, Hedeki; Okada, Tatsunori; Sumitani, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    Membrane-based photomask is used in proximity X-ray lithography including that in LIGA (Lithographie, Galvanoformung und Abformung) process, and near-field photolithography. In this article, out-of-plane deformation (OPD) and in-plane displacement (IPD) of membrane-based photomask blanks are theoretically analyzed to obtain the mask blanks with flat front surface and low stress absorber film. First, we derived the equations of OPD and IPD for the processing steps of membrane-based photomask such as film deposition, back-etching and bonding, using a theory of symmetrical bending of circular plates with a coaxial circular hole and that of deformation of cylinder under hydrostatic pressure. The validity of the equations was proved by comparing the calculation results with experimental ones. Using these equations, we investigated the relation between the geometry of the mask blanks and the distortions generally, and gave the criterion to attain the flat front surface. Moreover, the absorber stress-bias required to obtain zero-stress on finished mask blanks was also calculated and it has been found that only little stress-bias was required for adequate hole size of support plate.

  2. Effect of sintering temperature on the morphology and mechanical properties of PTFE membranes as a base substrate for proton exchange membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Aida Zubir

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the development of PTFE membranes as the base substrates for producing proton exchange membrane by using radiation-grafting technique. An aqueous dispersion of PTFE, which includes sodium benzoate, is cast in order to form suitable membranes. The casting was done by usinga pneumatically controlled flat sheet membrane-casting machine. The membrane is then sintered to fuse the polymer particles and cooled. After cooling process, the salt crystals are leached from the membrane by dissolution in hot bath to leave a microporous structure, which is suitable for such uses as a filtration membrane or as a base substrate for radiation grafted membrane in PEMFC. The effects of sintering temperature on the membrane morphology and tensile strength were investigated at 350oC and 385oC by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EX 20, respectively. The pore size and total void space are significantly smaller at higher sintering temperature employed with an average pore diameter of 11.78 nm. The tensile strength and tensile strain of sintered PTFE membrane at 385oC are approximately 19.02 + 1.46 MPa and 351.04 + 23.13 %, respectively. These results were indicated at 385oC, which represents significant improvements in tensile strength and tensile strain, which are nearly twice those at 350oC.

  3. Link Anchors in Images: Is there Truth?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aly, Robin; McGuinness, Kevin; Kleppe, Martijn; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; O'Connor, Noel; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    2012-01-01

    While automatic linking in text collections is well understood, little is known about links in images. In this work, we investigate two aspects of anchors, the origin of a link, in images: 1) the requirements of users for such anchors, e.g. the things users would like more information on, and 2)

  4. 76 FR 30301 - Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Part 1812 RIN 2700-AD64 Commercial... consistent with NASA's authority under Section 401 of the Commercial Space Competitiveness Act (CSCA) of 1992. NASA may enter into multi-year anchor tenancy contracts for commercial space goods or services. Anchor...

  5. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okada, Masato, E-mail: okadam@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  6. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose; Okada, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. ► We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. ► The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. ► Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. ► The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome–lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  7. Proteome analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus identifies glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins associated to the cell wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, J M; Magnin, T; Tagat, E; Legrand, R; Bernard, M; Diaquin, M; Fudali, C; Latgé, J P

    2001-08-01

    Previous studies in Aspergillus fumigatus (Mouyna I., Fontaine T., Vai M., Monod M., Fonzi W. A., Diaquin M., Popolo L., Hartland R. P., Latgé J.-P, J. Biol. Chem. 2000, 275, 14882-14889) have shown that a glucanosyltransferase playing an important role in fungal cell wall biosynthesis is glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored to the membrane. To identify other GPI-anchored proteins putatively involved in cell wall biogenesis, a proteomic analysis has been undertaken in A. fumigatus and the protein data were matched with the yeast genomic data. GPI-anchored proteins of A. fumigatus were released from membrane preparation by an endogenous GPI-phospholipase C, purified by liquid chromatography and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. They were characterized by their peptide mass fingerprint through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-(MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry and by internal amino acid sequencing. Nine GPI-anchored proteins were identified in A. fumigatus. Five of them were homologs of putatively GPI-anchored yeast proteins (Csa1p, Crh1p, Crh2p, Ecm33p, Gas1p) of unknown function but shown by gene disruption analysis to play a role in cell wall morphogenesis. In addition, a comparative study performed with chitin synthase and glucanosyl transferase mutants of A. fumigatus showed that a modification of the growth phenotype seen in these mutants was associated to an alteration of the pattern of GPI-anchored proteins. These results suggest that GPI-anchored proteins identified in this study are involved in A. fumigatus cell wall organization.

  8. Ringstone anchors from Gujarat, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    of Dwarka and Somanath have yielded several ringstone anchors along with other stone anchors such as triangular and grapnel types. The raw material used for these ring stones comprises basalt, sandstone and limestone. Earlier, these anchors were identified...

  9. Atomic force microscopy reveals multiple patterns of antenna organization in purple bacteria: implications for energy transduction mechanisms and membrane modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, James N; Niederman, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Recent topographs of the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) of purple bacteria obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM) have provided the first surface views of the native architecture of a multicomponent biological membrane at submolecular resolution, representing an important landmark in structural biology. A variety of species-dependent, closely packed arrangements of light-harvesting (LH) complexes was revealed: the most highly organized was found in Rhodobacter sphaeroides in which the peripheral LH2 antenna was seen either in large clusters or in fixed rows interspersed among ordered arrays of dimeric LH1-reaction center (RC) core complexes. A more random organization was observed in other species containing both the LH1 and LH2 complexes, as typified by Rhododspirillum photometricum with randomly packed monomeric LH1-RC core complexes intermingled with large, paracrystalline domains of LH2 antenna. Surprisingly, no structures that could be identified as the ATP synthase or cytochrome bc (1) complexes were observed, which may reflect their localization at ICM vesicle poles or in curved membrane areas, out of view from the flat regions imaged by AFM. This possible arrangement of energy transducing complexes has required a reassessment of energy tranduction mechanisms which place the cytochrome bc (1) complex in close association with the RC. Instead, more plausible proposals must account for the movement of quinone redox species over considerable membrane distances on appropriate time scales. AFM, together with atomic resolution structures are also providing the basis for molecular modeling of the ICM that is leading to an improved picture of the supramolecular organization of photosynthetic complexes, as well as the forces that drive their segregation into distinct domains.

  10. Mechanism of mercurial inhibition of sodium-coupled alanine uptake in liver plasma membrane vesicles from Raja erinacea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellinger, M.; Ballatori, N.; Boyer, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    In mammalian hepatocytes the L-alanine carrier contains a sulfhydryl group that is essential for its activity and is inhibited by mercurials. In hepatocytes of the evolutionarily primitive little skate (Raja erinacea), HgCl2 inhibits Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake and Na+/K(+)-ATPase and increase K+ permeability. To distinguish between direct effects of HgCl2 on the Na(+)-alanine cotransporter and indirect effects on membrane permeability, [3H]alanine transport was studied in plasma membrane vesicles. [3H]Alanine uptake was stimulated by an out-to-in Na+ but not K+ gradient and was saturable confirming the presence of Na(+)-alanine cotransport in liver plasma membranes from this species. Preincubation of the vesicles with HgCl2 for 5 min reduced initial rates of Na(+)-dependent but not Na(+)-independent alanine uptake in a dose-dependent manner (10-200 microM). In the presence of equal concentrations of NaCl or KCl inside and outside of the vesicles, 75 microM HgCl2 directly inhibited sodium-dependent alanine-[3H]alanine exchange, demonstrating that HgCl2 directly affected the alanine cotransporter. Inhibition of Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake by 30 microM HgCl2 was reversed by dithiothreitol (1 mM). HgCl2 (10-30 microM) also increased initial rates of 22Na uptake (at 5 sec), whereas 22Na uptake rates were decreased at HgCl2 concentrations greater than 50 microM. Higher concentrations of HgCl2 (100-200 microM) produced nonspecific effects on vesicle integrity. These studies indicate that HgCl2 inhibits Na(+)-dependent alanine uptake in skate hepatocytes by three different concentration-dependent mechanisms: direct interaction with the transporters, dissipation of the driving force (Na+ gradient), and loss of membrane integrity

  11. Collagen-based mechanical anisotropy of the tectorial membrane: implications for inter-row coupling of outer hair cell bundles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Gavara

    Full Text Available The tectorial membrane (TM in the mammalian cochlea displays anisotropy, where mechanical or structural properties differ along varying directions. The anisotropy arises from the presence of collagen fibrils organized in fibers of approximately 1 microm diameter that run radially across the TM. Mechanical coupling between the TM and the sensory epithelia is required for normal hearing. However, the lack of a suitable technique to measure mechanical anisotropy at the microscale level has hindered understanding of the TM's precise role.Here we report values of the three elastic moduli that characterize the anisotropic mechanical properties of the TM. Our novel technique combined Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, modeling, and optical tracking of microspheres to determine the elastic moduli. We found that the TM's large mechanical anisotropy results in a marked transmission of deformations along the direction that maximizes sensory cell excitation, whereas in the perpendicular direction the transmission is greatly reduced.Computational results, based on our values of elastic moduli, suggest that the TM facilitates the directional cooperativity of sensory cells in the cochlea, and that mechanical properties of the TM are tuned to guarantee that the magnitude of sound-induced tip-link stretching remains similar along the length of the cochlea. Furthermore, we anticipate our assay to be a starting point for other studies of biological tissues that require directional functionality.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes: Functional distinction between topological (tilted) and consensus (CARC/CRAC) domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Baier, Carlos J; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms that control the multiple possible modes of protein association with membrane cholesterol are remarkably convergent. These mechanisms, which include hydrogen bonding, CH-π stacking and dispersion forces, are used by a wide variety of extracellular proteins (e.g. microbial or amyloid) and membrane receptors. Virus fusion peptides penetrate the membrane of host cells with a tilted orientation that is compatible with a transient interaction with cholesterol; this tilted orientation is also characteristic of the process of insertion of amyloid proteins that subsequently form oligomeric pores in the plasma membrane of brain cells. Membrane receptors that are associated with cholesterol generally display linear consensus binding motifs (CARC and CRAC) characterized by a triad of basic (Lys/Arg), aromatic (Tyr/phe) and aliphatic (Leu/Val) amino acid residues. In some cases, the presence of both CARC and CRAC within the same membrane-spanning domain allows the simultaneous binding of two cholesterol molecules, one in each membrane leaflet. In this review the molecular basis and the functional significance of the different modes of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Constructing dual-defense mechanisms on membrane surfaces by synergy of PFSA and SiO2 nanoparticles for persistent antifouling performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Linjie; Gao, Kang; Jiao, Zhiwei; Wu, Mengyuan; He, Mingrui; Su, Yanlei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2018-05-01

    Synthetic antifouling membrane surfaces with dual-defense mechanisms (fouling-resistant and fouling-release mechanism) were constructed through the synergy of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) and SiO2 nanoparticles. During the nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS) process, the amphiphilic PFSA polymers spontaneously segregated to membrane surfaces and catalyzed the hydrolysis-polycondensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to generate hydrophilic SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs). The resulting PVDF/PFSA/SiO2 hybrid membranes were characterized by contact angle measurements, FTIR, XPS, SEM, AFM, TGA, and TEM. The hydrophilic microdomains and low surface energy microdomains of amphiphilic PFSA polymers respectively endowed membrane surfaces with fouling-resistant mechanism and fouling-release mechanism, while the hydrophilic SiO2 NPs intensified the fouling-resistant mechanism. When the addition of TEOS reached 3 wt%, the hybrid membrane with optimal synergy of PFSA and SiO2 NPs displayed low flux decline (17.4% DRt) and high flux recovery (99.8% FRR) during the filtration of oil-in-water emulsion. Meanwhile, the long-time stability test verified that the hybrid membrane possessed persistent antifouling performance.

  14. Crystal structure of an orthomyxovirus matrix protein reveals mechanisms for self-polymerization and membrane association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenting; Zheng, Wenjie; Toh, Yukimatsu; Betancourt-Solis, Miguel A; Tu, Jiagang; Fan, Yanlin; Vakharia, Vikram N; Liu, Jun; McNew, James A; Jin, Meilin; Tao, Yizhi J

    2017-08-08

    Many enveloped viruses encode a matrix protein. In the influenza A virus, the matrix protein M1 polymerizes into a rigid protein layer underneath the viral envelope to help enforce the shape and structural integrity of intact viruses. The influenza virus M1 is also known to mediate virus budding as well as the nuclear export of the viral nucleocapsids and their subsequent packaging into nascent viral particles. Despite extensive studies on the influenza A virus M1 (FLUA-M1), only crystal structures of its N-terminal domain are available. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length M1 from another orthomyxovirus that infects fish, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). The structure of ISAV-M1 assumes the shape of an elbow, with its N domain closely resembling that of the FLUA-M1. The C domain, which is connected to the N domain through a flexible linker, is made of four α-helices packed as a tight bundle. In the crystal, ISAV-M1 monomers form infinite 2D arrays with a network of interactions involving both the N and C domains. Results from liposome flotation assays indicated that ISAV-M1 binds membrane via electrostatic interactions that are primarily mediated by a positively charged surface loop from the N domain. Cryoelectron tomography reconstruction of intact ISA virions identified a matrix protein layer adjacent to the inner leaflet of the viral membrane. The physical dimensions of the virion-associated matrix layer are consistent with the 2D ISAV-M1 crystal lattice, suggesting that the crystal lattice is a valid model for studying M1-M1, M1-membrane, and M1-RNP interactions in the virion.

  15. Feedback control for distributed heat transfer mechanisms in direct-contact membrane distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi; N'Doye, Ibrahima; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of stabilization and production rate reference tracking for a Direct-Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) system is addressed. Sufficient conditions for the asymptotic and exponential stabilization for DCMD system are presented using the Gronwall-Bellman lemma and Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) approaches, respectively. A nonlinear observer is then proposed to estimate the temperature distribution among the DCMD domain. This contributes to propose a reference production rate control design for the DCMD process via observer-based output control approach. Finally, numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  16. Feedback control for distributed heat transfer mechanisms in direct-contact membrane distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-09-21

    In this paper, the problem of stabilization and production rate reference tracking for a Direct-Contact Membrane Distillation (DCMD) system is addressed. Sufficient conditions for the asymptotic and exponential stabilization for DCMD system are presented using the Gronwall-Bellman lemma and Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs) approaches, respectively. A nonlinear observer is then proposed to estimate the temperature distribution among the DCMD domain. This contributes to propose a reference production rate control design for the DCMD process via observer-based output control approach. Finally, numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  17. Evaluation of Removal Mechanisms in a Graphene Oxide-Coated Ceramic Ultrafiltration Membrane for Retention of Natural Organic Matter, Pharmaceuticals, and Inorganic Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Fathizadeh, Mahdi; Yu, Miao; Flora, Joseph R V; Jang, Am; Jang, Min; Park, Chang Min; Yoo, Sung Soo; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin

    2017-11-22

    Functionalized graphene oxide (GO), derived from pure graphite via the modified Hummer method, was used to modify commercially available ceramic ultrafiltration membranes using the vacuum method. The modified ceramic membrane functionalized with GO (ceramic GO ) was characterized using a variety of analysis techniques and exhibited higher hydrophilicity and increased negative charge compared with the pristine ceramic membrane. Although the pure water permeability of the ceramic GO membrane (14.4-58.6 L/m 2 h/bar) was slightly lower than that of the pristine membrane (25.1-62.7 L/m 2 h/bar), the removal efficiencies associated with hydrophobic attraction and charge effects were improved significantly after GO coating. Additionally, solute transport in the GO nanosheets of the ceramic GO membrane played a vital role in the retention of target compounds: natural organic matter (NOM; humic acid and tannic acid), pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole), and inorganic salts (NaCl, Na 2 SO 4 , CaCl 2 , and CaSO 4 ). While the retention efficiencies of NOM, pharmaceuticals, and inorganic salts in the pristine membrane were 74.6%, 15.3%, and 2.9%, respectively, these increased to 93.5%, 51.0%, and 31.4% for the ceramic GO membrane. Consequently, the improved removal mechanisms of the membrane modified with functionalized GO nanosheets can provide efficient retention for water treatment under suboptimal environmental conditions of pH and ionic strength.

  18. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  19. Molecular mechanism of α-tocopheryl-phosphate transport across the cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negis, Yesim; Meydani, Mohsen; Zingg, Jean-Marc; Azzi, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    α-Tocopheryl-phosphate (α-TP) is synthesized and hydrolyzed in animal cells and tissues where it modulates several functions. α-TP is more potent than α-T in inhibiting cell proliferation, down-regulating CD36 transcription, inhibiting atherosclerotic plaque formation. Administration of α-TP to cells or animals requires its transfer through membranes, via a transporter. We show here that α-TP is passing the plasma membrane via a system that is inhibited by glibenclamide and probenecid, inhibitors of a number of transporters. Glibenclamide and probenecid prevent dose-dependently α-TP inhibition of cell proliferation. The two inhibitors act on ATP binding cassette (ABC) and organic anion transporters (OAT). Since ABC transporters function to export solutes and α-TP is transported into cells, it may be concluded that α-TP transport may occur via an OAT family member. Due to the protection by glibenclamide and probenecid on the α-TP induced cell growth inhibition it appears that α-TP acts after its uptake inside cells

  20. [Changes of the neuronal membrane excitability as cellular mechanisms of learning and memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaĭnutdinov, Kh L; Andrianov, V V; Gaĭnutdinova, T Kh

    2011-01-01

    In the presented review given literature and results of own studies of dynamics of electrical characteristics of neurons, which change are included in processes both an elaboration of learning, and retention of the long-term memory. Literary datas and our results allow to conclusion, that long-term retention of behavioural reactions during learning is accompanied not only by changing efficiency of synaptic transmission, as well as increasing of excitability of command neurons of the defensive reflex. This means, that in the process of learning are involved long-term changes of the characteristics a membrane of certain elements of neuronal network, dependent from the metabolism of the cells. see text). Thou phenomena possible mark as cellular (electrophysiological) correlates of long-term plastic modifications of the behaviour. The analyses of having results demonstrates an important role of membrane characteristics of neurons (their excitability) and parameters an synaptic transmission not only in initial stage of learning, as well as in long-term modifications of the behaviour (long-term memory).

  1. Bone suture anchor fixation in the lower extremity: a review of insertion principles and a comparative biomechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scranton, Pierce E; Lawhon, S Michael; McDermott, John E

    2005-07-01

    Suture anchors have been developed for the fixation of ligaments, capsules, or tendons to bone. These devices have led to improved fixation, smaller incisions, earlier limb mobility, and improved outcomes. They were originally developed for use in shoulder reconstructions but are now used in almost all extremities. In the lower leg they are used in the tibia, the talus, the calcaneus, tarsal bones, and phalanges. Nevertheless, techniques for insertion and mechanisms of failure are not well described. Five suture anchors were studied to determine the pullout strength in four distal cadaver femurs and four proximal cadaver tibias from 55- and 62-year-old males. Eight hundred ninety Newton line was used, testing the anchors to failure with an Instron testing device (Instron, Norwood, MA). The anchor devices were inserted randomly and tested blindly (12 tests per anchor device, 60 tests in all). Two anchors in each group tested failed at low loads. Both types of plastic anchors had failures at the eyelet. Average pullout strength varied from 85.4 to 185.6 N. Insertion techniques are specific for each device, and they must be followed for optimal fixation. In this study, in all five groups of anchors tested two of the 12 anchors in each group failed with minimal force. On the basis of this finding we recommend that, if suture anchor fixation is necessary, at least two anchors should be used. Since there appears to be a percentage of failure in all devices, the second anchor can serve as a backup. It is imperative that surgeons be familiar with the insertion techniques of each device before use.

  2. Organization, 'Anchoring' of Knowledge, and Innovative Activity in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ina; Vinding, Anker Lund

    2006-01-01

    The construction industry is characterised by the widespread use of project organisation. It has been suggested that the relatively low level of innovative activity in the industry can be explained by the temporary nature of firm boundary-crossing projects. Survey data from the Danish construction...... industry is used to investigate the importance of learning and 'anchoring' of project-specific knowledge at the firm level for participation in innovative activities. The data cover both the overall Danish construction industry and a specific region, North Jutland, which has a relatively high...... specialisation of construction workers. Latent class and regression analyses reveal that firms that make extensive use of partnering, together with internal product and process evaluation and knowledge diffusion (labelled 'knowledge-anchoring mechanisms'), are more likely to participate in innovative activities...

  3. Lower limit of strength wedge-type anchor bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnedo Pena, A.; Frances Urmeneta, M.

    1998-01-01

    Simple expansion bolts, with a split expansion ring and a threaded bolt with an integral cone expander, called wedge type, are very used in securing and anchoring structures. The anchorage is obtained by a mechanism of torque-controlled expansion. Although less resistant than other types, its easy installation and low cost make them very competitive in light structures. In this paper, the minimum capacity values are analysed, when they are used to anchor safety-related equipment in NPP. The EPRI criteria developed in response to USI A-46 are applied and complemented by the new CEB Anchorage Design Guide. The results are compared with the information from european manufactures, adopting different safety factors for cracked and non-cracked concrete. With adequate control and inspection measures, including areas of noticeable cracking of concrete. minimum values for equipment can be obtained satisfying the strictest seismic validation requirements. (Author) 5 refs

  4. Transport Properties, Mechanical Behavior, Thermal and Chemical Resistance of Asymmetric Flat Sheet Membrane Prepared from PSf/PVDF Blended Membrane on Gauze Supporting Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nita Kusumawati

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric polysulfone (PSf membrane is prepared using phase inversion method and blending with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF on the gauze solid support. Casting solution composition optimization has been done to get PSf/PVDF membrane with best characteristics and permeability. The result shows that blending on PSf with PVDF polymer using phase inversion method has been very helpful in creating an asymmetric porous membrane. Increased level of PVDF in casting solution has increased the formation of asymmetry structure and corresponding flux membrane. The result from thermal test using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC-Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA shows the resistance of the membrane to temperature 460 °C. Membrane resistance against acid looks from undetectable changes on infrared spectra after immersion process in H2SO4 6–98 v/v%. While membrane color changes from white to brownish and black is detected after the immersion process in sodium hydroxide (NaOH 0.15–80 w/v%.

  5. Large-scale atomistic and quantum-mechanical simulations of a Nafion membrane: Morphology, proton solvation and charge transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Komarov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the structure formation in a hydrated Nafion membrane and the solvation and transport of protons in the water channel of the membrane. For the water/Nafion systems containing more than 4 million atoms, it is found that the observed microphase-segregated morphology can be classified as bicontinuous: both majority (hydrophobic and minority (hydrophilic subphases are 3D continuous and organized in an irregular ordered pattern, which is largely similar to that known for a bicontinuous double-diamond structure. The characteristic size of the connected hydrophilic channels is about 25–50 Å, depending on the water content. A thermodynamic decomposition of the potential of mean force and the calculated spectral densities of the hindered translational motions of cations reveal that ion association observed with decreasing temperature is largely an entropic effect related to the loss of low-frequency modes. Based on the results from the atomistic simulation of the morphology of Nafion, we developed a realistic model of ion-conducting hydrophilic channel within the Nafion membrane and studied it with quantum molecular dynamics. The extensive 120 ps-long density functional theory (DFT-based simulations of charge migration in the 1200-atom model of the nanochannel consisting of Nafion chains and water molecules allowed us to observe the bimodality of the van Hove autocorrelation function, which provides the direct evidence of the Grotthuss bond-exchange (hopping mechanism as a significant contributor to the proton conductivity.

  6. Multifunctional-layered materials for creating membrane-restricted nanodomains and nanoscale imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, P., E-mail: prasri@ece.ucsb.edu, E-mail: srinivasan@lifesci.ucsb.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA and Neuroscience Research Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    Experimental platform that allows precise spatial positioning of biomolecules with an exquisite control at nanometer length scales is a valuable tool to study the molecular mechanisms of membrane bound signaling. Using micromachined thin film gold (Au) in layered architecture, it is possible to add both optical and biochemical functionalities in in vitro. Towards this goal, here, I show that docking of complementary DNA tethered giant phospholiposomes on Au surface can create membrane-restricted nanodomains. These nanodomains are critical features to dissect molecular choreography of membrane signaling complexes. The excited surface plasmon resonance modes of Au allow label-free imaging at diffraction-limited resolution of stably docked DNA tethered phospholiposomes, and lipid-detergent bicelle structures. Such multifunctional building block enables realizing rigorously controlled in vitro set-up to model membrane anchored biological signaling, besides serving as an optical tool for nanoscale imaging.

  7. Membrane vesiculation induced by proteins of the dengue virus envelope studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira dos Santos Soares, Ricardo; Oliveira Bortot, Leandro; van der Spoel, David; Caliri, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Biological membranes are continuously remodeled in the cell by specific membrane-shaping machineries to form, for example, tubes and vesicles. We examine fundamental mechanisms involved in the vesiculation processes induced by a cluster of envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins of the dengue virus (DENV) using molecular dynamics simulations and a coarse-grained model. We show that an arrangement of three E-M heterotetramers (EM3) works as a bending unit and an ordered cluster of five such units generates a closed vesicle, reminiscent of the virus budding process. In silico mutagenesis of two charged residues of the anchor helices of the envelope proteins of DENV shows that Arg-471 and Arg-60 are fundamental to produce bending stress on the membrane. The fine-tuning between the size of the EM3 unit and its specific bending action suggests this protein unit is an important factor in determining the viral particle size.

  8. Acute Responses of Microorganisms from Membrane Bioreactors in the Presence of NaOCl: Protective Mechanisms of Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaomeng; Wang, Zhiwei; Chen, Mei; Zhang, Xingran; Tang, Chuyang Y; Wu, Zhichao

    2017-03-21

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are key foulants in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). However, their positive functions of protecting microorganisms from environmental stresses, e.g., during in situ hypochlorite chemical cleaning of membranes, have not been adequately elucidated. In this work, we investigated the response of microorganisms in an MBR to various dosages of NaOCl, with a particular emphasis on the mechanistic roles of EPS. Results showed that functional groups in EPS such as the hydroxyl and amino groups were attacked by NaOCl, causing the oxidation of polysaccharides, denaturation of amino acids, damage to protein secondary structure, and transformation of tryptophan protein-like substances to condensed aromatic ring substances. The presence of EPS alleviated the negative impacts on catalase and superoxide dismutase, which in turn reduced the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in microbial cells. The direct extracellular reaction and the mitigated intracellular oxidative responses facilitated the maintenance of microbial metabolism, as indicated by the quantity of adenosine triphosphate and the activity of dehydrogenase. The reaction with NaOCl also led to the changes of cell integrity and adhesion properties of EPS, which promoted the release of organic matter into bulk solution. Our results systematically demonstrate the protective roles of EPS and the underlying mechanisms in resisting the environmental stress caused by NaOCl, which provides important implications for in situ chemical cleaning in MBRs.

  9. Exploring the membrane fusion mechanism through force-induced disassembly of HIV-1 six-helix bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Kai [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Lou, Jizhong, E-mail: jlou@ibp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-05-13

    Enveloped virus, such as HIV-1, employs membrane fusion mechanism to invade into host cell. HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain uses six-helix bundle configuration to accomplish this process. Using molecular dynamic simulations, we confirmed the stability of this six-helix bundle by showing high occupancy of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Key residues and interactions important for the bundle integration were characterized by force-induced unfolding simulations of six-helix bundle, exhibiting the collapse order of these groups of interactions. Moreover, our results in some way concerted with a previous theory that the formation of coiled-coil choose a route which involved cooperative interactions between the N-terminal and C-terminal helix. -- Highlights: •Unfolding of HIV-1 gp41 six-helix bundle is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. •Specific interactions responsible for the stability of HIV-1 envelope post-fusion conformation were identified. •The gp41 six-helix bundle transition inducing membrane fusion might be a cooperative process of the three subunits.

  10. Ion-conduction mechanisms in NaSICON-type membranes for energy storage and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, Anthony H. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ihlefeld, Jon F. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bartelt, Norman Charles [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Next generation metal-ion conducting membranes are key to developing energy storage and utilization technologies like batteries and fuel ce lls. Sodium super-ionic conductors (aka NaSICON) are a class of compounds with AM 1 M 2 (PO 4 ) 3 stoichiometry where the choice of "A" and "M" cation varies widely. This report, which de scribes substitutional derivatives of NZP (NaZr 2 P 3 O 12 ), summarizes the accomplishments of a Laboratory D irected Research and Development (LDRD) project to analyze transport mec hanisms using a combination of in situ studies of structure, composition, and bonding, com bined with first principles theory and modeling. We developed an experimental platform and applied methods, such as synchrotron- based X-ray spectroscopies, to probe the electronic structure of compositionally well-controlled NaSICON films while in operation ( i.e ., conducting Na ions exposed to oxygen or water va por atmospheres). First principles theory and modeling were used to interpret the experimental observations and develop an enhanced understanding of atomistic processes that give rise to, and affect, ion conduction.

  11. Mechanisms of generation of membrane potential resonance in a neuron with multiple resonant ionic currents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Fox

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal membrane potential resonance (MPR is associated with subthreshold and network oscillations. A number of voltage-gated ionic currents can contribute to the generation or amplification of MPR, but how the interaction of these currents with linear currents contributes to MPR is not well understood. We explored this in the pacemaker PD neurons of the crab pyloric network. The PD neuron MPR is sensitive to blockers of H- (IH and calcium-currents (ICa. We used the impedance profile of the biological PD neuron, measured in voltage clamp, to constrain parameter values of a conductance-based model using a genetic algorithm and obtained many optimal parameter combinations. Unlike most cases of MPR, in these optimal models, the values of resonant- (fres and phasonant- (fϕ = 0 frequencies were almost identical. Taking advantage of this fact, we linked the peak phase of ionic currents to their amplitude, in order to provide a mechanistic explanation the dependence of MPR on the ICa gating variable time constants. Additionally, we found that distinct pairwise correlations between ICa parameters contributed to the maintenance of fres and resonance power (QZ. Measurements of the PD neuron MPR at more hyperpolarized voltages resulted in a reduction of fres but no change in QZ. Constraining the optimal models using these data unmasked a positive correlation between the maximal conductances of IH and ICa. Thus, although IH is not necessary for MPR in this neuron type, it contributes indirectly by constraining the parameters of ICa.

  12. Anchoring effects on early autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Daniel L; Bishara, Anthony J; Mugayar-Baldocchi, Marino A

    2017-10-01

    Studies of childhood memory typically show that our earliest memories come from between three and four years of age. This finding is not universal, however. The age estimate varies across cultures and is affected by social influences. Research from the judgments and decision-making literature suggests that these estimates might also involve a judgment under uncertainty. Therefore, they might be susceptible to less social influences such as heuristics and biases. To investigate this possibility, we conducted two experiments that used anchoring paradigms to influence participants' estimates of their age during early autobiographical memories. In Experiment 1, participants answered either a high-anchor or a low-anchor question, and were warned that the anchor was uninformative; they went on to estimate their age during their earliest autobiographical memory. In Experiment 2, we replicated Experiment 1 and extended the design to examine additional early autobiographical memories. In both experiments, participants in the low-anchor condition gave earlier age estimates than those in the high-anchor condition. These results provide new insights into the methods used to investigate autobiographical memory. Moreover, they show that reports of early autobiographical memories can be influenced by a relatively light touch - a change to a single digit in a single question.

  13. Improving performance by anchoring movement and "nerves".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iso-Ahola, Seppo E; Dotson, Charles O; Jagodinsky, Adam E; Clark, Lily C; Smallwood, Lorraine L; Wilburn, Christopher; Weimar, Wendi H; Miller, Matthew W

    2016-10-01

    Golf's governing bodies' recent decision to ban all putting styles "anchoring one end of the club against the body" bridges an important practical problem with psychological theory. We report the first experiment testing whether anchoring provides technical and/or psychological advantage in competitive performance. Many "greats" of professional golf from Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus to Tiger Woods have argued against anchoring, believing that it takes "nerves" out of competitive performance and therefore artificially levels the playing field. To shed more light on the issue, we tested participants' performance with anchored and unanchored putters under low and high pressure when controlling for the putter length. We found no statistically significant evidence for a technical advantage due to anchoring but a clear psychological advantage: participants who anchored their putters significantly outperformed unanchored counterparts under high, but not low, pressure. Results provide tentative evidence for the ban's justification from a competitive standpoint. However, before any definite conclusions can be made, more research is needed when using high-level golfers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Use of Comics-Based Cases in Anchored Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to understand how comics fulfill the role of anchor in an anchored instruction learning environment. Anchored instruction addresses the inert knowledge problem through the use of realistic multimedia stories, or "anchors," that embed a problem and the necessary data to solve it within the narrative. In the…

  15. An earth anchor system: installation and design guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.L. Copstead; D.D. Studier

    1990-01-01

    A system for anchoring the guylines and skylines of cable yarding equipment is presented. A description of three types of tipping plate anchors is given. Descriptions of the installation equipment and methods specific to each type are given. Procedures for determining the correct number of anchors to install are included, as are guidelines for installing the anchors so...

  16. Mechanisms and modeling development of water transport/phase change in catalyst layers of portion exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yexiang [Dept. of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University Beijing (China)], email: Yexiang.Xiao@energy.lth.se; Yuan, Jinliang; Sunden, Bengt [Dept. of Energy Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)], email: Jinliang.yuan@energy.lth.se, email: bengt.sunden@energy.lth.se

    2011-07-01

    Research on proton exchange membrane fuel cells has shown that incorporation of nanosized catalysts can effectively increase active areas and catalyst activity and make a great contribution to development in performance and catalyst utilization. Multiphase transport processes are as significant and complicated as water generation/transfer processes which occur in nano-structured catalyst layers. A review project has been launched aimed at gaining a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of water generation or transport phenomena. It covers catalytic reactions and water-phase change within the catalyst layers. The review proceeds in three main stages: Firstly, it characterizes and reconstructs the nano/micro-structured pores and solid-phases; secondly, it emphasises the importance of sensitive and consistent analysis of various water-phase change and transport schemes; and thirdly, it recommends development of microscopic models for multi-phase transport processes in the pores and the solid phases.

  17. Ceramide-Enriched Membrane Domains in Red Blood Cells and the Mechanism ofSphingomyelinase-Induced Hot-Cold Hemolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Lopez, David; Sot, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Hot-cold hemolysis is the phenomenon whereby red blood cells, preincubated at 37 °C in the presence of certain agents, undergo rapid hemolysis when transferred to 4 °C. The mechanism of this phenomenon is not understood. PlcHR2, a phospholipase C/sphingomyelinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa......) but also in goat erythrocytes, which lack PC. However, in horse erythrocytes, with a large proportion of PC and almost no SM, hot-cold hemolysis induced by PlcHR2 is not observed. Fluorescence microscopy observations confirm the formation of ceramide-enriched domains as a result of PlcHR2 activity. After......-cold hemolysis. Differential scanning calorimetry of erytrocyte membranes treated with PlcHR2 demonstrates the presence of ceramide-rich domains that are rigid at 4 °C but fluid at 37 °C. Ceramidase treatment causes the disapperance of the calorimetric signal assigned to ceramide-rich domains. Finally...

  18. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna; Tallerico, Rossana; Talib Hassan, Almosawy; Das, Gobind; Tadepally, Lakshmikanth; Matteucci, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; Mesuraca, Maria; Scumaci, Domenica; Gentile, Francesco; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Perozziello, Gerardo; Ammendolia, Antonio; Gallo, Adriana; Kä rre, Klas; Cuda, Giovanni; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also

  19. Membrane-active mechanism of LFchimera against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanthawong, S.; Puknun, A.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Nazmi, K.; van Marle, J.; de Soet, J.J.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Wongratanacheewin, S.; Taweechaisupapong, S.

    2014-01-01

    LFchimera, a construct combining two antimicrobial domains of bovine lactoferrin, lactoferrampin265-284 and lactoferricin17-30, possesses strong bactericidal activity. As yet, no experimental evidence was presented to evaluate the mechanisms of LFchimera against Burkholderia isolates. In this study

  20. Thermo-mechanical properties of mixed-matrix membranes encompassing zeolitic imidazolate framework-90 and polyvinylidine difluoride: ZIF-90/PVDF nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina S. Flyagina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-matrix membranes are contemporary nanocomposite materials with many potential applications, from liquid and gas separations to chemical sensors and biomedicine. We report fabrication of a metal-organic framework (MOF-based nanocomposite, combining polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF polymer as the matrix and ZIF-90 nanocrystals of up to 30 wt. % filler content. The focus is to establish the processing—microstructure—mechanical property relationships. We reveal the importance for quantifying salient effects of the filler contents: (i tensile strength degrades beyond 10 wt. % and (ii mechanical toughness declines due to membrane embrittlement. These are vital mechanical aspects but widely overlooked in the emergent field of MOF membranes and composites.

  1. B cell activation by outer membrane vesicles--a novel virulence mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura A Perez Vidakovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of outer membrane vesicles (OMV is an intriguing phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria and has been suggested to play a role as virulence factors. The respiratory pathogens Moraxella catarrhalis reside in tonsils adjacent to B cells, and we have previously shown that M. catarrhalis induce a T cell independent B cell response by the immunoglobulin (Ig D-binding superantigen MID. Here we demonstrate that Moraxella are endocytosed and killed by human tonsillar B cells, whereas OMV have the potential to interact and activate B cells leading to bacterial rescue. The B cell response induced by OMV begins with IgD B cell receptor (BCR clustering and Ca(2+ mobilization followed by BCR internalization. In addition to IgD BCR, TLR9 and TLR2 were found to colocalize in lipid raft motifs after exposure to OMV. Two components of the OMV, i.e., MID and unmethylated CpG-DNA motifs, were found to be critical for B cell activation. OMV containing MID bound to and activated tonsillar CD19(+ IgD(+ lymphocytes resulting in IL-6 and IgM production in addition to increased surface marker density (HLA-DR, CD45, CD64, and CD86, whereas MID-deficient OMV failed to induce B cell activation. DNA associated with OMV induced full B cell activation by signaling through TLR9. Importantly, this concept was verified in vivo, as OMV equipped with MID and DNA were found in a 9-year old patient suffering from Moraxella sinusitis. In conclusion, Moraxella avoid direct interaction with host B cells by redirecting the adaptive humoral immune response using its superantigen-bearing OMV as decoys.

  2. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization: Carbon nanohorn-induced reactive oxygen species generation and toxicity by this neglected mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mei, E-mail: happy_deercn@163.com [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Zhang, Minfang; Tahara, Yoshio; Chechetka, Svetlana; Miyako, Eijiro [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Iijima, Sumio [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tenpaku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Yudasaka, Masako, E-mail: m-yudasaka@aist.go.jp [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxic effects of carbon nanomaterials is important for their future biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubular materials induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which causes cell death; however, the exact details of this process are still unclear. Here, we identify a mechanism of ROS generation that is involved in the apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages caused by excess uptake of carbon nanohorns (CNHs), a typical type of carbon nanotubule. CNH accumulated in the lysosomes, where they induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and the subsequent release of lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsins, which in turn caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered the generation of ROS in the mitochondria. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase was not directly involved in CNH-related ROS production, and the ROS generation cannot be regulated by mitochondrial electron transport chain. ROS fed back to amplify the mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to the subsequent activation of caspases and cell apoptosis. Carbon nanotubules commonly accumulate in the lysosomes after internalization in cells; however, lysosomal dysfunction has not attracted much attention in toxicity studies of these materials. These results suggest that LMP, a neglected mechanism, may be the primary reason for carbon nanotubule toxicity. - Highlights: • We clarify an apoptotic mechanism of RAW264.7 cells caused by carbon nanohorns. • In the meantime, the mechanism of CNH-induced ROS generation is identified. • LMP is the initial factor of CNH-induced ROS generation and cell death. • Cathepsins work as mediators that connect LMP and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. The studies on the toxicity mechanism of environmentally hazardous natural (IAA) and synthetic (NAA) auxin--The experiments on model Arabidopsis thaliana and rat liver plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał

    2015-06-01

    This paper concerns the studies towards membrane-damage effect of two auxins: indole-3-acetic acid - IAA and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid - NAA on plant (Arabidopsis thaliana) and animal (rat liver) model membranes. The foregoing auxins are plant growth regulators widely used in agriculture to control the quality of the crop. However, their accumulation in the environment makes them hazardous for the living organisms. The aim of our investigations was to compare the effect of natural (IAA) vs. synthetic (NAA) auxin on the organization of plant and animal model membranes and find a possible correlation between membrane-disturbing effect of these compounds and their toxicity. The collected data evidenced that auxins cause destabilization of membranes, decrease their condensation and weakens interactions of molecules. The alterations in the morphology of model systems were also noticed. The foregoing effects of auxins are concentration-dependent and additionally NAA was found to act on animal vs. plant membranes more selectively than IAA. Interestingly, both IAA and NAA induce the strongest disordering in model lipid system at the concentration, which is frequently reported as toxic to animal and plants. Based on the above findings it was proposed that membrane-damage effect induced by IAA and NAA may be important from the point of view of the mechanism of toxicity of these compounds and cannot be ignored in further investigations in this area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of PolyHIPE Membrane with Tricaprylmethylammonium Chloride for Cr(VI) Ion Separation: Parameters and Mechanism of Transport Relating to the Pore Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jyh-Herng; Le, Thi Tuyet Mai; Hsu, Kai-Chung

    2018-03-02

    The structural characteristics of membrane support directly affect the performance of carrier facilitated transport membrane. A highly porous PolyHIPE impregnated with Aliquat 336 is proposed for Cr(VI) separation. PolyHIPE consisting of poly(styrene- co -2-ethylhexyl acrylate) copolymer crosslinked with divinylbenzene has the pore structure characteristic of large pore spaces interconnected with small window throats. The unique pore structure provides the membrane with high flux and stability. The experimental results indicate that the effective diffusion coefficient D* of Cr(VI) through Aliquat 336/PolyHIPE membrane is as high as 1.75 × 10 -11 m² s -1 . Transport study shows that the diffusion of Cr(VI) through Aliquat 336/PolyHIPE membrane can be attributed to the jumping transport mechanism. The hydraulic stability experiment shows that the membrane is quite stable, with recovery rates remaining at 95%, even after 10 consecutive cycles of operation. The separation study demonstrates the potential application of this new type of membrane for Cr(VI) recovery.

  5. Investigation on degradation mechanism of ion exchange membrane immersed in highly concentrated tritiated water under the Broader Approach Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Yasunori, E-mail: iwai.yasunori@jaea.go.jp; Sato, Katsumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Endurance of Nafion ion exchange membrane immersed into 1.38 × 10{sup 12} Bq/kg of highly concentrated tritiated water has been demonstrated. • The formation of free hydrophobic free products by reactions between radicals on the membrane and oxygen caused the decrease in ionic conductivity. • From the {sup 19}F NMR spectrum, no distinctive degradation in the membrane structure by interaction with tritium was measured. - Abstract: The ion exchange membrane is a key material for electrolysis cells of the water detritiation system. Durability of ion exchange membrane has been demonstrated under the Broader Approach Activities. Long-term exposure of Nafion{sup ®} ion exchange membrane in 1.38 × 10{sup 12} Bq/kg of tritiated water was conducted at room temperature for up to 2 years. The ionic conductivity of Nafion{sup ®} membrane after immersed in tritiated water was changed. The change in color of membrane from colorless to yellowish was caused by reactions of radicals on the polymer and oxygen molecules in air. Infrared Fourier transform spectrum of a yellowish membrane revealed a small peak for bending vibration of C-H situated at 1437 cm{sup −1}, demonstrating the formation of hydrophobic functional group in the membrane. The hydrophilic network in Nafion{sup ®} membrane was partially obstructed by the hydrophobic free products. This caused the decrease in ionic conductivity. The peak for bending vibration was clearly eliminated in the spectrum of the membrane after treatment by acid for removal of free products. The high-resolution solid state {sup 19}F NMR spectrum of a membrane after immersed in tritiated water was similar to that of a membrane irradiated with gamma-rays. From the {sup 19}F NMR spectrum, no distinctive degradation in the membrane structure by interaction with tritium was measured.

  6. Investigation on degradation mechanism of ion exchange membrane immersed in highly concentrated tritiated water under the Broader Approach Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Yasunori; Sato, Katsumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Endurance of Nafion ion exchange membrane immersed into 1.38 × 10 12 Bq/kg of highly concentrated tritiated water has been demonstrated. • The formation of free hydrophobic free products by reactions between radicals on the membrane and oxygen caused the decrease in ionic conductivity. • From the 19 F NMR spectrum, no distinctive degradation in the membrane structure by interaction with tritium was measured. - Abstract: The ion exchange membrane is a key material for electrolysis cells of the water detritiation system. Durability of ion exchange membrane has been demonstrated under the Broader Approach Activities. Long-term exposure of Nafion ® ion exchange membrane in 1.38 × 10 12 Bq/kg of tritiated water was conducted at room temperature for up to 2 years. The ionic conductivity of Nafion ® membrane after immersed in tritiated water was changed. The change in color of membrane from colorless to yellowish was caused by reactions of radicals on the polymer and oxygen molecules in air. Infrared Fourier transform spectrum of a yellowish membrane revealed a small peak for bending vibration of C-H situated at 1437 cm −1 , demonstrating the formation of hydrophobic functional group in the membrane. The hydrophilic network in Nafion ® membrane was partially obstructed by the hydrophobic free products. This caused the decrease in ionic conductivity. The peak for bending vibration was clearly eliminated in the spectrum of the membrane after treatment by acid for removal of free products. The high-resolution solid state 19 F NMR spectrum of a membrane after immersed in tritiated water was similar to that of a membrane irradiated with gamma-rays. From the 19 F NMR spectrum, no distinctive degradation in the membrane structure by interaction with tritium was measured

  7. Influence of length and conformation of saccharide head groups on the mechanics of glycolipid membranes: Unraveled by off-specular neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akihisa, E-mail: ayamamoto@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tanaka@uni-heidelberg.de; Tanaka, Motomu, E-mail: ayamamoto@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tanaka@uni-heidelberg.de [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Abuillan, Wasim; Körner, Alexander [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Burk, Alexandra S. [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ries, Annika [Institute of Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry, University of Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Werz, Daniel B. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Demé, Bruno [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, Grenoble (France)

    2015-04-21

    The mechanical properties of multilayer stacks of Gb3 glycolipid that play key roles in metabolic disorders (Fabry disease) were determined quantitatively by using specular and off-specular neutron scattering. Because of the geometry of membrane stacks deposited on planar substrates, the scattered intensity profile was analyzed in a 2D reciprocal space map as a function of in-plane and out-of-plane scattering vector components. The two principal mechanical parameters of the membranes, namely, bending rigidity and compression modulus, can be quantified by full calculation of scattering functions with the aid of an effective cut-off radius that takes the finite sample size into consideration. The bulkier “bent” Gb3 trisaccharide group makes the membrane mechanics distinctly different from cylindrical disaccharide (lactose) head groups and shorter “bent” disaccharide (gentiobiose) head groups. The mechanical characterization of membranes enriched with complex glycolipids has high importance in understanding the mechanisms of diseases such as sphingolipidoses caused by the accumulation of non-degenerated glycosphingolipids in lysosomes or inhibition of protein synthesis triggered by the specific binding of Shiga toxin to Gb3.

  8. A Study on Anti – Fouling Behaviour and Mechanical Properties of PVA/Chitosan/TEOS Hybrid membrane in The Treatment of Copper Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, N. A.; Kassim Shaari, N. Z.; Rahman, N. Abdul

    2018-05-01

    In a wastewater treatment by using membrane filtration, fouling has been one of the major problems. In this study, the anti-fouling behaviour of the fabricated thin-film composite membrane were studied during the treatment of water containing copper ion. The membranes were prepared from a polymer blend of 2wt.% chitosan with 10 wt.% poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and then it was cross – linked with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) through sol-gel method. The membrane had been evaluated for its resistance against organic fouling where humic acid had been chosen as organic foulant model which represent the natural organic matter (NOM) in water or wastewater. The dead-end filtration experiments were carried out by using 50 ppm of copper solution with and without the presence of humic acid as feed solution, which was passed through two types of thin film composite membranes. The possible reversible fouling was evaluated by using relative flux decay (RFD) and relative flux recovery (RFR) calculations. The percentage of copper ion removal was evaluated by using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). Based on the results, with the presence of humic acid, the membrane incorporated with silica precursor (TEOS) showed lower flux decay (3%) and higher flux recovery (76%), which show that the formulated hybrid membrane possesses the anti fouling property. The same trend was observed in the mechanical properties of hybrid membrane, where the presence of TEOS has improved the tensile strength and flexibility of the membrane. Therefore, the fabricated thin film composite with the anti-fouling properties and good physical flexibility has potential to be used in the treatment of wastewater containing heavy metal as it could result in good saving in term of operational cost.

  9. Modulation of erythrocyte membrane mechanical stability by 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in the neonatal poikilocytosis/elliptocytosis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzer, W C; Iarocci, T A; Mohandas, N; Lane, P A; Smith, B; Lazerson, J; Hays, T

    1987-01-01

    To explain the transient anemia and poikilocytosis seen during infancy in hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), we resealed erythrocyte (RBC) ghosts from affected children or their elliptocytic parents with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) (0-8 mM), a compound that dissociates membrane skeletons, then measured ghost mechanical stability in the ektacytometer. Without added 2,3-DPG, ghost mechanical stability was subnormal in infantile poikilocytosis (IP) and HE but was even more abnormal in hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP). Addition of 2,3-DPG (2.55 mM) to IP or HE ghosts, decreased their stability to that of HPP ghosts (without 2,3-DPG). Nonphysiological 2,3-DPG levels (6-8 mM) were required to elicit a similar effect in normal ghosts. The data suggest that free 2,3-DPG, present in neonatal RBC as a consequence of diminished binding to HbF, may render HE susceptible to in vivo fragmentation. The developmental switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin, by diminishing available free 2,3-DPG, may explain the abatement of poikilocytosis and hemolytic anemia that accompanies maturation. Images PMID:3818955

  10. Metallurgical evaluation of failed post-tensioned containment tendon anchors at Joseph M. Farley Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    A metallurgical examination has been performed on three failed post-tensioned containment tendon anchors and one intact anchor from the Farley Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation consisted of chemical/mechanical testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The conclusions drawn from the investigation were: 1) the anchors met the chemical and mechanical properties of AISI 4140/4142 steel; 2) there was no evidence of phosphorous segregation to the grain boundary (by ethereal picral etch); 3) the observed cracking was generally a mixed mode of intergranular and quasi-cleavage as well as ductile rupture with the intergranular cracking occurring along prior austenite grain boundaries; 4) the results of the mechanical tests coupled with the discontinuous nature of the intergranular areas and the elimination of other modes of failure give sufficient indication that the failure was a hydrogen induced cracking phenomenon

  11. Career anchors and learning plan (part one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is divided into three parts. The first part concentrates on how important career is for an individual, organization and society. The author establishes that understanding of career has changed dramatically and does not only refer to climbing up the career ladder, but also moving off or even down the career ladder. The notion of career, as a lifelong and professional path, encompasses all aspects of human personality and their roles acquired through one's life. On basis of vast and longitudinal research, where the author has studied career anchors of individuals, it is the objective of the author to find out on basis of what grounds do the individuals decide to take certain directions in their careers and how learning contributes to such decisions. As a source the author has used Shein's theory of career anchors. Part one describes in greater detail 8 different career anchors and introduces their main features with the findings of the research, which refer to the analysis of professions (work positions and established career anchors. The author thus verifies the hypothesis that career anchors do exist in our area.

  12. Contribution of ankyrin-band 3 complexes to the organization and mechanical properties of the membrane skeleton of human erythrocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Biological and Medical Research Div.

    1995-02-01

    To understand the role of ankyrin-band 3 complexes in the organization of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton and its contribution to the mechanical properties of human erythrocytes, intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets were prepared from intact and physically sheared membrane ghosts, expanded in low salt buffer, and examined by transmission electron microscopy. While the structures of intact skeletons and single-layered skeleton leaflets shared many common features, including rigid junctional complexes of spectrin, actin, and band 4.1; short stretches ({approximately}50 {angstrom}) of flexible spectrin filaments; and globular masses of ankyrin-band 3 complexes situated close to the middle of the spectrin filaments, the definition of structural units in the intact skeleton is obscured by the superposition of the two layers. However, the spatial disposition of structural elements can be clearly defined in the images of the single-layered skeleton leaflets. Partially expanded skeletal leaflets contain conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes arranged in a circular or clove-leaf configuration that straddles multiple strands of thick spectrin cables, presumably reflecting the association of ankyrin-band 3 complexes on neighboring spectrin tetramers as well as the lateral association of the spectrin filaments. Hyperexpansion of the skeleton leaflets led to dissociation of the conglomerates of ankyrin-band 3 complexes, full-extension of the spectrin tetramers, and separation of the individual strands of spectrin tetramers. Clearly defined stands of spectrin tetramers in the hyperexpanded single-layered skeletal leaflets often contained two sets of globular protein masses that divided the spectrin tetramers into three segments of approximately equal length.

  13. Molecular mechanism of ligand recognition by membrane transport protein, Mhp1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Katie J; Jackson, Scott M; Brueckner, Florian; Patching, Simon G; Beckstein, Oliver; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Geng, Tian; Weyand, Simone; Drew, David; Lanigan, Joseph; Sharples, David J; Sansom, Mark SP; Iwata, So; Fishwick, Colin WG; Johnson, A Peter; Cameron, Alexander D; Henderson, Peter JF

    2014-01-01

    The hydantoin transporter Mhp1 is a sodium-coupled secondary active transport protein of the nucleobase-cation-symport family and a member of the widespread 5-helix inverted repeat superfamily of transporters. The structure of Mhp1 was previously solved in three different conformations providing insight into the molecular basis of the alternating access mechanism. Here, we elucidate detailed events of substrate binding, through a combination of crystallography, molecular dynamics, site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical/biophysical assays, and the design and synthesis of novel ligands. We show precisely where 5-substituted hydantoin substrates bind in an extended configuration at the interface of the bundle and hash domains. They are recognised through hydrogen bonds to the hydantoin moiety and the complementarity of the 5-substituent for a hydrophobic pocket in the protein. Furthermore, we describe a novel structure of an intermediate state of the protein with the external thin gate locked open by an inhibitor, 5-(2-naphthylmethyl)-L-hydantoin, which becomes a substrate when leucine 363 is changed to an alanine. We deduce the molecular events that underlie acquisition and transport of a ligand by Mhp1. PMID:24952894

  14. Ultimate load capacities of expansion anchor bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnecki, R.M.; Manrique, M.A.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of available experimental expansion anchor bolt test data is presented. These data were collected as part of programs by the nuclear industry to address generic issues related to verification of seismic adequacy of equipment in nuclear power plants. Some of the data presented are suitable for use in seismic probabilistic risk assessments. For example, mean values of ultimate strength, along with their standard deviation and coefficients of variation, for a range of most typical expansion anchor bolt sizes are presented. Effects of interaction between shear and tension, edge distance, spacing, and cracking of the concrete are presented in a manner that is more suitable for use in deterministic evaluations. Related industry programs to derive anchor bolt capacities are briefly discussed. Recommendations for areas of further investigation are also presented

  15. Investigation of a robust tendon-sheath mechanism for flexible membrane wing application in mini-UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shian; Tjahjowidodo, Tegoeh; Lee, Hsuchew; Lai, Benedict

    2017-02-01

    Two inherent issues manifest themselves in flying mini-unmanned aerial vehicles (mini-UAV) in the dense area at tropical climate regions, namely disturbances from gusty winds and limited space for deployment tasks. Flexible membrane wing (FMW) UAVs are seen to be potentials to mitigate these problems. FMWs are adaptable to gusty airflow as the wings are able to flex according to the gust load to reduce the effective angle-of-attack, thus, reducing the aerodynamic loads on the wing. On the other hand, the flexible structure is allowing the UAV to fold in a compact package, and later on, the mini-UAV can be deployed instantly from the storage tube, e.g. through a catapult mechanism. This paper discusses the development of an FMW UAV actuated by a tendon-sheath mechanism (TSM). This approach allows the wing to morph to generate a rolling moment, while still allowing the wing to fold. Dynamic characteristics of the mechanism that exhibits the strong nonlinear phenomenon of friction on TSM are modeled and compensated for. A feed-forward controller was implemented based on the identified nonlinear behavior to control the warping position of the wing. The proposed strategy is validated experimentally in a wind tunnel facility by creating a gusty environment that is imitating a realistic gusty condition based upon the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results demonstrate a stable and robust wing-warping actuation, even in gusty conditions. Accurate wing-warping can be achieved via the TSM, while also allowing the wings to fold.

  16. Dystroglycan loss disrupts polarity and beta-casein induction inmammary epithelial cells by perturbing laminin anchoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, M. Lynn; Oppizzi, Maria Luisa; Henry, Michael D.; Onishi,Akiko; Campbell, Kevin P.; Bissell, Mina J.; Muschler, John L.

    2006-02-17

    Precise contact between epithelial cells and their underlying basement membrane is critical to the maintenance of tissue architecture and function. To understand the role that the laminin receptor dystroglycan (DG) plays in these processes, we assayed cell responses to laminin-111 following conditional ablation of DG expression in cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Strikingly, DG loss disrupted laminin-111-induced polarity and {beta}-casein production, and abolished laminin assembly at the step of laminin binding to the cell surface. DG re-expression restored these deficiencies. Investigations of mechanism revealed that DG cytoplasmic sequences were not necessary for laminin assembly and signaling, and only when the entire mucin domain of extracellular DG was deleted did laminin assembly not occur. These results demonstrate that DG is essential as a laminin-111 co-receptor in MECs that functions by mediating laminin anchoring to the cell surface, a process that allows laminin polymerization, tissue polarity, and {beta}-casein induction. The observed loss of laminin-111 assembly and signaling in DG-/-MECs provides insights into the signaling changes occurring in breast carcinomas and other cancers, where DG's laminin-binding function is frequently defective.

  17. Highly Hydrophilic Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Ultrafiltration Membranes via Postfabrication Grafting of Surface-Tailored Silica Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Shuai

    2013-07-24

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) has drawn much attention as a predominant ultrafiltration (UF) membrane material due to its outstanding mechanical and physicochemical properties. However, current applications suffer from the low fouling resistance of the PVDF membrane due to the intrinsic hydrophobic property of the membrane. The present study demonstrates a novel approach for the fabrication of a highly hydrophilic PVDF UF membrane via postfabrication tethering of superhydrophilic silica nanoparticles (NPs) to the membrane surface. The pristine PVDF membrane was grafted with poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) by plasma induced graft copolymerization, providing sufficient carboxyl groups as anchor sites for the binding of silica NPs, which were surface-tailored with amine-terminated cationic ligands. The NP binding was achieved through a remarkably simple and effective dip-coating technique in the presence or absence of the N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linking process. The properties of the membrane prepared from the modification without EDC/NHS cross-linking were comparable to those for the membrane prepared with the EDC/NHS cross-linking. Both modifications almost doubled the surface energy of the functionalized membranes, which significantly improved the wettability of the membrane and converted the membrane surface from hydrophobic to highly hydrophilic. The irreversibly bound layer of superhydrophilic silica NPs endowed the membranes with strong antifouling performance as demonstrated by three sequential fouling filtration runs using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model organic foulant. The results suggest promising applications of the postfabrication surface modification technique in various membrane separation areas. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. GPI-anchored protein organization and dynamics at the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Suvrajit; Anilkumar, Anupama Ambika; Mayor, Satyajit

    2016-02-01

    The surface of eukaryotic cells is a multi-component fluid bilayer in which glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are an abundant constituent. In this review, we discuss the complex nature of the organization and dynamics of GPI-anchored proteins at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Different biophysical techniques have been utilized for understanding this organization, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, single particle tracking, and a number of super resolution methods. Major insights into the organization and dynamics have also come from exploring the short-range interactions of GPI-anchored proteins by fluorescence (or Förster) resonance energy transfer microscopy. Based on the nanometer to micron scale organization, at the microsecond to the second time scale dynamics, a picture of the membrane bilayer emerges where the lipid bilayer appears inextricably intertwined with the underlying dynamic cytoskeleton. These observations have prompted a revision of the current models of plasma membrane organization, and suggest an active actin-membrane composite. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Hydrolytic Degradation and Mechanical Stability of Poly(ε-Caprolactone)/Reduced Graphene Oxide Membranes as Scaffolds for In Vitro Neural Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-González, Sandra; Diban, Nazely; Urtiaga, Ane

    2018-03-05

    The present work studies the functional behavior of novel poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) membranes functionalized with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplatelets under simulated in vitro culture conditions (phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at 37 °C) during 1 year, in order to elucidate their applicability as scaffolds for in vitro neural regeneration. The morphological, chemical, and DSC results demonstrated that high internal porosity of the membranes facilitated water permeation and procured an accelerated hydrolytic degradation throughout the bulk pathway. Therefore, similar molecular weight reduction, from 80 kDa to 33 kDa for the control PCL, and to 27 kDa for PCL/rGO membranes, at the end of the study, was observed. After 1 year of hydrolytic degradation, though monomers coming from the hydrolytic cleavage of PCL diffused towards the PBS medium, the pH was barely affected, and the rGO nanoplatelets mainly remained in the membranes which envisaged low cytotoxic effect. On the other hand, the presence of rGO nanomaterials accelerated the loss of mechanical stability of the membranes. However, it is envisioned that the gradual degradation of the PCL/rGO membranes could facilitate cells infiltration, interconnectivity, and tissue formation.

  20. Identification of a transport mechanism for NH4+ in the symbiosome membrane of pea root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritzen, P.; Rosendahl, L.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiosome membrane vesicles, facing bacteroid-side-out, were purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules and used to study NH4+ transport across the membrane by recording vesicle uptake of the NH4+ analog [C-14]methylamine (MA). Membrane potentials (Delta psi) were imposed on the vesicles...... of the pH gradient indicated that uptake of MA was not related to the presence of a pH gradient. The MA-uptake mechanism appeared to have a large capacity for transport, and saturation was not observed at MA concentrations in the range of 25 mu M to 150 mM. MA uptake could be inhibited by NH4+, which...... indicates that NH4+ and MA compete for the same uptake mechanism. The observed fluxes suggest that voltage-driven channels are operating in the wsymbiosome membrane and that these are capable of transporting NH4+ at high rates from the bacteroid side of the membrane to the plant cytosol. The p...

  1. Enhanced mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of electrospun poly(L-lactide) composite fiber membranes assisted by polydopamine-coated halloysite nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chuang; Zou, Ziping [Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Department of Material Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Luo, Binghong, E-mail: tluobh@jnu.edu.cn [Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Department of Material Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Wen, Wei [Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Department of Material Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Huihua [Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Department of Material Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Liu, Mingxian [Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Department of Material Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Zhou, Changren, E-mail: tcrz9@jnu.edu.cn [Biomaterial Research Laboratory, Department of Material Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Engineering Research Center of Artificial Organs and Materials, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2016-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • D-HNTs was prepared by a facile approach based on the self-polymerization of DOPA. • The D-HNTs can disperse more uniformly in PLLA matrix than untreated HNTs. • The interfacial adhesion between D-HNTs and PLLA matrix was obviously improved. • D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane has better tensile properties compared with HNTs/PLLA. • The D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane is favorable to cell adhesion and proliferation. - Abstract: To improve the dispersion and interfacial interaction between halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) and poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) matrix, and hence to increase the mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of the HNTs/PLLA composite, a facile approach was developed to prepare polydopamine-coated HNTs (D-HNTs) by the self-polymerization of dopamine (DOPA), and then HNTs and D-HNTs were further introduced into PLLA matrix to fabricate HNTs/PLLA and D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membranes based on electrospinning technique. The successful immobilization of the polydopamine (PDOPA) coating on the surfaces of HNTs was confirmed, and such PDOPA coating played an important role in improving the interfacial interaction between the nanotubes and PLLA matrix. The D-HNTs were dispersed in the matrix more uniformly than untreated HNTs, and relative smooth and uniform fiber were obtained for the D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane. As a result, the tensile strength and modulus of the D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane were obviously superior to those of the HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane. Cell culture results revealed that D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane was more effectively to promote MC3T3-E1 cells adhesion and proliferation than neat PLLA and HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane.

  2. Enhanced mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of electrospun poly(L-lactide) composite fiber membranes assisted by polydopamine-coated halloysite nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Chuang; Zou, Ziping; Luo, Binghong; Wen, Wei; Li, Huihua; Liu, Mingxian; Zhou, Changren

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • D-HNTs was prepared by a facile approach based on the self-polymerization of DOPA. • The D-HNTs can disperse more uniformly in PLLA matrix than untreated HNTs. • The interfacial adhesion between D-HNTs and PLLA matrix was obviously improved. • D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane has better tensile properties compared with HNTs/PLLA. • The D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane is favorable to cell adhesion and proliferation. - Abstract: To improve the dispersion and interfacial interaction between halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) and poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) matrix, and hence to increase the mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of the HNTs/PLLA composite, a facile approach was developed to prepare polydopamine-coated HNTs (D-HNTs) by the self-polymerization of dopamine (DOPA), and then HNTs and D-HNTs were further introduced into PLLA matrix to fabricate HNTs/PLLA and D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membranes based on electrospinning technique. The successful immobilization of the polydopamine (PDOPA) coating on the surfaces of HNTs was confirmed, and such PDOPA coating played an important role in improving the interfacial interaction between the nanotubes and PLLA matrix. The D-HNTs were dispersed in the matrix more uniformly than untreated HNTs, and relative smooth and uniform fiber were obtained for the D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane. As a result, the tensile strength and modulus of the D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane were obviously superior to those of the HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane. Cell culture results revealed that D-HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane was more effectively to promote MC3T3-E1 cells adhesion and proliferation than neat PLLA and HNTs/PLLA fiber membrane.

  3. Contribution of a submerged membrane bioreactor in the treatment of synthetic effluent contaminated by Bisphenol-A: Mechanism of BPA removal and membrane fouling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyhi, Brahima; Drogui, Patrick; Buelna, Gerardo; Azaïs, Antonin; Heran, Marc

    2013-01-01

    A submerged membrane bioreactor has been operated at the laboratory scale for the treatment of a synthetic effluent containing Bisphenol-A (BPA). COD, NH 4 –N, PO 4 –P and BPA were eliminated respectively, at 99%, 99%, 61% and 99%. The increase of volumetric loading rate from 0 to 21.6 g/m 3 /d did not affect the performance of the MBR system. However, the removal rate decreased rapidly when the BPA loading rate increased above 21.6 g/m 3 /d. The adsorption process of BPA on the biomass was very well described by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Subsequently, biodegradation of BPA occurred and followed the first order kinetic reaction, with a constant rate of 1.13 ± 0.22 h −1 . During treatment, membrane fouling was reversible in the first 84 h of filtration, and then became irreversible. The membrane fouling was mainly due to the accumulation of suspended solid and development of biofilm on the membrane surface. -- Highlights: •High BPA removal rates (up to 99%) were obtained in the MBR. •A limit of the toxicity of 21.6 g/m 3 /d of BPA was recorded for the MBR. •The first order kinetic model described very well the biodegradation process for BPA. •The kinetic rates (0.61–1.13 h −1 ) depend on BPA loading (0.10–0.50 mg/g TSS). •The initial organic loading (0.04 and 0.20 g COD g −1 TSS) did not affect the kinetic. -- High BPA removal rates (up to 99%) were obtained in the MBR, with a limit of the toxicity closed to 21.6 g/m 3 /d of BPA

  4. Membrane Interactions of Phytochemicals as Their Molecular Mechanism Applicable to the Discovery of Drug Leads from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Tsuchiya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In addition to interacting with functional proteins such as receptors, ion channels, and enzymes, a variety of drugs mechanistically act on membrane lipids to change the physicochemical properties of biomembranes as reported for anesthetic, adrenergic, cholinergic, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antitumor, antiplatelet, antimicrobial, and antioxidant drugs. As well as these membrane-acting drugs, bioactive plant components, phytochemicals, with amphiphilic or hydrophobic structures, are presumed to interact with biological membranes and biomimetic membranes prepared with phospholipids and cholesterol, resulting in the modification of membrane fluidity, microviscosity, order, elasticity, and permeability with the potencies being consistent with their pharmacological effects. A novel mechanistic point of view of phytochemicals would lead to a better understanding of their bioactivities, an insight into their medicinal benefits, and a strategic implication for discovering drug leads from plants. This article reviews the membrane interactions of different classes of phytochemicals by highlighting their induced changes in membrane property. The phytochemicals to be reviewed include membrane-interactive flavonoids, terpenoids, stilbenoids, capsaicinoids, phloroglucinols, naphthodianthrones, organosulfur compounds, alkaloids, anthraquinonoids, ginsenosides, pentacyclic triterpene acids, and curcuminoids. The membrane interaction’s applicability to the discovery of phytochemical drug leads is also discussed while referring to previous screening and isolating studies.

  5. Membrane fusion and exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, R; Südhof, T C

    1999-01-01

    Membrane fusion involves the merger of two phospholipid bilayers in an aqueous environment. In artificial lipid bilayers, fusion proceeds by means of defined transition states, including hourglass-shaped intermediates in which the proximal leaflets of the fusing membranes are merged whereas the distal leaflets are separate (fusion stalk), followed by the reversible opening of small aqueous fusion pores. Fusion of biological membranes requires the action of specific fusion proteins. Best understood are the viral fusion proteins that are responsible for merging the viral with the host cell membrane during infection. These proteins undergo spontaneous and dramatic conformational changes upon activation. In the case of the paradigmatic fusion proteins of the influenza virus and of the human immunodeficiency virus, an amphiphilic fusion peptide is inserted into the target membrane. The protein then reorients itself, thus forcing the fusing membranes together and inducing lipid mixing. Fusion of intracellular membranes in eukaryotic cells involves several protein families including SNAREs, Rab proteins, and Sec1/Munc-18 related proteins (SM-proteins). SNAREs form a novel superfamily of small and mostly membrane-anchored proteins that share a common motif of about 60 amino acids (SNARE motif). SNAREs reversibly assemble into tightly packed helical bundles, the core complexes. Assembly is thought to pull the fusing membranes closely together, thus inducing fusion. SM-proteins comprise a family of soluble proteins that bind to certain types of SNAREs and prevent the formation of core complexes. Rab proteins are GTPases that undergo highly regulated GTP-GDP cycles. In their GTP form, they interact with specific proteins, the effector proteins. Recent evidence suggests that Rab proteins function in the initial membrane contact connecting the fusing membranes but are not involved in the fusion reaction itself.

  6. Electric Response and Conductivity Mechanism in H3PO4‑Doped Polybenzimidazole-4N−HfO2 Nanocomposite Membranes for High Temperature Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawn, Graeme; Vezzù, Keti; Bertasi, Federico; Pagot, Gioele; Pace, Giuseppe; Conti, Fosca; Negro, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Relaxation and polarization phenomena of phosphoric acid-doped [PBI4N(HfO 2 ) x ](H 3 PO 4 ) y nanocomposite membranes for high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are studied using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and Broadband Electrical Spectroscopy (BES). The membranes are obtained by casting combinations of a polybenzimidazole polymer (PBI4N) with increasing amounts of hafnium oxide nanofiller, resulting in [PBI4N(HfO 2 ) x ] hybrid systems with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.32. Phosphoric acid at varying content levels (0 ÷ 18 wt%) is used as a doping agent, giving rise to [PBI4N(HfO 2 ) x ](H 3 PO 4 ) y membranes. DMA and BES studies lead us to determine that the electric response of the membranes is modulated by polarization phenomena and by α and β dielectric relaxation events of the polymer matrix. Additionally, the experimental results suggest that in [PBI4N(HfO 2 ) x ](H 3 PO 4 ) y membranes the conductivity occurs owing to three conductivity pathways: two mechanisms involving inter-domain proton migration phenomena by “hopping” events; and one mechanism in which proton exchange occurs between delocalization bodies. These results highlight the significant effect of the hafnium oxide nanofiller content on the conductivity of [PBI4N(HfO 2 ) x ](H 3 PO 4 ) y where, at x ≥ 0.04, demonstrates conductivity higher (9.0 × 10 −2 S/cm) than that of pristine H 3 PO 4 -doped PBI4N (4.8 × 10 −2 S/cm) at T ≥ 155 °C.

  7. Controlling the Anchoring Effect through Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS to the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbiao Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Selective accessibility mechanisms indicate that anchoring effects are results of selective retrieval of working memory. Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC is closely related to memory retrieval and performance. However, no research has investigated the effect of changing the cortical excitability in right DLPFC on anchoring effects. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS can modulate the excitability of the human cerebral cortex, while anodal and cathodal tDCS are postulated to increase or decrease cortical activity, respectively. In this study, we used tDCS to investigate whether effects of increased or decreased right DLPFC excitability influence anchoring effects in willingness to pay (WTP experiments. Ninety participants were first randomly assigned to receive either anodal, cathodal, or sham stimulation of 15 min, then they performed a valuation task regarding WTP. The results showed that anchoring effects were negatively related to activities of right DLPFC: the anodal stimulation diminished anchoring effects while the cathodal stimulation increased anchoring effects. These outcomes provide one of the first instances of neural evidence for the role of the right DLPFC in anchoring effects and support psychological explanations of the selective accessibility mechanisms and cognitive sets.

  8. Comparison of Suture-Based Anchors and Traditional Bioabsorbable Anchors in Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembree, W Chad; Tsai, Michael A; Parks, Brent G; Miller, Stuart D

    We compared the pullout strength of a suture-based anchor versus a bioabsorbable anchor in the distal fibula and calcaneus and evaluated the relationship between bone mineral density and peak load to failure. Eight paired cadaveric specimens underwent a modified Broström procedure and Achilles tendon reattachment. The fibula and calcaneus in the paired specimens received either a suture-based anchor or a bioabsorbable suture anchor. The fibular and calcaneal specimens were loaded to failure, defined as a substantial decrease in the applied load or pullout from the bone. In the fibula, the peak load to failure was significantly greater with the suture-based versus the bioabsorbable anchors (133.3 ± 41.8 N versus 76.8 ± 35.3 N; p = .002). No significant difference in load with 5 mm of displacement was found between the 2 groups. In the calcaneus, no difference in the peak load to failure was found between the 2 groups, and the peak load to failure with 5 mm of displacement was significantly lower with the suture-based than with the bioabsorbable anchors (52.2 ± 9.8 N versus 75.9 ± 12.4 N; p = .003). Bone mineral density and peak load to failure were significantly correlated in the fibula with the suture-based anchor. An innovative suture-based anchor had a greater peak load to failure compared with a bioabsorbable anchor in the fibula. In the calcaneus, the load at 5 mm of displacement was significantly lower in the suture-based than in the bioabsorbable group. The correlation findings might indicate the need for a cortical bone shelf with the suture-based anchor. Suture-based anchors could be a viable alternative to bioabsorbable anchors for certain foot and ankle procedures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The pectinate zone is stiff and the arcuate zone determines passive basilar membrane mechanics in the gerbil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongyi; Steele, Charles R.; Puria, Sunil

    2018-05-01

    The gerbil basilar membrane (BM) differs from other mammalian BMs in that the lower collagen-fiber layer of the pectinate zone (PZ) forms an arch, the upper fiber layer is flat, and ground substance separates the two layers. The role of this arch has been unknown, but can be elucidated by models. In the standard simple beam model (SBM), the upper and lower collagen-fiber layers of the BM are represented as a single layer in both the PZ and the arcuate zone (AZ). In our new arch-beam model (ABM), the upper fiber layer is flat, the lower layer forms an arch in the PZ, and the two layers combine to form the flat portion of the BM in the AZ. This design is incorporated into a 3D finite-element tapered-box model of the cochlea with viscous fluid. We find in the model that the PZ rotates as a rigid body, so its specific properties have little influence, while the AZ thickness and collagen volume fraction primarily determine passive BM mechanics.

  10. Analysis of the outer membrane proteome and secretome of Bacteroides fragilis reveals a multiplicity of secretion mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena M Wilson

    Full Text Available Bacteroides fragilis is a widely distributed member of the human gut microbiome and an opportunistic pathogen. Cell surface molecules produced by this organism likely play important roles in colonization, communication with other microbes, and pathogenicity, but the protein composition of the outer membrane (OM and the mechanisms used to transport polypeptides into the extracellular space are poorly characterized. Here we used LC-MS/MS to analyze the OM proteome and secretome of B. fragilis NCTC 9343 grown under laboratory conditions. Of the 229 OM proteins that we identified, 108 are predicted to be lipoproteins, and 61 are predicted to be TonB-dependent transporters. Based on their proximity to genes encoding TonB-dependent transporters, many of the lipoprotein genes likely encode proteins involved in nutrient or small molecule uptake. Interestingly, protease accessibility and biotinylation experiments indicated that an unusually large fraction of the lipoproteins are cell-surface exposed. We also identified three proteins that are members of a novel family of autotransporters, multiple potential type I protein secretion systems, and proteins that appear to be components of a type VI secretion apparatus. The secretome consisted of lipoproteins and other proteins that might be substrates of the putative type I or type VI secretion systems. Our proteomic studies show that B. fragilis differs considerably from well-studied Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli in both the spectrum of OM proteins that it produces and the range of secretion strategies that it utilizes.

  11. Structure and physical properties of bio membranes and model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibor Hianik

    2006-01-01

    Bio membranes belong to the most important structures of the cell and the cell organelles. They play not only structural role of the barrier separating the external and internal part of the membrane but contain also various functional molecules, like receptors, ionic channels, carriers and enzymes. The cell membrane also preserves non-equilibrium state in a cell which is crucial for maintaining its excitability and other signaling functions. The growing interest to the bio membranes is also due to their unique physical properties. From physical point of view the bio membranes, that are composed of lipid bilayer into which are incorporated integral proteins and on their surface are anchored peripheral proteins and polysaccharides, represent liquid s crystal of smectic type. The bio membranes are characterized by anisotropy of structural and physical properties. The complex structure of bio membranes makes the study of their physical properties rather difficult. Therefore several model systems that mimic the structure of bio membranes were developed. Among them the lipid monolayers at an air-water interphase, bilayer lipid membranes, supported bilayer lipid membranes and liposomes are most known. This work is focused on the introduction into the physical word of the bio membranes and their models. After introduction to the membrane structure and the history of its establishment, the physical properties of the bio membranes and their models are stepwise presented. The most focus is on the properties of lipid monolayers, bilayer lipid membranes, supported bilayer lipid membranes and liposomes that were most detailed studied. This lecture has tutorial character that may be useful for undergraduate and graduate students in the area of biophysics, biochemistry, molecular biology and bioengineering, however it contains also original work of the author and his co-worker and PhD students, that may be useful also for specialists working in the field of bio membranes and model

  12. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  13. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial TOM complex: Mim1 promotes insertion and assembly of signal-anchored receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thomas; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Stojanovski, Diana; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Kutik, Stephan; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils

    2008-01-04

    The translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) is the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. All Tom proteins are also encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized as precursors in the cytosol. The channel-forming beta-barrel protein Tom40 is targeted to mitochondria via Tom receptors and inserted into the outer membrane by the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). A further outer membrane protein, Mim1, plays a less defined role in assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. The three receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 are anchored in the outer membrane by a single transmembrane alpha-helix, located at the N terminus in the case of Tom20 and Tom70 (signal-anchored) or in the C-terminal portion in the case of Tom22 (tail-anchored). Insertion of the precursor of Tom22 into the outer membrane requires pre-existing Tom receptors while the import pathway of the precursors of Tom20 and Tom70 is only poorly understood. We report that Mim1 is required for efficient membrane insertion and assembly of Tom20 and Tom70, but not Tom22. We show that Mim1 associates with SAM(core) components to a large SAM complex, explaining its role in late steps of the assembly pathway of Tom40. We conclude that Mim1 is not only required for biogenesis of the beta-barrel protein Tom40 but also for membrane insertion and assembly of signal-anchored Tom receptors. Thus, Mim1 plays an important role in the efficient assembly of the mitochondrial TOM complex.

  14. Chemical biology of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    CSIR-IIIM. Chemical biology of. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors. Ram Vishwakarma. CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu. N ti l I tit t f I l. N. D lhi. National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi. Piramal Life Sciences Ltd, Mumbai ...

  15. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhuang

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  16. Stone anchors from the Okhamandal region, Gujarat Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundaresh; Gaur, A.S.; Gudigar, P.; Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    During marine archaeological explorations since 1983, off Dwarka, a large number of stone anchors were discovered and dated to 1400 BC, comparing with anchors found in Mediterranean waters. In recent archaeological explorations off Dwarka, Bet...

  17. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  18. Decay accelerating factor of complement is anchored to cells by a C-terminal glycolipid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medof, M.E.; Walter, E.I.; Roberts, W.L.; Haas, R.; Rosenberry, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    Membrane-associated decay accelerating factor (DAF) of human erythrocytes (E/sup hu/) was analyzed for a C-terminal glycolipid anchoring structure. Automated amino acid analysis of DAF following reductive radiomethylation revealed ethanolamine and glucosamine residues in proportions identical with those present in the E/sup hu/ acetylcholinesterase (AChE) anchor. Cleavage of radiomethylated 70-kilodalton (kDa) DAF with papain released the labeled ethanolamine and glucosamine and generated 61- and 55-kDa DAF products that retained all labeled Lys and labeled N-terminal Asp. Incubation of intact E/sup hu/ with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), which cleaves the anchors in trypanosome membrane form variant surface glycoproteins (mfVSGs) and murine thymocyte Thy-1 antigen, released 15% of the cell-associated DAF antigen. The released 67-kDa PI-PLC DAF derivative retained its ability to decay the classical C3 convertase C4b2a but was unable to membrane-incorporate and displayed physicochemical properties similar to urine DAF, a hydrophilic DAF form that can be isolated for urine. Nitrous acid deamination cleavage of E/sup hu/ DAF at glucosamine following labeling with the lipophilic photoreagent 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[ 125 I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([ 125 I]TID) released the [ 125 I]TID label in a parallel fashion as from [ 125 I]TID-labeled AChE. Biosynthetic labeling of HeLa cells with [ 3 H] ethanolamine resulted in rapid 3 H incorporation into both 48-kDa pro-DAF and 72-kDa mature epithelial cell DAF. The findings indicate that DAF and AChE are anchored in E/sup hu/ by the same or a similar glycolipid structure and that, like VSGs, this structure is incorporated into DAF early in DAF biosynthesis prior to processing of pro-DAF in the Golgi

  19. Membrane recognition and dynamics of the RNA degradosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Strahl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available RNase E, which is the central component of the multienzyme RNA degradosome, serves as a scaffold for interaction with other enzymes involved in mRNA degradation including the DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlB. Epifluorescence microscopy under live cell conditions shows that RNase E and RhlB are membrane associated, but neither protein forms cytoskeletal-like structures as reported earlier by Taghbalout and Rothfield. We show that association of RhlB with the membrane depends on a direct protein interaction with RNase E, which is anchored to the inner cytoplasmic membrane through an MTS (Membrane Targeting Sequence. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the MTS interacts with the phospholipid bilayer by forming a stabilized amphipathic α-helix with the helical axis oriented parallel to the plane of the bilayer and hydrophobic side chains buried deep in the acyl core of the membrane. Based on the molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that the MTS freely diffuses in the membrane by a novel mechanism in which a large number of weak contacts are rapidly broken and reformed. TIRFm (Total Internal Reflection microscopy shows that RNase E in live cells rapidly diffuses over the entire inner membrane forming short-lived foci. Diffusion could be part of a scanning mechanism facilitating substrate recognition and cooperativity. Remarkably, RNase E foci disappear and the rate of RNase E diffusion increases with rifampicin treatment. Control experiments show that the effect of rifampicin is specific to RNase E and that the effect is not a secondary consequence of the shut off of E. coli transcription. We therefore interpret the effect of rifampicin as being due to the depletion of RNA substrates for degradation. We propose a model in which formation of foci and constraints on diffusion arise from the transient clustering of RNase E into cooperative degradation bodies.

  20. Detection of pH and Enzyme-Free H2O2 Sensing Mechanism by Using GdO x Membrane in Electrolyte-Insulator-Semiconductor Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Maikap, Siddheswar; Qiu, Jian-Tai; Jana, Surajit; Roy, Anisha; Singh, Kanishk; Cheng, Hsin-Ming; Chang, Mu-Tung; Mahapatra, Rajat; Chiu, Hsien-Chin; Yang, Jer-Ren

    2016-12-01

    A 15-nm-thick GdO x membrane in an electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure shows a higher pH sensitivity of 54.2 mV/pH and enzyme-free hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection than those of the bare SiO2 and 3-nm-thick GdO x membranes for the first time. Polycrystalline grain and higher Gd content of the thicker GdO x films are confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. In a thicker GdO x membrane, polycrystalline grain has lower energy gap and Gd(2+) oxidation states lead to change Gd(3+) states in the presence of H2O2, which are confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The oxidation/reduction (redox) properties of thicker GdO x membrane with higher Gd content are responsible for detecting H2O2 whereas both bare SiO2 and thinner GdO x membranes do not show sensing. A low detection limit of 1 μM is obtained due to strong catalytic activity of Gd. The reference voltage shift increases with increase of the H2O2 concentration from 1 to 200 μM owing to more generation of Gd(3+) ions, and the H2O2 sensing mechanism has been explained as well.

  1. Phospholipase D specific for the phosphatidylinositol anchor of cell-surface proteins is abundant in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, M.G.; Prasad, A.R.S.

    1988-01-01

    An enzyme activity capable of degrading the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchor of cell-surface proteins has previously been reported in a number of mammalian tissues. The experiments reported here demonstrate that this anchor-degrading activity is also abundant in mammalian plasma. The activity was inhibited by EGTA or 1,10-phenanthroline. It was capable of removing the anchor from alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase, and variant surface glycoprotein but had little or no activity toward phosphatidylinositol or phosphatidylcholine. Phosphatidic acid was the only 3 H-labeled product when this enzyme hydrolyzed [ 3 H]myristate-labeled variant surface glycoprotein. It could be distinguished from the Ca 2 =-dependent inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C activity in several rat tissues on the basis of its molecular size and its sensitivity to 1,10-phenanthroline. The data therefore suggest that this activity is due to a phospholipase D with specificity for glycosylphosphatidylinositol structures. Although the precise physiological function of this anchor-specific phospholipase D remains to be determined, these findings indicate that it could play an important role in regulating the expression and release of cell-surface proteins in vivo

  2. Linking Cellular Mechanisms to Behavior: Entorhinal Persistent Spiking and Membrane Potential Oscillations May Underlie Path Integration, Grid Cell Firing, and Episodic Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Hasselmo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex plays an important role in spatial memory and episodic memory functions. These functions may result from cellular mechanisms for integration of the afferent input to entorhinal cortex. This article reviews physiological data on persistent spiking and membrane potential oscillations in entorhinal cortex then presents models showing how both these cellular mechanisms could contribute to properties observed during unit recording, including grid cell firing, and how they could underlie behavioural functions including path integration. The interaction of oscillations and persistent firing could contribute to encoding and retrieval of trajectories through space and time as a mechanism relevant to episodic memory.

  3. AnchorDock: Blind and Flexible Anchor-Driven Peptide Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shimon, Avraham; Niv, Masha Y

    2015-05-05

    The huge conformational space stemming from the inherent flexibility of peptides is among the main obstacles to successful and efficient computational modeling of protein-peptide interactions. Current peptide docking methods typically overcome this challenge using prior knowledge from the structure of the complex. Here we introduce AnchorDock, a peptide docking approach, which automatically targets the docking search to the most relevant parts of the conformational space. This is done by precomputing the free peptide's structure and by computationally identifying anchoring spots on the protein surface. Next, a free peptide conformation undergoes anchor-driven simulated annealing molecular dynamics simulations around the predicted anchoring spots. In the challenging task of a completely blind docking test, AnchorDock produced exceptionally good results (backbone root-mean-square deviation ≤ 2.2Å, rank ≤15) for 10 of 13 unbound cases tested. The impressive performance of AnchorDock supports a molecular recognition pathway that is driven via pre-existing local structural elements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Career Paths, Images and Anchors: A Study with Brazilian Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimnik, Zelia Miranda; de Oliveira, Luiz Claudio Vieira; Sant'anna, Anderson De Souza; Barros, Delba Teixeira Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses career anchors changes associated to images and professionals trajectories. Its main question: Do anchors careers change through time? We conducted twelve interviews involving professionals from the Administration Area, applying Schein's Career Anchors Inventory (1993). We did the same two years later. In both of them, the…

  5. Ultrafiltration and nanofiltration membrane fouling by natural organic matter: Mechanisms and mitigation by pre-ozonation and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenzheng; Liu, Teng; Crawshaw, John; Liu, Ting; Graham, Nigel

    2018-08-01

    The fouling of ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes during the treatment of surface waters continues to be of concern and the particular role of natural organic matter (NOM) requires further investigation. In this study the effect of pH and surface charge on membrane fouling during the treatment of samples of a representative surface water (Hyde Park recreational lake) were evaluated, together with the impact of pre-ozonation. While biopolymers in the surface water could be removed by the UF membrane, smaller molecular weight (MW) fractions of NOM were poorly removed, confirming the importance of membrane pore size. For NF membranes the removal of smaller MW fractions (800 Da-10 kDa) was less than expected from their pore size; however, nearly all of the hydrophobic, humic-type substances could be removed by the hydrophilic NF membranes for all MW distributions (greater than 90%). The results indicated the importance of the charge and hydrophilic nature of the NOM. Thus, the hydrophilic NF membrane could remove the hydrophobic organic matter, but not the hydrophilic substances. Increasing charge effects (more negative zeta potentials) with increasing solution pH were found to enhance organics removal and reduce fouling (flux decline), most likely through greater membrane surface repulsion. Pre-ozonation of the surface water increased the hydrophilic fraction and anionic charge of NOM and altered their size distributions. This resulted in a decreased fouling (less flux decline) for the UF and smaller pore NF, but a slight increase in fouling for the larger pore NF. The differences in the NF behavior are believed to relate to the relative sizes of ozonated organic fractions and the NF pores; a similar size of ozonated organic fractions and the NF pores causes significant membrane fouling. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of anchoring on miscarriage risk perception associated with amniocentesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccio, Regina; Hashmi, S Shahrukh; Mastrobattista, Joan; Noblin, Sarah Jane; Refuerzo, Jerrie; Smith, Janice L; Singletary, Claire N

    2015-04-01

    One factor women consider when deciding whether to pursue amniocentesis is the risk of miscarriage. People use mechanisms like anchoring, or the prior belief regarding the magnitude of risk, as a frame of reference for new information. This study aimed to determine a woman's perception of miscarriage risk associated with amniocentesis before and after genetic counseling and to determine what factors anchor a woman's perception of miscarriage risk. One hundred thirteen women being seen for prenatal genetic counseling and possible amniocentesis at six Houston clinics participated in the two-part anonymous survey. While most women (56.7 %) perceived the risk as low or average pre-counseling and indicated the numeric risk of amniocentesis as risk as risk perception did not change after the genetic counseling session (60 %). Those who changed their feeling about the risk after counseling showed a decreased perception of the risk (p perception of the risk (p = 0.017) whereas those who declined amniocentesis were more likely to view the risk as high (p = 0.004). The only two anchoring factors that had an effect were having a friend or relative with a personal or family history of a genetic disorder (p = 0.001) and having a child already (p = 0.038); both were associated with a lower risk perception. The lack of significant factors may reflect the uniqueness of each patient's risk assessment framework and reinforces the importance of genetic counseling to elucidate individual concerns, particularly as non-invasive prenatal testing becomes more widely available and further complicates the prenatal testing landscape.

  7. Experimental Research on Destruction Mode and Anchoring Performance of Carbon Fiber Phyllostachys pubescens Anchor Rod with Different Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yulan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The anchoring technology is extensively applied in reinforcing protection of the earth relics. Now that no specification is available for different new anchor rods in earth relics protection due to diversified destruction modes of earth relics and complexity of engineering technology conditions, it is urgent to guide reinforcing design and construction with a complete detailed anchor rod research document. With the new carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod as the research object, six lots of in situ tests are designed to, respectively, study the destruction mode and anchoring performance of the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod under different anchor length L, anchor rod diameter D, bore diameter H, grouting material S, rib spacing R, and inclination angle A in this paper. By studying load shift curve experiment in drawing of the anchor rod, the destruction mode and ultimate bearing capacity of the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod in different experiment lots are obtained, and the concept of permitted application value N in anchor rod design is proposed. By studying strain distribution characteristics of anchor rods in experimental lots along the length direction under action of the permitted application value N and combining the existing destruction mode and ultimate bearing capacity, this paper analyzes influences of L, D, H, S, R, and A on anchoring effect of the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod; gives the reasonable value range of L, D, H, and R when the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod is used for reinforcing design of the earth relics; and provides favorable experiment basis for reinforcing design of the earth relics based on the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod.

  8. PF-1355, a mechanism-based myeloperoxidase inhibitor, prevents immune complex vasculitis and anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Warner, Roscoe; Ruggeri, Roger; Su, Chunyan; Cortes, Christian; Skoura, Athanasia; Ward, Jessica; Ahn, Kay; Kalgutkar, Amit; Sun, Dexue; Maurer, Tristan S; Bonin, Paul D; Okerberg, Carlin; Bobrowski, Walter; Kawabe, Thomas; Zhang, Yanwei; Coskran, Timothy; Bell, Sammy; Kapoor, Bhupesh; Johnson, Kent; Buckbinder, Leonard

    2015-05-01

    Small vessel vasculitis is a life-threatening condition and patients typically present with renal and pulmonary injury. Disease pathogenesis is associated with neutrophil accumulation, activation, and oxidative damage, the latter being driven in large part by myeloperoxidase (MPO), which generates hypochlorous acid among other oxidants. MPO has been associated with vasculitis, disseminated vascular inflammation typically involving pulmonary and renal microvasculature and often resulting in critical consequences. MPO contributes to vascular injury by 1) catabolizing nitric oxide, impairing vasomotor function; 2) causing oxidative damage to lipoproteins and endothelial cells, leading to atherosclerosis; and 3) stimulating formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, resulting in vessel occlusion and thrombosis. Here we report a selective 2-thiouracil mechanism-based MPO inhibitor (PF-1355 [2-(6-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide) and demonstrate that MPO is a critical mediator of vasculitis in mouse disease models. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic response model of PF-1355 exposure in relation with MPO activity was derived from mouse peritonitis. The contribution of MPO activity to vasculitis was then examined in an immune complex model of pulmonary disease. Oral administration of PF-1355 reduced plasma MPO activity, vascular edema, neutrophil recruitment, and elevated circulating cytokines. In a model of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, formerly known as Goodpasture disease, albuminuria and chronic renal dysfunction were completely suppressed by PF-1355 treatment. This study shows that MPO activity is critical in driving immune complex vasculitis and provides confidence in testing the hypothesis that MPO inhibition will provide benefit in treating human vasculitic diseases. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Modeling and experimental validation of sawing based lander anchoring and sampling methods for asteroid exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Chengcheng; Zhang, Hui; Li, Song; Song, Aiguo

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a novel lander anchoring system based on sawing method for asteroid exploration. The system is composed of three robotic arms, three cutting discs, and a control system. The discs mounted at the end of the arms are able to penetrate into the rock surface of asteroids. After the discs cut into the rock surface, the self-locking function of the arms provides forces to fix the lander on the surface. Modeling, trajectory planning, simulations, mechanism design, and prototype fabrication of the anchoring system are discussed, respectively. The performances of the syst