WorldWideScience

Sample records for melting temperature distribution

  1. Inferring snow pack ripening and melt out from distributed ground surface temperature measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-O. Schmid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal snow cover and its melting are heterogeneous both in space and time. Describing and modelling this variability are important because it affects divers phenomena such as runoff, ground temperatures or slope movements. This study investigates the derivation of melting characteristics based on spatial clusters of temperature measurements. Results are based on data from Switzerland where ground surface temperatures were measured with miniature loggers (iButtons at 40 locations, referred to as footprints. At each footprint, ten iButtons have been distributed randomly few cm below the ground surface over an area of 10 m × 10 m. Footprints span elevations of 2100–3300 m a.s.l. and slope angles of 0–55°, as well as diverse slope expositions and types of surface cover and ground material. Based on two years of temperature data, the basal ripening date and the melt-out date are determined for each iButton, aggregated to the footprint level and further analysed. The date of melt out could be derived for nearly all iButtons, the ripening date could be extracted for only approximately half of them because it requires ground freezing below the snow pack. The variability within a footprint is often considerable and one to three weeks difference between melting or ripening of the points in one footprint is not uncommon. The correlation of mean annual ground surface temperatures, ripening date and melt-out date is moderate, making them useful intuitive complementary measured for model evaluation.

  2. Computation and measurement of air temperature distribution of an industrial melt blowing die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li-Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The air flow field of the dual slot die on an HDF-6D melt blowing non-woven equipment is computed numerically. A temperature measurement system is built to measure air temperatures. The computation results tally with the measured results proving the correctness of the computation. The results have great valuable significance in the actual melt blowing production.

  3. Effect of ultrasonic stirring on temperature distribution and grain refinement in Al- 1.65% Si alloy melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments were conducted for Al-1.65%Si (mass fraction) alloy melt to study the formation of grain refining structure with ultrasonic stirring. The cooling curves of ingots with ultrasonic were measured and compared with those without ultrasonic. At the same time, the effect of the time of ultrasonic stirring on solidification structure of ingots was investigated. The influence of ultrasonic on the grain-refining efficiency of ingots was analyzed. In order to well understand the melts behavior under ultrasonic, by using ammonium chloride solution, the simulation experiment was carried out and the temperature distribution in ingot with or without ultrasonic was compared. The results indicate that the ultrasonic reduces the temperature inhomogeneity of melt, i.e.the ultrasonic helps to homogenize the melt temperature. The effect of stirring and heat generation in ingot start to occur with increasing the time of ultrasonic stirring.

  4. In-Core-Instrumentation Methods for 3-Dimensional Distribution Information of Reactor Core Temperatures and Melt-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yeong Cheol [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Myoung; Kim, Sung Jun [Woojin Inc., Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The tsunami-induced nuclear accident at Japanese Fukushima power plants in March 2011 has revealed some weaknesses in the severe accident monitoring system. The plant instrumentation did not provide utility, safety experts, and government officials with adequate and reliable information. The information on the reactor core damage and coolability is critical for making decisions correctly as well as in a timely manner during the course of the mitigation of severe accidents. Current Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)s have an In-Core-Instrumentation (ICI) system that measures the temperature distribution of the top surface (i.e. Core Exit Temperatures) of the reactor core mainly to indicate when to begin Severe Accident Mitigation Guidelines (SAMG). This design concept giving only the core exit temperature has limitations in terms of sufficiency as well as availability of the information necessary for diagnosis on the status of the degraded core and the effectiveness of the measures taken as mitigation strategies. The reactor core exit temperatures are not sufficient to support the assessment of the degree of the core damage and the location of the molten core debris and recognition whether the core damage progresses on or it is mitigated. The ICI location being at the top of the reactor core also makes the ICI thermocouples vulnerable to melt-down because the upper part of the reactor core uncovers first, thereby melt down at the early stage of the accident. This means that direct indication of reactor core temperature will be lost and unavailable during the later stages of severe accident. To address the aforementioned weaknesses of the current ICIs, it is necessary to develop a new ICI system that provides information that is more expanded and more reliable for accident mitigation. With the enhanced information available, the SAMG can be prepared in more refined and effective way based on the direct and suitable indication of status of damages and the 3-dimensional

  5. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  6. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF VELOCITY AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF THE BUOYANCY CONVECTION EFFECT IN KNbO3 MELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Numerical modelling of velocity and temperature fields in high-temperature KNbO3 melt of a loop-shaped Pt wire heater is carried out by using the commercial com putational code ANSYS for the mathematical solution of the governing equations.Based on the experimental boundary conditions and the Boussinesq approximation,the numerical modelling of a steady and two-dimensional model is applied to study the process under consideration of the buoyancy-driven convection condition. The result is compared with the previous experimental and theoretical data obtained in our laboratory, and the former is in agreement with the latter. Thus a theoretical guide for reasonable growth conditions is provided by studying in depth the real fluid flow effects in the crystal growth from the melt.

  7. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  8. Modeling the Temperature Fields of Copper Powder Melting in the Process of Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprykin, A. A.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Babakova, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    Various process variables influence on the quality of the end product when SLM (Selective Laser Melting) synthesizing items of powder materials. The authors of the paper suggest using the model of distributing the temperature fields when forming single tracks and layers of copper powder PMS-1. Relying on the results of modeling it is proposed to reduce melting of powder particles out of the scanning area.

  9. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.;

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...... temperatures. The A feature of the melting curve which suggests itself as a thermometric fixed point is found to be T//A equals 2. 75 plus or minus 0. 11 mK. The agreement between this value and independent measurements of T//A, based on nuclear or electronic paramagnetism, Johnson noise thermometry...

  10. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...

  11. Statistical distribution of thermal vacancies close to the melting point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Pozo, María, E-mail: mariaj.pozom@gmail.com [Grupo de Nanomateriales, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Davis, Sergio, E-mail: sdavis@gnm.cl [Grupo de Nanomateriales, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Peralta, Joaquín, E-mail: joaquin.peralta@unab.cl [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-01-15

    A detailed description of the statistical distribution of thermal vacancies in an homogeneous crystal near its melting point is presented, using the embedded atom model for copper as an example. As the temperature increase, the average number of thermal vacancies generated by atoms migrating to neighboring sites increases according to Arrhenius’ law. We present for the first time a model for the statistical distribution of thermal vacancies, which according to our atomistic computer simulations follow a Gamma distribution. All the simulations are carried out by classical molecular dynamics and the recognition of vacancies is achieved via a recently developed algorithm. Our results could be useful in the further development of a theory explaining the mechanism of homogeneous melting, which seems to be mediated by the accumulation of thermal vacancies near the melting point.

  12. Distribution of radionuclides during melting of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurber, W.C.; MacKinney, J.

    1997-02-01

    During the melting of steel with radioactive contamination, radionuclides may be distributed among the metal product, the home scrap, the slag, the furnace lining and the off-gas collection system. In addition, some radionuclides will pass through the furnace system and vent to the atmosphere. To estimate radiological impacts of recycling radioactive scrap steel, it is essential to understand how radionuclides are distributed within the furnace system. For example, an isotope of a gaseous element (e.g., radon) will exhaust directly from the furnace system into the atmosphere while a relatively non-volatile element (e.g., manganese) can be distributed among all the other possible media. This distribution of radioactive contaminants is a complex process that can be influenced by numerous chemical and physical factors, including composition of the steel bath, chemistry of the slag, vapor pressure of the particular element of interest, solubility of the element in molten iron, density of the oxide(s), steel melting temperature and melting practice (e.g., furnace type and size, melting time, method of carbon adjustment and method of alloy additions). This paper discusses the distribution of various elements with particular reference to electric arc furnace steelmaking. The first two sections consider the calculation of partition ratios for elements between metal and slag based on thermodynamic considerations. The third section presents laboratory and production measurements of the distribution of various elements among slag, metal, and the off-gas collection system; and the final section provides recommendations for the assumed distribution of each element of interest.

  13. Optimization of Temperatures Heating Melt and Annealing Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsepelev, Vladimir; Starodubtsev, Yuri

    2017-05-01

    Taking into account the concept of the quasi-chemical model of the liquid micro-non-uniform composition and the research made on the physical properties of the Fe-based melts being crystallized, the unique technology of the melt time-temperature treatment has been developed. Amorphous ribbons produced using this technology require optimal annealing temperatures to be specifically selected. Temperature dependences of the kinematic viscosity of a multicomponent Fe72.5Cu1Nb2Mo1.5Si14B9 melt have been studied. A critical temperature is detected above which the activation energy of viscous flow of the melt changes. Upon cooling the overheated melt, the temperature curves of the kinematic viscosity become linear within the given coordinates. In amorphous ribbon produced in the mode with overheating the melt above the critical temperature, the enthalpy of crystallization grows, the following heat treatment results in an increase in magnetic permeability.

  14. Temperature dependence of densities of Sb and Bi melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG HaoRan; SUN ChunJing; WANG Rui; QI XiaoGang; ZHANG Ning

    2007-01-01

    The densities of Sb and Bi melts were investigated by an improved Archimedean method. The results show that the density of the Sb melt decreases linearly with increasing temperature, but the density of the Bi melt firstly increases and then decreases as the temperature increases. There is a maximum density value of 10.002 g/cm3 at 310℃, about 39℃ above the melting point. The temperature dependence of the Sb melt is well fitted with the expression ρ= 6.8590-5.8105×10-4T, and that of the Bi melt is fitted with ρ=10.3312-1.18×10-3T. The results were discussed from a microstructure viewpoint.

  15. Thermal equivalence of DNA duplexes without calculation of melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerald; Haslam, Niall; Whiteford, Nava; Prügel-Bennett, Adam; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    The common key to nearly all processes involving DNA is the hybridization and melting of the double helix: from transmission of genetic information and RNA transcription, to polymerase chain reaction and DNA microarray analysis, DNA mechanical nanodevices and DNA computing. Selecting DNA sequences with similar melting temperatures is essential for many applications in biotechnology. We show that instead of calculating these temperatures, a single parameter can be derived from a statistical-mechanics model that conveniently represents the thermodynamic equivalence of DNA sequences. This parameter is shown to order experimental melting temperatures correctly, is much more readily obtained than the melting temperature, and is easier to handle than the numerous parameters of empirical regression models.

  16. Modeling the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Tian-Shu

    2016-06-22

    The effect of size, composition and dimension on the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys was investigated by considering the interatomic interaction. The established thermodynamics model without any arbitrarily adjustable parameters can be used to predict the melting temperature of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys. It is found that, the melting temperature and interatomic interaction of nanoscaled bimetallic alloys decrease with the decrease in size and the increasing composition of the lower surface energy metal. Moreover, for the nanoscaled bimetallic alloys with the same size and composition, the dependence of the melting temperature on the dimension can be sequenced as follows: nanoparticles > nanowires > thin films. The accuracy of the developed model is verified by the recent experimental and computer simulation results.

  17. Nitrogen distribution between aqueous fluids and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Ruifang; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Keppler, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen between hydrous fluids and haplogranitic, basaltic, or albitic melts was studied at 1-15 kbar, 800-1200 °C, and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from the Fe-FeO buffer to 3log units above the Ni-NiO buffer. The nitrogen contents in quenched glasses were analyzed either by electron microprobe or by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), whereas the nitrogen contents in fluids were determined by mass balance. The results show that the nitrogen content in silicate melt increases with increasing nitrogen content in the coexisting fluid at given temperature, pressure, and fO2. Raman spectra of the silicate glasses suggest that nitrogen species change from molecular N2 in oxidized silicate melt to molecular ammonia (NH3) or the ammonium ion (NH4+) in reduced silicate melt, and the normalized Raman band intensities of the nitrogen species linearly correlate with the measured nitrogen content in silicate melt. Elevated nitrogen contents in silicate melts are observed at reduced conditions and are attributed to the dissolution of NH3/NH4+. Measured fluid/melt partition coefficients for nitrogen (DNfluid/ melt) range from 60 for reduced haplogranitic melts to about 10 000 for oxidized basaltic melts, with fO2 and to a lesser extent melt composition being the most important parameters controlling the partitioning of nitrogen. Pressure appears to have only a minor effect on DNfluid/ melt in the range of conditions studied. Our data imply that degassing of nitrogen from both mid-ocean ridge basalts and arc magmas is very efficient, and predicted nitrogen abundances in volcanic gases match well with observations. Our data also confirm that nitrogen degassing at present magma production rates is insufficient to accumulate the atmosphere. Most of the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have degassed very early in Earth's history and degassing was probably enhanced by the oxidation of the mantle.

  18. Effect of low temperature melt on solidification structure of A356 alloy with melt thermal treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何树先; 王俊; 孙宝德; 周尧和

    2001-01-01

    The influence of the low temperature melt (LTM) structure on solidification structure of the sample with melt thermal treatment (MTT) process was studied. And the mechanism of the MTT process was analyzed with cluster theory. It is shown that the final solidification structure is dependent mainly on the structure of LTM. Dendrites will appear in the solidification structure if the structure of LTM is dendritic before MTT. Otherwise, non-dendritic grains will appear in the solidification structure. And the lower the temperature of LTM, the more remarkable the effect of the LTM structure is.

  19. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Vinet, Pascal; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of the experimental data for the pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals is presented. The method combines Lindemann's law, the Debye model, and a first-order equation of state with the experimental observation that the Grueneisen parameter divided by the volume is constant. It is observed that, based on these assumptions, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the normalized melting temperature versus the logarithm of the normalized pressure are straight lines. It is found that the normalized-melting--temperature versus normalized-pressure curves accurately satisfy the linear relationship for Al, Ag, Au, Cs, Cu, K, Na, Pt, and Rb. In addition, this technique provides a sensitive tool for detecting phase transitions.

  20. Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerald; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

  1. High Temperature Protonic Conductors by Melt Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    ceramic materials of BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 that exhibit high temperature protonic conductance and superior mechanical properties at elevated...TEM). The mechanical behavior BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a (x=0 to 0.2) and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 ceramics in the elastic, brittle and plastic regime will be studied...spatial variations of compositions in BaCe1 -xNdxO3-a and Ba3(CaNb2)O9 following high temperature wet atmosphere treatment will be measured using a

  2. Melt Patterns and Dynamics in Alaska and Patagonia Derived from Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Semmens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers and icefields are critical components of Earth’s cryosphere to study and monitor for understanding the effects of a changing climate. To provide a regional perspective of glacier melt dynamics for the past several decades, brightness temperatures (Tb from the passive microwave sensor Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I were used to characterize melt regime patterns over large glacierized areas in Alaska and Patagonia. The distinctness of the melt signal at 37V-GHz and the ability to acquire daily data regardless of clouds or darkness make the dataset ideal for studying melt dynamics in both hemispheres. A 24-year (1988–2011 time series of annual Tb histograms was constructed to (1 characterize and assess temporal and spatial trends in melt patterns, (2 determine years of anomalous Tb distribution, and (3 investigate potential contributing factors. Distance from coast and temperature were key factors influencing melt. Years of high percentage of positive Tb anomalies were associated with relatively higher stream discharge (e.g., Copper and Mendenhall Rivers, Alaska, USA and Rio Baker, Chile. The characterization of melt over broad spatial domains and a multi-decadal time period offers a more comprehensive picture of the changing cryosphere and provides a baseline from which to assess future change.

  3. Shock Melting Temperature of Initially Porous Iron and Indication for Melting Curve of Iron at High Pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi-Jun; ZHANG Dai-Yu; LIU Fu-Sheng; JING Fu-Qian

    2004-01-01

    The melting curve ofiron is crucial for modelling of the earth's internal heat structures and to understand melting of solids at high pressures. However, the measured melting temperatures of iron at high pressures are disparate so far. We measured the shocked interface (porous iron/sapphire window) temperatures of a kind of porous iron. By using a model for shock temperature measurement [High Pressures Res. 2 (1990) 159] and the previous results of sound velocity measurements [Chin. Phys. Lett. 18 (2001) 852], we determine the melting temperatures of iron at shock compression high pressures of 145 and 171 Gpa. They are consistent with the results reported by other shock compression experiments. Based on the possible different melting mechanisms of iron in diamond anvil cell and in shock compression, the corrected melting temperatures of iron at high pressures become more consistent.

  4. Temperature distribution of single layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuefei; Fan, Zhengxiu; Wang, ZhiJiang

    1993-03-01

    Temperature distributions of Ti02 single layer irradiated by iOns, 1. 06 m wavelength laser pulse were calculated with thermal transfer equation. Following conclusions were obtained: To improve thermal parameters of coating can reduce the peak temperature obviously; The thermal parameters of substrate have little effect on temperature response of coating; Temperature distribution of thin film depends on the electrical field distribution, The peak temperature of quarter -wavelength coatings is lower than that of half-wavelength coatings.

  5. Syntheses of neptunium trichloride and measurements of its melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hirokazu; Takano, Masahide; Kurata, Masaki; Minato, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Neptunium trichloride (NpCl3) of high purity was synthesized by the solid state reaction of neptunium nitride with cadmium chloride. Lattice parameters of hexagonal NpCl3 were determined from the powder X-ray diffraction pattern to be a = 0.7428 ± 0.0001 nm and c = 0.4262 ± 0.0003 nm, which fairly agree with the reported values. The melting temperature of NpCl3 was measured on a sample of about 1 mg, hermetically encapsulated in a gold crucible with a differential thermal analyzer. The value determined was 1070 ± 3 K which is close to the recommended value (1075 ± 30 K) derived from the mean value of the melting temperature of UCl3 and of PuCl3.

  6. Model of temperature field for the preparation process of melt-spun NdFeB powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖彬; 李岩峰; 王会杰; 李安华; 朱明刚; 李卫; 张跃

    2014-01-01

    Melt-spun ribbons which are the important raw material for hot-deformed magnets can be prepared by single-roller melt-spinning. In order to prepare well-structured ribbons, the model of temperature field for single-roller melt-spinning process was constructed in this work. The heat conduction in this process was simplified as one dimensional heat conduction problem. It was shown by modeling that, the temperature field in the melt-spinning before solidification in this model could be described as this equa-tionT(x,t)=Tmoexp[-k(x-x0)-k2αt]+T0. The temperatureT(x,t) of the alloy melts decreased with increased positionx and cooling timet exponentially from the wheel-free surface to the wheel-side surface. The constantk determined the decrease speed of alloy tempera-tureT(x,t), which was proportional to the interfacial heat transfer coefficienth and the interfacial area of heat conductionA0, but in-versely proportional to the thermal conductivityK.x0 was the thickness of the alloy melt. With increasedx0, the temperature differ-ence between wheel-free surface and the wheel-side surface became larger, which would lead to larger difference in grain size. In ex-periments, the influence of melt-spinning process parameters on the temperature field model was discussed, such as cooling roller materials, wheel speed, and so on. Melt-spun ribbons prepared by single-roller melt spinning at different wheel speed were investi-gated and magnetic properties of die-upset magnets from melt-spun ribbons on different cooling roller were analyzed. The variation of grain size in the depth direction consisted with temperature field model. This model provided directions for the preparation of melt-spun ribbons with uniformly distributed fine grains, which were very necessary for producing hot-deformed magnets with high magnetic performance.

  7. Human neuronal tau promoting the melting temperature of DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The hyperchromic effect of ultraviolet spectroscopy shows that adding recombinant human neuronal tau to the solution of calf thymus DNA will promote the melting temperature (Tm) from 67℃ to 81℃. Similar result has been detected when adding tau to plasmid pBluescript-Ⅱ SK, by raising Tm from 75℃ to 85℃. The kinetics of thermal denaturation of DNA with tau is much slower than that of control. It suggests that tau may stabilize the double helix conformation of DNA.

  8. Measurements of true polymer melt temperature in a circular cross-sectional duct by moving temperature sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharaphun,S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to design and develop an experimental apparatus and a temperature sensor in order to measure true melt temperature rise due to the shear heating during the flow. The designed apparatus featured two different forms, one being the polymer melt flowing past the stationary sensor (so-called moving piston, and the other being the sensor moving along the stationary polymer melt (so-called moving sensor. By subtracting the temperature data obtained by moving sensor from those obtained by moving piston the true melt temperature rise could be yielded. The temperature data were collected using a high-speed data logger and a computer. The effects of melt/piston velocity, initial melts temperature and various types of polymer melts used were of interest in this work. It was found that the experimental apparatus designed and used in this work was very effective and gave reasonably accurate

  9. Investigation on recalescence temperatures of deeply undercooled melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X. L.; Liu, F.; Hou, H.; Zhao, Y. H.; Gu, T.; Wang, S. Y.; Yan, F.

    2016-12-01

    According to the theory of classic thermodynamics, any transformation is driven by the decrease of Gibbs free energy of the system. Solidification pertains to the first order transformation and obeys this basic law. The Gibbs free energy of the condensed phases of metals and alloys is closely related to the temperature and composition of the system. Thus we can describe rapid solidification process in a more precise way by using quantitative thermodynamic calculation. In combination with solidification kinetics theory, we calculated the evolution of the thermodynamic parameters during rapid solidification process. On this basis, we proposed a criterion for the end point of recalescence process and built a physical model for describing rapid solidification process and predicting recalescence temperatures of undercooled melts. Good agreement can be achieved between the present model prediction and experimental data.

  10. Temperature Effects on Aluminoborosilicate Glass and Melt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative determination of the atomic-scale structure of multi-component oxide melts, and the effects of temperature on them, is a complex problem. Ca- and Na- aluminoborosilicates are especially interesting, not only because of their major role in widespread technical applications (flat-panel computer displays, fiber composites, etc.), but because the coordination environments of two of their main network cations (Al3+ and B3+) change markedly with composition and temperature is ways that may in part be analogous to processes in silicate melts at high pressures in the Earth. Here we examine a series of such glasses with different cooling rates, chosen to evaluate the role modifier cation field strength (Ca2+ vs. Na+) and of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) content. To explore the effects of fictive temperature, fast quenched and annealed samples were compared. We have used B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to measure the different B and Al coordinations and calculated the contents of non-bridging oxygens (NBO). Lower cooling rates increase the fraction of [4]B species in all compositions. The conversion of [3]B to [4]B is also expected to convert NBO to bridging oxygens, which should affect thermodynamic properties such as configurational entropy and configurational heat capacity. For four compositions with widely varying compositions and initial NBO contents, analysis of the speciation changes with the same, simple reaction [3]B = [4]B + NBO yields similar enthalpy values of 25±7 kJ/mol. B-11 triple quantum MAS NMR allows as well the proportions of [3]B boroxol ring and non-ring sites to be determined, and reveals more [3]B boroxol ring structures present in annealed (lower temperature) glasses. In situ, high-temperature MAS NMR spectra have been collected on one of the Na-aluminoborosilicate and on a sodium borate glass at 14.1 T. The exchange of boron between the 3- and 4-coordinated sites is clearly observed well above the glass transition temperatures, confirming the

  11. Studying regimes of convective heat transfer in the production of high-temperature silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, O. G.; Sheremet, M. A.; Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Bondareva, N. S.; Kuzmin, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the production of high-temperature silicate melts using the energy of low-temperature plasma in a conceptually new setup. A mathematical model of unsteady regimes of convective heat and mass transfer is developed and numerically implemented under the assumption of non-Newtonian nature of flow in the melting furnace with plasma-chemical synthesis of high-temperature silicate melts. Experiments on melting silicate containing materials were carried out using the energy of low-temperature plasma. The dependence of dynamic viscosity of various silicate materials (basalt, ash, waste of oil shale) was found experimentally.

  12. Thermal performance of a heat storage module using PCM's with different melting temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, M.M.; Kanzawa, A.

    1989-05-01

    The performance of a heat storage unit consisting of number of vertical cylindrical capsules filled with phase change materials, with air flowing across them for heat exchange has been analyzed. Earlier theoretical models did not consider temperature distribution in the radial direction within the capsules, an assumption that limits their applications for small diameter capsules. The mathematical model developed in this work is based on solving the heat conduction equation in both melt and solid phases in cylindrical coordinates, taking into account the radial temperature distribution in both phases. Heat flux was then evaluated at the surface of the first row of the capsules to determine the temperature of the air leaving that row by a simple heat balance. It was found that such computation may be carried out for every few rows rather than for a single row to minimize computer time. The simulation study showed a significant improvement in the rate of heat transfer during heat charge and discharge when phase change materials with different melting temperatures were used.

  13. Accurate thermodynamic relations of the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different shapes and pure theoretical calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jinhua; Fu, Qingshan; Xue, Yongqiang, E-mail: xyqlw@126.com; Cui, Zixiang

    2017-05-01

    Based on the surface pre-melting model, accurate thermodynamic relations of the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different shapes (tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, dodecahedron, icosahedron, nanowire) were derived. The theoretically calculated melting temperatures are in relative good agreements with experimental, molecular dynamic simulation and other theoretical results for nanometer Au, Ag, Al, In and Pb. It is found that the particle size and shape have notable effects on the melting temperature of nanocrystals, and the smaller the particle size, the greater the effect of shape. Furthermore, at the same equivalent radius, the more the shape deviates from sphere, the lower the melting temperature is. The value of melting temperature depression of cylindrical nanowire is just half of that of spherical nanoparticle with an identical radius. The theoretical relations enable one to quantitatively describe the influence regularities of size and shape on the melting temperature and to provide an effective way to predict and interpret the melting temperature of nanocrystals with different sizes and shapes. - Highlights: • Accurate relations of T{sub m} of nanocrystals with various shapes are derived. • Calculated T{sub m} agree with literature results for nano Au, Ag, Al, In and Pb. • ΔT{sub m} (nanowire) = 0.5ΔT{sub m} (spherical nanocrystal). • The relations apply to predict and interpret the melting behaviors of nanocrystals.

  14. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y.

    2013-07-01

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and additional DSC data on nanocomposites and pure PI resin. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02842a

  15. Temperature Distribution in Ethylene Pyrolyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝兴英; 高金森; 徐春明

    2003-01-01

    Abstract A good understanding of the detailed temperature distribution in the furnace plays an important role in the implementation of operation optimization and design improvement of ethylene pyrolyzer. Numerical simulation of the turbulent flow, combustion and heat transfer was carried out to investigate the temperature distribution in industrial furnace. Inhomogeneities of the flue-gas temperature distribution were observed in X, Y, and Z direction of the furnace from the simulated results. Along the height of the furnace, the average flue-gas temperature increased initially and decreased afterward, and reached its peak at the height of 5m. The reactor tube skin temperature varied not only along the height of the furnace, but also around the circumference of the tube. The heat flux profiles from the furnace towards the reactor tubes followed the shape of the average flue-gas temperature profile. The heat flux of the inlet tubes was constantly higher than that of the outlet tubes at the same height in the furnace.

  16. Numerical modeling of inward and outward melting of high temperature PCM in a vertical cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, S.; Saman, W. Y.; Bruno, F.; Tay, N. H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical study of inward and outward melting of a high temperature PCM in cylindrical enclosures were performed, using FLUENT 15. For validation purposes, numerical modeling of inward melting of a low temperature PCM was initially conducted and the predicted results were compared with the experimental data from the literature. The validated model for the low temperature PCM was used for two high temperature cases; inward melting of a high temperature PCM in a cylindrical enclosure and outward melting in a cylindrical case with higher aspect ratio. The results of this study show that the numerical model developed is capable of capturing the details of melting process with buoyancy driven convection for RaPCM and can be used for the design and optimization of a latent heat thermal storage unit.

  17. Influence of Air Temperature Difference on the Snow Melting Simulation of SWAT Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAN, Y.; Onishi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The temperature-index models are commonly used to simulate the snowmelt process in mountain areas because of its good performance, low data requirements, and computational simplicity. Widely used distributed hydrological model: Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is also using a temperature-index module. However, the lack of monitoring air temperature data still involves uncertainties and errors in its simulation performance especially in data sparse area. Thus, to evaluate the different air temperature data influence on the snow melt of the SWAT model, five different air temperature data are applied in two different Russia basins (Birobidjan basin and Malinovka basin). The data include the monitoring air temperature data (TM), NCEP reanalysis data (TNCEP), the dataset created by inverse distance weighted interpolation (IDW) method (TIDW), the dataset created by improved IDW method considering the elevation influence (TIDWEle), and the dataset created by using linear regression and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data (TLST). Among these data, the TLST , the TIDW and TIDWEle data have the higher spatial density, while the TNCEP and TM DATA have the most valid monitoring value for daily scale. The daily simulation results during the snow melting seasons (March, April and May) showed reasonable results in both test basins for all air temperature data. While R2 and NSE in Birobidjan basin are around 0.6, these values in Malinovka basin are over 0.75. Two methods: Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) and Sequential Uncertainty Fitting, version. 2 (SUFI-2) were used for model calibration and uncertainty analysis. The evolution index is p-factor which means the percentage of measured data bracketed by the 95% Prediction Uncertainty (95PPU). The TLST dataset always obtained the best results in both basins compared with other datasets. On the other hand, the two IDW based method get the worst results among all the scenarios. Totally, the

  18. Investigating the highest melting temperature materials: A laser melting study of the TaC-HfC system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedillos-Barraza, Omar; Manara, Dario; Boboridis, K.; Watkins, Tyson; Grasso, Salvatore; Jayaseelan, Daniel D.; Konings, Rudy J. M.; Reece, Michael J.; Lee, William E.

    2016-12-01

    TaC, HfC and their solid solutions are promising candidate materials for thermal protection structures in hypersonic vehicles because of their very high melting temperatures (>4000 K) among other properties. The melting temperatures of slightly hypostoichiometric TaC, HfC and three solid solution compositions (Ta1‑xHfxC, with x = 0.8, 0.5 and 0.2) have long been identified as the highest known. In the current research, they were reassessed, for the first time in the last fifty years, using a laser heating technique. They were found to melt in the range of 4041–4232 K, with HfC having the highest and TaC the lowest. Spectral radiance of the hot samples was measured in situ, showing that the optical emissivity of these compounds plays a fundamental role in their heat balance. Independently, the results show that the melting point for HfC0.98, (4232 ± 84) K, is the highest recorded for any compound studied until now.

  19. The Effect of Si on the Melting Temperature of Iron up to 24 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Fei, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's outer core consists of iron plus about 10wt% light elements, such as oxygen, sulfur, silicon, carbon, and hydrogen, based on geophysical and geochemical observations, cosmochemical arguments, and mineral physics data. Among the proposed light elements, silicon (Si) is considered as one of the leading candidates in the Earth's core. For Mercury, its core could contain substantial amount of Si if it is accreted under relatively reduced environment. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the effect of Si on the melting temperature of iron at high pressure in order to provide an estimate of the core temperature for a Si-bearing core. We have carried out a series of high-pressure melting experiments on Fe-17wt%Si in the multi-anvil apparatus. The experiments were conducted using an 8/3 assembly with rhenium heater and MgO capsule. The quenched samples were examined with the scanning electron microscope equipped with a silicon drift detector EDS. Quenching textures and composition mappings of the recovered samples were used as the melting criteria. The melting temperatures of Fe-17wt%Si are 1800K, 2070K, 2170K, and 2270K at 10GP, 15GPa, 20GPa and 24GPa respectively. The result is consistent with the melting curve at low pressure (up to 5.5 GPa) based on the measurements of the discontinuities in temperature and pressure dependence of electrical resistance. Compared with the melting temperature of fcc iron, the P-T slope of the melting curve of Fe-17wt%Si is larger than that of pure Fe, indicating that the melting temperature depression becomes smaller at high pressure which may lead to change of melting relations at higher pressure. The new data provide constraints on the thermal structure of Mercury's core and a basis for extrapolation to higher pressure. Key words: melting temperature, high pressure, Fe-Si, outer core

  20. 46 CFR 153.908 - Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Documents and Cargo Information § 153.908 Cargo viscosity and melting point information; measuring cargo temperature during discharge:...

  1. Relationship between Thermodynamic Parameters for Mn-Fe Melt and Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Er-bao; DONG Yuan-chi; GUO Shang-xing; WU Bao-guo

    2004-01-01

    The carbon solubility in Mn-Fe melts were measured at 1 350 ℃,1 375 ℃,1 425 ℃ and 1 450 ℃,and accordingly the calculated equations were obtained. By thermodynamic derivation and calculation, some relationships between thermodynamic parameters for Mn-Fe melt and temperature were obtained.

  2. A simple classical approach for the melting temperature of inert-gas nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, K. K.

    2006-02-01

    Like the metal and semiconductor nanoparticles, the melting temperature of free inert-gas nanoparticles decreases with decreasing size. The variation is linear with the inverse of the particle size for large nanoparticles and deviates from the linearity for small nanoparticles. The decrease in the melting temperature is slower for free nanoparticles with non-wetting surfaces, while the decrease is faster for nanoparticles with wetting surfaces. Though the depression of the melting temperature has been reported for inert-gas nanoparticles in porous glasses, superheating has also been observed when the nanoparticles are embedded in some matrices. By using a simple classical approach, the influence of size, geometry and the matrix on the melting temperature of nanoparticles is understood quantitatively and shown to be applicable for other materials. It is also shown that the classical approach can be applied to understand the size-dependent freezing temperature of nanoparticles.

  3. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2016-01-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity...... of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes......, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso...

  4. On the determination of the equilibrium melting temperature of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luz, Alexandre P. da; Bretas, Rosario E.S. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais. Ncleo de Reologia e Processamento de Polimeros]. E-mail: bretas@power.ufscar.br; Marinelli, Alessandra L. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Centro de Caracterizacao e Desenvolvimento de Materiais]. E-mail: alucas@ccdm.ufscar.br; Farah, Marcelo [Braskem S.A., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcelo.farah@braskem.com.br; Torriani, Iris [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas (Brazil)]. E-mails: tomas@lnls.br; torriani@lnls.br

    2005-07-01

    In this work, the equilibrium melting temperature, T{sub m}{sup 0}, of a PBT sample using the classical Hoffman-Weeks (H-W) Method and the Method proposed by Marand and Hoffman was evaluated. We also investigated the influence of the pre-melting temperature, T{sub pm}, that is the temperature of the melt prior to the isothermal crystallization, and different rates during the heating DSC scan, on the values of the T{sub m}{sup 0} calculated. The results show that the evaluation of the equilibrium melting temperatures of polymers is quite dependent of the experimental conditions used to crystallize the sample and the method used to evaluate it. (author)

  5. Thermophysical properties of liquid Ni around the melting temperature from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, R. E.; Demiraǧ, A. D.; Toledo, P. G.; Horbach, J.

    2016-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of liquid nickel (Ni) around the melting temperature are investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, using three different embedded atom method potentials to model the interactions between the Ni atoms. Melting temperature, enthalpy, static structure factor, self-diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal diffusivity are compared to recent experimental results. Using ab initio MD simulation, we also determine the static structure factor and the mean-squared displacement at the experimental melting point. For most of the properties, excellent agreement is found between experiment and simulation, provided the comparison relative to the corresponding melting temperature. We discuss the validity of the Hansen-Verlet criterion for the static structure factor as well as the Stokes-Einstein relation between self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity. The thermal diffusivity is extracted from the autocorrelation function of a wavenumber-dependent temperature fluctuation variable.

  6. Defects Can Increase the Melting Temperature of DNA-Nanoparticle Assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Nolan C

    2006-01-01

    DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies have shown promise as an alternative technology to DNA microarrays for DNA detection and RNA profiling. Understanding the effect of DNA sequences on the melting temperature of the system is central to developing reliable detection technology. We studied the effects of DNA base-pairing defects, such as mismatches and deletions, on the melting temperature of DNA-nanoparticle assemblies. We found that, contrary to the general assumption that defects lower the melting temperature of DNA, some defects increase the melting temperature of DNA-linked nanoparticle assemblies. The effects of mismatches and deletions were found to depend on the specific base pair, the sequence, and the location of the defects. Our results demonstrate that the surface-bound DNA exhibit hybridization behavior different from that of free DNA. Such findings indicate that a detailed understanding of DNA-nanoparticle assembly phase behavior is required for quantitative interpretation of DNA-nanoparticle aggreg...

  7. Effect of coupling between melt shape and temperature field on electromagnetic shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analyses of electromagnetic pressure on melt and heat induced in melt, the ratio of heat to pressure Q0/pm was defined. It was given that the relationship between Q0/pm and thickness a, electromagnetic parameter μγ of melt and electric current frequency f under electromagnetic confinement and shaping process. If the value of Q0/pm is big, any adjustment on melt shape will easily cause a variation of temperature in melt. In this situation, there appears a more sensitive interaction between shape and temperature field and a more narrow adjustment range for this process. Experiments on some thin plate samples with a cross-section of 6  mm×18  mm have been done in two kinds of induction coils respectively. The results show that as the coil with a trumpet inside wall is used and the positions of melt top and S/L interface are properly selected, the melt periphery is nearly vertical and the temperature gradient ahead of S/L interface is high. On this condition, a more stable and wider coupling between shape and temperature field has been continuously maintained and samples with smooth surface and unidirectional crystals have been successfully obtained.

  8. Soil Temperature Variability in Complex Terrain measured using Distributed a Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, M. S.; Link, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    Soil temperature (Ts) exerts critical environmental controls on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Rates of carbon cycling, mineral weathering, infiltration and snow melt are all influenced by Ts. Although broadly reflective of the climate, Ts is sensitive to local variations in cover (vegetative, litter, snow), topography (slope, aspect, position), and soil properties (texture, water content), resulting in a spatially and temporally complex distribution of Ts across the landscape. Understanding and quantifying the processes controlled by Ts requires an understanding of that distribution. Relatively few spatially distributed field Ts data exist, partly because traditional Ts data are point measurements. A relatively new technology, fiber optic distributed temperature system (FO-DTS), has the potential to provide such data but has not been rigorously evaluated in the context of remote, long term field research. We installed FO-DTS in a small experimental watershed in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in the Owyhee Mountains of SW Idaho. The watershed is characterized by complex terrain and a seasonal snow cover. Our objectives are to: (i) evaluate the applicability of fiber optic DTS to remote field environments and (ii) to describe the spatial and temporal variability of soil temperature in complex terrain influenced by a variable snow cover. We installed fiber optic cable at a depth of 10 cm in contrasting snow accumulation and topographic environments and monitored temperature along 750 m with DTS. We found that the DTS can provide accurate Ts data (+/- .4°C) that resolves Ts changes of about 0.03°C at a spatial scale of 1 m with occasional calibration under conditions with an ambient temperature range of 50°C. We note that there are site-specific limitations related cable installation and destruction by local fauna. The FO-DTS provide unique insight into the spatial and temporal variability of Ts in a landscape. We found strong seasonal

  9. A yttrium-containing high-temperature titanium alloy additively manufactured by selective electron beam melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    逯圣路; 汤慧萍; 马前; 洪权; 曾立英

    2015-01-01

    A yttrium-containing high-temperature titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-2.7Sn-4Zr-0.4Mo-0.45Si-0.1Y, mass fraction, %) has been additively manufactured using selective electron beam melting (SEBM). The resulting microstructure and textures were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and compared with the conventionally manufactured form. A notable distinct difference of microstructures is that additive manufacturing by SEBM enables homogeneous precipitation of fine Y2O3 dispersoids in the size range of 50−250 nm throughout the as-fabricated alloy, despite the presence of just trace levels of oxygen (7×10−4, mass fraction) and yttrium (10−3, mass fraction) in the alloy. In contrast, the conventionally manufactured alloy shows inhomogeneously distributed coarse Y2O3 precipitates, including cracked or debonded Y2O3 particles.

  10. Applicability of low-melting-point microcrystalline wax to develop temperature-sensitive formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kohei; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-10-30

    Low-melting-point substances are widely used to develop temperature-sensitive formulations. In this study, we focused on microcrystalline wax (MCW) as a low-melting-point substance. We evaluated the drug release behavior of wax matrix (WM) particles using various MCW under various temperature conditions. WM particles containing acetaminophen were prepared using a spray congealing technique. In the dissolution test at 37°C, WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs whose melting was starting at approx. 40°C (Hi-Mic-1045 or 1070) released the drug initially followed by the release of only a small amount. On the other hand, in the dissolution test at 20 and 25°C for WM particles containing Hi-Mic-1045 and at 20, 25, and 30°C for that containing Hi-Mic-1070, both WM particles showed faster drug release than at 37°C. The characteristic drug release suppression of WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs at 37°C was thought attributable to MCW melting, as evidenced by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Taken together, low-melting-point MCWs may be applicable to develop implantable temperature-sensitive formulations that drug release is accelerated by cooling at administered site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synergistically improved thermal conductivity of polyamide-6 with low melting temperature metal and graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Jia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Low melting temperature metal (LMTM-tin (Sn was introduced into polyamide-6 (PA6 and PA6/graphite composites respectively to improve the thermal conductivity of PA6 by melt processing (extruding and injection molding. After introducing Sn, the thermal conductivity of PA6/Sn was nearly constant because of the serious agglomeration of Sn. However, when 20 wt% (5.4 vol% of Sn was added into PA6 containing 50 wt% (33.3 vol% of graphite, the thermal conductivity of the composite was dramatically increased to 5.364 versus 1.852 W·(m·K–1 for the PA6/graphite composite, which suggests that the incorporation of graphite and Sn have a significant synergistic effect on the thermal conductivity improvement of PA6. What is more, the electrical conductivity of the composite increased nearly 8 orders of magnitudes after introducing both graphite and Sn. Characterization of microstructure and energy dispersive spectrum analysis (EDS indicates that the dispersion of Sn in PA6/graphite/Sn was much more uniform than that of PA6/Sn composite. According to Differential Scanning Calorimetry measurement and EDS, the uniform dispersion of Sn in PA6/graphite/Sn and the high thermal conductivity of PA6/graphite/Sn are speculated to be related with the electron transfer between graphite and Sn, which makes Sn distribute evenly around the graphite layers.

  12. Experimental investigations of melting at ultra-high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavner, Abby

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is an important experimental tool used to access the high pressures and temperatures existing in the interior of the Earth and other planets. The ability to measure a temperature at high pressures is established, and the melting curves of elemental platinum and a complex aggregate, Allende meteorite, are determined. The melting curve of platinum was determined using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell in the pressure range of 12 to 70 GPa. The melting temperature at a given pressure is bracketed by a combination of visual observations and corresponding temperature measurements. The complete melting curve is built up from a series of melting experiments as a function of pressure, performed under different experimental conditions in the diamond cell; however, the placement of the phase boundary is inherently uncertain, due to an experimental "region of indifference" as the phase boundary is approached. To quantify the uncertainties, a statistical method using the logistic model is presented to provide best-fit phase boundaries to the platinum melting data, and can be generalized to fit phase boundary data of any sort. The high-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of Allende meteorite, a chondritic meteorite serving as a model of a primordial terrestrial planet, was investigated in the pressure and temperature ranges of 15 to 70 GPa and 1000 to 4000 K. The melting curve determined here overlaps and is in excellent agreement with previous piston-cylinder and multi-anvil measurements on the same material (Agee, et al., 1995). X-ray diffraction analysis of phases quenched from high pressure and temperature, and high pressure phases both before and after heating, are in good agreement with previous work. The phase diagram of Allende meteorite can be used to constrain events in the early geological evolution of the terrestrial planets.

  13. Effects of water, depth and temperature on partial melting of mantle-wedge fluxed by hydrous sediment-melt in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Ananya; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Tsuno, Kyusei; Nelson, Jared

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the partial melting of variable bulk H2O-bearing parcels of mantle-wedge hybridized by partial melt derived from subducted metapelites, at pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions applicable to the hotter core of the mantle beneath volcanic arcs. Experiments are performed on mixtures of 25% sediment-melt and 75% fertile peridotite, from 1200 to 1300 °C, at 2 and 3 GPa, with bulk H2O concentrations of 4 and 6 wt.%. Combining the results from these experiments with previous experiments containing 2 wt.% bulk H2O (Mallik et al., 2015), it is observed that all melt compositions, except those produced in the lowest bulk H2O experiments at 3 GPa, are saturated with olivine and orthopyroxene. Also, higher bulk H2O concentration increases melt fraction at the same P-T condition, and causes exhaustion of garnet, phlogopite and clinopyroxene at lower temperatures, for a given pressure. The activity coefficient of silica (ϒSiO2) for olivine-orthopyroxene saturated melt compositions (where the activity of silica, aSiO2 , is buffered by the reaction olivine + SiO2 = orthopyroxene) from this study and from mantle melting studies in the literature are calculated. In melt compositions generated at 2 GPa or shallower, with increasing H2O concentration, ϒSiO2 increases from transition from non-ideal mixing as OH- in the melt (ϒSiO2 2 GPa, ϒSiO2 >1 at higher H2O concentrations in the melt, indicate requirement of excess energy to incorporate molecular H2O in the silicate melt structure, along with a preference for bridging species and polyhedral edge decorations. With vapor saturation in the presence of melt, ϒSiO2 decreases indicating approach towards ideal mixing of H2O in silicate melt. For similar H2O concentrations in the melt, ϒSiO2 for olivine-orthopyroxene saturated melts at 3 GPa is higher than melts at 2 GPa or shallower. This results in melts generated at 3 GPa being more silica-poor than melts at 2 GPa. Thus, variable bulk H2O and pressure of

  14. Steady distribution structure of point defects near crystal-melt interface under pulling stop of CZ Si crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, T.; Takahashi, T.; Shirai, K.

    2017-02-01

    In order to reveal a steady distribution structure of point defects of no growing Si on the solid-liquid interface, the crystals were grown at a high pulling rate, which Vs becomes predominant, and the pulling was suddenly stopped. After restoring the variations of the crystal by the pulling-stop, the crystals were then left in prolonged contact with the melt. Finally, the crystals were detached and rapidly cooled to freeze point defects and then a distribution of the point defects of the as-grown crystals was observed. As a result, a dislocation loop (DL) region, which is formed by the aggregation of interstitials (Is), was formed over the solid-liquid interface and was surrounded with a Vs-and-Is-free recombination region (Rc-region), although the entire crystals had been Vs rich in the beginning. It was also revealed that the crystal on the solid-liquid interface after the prolonged contact with the melt can partially have a Rc-region to be directly in contact with the melt, unlike a defect distribution of a solid-liquid interface that has been growing. This experimental result contradicts a hypothesis of Voronkov's diffusion model, which always assumes the equilibrium concentrations of Vs and Is as the boundary condition for distribution of point defects on the growth interface. The results were disscussed from a qualitative point of view of temperature distribution and thermal stress by the pulling-stop.

  15. Size and Shape Dependence on Melting Temperature of Gallium Nitride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paneerselvam Antoniammal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of variation of the size and shape effect on the melting property of gallium nitride nanoparticles with their spherical and cylindrical geometrical feature is theoretically explored. A numerical thermodynamical model has been devoted for the study. A comparative investigation is made between the two shapes, at the range of ~3 nm dia. The cylindrical GaN nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical-shaped nanoparticles. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is in line with the function of radius of curvature.

  16. Melt nucleating and the three-dimension steady model of the temperature fluctuation with convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingwen Chen; Renji Sun; Zidong Wang; Fengying Wang

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional steady model of temperature fluctuation with melt convection is studied. It is proved that there exists a unique and stable solution in the model and the solution is expressed in a Fourier series form. It theoretically conf1rms the mechanism of melt nucleating: as long as the convection with transverse directions exists, the melt temperature on the front of the solidliquid interface would be not only periodical along the direction which is perpendicular to the direction of crystal growth, but also oscillatory and exponential decay along the direction of crystal growth; this oscillatory property, i.e. temperature fluctuation, leads to local supercooling, accelerates local temperature fluctuation and then results in a large number of nuclei.

  17. Melting temperatures of MgO under high pressure by micro-texture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Ohfuji, H.; Nishi, M.; Irifune, T.

    2017-06-01

    Periclase (MgO) is the second most abundant mineral after bridgmanite in the Earth's lower mantle, and its melting behaviour under pressure is important to constrain rheological properties and melting behaviours of the lower mantle materials. Significant discrepancies exist between the melting temperatures of MgO determined by laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) and those based on dynamic compressions and theoretical predictions. Here we show the melting temperatures in earlier LHDAC experiments are underestimated due to misjudgment of melting, based on micro-texture observations of the quenched samples. The high melting temperatures of MgO suggest that the subducted cold slabs should have higher viscosities than previously thought, suggesting that the inter-connecting textural feature of MgO would not play important roles for the slab stagnation in the lower mantle. The present results also predict that the ultra-deep magmas produced in the lower mantle are peridotitic, which are stabilized near the core-mantle boundary.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Melting Temperatures of SrF2and BaF2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-yu Huang; Xin-lu Cheng; Chao-lei Fan; Qiong Chen; Xiao-li Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The shell-model molecular dynamics method was applied to simulate the melting temper-atures of SrF2 and BaF2 at elevated temperatures and high pressures. The same method was used to calculate the equations of state for SrF2 and BaF2 over the pressure range of 0.1 MPa-3 GPa and 0.1 MPa-7 GPa. Compared with previous results for equations of state, the maximum errors are 0.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Considering the pre-melting in the fluorite-type crystals, we made the necessary corrections for the simulated melting temper-atures of SrF2 and BaF2. Consequently, the melting temperatures of SrF2 and BaF2 were obtained for high pressures. The melting temperatures of SrF2 and BaF2 that were obtained by the simulation are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  19. Temperature Distribution in a Displacement Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The vertical temperature gradient is normally given as a linear temperature distribution between a minimum temperature close to the floor and a maximum temperature close to the ceiling. The minimum temperature can either be a constant fraction of a load dependent difference or it can be connected...

  20. Adhesion of Polymer Composite Melt to PTFE at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, David; Debies, Thomas; McVeigh, Dan

    2007-03-01

    A novel technique for measuring the adhesive force between a thin molten polyester composite film and a PTFE surface is presented in the paper. The molten film was prepared by first depositing powdery composite particles on a substrate and then heating the powdery film on the substrate to the test temperature through a heated pressure nip between two conformable rollers comprising a PTFE overcoat at a speed up to 400 mm/s. The adhesive force is measured by wedging a bendable metal knife into the interface between the molten film and PTFE near the exit of the heating nip. Strain gauges were mounted on both sides of the metal knife. The differential strain gauge reading resulting from the degree of the knife bending is calibrated against standard weights. The technique was used to investigate the effects of the substrate, substrate roughness, molten film thickness, temperature and type of wax additive on the adhesion of the molten composite film to PTFE. On the effects of temperature and type of wax, we found that the adhesive force remains relatively constant at low temperature, and then drops significantly, in some instances to zero, as the temperature further increases. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the effects of main temperature and the wax additive. The model is evidenced by the surface segregation of wax from the polyester composite film as determined by XPS.

  1. Shear Melting and High Temperature Embrittlement: Theory and Application to Machining Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  2. Shear melting and high temperature embrittlement: theory and application to machining titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Con; Koch, Sascha; Siemers, Carsten; Mukherji, Debashis; Ackland, Graeme J

    2015-04-24

    We describe a dynamical phase transition occurring within a shear band at high temperature and under extremely high shear rates. With increasing temperature, dislocation deformation and grain boundary sliding are supplanted by amorphization in a highly localized nanoscale band, which allows for massive strain and fracture. The mechanism is similar to shear melting and leads to liquid metal embrittlement at high temperature. From simulation, we find that the necessary conditions are lack of dislocation slip systems, low thermal conduction, and temperature near the melting point. The first two are exhibited by bcc titanium alloys, and we show that the final one can be achieved experimentally by adding low-melting-point elements: specifically, we use insoluble rare earth metals (REMs). Under high shear, the REM becomes mixed with the titanium, lowering the melting point within the shear band and triggering the shear-melting transition. This in turn generates heat which remains localized in the shear band due to poor heat conduction. The material fractures along the shear band. We show how to utilize this transition in the creation of new titanium-based alloys with improved machinability.

  3. Neural Network Approach to Predict Melt Temperature in Injection Molding Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Among the processing conditions of injection molding, temperature of the melt entering the mold plays a significant role in determining the quality of molded parts. In our previous research, a neural network was developed to predict, the melt temperature in the barrel during the plastication phase. In this paper, a neural network is proposed to predict the melt temperature at the nozzle exit during the injection phase. A typical two layer neural network with back propagation learning rules is used to model the relationship between input and output in the injection phase. The preliminary results show that the network works well and may be used for on-line optimization and control of injection molding processes.

  4. Utilizing Rice Husk Briquettes in Firing Crucible Furnace for Low Temperature Melting Metals in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Musa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The search for alternative fuels for firing crucible furnace for low temperature melting metals has become mandatory, as a result of the pollution problem associated with the use of fossil fuels, the expense of electricity and also deforestation as a result of the use of charcoal. An agricultural waste, rice husk, in briquette form was used as an alternative fuel to fire crucible furnace to melt lead, zinc and aluminium. Results showed that lead and zinc melted and reached their pouring temperatures of 3840C and 5300C in 70 minutes and 75 minutes respectively. Aluminium was raised to a maximum temperature of 5200C in 75 and 100 minutes.The average concentration of the pollutants (CO, SO2and NOX were found to be below the tolerance limit and that of TSP (Total Suspended Particulates was found to be within the tolerance limit stipulated by Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA in Nigeria.

  5. Characteristics of element distributions in an MSW ash melting treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekito, T; Dote, Y; Onoue, K; Sakanakura, H; Nakamura, K

    2014-09-01

    Thermal treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a common practice in waste volume reduction and resource recovery. For the utilization of molten slag for construction materials and metal recovery, it is important to understand the behavior of heavy metals in the melting process. In this study, the correlation between the contents of elements in feed materials and MSW molten slag and their distributions in the ash melting process, including metal residues, are investigated. The hazardous metal contents in the molten slag were significantly related to the contents of metals in the feed materials. Therefore, the separation of products containing these metals in waste materials could be an effective means of producing environmentally safe molten slag with a low hazardous metals content. The distribution ratios of elements in the ash melting process were also determined. The elements Zn and Pb were found to have a distribution ratio of over 60% in fly ash from the melting furnace and the contents of these metals were also high; therefore, Zn and Pb could be potential target metals for recycling from fly ash from the melting furnace. Meanwhile, Cu, Ni, Mo, Sn, and Sb were found to have distribution ratios of over 60% in the metal residue. Therefore, metal residue could be a good resource for these metals, as the contents of Cu, Ni, Mo, Sn, and Sb in metal residue are higher than those in other output materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000 - 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koeing, Lora S.; Box, Jason E.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) IST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov.Using daily and mean-monthly MODIS IST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approx 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions in different drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  7. Variability of Surface Temperature and Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet, 2000-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Comiso, Josefino, C.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Koenig, Lora S.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced melting along with surface-temperature increases measured using infrared satellite data, have been documented for the Greenland Ice Sheet. Recently we developed a climate-quality data record of ice-surface temperature (IST) of the Greenland Ice Sheet using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 1ST product -- http://modis-snow-ice.gsfc.nasa.gov. Using daily and mean monthly MODIS 1ST maps from the data record we show maximum extent of melt for the ice sheet and its six major drainage basins for a 12-year period extending from March of 2000 through December of 2011. The duration of the melt season on the ice sheet varies in different drainage basins with some basins melting progressively earlier over the study period. Some (but not all) of the basins also show a progressively-longer duration of melt. The short time of the study period (approximately 12 years) precludes an evaluation of statistically-significant trends. However the dataset provides valuable information on natural variability of IST, and on the ability of the MODIS instrument to capture changes in IST and melt conditions indifferent drainage basins of the ice sheet.

  8. Patterns in new dimensionless quantities containing melting temperature, and their dependence on pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. WALZER

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationships existing between melting temperature and other
    macroscopic physical quantities are investigated. A new dimensionless
    quantity Q(1 not containing the Grtineisen parameter proves to be suited for serving in future studies as a tool for the determination of the melting temperature in the outer core of the Earth. The pressure dependence of more general dimensionless quantities Q„ is determined analytically and, for the chemical elements, numerically, too. The patterns of various interesting dimensionless quantities are shown in the Periodic Table and compared.

  9. First-Principles Calculations for Structures and Melting Temperature of Si6 Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yu-Lin; CHEN Xiang-Rong; ZHOU Xiao-Lin; CHENG Xiao-Hong; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2006-01-01

    @@ We investigate the structures and the melting temperature of the Si6 cluster by using the first-principles pseudopotential method in real space and Langevin molecular dynamics. It is shown that the ground structure of the Si6 cluster is a square bipyramid, and the corresponding melting temperature is about 1923 K. In the heating procedure, the structures of the Si6 cluster change from high symmetry structures containing 5-8 bonds, via prolate structures containing 3-4 bonds, to oblate structures containing 1-2 bonds.

  10. Sulfur solubility in reduced mafic silicate melts: Implications for the speciation and distribution of sulfur on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard; Holtz, Francois; Cartier, Camille; McCammon, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Chemical data from the MESSENGER spacecraft revealed that surface rocks on Mercury are unusually enriched in sulfur compared to samples from other terrestrial planets. In order to understand the speciation and distribution of sulfur on Mercury, we performed high temperature (1200-1750 °C), low- to high-pressure (1 bar to 4 GPa) experiments on compositions representative of Mercurian lavas and on the silicate composition of an enstatite chondrite. We equilibrated silicate melts with sulfide and metallic melts under highly reducing conditions (IW-1.5 to IW-9.4; IW = iron-wüstite oxygen fugacity buffer). Under these oxygen fugacity conditions, sulfur dissolves in the silicate melt as S2- and forms complexes with Fe2+, Mg2+ and Ca2+. The sulfur concentration in silicate melts at sulfide saturation (SCSS) increases with increasing reducing conditions (from 10 wt.% S at IW-8) and with increasing temperature. Metallic melts have a low sulfur content which decreases from 3 wt.% at IW-2 to 0 wt.% at IW-9. We developed an empirical parameterization to predict SCSS in Mercurian magmas as a function of oxygen fugacity (fO2), temperature, pressure and silicate melt composition. SCSS being not strictly a redox reaction, our expression is fully valid for magmatic systems containing a metal phase. Using physical constraints of the Mercurian mantle and magmas as well as our experimental results, we suggest that basalts on Mercury were free of sulfide globules when they erupted. The high sulfur contents revealed by MESSENGER result from the high sulfur solubility in silicate melt at reducing conditions. We make the realistic assumption that the oxygen fugacity of mantle rocks was set during equilibration of the magma ocean with the core and/or that the mantle contains a minor metal phase and combine our parameterization of SCSS with chemical data from MESSENGER to constrain the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's interior to IW- 5.4 ± 0.4. We also calculate that the mantle of Mercury

  11. High DNA melting temperature predicts transcription start site location in human and mouse.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dineen, David G

    2009-12-01

    The accurate computational prediction of transcription start sites (TSS) in vertebrate genomes is a difficult problem. The physicochemical properties of DNA can be computed in various ways and a many combinations of DNA features have been tested in the past for use as predictors of transcription. We looked in detail at melting temperature, which measures the temperature, at which two strands of DNA separate, considering the cooperative nature of this process. We find that peaks in melting temperature correspond closely to experimentally determined transcription start sites in human and mouse chromosomes. Using melting temperature alone, and with simple thresholding, we can predict TSS with accuracy that is competitive with the most accurate state-of-the-art TSS prediction methods. Accuracy is measured using both experimentally and manually determined TSS. The method works especially well with CpG island containing promoters, but also works when CpG islands are absent. This result is clear evidence of the important role of the physical properties of DNA in the process of transcription. It also points to the importance for TSS prediction methods to include melting temperature as prior information.

  12. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure, the melting temperature is used as a reference, together with corrections for certain compounds that are used during FISH. However, the quantitative relation between melting and experimental FISH temperatures is poorly described. In this review, various models used to predict the melting temperature for rRNA targets, for DNA oligonucleotides and for nucleic acid mimics (chemically modified oligonucleotides), will be addressed in detail, together with a critical assessment of how this information should be used in FISH.

  13. The impact of melt ponds on summertime microwave brightness temperatures and sea-ice concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Stefan; Rösel, Anja; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Ivanova, Natalia; Saldo, Roberto; Tage Tonboe, Rasmus

    2016-09-01

    Sea-ice concentrations derived from satellite microwave brightness temperatures are less accurate during summer. In the Arctic Ocean the lack of accuracy is primarily caused by melt ponds, but also by changes in the properties of snow and the sea-ice surface itself. We investigate the sensitivity of eight sea-ice concentration retrieval algorithms to melt ponds by comparing sea-ice concentration with the melt-pond fraction. We derive gridded daily sea-ice concentrations from microwave brightness temperatures of summer 2009. We derive the daily fraction of melt ponds, open water between ice floes, and the ice-surface fraction from contemporary Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance data. We only use grid cells where the MODIS sea-ice concentration, which is the melt-pond fraction plus the ice-surface fraction, exceeds 90 %. For one group of algorithms, e.g., Bristol and Comiso bootstrap frequency mode (Bootstrap_f), sea-ice concentrations are linearly related to the MODIS melt-pond fraction quite clearly after June. For other algorithms, e.g., Near90GHz and Comiso bootstrap polarization mode (Bootstrap_p), this relationship is weaker and develops later in summer. We attribute the variation of the sensitivity to the melt-pond fraction across the algorithms to a different sensitivity of the brightness temperatures to snow-property variations. We find an underestimation of the sea-ice concentration by between 14 % (Bootstrap_f) and 26 % (Bootstrap_p) for 100 % sea ice with a melt-pond fraction of 40 %. The underestimation reduces to 0 % for a melt-pond fraction of 20 %. In presence of real open water between ice floes, the sea-ice concentration is overestimated by between 26 % (Bootstrap_f) and 14 % (Bootstrap_p) at 60 % sea-ice concentration and by 20 % across all algorithms at 80 % sea-ice concentration. None of the algorithms investigated performs best based on our investigation of data from summer 2009. We suggest that those algorithms which are

  14. Dynamic yield and tensile strength of aluminum single crystals at temperatures up to the melting point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Baumung, K.; Singer, J.

    2001-07-01

    This article presents experimental results of the dynamic yield strength and dynamic tensile strength ({open_quotes}spall strength{close_quotes}) of aluminum single crystals at shock-wave loading as a function of temperature. The load duration was {similar_to}40 and {similar_to}200 ns. The temperature varied from 20 to 650{degree}C which is only by 10{degree}C below the melting temperature. A linear growth of the dynamic yield strength by more than a factor of 4 was observed within this temperature range. This is attributed to the phonon drag effect on the dislocation motion. High dynamic tensile strength was maintained over the whole temperature range, including the conditions at which melting should start in a material under tension. This could be an indication of the existence of superheated states in solid crystals. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Applicability of mass action law to sulphur distribution between slag melts and liquid iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    According to the mass action law and the coexistence theory of slag structure, the calculating models of mass action concentration for CaO-MgO-FeO-Fe2O3-SiO2, CaO-MgO-MnO-FeO-Fe2O3-P2O5-SiO2 and CaO-MgO-MnO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-P2O5-SiO2 slag melts are formulated and sulphur distribution between the slag melts and liquid iron is treated. It is found that CaO, MnO and FeO promote desulphurization, while MgO is detrimental to desulphurization. In addition, the sulphur distribution coefficients between the slag melts and liquid iron are presented.

  16. Simulation of temperature and flow fields in an inductively heated melt growth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakoli, M.H.; Mohammadi-Manesh, E.; Omid, S. [Physics Department, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The goal of the research presented here is to apply a global analysis of an inductively heated Czochralski furnace for a real sapphire crystal growth system and predict the characteristics of the temperature and flow fields in the system. To do it, for the beginning stage of a sapphire growth process, influence of melt and gas convection combined with radiative heat transfer on the temperature field of the system and the crystal-melt interface have been studied numerically using the steady state two-dimensional finite element method. For radiative heat transfer, internal radiation through the grown crystal and surface to surface radiation for the exposed surfaces have been taken into account. The numerical results demonstrate that there are a powerful vortex which arises from the natural convection in the melt and a strong and large vortex that flows upwards along the afterheater side wall and downwards along the seed and crystal sides in the gas part. In addition, a wavy shape has been observed for the crystal-melt interface with a deflection towards the melt. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Experimental constraints on melting temperatures in the MgO-SiO2 system at lower mantle pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Marzena A.; Lord, Oliver T.; Myhill, Robert; Thomson, Andrew R.; Wang, Weiwei; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Walter, Michael J.

    2017-08-01

    Eutectic melting curves in the system MgO-SiO2 have been experimentally determined at lower mantle pressures using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) techniques. We investigated eutectic melting of bridgmanite plus periclase in the MgO-MgSiO3 binary, and melting of bridgmanite plus stishovite in the MgSiO3-SiO2 binary, as analogues for natural peridotite and basalt, respectively. The melting curve of model basalt occurs at lower temperatures, has a shallower dT / dP slope and slightly less curvature than the model peridotitic melting curve. Overall, melting temperatures detected in this study are in good agreement with previous experiments and ab initio simulations at ∼25 GPa (Liebske and Frost, 2012; de Koker et al., 2013). However, at higher pressures the measured eutectic melting curves are systematically lower in temperature than curves extrapolated on the basis of thermodynamic modelling of low-pressure experimental data, and those calculated from atomistic simulations. We find that our data are inconsistent with previously computed melting temperatures and melt thermodynamic properties of the SiO2 endmember, and indicate a maximum in short-range ordering in MgO-SiO2 melts close to Mg2SiO4 composition. The curvature of the model peridotite eutectic relative to an MgSiO3 melt adiabat indicates that crystallization in a global magma ocean would begin at ∼100 GPa rather than at the bottom of the mantle, allowing for an early basal melt layer. The model peridotite melting curve lies ∼ 500 K above the mantle geotherm at the core-mantle boundary, indicating that it will not be molten unless the addition of other components reduces the solidus sufficiently. The model basalt melting curve intersects the geotherm at the base of the mantle, and partial melting of subducted oceanic crust is expected.

  18. Simulation of shock-induced melting of Ni using molecular dynamics coupled to a two-temperature model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koči, L.; Bringa, E. M.; Ivanov, D. S.; Hawreliak, J.; McNaney, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Remington, B. A.; Ahuja, R.

    2006-07-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we study shock-induced melting in Ni with an embedded atom method (EAM). Dynamic melting is probed by the pair correlation function, and we find a melting lattice temperature of Tmelt=6400±300K for a melting pressure of Pmelt=275±10GPa . When a combined MD+TTM (two-temperature model) approach is used to include electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling, Pmelt and Tmelt change. For a given pressure, the temperature behind the shock decreases due to electronic heat diffusion into the cold, unshocked material. This cooling of the material behind the shock slightly increases the melting pressure compared to simulations without electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling. The decrease in the temperature behind the shock front is enhanced if the electron-phonon coupling is artificially made larger. We also explore the feasibility of using x-ray diffraction to detect melting.

  19. Linear thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and melting temperature of Am-MOX and Np-MOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieur, D., E-mail: damien.prieur@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Belin, R.C. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SPUA/LMPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez Durance (France); Manara, D.; Staicu, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Richaud, J.-C. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SPUA/LMPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez Durance (France); Vigier, J.-F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Scheinost, A.C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Martin, P. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC/LLCC, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance cedex (France)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions were investigated. • Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions exhibit the same linear thermal expansion. • The thermal conductivity of Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. • The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX are 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively. - Abstract: The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solution materials were investigated. Their linear thermal expansion, determined using high temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1973 K showed no significant difference between the Np and the Am doped MOX. The thermal conductivity of the Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX, measured using a laser heating self crucible arrangement were 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively.

  20. Flavor dependence of baryon melting temperature in effective models of QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Sintes, Benjamin; Aichelin, Joerg

    2015-06-01

    We apply the three-flavor (Polyakov-)Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model to generate baryons as quark-diquark bound states using many-body techniques at finite temperature. All the baryonic states belonging to the octet and decuplet flavor representations are generated in the isospin-symmetric case. For each state we extract the melting temperature at which the baryon may decay into a quark-diquark pair. We seek for an evidence of the strangeness dependence of the baryon melting temperature as suggested by the statistical thermal models and supported by lattice quantum chromodynamics results. A clear and robust signal for this claim is found, pointing to a flavor dependence of the hadronic deconfinement temperature.

  1. Acoustic imaging for temperature distribution reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ruixi; Xiong, Qingyu; Liang, Shan

    2016-12-01

    For several industrial processes, such as burning and drying, temperature distribution is important because it can reflect the internal running state of industrial equipment and assist to develop control strategy and ensure safety in operation of industrial equipment. The principle of this technique is mainly based on the relationship between acoustic velocity and temperature. In this paper, an algorithm for temperature distribution reconstruction is considered. Compared with reconstruction results of simulation experiments with the least square algorithm and the proposed one, the latter indicates a better information reflection of temperature distribution and relatively higher reconstruction accuracy.

  2. Acoustic imaging for temperature distribution reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixi Jia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For several industrial processes, such as burning and drying, temperature distribution is important because it can reflect the internal running state of industrial equipment and assist to develop control strategy and ensure safety in operation of industrial equipment. The principle of this technique is mainly based on the relationship between acoustic velocity and temperature. In this paper, an algorithm for temperature distribution reconstruction is considered. Compared with reconstruction results of simulation experiments with the least square algorithm and the proposed one, the latter indicates a better information reflection of temperature distribution and relatively higher reconstruction accuracy.

  3. Acoustic CT system for temperature distribution measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinji Ohyama; Toyofumi Oga; Kazuo Oshima; Junya Takayama

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,a measurement method for crosssectional temperature distribution is addressed. A novel method based on an acoustic CT technique is proposed. Specifically,the temperature distributions are estimated using the time of flight data of several ultrasonic propagation paths. The times of the flight data contain both temperature and wind effect,and the method to select only temperature component is introduced. A filtered back projection method is applied to reconstruct the temperature distributions from the time of flight data. An experimental system was designed and fabricated to realize simultaneous temperature and wind velocity distribution measurements. Through this system,the effectiveness of the proposed measurement method is confirmed.

  4. Studies of Behavior Melting Temperature Characteristics for Multi Thermocouple In-Core Instrument Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Donghyup; Chae, Myoungeun; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Kyulim [Woojin inc, Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Bottom-up type in-core instruments (ICIs) are used for the pressurized water reactors of OPR-1000, APR- 1400 in order to measure neutron flux and temperature in the reactor. It is a well-known technique and a proven design using years in the nuclear field. ICI consists of one pair of K-type thermocouple, five self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) and one back ground detector. K-type thermocouple's purpose is to measure the core exit temperature (CET) in the reactor. The CET is a very important factor for operating nuclear power plants and it is 327 .deg. C when generally operating the reactor in the nuclear power plant(NPP) in case of OPR- 1000. If the CET will exceed 650 .deg. C, Operators in the main control room should be considered to be an accident situation in accordance with a severe accident management guidance(SAMG). The Multi Thermocouple ICI is a new designed ICI assuming severe accident conditions. It consists of four more thermocouples than the existing design, so it has five Ktype thermocouples besides the thermocouple measuring CET is located in the same elevation as the ICI. Each thermocouple is able to be located in the desired location as required. The Multi Thermocouple ICI helps to measure the temperature distribution of the entire reactor. In addition, it will measure certain point of melted core because of the in-vessel debris of nuclear fuel when an accident occurs more seriously. In this paper, to simulate a circumstance such as a nuclear reactor severe accident was examined. In this study, the K-type thermocouples of Multi Thermocouple ICI was confirmed experimentally to be able to measure up to 1370 .deg. C before the thermocouples have been melted. And after the thermocouples were melted by debris, it was able to be monitored that the signal of EMF directed the infinite value of voltage. Therefore through the results of the test, it can be assumed that if any EMF data among the Multi Thermocouple ICI will direct the infinite value

  5. High-temperature apparatus for chaotic mixing of natural silicate melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgavi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Vetere, F. P.; González-García, D.; Perugini, D., E-mail: diego.perugini@unipg.it [Department of Physics and Geology, Petro-Volcanology Research Group (PVRG), University of Perugia, Piazza Università, Perugia 06100 (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    A unique high-temperature apparatus was developed to trigger chaotic mixing at high-temperature (up to 1800 °C). This new apparatus, which we term Chaotic Magma Mixing Apparatus (COMMA), is designed to carry out experiments with high-temperature and high-viscosity (up to 10{sup 6} Pa s) natural silicate melts. This instrument allows us to follow in time and space the evolution of the mixing process and the associated modulation of chemical composition. This is essential to understand the dynamics of magma mixing and related chemical exchanges. The COMMA device is tested by mixing natural melts from Aeolian Islands (Italy). The experiment was performed at 1180 °C using shoshonite and rhyolite melts, resulting in a viscosity ratio of more than three orders of magnitude. This viscosity ratio is close to the maximum possible ratio of viscosity between high-temperature natural silicate melts. Results indicate that the generated mixing structures are topologically identical to those observed in natural volcanic rocks highlighting the enormous potential of the COMMA to replicate, as a first approximation, the same mixing patterns observed in the natural environment. COMMA can be used to investigate in detail the space and time development of magma mixing providing information about this fundamental petrological and volcanological process that would be impossible to investigate by direct observations. Among the potentials of this new experimental device is the construction of empirical relationships relating the mixing time, obtained through experimental time series, and chemical exchanges between the melts to constrain the mixing-to-eruption time of volcanic systems, a fundamental topic in volcanic hazard assessment.

  6. Snow Dunes: A Controlling Factor of Melt Pond Distribution on Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrich, Chris; Eicken, Hajo; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Sturm, Matthew; Harbeck, Jeremy P.; Perovich, Donald K.; Finnegan, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The location of snow dunes over the course of the ice-growth season 2007/08 was mapped on level landfast first-year sea ice near Barrow, Alaska. Landfast ice formed in mid-December and exhibited essentially homogeneous snow depths of 4-6 cm in mid-January; by early February distinct snow dunes were observed. Despite additional snowfall and wind redistribution throughout the season, the location of the dunes was fixed by March, and these locations were highly correlated with the distribution of meltwater ponds at the beginning of June. Our observations, including ground-based light detection and ranging system (lidar) measurements, show that melt ponds initially form in the interstices between snow dunes, and that the outline of the melt ponds is controlled by snow depth contours. The resulting preferential surface ablation of ponded ice creates the surface topography that later determines the melt pond evolution.

  7. Origin of Invariant Gel Melting Temperatures in the c-T Phase Diagram of an Organogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Elliot; Blanc, Christophe; Al Ouahabi, Abdelaziz; Maurin, David; Le Parc, Rozenn; Bantignies, Jean-Louis; Guenet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Dominique; Mésini, Philippe J

    2016-05-17

    Binary c-T phase diagrams of organogelators in solvent are frequently simplified to two domains, gel and sol, even when the melting temperatures display two distinct regimes, an increase with T and a plateau. Herein, the c-T phase diagram of an organogelator in solvent is elucidated by rheology, DSC, optical microscopy, and transmitted light intensity measurements. We evidence a miscibility gap between the organogelator and the solvent above a threshold concentration, cL. In this domain the melting or the formation of the gel becomes a monotectic transformation, which explains why the corresponding temperatures are nonvariant above cL. As shown by further studies by variable temperature FTIR and NMR, different types of H-bonds drive both the liquid-liquid phase separation and the gelation.

  8. Signatures of present and past melt distribution along fast and intermediate spreading centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Milena

    The work presented in this dissertation depicts past and present signatures of melt distribution at fast and intermediate spreading centers. The primary goal of the studies included in this thesis is to provide better understanding of melt distribution and variation in melt physical properties within and at the base of oceanic crust formed at these spreading centers. Furthermore, this work examines effects that melt presence might have on formation and structural characteristics of oceanic crust. To explore the above we use geophysical data collected during two expeditions conducted along the Juan de Fuca Ridge (intermediate) and the East Pacific Rise (fast). The major part of the thesis is based on the work conducted on high resolution reflection seismic data that investigate present day intracrustal melt distribution along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) axis extending between 8°20' and 10°10'N. Here, the character of the melt reservoir is examined from different aspects and by using different seismic data analysis methods. By systematic analysis of the seismic reflection data, we show that the axial melt lens (AML) is segmented at different segment scales. Locations of the mapped disruptions in the AML correspond to previously identified tectonic discontinuities well expressed in the seafloor bathymetry. The above result corroborates genetic relationship between tectonic and magmatic segmentation. To examine melt distribution along the EPR, here for the first time we use amplitude variation with angle of incidence (AVA) crossplotting technique that was developed by oil and gas industry experts to look for presence of hydrocarbons. Further data examination for the first time for the mid-ocean ridges show presence of deeper lenses (lenses that are present below the AML). Presence of gaps in these sub-events and their collocation with what is believed to be the location of origin of the last documented eruption occurred in 2005--06, may shed light on the mechanisms

  9. Surface Transformations and Water Uptake on Liquid and Solid Butanol near the Melting Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Papagiannakopoulos, Panos; Thomson, Erik S; Markovic, Nikola; Pettersson, Jan B C

    2013-01-01

    Water interactions with organic surfaces are of central importance in biological systems and many Earth system processes. Here we describe experimental studies of water collisions and uptake kinetics on liquid and solid butanol from 160 to 200 K. Hyperthermal D2O molecules (0.32 eV) undergo efficient trapping on both solid and liquid butanol, and only a minor fraction scatters inelastically after an 80% loss of kinetic energy to surface modes. Trapped molecules either desorb within a few ms, or are taken up by the butanol phase during longer times. The water uptake and surface residence time increase with temperature above 180 K indicating melting of the butanol surface 4.5 K below the bulk melting temperature. Water uptake changes gradually across the melting point and trapped molecules are rapidly lost by diffusion into the liquid above 190 K. This indicates that liquid butanol maintains a surface phase with limited water permeability up to 5.5 K above the melting point. These surface observations are indic...

  10. Linear thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and melting temperature of Am-MOX and Np-MOX

    OpenAIRE

    PRIEUR DAMIEN; BELIN R. C.; Manara, Dario; Staicu, Dragos; RICHAUD J.-C.; VIGIER JEAN-FRANCOIS; Scheinost A.C.; Somers, Joseph; Martin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solution materials were investigated. Their linear thermal expansion, determined using high temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1973 K showed no significant difference between the Np and the Am doped MOX. The thermal conductivity of the Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX, measured using a laser heating self crucible arrangement were 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respecti...

  11. A study on structural analysis of highly corrosive melts at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtori, N

    2002-01-01

    When sodium is burned at high temperature in the atmosphere, it reacts simultaneously with H sub 2 O in the atmosphere so that it can produce high temperature melt of sodium hydroxide as a solvent. If this melt includes peroxide ion (O sub 2 sup 2 sup -), it will be a considerably active and corrosive for iron so that several sodium iron double oxides will be produced as corrosion products after the reaction with steel structures. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the ability of presence of peroxide ion in sodium hydroxide solvent at high temperature and that of identification of the several corrosion products using laser Raman spectroscopy. The measurement system with ultraviolet laser was developed simultaneously in the present work to improve the ability of the measurement at high temperature. As results from the measurements, the possibility of the presence of peroxide ion was shown up to 823K in sodium peroxide and 823K in the melt of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium peroxide. A...

  12. Greenland ice sheet surface temperature, melt and mass loss: 2000-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S.; Luthcke, S.B.; DiGirolamo, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    A daily time series of 'clear-sky' surface temperature has been compiled of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) using 1 km resolution moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) maps from 2000 to 2006. We also used mass-concentration data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to study mass change in relationship to surface melt from 2003 to 2006. The mean LST of the GIS increased during the study period by ???0.27??Ca-1. The increase was especially notable in the northern half of the ice sheet during the winter months. Melt-season length and timing were also studied in each of the six major drainage basins. Rapid (meltwater is flowing rapidly to the base of the ice sheet, causing acceleration of outlet glaciers, thus highlighting the metastability of parts of the GIS and the vulnerability of the ice sheet to air-temperature increases. If air temperatures continue to rise over Greenland, increased surface melt will play a large role in ice-sheet mass loss.

  13. Hurst's Exponent Determination for Radial Distribution Functions of In, Sn and In-40 wt%Sn Melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周永志; 李梅; 耿浩然; 杨中喜; 孙春静

    2011-01-01

    Hurst's exponent of radial distribution functions (RDFs) within the short-range scope of In, Sn and In-40wt%Sn melts are determined by the rescaled range analysis method. Hurst's exponents H are between 0.94 and 0.97, which display long-range dependence. Within short-range scope, the number of particles from a reference particle belongs to fractional Brownian motion. After RDF serials are randomly scrambled, Hurst's exponents all dramatically dropped, which proves long-range dependence. H irregularly varies as the temperature rises, but the change tendency is not consistent with the correlation radius rc.%Hurst's exponent of radial distribution functions(RDFs)within the short-range scope of In,Sn and In-40 wt%Sn melts are determined by the rescaled range analysis method.Hurst's exponents H are between 0.94 and 0.97,which display long-range dependence.Within short-range scope,the number of particles from a reference particle belongs to fractional Brownian motion.After RDF serials are randomly scrambled,Hurst's exponents all dramatically dropped,which proves long-range dependence.H irregularly varies as the temperature rises,but the change tendency is not consistent with the correlation radius rc.

  14. [Effect of single-stranded and double-stranded breaks on the melting temperature of phage T2 DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurgaĭtis, A P; Lazurkin, Iu S; Bannikov, Iu A

    1979-01-01

    The effect of single- and double-stranded breaks in DNA phage T2, on the melting temperature of this DNA in the 0,05 M SSC solution, was investigated. The number of cleavages per 1000 nucleotide pairs varied in the range of 0 to 10. It is shown that single- and double-stranded breaks affect the melting temperature with approximately (within 20%) the same efficiency. The relationship between the melting temperature shift (delta Tm) and the number of cleavages is non-linear. The magnitude of the effect is characterized by delta Tm of 2 +/- 0.4 degrees C for the average inter-cleavage distance of 200 base pairs. It is shown that the observed melting curves are non-equilibrium ones, which is probably due to the fact that the effect of cleavages on the melting temperature is largely results from the complete and practically irreversible separation of strands.

  15. Temperature distribution in growing semi-transparent crystals. 3. Conical liquid/solid interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvapil, J.; Kubelka, J.; Kvapil, J.; Perner, B. (Monokrystaly, Turnov (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-05-01

    Temperature distribution in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and YAG crystals grown by Czochralski method and in the melt layer adjacent to the liquid/solid interface of the conical shape was computed. The results were compared with the quality of the crystals. Using a highly absorbing material, temperature difference near the deeply submerged sharp interface decreases from the edge to the centre of a crystal and it is relatively great and unalterable in the case of a shallowly submerged blunt interface. Sharp interface show the crystals grown from the melt of the same composition (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or accurately ''stoichiometric'' YAG), whereas the blunt one is typical of YAG grown from the melt of the ''non-stoichiometric'' composition, because its solidifying point is below the melting point of YAG phase.

  16. Role of melt behavior in modifying oxidation distribution using an interface incorporated model in selective laser melting of aluminum-based material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongdong; Dai, Donghua

    2016-08-01

    A transient three dimensional model for describing the molten pool dynamics and the response of oxidation film evolution in the selective laser melting of aluminum-based material is proposed. The physical difference in both sides of the scan track, powder-solid transformation and temperature dependent physical properties are taken into account. It shows that the heat energy tends to accumulate in the powder material rather than in the as-fabricated part, leading to the formation of the asymmetrical patterns of the temperature contour and the attendant larger dimensions of the molten pool in the powder phase. As a higher volumetric energy density is applied (≥1300 J/mm3), a severe evaporation is produced with the upward direction of velocity vector in the irradiated powder region while a restricted operating temperature is obtained in the as-fabricated part. The velocity vector continuously changes from upward direction to the downward one as the scan speed increases from 100 mm/s to 300 mm/s, promoting the generation of the debris of the oxidation films and the resultant homogeneous distribution state in the matrix. For the applied hatch spacing of 50 μm, a restricted remelting phenomenon of the as-fabricated part is produced with the upward direction of the convection flow, significantly reducing the turbulence of the thermal-capillary convection on the breaking of the oxidation films, and therefore, the connected oxidation films through the neighboring layers are typically formed. The morphology and distribution of the oxidation are experimentally acquired, which are in a good agreement with the results predicted by simulation.

  17. Phase relations study on the melting and crystallization regions of the Bi-2223 high temperature superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polasek Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The melting and solidification behavior of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3 O10 (Bi-2223 precursors has been studied. Nominal compositions corresponding to excess of liquid, Ca2CuO3 and CuO have been investigated. Each sample was made by packing a precursor powder into a silver crucible, in order to approximately simulate the situation found in 2223 silver-sheathed tapes. The samples were partially melted and then slow-cooled, being quenched from different temperatures and analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS. The precursors decomposed peritectically during melting, forming liquid and solid phases. Very long plates with compositions falling in the vicinity of the 2223 primary phase field formed upon slow-cooling. The 2223 phase may have been formed and the results suggest that long grains of this phase might be obtained by melting and crystallization if the exact peritectic region and the optimum processing conditions are found.

  18. Selective laser melting of Ti6Al4V alloy for biomedical applications: Temperature monitoring and microstructural evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadroitsev, I., E-mail: ihar.yadroitsau@enise.fr [Université de Lyon, Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Saint-Etienne, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Krakhmalev, P. [Karlstad University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, SE-651 88 Karlstad (Sweden); Yadroitsava, I. [Université de Lyon, Ecole Nationale d’Ingénieurs de Saint-Etienne, 58 rue Jean Parot, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Temperature measurements of molten pool were done using CCD camera. • Temperature of molten pool versus scanning speed and laser power was determined. • Microstructures and microhardness of SLM samples were analyzed. • Influence of heat treatment on microstructure were discussed and presented. -- Abstract: Selective laser melting (SLM) is a kind of additive manufacturing where parts are made directly from 3D CAD data layer-by-layer from powder material. SLM products are used in various industries including aerospace, automotive, electronic, chemical, biomedical and other high-tech areas. The properties of the parts produced by SLM depend strongly on the material nature, characteristics of each single track and each single layer, as well as the strength of the connections between them. Studying the temperature distribution during SLM is important because temperature gradient and heat transfer determine the microstructure and finally mechanical properties of the SLM part. In this study a CCD camera was applied for determination of the surface temperature distribution and the molten pool size of Ti6Al4V alloy. The investigation of the microstructure evolution after different heat treatments was carried out to determine the microstructure in terms of applicability for the biomedical industry.

  19. Property-Composition-Temperature Modeling of Waste Glass Melt Data Subject to a Randomization Restriction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cooley, Scott K.

    2008-10-01

    Properties such as viscosity and electrical conductivity of glass melts are functions of melt temperature as well as glass composition. When measuring such a property for several glasses, the property is typically measured at several temperatures for one glass, then at several temperatures for the next glass, and so on. This data-collection process involves a restriction on randomization, which is referred to as split-plot experiment. The split-plot data structure must be accounted for in developing property-composition-temperature models and the corresponding uncertainty equations for model predictions. Instead of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods, generalized least squares (GLS) regression methods using restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimation must be used. This article describes the methodology for developing property-composition-temperature models and corresponding prediction uncertainty equations using the GLS/REML regression approach. Viscosity data collected on 197 simulated nuclear waste glasses are used to illustrate the GLS/REML methods for developing a viscosity-composition-temperature model and corresponding equations for model prediction uncertainties. The correct results using GLS/REML regression are compared to the incorrect results obtained using OLS regression.

  20. Temperature distribution in magnetized neutron star crusts

    CERN Document Server

    Geppert, U; Page, D

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the influence of different magnetic field configurations on the temperature distribution in neutron star crusts. We consider axisymmetric dipolar fields which are either restricted to the stellar crust, ``crustal fields'', or allowed to penetrate the core, ``core fields''. By integrating the two-dimensional heat transport equation in the crust, taking into account the classical (Larmor) anisotropy of the heat conductivity, we obtain the crustal temperature distribution, assuming an isothermal core. Including quantum magnetic field effects in the envelope as a boundary condition, we deduce the corresponding surface temperature distributions. We find that core fields result in practically isothermal crusts unless the surface field strength is well above $10^{15}$ G while for crustal fields with surface strength above a few times $10^{12}$ G significant deviations from isothermality occur at core temperatures inferior or equal to $10^8$ K. At the stellar surface, the cold equatorial region produce...

  1. A Direct Comparison between Static and Dynamic Melting Temperature Determinations below 100 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yu-Huai; HUANG Hai-Jun; LIU Fu-Sheng; YANG Mei-Xia; JING Fu-Qian

    2005-01-01

    @@ A preliminary experiment of sound velocity measurements for porous iron with initial average density of 6.275 g/cm3 has been performed at pressures below 100 GPa, in order to clarify a long-standing problem that the static melting temperature Tm, mostly below 100 GPa due to its technical limitations, is notably lower than the extrapolated melting data inferred from the shock wave experiments made above 200 GPa, for the sake of making a direct comparison between the experimental static and dynamic melting temperatures in the same pressure region.With the lately proposed Hugoniot sound velocity data analysis technique [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 863], the results deduced from this Hugoniot sound velocity measurement is Tm = 3200 K at 87GPa and Tm = 3080 K at80 GPa, which are in good agreement with the two latest static data ofTm = 3510 K at 105 GPa and Tm = 2750 K at 58 GPa, which utilized modern improved double-side laser heating and in situ accurate x-ray diffraction techniques in experiments. It can be concluded that consensus Tm data would be obtained from static and shock wave experiments in the case that the recently improved techniques are adopted in investigations.

  2. Slowdown of global surface air temperature increase and acceleration of ice melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, André; Yin, Qiuzhen; Nifenecker, Hervé; Poitou, Jean

    2017-07-01

    Although recent decades have been the warmest since 1850, and global mean temperatures during 2015 and 2016 beat all instrumental records, the rate of increase in global surface air temperature (GSAT) significantly decreased at the beginning of the 21st Century. In this context, we examine the roles of ice melting and associated increase in sea-water mass, both of which significantly increased at the same time as GSAT decreased. Specifically, we show that (1) the slowdown of the rate of increase in GSAT between the specific periods 1992-2001 and 2002-2011 exists in all three climate records analyzed and is statistically significant at the 5% level amounting between 0.029 and 0. 036°C/yr and leaving an energy of 14.8-18.4 1019 J/yr available; (2) the increase of the atmosphere-related ice melt between these two periods amounts to 316 Gt/yr which requires 10.5 1019 J/yr, that is, between 57% and 71% of the energy left by the slowdown; and (3) the energy budget shows, therefore, that the heat required to melt this additional 316 Gt/yr of ice is of the same order as the energy needed to warm the atmosphere during the decade 2002-2011 as much as during the previous one, suggesting a redistribution of heat within the atmosphere-cryosphere system.

  3. Distribution of siderophile and other trace elements in melt rock at the Chicxulub impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuraytz, B. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Martinez, R. R.; Sharpton, V. L.; Marin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recent isotopic and mineralogical studies have demonstrated a temporal and chemical link between the Chicxulub multiring impact basin and ejecta at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. A fundamental problem yet to be resolved, however, is identification of the projectile responsible for this cataclysmic event. Drill core samples of impact melt rock from the Chichxulub structure contain Ir and Os abundances and Re-Os isotopic ratios indicating the presence of up to approx. 3 percent meteoritic material. We have used a technique involving microdrilling and high sensitivity instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in conjunction with electron microprobe analysis to characterize further the distribution of siderophile and other trace elements among phases within the C1-N10 melt rock.

  4. Distribution of Phosphorus between CaO-CaF2 Slag and Fe-C-P Melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-xiang; ZHOU Jian-jian; DU Xiao-jian

    2005-01-01

    The equilibrium distribution ratio of phosphorus between CaO-CaF2 molten slag and Fe-C-P melt at 1450 ℃ was measured. The phosphate capacity of slag and the activity coefficient of phosphorus oxide were calculated.

  5. temperature distribution in underground cable system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rerak Monika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a mathematical model of heat transfer in the underground cable system. The computations were performed for flat formation of power cables buried in the ground at a depth of 2 meters. The model allows determining the two-dimensional temperature distribution in the soil, thermal backfill and power cables. The simulations studied the effect of soil thermal conductivity on the maximum temperature of the cable conductor. Furthermore, the effect of thermal backfill soil conductivity on the cable conductor temperature was studied. Numerical analyses were performed based on a program written in MATLAB.

  6. Transient High-Temperature Processing of Silicates in Fulgurites as Analogues for Meteorite and Impact Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.; Thackrey, S.; Muirhead, D. K.; Wright, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    A fulgurite from the Sahara yielded petrographic data valuable as an analogue for highly reduced meteorite and impact melts, including iron silicide formation, devolatilization features, zircon melting and extreme melt heterogeneity.

  7. TSDC study of XLPE recrystallization effects in the melting range of temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, J. A.; Belana, J.; Òrrit, J.; Sellarès, J.; Mudarra, M.; Cañadas, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    The electrical properties of crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), employed in mid-voltage cable insulation are studied using thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. A complex heteropolar peak appears by TSDC between 50 and 110 °C, with a maximum at 105 °C. These measurements reveal that there is an optimal polarization temperature (Tpo) around 90 °C. For this polarization temperature, the measured discharge peak area is maximum. Although the presence of a Tpo is common in the study of relaxations by TSDC, in this case one would expect a monotonic decrease in the TSDC response with increasing polarization temperatures due to the decrease in the total crystalline fraction. In this paper, TSDC curves obtained under several conditions are interpreted in terms of recrystallization processes in XLPE during the polarization stage, if the sample is polarized in the melting temperature range. In this case, the recrystallization of a fraction of the material molten at this temperature promotes the formation of more stable and defect-free crystals. The presence of recrystallization processes is detected by DSC and confirmed by x-ray diffractometry. TSDC measurements have been performed with samples polarized at several temperatures (Tp) cooling from the melt or heating from room temperature. Also, TSDC results are obtained with previous annealing or with several cooling rates. These results allow us to infer that crystalline material grown from recrystallization processes that take place in the polarization stage attains a particularly stable polarization. Possible microscopical causes of this effect are discussed.

  8. Robust Ultrasonic Waveguide Based Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, S.; Rajagopal, P.; Balasubramaniam, K.

    This is a novel technique for distributed temperature measurements, using single robust ultrasonic wire or strip-like waveguides, special embodiments in the form of Helical or Spiral configurations that can cover large area/volume in enclosed regions. Such distributed temperature sensing has low cost applications in the long term monitoring critical enclosures such as containment vessels, flue gas stacks, furnaces, underground storage tanks, buildings for fire, etc. The range of temperatures that can be measured are from very low to elevated temperatures. The transduction is performed using Piezo-electric crystals that are bonded to one end of the waveguide which acts as both transmitter and receivers. The wires will have periodic reflector embodiments (bends, gratings, etc.) that allow reflections of an input ultrasonic wave, in a pulse echo mode, back to the crystal. Using the time of fight (TOF) variations at the multiple predefined reflector locations, the measured temperatures are mapped with multiple thermocouples. Using either the L(0,1) or the T(0,1)modes, or simultaneously, measurements other than temperature may also be included. This paper will describe the demonstration of this technology using a 0.5 MHz longitudinal piezo-crystal for transmitting and receiving the L (0, 1) mode through the special form of waveguide at various temperatures zones.

  9. Experimental study on liquid immiscibility of lamprophyre-sulfide melt at high temperature and high pressure and its geological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; HUANG Zhilong; ZHU Chengming

    2009-01-01

    With lamprophyre and pyrite from the Laowangzhai gold deposit, Yunnan Province, China, as starting materials, and at pressures from 1.5 to 3.0 GPa and temperatures from 1160 to 1560℃, an experimental study was carried out on the liquid immiscibility of lamprophyre-sulfide melt at high temperature and ultra-high pressure in the DS-29A cubic 3600T/6-type high pressure apparatus. Results showed that the liquid immiscibility of lampropyre-sulfide melt in the magmatic system would happen during the early magmatic evolution (high temperature and high pressure conditions) and was controlled by temperature and pressure. The sulfide melt which was separated from the lamprophyric melt would make directional movement in the temperature and pressure field and assemble in the low-temperature and low-pressure region. Because the density of SM is higher than that of the lamprophyric melt, the former would gather together at the bottom of the magma chamber and there would exist a striking boundary between the two melts. On the other hand, the results also suggested that there would be little possibility for lamprophyric magma to carry massive gold, and lamprophyres can't provide many of ore-forming materials (Au) in the processes of gold mineralization.

  10. Test of Taylor's Hypothesis with Distributed Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; Gentine, P.; Sayde, C.; Tanner, E.; Ochsner, T. E.; Dong, J.

    2016-12-01

    Taylor's hypothesis[Taylor, 1938] assumes that mean wind speed carries the spatial pattern of turbulent motion past a fixed point in a "frozen" way, which has been widely used to relate streamwise wavenumber and angular frequency . Experiments[Fisher, 1964; Tong, 1996] have shown some deviation from Taylor's hypothesis at highly turbulent intensity flows and at high wavenumbers. However, the velocity or scalar measurements have always been fixed at a few spatial points rather than distributed in space. This experiment was designed for the first time to directly compare the time and spatial spectrum of temperature to test Taylor's hypothesis, measuring temperature with high resolution in both time and space by Distributed Temperature Sensing utilizing the attenuation difference of Raman scattering in the optic fiber at the MOISST site Oklahoma. The length of transact is 233 meters along the dominant wind direction. The temperature sampling distance is 0.127m and sampling time frequency is 1 Hz. The heights of the 4 fiber cables parallel to ground are 1m, 1.254m, 1.508m and 1.762m respectively. Also, eddy covariance instrument was set up near the Distributed Temperature Sensing as comparison for temperature data. The temperature spatial spectrum could be obtained with one fixed time point, while the temperature time spectrum could be obtained with one fixed spatial point in the middle of transact. The preliminary results would be presented in the AGU fall meeting. Reference Fisher, M. J., and Davies, P.O.A.L (1964), Correlation measurements in a non-frozen pattern of turbulence, Journal of fluid mechanics, 18(1), 97-116. Taylor, G. I. (1938), The spectrum of turbulence, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 164(919), 476-490. Tong, C. (1996), Taylor's Hypothesis and Two-point Coherence Measurements, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 81(3), 399-410.

  11. Silicate melt structure at high temperatures and pressures: concepts and questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A great deal is now known about the structure of glass-forming silicate (and other oxide) liquids, from decades of research on quenched glasses of interest to the geosciences and technology. However, specific structural information and derived general concepts from such studies are only the starting point for thinking about melts at temperatures far above the glass transition, and for high pressures and compositions that do not result in quenchable glasses. This talk will attempt to briefly summarize what we know about temperature and pressure effects on melt structure, emphasizing questions yet to be clearly answered. As examples of the latter, we are yet to have a quantitative structural explanation of the all-important configurational entropy and enthalpy of even simple silicate compositions, suggesting that short-lived and possibly ill-defined defect structures account for much of the non-vibrational energy taken up on heating to liquidus temperatures. At least in the pressure range before major increases in silicon coordination (which probably includes the upper mantle source regions for most modern mafic magmas), known changes in cation coordination are not enough to account for known changes in density, either at high T/P or in quenched and decompressed glasses. And even the basic concepts of silicate melt structure, such as `network formers' and `network modifiers' are inadequate in a high pressure liquid comprised primarily of cations with 6, 7 or 8-fold coordination. Such kinds of questions pose important and intriguing challenges for structural thinking based on improved computational models and rapid advances in in-situ, high P/T structural measurements.

  12. Can the thermodynamic melting temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose be measured using rapid-scanning differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Won; Thomas, Leonard C; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2011-04-13

    The loss of crystalline structure in sucrose, glucose, and fructose has been shown to be due to the kinetic process of thermal decomposition (termed apparent melting), rather than thermodynamic melting. The purpose of this research was to investigate whether or not it is possible to scan quickly enough to suppress the kinetic process of thermal decomposition and reach the thermodynamic melting temperature of these sugars using a new rapid-scanning DSC. Indium, a thermodynamic melting material, and sucrose, glucose, and fructose were analyzed at three heating rates from 1 to 25 °C/min using standard DSC and at seven heating rates from 50 to 2000 °C/min using rapid-scanning DSC. Thermodynamic melting was achieved when the onset temperature (T(m onset)) of the endothermic peak leveled off to a constant value independent of heating rate. The T(m onset) for indium was constant (156.74 ± 0.42 °C) at all heating rates. In the case of fructose, the T(m onset) increased considerably until a heating rate of approximately 698 °C/min, after which the average T(m onset) for the remaining three heating rates was constant at 135.83 ± 1.14 °C. Thus, 135.83 °C is proposed to be the thermodynamic melting temperature of fructose. It is important to note that the heating rate at which this thermodynamic melting temperature is achieved is most likely influenced by the type and amount of trace components (e.g., water and salts) contained in the fructose, which are known to vary widely in sugars. In the case of sucrose and glucose, thermodynamic melting temperatures were not able to be obtained, because the upper limit heating rate used was not fast enough to suppress thermal decomposition and achieve thermodynamic melting, perhaps due to the higher apparent T(m onset) for sucrose and glucose compared to that for fructose.

  13. MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500°C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

  14. Size Dependence of the Melting Temperature of Metallic Films: Two Possible Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Samsonov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The size dependence was investigated of the melting temperature Tm of metallic films (tin and copper on different substrate (amorphous carbon, another infusible metal, i.e. the dependence of Tm on the film thickness h. It was found that the effect of interfacial boundary can result in the growth of Tm for thin metallic films on the carbon substrate in comparison with the corresponding bulk value. For the metal 1 / metal 2 system the size dependence of Tm seems to be less pronounced and Tm decreases with decreasing thickness h.

  15. Modelling the size effect on the melting temperature of nanoparticles, nanowires and nanofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safaei, A [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shandiz, M Attarian [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanjabi, S [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barber, Z H [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-30

    A model has been developed to account for the dependence of melting temperature on the size of nanosolids (nanoparticles, nanowires and nanofilms). In this model the effect of particle size and shape, lattice and surface packing factor, and the coordination number of the lattice and of the surface crystalline planes are considered. A general equation is proposed, having nonlinear form as a function of the reciprocal of nanosolid size. This model is consistent with reported experimental data for nanoparticles of In and Au, nanowires of Pb and In, and nanofilms of In.

  16. Adiabatic Joule Heating of Copper from 4 K to the Melting Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Guillet, Alain; Delamarre, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Considering a copper wire heated by Joule effect and the variation of its resistivity and specific heat with temperature, we established numerical and analytical solutions (between 293 and 1356 K for the latter) for the evolution of its temperature over time. The Temperature vs. Time evolution follows a Lambertian function. The calculations are based on the assumption of adiabatic heating and uniform current distribution within the wire. We demonstrate that at very low temperature the heating...

  17. [A study of phonon vibration like modes for aggregation structure in silicate melts by high temperature Raman spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei-Cang; Li, Ru-Bi; Shang, Tong-Ming; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Jian-Hua; You, Jing-Lin

    2010-05-01

    Silicate melts are special fractal dimension system that is metastable state of near-way order and far-way disorder. In this paper, the size of nanometer aggregation structure and the frequences of phonon vibration like mode in the low dimension silicate series (CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and Na2-Al2O3-SiO2 series) synthesized via high temperature melting and sol gel methods were measured by means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), low wavenumber Raman spectrum (LWRS) and high temperature Raman spectrum (HTRS in situ measuring). The nanometer self-similarity aggregation structure(it's size is about a few nm to a few tens nm) and phonic phonon vibration like modes of low temperature silicate gel, high temperature silicate melts and it's quenching glasses phases were obtained. So a quantitative method by HTRS for measuring the aggregation size in the high temperature melts was established. The results showed that the aggregation size of the silicate melts is smaller at high temperature than at room temperature and the number of bridge oxygen in one Si-O tetrahedron in network structure units is decreasing at high temperature. This study work provides important theory and information for deliberating geochemistry characteristic, crystallization & evolution of natural magma and enhancing performance of low dimension silicate matelials.

  18. DENSITY, EQUILIBRIUM HEAT OF FUSION AND EQUILIBRIUM MELTING TEMPERATURE OF NYLON 1010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jinhua; MO Zishen; CHEN Donglin

    1990-01-01

    The density, equilibrium heat of fusion and equilibrium melting temperature of Nylon 1010 were determined by means of infrared spectrum, differential scanning calorimetry, wide angle X-ray diffraction and density measurement techniques. According to Starkweather 's method crystalline density ρc and amorphous density ρa were estimated to be 1.098 and 1.003 g/cm3 respectively by extrapolating the straight lines of the IR absorbance against density to zero intensity. Owing to the less intense in absorbance and less sensitive to the change in crystallinity of the amorphors band the thus obtained ρc was too low in value.Thereby the value of the ratio ρc / ρa is far less than generally accepted mean value for most crystalline polymers. Accordingly, traditional X-raydiffraction method was used through determining the crystalline dimension(a=4.9(A), b=5.4(A) , c=27.8(A) , α=4 9 °β=77.0 °γ= 63.5 ° ) , and a rather correct value of ρc or the crystal density 1. 13 g/cm3 was obtained . The equilibrium heat of fusion Δ H 0m was estimated to be 244.0 J/g plotting Δ Hm's of specimens with different crystallinity against their corresponding specific volumes Vsp and extrapolating to completely crystalline condition ( Vcsp = 1 /ρc) As to the equilibrium melting temperature T0m ,because of the easiness ofrecrystallization of melt crystallized Nylon 1010 specimen ,the well-known Hoffman's Tm-Tc method failed in determining this value and an usually rarely used Kamide double extrapolation method was adopted. The so obtained value of T0m 487 seems to be fairly reasonable.

  19. Very high-temperature impact melt products as evidence for cosmic airbursts and impacts 12,900 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Ted E; Hermes, Robert E; Moore, Andrew M T; Kennett, Douglas J; Weaver, James C; Wittke, James H; DeCarli, Paul S; Bischoff, James L; Hillman, Gordon C; Howard, George A; Kimbel, David R; Kletetschka, Gunther; Lipo, Carl P; Sakai, Sachiko; Revay, Zsolt; West, Allen; Firestone, Richard B; Kennett, James P

    2012-07-10

    It has been proposed that fragments of an asteroid or comet impacted Earth, deposited silica- and iron-rich microspherules and other proxies across several continents, and triggered the Younger Dryas cooling episode 12,900 years ago. Although many independent groups have confirmed the impact evidence, the hypothesis remains controversial because some groups have failed to do so. We examined sediment sequences from 18 dated Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) sites across three continents (North America, Europe, and Asia), spanning 12,000 km around nearly one-third of the planet. All sites display abundant microspherules in the YDB with none or few above and below. In addition, three sites (Abu Hureyra, Syria; Melrose, Pennsylvania; and Blackville, South Carolina) display vesicular, high-temperature, siliceous scoria-like objects, or SLOs, that match the spherules geochemically. We compared YDB objects with melt products from a known cosmic impact (Meteor Crater, Arizona) and from the 1945 Trinity nuclear airburst in Socorro, New Mexico, and found that all of these high-energy events produced material that is geochemically and morphologically comparable, including: (i) high-temperature, rapidly quenched microspherules and SLOs; (ii) corundum, mullite, and suessite (Fe(3)Si), a rare meteoritic mineral that forms under high temperatures; (iii) melted SiO(2) glass, or lechatelierite, with flow textures (or schlieren) that form at > 2,200 °C; and (iv) particles with features indicative of high-energy interparticle collisions. These results are inconsistent with anthropogenic, volcanic, authigenic, and cosmic materials, yet consistent with cosmic ejecta, supporting the hypothesis of extraterrestrial airbursts/impacts 12,900 years ago. The wide geographic distribution of SLOs is consistent with multiple impactors.

  20. Oxidation/Corrosion Behaviour of ODS Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in Pb Melt at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Yaskiv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead-based melts (Pb, Pb-Bi are considered as candidate coolants and spallation neutron targets due to their excellent thermophysical and nuclear properties. However, the corrosion of structural materials remains a major issue. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS ferritic/martensitic steels are considered for high temperature application for both fission and fusion reactor concepts. The oxidation/corrosion kinetics in a static oxygen-saturated Pb melt at temperature of 550°C as well as the morphology and composition of scales formed on ferritic/martensitic Fe-9Cr-1.5W and ferritic Fe-14Cr-1.5W ODS steels have been investigated. Both materials showed homogeneous multiple, dense scales that consisted of typical combination of Fe3O4 as outer sublayer and (Fe,Cr3O4 as inner sublayer. A nonuniform growth of inner oxide sublayers into the metal matrix as well as a good adhesion to the metal substrate is observed. With the prolongation of exposure from 240 to 1000 h, observed scales grow from 35 µm to 45 µm for ODS Fe-9Cr steel and from 40 µm to 60 µm for ODS Fe-14Cr steel with the thinning rates of 0,22 and 0,31 mm/year correspondingly. The mechanism of scales formation is discussed.

  1. Noncontact Laser Calorimetry of High Temperature Melts in a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hiroyuki; Kobatake, Hidekazu; Tsukada, Takao; Awaji, Satoshi

    Numerical simulations are widely used for high value-added materials processing such as semiconductor crystal growth, casting of super high-temperature alloys for a jet-engine turbine blade, and for welding in automobile manufacturing [1, 2]. Process modeling involving a liquid-to-solid transition requires precise thermophysical properties of materials in the solid and liquid state at temperatures near their melting points. However, high-temperature materials such as liquid silicon are chemically reactive and are easily contaminated by their containers and contact materials. Therefore, it remains extremely difficult to measure the thermophysical properties of high-temperature liquids. Especially, the thermal conductivity of a high-temperature liquid is a difficult property to measure because of the existence of the buoyancy and Marangoni convections in the liquid. Not only from process modeling but also from a scientific perspective, thermal conductivity data of high-temperature metallic or semiconductor liquids are important to investigate whether the Wiedemann—Franz law [3] is applicable to them.

  2. The Combustion Synthesis Process of Al-Ti-C System in an Elevated-temperature Al-melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    One of the main disadvantages of combustion synthesis of ceramic/metal composite materials is the relatively high level of porosity present in the products.To synthesize TiC/Al composites with a dense structure,this paper proposes a novel application of an elevated-temperature Al-melt to directly ignite and simultaneously infiltrate Al-Ti-C preform dipped in the melt.The emphasis was placed on the combustion synthesis process and microstructural evalution of the preform in the melt,by a liquid quenching test combined with the measurement of the temperature history of the dipped preform.The results show that the combustion synthesis process of the preform in the elevated-temperature melt involves a series of reactions,and that higher temperature of the melt is favourable for the formation of TiC.The synthesized TiC/Al composites exhibit a dense structure,which is attributed to the infiltration of the melt into the preform.

  3. Crystallization and structure of cast A390.0 alloy with melt overheating temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piątkowski

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research on the influence of melt overheating temperature on crystallization parameters and primary structure of cast AlSi17Cu5Mg (A390.0 alloy overheated to temperature: 820 °C, 880 °C, 940 °C and 1 000 °C. It was found that the degree of overheating influences the change of microstructure significantly and morphologies of primary silicon of the castings from Al-Si alloys. Research has shown that the overheating of the liquid metal bath is one of the methods of finding more applications of hypereutectic Al-Si system alloys without the addition of modifiers.

  4. Prediction of melting temperatures in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures using thermodynamic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Guimarães, Nuno; Wengel, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA thermody......Abstract The thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hybridization, i.e. the process of self-assembly of one, two or more complementary nucleic acid strands, has been studied for many years. The appearance of the nearest-neighbor model led to several theoretical and experimental papers on DNA...... thermodynamics that provide reasonably accurate thermodynamic information on nucleic acid duplexes and allow estimation of the melting temperature. Because there are no thermodynamic models specifically developed to predict the hybridization temperature of a probe used in a fluorescence in situ hybridization...

  5. An experimental study on the effect of temperature and melt composition on the partitioning of nickel between olivine and silicate melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzler, R.J.; Grove, T.L.; Recca, S.I. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Experiments in the simple system CaO-MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}Na{sub 2}O-FeO were carried out to investigate the control of temperature and melt composition on the partitioning of nickel between olivine and silicate melt (D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni}). Eleven experiments determine the influence of changing forsterite (Of) content on D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni} in this simple system. The equation of Hart and Davis (1978) that accounts for the variation of D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni} in terms of MgO content of the silicate liquid is tested using experimental data from iron-bearing simple and natural systems and found to be inadequate to explain the observed variation of D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni}. Two different equations are formulated to describe the partitioning behavior of Ni between olivine and silicate melt. The first is similar to that of Hart and Davis (1978) and uses an expression for Ni-Mg exchange between olivine and silicate melt. The second uses an expression for the Ni-olivine formation reaction. The Ni-Mg exchange equation for D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni} depends on the forsterite content of the olivine and the mole fraction MgO{sup liq}, and predicts the experimentally determined values within {plus minus}13% relative average error. The Ni-olivine formation reaction equation for D{sup oliv/liq}{sub Ni} depends on temperature, mole fraction SiO{sup liq}{sub 2}, and melt compositional terms that arise from a symmetric, binary, Margules formulation of the activity coefficients for NiO{sup liq} and SiO{sup liq}{sub 2}. This equation predicts the experimentally determined values within {plus minus}9% relative average error.

  6. Experimental and numerical analysis of the temperature distribution of injection molded products using protruding microprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Jung; Ho, Chia-Wei

    2011-05-01

    Injection molding has been one of the most important polymer processing methods for manufacturing plastic parts. In the process, the temperature is an important parameter that influences process features such as cycle times, crystallization rates, degree of crystallinity, melt flow properties, and molded product qualities. This study aims to, experimentally and numerically, examine the three-dimensional temperature distribution along the melt flow path of injection molded parts. A special experimental set-up, which includes an injection mold equipped with protruding microprobes for guiding embedded thermocouples, was designed and built to measure the temperature field along the flow path, i.e., inside the runner and the cavity, of injection molded products. The experimental results suggested that the disturbance induced by the probes remained negligible and precise temperature profiles could be measured at various positions inside the cavity. A significant increase of melt temperature was found to result from the viscous dissipation of the polymeric materials in the runner. Additionally, a commercially available code was employed to simulate and predict the temperature variation in injection molded parts. It was shown that the numerical simulation predicted better the temperature distributions inside the cavity than those along the runner.

  7. High temperature (salt melt) corrosion tests with ceramic-coated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schütz, Adelheid [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Günthner, Martin; Motz, Günter [University Bayreuth, Ceramic Materials Engineering, L.-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Greißl, Oliver [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Schelmenwasenstraße 13-15, D-70567 Stuttgart (Germany); Glatzel, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.glatzel@uni-bayreuth.de [University Bayreuth, Metals and Alloys, Ludwig-Thoma-Str. 36b, D-95447 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Thermal recycling of refuse in waste-to-energy plants reduces the problems connected to waste disposal, and is an alternative source of electric energy. However, the combustion process in waste incinerators results in a fast degradation of the steam-carrying superheater steel tubes by corrosive attack and abrasive wear. Higher firing temperatures are used to increase their efficiency but lead to higher corrosion rates. It is more economical to apply protective coatings on the superheater steel tubes than to replace the base material. In-situ tests were conducted in a waste-to-energy plant first in order to identify and quantify all involved corrosive elements. Laboratory scale experiments with salt melts were developed accordingly. The unprotected low-alloyed steel displayed substantial local corrosion. Corrosion was predominant along the grain boundaries of α-ferrite. The corrosion rate was further increased by FeCl{sub 3} and a mixture of HCL and FeCl{sub 3}. Coatings based on pre-ceramic polymers with specific filler particles were engineered to protect superheater tubes. Tests proved their suitability to protect low-alloYed steel tubes from corrosive attack under conditions typical for superheaterS in waste incinerators, rendering higher firing temperatures in waste-to-energy plants possible. - Highlights: • Corrosion wall thickness losses of 400 μm/2 weeks occurred in a waste incinerator. • Abrasion is a major problem on superheater tubes in waste incinerators. • Laboratory salt melt tests can simulate metal corrosion in waste incinerators. • Corrosion protection coatings for steel (temperature: max. 530 °C) were developed. • Higher steam temperatures are possible in WIs with the developed coatings.

  8. Tensile Properties of Al-12Si Fabricated via Selective Laser Melting (SLM at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser melting (SLM are attracting increasing attention and are regarded as the manufacturing technology of the future, because of their ability to produce near net shaped components of theoretically any shape with added functionality. Various properties, including mechanical, tribological, welding, and corrosion properties, of Al-12Si alloys fabricated via SLM have been extensively studied. However, all of these studies were carried out at ambient conditions. Nevertheless, under working conditions, these alloys experience service temperatures ranging between 373 and 473 K. The present study focuses on the evaluation of the mechanical properties of SLM-fabricated Al-12Si alloys in this temperature range. For this, Al-12Si alloy specimens were annealed at 573 K, a temperature well beyond the test temperature in order to provide a stable microstructure during tensile testing. The plasticity of these materials increases along with the size of the dimples on the fracture surface with increasing tensile test temperature. Moreover, the annealed Al-12Si alloy exhibits appreciable tensile properties when tested between 373 K and 473 K. The results suggest that Al-12Si samples fabricated via SLM may be ideal candidates for automotive applications such as pistons and cylinder heads.

  9. [Flame temperature distribution measurement of solid propellants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen-hua; Zhu, Shu-guang; Li, Yan; Fang, Zhong-yan; Yang, Rong-jie; Li, Yu-ping; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Yun-fei

    2004-09-01

    Many high temperature bodies such as flame, in which chemical reactions are very complex, emit their own spectra. These emission spectra usually consist of the spectral lines, spectral bands and the continuous spectra. In some cases, the spectral lines gather together. It is very difficult to find the right single spectral line when the spectral line intensity method is used. To deal with this problem, the idea that the single spectral line intensity is replaced by the total intensity of many spectral lines to measure the temperature is mentioned. And the relative intensity method is also changed to deal with this idea. The measurement of the temperature distribution based on this improved method is successful, and the measurement results are compared with the results of the thermocouple method.

  10. Distributed strain monitoring for bridges: temperature effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Ryan; Hoult, Neil A.

    2014-03-01

    To better manage infrastructure assets as they reach the end of their service lives, quantitative data is required to better assess structural behavior and allow for more informed decision making. Distributed fiber optic strain sensors are one sensing technology that could provide comprehensive data for use in structural assessments as these systems potentially allow for strain to be measured with the same accuracy and gage lengths as conventional strain sensors. However, as with many sensor technologies, temperature can play an important role in terms of both the structure's and sensor's performance. To investigate this issue a fiber optic distributed strain sensor system was installed on a section of a two span reinforced concrete bridge on the TransCanada Highway. Strain data was acquired several times a day as well as over the course of several months to explore the effects of changing temperature on the data. The results show that the strain measurements are affected by the bridge behavior as a whole. The strain measurements due to temperature are compared to strain measurements that were taken during a load test on the bridge. The results show that even a small change in temperature can produce crack width and strain changes similar to those due to a fully loaded transport truck. Future directions for research in this area are outlined.

  11. Self-heating probe instrument and method for measuring high temperature melting volume change rate of material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwei; Wang, Zhiping; Lu, Yang; Cheng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    The castings defects are affected by the melting volume change rate of material. The change rate has an important effect on running safety of the high temperature thermal storage chamber, too. But the characteristics of existing measuring installations are complex structure, troublesome operation and low precision. In order to measure the melting volume change rate of material accurately and conveniently, a self-designed measuring instrument, self-heating probe instrument, and measuring method are described. Temperature in heating cavity is controlled by PID temperature controller; melting volume change rate υ and molten density are calculated based on the melt volume which is measured by the instrument. Positive and negative υ represent expansion and shrinkage of the sample volume after melting, respectively. Taking eutectic LiF+CaF2 for example, its melting volume change rate and melting density at 1 123 K are -20.6% and 2 651 kg·m-3 measured by this instrument, which is only 0.71% smaller than literature value. Density and melting volume change rate of industry pure aluminum at 973 K and analysis pure NaCl at 1 123 K are detected by the instrument too. The measure results are agreed with report values. Measuring error sources are analyzed and several improving measures are proposed. In theory, the measuring errors of the change rate and molten density which are measured by the self-designed instrument is nearly 1/20-1/50 of that measured by the refitted mandril thermal expansion instrument. The self-designed instrument and method have the advantages of simple structure, being easy to operate, extensive applicability for material, relatively high accuracy, and most importantly, temperature and sample vapor pressure have little effect on the measurement accuracy. The presented instrument and method solve the problems of complicated structure and procedures, and large measuring errors for the samples with high vapor pressure by existing installations.

  12. Effect of Melt Temperature on Surface Films Formed on Molten AZ91D Alloy Protected by Graphite Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihong; Zhou, Jixue; Ma, Baichang; Wang, Jinwei; Wu, Jianhua; Yang, Yuansheng

    2017-08-01

    Graphite powder was adopted to prevent AZ91D alloy from oxidizing during melting and casting. The microstructure of the resultant surface films, formed at 933 K, 973 K, 1013 K, and 1053 K (660 °C, 700 °C, 740 °C, and 780 °C) for 30 minutes, was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction, and the phase composition of the surface films was analyzed by the standard Gibbs free energy change of the reactions between the graphite powder, the alloy melt, and the ambient atmosphere. The effect and mechanism of melt temperature on the resultant surface films were also discussed. The results indicated that the surface films, of which the surface morphology comprised folds and wrinkles, were composed of a protective layer and MgF2 particles. The protective layer was contributive to the prevention of the molten alloy from oxidizing, and consisted of magnesium, oxygen, fluorine, carbon, and a small amount of aluminium existing in the form of MgO, MgF2, C, and MgAl2O4. The layer thickness was 200 to 900 nm. The melt temperature may affect the surface films through the increased interaction between the graphite powder, the melt, and the ambient atmosphere. The oxygen content and thickness of the protective layer decreased and then increased, while the height of the folds increased with melt temperature.

  13. Impact of ice melting on distribution of particulate sterols in glacial fjords of Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Marcelo H.; Riquelme, Pablo; Pantoja, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed variability in abundance and composition of sterols in waters of the fjord adjacent to glacier Jorge Montt, one of the fastest retreated glaciers in Patagonian Icefields. The study was carried out between August 2012 and November 2013 under different meltwater scenarios. Distribution of sterols in surface and bottom waters was determined by Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry. Sterol concentration ranged from 18 to 1726 ng/L in surface and bottom waters and was positive correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration. Under high melting conditions in austral summer, surface meltwaters showed high concentrations of sterols and were dominated by methylene-cholesterol, a representative sterol of centric diatoms. In the area near open ocean and in austral autumn, winter and spring in proglacial fjord, lower sterol concentrations in surface waters were accompanied by other microalgae sterols and an increase in relative abundance of plant sterols, evidencing a different source of organic matter. In autumn, when high meltwater flux was also evidenced, presence of stanols and an uncommon tri-unsaturated sterol suggests influence of meltwaters in composition of sterols in the downstream fjord. We conclude that ice melting can modify sterol composition by setting conditions for development of a singular phytoplankton population able to thrive in surface meltwater and by carrying glacier organic matter into Patagonian glacial fjords. In projected ice melting scenario, these changes in organic matter quantity and quality can potentially affect availability of organic substrates for heterotrophic activity and trophic status of glacial fjords. This research was funded by COPAS Sur-Austral (PFB-31)

  14. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, E. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu P.; Konchakov, R. A.; Vinogradov, A. Yu; Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to -1.5% near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  15. High temperature phase transition of mixed (PuO2 + ThO2) investigated by laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böhler, R.; Cakir, P.; Benes, O.; Hein, H.; Konings, R.J.M.; Manara, D.

    2014-01-01

    A laser heating approach combined with fast pyrometry in a thermal arrest method was used to provide new data for the melting/solidification phase transition in mixed (PuO2 + ThO2) at high temperature. At low concentration of ThO2 in PuO2 a minimum in the solidification temperature in the pseudo bin

  16. 3D mapping of chemical distribution from melting at lower mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Nabiei, F.; Cantoni, M.; Badro, J.; Gaal, R.; Gillet, P.

    2014-12-01

    The laser-heated diamond anvil cell is a unique tool for subjecting materials to pressures over few hundreds of GPa and temperatures of thousands of Kelvins which enables us to experimentally simulate the inaccessible interiors of planets. However, small sample size, laser profile and thermally conductive diamonds cause temperature gradients of 1000s K over a few microns which also affects chemical and structural distribution of phases in the sample. We have examined samples of San Carlos olivine (Mg,Fe)2SiO3 powder melted in the diamond anvil cell by double-sided and single-sided laser heating for 3-6 minutes to ~3000 K at 35-37 GPa. Moreover, MgO is used as an insulating media in one of the sample. Recovered samples were analyzed by a combination of focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector. Images and chemical maps were acquired for ~300 slices with ~70 nm depth from each sample, comprising about half of the heated zone. Detailed chemical and structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of lamellas prepared from the remaining section of the samples will also be presented. In all samples the heated zone included (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite-structured bridgmanite (PV) phase and two (Mg, Fe)O phases, one of which, magnesiowüstite (MW), is richer in iron than the other one, ferropericlase (FP). In double-side heated samples we observe a Fe-rich quenched melt core surrounded by MW phase. Our results show that with increasing heating time, Fe migrates to the molten center of the sample. In the single-side heated sample, the Fe-rich MW phase is concentrated in the center of heated zone. In all samples a FP crust was observed around the heated zone. This crust, however, is broken in the upper part (colder part) of the single-side heated sample due the high asymmetrical temperature gradient within the sample. The results confirm the importance of double-side heating and insulating media

  17. Extraction of temperature dependent electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity from silicon microwires self-heated to melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Adnane, Lhacene; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2012-09-01

    Temperature-dependent electrical resistivity, ρ(T), and thermal conductivity, k(T), of nanocrystalline silicon microwires self-heated to melt are extracted by matching simulated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics to experimental I-V characteristics. Electrical resistivity is extracted from highly doped p-type wires on silicon dioxide in which the heat losses are predominantly to the substrate and the self-heating depends mainly on ρ(T) of the wires. The extracted ρ(T) decreases from 11.8 mΩ cm at room-temperature to 5.2 mΩ cm at 1690 K, in reasonable agreement with the values measured up to ˜650 K. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity are extracted from suspended highly doped n-type silicon wires in which the heat losses are predominantly through the wires. In this case, measured ρ(T) (decreasing from 20.5 mΩ cm at room temperature to 12 mΩ cm at 620 K) is used to extract ρ(T) at higher temperatures (decreasing to 1 mΩ cm at 1690 K) and k(T) (decreasing from 30 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature to 20 W m-1 K-1 at 1690 K). The method is tested by using the extracted parameters to model wires with different dimensions. The experimental and simulated I-V curves for these wires show good agreement up to high voltage and temperature levels. This technique allows extraction of the electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity up to very high temperatures from self-heated microstructures.

  18. Manufacturing of a high-temperature resistojet heat exchanger by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romei, F.; Grubišić, A. N.; Gibbon, D.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the design, manufacturing and postproduction analysis of a novel high-temperature spacecraft resistojet heat exchanger manufactured through selective laser melting to validate the manufacturing approach. The work includes the analysis of critical features of a heat exchanger with integrated converging-diverging nozzle as a single piece element. The metrology of the component is investigated using optical analysis and profilometry to verify the integrity of components. High-resolution micro-Computed Tomography (CT) is applied as a tool for volumetric non-destructive inspection and conformity since the complex geometry of the thruster does not allow internal examination. The CT volume data is utilised to determine a surface mesh on which a novel perform coordinate measurement technique is applied for nominal/actual comparison and wall thickness analysis. A thin-wall concentric tubular heat exchanger design is determined to meet dimensional accuracy requirements. The work indicates the production of fine structures with feature sizes below 200 μm in 316L stainless via selective laser melting is feasible and opens up new possibilities for the future developments in multiple industries.

  19. Correlation between the band gap expansion and melting temperature depression of nanostructured semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianwei, E-mail: jwl189@163.com; Zhao, Xinsheng [Laboratory for Quantum Design of Functional Material, School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liu, Xinjuan [Center for Coordination Bond and Electronic Engineering, College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zheng, Xuejun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Yang, Xuexian [Department of Physics, Jishou University, Jishou 416000, Hunan (China); Zhu, Zhe [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2015-09-28

    The band gap and melting temperature of a semiconductor are tunable with the size and shape of the specimen at the nanometer scale, and related mechanisms remain as yet unclear. In order to understand the common origin of the size and shape effect on these two seemingly irrelevant properties, we clarify, correlate, formulate, and quantify these two properties of GaAs, GaN, InP, and InN nanocrystals from the perspectives of bond order-length-strength correlation using the core-shell configuration. The consistency in the theoretical predictions, experimental observations, and numerical calculations verify that the broken-bond-induced local bond contraction and strength gain dictates the band gap expansion, while the atomic cohesive energy loss due to bond number reduction depresses the melting point. The fraction of the under-coordinated atoms in the skin shell quantitatively determines the shape and size dependency. The atomic under-coordination in the skin down to a depth of two atomic layers inducing a change in the local chemical bond is the common physical origin.

  20. Direct Selective Laser Sintering/Melting of High Density Alumina Powder Layers at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, J.; Meyers, S.; Kruth, J. P.; Vleugels, J.

    Direct selective laser sintering (SLS) or selective laser melting (SLM) are additive manufacturing techniques that can be used to produce three-dimensional ceramic parts directly, without the need for a sacrificial binder. In this paper, a low laser energy density is applied to SLS/SLM high density powder layers of sub-micrometer alumina at elevated temperatures (up to 800̊C). In order to achieve this, a furnace was designed and built into a commercial SLS machine. This furnace was able to produce a homogeneously heated cylindrical zone with a height of 60 mm and a diameter of 32 mm. After optimizing the layer deposition and laser scanning parameters, two ceramic parts with a density up to 85% and grain sizes as low as 5 μm were successfully produced.

  1. Recent progress in the melt-process technique of high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Ikuta, H; Mizutani, U

    1999-01-01

    Recently, the performance of high-temperature super conductors prepared by the melt-process technique has been greatly improved. This progress was accomplished by the addition of Ag into the starting materials of the Sm-Ba-CuO $9 system, which prevents the formation of severe macro-sized cracks in the finished samples. The magnetic flux density trapped by this material has now reached 9 T at 25 K, which is comparable to the magnetic flux density produced by $9 ordinary superconducting magnets. The amount of magnetic flux density that can be trapped by the sample is limited by the mechanical strength rather than superconducting properties of the material. The increase in the mechanical $9 strength of the material is important both for further improvement of the material properties and for ensuring reliability of the material in practical applications. (20 refs).

  2. Solute Redistribution in Directional Melting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The solute redistribution in directional melting process is theoretically studied. Based on quantitative evaluations, uniform solute distribution in liquid and a quasi-steady solute distribution in solid are supposed. The discussion on the solute balance comes to a simple model for the solute redistribution in directional melting process. As an example, the variation of liquid composition during melting process of carbon steel is quantitatively evaluated using the model. Results show that the melting of an alloy starts at solidus temperature, but approaches the liquidus temperature after a very short transient process.

  3. Thermal performance of a heat storage module using PCM's with different melting temperature; Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, M.M. (Chemical Engineering Dept., College of Engineering, Univ. of Basrah (IQ)); Kim, Y.; Kansawa, A. (Chemical Engineering Dept., Tokyo Inst. of Technology, O-Okayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 152 (JP))

    1990-05-01

    A latent heat storage module was constructed, consisting of 45 cylindrical capsules fixed vertically in 15 rows. The capsules, made of 0.335-m long copper tubes having external diameters of 31.8 mm, were fixed in an insulated rectangular duct. Three commercial waxes having melting temperatures of 44{degrees}C, 53{degrees}C, and 64{degrees}C were selected. Each of the three sets of 15 tubes was filled with different wax. For comparison purposes, experiments were also done with a single commercial wax, having a melting temperature of 53{degrees}C, in all the tubes. During heat charge, hot air flowed across the capsules such that the melting temperature of the waxes decreased in the flow direction. Air flow direction was reversed during heat discharge. This paper reports that experimental measurements showed some improvement in the heat transfer rates during both heat charge and discharge when three types of PCM's were used.

  4. Surface temperature distribution in broiler houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Baracho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Brazilian meat production scenario broiler production is the most dynamic segment. Despite of the knowledge generated in the poultry production chain, there are still important gaps on Brazilian rearing conditions as housing is different from other countries. This research study aimed at analyzing the variation in bird skin surface as function of heat distribution inside broiler houses. A broiler house was virtually divided into nine sectors and measurements were made during the first four weeks of the grow-out in a commercial broiler farm in the region of Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil. Rearing ambient temperature and relative humidity, as well as light intensity and air velocity, were recorded in the geometric center of each virtual sector to evaluate the homogeneity of these parameters. Broiler surface temperatures were recorded using infrared thermography. Differences both in surface temperature (Ts and dry bulb temperature (DBT were significant (p<0.05 as a function of week of rearing. Ts was different between the first and fourth weeks (p<0.05 in both flocks. Results showed important variations in rearing environment parameters (temperature and relative humidity and in skin surface temperature as a function of week and house sector. Air velocity data were outside the limits in the first and third weeks in several sectors. Average light intensity values presented low variation relative to week and house sector. The obtained values were outside the recommended ranges, indicating that broilers suffered thermal distress. This study points out the need to record rearing environment data in order to provide better environmental control during broiler grow-out.

  5. Electron holography on remanent magnetization distribution of melt-spun Nd-Fe-B magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Gil; Shindo, Daisuke

    2004-01-01

    Microstructures and magnetic domain structures of melt-spun Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets were investigated in detail by analytical electron microscopy and electron holography. While the crystal orientation of matrix Nd2Fe14B grains was analyzed by nanobeam electron diffraction, precipitates of a few tens of nanometers at grain boundaries were identified to be alpha-Fe by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The detailed magnetization distribution in Nd2Fe14B grains and at their boundaries was visualized by electron holography. Ex situ experimentation with an electromagnet revealed that the domain walls in the demagnetized state and remanent states were pinned at grain boundaries, and Fe precipitates at the grain boundary were situated at the center of the closure domain.

  6. Distribution and temperatures in odontology acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ricardo; Creus, Mariano; Gallego Lluesma, Eliseo

    2000-03-01

    Acupuncture has been recognized by W.H.O. in 1989. It admits this therapy and accepts more than forty point on the external ear. After making thermograms to Odontology patients treated with acupuncture, we were able to compare the temperature distribution maps and we found that they were quasi repetitive in the same zones on several patients for a specific illness. We made this technique available to different patients that lack good irrigation on face and neck with the aim to establish patterns.

  7. High pressure and temperature structure of liquid and solid Cd: implications for the melting curve of Cd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, S. V.; Geballe, Z. M.; Godwal, B. K.; Kalkan, B.; Williams, Q.; Jeanloz, R.

    2014-12-01

    The structure of cadmium was characterized in both the solid and liquid forms at pressures to 10 GPa using in situ x-ray diffraction measurements in a resistively heated diamond anvil cell. The distorted hexagonal structure of solid cadmium persists at high pressures and temperatures, with anomalously large c/a ratio of Cd becoming larger as the melting curve is approached. The measured structure factor S(Q) for the melt reveals that the cadmium atoms are spaced about 0.6 Angstroms apart. The melt structure remains notably constant with increasing pressure, with the first peak in the structure factor remaining mildly asymmetric, in accord with the persistence of an anisotropic bonding environment within the liquid. Evolution of powder diffraction patterns up to the temperature of melting revealed the stability of the ambient-pressure hcp structure up to a pressure of 10 GPa. The melting curve has a positive Clausius-Clapeyron slope, and its slope is in good agreement with data from other techniques. We find deviations in the melting curve from Lindemann law type behavior for pressures above 1 GPa.

  8. Influence of temperature and chemical composition on phase transformations of selected oxide melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dobrovská

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with structural changes of solid phase of selected oxide systems during their transition into liquid state. Analyses concerned poly-component systems forming basis of casting powders for CCM mould. Industrially used oxide system with prevailing contents of CaO–Al2O3–SiO2 components and with numerous accompanying admixtures was tested. Investigation was focused on temperatures, during which individual phases disappear and precipitate, as well as on influence of CaO content on phase composition at selected temperatures. The experiments were realised with use of original methodology consisting of shock cooling of the tested melt in liquid nitrogen. Thus obtained samples were further investigated by X-ray diffraction phase analyses at ambient temperatures. The obtained results provide additional data on physical-chemical properties of oxide systems, such as surface tension, viscosity, sintering intervals, etc., which can be used in technological practice for appropriate lubrication effect of casting powders in the mould.

  9. Martian low-temperature alteration materials in shock-melt pockets in Tissint: Constraints on their preservation in shergottite meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchka, C. R.; Herd, C. D. K.; Walton, E. L.; Guan, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2017-08-01

    We apply an array of in situ analytical techniques, including electron and Raman microscopy, electron and ion probe microanalysis, and laser ablation mass spectrometry to the Tissint martian meteorite in order to find and elucidate a geochemical signature characteristic of low-temperature alteration at or near the martian surface. Tissint contains abundant shock-produced quench-crystallized melt pockets containing water in concentrations ranging from 73 to 1730 ppm; water content is positively correlated with Cl content. The isotopic composition of hydrogen in the shock-produced glass ranges from δD = 2559 to 4422‰. Water is derived from two distinct hydrogen reservoirs: the martian near-surface (>500‰) and the martian mantle (-100‰). In one shock melt pocket comprising texturally homogeneous vesiculated glass, the concentration of H in the shock melt decreases while simultaneously becoming enriched in D, attributable to the preferential loss of H over D to the vesicle while the pocket was still molten. While igneous sulfides are pyrrhotite in composition (Fe0.88-0.90S), the iron to sulfur ratios of spherules in shock melt pockets are elevated, up to Fe1.70S, which we attribute to shock-oxidation of igneous pyrrhotite and the formation of hematite at high temperature. The D- and Cl-enrichment, and higher oxidation of the pockets (as indicated by hematite) support a scenario in which alteration products formed within fractures or void spaces within the rock; the signature of these alteration products is preserved within shock melt (now glass) which formed upon collapse of these fractures and voids during impact shock. Thermal modeling of Tissint shock melt pockets using the HEAT program demonstrates that the shock melt pockets with the greatest potential to preserve a signature of aqueous alteration are small, isolated from other regions of shock melt, vesicle-free, and glassy.

  10. Analysis of Temperature Distributions in Nighttime Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telyak, Oksana; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Barodka, Siarhei

    2015-04-01

    Adequate prediction of temperature inversion in the atmospheric boundary layer is one of prerequisites for successful forecasting of meteorological parameters and severe weather events. Examples include surface air temperature and precipitation forecasting as well as prediction of fog, frosts and smog with hazardous levels of atmospheric pollution. At the same time, reliable forecasting of temperature inversions remains an unsolved problem. For prediction of nighttime inversions over some specific territory, it is important to study characteristic features of local circulation cells formation and to properly take local factors into account to develop custom modeling techniques for operational use. The present study aims to investigate and analyze vertical temperature distributions in tropospheric inversions (isotherms) over the territory of Belarus. We study several specific cases of formation, evolution and decay of deep nighttime temperature inversions in Belarus by means of mesoscale numerical simulations with WRF model, considering basic mechanisms of isothermal and inverse temperature layers formation in the troposphere and impact of these layers on local circulation cells. Our primary goal is to assess the feasibility of advance prediction of inversions formation with WRF. Modeling results reveal that all cases under consideration have characteristic features of radiative inversions (e.g., their formation times, development phases, inversion intensities, etc). Regions of "blocking" layers formation are extensive and often spread over the entire territory of Belarus. Inversions decay starts from the lowermost (near surface) layer (altitudes of 5 to 50 m). In all cases, one can observe formation of temperature gradients that substantially differ from the basic inversion gradient, i.e. the layer splits into smaller layers, each having a different temperature stratification (isothermal, adiabatic, etc). As opposed to various empirical techniques as well as

  11. Study of Temperature Distribution Along an Artificially Polluted Insulator String

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Insulator becomes wet partially or completely, and the pollution layer on it becomes conductive, when collecting pollutants for an extended period during dew, light rain, mist, fog or snow melting. Heavy rain is a complicated factor that it may wash away the pollution layer without initiating other stages of breakdown or it may bridge the gaps between sheds to promote flashover.The insulator with a conducting pollution layer being energized, can cause a surface leakage current to flow (also temperature-rise). As the surface conductivity is non-uniform, the conducting pollution layer becomes broken by dry bands (at spots of high current density), interrupting the flow of leakage current. Voltage across insulator gets concentrated across dry bands, and causes high electric stress and breakdown (dry band arcing). If the resistance of the insulator surface is sufficiently low, the dry band arcs can be propagated to bridge the terminals causing flashover.The present paper concerns the evaluation of the temperature distribution along the surface of an energized artificially polluted insulator string.

  12. Frequency and distribution of winter melt events from passive microwave satellite data in the pan-Arctic, 1988-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Toose, Peter; Brown, Ross; Derksen, Chris

    2016-11-01

    This study presents an algorithm for detecting winter melt events in seasonal snow cover based on temporal variations in the brightness temperature difference between 19 and 37 GHz from satellite passive microwave measurements. An advantage of the passive microwave approach is that it is based on the physical presence of liquid water in the snowpack, which may not be the case with melt events inferred from surface air temperature data. The algorithm is validated using in situ observations from weather stations, snow pit measurements, and a surface-based passive microwave radiometer. The validation results indicate the algorithm has a high success rate for melt durations lasting multiple hours/days and where the melt event is preceded by warm air temperatures. The algorithm does not reliably identify short-duration events or events that occur immediately after or before periods with extremely cold air temperatures due to the thermal inertia of the snowpack and/or overpass and resolution limitations of the satellite data. The results of running the algorithm over the pan-Arctic region (north of 50° N) for the 1988-2013 period show that winter melt events are relatively rare, totaling less than 1 week per winter over most areas, with higher numbers of melt days (around two weeks per winter) occurring in more temperate regions of the Arctic (e.g., central Québec and Labrador, southern Alaska and Scandinavia). The observed spatial pattern is similar to winter melt events inferred with surface air temperatures from the ERA-Interim (ERA-I) and Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis datasets. There was little evidence of trends in winter melt event frequency over 1988-2013 with the exception of negative trends over northern Europe attributed to a shortening of the duration of the winter period. The frequency of winter melt events is shown to be strongly correlated to the duration of winter period. This must be taken into

  13. Influence of Controlled Cooling in Bimodal Scaffold Fabrication Using Polymers with Different Melting Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Padilla, Hernan; Mendoza-Buenrostro, Christian; Cardenas, Diego; Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Rodriguez, Ciro A

    2017-06-11

    The combination of different materials and capabilities to manufacture at several scales open new possibilities in scaffold design for bone regeneration. This work is focused on bimodal scaffolds that combine polylactic acid (PLA) melt extruded strands with polycaprolactone (PCL) electrospun fibers. This type of bimodal scaffold offers better mechanical properties, compared to the use of PCL for the extruded strands, and provides potential a means for controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery through the electrospun fibers. The technologies of fused deposition modeling (FDM) and electrospinning were combined to create 3D bimodal constructs. The system uses a controlled cooling system allowing the combination of polymers with different melting temperatures to generate integrated scaffold architecture. The thermoplastic polymers used in the FDM process enhance the mechanical properties of the bimodal scaffold and control the pore structure. Integrated layers of electrospun microfibers induce an increase of the surface area for cell culture purposes, as well as potential in situ controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery. The proposed bimodal scaffolds (PLA extruded strands and PCL electrospun fibers) show appropriate morphology and better mechanical properties when compared to the use of PCL extruded strands. On average, bimodal scaffolds with overall dimensions of 30 × 30 × 2.4 mm³ (strand diameter of 0.5 mm, strand stepover of 2.5 mm, pore size of 2 mm, and layer height of 0.3 mm) showed scaffold stiffness of 23.73 MPa and compression strength of 3.85 MPa. A cytotoxicity assay based human fibroblasts showed viability of the scaffold materials.

  14. Influence of Controlled Cooling in Bimodal Scaffold Fabrication Using Polymers with Different Melting Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Lara-Padilla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of different materials and capabilities to manufacture at several scales open new possibilities in scaffold design for bone regeneration. This work is focused on bimodal scaffolds that combine polylactic acid (PLA melt extruded strands with polycaprolactone (PCL electrospun fibers. This type of bimodal scaffold offers better mechanical properties, compared to the use of PCL for the extruded strands, and provides potential a means for controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery through the electrospun fibers. The technologies of fused deposition modeling (FDM and electrospinning were combined to create 3D bimodal constructs. The system uses a controlled cooling system allowing the combination of polymers with different melting temperatures to generate integrated scaffold architecture. The thermoplastic polymers used in the FDM process enhance the mechanical properties of the bimodal scaffold and control the pore structure. Integrated layers of electrospun microfibers induce an increase of the surface area for cell culture purposes, as well as potential in situ controlled drug and/or growth factor delivery. The proposed bimodal scaffolds (PLA extruded strands and PCL electrospun fibers show appropriate morphology and better mechanical properties when compared to the use of PCL extruded strands. On average, bimodal scaffolds with overall dimensions of 30 × 30 × 2.4 mm3 (strand diameter of 0.5 mm, strand stepover of 2.5 mm, pore size of 2 mm, and layer height of 0.3 mm showed scaffold stiffness of 23.73 MPa and compression strength of 3.85 MPa. A cytotoxicity assay based human fibroblasts showed viability of the scaffold materials.

  15. Prospects and challenges of iron pyroelectrolysis in magnesium aluminosilicate melts near minimum liquidus temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, N M; Kovalevsky, A V; Mikhalev, S M; Costa, F M; Frade, J R

    2015-04-14

    Although steel production by molten oxide electrolysis offers potential economic and environmental advantages over classic extractive metallurgy, its feasibility is far from being convincingly demonstrated, mainly due to inherent experimental difficulties exerted by harsh conditions and lack of knowledge regarding relevant mechanisms and physico-chemical processes in the melts. The present work was intended to demonstrate the concept of pyroelectrolysis at very high temperature near the minimum liquidus point of magnesium aluminosilicate, being conducted under electron-blocking conditions using yttria-stabilized zirconia cells, and to provide a new insight into electrochemistry behind this process. Significant current yields are possible for pyroelectrolysis performed in electron-blocking mode using a solid electrolyte membrane to separate the anode and the molten electrolyte. Parasitic electrochemical processes rise gradually as the concentration of iron oxide dissolved in the molten electrolytes is depleted, impairing faradaic efficiency. Reduction of silica to metallic silicon was identified as a significant contribution to those parasitic currents, among other plausible processes. Direct pyroelectrolysis without electron blocking was found much less plausible, due to major limitations on faradaic efficiency imposed by electronic leakage and insufficient ionic conductivity of the aluminosilicate melt. Ohmic losses may consume an excessive fraction of the applied voltage, thus failing to sustain the Nernst potential required for reduction to metallic iron. The results suggest the need for further optimization of the molten electrolyte composition to promote ionic conductivity and to suppress electronic transport contribution, possibly, by tuning the Al/Si ratio and altering the network-forming/modifying behaviour of the iron cations.

  16. Mathematical modeling of the temperature distribution under the cathode spot of the vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V. G.; Babushkina, E. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a solution to the problem of the temperature distribution under the cathode spot of taking into account melting and spare deposits of metal, brought to boiling temperature on the surface of the cathode spot. The process of heat transfer in the metal is described by the unsteady three dimensional heat conduction equation in Cartesian coordinate system. Similarly, we present a solution to the problem of the temperature distribution in the presence of the pores in the surface layer of the metal. To solve this task we used a numerical method to finite differences and variable directions. We present the calculated data on the distribution of temperature under the cathode spot for different values of spot diameters and speeds its movement.

  17. Analysis of Contact Melting Driven by Surface Heat Flux Around a Cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Zhao; W.Z. Chen; F.R. Sun; Z.Y. Chen

    2008-01-01

    The contact melting of phase change material around a moving horizontal cylindrical heat source, which descended under its own weight, is investigated in this article. A melting model under constant surface heat flux is established. The analytical results for thickness and pressure distributions inside melt layer and steady melting velocity are obtained by using contact melting theory. The melting law is discussed, and compared with that of contact melting driven by temperature difference. It is found that quasi-steady melting velocity is determined by heat flux of heat source, and the variation of heat source density has less effect on melting velocity.

  18. Testing recent charge-on-spring type polarizable water models. I. Melting temperature and ice properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Bertsyk, Péter; Baranyai, András

    2012-11-01

    We determined the freezing point of eight molecular models of water. All models use the charge-on-spring (COS) method to express polarization. The studied models were the COS/G2, COS/G3 [H. Yu and W. F. van Gunsteren, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 9549 (2004), 10.1063/1.1805516], the COS/B2 [H. Yu, T. Hansson, and W. F. van Gunsteren, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 221 (2003), 10.1063/1.1523915], the SWM4-DP [G. Lamoureux, A. D. MacKerell, Jr., and B. Roux, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5185 (2003), 10.1063/1.1598191], the SWM4-NDP [G. Lamoureux, E. Harder, I. V. Vorobyov, B. Roux, and A. D. MacKerell, Jr., Chem. Phys. Lett. 418, 245 (2006), 10.1016/j.cplett.2005.10.135], and three versions of our model, the BKd1, BKd2, and BKd3. The BKd1 is the original Gaussian model [P. T. Kiss, M. Darvas, A. Baranyai, and P. Jedlovszky, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114706 (2012), 10.1063/1.3692602] with constant polarization and with a simple exponential repulsion. The BKd2 applies field-dependent polarizability [A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 234110 (2011), 10.1063/1.3670962], while the BKd3 model has variable size to approximate the temperature-density (T-ρ) curve of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 084506 (2012), 10.1063/1.4746419]. We used the thermodynamic integration (TI) and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation to determine the equality of the free energy for liquid water and hexagonal ice (Ih) at 1 bar. We used the TIP4P and the SPC/E models as reference systems of the TI. The studied models severely underestimate the experimental melting point of ice Ih. The calculated freezing points of the models are the following: COS/G2, 215 K; COS/G3, 149 K; SWM4-DP, 186 K; BKd1, 207 K; BKd2, 213 K; BKd3, 233 K. The freezing temperature of the SWM4-NDP system is certainly below 120 K. It might even be that the water phase is more stable than the ice Ih at 1 bar in the full temperature range. The COS/B2 model melts below 100 K. The best result was obtained for the BKd3 model which

  19. Distributed Temperature Sensing in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Giesen, Nicolaas; Selker, John; Sayde, Chadi; Thomas, Christoph K.; Higgins, Chad; Schilperoort, Bart; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Luxemburg, Wim; Hilgersom, Koen; van Emmerik, Tim; Solcerova, Anna; Berghuijs, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Over the past ten years, Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) has been applied for monitoring many different environmental processes, from groundwater movement, to seepage into streams and canals, to soil moisture, and internal waves in lakes. DTS uses optical fibres, along which temperatures are determined by measuring Raman shifts in light that scatters back after a laser pulse has been sent into the fiber. Over the past decade, performance of DTS equipment has dramatically improved. It is now possible to determine fiber temperatures with 0.05 K accuracy, for each 25 cm along a fiber optic cable. With typical spatial resolutions of 1 m, cable lengths can run up to 5 km. Accuracy improves with integration over longer sampling intervals, but measurements over 60 s can give 0.1 K accuracy with proper in-field calibration. DTS can also be used for atmospheric properties such as air temperature, vapor pressure, and wind speed. This presentation provides a complete overview of recent advances in atmospheric DTS observations. Air temperature is the simplest, as one simply has to suspend a fiber optic cable along the profile of interest. This can be from a balloon or along poles. Care has to be taken to correct for radiative heating of the cable. Using a thin white cable minimalizes radiative effects and normally brings the measured temperature to within 1 K of actual air temperature, sufficient for studies on effects of shading in natural and urban landscapes. It is also possible to correct for radiative heating by modeling in some detail the cable's thermal behavior or by using two cables of different diameters. Supporting structures may also have an effect on cable temperatures, which should be minimized or corrected for. Water vapor can be measured by comparing the temperatures of wet and dry cables. These wet and dry bulb temperatures allow derivation of humidity profiles, which, in turn, allows for Bowen-ratio type of calculations of latent and sensible heat

  20. The melting temperature of liquid water with the effective fragment potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brorsen, Kurt R.; Willow, Soohaeng Y.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-09-17

    Direct simulation of the solid-liquid water interface with the effective fragment potential (EFP) via the constant enthalpy and pressure (NPH) ensemble was used to estimate the melting temperature (Tm) of ice-Ih. Initial configurations and velocities, taken from equilibrated constant pressure and temperature (NPT) simulations at T = 300 K, 350 K and 400 K, respectively, yielded corresponding Tm values of 378±16 K, 382±14 K and 384±15 K. These estimates are consistently higher than experiment, albeit to the same degree with previously reported estimates using density functional theory (DFT)-based Born-Oppenheimer simulations with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional plus dispersion corrections (BLYP-D). KRB was supported by a Computational Science Graduate Fellowship from the Department of Energy. MSG was supported by a U.S. National Science Foundation Software Infrastructure (SI2) grant (ACI – 1047772). SSX acknowledges support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  1. Two-temperature relaxation and melting after absorption of femtosecond laser pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Inogamov, N A; Ashitkov, S I; Khokhlov, V A; Petrov, Yu V; Komarov, P S; Agranat, M B; Anisimov, S I; Nishihara, K

    2008-01-01

    The theory and experiments concerned with the electron-ion thermal relaxation and melting of overheated crystal lattice constitute the subject of this paper. The physical model includes two-temperature equation of state, many-body interatomic potential, the electron-ion energy exchange, electron thermal conductivity, and optical properties of solid, liquid, and two phase solid-liquid mixture. Two-temperature hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics codes are used. An experimental setup with pump-probe technique is used to follow evolution of an irradiated target with a short time step 100 fs between the probe femtosecond laser pulses. Accuracy of measurements of reflection coefficient and phase of reflected probe light are ~1% and $\\sim 1\\un{nm}$, respectively. It is found that, {\\it firstly}, the electron-electron collisions make a minor contribution to a light absorbtion in solid Al at moderate intensities; {\\it secondly}, the phase shift of a reflected probe results from heating of ion subsystem and kinetics o...

  2. Spray forming: A numerical investigation of the influence of the gas to melt ratio on the billet surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Hattel, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the Gas to Melt Ratio (GMR) and the surface temperature of an evolving billet surface in spray forming is investigated numerically. The basis for the analysis is an integrated approach for modelling the entire spray forming process. This model includes the droplet atomisa...

  3. Rheology Guided Rational Selection of Processing Temperature To Prepare Copovidone-Nifedipine Amorphous Solid Dispersions via Hot Melt Extrusion (HME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengyuan; Su, Yongchao; Zhang, Jingtao; DiNunzio, James; Leone, Anthony; Huang, Chengbin; Brown, Chad D

    2016-10-03

    The production of amorphous solid dispersions via hot melt extrusion (HME) relies on elevated temperature and prolonged residence time, which can result in potential degradation and decomposition of thermally sensitive components. Herein, the rheological properties of a physical mixture of polymer and an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) were utilized to guide the selection of appropriate HME processing temperature. In the currently studied copovidone-nifedipine system, a critical temperature, which is substantially lower (∼13 °C) than the melting point of crystalline API, was captured during a temperature ramp examination and regarded as the critical point at which the API could molecularly dissolve into the polymer. Based on the identification of this critical point, various solid dispersions were prepared by HME processing below, at, and above the critical temperature (both below and above the melting temperature (Tm) of crystalline API). In addition, the resultant extrudates along with two control solid dispersions prepared by physical mixing and cryogenic milling were assessed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, hot stage microscopy, rheology, and solid-state NMR. Physicochemical properties of resultant solid dispersions indicated that the identified critical temperature is sufficient for the polymer-API system to reach a molecular-level mixing, manifested by the transparent and smooth appearance of extrudates, the absence of API crystalline diffraction and melting peaks, dramatically decreased rheological properties, and significantly improved polymer-API miscibility. Once the critical temperature has been achieved, further raising the processing temperature only results in limited improvement of API dispersion, reflected by slightly reduced storage modulus and complex viscosity and limited improvement in miscibility.

  4. New investigation of distribution imaging and content uniformity of very low dose drugs using hot-melt extrusion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Bom; Kang, Chin-Yang; Kang, Wie-Soo; Choi, Han-Gon; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-12-31

    The content uniformity of low dose drugs in dosage forms is very important for quality assurance. The aim of this study was to prepare uniformly and homogeneously distributed dosage forms of very low-dose drugs using twin screw hot-melt extrusion (HME) and to investigate the distribution of drugs using instrumental analyses. For the feasibility of HME method, a very low amount of coumarin-6, a fluorescent dye, was used to visualize distribution images using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Limaprost, tamsulosin and glimepiride were then used as low-dose model drugs to study the applicability of HME for content uniformity and distribution behaviors. Hydrophilic thermosensitive polymers with low melting point, such as Poloxamer188 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000, were chosen as carriers. The melt extrusion was carried out around 50°C, at which both carriers were easily dissolved but model drugs remained in solid form. The physicochemical properties of the hot-melt extrudates, including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), were measured. Content uniformity of the drugs was also checked by HPLC. CLSM imaging showed that model drugs were well distributed throughout the hot-melt extrudate, giving better content uniformity with low batch-to-batch variations compared with simple physical mixtures. DSC, PXRD and FT-IR data showed that there was no interaction or interference between model drugs and thermosensitive polymers. The current HME methods could be used to prepare uniformly distributed and reproducible solid dosage forms containing very low dose drugs for further pharmaceutical applications.

  5. Structural investigation of room-temperature ionic liquids and high-temperature ionic melts using triplet correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabal, Debdas; Gupta, Aditya; Kashyap, Hemant K.

    2017-03-01

    We use means of molecular dynamics simulation to understand the local structural arrangements in three trihexyltetradecylphosphonium (P6,6,6 ,14 +) based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) by using triplet correlation functions (TCFs) along with pair correlation functions (PCFs) and X-ray scattering structure functions (S(q)s). The anions in these RTILs are either spherically symmetric but with different effective sizes (bromide (Br-) and tetrafluoroborate (BF4-)) or angular such as dicyanamide (DCA-). The simulated PCFs, S(q)s, and TCFs of the three RTILs have been compared with three high-temperature ionic melts (HTIMs); NaBr, NaCl, and NaF. In general, the pair correlation function gives angle-averaged probability as a function of inter-particle distance whereas the TCFs associated with equilateral and isosceles triangle configurations can be used to delineate angle-resolved information of liquids structure within nearest solvation shells. For the three ionic liquids studied, a very careful examination of co-ionic and counter-ionic TCFs associated with the equilateral triangular configuration within the nearest solvation shells of the ions reveals that co-ions (cat-cat-cat and an-an-an) favor close-packed local arrangement, but with lower probability for the DCA- RTIL. Co-ionic and counter-ionic TCFs obtained for HTIMs are found to be similar to that of RTILs with spherical anions. The TCFs associated with the isosceles triangle configuration signify that the ionic liquid with Br- anions tends to exhibit larger anion-cation-anion angle than that in the other two RTILs. Moreover, diffused counter-ionic angular correlations are observed in the DCA- system. We also observed angle-dependent charge ordering in all the three RTILs although its extent is enhanced for RTILs with spherical anions, very similar to what we find for NaBr, NaCl, and NaF melts. This study suggests that the presence of charge ordering is a generic feature of both the RTILs and HTIMs.

  6. Homogeneous bubble nucleation in H2O- and H2O-CO2-bearing basaltic melts: Results of high temperature decompression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Nolwenn; Pichavant, Michel

    2016-11-01

    High pressure and temperature decompression experiments were conducted to provide experimental information on the conditions of homogeneous bubble nucleation in basaltic melts. Experiments were performed on H2O- and H2O-CO2-bearing natural melts from Stromboli. Three starting volatile compositions were investigated: series #1 (4.91 wt% H2O, no CO2), series #2 (2.37-2.45 wt% H2O, 901-1011 ppm CO2) and series #3 (0.80-1.09 wt% H2O, 840-923 ppm CO2). The volatile-bearing glasses were first synthesized at 1200 °C and 200 MPa, and second continuously decompressed in the pressure range 150-25 MPa and rapidly quenched. A fast decompression rate of 78 kPa/s (or 3 m/s) was applied to limit the water loss from the glass cylinder and the formation of a H2O-depleted rim. Post-decompression glasses were characterized texturally by X-ray microtomography. The results demonstrate that homogenous bubble nucleation requires supersaturation pressures (difference between saturation pressure and pressure at which homogeneous bubble nucleation is observed, ∆ PHoN) ≤ 50-100 MPa. ∆ PHoN varies with the dissolved CO2 concentration, from ≪ 50 MPa (no CO2, series #1) to ≤ 50 MPa (872 ± 45 ppm CO2, series #3) to < 100 MPa (973 ± 63 ppm CO2, series #2). In series #1 melts, homogeneous bubble nucleation occurs as two distinct events, the first at high pressure (200 < P < 150 MPa) and the second at low pressure (50 < P < 25 MPa), just below the fragmentation level. In contrast, homogenous nucleation in series #2 and #3 melts is a continuous process. As well, chemical near-equilibrium degassing occurs in the series #1 melts, unlike in the series #2 and #3 melts which retain high CO2 concentrations even for higher vesicularities (up to 23% at 25 MPa). Thus, our experimental observations underline a significant effect of CO2 on the physical mechanisms of bubble vesiculation in basaltic melts. Our experimental decompression textures either reproduce or approach the characteristics of

  7. Photometric analysis of the structure evolution on the Pb-19.4%Sn melt surface in the S-L temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyakhovitskii M.M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution of alloys in solidification range is considered as the first-order phase transformation from the solid state to the liquid one, which occurs by the mechanism of nucleation and growth of more symmetrical phase to less symmetrical crystalline phase. The kinetic regularities of this transformation are studied by the method of the photometric analysis of structure images (PHASI, which makes it possible to establish the temperature dependence of the relationship between the solid and liquid phases and their distribution on the melt surface. The PHASI method is based on the combined analysis of the brightness spectra of the visible light reflections from the sample surface and of the distribution of its scattering centers in different intensity intervals. The data on the structure evolution of the Sn+19.4%Pb alloy upon melting and solidification were considered in parallel with the measured spectra of sound signals. It was revealed that a distinct maximum is observed in the temperature dependence of radiation energy in the temperature range of phase transformation from the liquid into the solid state and hot crack formation occurs near the transition zone in the region of the contact of the ingot with the crucible.

  8. Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Ames

    2011-06-15

    The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

  9. Aluminosilicate melts and glasses at 1 to 3 GPa: Temperature and pressure effects on recovered structural and density changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, S; Stebbins, Jonathan; Hankins, William B.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    In the pressure range in the Earth’s mantle where many basaltic magmas are generated (1 to 3 GPa) (Stolper et al. 1981), increases in the coordination numbers of the network-forming cations in aluminosilicate melts have generally been considered to be minor, although effects on silicon and particularly on aluminum coordination in non-bridging oxygen-rich glasses from the higher, 5 to 12 GPa range, are now well known. Most high-precision measurements of network cation coordination in such samples have been made by spectroscopy (notably 27Al and 29Si NMR) on glasses quenched from high-temperature, high-pressure melts synthesized in solid-media apparatuses and decompressed to room temperature and 1 bar pressure. There are several effects that could lead to the underestimation of the extent of actual structural (and density) changes in high-pressure/temperature melts from such data. For non-bridging oxygen-rich sodium and calcium aluminosilicate compositions in the 1 to 3 GPa range, we show here that glasses annealed near to their glass transition temperatures systematically record higher recovered increases in aluminum coordination and in density than samples quenched from high-temperature melts. In the piston-cylinder apparatus used, rates of cooling through the glass transition are measured as very similar for both higher and lower initial temperatures, indicating that fictive temperature effects are not the likely explanation of these differences. Instead, transient decreases in melt pressure during thermal quenching, which may be especially large for high initial run temperatures, of as much as 0.5 to 1 GPa, may be responsible. As a result, the equilibrium proportion of high-coordinated Al in this pressure range may be 50 to 90% greater than previously estimated, reaching mean coordination numbers (e.g., 4.5) that are probably high enough to significantly affect melt properties. New data on jadeite (NaAlSi2O6) glass confirm that aluminum coordination increase

  10. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the melting temperature on bubble size and bubble formation in an iron bearing calcium aluminosilicate melt is studied by means of in-depth images acquired by optical microscopy. The bubble size distribution and the total bubble volume are determined by counting the number of bubble...

  11. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the melting temperature on bubble size and bubble formation in an iron bearing calcium aluminosilicate melt is studied by means of in-depth images acquired by optical microscopy. The bubble size distribution and the total bubble volume are determined by counting the number of bubbles...

  12. Use of high-resolution melting and melting temperature-shift assays for specific detection and identification of Bacillus anthracis based on single nucleotide discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzelle, Sylviane; Mendy, Christiane; Laroche, Séverine; Madani, Nora

    2011-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are important diagnostic markers for the detection and differentiation of Bacillus anthracis. High-Resolution Melting (HRM) and Melting Temperature (Tm)-shift methods are two approaches that enable SNP detection without the need for expensive labeled probes. We evaluated the potential diagnostic capability of those methods to discriminate B. anthracis from the other members of the B. cereus group. Two assays targeting B. anthracis-specific SNPs in the plcR and gyrA genes were designed for each method and used to genotype a panel of 155 Bacilli strains. All B. anthracis isolates (n=65) were correctly and unambiguously identified. Assays also proved to be appropriate for the direct genotyping of biological samples. They could reliably detect B. anthracis in contaminated organs containing as little as 10(3)CFU/ml, corresponding to a few genome equivalents per reaction. The HRM and Tm-shift applications described here represent valuable tools for specific identification of B. anthracis at reduced cost.

  13. Dissolution kinetics for alumina in cryolite melts. Distribution of alumina in the electrolyte of industrial aluminium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobbeltvedt, Ove

    1997-12-31

    This thesis contributes to the understanding of which factors determine the rate of dissolution of alumina added to the bath in alumina reduction cells. Knowing this may help reduce the occurrences of operation interruptions and thus make it possible to produce aluminium using less energy. When alumina powder was added to a stirred cryolite melt, the alumina dissolved in two distinct main stages. In the first stage, the dissolution rate was very high, which reflects dissolution of single alumina grains that are being dispersed in the bath upon addition. In the second stage, lumps of alumina infiltrated with bath dissolved at a rate considerably slower than that of the first stage. The formation of these alumina agglomerates is the most important contributor to slow dissolution. The parameters varied in the experiments were convection, batch size, and temperature of the bath and of the added alumina. Increased gas stirring of the bath speeded up dissolution in both stages but the size of the batch was of little significance. Increasing the bath temperature had no effect in the first stage but speeded up dissolution considerably in the second stage. Compared to adding alumina at room temperature, preheating it to a high temperature (600 {sup o}C) increased the dissolution rate in the first stage while preheating to lower temperatures (100-300 {sup o}C) decreased the dissolution rate. In the second stage, preheating slowed the dissolution. The two latter phenomena of reduced dissolution rates are ascribed to the removal of moisture from the alumina upon preheating. The bath flow and the distribution of alumina in the bath were measured in four different types of cells. It was found that if a certain asymmetry of the magnetic field traverse to the cell was present, due to the presence of risers, then loops of high velocity bath flow occurred near the short ends of the cell. Thus, alumina added near the short ends is effectively transferred away from the feeding

  14. A preliminary view on adsorption of organics on ice at temperatures close to melting point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Orlando, Fabrizio; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    -level spectroscopies to reveal the behaviour of adsorption and dissociation on ice. Additionally, pure ice and amine doped ice will be compared for their surface structure change at different temperatures, which will indicate the differences of surface disordering caused by different factors. For instance, we will have a chance to know better if impurities will cause local disordering, i.e. forming hydration shell, which challenges the traditional picture of a homogenous disordered doped ice surface. The findings of this study could not only improve our understanding of how acidic organics adsorb to ice, and of their chemical properties on ice, but also have potentials to know better the behaviour of pure ice at temperatures approaching to the melting point.

  15. Experimentally-determined carbon isotope fractionation in and between methane-bearing melt and fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of melts and fluids is at the core of understanding formation and evolution of the Earth. To advance our understanding of their role, high-pressure/-temperature experiments were employed to determine melt and fluid structure together with carbon isotope partitioning within and between (CH4 +H2O +H2)-saturated aluminosilicate melts and (CH4 +H2O +H2)-fluids. The samples were characterized with vibrational spectroscopy while at temperatures and pressures from 475° to 850 °C and 92 to 1158 MPa, respectively. The solution equilibrium is 2CH4 +Qn = 2 CH3- +H2O +Q n + 1 where the superscript, n, in the Qn-notation describes silicate species where n denotes the number of bridging oxygen. The solution equilibrium affects the carbon isotope fractionation factor between melt and fluid, αmelt/fluid. Moreover, it is significantly temperature-dependent. The αmelt/fluid < 1 with temperatures less than about 1050 °C, and is greater than 1 at higher temperature. Methane-bearing melts can exist in the upper mantle at fO2 ≤fO2 (MW) (Mysen et al., 2011). Reduced (Csbnd H)-species in present-day upper mantle magma, therefore, are likely. During melting and crystallization in this environment, the δ13C of melts increases with temperature at a rate of ∼ 0.6 ‰ /°C. From the simple-system data presented here, at T ≤ 1050°C, melt in equilibrium with a peridotite-(CH4 +H2O +H2)-bearing mantle source will be isotopically lighter than fluid. At higher temperatures, melts will be isotopically heavier. Degassing at T ≤ 1050°C will shift δ13C of degassed magma to more positive values, whereas degassing at T ≥ 1050°C, will reduce the δ13C of the degassed magma.

  16. Simulation of water temperature distribution in Fenhe Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-fang FAN; Min-quan FENG; Zhao LIU

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate the need of controlling the temperature of water discharged from the Fenhe Reservoir, the reservoir water temperature distribution was examined. A three-dimensional mathematical model was used to simulate the in-plane and vertical distribution of water temperature. The parameters of the model were calibrated with field data of the temperature distribution in the Fenhe Reservoir. The simulated temperature of discharged water is consistent with the measured data. The difference in temperature between the discharged water and the natural river channel is less than 3℃ under the current operating conditions. This will not significantly impact the environment of downstream areas.

  17. Simulation of water temperature distribution in Fenhe Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-fang FAN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In order to evaluate the need of controlling the temperature of water discharged from the Fenhe Reservoir, the reservoir water temperature distribution was examined. A three-dimensional mathematical model was used to simulate the in-plane and vertical distribution of water temperature. The parameters of the model were calibrated with field data of the temperature distribution in the Fenhe Reservoir. The simulated temperature of discharged water is consistent with the measured data. The difference in temperature between the discharged water and the natural river channel is less than 3℃ under the current operating conditions. This will not significantly impact the environment of downstream areas.

  18. Temperature-induced anomalous structural changes of Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si melt and its influence on as-cast structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhiming

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si was studied with a high-temperature viscosity apparatus. Anomalous changes of viscosity of the melt were found at 1,103 K and 968 K in the cooling process, which indicates anomalous structural changes of the melt. It is calculated that the anomalous structural change is associated with an abrupt decrease of atomic clusters’ size and activation energy in the melt. According to the temperature of the anomalous structural changes, melt heat treatment process (quenching from superheat to pouring temperature was performed on Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si melt prior to pouring, aimed to keep the small atomic clusters from higher temperature to lower pouring temperature. The results suggest that relatively small atomic clusters at the pouring temperature in the melt could generate a deep under-cooling of nucleation in the subsequent solidification process, and refine the as-cast structure. After being quenched from superheating to pouring temperature, the relatively small atomic clusters, especially the Si-Si clusters in the melt will grow to equilibrium state (relatively big atomic clusters with holding time, resulting in the prominent coarsening of the Si morphology in the as-cast structure.

  19. Effects of Stretching Ratio and Temperature on Phase Transition of Melt-spun Poly (Vinylidene Fluoride) Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; REN Ping; ZHANG Guifang; XIAO Changfa

    2006-01-01

    The effects of stretching ratio and stretching temperature on phase transition of melt-spun poly ( vinylidene fluoride ) fibers were investigated and analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy, wide angle Xray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy. The β phase exists in the as-spun fiber. The β phase content increases as the stretching ratio increases. When the stretching temperature is lower than 100 ℃ , enhancing temperature is good for the transition of phase α to β. By contrast, when the stretching temperature is higher than 100 ℃ , enhancing temperature is unfavourable for the transition of phase α to β. Increasing the draw temperature increases the α-phase content.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Electrical Resistance of Woven Melt-Infiltrated SiCf/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have successfully shown the use of electrical resistance (ER)measurements to monitor room temperature damage accumulation in SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiCf/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). In order to determine the feasibility of resistance monitoring at elevated temperatures, the present work investigates the temperature dependent electrical response of various MI (Melt Infiltrated)-CVI (Chemical Vapor Infiltrated) SiC/SiC composites containing Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno ZMI and SA reinforcing fibers. Test were conducted using a commercially available isothermal testing apparatus as well as a novel, laser-based heating approach developed to more accurately simulate thermomechanical testing of CMCs. Secondly, a post-test inspection technique is demonstrated to show the effect of high-temperature exposure on electrical properties. Analysis was performed to determine the respective contribution of the fiber and matrix to the overall composite conductivity at elevated temperatures. It was concluded that because the silicon-rich matrix material dominates the electrical response at high temperature, ER monitoring would continue to be a feasible method for monitoring stress dependent matrix cracking of melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites under high temperature mechanical testing conditions. Finally, the effect of thermal gradients generated during localized heating of tensile coupons on overall electrical response of the composite is determined.

  1. Development of a new laboratory technique for high-temperature thermal emission spectroscopy of silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rachel J.; Ramsey, Michael S.; King, Penelope L.

    2013-05-01

    the prevalence of glass and molten silicates in volcanic environments, and the important role of surface emissivity in thermal infrared (TIR) measurements, it is imperative to characterize accurately the spectral features associated with silicate glasses and melts. A microfurnace has been developed specifically for use with a laboratory Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer to collect the first in situ TIR emission spectra of actively melting and cooling silicate glasses. The construction, implementation, and calibration of the microfurnace spectrometer system are presented here. Initial testing of the microfurnace is also discussed, which includes acquisition of thermal emission spectra of a quartz powder (unmelted), a melted and cooled oligoclase feldspar, and glassy melt of rhyolitic composition. Unlike a solid material, which may only have bending and stretching vibrations within its molecular structure, a fully molten material will exhibit several more degrees of freedom in structural movement, thus changing its spectral character. Differences in spectral behavior and morphology are observed between a glass in a solid state and its molten counterpart, confirming previous field measurements of lower emissivity upon melting. This laboratory microfurnace system has been designed to quantify the TIR emission spectral behavior of glassy materials in various physical states. Ultimately, it is hoped that the microfurnace data will help improve the ability of field-based, airborne, and spaceborne TIR data to characterize glassy volcanic terranes.

  2. Gradient Distribution of Martensite Phase in Melt-Spun Ribbons of a Fe-Ni-Ti-Al Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Volodymyr; Danilchenko, Vitalij; Dzevin, Ievgenij

    2016-12-01

    Metallographic, X-ray diffraction and magnetometric analysis were used to study the regularities of martensitic transformation in melt-spun ribbons of a Fe - 28 wt. % Ni - 2.1 wt. % Ti - 2 wt. % Al - 0.05 wt. % C alloy. The substantial differences in volume fractions of the martensite phase in local regions of thin melt-spun ribbons of the alloy are related to the size effect of the transformation and structural inhomogeneity of the ribbons. The distribution of austenitic grain size in different local areas of melt-spun ribbons is significantly different. The principal factor for changing the completeness of the martensitic transformation is the size effect of transformation. Difference in the martensite volume fraction in local regions of a ribbon is mainly determined by the different volume fractions of ultrafine-grained (500-1000 nm) and nanosized (80-100 nm and less) initial austenite grains, in which the transformation was slowed down or completely suppressed. Other factors almost do not affect the completeness of the martensitic transformation. The strong stabilizing effect of the reverse α-γ transformation with respect to the subsequent direct γ-α transformation in the melt-spun ribbons is also related to the grain size effect.

  3. Temperature Distribution in a Long-Span Aircraft Hangar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Yongzhong; BAI Yin; SHI Yongjiu; ZHU Dan; WANG Yuanqing

    2008-01-01

    Long-span aircraft hangars have features which differ from other large structural systems. The temperature stresses due to temperature variations often greatly impact the mechanical performance of the structure. The paper presents an analysis of the heat transfer processes and factors which influence the temperature distribution. The AMECO-A380 aircraft hangar at the Beijing Capital International Airport was selected as a practical example to illustrate the use of finite volume analysis to calculate the temperature field taking into account meteorological conditions, solar radiation, heat convection, etc. The temperature distribution and the variation of the length of the upper and lower chords of the grid structure roof were ana-lyzed to develop guidelines for the temperature distributions in very large aircraft hangars. The results show that the temperature effect will be large for long-span hangars, and the temperature stresses due to non-uniform temperatures should be analyzed to guarantee the structural safety of large aircraft hangars.

  4. The formation of nuggets of highly siderophile elements in quenched silicate melts at high temperatures: Before or during the silicate quench?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavergne, V.; Charon, E.; Jones, J.; Cordier, P.; Righter, K.; Deldicque, D.; Hennet, L.

    2016-01-01

    The Highly Siderophile Elements (HSE) are powerful tracers of planetary differentiation. Despite the importance of their partitioning between silicate and metal for the understanding of planetary core formation, especially for the Earth and Mars, there is still a huge discrepancy between conclusions based on different high temperature (HT) experimental studies. These disagreements may be due to the presence of HSE micro and nanonuggets in HT experiments. The formation of these nuggets is still interpreted in different ways. One hypothesis is that these HSE nuggets formed during the quench of the silicate melt, while another hypothesis supposes that these nuggets formed before the quench and represented artefacts of HT experiments. The goal of this work is to clarify whether the presence of HSE nuggets in silicate melts is linked to a quench effect or not. Understanding the formation of these HSE nuggets represents thus a necessary step towards the resolution of the Earth's core formation scenarios. We performed new HT experiments (1275-2000 °C) at different oxygen fugacities (fO2), between ambient air up to ∼5 log units below the Iron-Wüstite buffer [IW-5], for two different silicate compositions (synthetic martian and terrestrial basalts) mixed with a metallic mixture of Pt-Au-Pd-Ru. Our 1275-1600 °C experiments were contained in either olivine, diopside or graphite crucible; experiments at 2000 °C were performed using a levitation method, so no capsule was necessary. Our samples contained quenched silicate melts, minerals (olivine, pyroxene, spinel depending on the run), a two-phase metallic bead and nano and micro-nuggets of HSE. Our samples underwent fine textural, structural and analytical characterizations. The distribution of the nuggets was not homogeneous throughout the quenched silicate melt. HSE nuggets were present within crystals. Dendritic textures from the quenched silicate melt formed around HSE nuggets, which could be crystallized, showing

  5. A self-contained 3He melting curve thermometer for dissemination of the PLTS-2000 temperature scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvarts, Dm; Adams, A.; Lusher, C. P.; Körber, R.; Cowan, B. P.; Noonan, P.; Saunders, J.; Mikheev, V. A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a self-contained 3He melting curve thermometer (MCT), which is compact and easy to operate and makes a reliable tool for the direct dissemination of the new provisional low-temperature scale, PLTS-2000. It is based on a cylindrical pressure gauge and uses a tunnel diode oscillator circuit for capacitive read-out. The gas-handling system uses a set of relief valves and an electronic pressure sensor, enabling the thermometer to be fully automated, including the calibration procedure. The performance of the MCT was evaluated by comparison with a current-sensing noise thermometer in the temperature range from 20 to 700 mK.

  6. Ultra-High Temperature Distributed Wireless Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Russell; Rumpf, Raymond; Coggin, John; Davis, Williams; Yang, Taeyoung; O' Donnell, Alan; Bresnahan, Peter

    2013-03-31

    Research was conducted towards the development of a passive wireless sensor for measurement of temperature in coal gasifiers and coal-fired boiler plants. Approaches investigated included metamaterial sensors based on guided mode resonance filters, and temperature-sensitive antennas that modulate the frequency of incident radio waves as they are re-radiated by the antenna. In the guided mode resonant filter metamaterial approach, temperature is encoded as changes in the sharpness of the filter response, which changes with temperature because the dielectric loss of the guided mode resonance filter is temperature-dependent. In the mechanically modulated antenna approach, the resonant frequency of a vibrating cantilever beam attached to the antenna changes with temperature. The vibration of the beam perturbs the electrical impedance of the antenna, so that incident radio waves are phase modulated at a frequency equal to the resonant frequency of the vibrating beam. Since the beam resonant frequency depends on temperature, a Doppler radar can be used to remotely measure the temperature of the antenna. Laboratory testing of the guided mode resonance filter failed to produce the spectral response predicted by simulations. It was concluded that the spectral response was dominated by spectral reflections of radio waves incident on the filter. Laboratory testing of the mechanically modulated antenna demonstrated that the device frequency shifted incident radio waves, and that the frequency of the re-radiated waves varied linearly with temperature. Radio wave propagation tests in the convection pass of a small research boiler plant identified a spectral window between 10 and 13 GHz for low loss propagation of radio waves in the interior of the boiler.

  7. Sequence diversity within the HA-1 gene as detected by melting temperature assay without oligonucleotide probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattiuz Pier

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags are self-peptides derived from common cellular proteins and presented by MHC class I and II molecules. Disparities in mHags are a potential risk for the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD in the recipients of bone marrow from HLA-identical donors. Two alleles have been identified in the mHag HA-1. The correlation between mismatches of the mHag HA-1 and GvHD has been suggested and methods to facilitate large-scale testing were afterwards developed. Methods We used sequence specific primer (SSP PCR and direct sequencing to detect HA-1 gene polymorphisms in a sample of 131 unrelated Italian subjects. We then set up a novel melting temperature (Tm assay that may help identification of HA-1 alleles without oligonucleotide probes. Results We report the frequencies of HA-1 alleles in the Italian population and the presence of an intronic 5 base-pair deletion associated with the immunogeneic allele HA-1H. We also detected novel variable sites with respect to the consensus sequence of HA-1 locus. Even though recombination/gene conversion events are documented, there is considerable linkage disequilibrium in the data. The gametic associations between HA-1R/H alleles and the intronic 5-bp ins/del polymorphism prompted us to try the Tm analysis with SYBR® Green I. We show that the addition of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO during the assay yields distinct patterns when amplicons from HA-1H homozygotes, HA-1R homozygotes, and heterozygotes are analysed. Conclusion The possibility to use SYBR® Green I to detect Tm differences between allelic variants is attractive but requires great caution. We succeeded in allele discrimination of the HA-1 locus using a relatively short (101 bp amplicon, only in the presence of DMSO. We believe that, at least in certain assets, Tm assays may benefit by the addition of DMSO or other agents affecting DNA strand conformation and stability.

  8. Revisiting the melting temperature of NpO2 and the challenges associated with high temperature actinide compound measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böhler, R.; Welland, M.J.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Janssen, A.; Eloirdi, R.; Konings, R.J.M.; Manara, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work revisits the melting behaviour of neptunium dioxide, an actinide compound which can be produced in the nuclear fuel during operation, and which has an important impact on the nuclear fuel and waste radioactivity especially on the very long term. The present experimental approach employs re

  9. Effect of chain stiffness and temperature on the dynamics and microstructure of crystallizable bead-spring polymer melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong T.; Hoy, Robert S.

    2016-11-01

    We contrast the dynamics in model unentangled polymer melts of chains of three different stiffnesses: flexible, intermediate, and rodlike. Flexible and rodlike chains, which readily solidify into close-packed crystals (respectively, with randomly oriented and nematically aligned chains), display simple melt dynamics with Arrhenius temperature dependence and a discontinuous change upon solidification. Intermediate-stiffness chains, however, are fragile glass-formers displaying Vogel-Fulcher dynamical arrest, despite the fact that they also possess a nematic-close-packed crystalline ground state. To connect this difference in dynamics to the differing microstructure of the melts, we examine how various measures of structure, including cluster-level metrics recently introduced in studies of colloidal systems, vary with chain stiffness and temperature. No clear static-structural cause of the dynamical arrest is found. However, we find that the intermediate-stiffness chains display qualitatively different dynamical heterogeneity. Specifically, their stringlike motion (cooperative rearrangement) is correlated along chain backbones in a way not found for either flexible or rodlike chains. This activated "crawling" motion is clearly associated with the dynamical arrest observed in these systems, and illustrates one way in which factors controlling the crystallization versus glass formation competition in polymers can depend nonmonotonically on chain stiffness.

  10. Evaluation of Foaming Behavior of Glass Melts by High-Temperature Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Optical monitoring techniques can record in situ the size of glass samples during a dynamic heating process. This allowed us to study sintering and expansion rate of panel glass from cathode ray tube using MnO2 as foaming agent. We show the maximum expansion rate of glass melt foaming (in situ va...

  11. Structure and property of metal melt Ⅱ—Evolution of atomic clusters in the not high temperature range above liquidus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the theory of micro-inhomogeneity of liquid metal,a calculation model is established for the quantitative description of the structural information of metal melts.Only by thermophysical property parameters and basic structural parameters of solid metal,can this model produce the main information of melt structure,including the relative concentration of active atoms,size of atomic clusters and number of short-range order atoms.Based on this model,the main structural information of Al and Ni melts in the not high range above the liquidus is calculated,with results in good agreement with experimental values.Besides,analyzed is the influence of superheating temperature and atomic number on the melt structural information of the first (IA) and second main group (IIA) elements.With temperature increasing,melt structural information regularly changes for both IA and IIA elements.With the atomic number increasing,melt structural information of IA elements changes regularly,for the crystal structures of the IA elements are all of bcc lattice type.However,no notable regular change of melt structural information for IIA elements has been found,mainly because the lattice type of IIA elements is of hcp-fcc-bcc transition.The present work presents an effective way for better understanding metal melt structure and for forecasting the change of the physical property of metal melts.

  12. Simulation on electrical field distribution and fiber falls in melt electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Chi; An, Ying; He, Xuetao; Yang, Weimin

    2013-07-01

    Electrospinning is now a typical way of direct and consecutive producing nanofibers. In order to comprehensively understand the change of fiber chains in falling process of electrospinning, the article import dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) mesoscale simulation method into electrospinning study. In current work, an electrical force formula is proposed after simulation of the distribution of electrostatic field in electrospinning using Finite Element Method. Then, various electrostatic force, temperature and viscosity in electrospinning system are qualitatively simulated by DPD simulation. Results showed that the falling velocity of fiber increased with the increase of electrostatic force. It was found that the lower the polymer viscosity, the quicker the fiber falls. And the diameter of fiber significantly increased with augment of viscosity. Both of above are agree with experimental results. We also found that the falling velocity of fiber is in contrast with length of polymer chains, which has not been found in experiments.

  13. Estimation of the Temperature Distribution in the Rails of a High-Performance Electromagnetic Rail Gun

    CERN Document Server

    McCorkle, William C

    2008-01-01

    We estimate the temperature distribution in the rails of an electromagnetic rail gun at the time that the armature leaves the rails. In order to obtain analytic results, we assume a simple geometry for the rails and an electromagnetic skin effect with a current-carrying channel boundary that propagates with the accelerating armature. We use three different approaches to obtain expressions for the temperature rise in the rails: a constant gun current, a quadratic time-dependent current, and a channel with current density controlled by magnetic field diffusion into the rails. We look at a range of exit velocities, from 1500 m/s to 5000 m/s. In all three approaches, the model predicts the highest temperatures near the gun breech. We find that after a single gun firing the temperature reaches the melting temperature of the metal rails in a layer of finite thickness near the surface of the rails, for rails made of copper or tantalum. We plot the thickness of the melt layer as a function of position along the rails...

  14. Metal matrix-metal nanoparticle composites with tunable melting temperature and high thermal conductivity for phase-change thermal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wu, Hsinwei; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-02-24

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) are of broad interest for thermal storage and management applications. For energy-dense storage with fast thermal charging/discharging rates, a PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, large enthalpy of fusion, and high thermal conductivity. To simultaneously accomplish these traits, we custom design nanocomposites consisting of phase-change Bi nanoparticles embedded in an Ag matrix. We precisely control nanoparticle size, shape, and volume fraction in the composite by separating the nanoparticle synthesis and nanocomposite formation steps. We demonstrate a 50-100% thermal energy density improvement relative to common organic PCMs with equivalent volume fraction. We also tune the melting temperature from 236-252 °C by varying nanoparticle diameter from 8.1-14.9 nm. Importantly, the silver matrix successfully prevents nanoparticle coalescence, and no melting changes are observed during 100 melt-freeze cycles. The nanocomposite's Ag matrix also leads to very high thermal conductivities. For example, the thermal conductivity of a composite with a 10% volume fraction of 13 nm Bi nanoparticles is 128 ± 23 W/m-K, which is several orders of magnitude higher than typical thermal storage materials. We complement these measurements with calculations using a modified effective medium approximation for nanoscale thermal transport. These calculations predict that the thermal conductivity of composites with 13 nm Bi nanoparticles varies from 142 to 47 W/m-K as the nanoparticle volume fraction changes from 10 to 35%. Larger nanoparticle diameters and/or smaller nanoparticle volume fractions lead to larger thermal conductivities.

  15. Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM): A simplified model for oxide and silicate melts at mantle pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Aaron S.; Asimow, Paul D.; Stevenson, David J.

    2015-08-01

    We develop a new model to understand and predict the behavior of oxide and silicate melts at extreme temperatures and pressures, including deep mantle conditions like those in the early Earth magma ocean. The Coordinated Hard Sphere Mixture (CHaSM) is based on an extension of the hard sphere mixture model, accounting for the range of coordination states available to each cation in the liquid. By utilizing approximate analytic expressions for the hard sphere model, this method is capable of predicting complex liquid structure and thermodynamics while remaining computationally efficient, requiring only minutes of calculation time on standard desktop computers. This modeling framework is applied to the MgO system, where model parameters are trained on a collection of crystal polymorphs, producing realistic predictions of coordination evolution and the equation of state of MgO melt over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. We find that the typical coordination number of the Mg cation evolves continuously upward from 5.25 at 0 GPa to 8.5 at 250 GPa. The results produced by CHaSM are evaluated by comparison with predictions from published first-principles molecular dynamics calculations, indicating that CHaSM is accurately capturing the dominant physics controlling the behavior of oxide melts at high pressure. Finally, we present a simple quantitative model to explain the universality of the increasing Grüneisen parameter trend for liquids, which directly reflects their progressive evolution toward more compact solid-like structures upon compression. This general behavior is opposite that of solid materials, and produces steep adiabatic thermal profiles for silicate melts, thus playing a crucial role in magma ocean evolution.

  16. Noncontact Monitoring of Surface Temperature Distribution by Laser Ultrasound Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Akira; Ihara, Ikuo

    2011-07-01

    A laser ultrasound scanning method for measuring a surface temperature distribution of a heated material is presented. An experiment using an aluminum plate heated up to 120 °C is carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. A series of one-dimensional surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements within an area of a square on the aluminum surface are performed by scanning a pulsed laser for generating SAW using a galvanometer system, where the SAWs are detected at a fixed location on the surface. An inverse analysis is then applied to SAW data to determine the surface temperature distribution in a certain direction. The two-dimensional distribution of the surface temperature in the square is constructed by combining the one-dimensional surface temperature distributions obtained within the square. The surface temperature distributions obtained by the proposed method almost agrees with those obtained using an infrared radiation camera.

  17. Spread of the dust temperature distribution in circumstellar disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heese, S.; Wolf, S.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Accurate temperature calculations for circumstellar disks are particularly important for their chemical evolution. Their temperature distribution is determined by the optical properties of the dust grains, which, among other parameters, depend on their radius. However, in most disk studies, only average optical properties and thus an average temperature is assumed to account for an ensemble of grains with different radii. Aims: We investigate the impact of subdividing the grain radius distribution into multiple sub-intervals on the resulting dust temperature distribution and spectral energy distribution (SED). Methods: The temperature distribution, the relative grain surface below a certain temperature, the freeze-out radius, and the SED were computed for two different scenarios: (1) Radius distribution represented by 16 logarithmically distributed radius intervals, and (2) radius distribution represented by a single grain species with averaged optical properties (reference). Results: Within the considered parameter range, i.e., of grain radii between 5 nm and 1 mm and an optically thin and thick disk with a parameterized density distribution, we obtain the following results: in optically thin disk regions, the temperature spread can be as large as 63% and the relative grain surface below a certain temperature is lower than in the reference disk. With increasing optical depth, the difference in the midplane temperature and the relative grain surface below a certain temperature decreases. Furthermore, below 20 K, this fraction is higher for the reference disk than for the case of multiple grain radii, while it shows the opposite behavior for temperatures above this threshold. The thermal emission in the case of multiple grain radii at short wavelengths is stronger than for the reference disk. The freeze-out radius (snowline) is a function of grain radius, spanning a radial range between the coldest and warmest grain species of 30 AU.

  18. The calcium fluoride effect on properties of cryolite melts feasible for low-temperature production of aluminum and its alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacheva, O.; Dedyukhin, A.; Redkin, A.; Zaikov, Yu.

    2017-07-01

    The CaF2 effect on the liquidus temperature, electrical conductivity and alumina solubility in the potassium-sodium and potassium-lithium cryolite melts with cryolite ratio (CR = (nKF+nMF)/nAlF3, M = Li, Na) 1.3 was studied. The liquidus temperature in the quisi-binary system [KF-LiF-AlF3]-CaF2 changes with the same manner as in the [KF-NaF-AlF3]-CaF2. The electrical conductivity in the KF-NaF-AlF3-CaF2 melt decreases with increasing the CaF2 content, but it slightly raises with the first small addition of CaF2 into the KF-LiF-AlF3-CaF2 melts, enriched with KF, which was explained by the increased K+ ions mobility due to their relatively low ionic potential. The contribution of the Li+ cations in conductivity of the KF-LiF-AlF3-CaF2 electrolyte is not noteworthy. The Al2O3 solubility in the KF-NaF-AlF3 electrolyte rises with the increasing KF content, but the opposite tendency is observed in the cryolite mixtures containing CaF2. The insoluble compounds - KCaAl2F9 or KCaF3 - formed in the molten mixtures containing potassium and calcium ions endorse the increase of the liquidus temperature. The calcium fluoride effect on the side ledge formation in the electrolytic cell during low-temperature aluminum electrolysis is discussed.

  19. Melting temperatures of H2O up to 72 GPa measured in a diamond anvil cell using CO2 laser heating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T; Kuwayama, Y; Yagi, T

    2014-02-21

    The melting curve of H2O from 49 to 72 GPa was determined by using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Double-sided CO2 laser heating technique was employed in order to heat the sample directly. Discontinuous changes of the heating efficiency attributed to the H2O melting were observed between 49 and 72 GPa. The obtained melting temperatures at 49 and 72 GPa are 1200 and 1410 K, respectively. We found that the slope of the melting curve significantly decreases with increasing pressure, only 5 K/GPa at 72 GPa while 44 K/GPa at 49 GPa. Our results suggest that the melting curve does not intersect with the isentropes of Uranus and Neptune, and hence, H2O should remain in the liquid state even at the pressure and temperature conditions found deep within Uranus and Neptune.

  20. Non-linear effects of initial melt temperatures on microstructures and mechanical properties during quenching process of liquid Cu46Zr54 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yun-Fei; Liu, Rang-Su; Tian, Ze-An; Liang, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Liu, Hai-Rong; Zhang, Ai-long; Zhou, Li-Li; Peng, Ping; Xie, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    A MD simulation of liquid Cu46Zr54 alloys has been performed for understanding the effects of initial melt temperatures on the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties during quenching process. By using several microstructural analyzing methods, it is found that the icosahedral and defective icosahedral clusters play a key role in the microstructure transition. All the final solidification structures obtained at different initial melt temperatures are of amorphous structures, and their structural and mechanical properties are non-linearly related to the initial melt temperatures, and fluctuated in a certain range. Especially, there exists a best initial melt temperature, from which the glass configuration possesses the highest packing density, the optimal elastic constants, and the smaller extent of structural softening under deforming.

  1. Luminous Flame Temperature Distribution Measurement Using the Emission Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Flame temperature distribution is one of the most important characteristic parameters in combustion research. The emission method is a good way to measure the luminous flame temperature field. The maximum entropy method is introduced to the temperature distribution measurement of a luminous flame using the emission method. A simplified mathematical model was derived by combining the thermal radiation theory, reconstruction algorithm and maximum entropy method. Suitable parameters were selected in the computing process. Good experimental results were obtained with pulverized coal flames.

  2. Vertical Distribution of Air Temperatures in Heated Dwelling Rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Šikula, Ondřej

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental and theoretic research on one of factors influencing the indoor climate in dwelling rooms heated by heating systems, the vertical distribution of temperatures. The paper summarizes results from simulation of the room heated by a gas space heater and a plate radiator. Among main factors causing unfavorable distribution of temperatures in a room belong insufficient elimination of cold dropping airflows and high temperature of heating air. The paper presents...

  3. Vertical Temperature Distribution in a Room with Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    A displacement ventilation system exploits the use of energy efficiently because it is possible to remove exhaust air from a room with a temperature that is several degrees above the temperature in the occupied zone. This process will allow a higher air inlet temperature at the same load...... to consider the temperature gradient in the occupied zone, as well as the asymmetric radiation from the ceiling, in connection with the design of a displacement ventilation system and the evaluation of thermal comfort. This paper will introduce five temperature distribution models with different levels...... in comparison with mixing ventilation. It is necessary to have a design method for the temperature distribution used for instance in connection with the tlow element method and the energy calculations. The temperature distribution is also important in connection with thermal comfort in a room. It is necessary...

  4. Integrated simulation of snow and glacier melt in water and energy balance‐based, distributed hydrological modeling framework at Hunza River Basin of Pakistan Karakoram region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shrestha, Maheswor; Koike, Toshio; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Xue, Yongkang; Wang, Lei; Rasul, Ghulam; Ahmad, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Energy budget‐based distributed modeling of snow and glacier melt runoff is essential in a hydrologic model to accurately describe hydrologic processes in cold regions and high‐altitude catchments...

  5. An Infrared Study of Ambient Temperature Chloroaluminates as a Function of Melt Acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    ionic interaction more closely. Water has also * T"Z _ t I , .... ... ... ± . ... . . .. . . ",, . . . . - . -3- been added to the melt in an attempt...studies of this molten salt system (2,3) and of a similar 7-methyl 3-ethyl imidazolium chloride (ImCl) system (2). Both provided good evidence of ionic ... interaction (particularly on the basic side) and Wilkes et al proposed several oligomers to explain the observed behavior. This problem has not been

  6. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  7. Misestimation of temperature when applying Maxwellian distributions to space plasmas described by kappa distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolaou, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the misestimation of temperature when observations from a kappa distributed plasma are analyzed as a Maxwellian. One common method to calculate the space plasma parameters is by fitting the observed distributions using known analytical forms. More often, the distribution function is included in a forward model of the instrument's response, which is used to reproduce the observed energy spectrograms for a given set of plasma parameters. In both cases, the modeled plasma distribution fits the measurements to estimate the plasma parameters. The distribution function is often considered to be Maxwellian even though in many cases the plasma is better described by a kappa distribution. In this work we show that if the plasma is described by a kappa distribution, the derived temperature assuming Maxwell distribution can be significantly off. More specifically, we derive the plasma temperature by fitting a Maxwell distribution to pseudo-data produced by a kappa distribution, and then examine the d...

  8. Temperature-Induced Liquid-Liquid Transition in Metallic Melts: A Brief Review on the New Physical Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Qiu Zu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of liquid structures and properties remains an open problem for many fundamental and applied fields. It is well known that there is no other defined phase line above liquidus (TL in phase diagrams of ordinary alloys. However, via resorts of internal friction, electric resistivity, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, solidification, etc., the results of our research on lots of single- and multiple-component melts show a novel physical image: temperature induced liquid-liquid structure transition (TI-LLST can occur above TL. Moreover, the solidification behaviors and structures out of the melts that experienced TI-LLST are distinct from those out of the melts before TI-LLST. In this paper, some typical examples of TI-LLST and characteristic aspects of the TI-LLST are briefly reviewed, in which the main contents are limited in our own achievements, although other groups have also observed similar phenomena using different methods. In the sense of phenomenology, TI-LLST reported here is quite different from other recognized liquid transitions, i.e., there are only a few convincing cases of liquid P, Si, C, H2O, Al2O3-Y2O3, etc. in which the transition occurs, either induced by pressure or at a supercooled state and near liquidus.

  9. Influence of spatial temperature distribution on high accuracy interferometric metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yongqiang; Miao, Erlong; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Huaijiang

    2010-10-01

    We calculate the influence of temperature change on the refractive index of air, establish a model of air temperature distribution and analyze the effect of different temperature distribution on the high accuracy interferometric metrology. First, a revised Edlen formula is employed to acquire the relation between temperature and refractive index of air, followed by introducing the fixed temperature gradient distribution among the spatial grid within the optical cavity between the reference flat and the test flat of the Fizeau interferometer, accompanied by a temperature change random function within each grid. Finally, all the rays through the air layer with different incident angles are traced by Matlab program in order to obtain the final output position, angle and OPD for each ray. The influence of different temperature distribution and the length of the optical cavity in on the testing accuracy can be analyzed through the RMS value that results from repeatable rays tracing. As a result, the horizontal distribution (vertical to optical axis) has a large effect on the testing accuracy. Thus, to realize the high accuracy figure metrology, the horizontal distribution of temperature must be rigorously controlled as well as to shorten the length of the optical cavity to a large extent. The results from our simulation are of great significant for the accuracy analysis of interferometric testing and the research of manufacturing a interferometer.

  10. The long range distributed fiber raman photon temperature sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A 31 km long range distributed optical fiber Raman photon temperature sensor (DOFRPTS) system have been developed based on temperature effect of the amplified spontaneous Raman scattering in fiber, and using fiber laser as a pumped source. The results show that temperature measuring uncertainty is ±2 ℃, temperature resolution is 0.1 ℃, measurement time is 432 s, spatial resolution is less than 4 m.

  11. A study of accurate latent heat measurement for a PCM with a low melting temperature using T-history method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peck, Jong Hyeon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Energy System Team, 35-3 Ipjang-myeon, Chonan 330-820 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Jun [College of Architecture, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chaedong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hiki [School of Mechanical and Industrial System Engineering, KyungHee University, Yongin 449-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    When the latent heat of a phase change material (PCM) with a lower melting point than ambient temperature was assessed according to the standard T-history method using a vertically oriented test tube, a temperature gradient occurred in the longitudinal direction of the tube due to natural convection. This led to a decrease in the accuracy of the latent heat of fusion measurement. In this study, the accuracy of the measurement with the original T-history method was improved without decreasing the test's simplicity and convenience by setting the test tube horizontally. The heat transfer to the vapor-layer of the tube under volume change during melting was assumed to be negligible and the results were calculated using the two inflection points of temperature as the start and end of latent heat period. Under these assumptions, the results agree closely with other reference data. And, the new method proposed in this study showed a remarkable reduction in data scattering. (author)

  12. Numerical simulation of temperature distribution of deep field in high temperature mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu-guang; TANG Li-juan; XU Yi-hong

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the temperature distribution of deep field, mathematical models of temperature field in field and surrounding rock were built based on heat transfer and seepage theory. Combined test data with mathematical model, the temperature distribution under heat-transfer and underground-water coupling was studied by using Golden Software Surfer and Matlab. The results show that distribution law of most isothermal lines is very similar in deep field, and temperature gradient is equal in general. At the same time,temperature distribution is influenced by underground-water and fault. In surrounding rock,seepage changes symmetrical distribution of temperature field and vector, and the temperature field may divide into inward-diffusion area and outward-diffusion area. Peripheral temperature of working will approach to the temperature of airflow. In inward diffusion area,the distribution of temperature and temperature vector is symmetric, and the direction of temperature vector point to the center of working. The action of airflow is stronger than seepage in inward diffusion area, however, the case opposite is true in outward diffusion area.

  13. Temperature distribution and control in liquefied petroleum gas fluidized beds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Ping Wu; Yanping Zhang; Jing Yang; Lige Tong

    2004-01-01

    Temperature distribution and control have been investigated in a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fluidized bed with hollow corundum spheres (A12O3) of 0.867-1.212 mm in diameter at moderately high temperatures (800-1100℃). Experiments were carried out for the air consumption coefficient α in the range of 0.3 to 1.0 and the fluidization number N in the range of 1.3 to 3.0. Particle properties, initial bed height, α and N all affect temperature distribution in the bed. Bed temperature can be adjusted about 200℃ by combined the adjusting of α and N.

  14. Temperature of Earth's Deep Interior Constrained from Melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhao, J.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Toellner, T.; Murphy, C. A.; Prakapenka, V.

    2015-12-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe have been measured up to Mbar pressure. We use laser heated diamond anvil cells, time-resolved synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer to carry out these measurements. X-ray photons at 57Fe's resonant energy with 1 meV bandwidth are focused on the sample in a laser heated diamond anvil cell, and when melting occurs, the characteristic Mössbauer signal abruptly decreases. Thus, time-resolved Mössbauer spectroscopy provides an excellent diagnostic for the first melt formed in the sample chamber. The thermal contributions of pressure of Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe have been constrained by combining nuclear resonant inelastic scattering and high temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. We find that the melting curve of Fe is systematically higher than the melting curve of Fe0.9Ni0.1, while the 1-σ temperature uncertainties of both melting curves overlap. The pressure dependencies of the melting temperature of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 are measured, and the best-fit melting curves are located in the region bounded by previous studies. Our results may help reach a consensus on the high pressure melting curves of Fe and Fe-Ni alloys. We calculate the fcc-hcp-liquid triple points of Fe0.9Ni0.1and Fe, complemented by experiments with Mössbauer spectroscopy. The upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature is estimated from our results, and the upper bound of the temperature at Earth's core-mantle boundary is computed with an adiabatic model. We discuss the implications of these temperatures on the phase relations of deep Earth materials. References:Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 188, 114-120 Jackson, J.M., W. Sturhahn, M. Lerche, J. Zhao, T.S. Toellner, E.E. Alp, S.V. Sinogeikin, J

  15. Temperature Distribution Measurement of The Wing Surface under Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokawa, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Kimura, Shigeo; Sakaue, Hirotaka; Morita, Katsuaki; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Collaboration; Univ of Notre Dame Collaboration; Kanagawa Institute of Technology Collaboration; Univ of Electro-(UEC) Team, Comm

    2016-11-01

    De- or anti-icing system of an aircraft is necessary for a safe flight operation. Icing is a phenomenon which is caused by a collision of supercooled water frozen to an object. For the in-flight icing, it may cause a change in the wing cross section that causes stall, and in the worst case, the aircraft would fall. Therefore it is important to know the surface temperature of the wing for de- or anti-icing system. In aerospace field, temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) has been widely used for obtaining the surface temperature distribution on a testing article. The luminescent image from the TSP can be related to the temperature distribution. (TSP measurement system) In icing wind tunnel, we measured the surface temperature distribution of the wing model using the TSP measurement system. The effect of icing conditions on the TSP measurement system is discussed.

  16. Temperature distributions in trapezoidal built in storage solar water heaters with/without phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarhan, Sefa; Yardim, M. Hakan [Department of Farm Machinery, Faculty of Agriculture, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tasliciftlik Yerleskesi, 60240 Tokat (Turkey); Sari, Ahmet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tasliciftlik Yerleskesi, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    Built in storage solar water heaters (BSSWHs) have been recognized for their more compact constructions and faster solar gain than conventional solar water heaters, however, their water temperatures quickly go down during the cooling period. A trapezoidal BSSWH without PCM storage unit was used as the control heater (reference) to investigate the effect of two differently configured PCM storage units on the temperature distributions in water tanks. In the first design, myristic acid was filled into the PCM storage tank, which also served as an absorbing plate. In the second design, lauric acid was filled into the PCM storage tank, which also served as a baffle plate. The water temperature changes were followed by five thermocouples placed evenly and longitudinally into each of the three BSSWHs. The effects of the PCMs on the water temperature distributions depended on the configuration of the PCM storage unit and the longitudinal position in the water tanks. The use of lauric acid lowered the values of the peak temperatures by 15% compared to the control heater at the upper portion of the water tanks because of the low melting temperature of lauric acid, but it did not have any consistent effect on the retention of the water temperatures during the cooling period. The ability of the myristic acid storage unit to retain the water temperatures got more remarkable, especially at the middle portion of the water tank. The myristic acid storage increased the dip temperatures by approximately 8.8% compared to the control heater. In conclusion, lauric acid storage can be used to stabilize the water temperature during the day time, while the myristic acid storage unit can be used as a thermal barrier against heat loss during the night time because of its relatively high melting temperature and low heat conduction coefficient in its solid phase. The experimental results have also indicated that the thermal characteristics of the PCM and the configuration of the PCM storage

  17. Network Integration of Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Yan Li; Hong-Lin Liu; Zai-Xuan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The integration of distributed optical fiber temperature sensor with supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system is proposed and implemented. In the implementation of the integration, both the compatibility with traditional system and the characteristics of distributed optical fiber temperature sensor is considered before Modbus TCP/IP protocol is chosen. The protocol is implemented with open source component Indy. The Modbus TCP/IP protocol used in the system is proved to be fast and robust.

  18. Distributed Temperature Sensing as a downhole tool in hydrogeology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, V.F.; Read, T.; Bour, O.; Borgne, Le T.; Coleman, T.; Krause, S.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.; Ciocca, F.; Selker, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology enables downhole temperature monitoring to study hydrogeological processes at unprecedentedly high frequency and spatial resolution. DTS has been widely applied in passive mode in site investigations of groundwater flow, in-well flow, and subsurfac

  19. Calculation and Analysis of Temperature Distribution in Hot Rolling Strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaixiang Peng

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern steel grades require constant and reproducible production conditions both in the hot strip mill and in the cooling section to achieve constant material properties along the entire strip length and from strip to strip. Calculation of the temperature in final rolling process always utilizes factors such as the work piece's inner organizational structure, plastic deformation, and it's variations of properties and so on, also as well as the physical parameters such as gauge, shape, etc. In this paper, a finite element model is constructed for the temperature field in a rolling process. The temperature field of strip steel is modeled with a 3-D finite element analysis (FEA structure, simultaneously considering the distribution of the work roll temperature. Then the distribution of field is simulated numerically. From the model, the temperature contours can be obtained by analysis of the temperature distribution of contact area. At the same time, the distribution of temperature in any position at any time can be acquired. These efforts provide the reliable parameters for the later finishing temperature and shape control.  

  20. Rainfall and temperature affect tree species distributions in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, L.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Bongers, F.; Hawthorne, W.D.; Poorter, L.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the relative importance of annual rainfall, temperature and their seasonality to tree species distribution in Ghana. We used species presence/absence data from 2505 1-ha plots systematically distributed over Ghana's forests. Logistic regression was used to determine species responses to

  1. Temperature distribution of an infinite slab under point heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Zhao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature field in an infinite slab under an instantaneous or continuous point heat source is studied numerically. The numerical results reveal the temperature distribution and its change regularity, which are significant for the temperature control encountered in many practical manufacturing processes, such as the laser treatment processes on the surface of films, welding and cutting, and even the design of measuring devices for thermal properties of material.

  2. Extracting the temperature distribution on a phase-change memory cell during crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Gokhan; Gerislioglu, Burak; Dirisaglik, Faruk; Jurado, Zoila; Sullivan, Lindsay; Dana, Aykutlu; Lam, Chung; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2016-10-01

    Phase-change memory (PCM) devices are enabled by amorphization- and crystallization-induced changes in the devices' electrical resistances. Amorphization is achieved by melting and quenching the active volume using short duration electrical pulses (˜ns). The crystallization (set) pulse duration, however, is much longer and depends on the cell temperature reached during the pulse. Hence, the temperature-dependent crystallization process of the phase-change materials at the device level has to be well characterized to achieve fast PCM operations. A main challenge is determining the cell temperature during crystallization. Here, we report extraction of the temperature distribution on a lateral PCM cell during a set pulse using measured voltage-current characteristics and thermal modelling. The effect of the thermal properties of materials on the extracted cell temperature is also studied, and a better cell design is proposed for more accurate temperature extraction. The demonstrated study provides promising results for characterization of the temperature-dependent crystallization process within a cell.

  3. Temperature-Dependent Raman Spectra and Microstructure of Barium Metaborate Crystals and Its Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤静林; 蒋国昌; 侯怀宇; 吴永全; 陈辉; 徐匡迪

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of β- and α-barium metaborate in crystal and liquid states from room temperature to 1873K, with a semiconductor laser as the laser source, coupled with a time-resolved detection system to eliminate the dense thermal emission background when temperature was considerably high.Temperature-dependent Raman spectra can clearly indicate that the phase transformation from β- to α-barium metaborate has been completed during 1273 - 1300 K. Variations of different kinds of microstructure units with temperature are identified and discussed.

  4. Melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system at high pressure and temperature: Implications for the thermal structure of the planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakairi, T.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the Earth's core is mainly composed of iron and contains light elements to account for its density deficit. Alloying with light elements significantly affects the physical properties of iron and depresses its melting temperature. Therefore, the melting relation of the Fe-light elements system is the key to clarify the thermal structure of the Earth's core. Although there are many candidates for light elements in the core, sulfur and silicon are considered to be the major light elements. Some geochemical models predicted that sulfur and silicon could be present not only in the core of the Earth but also in the core of other terrestrial planets such as Mars and Mercury. To better understand the properties of the planetary cores, we investigated the melting relations of the Fe-S-Si system under high-pressure conditions. Here, we report the melting relations in the Fe-S-Si system up to 60 GPa. Melting experiments were performed in the pressure range of 20-60 GPa and the temperature range of 1300-2500 K using a double-sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with X-ray diffraction technique. In situ X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted at the BL10XU beamline of the SPring-8 facility. The melting detection was based on disappearance of the X-ray diffraction peaks of the sample. On the basis of X-ray diffraction patterns, we confirmed that iron-silicon alloy which hcp and fcc structure and Fe3S are stable phases under subsolidus conditions. Both solidus and liquidus temperatures are significantly lower than the melting temperature of pure Fe and increases with pressure in this study. In order to draw the melting curve as a function of pressure, we fitted the present results using the Simon's equation. Our results could provide important constraints on the thermal structure of the planetary cores.

  5. Temperature distribution effects on micro-CFPCR performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Chuan; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E; Soper, Steven A; Murphy, Michael C

    2008-04-01

    Continuous flow polymerase chain reactors (CFPCRs) are BioMEMS devices that offer unique capabilities for the ultra-fast amplification of target DNA fragments using repeated thermal cycling, typically over the following temperature ranges: 90 degrees C-95 degrees C for denaturation, 50 degrees C-70 degrees C for renaturation, and 70 degrees C-75 degrees C for extension. In CFPCR, DNA cocktail is pumped through the constant temperature zones and reaches thermal equilibrium with the channel walls quickly due to its low thermal capacitance. In previous work, a polycarbonate CFPCR was designed with microchannels 150 microm deep, 50 microm wide, and 1.78 m long-including preheating and post-heating zones, fabricated with LIGA, and demonstrated. The high thermal resistance of the polycarbonate led to a high temperature gradient in the micro-device at steady-state and was partly responsible for the low amplification yield. Several steps were taken to ensure that there were three discrete, uniform temperature zones on the polycarbonate CFPCR device including: reducing the thickness of the CFPCR substrate to decrease thermal capacitance, using copper plates as heating elements to ensure a uniform temperature input, and making grooves between temperature zones to increase the resistance to lateral heat conduction between zones. Finite element analyses (FEA) were used to evaluate the macro temperature distribution in the CFPCR device and the micro temperature distribution along a single microchannel. At steady-state, the simulated CFPCR device had three discrete temperature zones, each with a uniform temperature distribution with a variation of +/-0.3 degrees C. An infrared (IR) camera was used to measure the steady-state temperature distribution in the prototype CFPCR and validated the simulation results. The temperature distributions along a microchannel at flow velocities from 0 mm/s to 6 mm/s were used to estimate the resulting temperatures of the DNA reagents in a single

  6. The impact of coniferous forest temperature on incoming longwave radiation to melting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were conducted in Rocky Mountain evergreen forests of differing density, insolation and latitude to test whether air temperatures are suitable surrogates for canopy temperature in estimating sub-canopy longwave irradiance to snow. Under conditions of low to no insolation then air temper...

  7. Misestimation of temperature when applying Maxwellian distributions to space plasmas described by kappa distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Georgios; Livadiotis, George

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the misestimation of temperature when observations from a kappa distributed plasma are analyzed as a Maxwellian. One common method to calculate the space plasma parameters is by fitting the observed distributions using known analytical forms. More often, the distribution function is included in a forward model of the instrument's response, which is used to reproduce the observed energy spectrograms for a given set of plasma parameters. In both cases, the modeled plasma distribution fits the measurements to estimate the plasma parameters. The distribution function is often considered to be Maxwellian even though in many cases the plasma is better described by a kappa distribution. In this work we show that if the plasma is described by a kappa distribution, the derived temperature assuming Maxwell distribution can be significantly off. More specifically, we derive the plasma temperature by fitting a Maxwell distribution to pseudo-data produced by a kappa distribution, and then examine the difference of the derived temperature as a function of the kappa index. We further consider the concept of using a forward model of a typical plasma instrument to fit its observations. We find that the relative error of the derived temperature is highly depended on the kappa index and occasionally on the instrument's field of view and response.

  8. The research of improvements in Raman distributed temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Li-na; Zhang, Shu-juan

    2014-12-01

    Temperature measurement system has been applied in industrial areas extensively. The fiber optic distributed temperature system is one of the most popular means. Measurement error is relatively large when using the distributed temperature sensors (DTS) based on Raman scattering to measure ambient temperature in harsh environments. In this paper, we propose a novel calibration technique to measure the temperature highly accurately over a wide range of temperatures. We also propose an improved double-ended configuration that is insusceptible to the differential loss change in the fiber. By using the improved double-ended configuration, through the anti-Stokes and Stokes signal intensity comparison, the differential mode signal loss in the temperature measurement can be suppressed in optical fiber. So, the measurement results of automatic calibration are irrespectively with the wastage of optical fiber sensors. The result shows that we can obtain the temperature parameters accuracy in wide temperature range, and temperature measurement system has high robustness in harsh environments, suitable for field use.

  9. Measuring Temperature in Pipe Flow with Non-Homogeneous Temperature Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klason, P.; Kok, G. J.; Pelevic, N.; Holmsten, M.; Ljungblad, S.; Lau, P.

    2014-04-01

    Accurate temperature measurements in flow lines are critical for many industrial processes. It is normally more a rule than an exception in such applications to obtain water flows with inhomogeneous temperature distributions. In this paper, a number of comparisons were performed between different 100 ohm platinum resistance thermometer (Pt-100) configurations and a new speed-of-sound-based temperature sensor used to measure the average temperature of water flows with inhomogeneous temperature distributions. The aim was to achieve measurement deviations lower than 1 K for the temperature measurement of water flows with inhomogeneous temperature distributions. By using a custom-built flow injector, a water flow with a hot-water layer on top of a cold-water layer was created. The temperature difference between the two layers was up to 32 K. This study shows that the deviations to the temperature reference for the average temperature of four Pt-100s, the multisensor consisting of nine Pt-100s, and the new speed-of-sound sensors are remarkably lower than the deviation for a single Pt-100 under the same conditions. The aim of reaching a deviation lower than 1 K was achieved with the speed-of-sound sensors, the configuration with four Pt-100s, and the multisensor. The promising results from the speed-of sound temperature sensors open the possibility for an integrated flow and temperature sensor. In addition, the immersion depth of a single Pt-100 was also investigated at three different water temperatures.

  10. NUMERICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN THE ROLLING MILL ROLLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Claudino de Lira Júnior

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In hot rolling processes occur changes in the profile of the rolling mill rolls (expansion and contraction and constant wear due to mechanical stress and continuous thermal cycles of heating/cooling caused by contact rolled material- working roll and the cooling system by water jets in their surface, decreasing their lifetime. This paper presents a computational model to simulate the thermal performance of rolling mill rolls. The model was developed using the finite volume method for a transient two-dimensional system and allows calculating the temperature distribution of the rolling mill rolls under various conditions of service. Here it is investigated the influence of flow rate and temperature of the cooling water on the temperature distribution. The results show that the water temperature has greater influence than the water flow to control the surface temperature of the cylinders.

  11. Induction heating pure vapor source of high temperature melting point materials on electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsumi, Osamu; Kato, Yushi; Matsui, Yuuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Uchida, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    Multicharged ions that are needed are produced from solid pure material with high melting point in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We develop an evaporator by using induction heating (IH) with multilayer induction coil, which is made from bare molybdenum or tungsten wire without water cooling and surrounding the pure vaporized material. We optimize the shapes of induction coil and vaporized materials and operation of rf power supply. We conduct experiment to investigate the reproducibility and stability in the operation and heating efficiency. IH evaporator produces pure material vapor because materials directly heated by eddy currents have no contact with insulated materials, which are usually impurity gas sources. The power and the frequency of the induction currents range from 100 to 900 W and from 48 to 23 kHz, respectively. The working pressure is about 10(-4)-10(-3) Pa. We measure the temperature of the vaporized materials with different shapes, and compare them with the result of modeling. We estimate the efficiency of the IH vapor source. We are aiming at the evaporator's higher melting point material than that of iron.

  12. Interaction processes between vacancies and dislocations in molybdenum in the temperature range around 0.3 of the melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelada-Lambri, G.I. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Lambri, O.A. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Rosario, Member of the CONICET' s Research Staff (Argentina)], E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.ar; Bozzano, P.B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica, Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain); Celauro, C.A. [Reactor Nuclear RA-4, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Riobamba y Berruti, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2008-10-15

    Mechanical spectroscopy, electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed on pre-strained neutron irradiated single crystalline molybdenum in order to check the interaction processes between vacancies and dislocations in the temperature range between room temperature and 1273 K. The anelastic relaxation in molybdenum which appears between 800 K and 1273 K has been separated in two different physical mechanisms depending on the temperature of appearance of the relaxation peak. The physical mechanism which controls the damping peak appearing at around 800 K was related with the dragging of jogs by the dislocation under movement assisted by vacancy diffusion. The damping peak which appears at higher temperatures of about 1000 K was more consistent with the formation and diffusion of vacancies assisted by the dislocation movement.

  13. Temperature distribution study in flash-annealed amorphous ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, C. E-mail: cmoron@eui.upm.es; Garcia, A.; Carracedo, M.T

    2003-01-01

    Negative magnetrostrictive amorphous ribbons have been locally current annealed with currents from 1 to 8 A and annealing times from 14 ms to 200 s. In order to obtain information about the sample temperature during flash or current annealing, a study of the temperature dispersion during annealing in amorphous ribbons was made. The local temperature variation was obtained by measuring the local intensity of the infrared emission of the sample with a CCD liquid nitrogen cooled camera. A distribution of local temperature has been found in spite of the small dimension of the sample.

  14. Hot melt extrusion for amorphous solid dispersions: temperature and moisture activated drug-polymer interactions for enhanced stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Ashish L; Sandhu, Harpreet; Shah, Navnit; Malick, Waseem; Zia, Hossein

    2013-10-07

    Hot melt extrudates (HMEs) of indomethacin (IND) with Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64 and those of itraconazole (ITZ) with HPMCAS-LF and Kollidon VA 64 were manufactured using a Leistritz twin screw extruder. The milled HMEs were stored at controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were collected after specified time periods for 3 months. The stability of amorphous HMEs was assessed using moisture analysis, thermal evaluation, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, HPLC, and dissolution study. In general, the moisture content increased with time, temperature, and humidity levels. Amorphous ITZ was physically unstable at very high temperature and humidity levels, and its recrystallization was detected in the HMEs manufactured using Kollidon VA 64. Although physical stability of IND was better sustained by both Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64, chemical degradation of the drug was identified in the stability samples of HMEs with Eudragit EPO stored at 50 °C. The dissolution rates and the supersaturation levels were significantly decreased for the stability samples in which crystallization was detected. Interestingly, the supersaturation was improved for the stability samples of IND:Eudragit EPO and ITZ:HPMCAS-LF, in which no physical or chemical instability was observed. This enhancement in supersaturation was attributed to the temperature and moisture activated electrostatic interactions between the drugs and their counterionic polymers.

  15. Temperature distributions in pavement and bridge slabs heated by using vertical ground-source heat pump systems - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i4.15712

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asım Balbay

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperature distribution which occurs in pavement and bridge slabs heated for de-icing and snow melting during cold periods is determined by using vertical ground-source heat pump (GSHP systems with U-tube ground heat exchanger (GHE. The bridge and pavement models (slabs for de-icing and snow melting were constructed. A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM was developed to simulate temperature distribution of bridge slab (BS and pavement slab (PS. The temperature distribution simulations of PS and BS were conducted numerically by computational fluid dynamics (CFD program named ‘Fluent’. Congruence between the simulations and experimental data was determined.   

  16. The Influence of Constitutional Supercooling on the Distribution of Te-particles in Melt-Grown CZT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Alvine, Kyle J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bliss, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Jean A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-03

    A section of a vertical gradient freeze Cd0.9Zn0.1Te boule approximately 2100-mm3 with a planar area of 300-mm2 was prepared and examined using transmitted IR microscopy at various magnifications to determine the three-dimensional spatial and size distributions of Te-particles over large longitudinal and radial length scales. Te-particle density distributions were determined as a function of longitudinal and radial positions in these strips and exhibited a multi-modal lognormal size density distribution that indicated a slight preference for increasing size with longitudinal growth time, while showing a pronounced cellular network structure. Higher magnification images revealed a typical Rayleigh-instability pearl string morphology with large and small satellite droplets. This study includes solidification experiments in small crucibles of 30:70 mixtures of Cd:Te performed over a wide range of cooling rates that clearly demonstrated a growth instability with Te-particle capture that is suggested to be responsible for one of the peaks in the size distribution using size discrimination visualization. The results are discussed with regard to a manifold Te-particle genesis history as Te-particle direct capture from melt-solid growth instabilities due to constitutional supercooling and as Te-particle formation from the breakup of Te-ribbons via a Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  17. Determination of gas temperature in the plasmatron channel according to the known distribution of electronic temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method to calculate the temperature distribution of heavy particles in the channel of the plasma torch on the known distribution of the electronic temperature has been proposed. The results can be useful for a number of model calculations in determining the most effective conditions of gas blowing through the plasma torch with the purpose of heating the heavy component. This approach allows us to understand full details about the heating of cold gas, inpouring the plasma, and to estimate correctly the distribution of the gas temperature inside the channel.

  18. Temperature Distribution within a Cold Cap during Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Derek R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2015-07-21

    The kinetics of the feed-to-glass conversion affects the waste vitrification rate in an electric melter. The primary area of interest in this conversion process is the cold cap, a layer of reacting feed on top of molten glass. Knowing the temperature profile within a cold cap will help determine its characteristics and relate them to the rate of glass production. The work presented here provides an experimental determination of the temperature distribution within the cold cap. Since a direct measurement of the temperature field within the cold cap is impracticable, an indirect method was developed where the textural features in a laboratory-made cold cap with a high-level waste feed were mapped as a function of position using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. To correlate the temperature distribution to microstructures within the cold cap, microstructures were identified of individual feed samples that were heat treated to set temperatures between 400°C and 1200°C and quenched. The temperature distribution within the cold cap was then established by correlating cold-cap regions with the feed samples of nearly identical structures and was compared with the temperature profile from a mathematical model.

  19. Room-temperature sliding wear properties of laser melt deposited Cr13Ni5Si2/γalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yanli; WANG Huaming

    2007-01-01

    A wear-resistant alloy consisting of Cr13Ni5Si2 ternary silicide dendrites and the interdendritic nickel-base solid solution (γ) was designed and fabricated by the laser melting/continuous deposition (LMCD) process.The wear resistance of Cr13Ni5Si2/γalloy was evaluated on an MM-200 block-on-wheel dry sliding wear tester at room temperature. Results indicate that the Cr13Ni5Si2/γ alloy has excellent wear resistance and extremely low load-sensitivity of wear under dry sliding wear test conditions due to the high toughness and the high strength,as well as the transferred cover-layer on the worn surface of the alloy.

  20. Measurement of solid-liquid interfacial energy in the In-Bi eutectic alloy at low melting temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marasli, N [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Akbulut, S [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Ocak, Y [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keslioglu, K [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Boeyuek, U [Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Kaya, H [Department of Science Education, Education Faculty, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Cadirli, E [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey)

    2007-12-19

    The Gibbs-Thomson coefficient and solid-liquid interfacial energy of the solid In solution in equilibrium with In Bi eutectic liquid have been determined to be (1.46 {+-} 0.07) x 10{sup -7} K m and (40.4 {+-} 4.0) x 10{sup -3} J m{sup -2} by observing the equilibrated grain boundary groove shapes. The grain boundary energy of the solid In solution phase has been calculated to be (79.0 {+-} 8.7) x 10{sup -3} J m{sup -2} by considering force balance at the grain boundary grooves. The thermal conductivities of the In-12.4 at.% Bi eutectic liquid phase and the solid In solution phase and their ratio at the eutectic melting temperature (72 deg. C) have also been measured with radial heat flow apparatus and Bridgman-type growth apparatus.

  1. Discrimination of closely homologous HPV types by nonisotopic in situ hybridization: definition and derivation of tissue melting temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, C S; Graham, A K; Flannery, D M; Burns, J; McGee, J O

    1990-10-01

    It is generally assumed that nucleic acid association during in situ hybridization reactions is similar to that of nucleic acid association in solution. This assumption has been investigated by detecting closely homologous human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 by in situ hybridization as a model for the evaluation of stringency conditions in clinical biopsies. By examining matched and mismatched, labelled and target sequences under various stringency conditions, empirical DNA-DNA stability curves and their derivative equations for tissue melting temperatures (Tmt) were derived. The corresponding values for Tmt are 10-20 degrees C higher than their solution equivalents. These data, supported by polymerase chain reaction experiments, demonstrate that closely homologous viral DNAs cross linked in tissue by formaldehyde fixation do not interact with the corresponding labelled probes as predicted from solution kinetic equations. This not only has theoretical implications but is also relevant to the accuracy of clinical diagnostic testing.

  2. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  3. Temperature and flow distribution in planar SOFC stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Østenstad

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stack requires the solution of the mass balances of the chemical species, the energy balances, the charge balance and the channel flow equations in order to compute the species concentrations, the temperature distributions, the current density and the channel flows. The unit cell geometry can be taken into account by combining detailed modeling of a unit cell with a homogenized model of a whole stack. In this study the effect of the asymmetric temperature distribution on the channel flows in a conventional cross-flow design has been investigated. The bidirectional cross-flow design is introduced, for which we can show more directional temperature and flow distributions.

  4. Structural and elemental analysis of melt-processible high-temperature superconductors by surface science and x-ray diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, A.M.; Sheng, Z.Z.; El Ali, A.; Mooney, G.D.; Nelson, A.J.; Goral, J.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1988-11-15

    We report the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis (wavelength dispersive and energy dispersive spectroscopies), secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and x-ray diffraction measurements on a series of melt-processed high critical-temperature superconductors. The superconductors were synthesized through a melt reaction between TbBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ and nonstoichiometric rare-earth Ba-Cu-O oxides. The melt-processed samples are dense, largely void-free superconductors with critical temperatures in the 90--95 K range. Microprobe and SIMS data show the absence of Tb in surfaces of the interiors of samples which had been fractured to expose the interior regions. Comparative microprobe and SEM data are included for conventionally prepared sintered samples. Comparative x-ray diffraction studies are presented which show that the melt-processed samples studied have diffraction patterns nearly identical to those of sintered (rare earth)Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ samples. In two of the three Y-based melt-processed superconductors studied, the compound stoichiometry from microprobe analysis is Y/sub 1/Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/. The evidence presented indicates that the TbBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub x/ decomposes during the melt reaction.

  5. Simulation of Temperature Distribution in TIG Spot Welds of(Al-Mg Alloy Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlam Abid Ameer Alkhafajy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research concern to analyse and simulate the temperature distribution in the spot welding joints using tungsten arc welding shielded with inert gas (TIG Spot for the aluminum-magnesium alloy type (5052-O. The effect of and the quantity of the heat input that enter the weld zone has been investigated welding current, welding time and arc length on temperature distribution. The finite element method (by utilizing programme ANSYS 5.4 is presented the temperature distribution in a circular weld pool and the weld pool penetration (depth of welding through the top sheet ,across the interface into the lower sheet forming a weld spot. A three dimensional (3-D model has been constructed to study the temperature distribution and the depth or penetration of the weld spot. The results showed that the weld zone and heat affected zone (HAZ suffer from high temperature variation caused by severe thermal cycle. The temperature reaches the highest value of the melt metal at the weld spot 698°C at weld current 130 Amp, weld time 6 sec and arc length 1.6 mm, then drops further away from the weld spot in the direction the base metal. Figuers were plotted to explain the results and to show the temperature distribution and its value in the weld spot and heat effected zone.

  6. Temperature dependence of the slip length in polymer melts at attractive surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servantie, J; Müller, M

    2008-07-11

    Using Couette and Poiseuille flows, we extract the temperature dependence of the slip length, delta, from molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained polymer model in contact with an attractive surface. delta is dictated by the ratio of bulk viscosity and surface mobility. At weakly attractive surfaces, lubrication layers form; delta is large and increases upon cooling. Close to the glass transition temperature Tg, very large slip lengths are observed. At a more attractive surface, a sticky surface layer is built up, giving rise to small slip lengths. Upon cooling, delta decreases at high temperatures, passes through a minimum, and grows for T-->Tg. At strongly attractive surfaces, the Navier-slip condition fails to describe Couette and Poiseuille flows simultaneously. The simulations are corroborated by a schematic, two-layer model suggesting that the observations do not depend on details of the computational model.

  7. Temperature Distribution Pattern of Brassica chinensis during Vacuum Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature distribution of leafy vegetables is often less uniform than that of other vegetables during the vacuum cooling process, a factor that can cause undesired effects such as frostbite. Brassica chinensis, a type of classical leafy vegetable, was used as a model in this paper to optimize vacuum cooling technology for the whole and fresh-cut leafy vegetables. We found that noticeable temperature differences between the leaf and the petiole occurred, which resulted from their structural difference. Temperature variations of different parts of the leaf were also observed, indicating that cooling rate of leaf margin was quicker than the other parts. Our experiments show that using a moderate volumetric displacement of the chamber (0.033 s−1 is beneficial for obtaining a relative uniform temperature distribution of the leaf part.

  8. Beyond average temperature: distribution of wintering birds at multiple scales

    OpenAIRE

    Villén Pérez, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Ecología. Fecha de lectura: 03-12-2013 To disentangle the subtleties of the relationship between the thermal environment and the distribution of wintering birds, at multiple spatial scales. Specifically, to analyze the relative influence of temperature on species distributions, its interaction with various thermal and non-thermal factors, and the context-dependence of these relationships...

  9. Quantifying melting and mobilistaion of interstitial melts in crystal mushes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veksler, Ilya; Dobson, Katherine; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Ertel-Ingrisch, Werner; Humphreys, Madeleine

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of crystals mushes and separation of melts and crystals in is critical to understanding the development of physical and chemical heterogeneity in magma chambers and has been invoked as an eruption trigger mechanism. Here we investigate the behaviour of the melt in the well characterised, classic crystal mush system of the Skaergaard intrusion by combining experimental petrology and the non-destructive 3D imaging methods. Starting materials for partial melting experiments were four samples from the upper Middle Zone of the Layered Series. Cylinders, 15 mm in diameter and 20 mm in length, were drilled out of the rock samples, placed in alumina crucibles and held for 5 days in electric furnaces at atmospheric pressure and 1050-1100 °C. Redox conditions set by the CO-CO2 gas mixture were kept close to those of the FMQ buffer. We then use spatially registered 3D x-ray computed tomography images, collected before and after the experiment, to determine the volume and distribution of the crystal framework and interstitial phases, and the volume, distribution and connectivity the interstitial phases that undergo melting and extraction while at elevated temperature. Image analysis has allowed us to quantify these physical changes with high spatial resolution. Our work is a first step towards quantitative understanding of the melt mobilisation and migration processes operating in notionally locked crystal rich magmatic systems.

  10. Does Ice Dissolve or Does Halite Melt? A Low-Temperature Liquidus Experiment for Petrology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of the compositions and temperatures of H2O-NaCl brines in equilibrium with ice can be used as an easy in-class experimental determination of a liquidus. This experiment emphasizes the symmetry of the behavior of brines with regard to the minerals ice and halite and helps to free students from the conceptual tethers of one-component…

  11. Does Ice Dissolve or Does Halite Melt? A Low-Temperature Liquidus Experiment for Petrology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of the compositions and temperatures of H2O-NaCl brines in equilibrium with ice can be used as an easy in-class experimental determination of a liquidus. This experiment emphasizes the symmetry of the behavior of brines with regard to the minerals ice and halite and helps to free students from the conceptual tethers of one-component…

  12. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  13. Predicting critical temperatures of ionic and non-ionic fluids from thermophysical data obtained near the melting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Volker C

    2015-10-14

    In the correlation and prediction of thermophysical data of fluids based on a corresponding-states approach, the critical temperature Tc plays a central role. For some fluids, in particular ionic ones, however, the critical region is difficult or even impossible to access experimentally. For molten salts, Tc is on the order of 3000 K, which makes accurate measurements a challenging task. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) decompose thermally between 400 K and 600 K due to their organic constituents; this range of temperatures is hundreds of degrees below recent estimates of their Tc. In both cases, reliable methods to deduce Tc based on extrapolations of experimental data recorded at much lower temperatures near the triple or melting points are needed and useful because the critical point influences the fluid's behavior in the entire liquid region. Here, we propose to employ the scaling approach leading to universal fluid behavior [Román et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124512 (2005)] to derive a very simple expression that allows one to estimate Tc from the density of the liquid, the surface tension, or the enthalpy of vaporization measured in a very narrow range of low temperatures. We demonstrate the validity of the approach for simple and polar neutral fluids, for which Tc is known, and then use the methodology to obtain estimates of Tc for ionic fluids. When comparing these estimates to those reported in the literature, good agreement is found for RTILs, whereas the ones for the molten salts NaCl and KCl are lower than previous estimates by 10%. The coexistence curve for ionic fluids is found to be more adequately described by an effective exponent of βeff = 0.5 than by βeff = 0.33.

  14. Temperature Distribution and Heat Saturating Time of Regenerative Heat Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li JIA; Ying MAO; Lixin YANG

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, heat transfer of the ceramic honeycomb regenerator was numerically simulated based on the computational fluid dynamics numerical analysis software CFX5. The longitudinal temperature distribution of regenerator and gas were obtained. The variation of temperature with time was discussed. In addition, the effects of some parameters such as switching time, gas temperature at the inlet of regenerator, height of regenerator and specific heat of the regenerative materials on heat saturating time were discussed. It provided primarily theoretic basis for further study of regenerative heat transfer mechanism.

  15. Temperature measurements of partially-melted tin as a function of shock pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifter, Achim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Furlanetto, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obst, Andrew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Payton, J R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stone, J B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grover, M [NST; Macrum, G [NST; Stevens, G D [NST; Swift, D C [LLNL; Turley, W D [NST; Veeser, L R [NST

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium equation of state theory predicts that the free surface release temperature of shock loaded tin will show a plateau of 505 K in the pressure range from 19.5 to 33.0 GPa, corresponding to the solid-liquid mixed-phase region. In this paper we report free surface temperature measurements on shock-loaded tin from 15 to 31 GPa using multi-wavelength optical pyrometry. The shock waves were generated by direct contact of detonating high explosive with the sample. The pressure in the sample was determined by free surface velocity measurements using Photon Doppler Velocimetry. The emitted thermal radiance was measured at four wavelength bands in the near IR region from 1.5 to 5.0 {micro}m. The samples in most of the experiments had diamond-turned surface finishes, with a few samples being polished or ball rolled. At pressures higher than 25 GPa the measured free surface temperatures were higher than the predicted 505 K and increased with increasing pressure. This deviation could be explained by hot spots and/or variations in surface emissivity and requires a further investigation.

  16. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing for the determination of air temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, S.A.P.; Slingerland, J.D.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a method to correct for the effect of solar radiation in atmospheric distributed temperature sensing (DTS) applications. By using two cables with different diameters, one can determine what temperature a zero diameter cable would have. Such a virtual cable would not be affected

  17. Soil temperature variability in complex terrain measured using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil temperature (Ts) exerts critical controls on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes but magnitude and nature of Ts variability in a landscape setting are rarely documented. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing systems (FO-DTS) potentially measure Ts at high density over a large extent. ...

  18. Power dissipation and temperature distribution in piezoelectric ceramic slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D; Ebenezer, D D; Srinivasan, Sivakumar M

    2010-10-01

    A method is presented to determine power dissipation in one-dimensional piezoelectric slabs with internal losses and the resulting temperature distribution. The length of the slab is much greater than the lateral dimensions. Losses are represented using complex piezoelectric coefficients. It is shown that the spatially non-uniform power dissipation density in the slab can be determined by considering either hysteresis loops or the Poynting vector. The total power dissipated in the slab is obtained by integrating the power dissipation density over the slab and is shown to be equal to the power input to the slab for special cases of mechanically and electrically excited slabs. The one-dimensional heat equation that includes the effect of conduction and convection, and the boundary conditions, are then used to determine the temperature distribution. When the analytical expression for the power dissipation density is simple, direct integration is used. It is shown that a modified Fourier series approach yields the same results. For other cases, the temperature distribution is determined using only the latter approach. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the effects of internal losses, heat conduction and convection coefficients, and boundary conditions on the temperature distribution.

  19. Control and modelling of vertical temperature distribution in greenhouse crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempkes, F.L.K.; Bakker, J.C.; Braak, van de N.J.

    1998-01-01

    Based on physical transport processes (radiation, convection and latent heat transfer) a model has been developed to describe the vertical temperature distribution of a greenhouse crop. The radiation exchange factors between heating pipes, crop layers, soil and roof were determined as a function of

  20. Temperature dependent fission fragment distribution in the Langevin equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; MA Yu-Gang; ZHENG Qing-Shan; CAI Xiang-Zhou; FANG De-Qing; FU Yao; LU Guang-Cheng; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependent width of the fission fragment distributions was simulated in the Langevin equation by taking two-parameter exponential form of the fission fragment mass variance at scission point for each fission event. The result can reproduce experimental data well, and it permits to make reliable estimate for unmeasured product yields near symmetry fission.

  1. Room temperature magneto-structural transition in Al for Sn substituted Ni–Mn–Sn melt spun ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziarz, W. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Czaja, P., E-mail: p.czaja@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Szczerba, M.J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Przewoźnik, J.; Kapusta, C. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Department of Solid State Physics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Żywczak, A.; Stobiecki, T. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Cesari, E. [Department de Fisica, Universitat de Illes Balears, Ctra. de Valldemossa, km 7.5, Palma de Mallorca E-07071 (Spain); Dutkiewicz, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 W. Reymonta Str., 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2013-12-15

    Martensitic and magnetic transformations in Ni{sub 48}Mn{sub 39.5}Sn{sub 12.5−x}Al{sub x} (x=0, 1, 2, 3) Heusler alloy ribbons were investigated. It is demonstrated that both magnetic and structural transformations occur in all of the studied samples. It is also shown that substitution of Sn with Al causes the martensitic transformation (MT) and the reverse martensitic transformation (RMT) temperatures to increase to room temperature (ΔT{sub MT}=49 K; ΔT{sub RMT}=43 K), whereas the Curie temperature of martensite T{sub C}{sup M} decreases (ΔT=36 K) and the Curie temperature of austenite T{sub C}{sup A} remains practically insensitive to Al introduction. This then allows to tune T{sub C}{sup A} and the MT temperature leading to their coincidence at ambient temperature. The austenite phase with the L2{sub 1} type structure has been identified to exist in all the samples regardless of composition. On the other hand the structure of martensite has been shown to be sensitive to composition. It has been determined as the 10 M martensite with (32{sup ¯}) stacking sequence in Al free samples and the 4O martensite with the stacking periodicity (31{sup ¯}) in Al containing samples. In addition, the splitting of the field cooling (FC) and the field heating (FH) thermo-magnetic curves at low (50 Oe) magnetic field and below the T{sub C}{sup M} has been attributed to intermartensitic transition. The application of large magnetic field (50 kOe) has shown the existence of two distinct ferromagnetic states with a considerable hysteresis loop. The properties of these materials make them promising for magnetocaloric applications. - Highlights: • Al for Sn substituted Ni–Mn–Sn based ferromagnetic Heusler alloys were produced by melt spinning. • Martensitic, reverse martensitic and intermartensitic transformations were observed, their temperatures and magnitude changed with Al substitution. • Different types of martensite structures were identified depending on Al

  2. Investigation of the temperature dependence of the critical state in melt processed YBa2Cu3O7-∂ thick films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, C. D.; Cardwell, D. A.; Alford, N. McN.

    1995-03-01

    The inter- and intra-grain critical current densities of melt processed YBa2Cu3O7-∂ (YBCO) thick films have been measured as a function of temperature using vibrating sample magnetometry. The width of the M-H hysteresis curve has been observed to scale with the cube of the sample width for temperatures up to ˜70 K and applied fields of greater than 1 T which implies that current flows on the length scale of the sample over this temperature and field regime. An exponential decrease of magnetic moment hysteresis with temperature up to ˜70 K and between ˜80 K and Tc has been observed and attributed to the dominance of inter- and intra-granular current, respectively. An empirical model is presented to account for the observed dependence of the critical current density on temperature, based upon weak link behavior within the ``Hub and Spoke'' like morphology characteristic of melt processed YBCO thick films.

  3. Prediction of temperature distribution in the hot rolling of slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serajzadeh, S.; Karimi Taheri, A.; Mucciardi, F.

    2002-03-01

    In the process of continuous hot slab rolling, it is vital to know the temperature distribution within the slab along the length of the rolling mill because temperature is the dominant parameter controlling the kinetics of metallurgical transformations and the flow stress of the rolled metal. In other words, the microstructural changes, the mechanical properties as well as the final dimensions of the product and roll-force depend on the temperature distribution within the metal being rolled. In this paper, a mathematical model based on the finite element method is utilized to predict the temperature distribution and microstructural changes during the continuous hot slab rolling process. The effects of various parameters such as the heat of deformation, the work-roll temperature, the rolling speed, and the heat transfer coefficient between the work-roll and the metal are all taken into account in the analyses. To verify the validity of the model and the generated computer code, a comparison is carried out between the theoretical and plant-recorded results.

  4. Experimental investigations and CFD study of temperature distribution during oscillating combustion in a crucible furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Govardhan, G.V.S. Rao, J. Narasaiah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of an investigation few experiments were conducted to study the enhanced heat transfer rate and increased furnace efficiency in a diesel fired crucible furnace with oscillating combustion. The results of experimental investigations of temperature distribution inside the crucible furnace during oscillating combustion are validated with the numerical simulation CFD code. At first pragmatic study of temperature distribution inside a furnace was carried out with conventional mode of combustion at certain conditions and later transient behavior similar to that is conducted with oscillating combustion mode with the same conditions. There found to be enhanced heat transfer rate, reduced processing time and increased furnace efficiency with visibly clean emissions during the oscillating combustion mode than the conventional combustion mode. In the present paper the temperatures inside the furnace at few designated points measured by suitable K type thermo-couples are compared with the CFD code. The geometric models were created in ANSYS and the configuration was an asymmetric one for computational reason. The experimental and numerical investigations produce similar acceptable results. The presented results show that the 3D transient model appeared to be an effective numerical tool for the simulation of the crucible furnace for melting processes.

  5. TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION MONITORING AND ANALYSES AT DIFFERENT HEATING CONTROL PRINCIPLES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Rode, Carsten; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2010-01-01

    control sensor which was already installed. The room was heated by means of electrical radiators, which should be able to control the indoor environment to guarantee the desired thermal conditions for the occupants and to supply heat according to desired load patterns. Five series of experiments were done......In the last decades significant efforts have been made to reduce energy use in buildings. Heating, cooling and ventilation systems are responsible for 30-40% of the energy consumption in buildings. Although they are evaluated based on the energy performance they should guarantee the desired thermal...... comfort conditions for the building occupants. During the winter and spring of 2009 a study based on analyses of the local temperatures distribution in a room was performed. The purpose was to compare the temperature distribution in the room with the temperature measured and logged by the heating system...

  6. Selective laser melting additive manufactured Inconel 718 superalloy parts: High-temperature oxidation property and its mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingbo; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    This work presented a comprehensive study of high-temperature oxidation behaviors and mechanisms of Selective laser melting (SLM) processed Inconel 718 superalloy parts using different methods including isothermal oxidation testing, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that the oxidation process of the tested parts processed at a lower volumetric laser energy density experienced the severe spallation. On reasonably increasing the applied volumetric laser energy density, the oxidation kinetics of the as-produced parts obeyed a parabolic law, exhibiting the significantly improved oxidation resistance performance. The constitutional phases within the oxidation film were identified and the corresponding formation mechanisms were elucidated in detail according to the thermodynamic principles. The cross-sectional morphologies of oxidized Inconel 718 parts indicated that the oxidation microstructure mainly consisted of an external oxidation layer and an internal oxidation zone. The oxidation process was controlled by the outward diffusion of oxide forming elements and inward penetration of oxygen, by which the interaction mechanisms between the microstructures and internal oxidation zones were clarified. On the basis of the experimental results and theoretical analyses, the physical oxidation mechanisms were accordingly established to illustrate the oxidation behaviors of SLM-processed Inconel 718 parts at elevated operative temperatures.

  7. Numerical modeling of temperature distributions within the neonatal head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, G M; Hand, J W; Lagendijk, J J; Azzopardi, D V; Edwards, A D

    2000-09-01

    Introduction of hypothermia therapy as a neuroprotection therapy after hypoxia-ischemia in newborn infants requires appraisal of cooling methods. In this numerical study thermal simulations were performed to test the hypothesis that cooling of the surface of the cranium by the application of a cooling bonnet significantly reduces deep brain temperature and produces a temperature differential between the deep brain and the body core. A realistic three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of infant head anatomy was used, derived from magnetic resonance data from a newborn infant. Temperature distributions were calculated using the Pennes heatsink model. The cooling bonnet was at a constant temperature of 10 degrees C. When modeling head cooling only, a constant body core temperature of 37 degrees C was imposed. The computed result showed no significant cooling of the deep brain regions, only the very superficial regions of the brain are cooled to temperatures of 33-34 degrees C. Poor efficacy of head cooling was still found after a considerable increase in the modeled thermal conductivities of the skin and skull, or after a decrease in perfusion. The results for the heatsink thermal model of the infant head were confirmed by comparison of results computed for a scaled down adult head, using both the heatsink description and a discrete vessel thermal model with both anatomy and vasculature obtained from MR data. The results indicate that significant reduction in brain temperature will only be achieved if the infant's core temperature is lowered.

  8. The Effects of Annealing Temperatures on Composition and Strain in SixGe1−x Obtained by Melting Growth of Electrodeposited Ge on Si (100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastura Shafinaz Zainal Abidin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of annealing temperatures on composition and strain in SixGe1−x, obtained by rapid melting growth of electrodeposited Ge on Si (100 substrate were investigated. Here, a rapid melting process was performed at temperatures of 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C for 1 s. All annealed samples show single crystalline structure in (100 orientation. A significant appearance of Si-Ge vibration mode peak at ~400 cm−1 confirms the existence of Si-Ge intermixing due to out-diffusion of Si into Ge region. On a rapid melting process, Ge melts and reaches the thermal equilibrium in short time. Si at Ge/Si interface begins to dissolve once in contact with the molten Ge to produce Si-Ge intermixing. The Si fraction in Si-Ge intermixing was calculated by taking into account the intensity ratio of Ge-Ge and Si-Ge vibration mode peaks and was found to increase with the annealing temperatures. It is found that the strain turns from tensile to compressive as the annealing temperature increases. The Si fraction dependent thermal expansion coefficient of SixGe1−x is a possible cause to generate such strain behavior. The understanding of compositional and strain characteristics is important in Ge/Si heterostructure as these properties seem to give significant effects in device performance.

  9. Late Noachian Icy Highlands Climate Model: Exploring the Possibility of Transient Melting and Fluvial/Lacustrine Activity Through Peak Annual and Seasonal Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, A. M.; Head, J. W.; Wordsworth, R. D.

    2017-10-01

    We use the LMD GCM to explore the role of seasonal and diurnal temperature variation on a "cold and icy" early Mars. In a cold climate with MAT 243 K, peak summertime conditions permit ice melt, runoff, and possibly valley network formation.

  10. Optical-fiber distributed temperature sensor: design and realization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Ling; JIANG Mingshun; SUI Qing-mei; FENG De-jun

    2008-01-01

    Through analyzing theoretically the temperature effect of the optical-fiber Raman backscattering, a distributed temperaturesensor is designed based on the single-mode fiber. Demodulation methods of temperature transduction are compared, andthen the demodulation method using the ratio of the anti-Stokes and the Stokes Raman backscattering intensity is adopted.Both the hardware composition and the software realization of the system are introduced in detail.The experiment showsthat the distinguishing ability of the temperature and that of the space are 1℃ and 2 m, respectively, and that the systemresponse time is about 180 s with a sensing range of 5 km and with a temperature measurement range of 0-100℃.

  11. Simulation of temperature distribution of point contacts in mixed lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Yuchuan(刘雨川); HU; Yuanzhong(胡元中); WANG; Wenzhong; (王文中); WANG; Hui(王慧)

    2002-01-01

    The numerical simulation of temperature distribution of point contacts in mixed lubrication is presented. The calculating includes two steps. First, temperature rises on two surfaces are obtained by a temperature integration method of transient point heat source. Second, the partition coefficients of heat flux are determined by matching the temperature of two surfaces. Similar to the calculation of elastic deformation, double linear interpolation function is used to get a better accuracy, and moving grid method is used to increase the efficiency of the computation. Due to the symmetry of influence coefficient matrix in the direction perpendicular to the velocity, storage and computational work are further reduced by 50%. Numerical samples validate the algorithm and program. The calculating results of the cases of smooth surface and isotropic sinusoidal surface are presented.

  12. Distributed temperature sensing using a SPIRAL configuration ultrasonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    Distributed temperature sensing has important applications in the long term monitoring of critical enclosures such as containment vessels, flue gas stacks, furnaces, underground storage tanks and buildings for fire risk. This paper presents novel techniques for such measurements, using wire in a spiral configuration and having special embodiments such a notch for obtaining wave reflections from desired locations. Transduction is performed using commercially available Piezo-electric crystal that is bonded to one end of the waveguide. Lower order axisymmetric guided ultrasonic modes were employed. Time of fight (TOF) differences between predefined reflectors located on the waveguides are used to infer temperature profile in a chamber with different temperatures. The L(0,1) wave mode (pulse echo approach) was generated/received in a spiral waveguide at different temperatures for this work. The ultrasonic measurements were compared with commercially available thermocouples.

  13. Prediction of Skin Temperature Distribution in Cosmetic Laser Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Kuen; Chen, Kuen-Tasnn; Cheng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Wen-Shiung; Chang, Cheng-Ren

    2008-01-01

    The use of lasers in cosmetic surgery has increased dramatically in the past decade. To achieve minimal damage to tissues, the study of the temperature distribution of skin in laser irradiation is very important. The phenomenon of the thermal wave effect is significant due to the highly focused light energy of lasers in very a short time period. The conventional Pennes equation does not take the thermal wave effect into account, which the thermal relaxation time (τ) is neglected, so it is not sufficient to solve instantaneous heating and cooling problem. The purpose of this study is to solve the thermal wave equation to determine the realistic temperature distribution during laser surgery. The analytic solutions of the thermal wave equation are compared with those of the Pennes equation. Moreover, comparisons are made between the results of the above equations and the results of temperature measurement using an infrared thermal image instrument. The thermal wave equation could likely to predict the skin temperature distribution in cosmetic laser surgery.

  14. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time-integrated synchrotron Mössbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the γ-ɛ-l triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5GPa, 3345 ± 120K and 116 ± 5GPa, 3260 ± 120K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core-mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core-mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  15. Bottom temperature and salinity distribution and its variability around Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochumsen, Kerstin; Schnurr, Sarah M.; Quadfasel, Detlef

    2016-05-01

    The barrier formed by the Greenland-Scotland-Ridge (GSR) shapes the oceanic conditions in the region around Iceland. Deep water cannot be exchanged across the ridge, and only limited water mass exchange in intermediate layers is possible through deep channels, where the flow is directed southwestward (the Nordic Overflows). As a result, the near-bottom water masses in the deep basins of the northern North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas hold major temperature differences. Here, we use near-bottom measurements of about 88,000 CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) and bottle profiles, collected in the period 1900-2008, to investigate the distribution of near-bottom properties. Data are gridded into regular boxes of about 11 km size and interpolated following isobaths. We derive average spatial temperature and salinity distributions in the region around Iceland, showing the influence of the GSR on the near-bottom hydrography. The spatial distribution of standard deviation is used to identify local variability, which is enhanced near water mass fronts. Finally, property changes within the period 1975-2008 are presented using time series analysis techniques for a collection of grid boxes with sufficient data resolution. Seasonal variability, as well as long term trends are discussed for different bottom depth classes, representing varying water masses. The seasonal cycle is most pronounced in temperature and decreases with depth (mean amplitudes of 2.2 °C in the near surface layers vs. 0.2 °C at depths > 500 m), while linear trends are evident in both temperature and salinity (maxima in shallow waters of +0.33 °C/decade for temperature and +0.03/decade for salinity).

  16. Temperature Distribution within a Cold Cap during Nuclear Waste Vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Derek R; Schweiger, Michael J; Riley, Brian J; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel

    2015-07-21

    The kinetics of the feed-to-glass conversion affects the waste vitrification rate in an electric glass melter. The primary area of interest in this conversion process is the cold cap, a layer of reacting feed on top of the molten glass. The work presented here provides an experimental determination of the temperature distribution within the cold cap. Because direct measurement of the temperature field within the cold cap is impracticable, an indirect method was developed in which the textural features in a laboratory-made cold cap with a simulated high-level waste feed were mapped as a function of position using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature distribution within the cold cap was established by correlating microstructures of cold-cap regions with heat-treated feed samples of nearly identical structures at known temperatures. This temperature profile was compared with a mathematically simulated profile generated by a cold-cap model that has been developed to assess the rate of glass production in a melter.

  17. Temperature distribution and scuffing of tapered roller bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ailin; Wang, Jiugen

    2014-11-01

    In the field of aerospace, high-speed trains and automobile, etc, analysis of temperature filed and scuffing failure of tapered roller bearings are more important than ever, and the scuffing failure of elements of such rolling bearings under heavy load and high speed still cannot be effectively predicted yet. A simplified model of tapered roller bearings consisted of one inner raceway, one outer raceway and a tapered roller was established, in which the interaction of several heat sources is ignored. The contact mechanics model, temperature model and model of scuffing failure are synthesized, and the corresponding computer programs are developed to analyze the effects of bearings parameters, different material and operational conditions on thermal performance of bearings, and temperature distribution and the possibility of surface scuffing are obtained. The results show that load, speed, thermal conductivity and tapered roller materials influence temperature rise and scuffing failure of bearings. Ceramic material of tapered roller results in the decrease of scuffing possibility of bearings to a high extent than the conventional rolling bearing steel. Compared with bulk temperature, flash temperature on the surfaces of bearing elements has a little influence on maximum temperature rise of bearing elements. For the rolling bearings operated under high speed and heavy load, this paper proposes a method which can accurately calculate the possibility of scuffing failure of rolling bearings.

  18. Temperature Distribution and Scuffing of Tapered Roller Bearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ailin; WANG Jiugen

    2014-01-01

    In the field of aerospace, high-speed trains and automobile, etc, analysis of temperature filed and scuffing failure of tapered roller bearings are more important than ever, and the scuffing failure of elements of such rolling bearings under heavy load and high speed still cannot be effectively predicted yet. A simplified model of tapered roller bearings consisted of one inner raceway, one outer raceway and a tapered roller was established, in which the interaction of several heat sources is ignored. The contact mechanics model, temperature model and model of scuffing failure are synthesized, and the corresponding computer programs are developed to analyze the effects of bearings parameters, different material and operational conditions on thermal performance of bearings, and temperature distribution and the possibility of surface scuffing are obtained. The results show that load, speed, thermal conductivity and tapered roller materials influence temperature rise and scuffing failure of bearings. Ceramic material of tapered roller results in the decrease of scuffing possibility of bearings to a high extent than the conventional rolling bearing steel. Compared with bulk temperature, flash temperature on the surfaces of bearing elements has a little influence on maximum temperature rise of bearing elements. For the rolling bearings operated under high speed and heavy load, this paper proposes a method which can accurately calculate the possibility of scuffing failure of rolling bearings.

  19. A coupled melt-freeze temperature index approach in a one-layer model to predict bulk volumetric liquid water content dynamics in snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; De Michele, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Liquid water in snow rules runoff dynamics and wet snow avalanches release. Moreover, it affects snow viscosity and snow albedo. As a result, measuring and modeling liquid water dynamics in snow have important implications for many scientific applications. However, measurements are usually challenging, while modeling is difficult due to an overlap of mechanical, thermal and hydraulic processes. Here, we evaluate the use of a simple one-layer one-dimensional model to predict hourly time-series of bulk volumetric liquid water content in seasonal snow. The model considers both a simple temperature-index approach (melt only) and a coupled melt-freeze temperature-index approach that is able to reconstruct melt-freeze dynamics. Performance of this approach is evaluated at three sites in Japan. These sites (Nagaoka, Shinjo and Sapporo) present multi-year time-series of snow and meteorological data, vertical profiles of snow physical properties and snow melt lysimeters data. These data-sets are an interesting opportunity to test this application in different climatic conditions, as sites span a wide latitudinal range and are subjected to different snow conditions during the season. When melt-freeze dynamics are included in the model, results show that median absolute differences between observations and predictions of bulk volumetric liquid water content are consistently lower than 1 vol%. Moreover, the model is able to predict an observed dry condition of the snowpack in 80% of observed cases at a non-calibration site, where parameters from calibration sites are transferred. Overall, the analysis show that a coupled melt-freeze temperature-index approach may be a valid solution to predict average wetness conditions of a snow cover at local scale.

  20. Airflow and Temperature Distribution in Rooms with Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T. V.

    This thesis deals with air flow and temperature distribution in a room ventilated by the displacement principle. The characteristic features of the ventilation system are treated in the whole room but main emphasis is laid on the analysis of the stratified flow region in front of the inlet device....... After a prefatory description of the background and the fundamentals of displacement ventilation the objectives of the current study are specified. The subsequent sections describe the measurements of velocity and temperature profiles carried out in a full scale test room. Based on experimental data...

  1. Calibrating IR cameras for in-situ temperature measurement during the electron beam melt processing of Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Kirka, M. M.; Lloyd, P. D.; Dehoff, R. R.; Lowe, L. E.; Marlow, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ electron beam melt process monitoring and temperature measurements. Since standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption, two techniques for temperature calibrations are compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.

  2. Investigating the effect of surface water - groundwater interactions on stream temperature using Distributed temperature sensing and instream temperature model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karthikeyan, Matheswaran; Blemmer, Morten; Mortensen, Julie Flor;

    2011-01-01

    Surface water–groundwater interactions at the stream interface influences, and at times controls the stream temperature, a critical water property driving biogeochemical processes. This study investigates the effects of these interactions on temperature of Stream Elverdamsåen in Denmark using...... the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and instream temperature modelling. Locations of surface water–groundwater interactions were identified from the temperature data collected over a 2-km stream reach using a DTS system with 1-m spatial and 5-min temporal resolution. The stream under consideration...... exhibits three distinct thermal regimes within a 2 km reach length due to two major interactions. An energy balance model is used to simulate the instream temperature and to quantify the effect of these interactions on the stream temperature. This research demonstrates the effect of reach level small scale...

  3. MORPHOLOGY EVOLUTION IN PTFE AS A FUNCTION OF MELT TIME AND TEMPERATURE Ⅰ. HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT SINGLE- AND MULTI-MOLECULE FOLDED CHAIN SINGLE CRYSTALS AND BAND STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Yang; K.L.Petersen; R.A.Williams; P.H.Geil; T.C.Long; P.Xu

    2005-01-01

    The effect of sintering dispersed dispersion and nano-emulsion particles of high molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on a substrate as a function of "melt" time and temperature is described. Folded chain single crystals parallel to the substrate and as ribbons on-edge (with double striations), as well as bands, are produced for longer sintering times; particle merger and diffusion of individual molecules, crystallizing as folded chain, single (or few) molecule,single crystals when "trapped" on the substrate by cooling occur for shorter sintering times. It is suggested the observed structures develop with sintering time, in a mesomorphic melt. The structure of the nascent particles is also discussed.

  4. CRYSTALLIZATION AND MELTING OF NYLON 610

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the crystallization and melting of nylon 610. For nylon 610 crystallized from the melt state (260℃), the overall rate of bulk crystallization can be described by a simple Avrami equation with Avrami exponent n≈2, independent of crystallization temperature. With the experimentally obtained Tm0 (235℃~255℃) of nylon 610, the fold surface free energy σe was determined to be 35~38 erg/cm2. The effects of annealing temperature and time on the melting of quenched nylon 610 were also investigated. For nylon 610 quenched at room temperature there is only one DSC endotherm peak DSC scans on annealed samples exhibited an endotherm peak at approximately 10℃ above the annealing temperature. The size and position of the endothermic peak is strongly related to annealing temperature and time. An additional third melting was observed when quenched nylon 610 was annealed at high temperature for a sufficiently long residence time. The existence of the third melting peak suggests that more than one kind of distribution of lamella thickness may occur when quenched nylon610 is annealed. The implications of these results in terms of crystal thickening mechanism were discussed.

  5. Study of the Vertical Distribution of Air Temperature in Warehouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Porras-Amores

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Warehouses are usually large, plain industrial buildings commonly used for storage of goods. Vertical distribution of air temperature is an important aspect for indoor environment design, which must be taken into account by architects and engineers in the early stages of warehouse design. The aim of this work is to analyze the vertical temperature gradients existing in warehouses, quantifying their value and analyzing their evolution along the year. To do so, the study outlines the monitoring of several warehouses with different building typology and height located in different areas of Spain for a complete annual cycle. The results obtained when applying a simple linear regression analysis to 175,200 vertical temperature profiles show that there is a strong influence of the outdoor temperature over the stratification of the indoor air. During warm months, the ceiling and the upper strata get warmer, whereas the cold air accumulates in the lower levels, increasing the stratification of indoor air (maximum values between 0.3 °C/m and 0.7 °C/m. During cold months, the ceiling gets cold due to its contact with the outdoor air, therefore, the colder, heavier air moves down to the lower strata, registering insignificant vertical temperature differences. Air conditioning of the warehouse, besides controlling the temperature, limits the influence of the outdoor environment on the stratification of temperatures. The results of the study may be of great use for warehouses for products sensitive to temperature, which may suffer a different evolution, conservation or maturation when the temperature differences are maintained for a long time.

  6. Differential Transformation Method for Temperature Distribution in a Radiating Fin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, M.; Hosseini, M. J.; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    Radiating extended surfaces are widely used to enhance heat transfer between a primary surface and the environment. In this paper, the differential transformation method (DTM) is proposed for solving nonlinear differential equation of temperature distribution in a heat radiating fin. The concept...... of differential transformation is briefly introduced, and then we employed it to derive solutions of two nonlinear equations. The results obtained by DTM are compared with those derived from the analytical solution to verify the accuracy of the proposed method....

  7. Numerical methods for computing the temperature distribution in satellite systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Valadés Maturano, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] The present thesis has been done at ASTRIUM company to find new methods to obtain temperature distributions. Current software packages such as ESATAN or ESARAD provide not only excellent thermal analysis solutions, at a high price as they are very time consuming though, but also radiative simulations in orbit scenarios. Since licenses of this product are usually limited for the use of many engineers, it is important to provide new tools to do these calculations. In consequence, a dif...

  8. Numerical methods for computing the temperature distribution in satellite systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Valadés Maturano, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] The present thesis has been done at ASTRIUM company to find new methods to obtain temperature distributions. Current software packages such as ESATAN or ESARAD provide not only excellent thermal analysis solutions, at a high price as they are very time consuming though, but also radiative simulations in orbit scenarios. Since licenses of this product are usually limited for the use of many engineers, it is important to provide new tools to do these calculations. In consequence, a dif...

  9. Grüneisen Parameter along Hugoniot and Melting Temperature of ε-Iron: a Result from Thermodynamic Calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hai-Jun; JING Fu-Qian; CAI Ling-Cang; Bi Yan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Based on the available data of specific heat Cv at constant volume and the Grüeisen parameter γ of both lattice and electron contributions, we present a consistent method for simultaneously calculating the effective or synthesized Grüeisen parameter along Hugoniot, γeH, covering solid, mixed, and liquid states, and the melting temperature Tm for ε-iron.The rationality validation for this method is confirmed as compared with the experimental data, including the measured Tm and Hugoniot bulk sound velocities Cb.The calculated γeH and Tm for ε-iron at the Earth's inner-core boundary (330GPa) are 1.58 and 5930K, respectively, which are close to the values of 1.53 and 6050K given by Anderson [J.Phys.Chem.Solids 64 (2003) 2125].This method for determination of γeH could be, in principle, also applicable to any thermodynamic state calculations, e.g., along isothermal and isentropic paths, other than the Hugoniot locus.

  10. Estimation of teaching-learning-based optimization primer design using regression analysis for different melting temperature calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Primers plays important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments, thus it is necessary to select characteristic primers. Unfortunately, manual primer design manners are time-consuming and easy to get human negligence because many PCR constraints must be considered simultaneously. Automatic programs for primer design were developed urgently. In this study, the teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO), a robust and free of algorithm-specific parameters method, is applied to screen primers conformed primer constraints. The optimal primer frequency (OPF) based on three known melting temperature formulas is estimated by 500 runs for primer design in each different number of generations. We selected optimal primers from fifty random nucleotide sequences of Homo sapiens at NCBI. The results indicate that the SantaLucia's formula is better coupled with the method to get higher optimal primer frequency and shorter CPU-time than the Wallace's formula and the Bolton and McCarthy's formula. Through the regression analysis, we also find the generations are significantly associated with the optimal primer frequency. The results are helpful for developing the novel TLBO-based computational method to design feasible primers.

  11. Synthesis of polystyrene with high melting temperature through BDE/CuCl catalyzed polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN; Xiaolong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Ewen, J. A., Novel method for plastic production, Science (in Chinese), 1997, 9: 34.[2]Brintzinger, H. H., Fischer, D., Waymouth, R. M. et al., Stereospecific olefin polymerization with chiral metallocene catalysts, Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English, 1995, 34(11): 1143.[3]Matyjaszewski, K., Atom transfer radical polymerization, role of various components and reaction conditions, Polym. Prep., 1997, 38(2): 736.[4]Wang, J. S., Matyjaszewski, K., Controlled/"living" radical polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization in the presence of transition-metal complex, J. Am. Soc., 1995, 117: 5614.[5]Wang, J. S., Matyjaszewski, K., Controlled/"living" radical polymerization, halogen atom transfer radical polymerization promoted by a Cu(I)/Cu(II) redox process, Macromolecules, 1995, 28: 7901.[6]Koto, M., Kamigaito, M., Sawamoto, M. et al., Polymerization of methyl methacrylate with the carbon tetrachloride/dichloro-tris(triphenyphosphine) ruthenium(II)/methylaluminum bis(2,6-di-tert-butylphenoxide) initiating system: possible of living radical polymerization, Macromolecules, 1995, 28: 1721.[7]Ando, T., Kato, M., Living radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate with Ruthenium complex: formation of polymers with controlled molecular weights and very narrow distributions, Macromolecules, 1996, 29: 1070.[8]Granel, C., Dubios, P., Jerome, R. et al., Controlled radical polymerization of methacrylic monomers in the presence of a bis(ortho-chelated) arylnickel(II) complex and different activated alkyl halides, Macromolecules, 1996, 29: 8576.[9]Granel, C., Moineau, G., Lecome, P. et al., (Meth)acrylates pseudo-living radical polymerization in the presence of transition metal complexes: the kharasch reaction revisited, Polym. Prep., 1997, 38(1): 450.[10]Ando, T., Kamigaito, M., Sawamoto, M., Iron(II) chloride complex for living radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate, Macromolecules, 1997, 30: 4507.[11

  12. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing for fire source localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Yang, Shuang; Sigrist, Markus W.; Li, Jun; Dong, Fengzhong

    2017-08-01

    A method for localizing a fire source based on a distributed temperature sensor system is proposed. Two sections of optical fibers were placed orthogonally to each other as the sensing elements. A tray of alcohol was lit to act as a fire outbreak in a cabinet with an uneven ceiling to simulate a real scene of fire. Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Rather large fluctuations and systematic errors with respect to predicting the exact room coordinates of the fire source caused by the uneven ceiling were observed. Two mathematical methods (smoothing recorded temperature curves and finding temperature peak positions) to improve the prediction accuracy are presented, and the experimental results indicate that the fluctuation ranges and systematic errors are significantly reduced. The proposed scheme is simple and appears reliable enough to locate a fire source in large spaces.

  13. Further enhancement of the critical temperature up to 105 K of hydrogen loaded YBCO melted samples by {mu}s pulsed electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gioacchino, D. [INFN, Frascati (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Pripodi, P.; Celani, F.; Spallone, A.

    1996-11-01

    In this paper they report results about enhancement of the transition temperatures of Y{sub 1} Ba{sub 2} Cu{sub 3} O{sub 7{delta}} melted samples hydrogen loaded (H-YBCO) with high power {mu}s pulsed electrolysis. The fundamental AC magnetic susceptibility has been measured as a function of the temperature for different frequency values of the exciting magnetic field. The H-YBCO sample exhibited a magnetic on-set temperature (T{sub on}) as high as 105 K. The susceptibility behaviour below the T{sub on} shows significant change of shape. Result on a sintered YBCO pellets have been reproduced using melted YBCO samples.

  14. In situ measurement of the particle size distribution of the fragmentation product of laser-shock-melted aluminum using in-line picosecond holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic fragmentation of shock-melted metal is a topic of increasing interest in shock physics. However, high-quality experimental studies of the phenomenon are limited, and data that are essential for developing predictive models of the phenomenon, such as the mass and particle sizes distributions, are quite sparse. In-line holography is an effective non-contact technique for measuring particle size distribution, but critical technical requirements, in particular, particle density limits, complicate its application to the subject phenomenon. These challenges have been reasonably overcome in the present study, allowing for successful in situ measurements of the size distribution of the fragmentation product from laser-shock-melted aluminum. In this letter, we report on our experiments and present the measured data.

  15. Cloud Masking and Surface Temperature Distribution in the Polar Regions Using AVHRR and other Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Joey C.

    1995-01-01

    Surface temperature is one of the key variables associated with weather and climate. Accurate measurements of surface air temperatures are routinely made in meteorological stations around the world. Also, satellite data have been used to produce synoptic global temperature distributions. However, not much attention has been paid on temperature distributions in the polar regions. In the polar regions, the number of stations is very sparse. Because of adverse weather conditions and general inaccessibility, surface field measurements are also limited. Furthermore, accurate retrievals from satellite data in the region have been difficult to make because of persistent cloudiness and ambiguities in the discrimination of clouds from snow or ice. Surface temperature observations are required in the polar regions for air-sea-ice interaction studies, especially in the calculation of heat, salinity, and humidity fluxes. They are also useful in identifying areas of melt or meltponding within the sea ice pack and the ice sheets and in the calculation of emissivities of these surfaces. Moreover, the polar regions are unique in that they are the sites of temperature extremes, the location of which is difficult to identify without a global monitoring system. Furthermore, the regions may provide an early signal to a potential climate change because such signal is expected to be amplified in the region due to feedback effects. In cloud free areas, the thermal channels from infrared systems provide surface temperatures at relatively good accuracies. Previous capabilities include the use of the Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite which was launched in 1978. Current capabilities include the use of the Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard NOAA satellites. Together, these two systems cover a span of 16 years of thermal infrared data. Techniques for retrieving surface temperatures with these sensors in the polar regions have

  16. Effect of temperature distribution of thermal buffer tube on onset temperature in a straight-tube-type thermoacoustic prime mover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Orino, Yuichiro; Ueno, So; Kajiura, Yuma

    2017-07-01

    We investigated a thermoacoustic system to achieve low-temperature driving. Inputting heat to the stack causes unwanted heat flows through the tube wall and the working gas, i.e., heat leak. The heat leak generates the temperature distribution along the tube from the high-temperature side of the stack to the closed end. The section where the temperature distribution is formed is called the thermal buffer tube. In this study, we focused on the temperature distribution of the thermal buffer tube. We measured the temperature distribution of the thermal buffer tube and made a comparison between the onset temperature obtained from the experiment and the critical temperature obtained by stability analysis. The difference in the results was 6 °C. The analytical critical temperature changed significantly with the assumed shape of the temperature distribution in the thermal buffer tube.

  17. Investigations on Temperature Fields during Laser Beam Melting by Means of Process Monitoring and Multiscale Process Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schilp

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Process monitoring and modelling can contribute to fostering the industrial relevance of additive manufacturing. Process related temperature gradients and thermal inhomogeneities cause residual stresses, and distortions and influence the microstructure. Variations in wall thickness can cause heat accumulations. These occur predominantly in filigree part areas and can be detected by utilizing off-axis thermographic monitoring during the manufacturing process. In addition, numerical simulation models on the scale of whole parts can enable an analysis of temperature fields upstream to the build process. In a microscale domain, modelling of several exposed single hatches allows temperature investigations at a high spatial and temporal resolution. Within this paper, FEM-based micro- and macroscale modelling approaches as well as an experimental setup for thermographic monitoring are introduced. By discussing and comparing experimental data with simulation results in terms of temperature distributions both the potential of numerical approaches and the complexity of determining suitable computation time efficient process models are demonstrated. This paper contributes to the vision of adjusting the transient temperature field during manufacturing in order to improve the resulting part's quality by simulation based process design upstream to the build process and the inline process monitoring.

  18. Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing of Recharge Basin Percolation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Allen, E. M.; Hutchinson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Infiltration (spreading) basins are a central component of managed aquifer and recovery operations around the world. The concept is simple. Water is percolated into an aquifer where it can be withdrawn at a later date. However, managing infiltration basins can be complicated by entrapped air in sediments, strata of low permeability, clogging of the recharge surface, and biological growth, among other factors. Understanding the dynamics of percolation in light of these complicating factors provides a basis for making management decisions that increase recharge efficiency. As an aid to understanding percolation dynamics, fiber optic distribute temperature sensing (DTS) was used to track heat as a tracer of water movement in an infiltration basin. The diurnal variation of temperature in the basin was sensed at depth. The time lag between the oscillating temperature signal at the surface and at depth indicated the velocity of water percolation. DTS fiber optic cables were installed horizontally along the basin and vertically in boreholes to measure percolation behavior. The horizontal cable was installed in trenches at 0.3 and 1 m depth, and the vertical cable was installed using direct push technology. The vertical cable was tightly wound to produce a factor of 10 increase in spatial resolution of temperature measurements. Temperature was thus measured every meter across the basin and every 10 cm to a depth of 10 m. Data from the trenched cable suggested homogeneous percolation across the basin, but infiltration rates were a function of stage indicating non-ideal percolation. Vertical temperature monitoring showed significant lateral flow in sediments underlying the basin both during saturation and operation of the basin. Deflections in the vertical temperature profile corresponded with fine grained layers identified in core samples indicating a transient perched water table condition. The three-dimensional flow in this relatively homogenous surficial geology calls

  19. Effect of composition and temperature on the properties of High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses melting above 1200{degrees}C (Draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J. [and others

    1996-02-01

    Increasing the melting temperature of HLW glass allows an increase of waste loading (thus reducing product volume) and the production of more durable glasses at a faster melting rate. However, HLW glasses that melt at high temperatures differ in composition from glasses formulated for low temperature ({approximately}1150{degree}C). Consequently, the composition of high-temperature glasses falls in a region previously not well tested or understood. This report represents a preliminary study of property/composition relationships of high-temperature Hanford HLW glasses using a one-component-at-a-time change approach. A test matrix has been designed to explore a composition region expected for high-temperature high-waste loading HLW glasses to be produced at Hanford. This matrix was designed by varying several key components (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, UO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and others) starting from a glass based on a Hanford HLW all-blend waste. Glasses were fabricated and tested for viscosity, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, liquidus temperature, and PCT release. The effect of individual components on glass properties was assessed using first- and second- order empirical models. The first-order component effects were compared with those from low-temperature HLW glasses.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann technique for heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahem, A. M.; El-Amin, M. F.; Mohammadein, A. A.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process are studied by using the enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The proposed model is a modified version of thermal LB model, where could avoid iteration steps and ensures high accuracy. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation with a D1Q2 lattice was used to determine the temperature field for one-dimensional melting by conduction and multi-distribution functions (MDF) with D2Q9 lattice was used to determine the density, velocity and temperature fields for two-dimensional melting by natural convection. Different boundary conditions including Dirichlet, adiabatic and bounce-back boundary conditions were used. The influence of increasing Rayleigh number (from 103 to 105) on temperature distribution and melting process is studied. The obtained results show that a good agreement with the analytical solution for melting by conduction case and with the benchmark solution for melting by convection.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann technique for heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahem, A. M.; El-Amin, M. F.; Mohammadein, A. A.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process are studied by using the enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The proposed model is a modified version of thermal LB model, where could avoid iteration steps and ensures high accuracy. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation with a D1Q2 lattice was used to determine the temperature field for one-dimensional melting by conduction and multi-distribution functions (MDF) with D2Q9 lattice was used to determine the density, velocity and temperature fields for two-dimensional melting by natural convection. Different boundary conditions including Dirichlet, adiabatic and bounce-back boundary conditions were used. The influence of increasing Rayleigh number (from 103 to 105) on temperature distribution and melting process is studied. The obtained results show that a good agreement with the analytical solution for melting by conduction case and with the benchmark solution for melting by convection.

  2. Laser melting of carbide tool surface: Model and experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [ME Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Shuja, S.Z.; Khan, S.M.A.; Aleem, A. [ME Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-09-15

    Laser controlled melting is one of the methods to achieve structural integrity in the surface region of the carbide tools. In the present study, laser heating of carbide cutting tool and temperature distribution in the irradiated region are examined. The phase change process during the heating is modeled using the enthalpy-porosity method. The influence of laser pulse intensity distribution across the irradiated surface ({beta}) on temperature distribution and melt formation is investigated. An experiment is carried out and the microstructural changes due to laser consecutive pulse heating is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that melt depth predicted agrees with the experimental results. The maximum depth of the melt layer moves away from the symmetry axis with increasing {beta}.

  3. Laser melting of carbide tool surface: Model and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.; Khan, S. M. A.; Aleem, A.

    2009-09-01

    Laser controlled melting is one of the methods to achieve structural integrity in the surface region of the carbide tools. In the present study, laser heating of carbide cutting tool and temperature distribution in the irradiated region are examined. The phase change process during the heating is modeled using the enthalpy-porosity method. The influence of laser pulse intensity distribution across the irradiated surface ( β) on temperature distribution and melt formation is investigated. An experiment is carried out and the microstructural changes due to laser consecutive pulse heating is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that melt depth predicted agrees with the experimental results. The maximum depth of the melt layer moves away from the symmetry axis with increasing β.

  4. Modelling the runoff regime of the glacierised upper Aconcagua River Basin using a distributed hydrological model: a multi-criteria approach for simulations of glacier and snow melt contributions to streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, Silvan; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Molnar, Darcy; Rimkus, Stefan; Helbing, Jakob; Escobar, Fernando; Burlando, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    In the Central Andes of Chile the interactions between snow, glaciers and water resources are governed by a distinct climatological forcing. Summers are dry and stable, with precipitation close to zero, low relative humidity and intense solar radiation. During the summer months, water originates almost exclusively from snow and ice melt. Evidence of glaciers retreat and changes in the seasonal snow cover suggests that climate change might have an impact on the water resources in the area. We use the physically-based, spatially-distributed hydrological model TOPKAPI to study the processes governing the exchange between the climate, snow and ice in the upper Aconcagua River Basin. The model incorporates the melting of snow and ice based on a simplified energy-balance approach (ETI model) and the routing of melt water through the glacial system. The model has numerous empirical parameters used in the computation of the single components of the hydrological cycle, the determination of which might lead to problems of equifinality. To address this issue we set up a rigorous calibration procedure that allows calibration of the main model parameters in three different steps by separating parameters governing distinct processes. We evaluate the parameters' transferability in time and investigate the differences in model parameters and performance that result from applying the model at different spatial scales. The model ability to simulate the relevant processes is tested against a data set of meteorological data, measurements of surface ablation and glacier runoff at the snout of the Juncal Norte Glacier during two ablation seasons. Modelled snow height is compared to snow maps derived from terrestrial photos. Results show that the magnitude of snow and icemelt rates on the glacier tongue is correctly reproduced, but simulations at higher elevation have a larger uncertainty. Crucial factors affecting model performance are the model ability to simulate the redistribution of

  5. Melting and freezing in a finite slab due to a linearly decreasing free-stream temperature of a convective boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roday Anand P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional melting and freezing problem in a finite slab with time-dependent convective boundary condition is solved using the heat-balance integral method. The temperature, T4 1(t, is applied at the left face and decreases linearly with time while the other face of the slab is imposed with a constant convective boundary condition where T4 2 is held at a fixed temperature. In this study, the initial condition of the solid is subcooled (initial temperature is below the melting point. The temperature, T4 1(t at time t = 0 is so chosen such that convective heating takes place and eventually the slab begins to melt (i. e., T4 1(0 > Tf > T4 2. The transient heat conduction problem, until the phase-change starts, is also solved using the heat-balance integral method. Once phase-change process starts, the solid-liquid interface is found to proceed to the right. As time continues, and T4,1(t decreases with time, the phase-change front slows, stops, and may even reverse direction. Hence this problem features sequential melting and freezing of the slab with partial penetration of the solid-liquid front before reversal of the phase-change process. The effect of varying the Biot number at the right face of the slab is investigated to determine its impact on the growth/recession of the solid-liquid interface. Temperature profiles in solid and liquid regions for the different cases are reported in detail. One of the results for Biot number, Bi2=1.5 are also compared with those obtained by having a constant value of T4 1(t.

  6. Measuring melting capacity with calorimetry - Low temperature testing with mixtures of sodium chloride and magnesium chloride solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Delapaz, Michele Ann

    2015-01-01

    Salt application is an important part of winter maintenance activities. As the use of salt increases, there is a need for usage optimization due to environmental impacts. For deicing purposes an important property is the chemical s melting ability; i.e. its ice-melting capacity. As several chemical alternatives and additive to salt exist, a test method to accurately measure this property is required to be able to compare different chemicals. The motivation of this thesis is the lack of inform...

  7. Determination of the melting temperature, heat of fusion, and purity analysis of different samples of zidovudine (AZT using DSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Antunes Souza Araújo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of chemical purity, melting range, and variation of enthalpy in the process of characterizing medicines is one of the principal requirements evaluated in quality control of the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, the method of purity determination using DSC was outlined, as well as the application of this technique for the evaluation of commercial samples of zidovudine (AZT (raw material supplied by different laboratories. To this end, samples from six different laboratories (A, B, C, D, E, and F and the standard reference (R from the United States Pharmacopeia (USP were analyzed. The DSC curves were obtained in the temperature range of 25 to 200 ºC under the dynamic atmosphere of N2 (50 mL min-1, heating rate of β=2 ºC min-1, using an Al capsule containing approximately 2 mg of sample material. The results demonstrated that the standard reference presented a proportion of 99.83% whereas the AZT samples presented a variation ranging from 97.59 to 99.54%. In addition, the standard reference was found to present a temperature of onset of melting point of 122.80 °C. Regarding the samples of active agents provided by the different laboratories, a variation ranging from 118.70 to 122.87 °C was measured. In terms of ΔHm, the samples presented an average value of 31.12 kJ mol-1.A determinação da pureza química, a faixa de fusão e a variação de entalpia envolvida no processo de caracterização de fármacos é um dos principais requisitos avaliados no controle de qualidade em indústrias farmacêuticas. Neste trabalho é feita uma breve abordagem sobre o método de determinação de pureza utilizando DSC, assim como a aplicação desta técnica para avaliação de amostras comerciais de zidovudina (AZT (matéria-prima fornecida por diferentes laboratórios. Para tal, foram analisadas amostras de seis diferentes laboratórios (A,B,C,D,E e F e a substância química de referência (R da United States Pharmacopeia (USP. As

  8. Investigating the vortex melting phenomenon in BSCCO crystals using magneto-optical imaging technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Soibel; S S Banerjee; Y Myasoedov; M L Rappaport; E Zeldov; S Ooi; T Tamegai

    2002-05-01

    Using a novel differential magneto-optical imaging technique we investigate the phenomenon of vortex lattice melting in crystals of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (BSCCO). The images of melting reveal complex patterns in the formation and evolution of the vortex solid–liquid interface with varying field ()/temperature (). We believe that the complex melting patterns are due to a random distribution of material disorder/inhomogeneities across the sample, which create fluctuations in the local melting temperature or field value. To study the fluctuations in the local melting temperature/field, we have constructed maps of the melting landscape m(, ), viz., the melting temperature (m) at a given location () in the sample at a given field (). A study of these melting landscapes reveals an unexpected feature: the melting landscape is not fixed, but changes rather dramatically with varying field and temperature along the melting line. It is concluded that the changes in both the scale and shape of the landscape result from the competing contributions of different types of quenched disorder which have opposite effects on the local melting transition.

  9. Temperature distribution in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo B, F.; Bermejo M, F.J.; Domiguez A, B.; Esquer P, C.A.; Navarro O, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    A series of temperature and pressure logs and flow rate measurements was compiled for each of the geothermal wells drilled to different reservoir depths between October 1979 and December 1980. Based on the valuable information obtained, a series of graphs showing the thermal characteristics of the reservoir were prepared. These graphs clearly show the temperature distribution resulting from the movement of fluids from the deep regions toward the higher zones of the reservoir, thus establishing more reliable parameters for locating new wells with better production zones. Updated information based on data from new deep wells drilled in the geothermal field is presented here. This new information does not differ much from earlier estimates and theories. However, the influence of faulting and fracturing on the hydrothermal recharge of the geothermal reservoir is seen more clearly.

  10. Temperature Trends and Distribution in the Arabian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad N. ElNesr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Temperature trend’s investigation is important for proper water resources management and urban planning. This study aims to investigate trends and distribution of temperature in the past thirty years for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, which represents about 86% of the Arabian Peninsula’s area. Approach: The trend in the temperature time series, including the recorded maximum, average and minimum daily values, were analyzed using non-parametric statistics. These were Mann-Kendall tau coefficient and Sen’s slope estimator. Results: (1: The study showed a warming trend through 9 months of the year except in November to January where non-significant cooling trends were observed. (2: The most significant warming trend appears in the summer months of June, August and September around the central region of KSA. (3 Spatially, The northwestern and southern regions were the least affected by the warming trend. Conclusion: The study concluded that KSA as well as the Arabian Peninsula are suffering from a considerable warming temperature trend, which is an important issue to be considered for rural development and water resources management.

  11. SIMULATION OF THE TEMPERATURE FIELD DURING LASER MELTING OF MATERIAL WITH A SHAPE MEMORY BASED ON TiNi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blednova Z. M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A thermal physical and mathematical model of laser cladding with TiNi on steel was developed which allows us to monitor the formation of the structure and the properties of the surface layer. A description of the model included assumptions and simplifications; analysis of the energy balance; numerical modeling of thermal processes; evaluation of the temperature distribution; experimental verification of the obtained solutions. The composition of the steel and TiNi alloy was examined as a two-layer material with different thermal characteristics. The energy balance of the system was described with a heat equation in a three-dimensional form. The main channels of the radiation energy costs were taken into account: absorption surface of the product, loss owed to the reflection surface, energy absorbed by the coating which did not come down to the base material. To solve the differential equation of heat conduction we used the Fourier integral method. In assessing the temperature distribution we have reviewed a dimensional problem when exposed to a point source of the Gaussian distribution in a pulsed mode. Computer calculations used MathCAD graphs of temperature changes at different depths of the TiNi layer and the steel substrate. The results obtained allowed us to develop the recommendations for optimizing the technological parameters of laser cladding of TiNi. The simulation of thermal processes significantly reduces the time and resources required to develop the technology, allowing prediction of the quality of the surface layer during the development of the technology and promoting the adoption of efficient technical and technological solutions

  12. Temperature-induced melting of double-stranded DNA in the absence and presence of covalently bonded antitumour drugs: insight from molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Bueren-Calabuig, J. A.; Giraudon, C.; Galmarini, C M; Egly, J M; Gago, F.

    2011-01-01

    The difference in melting temperature of a double-stranded (ds) DNA molecule in the absence and presence of bound ligands can provide experimental information about the stabilization brought about by ligand binding. By simulating the dynamic behaviour of a duplex of sequence 5′-d(TAATAACGGATTATT)·5′-d(AATAATCCGTTATTA) in 0.1 M NaCl aqueous solution at 400 K, we have characterized in atomic detail its complete thermal denaturation profile in

  13. Evaluation of cadaveric lumbar spine temperature distributions during nucleoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2003-06-01

    This study investigated the contribution of applied thermal energy during the nucleoplasty procedure by obtaining temperature maps throughout human cadaveric disc specimens (n=5) during a simulated treatment protocol. The procedure was performed using the ArthroCare SpineWand RF-Coblation device inserted through a 17 g needle into the cadaveric disc. The device uses a dual mode heating technique which employs a high voltage RF plasma field to vaporize tissue, followed by RF current heating for thermal coagulation. The device is manipulated to create a series of 6 channels at a 60 degree angular spacing within a period of 3 minutes. A computer-controlled, motorized translational system was used to mimic the insertion (coblation) and retraction (rf-coagulation) performed during clinical implementation. Rotation was performed manually between each coblation/rf-coagulation cycle. Transient temperature data were obtained using five multi-junction thermocouple probes (5 to 6- 0.05 mm diameter junctions spaced at either 2 or 5 mm) spaced throughout the desired heating volume. Temperature distributions and accumulated thermal doses calculated from the temperature-time history were used to define probable regions of thermal coagulation. Intra-discal temperatures of 60-65C were measured within 2 to 3 mm radial distance from the introducer with therapeutic thermal doses of >250 EM43C achieved at radial distances of up to 5 mm from the introducer. Although appreciable regions of thermal coagulation within the nucleus are localized around the applicator, improper placement of the applicator during treatment may also generate undesirable hot spots in the bone endplate.

  14. Upper mantle temperatures from teleseismic tomography of French Massif Central including effects of composition, mineral reactions, anharmonicity, anelasticity and partial melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Stephan V.; Zeyen, Hermann; Stoll, Gerald; Werling, Friederike; Altherr, Rainer; Fuchs, Karl

    1996-03-01

    A new technique for interpretation of 3-D seismic tomographic models in terms of temperature, degree of partial melt and rock composition is presented and tested. We consider both anharmonic and anelastic temperature effects on seismic velocities as well as the effects of mineral reactions, composition and partial melt. It is shown that composition effect is small (less than 1% of velocity) if there are no strongly depleted, Mg-rich harzburgites. We calculate anharmonic temperature derivatives of seismic velocities from compositions of mantle xenoliths. The parameters of a non-linear frequency and temperature-dependent model of attenuation have been taken from published laboratory experiments and calibrated using global Q observations in the upper mantle. For every block of the tomographic model we calculate the absolute temperature and melt fraction required to fit the observed Vp perturbation, the average temperature of the tomographic layer being constrained by the observed surface heat flow. With these temperatures we calculate attenuation, density, Vp and Vs from petrophysical modelling, using the average for 80 mantle xenoliths samples from the French Massif Central. The technique is applied to a recently published 3-D teleseismic P wave tomographic model of the upper mantle beneath the French Massif Central. The observed velocity perturbations are probably caused there by variations in temperature. Temperature does not reach the dry solidus temperature (except for a few tomographic blocks), although it comes close to it at the depth of 60-100 km below volcanic areas. At high subsolidus temperatures the contribution of anelasticity to velocity perturbations is at least as important as the combined effect of anharmonicity and mineral reactions. Our model is consistent with the Pn velocities from refraction seismic studies, QS estimations from surface waves, observed gravity, geoid, topography and surface heat flow, as well as with the composition and

  15. Mixing Experiments with Shoshonitic and Trachytic Melts using a High-Temperature Centrifuge and a Viscometer: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Cristina; Dorfman, Alexander; Perugini, Diego; Kolzenburg, Stephan; Petrelli, Maurizio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2010-05-01

    Evidence of cyclic replenishment of the shallow magmatic reservoir with deeper alkali basaltic (shoshonitic) magma (Campi Flegrei, in Italy; see Arienzo et al., 2008, Bull. Volcanol.) motivated this study. Results from different mixing experiments using natural volcanic samples from this region will be presented. The end-member melts derive from the Agnano-Monte Spina (trachytic) and Minopoli (shoshonitic) eruptions. Based on previous isotopic data, these are thought to be the most suitable counterparts for simulating the extreme interacting compositions in this system. In order to study the mixing dynamics between these natural magmas, we performed time series of convection-diffusion experiments using two different techniques: 1) a high-temperature centrifuge and 2) a viscometer. For the centrifuge experiments the rotating speed was 1850 revolutions per minute and the acceleration 10 3 g. In this way, dynamic conditions closer to those calculated for magma chambers (Reynolds Numbers [Re] around 102) could be simulated. For every experiment, a 4 mm thick disk of previously homogenized crystal free shoshonitic glass and an 8 mm thick disk of homogenized crystal free trachytic glass were loaded in a 5mm diameter Pt capsule. The capsule was then sealed on both sides, but for a small opening on the upper end, allowing intersticial degassing during the acceleration. Samples were arranged in a buoyantly unstable geometry, where the denser material is placed at the inner side of the rotating circle (basaltic trachyandesite, ρ=2.63 g/cm3 at 1169oC) and the lighter material at the external side (trachyte, ρ=2.45 g/cm3 at ~1000oC). Temperature has been kept constant at 1,200oC during all experimental runs, with a negligible thermal gradient (< 1°C). Forced convection was applied via centrifugal acceleration and density instabilities. Results from three experimental runs with the centrifuge: after 5, 20 and 120 min will be discussed. The second set of experiments consisted

  16. Melting behavior of large disordered sodium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Aguado, A

    2000-01-01

    The melting-like transition in disordered sodium clusters Na_N, with N=92 and 142 is studied by using a first-principles constant-energy molecular dynamics simulation method. Na_142, whose atoms are distributed in two (surface and inner) main shells with different radial distances to the center of mass of the cluster, melts in two steps: the first one, at approx. 130 K, is characterized by a high intrashell mobility of the atoms, and the second, homogeneous melting, at approx. 270 K, involves diffusive motion of all the atoms across the whole cluster volume (both intrashell and intershell displacements are allowed). On the contrary, the melting of Na_92 proceeds gradually over a very wide temperature interval, without any abrupt step visible in the thermal or structural melting indicators. The occurrence of well defined steps in the melting transition is then shown to be related to the existence of a distribution of the atoms in shells. Thereby we propose a necessary condition for a cluster to be considered r...

  17. Distributed measurement of flow rate in conduits using heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Zubelzu, Sergio; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis

    2016-04-01

    In some cases flow varies along conduits, such as in irrigated land drainage pipes and channels, irrigation laterals and others. Detailed knowledge of flow rate along the conduit makes possible analytical evaluation of water distribution and collection systems performance. Flow rate can change continuously in some systems, like in drainage pipes and channels, or abruptly, like in conduits bifurcations or emitter insertions. A heat pulse along the conduit makes possible to get flow rate from continuity and heat balance equations. Due to the great value of specific heat of water, temperature changes along conduit are smaller than the noise that involves the measurement process. This work presents a methodology that, dealing with the noise of distributed temperature measurements, leads to flow rate determination along pressurized pipes or open channel flows.

  18. Viscosity Measurement for Tellurium Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Li, Chao; Ban, Heng; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2006-01-01

    The viscosity of high temperature Te melt was measured using a new technique in which a rotating magnetic field was applied to the melt sealed in a suspended ampoule, and the torque exerted by rotating melt flow on the ampoule wall was measured. Governing equations for the coupled melt flow and ampoule torsional oscillation were solved, and the viscosity was extracted from the experimental data by numerical fitting. The computational result showed good agreement with experimental data. The melt velocity transient initiated by the rotating magnetic field reached a stable condition quickly, allowing the viscosity and electrical conductivity of the melt to be determined in a short period.

  19. Experimental Studies on Partial Melting of Massive Samples of Granite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林强; 吴福元

    1994-01-01

    As a basis of modern petrology,the equilibrium relations describing the melting of granite were established mainly on melting experiments of Powder samples.Such experiments,however,have serious limitations in providing information about the variations in compositional and fabric features of the minerals and in the composition and distribution of the melt.Our experiments using massive samples indicate that melt occure mainly at the quartz-plagioclase and quartz-potash feldspar boundaries and the composition of the melt is dependent on local characteristics in the melting system,showing no correlation with the bulk composition of the rock samples.At lower temperatures(740-760℃,0.2GPa),the melt plots at or near the eutectic point in Q-Ab-Or-An-H2O diagram,indicating equilibrium melting.At higher temperatures(790-800℃,0.2GPa)the melt becomes lower in SiO2 and higher in Na2O,deviating makedly from the eutectic line but without disappearance of any mineral phase,suggesting a non-equilibrium process.It is obvious that the phase-equilibrium relations in natural massive granites may be greatly different from those deduced from powder experiments.

  20. Use of Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology to Characterize Fire Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Cram

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the potential of a fiber optic cable connected to distributed temperature sensing (DTS technology to withstand wildland fire conditions and quantify fire behavior parameters. We used a custom-made ‘fire cable’ consisting of three optical fibers coated with three different materials—acrylate, copper and polyimide. The 150-m cable was deployed in grasslands and burned in three prescribed fires. The DTS system recorded fire cable output every three seconds and integrated temperatures every 50.6 cm. Results indicated the fire cable was physically capable of withstanding repeated rugged use. Fiber coating materials withstood temperatures up to 422 °C. Changes in fiber attenuation following fire were near zero (−0.81 to 0.12 dB/km indicating essentially no change in light gain or loss as a function of distance or fire intensity over the length of the fire cable. Results indicated fire cable and DTS technology have potential to quantify fire environment parameters such as heat duration and rate of spread but additional experimentation and analysis are required to determine efficacy and response times. This study adds understanding of DTS and fire cable technology as a potential new method for characterizing fire behavior parameters at greater temporal and spatial scales.

  1. Temperature Distribution in Solar Cells Calculated in Three Dimensional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy K. Elminir

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Field-testing is costly, time consuming and depends heavily on prevailing weather conditions. Adequate security and weather protection must also provide at the test site. Delays can also be caused due to bad weather and system failures. To overcome these problems, a Photovoltaic (PV array simulation may be used. For system design purpose, the model must reflect the details of the physical process occurring in the cell, to get a closer insight into device operation as well as optimization of particular device parameters. PV cell temperature ratings have a great effect on the main cell performance. Hence, the need for an exact technique to calculate accurately and efficiently the temperature distribution of a PV cell arises, from which we can adjust safe and proper operation at maximum ratings. The Scope of this work is to describe the development of 3D-thermal models, which are used to update the operation temperature, to get a closer insight into the response behavior and to estimate the overall performance.

  2. Melting experiments on peridotite to lowermost mantle conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Shigehiko; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    Melting experiments on a pyrolitic mantle material were performed in a pressure range from 34 to 179 GPa based on laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC) techniques. The textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were made by using field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Melts formed by 46 to 77 wt.% partial melting in this study were ultrabasic in composition and became more depleted in SiO2 and more enriched in FeO with increasing pressure. Melting textures indicate that the liquidus phase changed from ferropericlase to MgSiO3-rich perovskite at least above 34 GPa and further to post-perovskite. The first phase to melt (disappear) changed from CaSiO3 perovskite to (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase between 68 and 82 GPa. The stability of ferropericlase above solidus temperature shrinks with increasing pressure (melting last below 34 GPa and first 82 GPa), resulting in higher (MgO + FeO)/SiO2 ratio in partial melt at higher pressure. Additionally, the Fe-Mg distribution coefficients (KD) between perovskite/post-perovskite and melt decreased considerably with increasing pressure, leading to strong Fe-enrichment in partial melts. It supports dense partial melts in a deep lower mantle, which migrate downward to the core mantle boundary (CMB).

  3. Simulation of the temperature distribution in crystals grown by Czochralski method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudokovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Production of perfect crystals, free of residual strain and dislocations and with prescribed dopant concentration, by the Czochralski method is possible only if the complex, interacting phenomena that affect crystal growth in a Cz-puller are fully understood and quantified. Natural and forced convection in the melt, thermocapillary effect and heat transfer in and around the crystal affect its growth rate, the shape of the crystal-melt interface and the temperature gradients in the crystal. The heat transfer problem in the crystal and between the crystal and all other surfaces present in the crystal pulling apparatus are discussed at length. A simulation and computer algorithm are used, based on the following assumptions: (1) only conduction occurs in the crystal (experimentally determined conductivity as a function of temperature is used), (2) melt temperature and the melt-crystal heat transfer coefficient are available (either as constant values or functions of radial position), (3) pseudo-steady state is achieved with respect to temperature gradients, (4) crystal radius is fixed, and (5) both direct and reflected radiation exchange occurs among all surfaces at various temperatures in the crystal puller enclosure.

  4. Evaluating geothermal and hydrogeologic controls on regional groundwater temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erick R.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael; Williams, Colin F.

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1-D) analytic solution is developed for heat transport through an aquifer system where the vertical temperature profile in the aquifer is nearly uniform. The general anisotropic form of the viscous heat generation term is developed for use in groundwater flow simulations. The 1-D solution is extended to more complex geometries by solving the equation for piece-wise linear or uniform properties and boundary conditions. A moderately complex example, the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), is analyzed to demonstrate the use of the analytic solution for identifying important physical processes. For example, it is shown that viscous heating is variably important and that heat conduction to the land surface is a primary control on the distribution of aquifer and spring temperatures. Use of published values for all aquifer and thermal properties results in a reasonable match between simulated and measured groundwater temperatures over most of the 300 km length of the ESRP, except for geothermal heat flow into the base of the aquifer within 20 km of the Yellowstone hotspot. Previous basal heat flow measurements (∼110 mW/m2) made beneath the ESRP aquifer were collected at distances of >50 km from the Yellowstone Plateau, but a higher basal heat flow of 150 mW/m2 is required to match groundwater temperatures near the Plateau. The ESRP example demonstrates how the new tool can be used during preliminary analysis of a groundwater system, allowing efficient identification of the important physical processes that must be represented during more-complex 2-D and 3-D simulations of combined groundwater and heat flow.

  5. Influence of grain size on distribution of temperature and thermal stress in ZnO varistor ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈青恒; 何金良; 谈克雄; 陈水明; 严民昱; 唐建新

    2002-01-01

    The nonuniformity of temperature distribution within ZnO varistor ceramics would decrease its energy absorption capability. In this paper, the distributions of current, temperature and thermal stress within the microstructures of ZnO varistor ceramics are simulated using Voronoi diagram models. The results show that the current concentrates through a few paths in ZnO varistor due to the nonuniformity of ZnO grain size and the variety of electrical characteristics of grain boundaries, which induces local high temperature and great thermal stress when injecting impulse current into ZnO varistor, and leads to melting puncture or cracking failure. The influence of the ZnO grain size on the distributions of temperature and thermal stress within ZnO varistor ceramics is analyzed in detail. The energy absorption capability of ZnO varistor ceramics can be greatly improved by increasing the uniformity of ZnO grain size or decreasing the average size of ZnO grains.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann Method Simulation of 3-D Melting Using Double MRT Model with Interfacial Tracking Method

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional melting problems are investigated numerically with Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Regarding algorithm's accuracy and stability, Multiple-Relaxation-Time (MRT) models are employed to simplify the collision term in LBM. Temperature and velocity fields are solved with double distribution functions, respectively. 3-D melting problems are solved with double MRT models for the first time in this article. The key point for the numerical simulation of a melting problem is the methods to obtain the location of the melting front and this article uses interfacial tracking method. The interfacial tracking method combines advantages of both deforming and fixed grid approaches. The location of the melting front was obtained by calculating the energy balance at the solid-liquid interface. Various 3-D conduction controlled melting problems are solved firstly to verify the numerical method. Liquid fraction tendency and temperature distribution obtained from numerical methods agree with the analytical result...

  7. An effect of temperature distribution on terahertz phase dynamics in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Hidehiro, E-mail: hd-asai@aist.go.jp; Kawabata, Shiro

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We calculate the temperature distribution in intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). •We investigate the effect of temperature distribution on THz radiation from IJJs. •The Joule heating in the IJJs makes inhomogeneous temperature distribution. •The inhomogeneous temperature distribution strongly excites THz emission. -- Abstract: In this study, we numerically calculate the temperature distribution and the THz phase dynamics in the mesa-structured intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) using the thermal diffusion equation and the Sine–Gordon equation. We observe that the temperature distribution has a broad peak around the center region of the IJJ mesa. Under a high external current, a “hot spot” where the temperature is locally higher than the superconducting critical temperature appears around this region. The transverse Josephson plasma wave is strongly excited by the inhomogeneous temperature distribution in the mesa. This gives rise to intense THz emission.

  8. Thermodynamic Calculations of Melt in Melt Pool During Laser Cladding High Silicon Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dan-yang; LIU Chang-sheng; ZHANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    Based on the Miedema's formation heat model for binary alloys and the Toop's asymmetric model for terna-ry alloys, the formation heat, excess entropy, and activity coefficients of silicon ranging from 1 900 K to 4 100 K in the Fe-Si-C melt formed during the laser cladding high silicon coatings process were calculated. The results indicated that all values of InγOSi, εCSi, ρSiSi and ρCSi are negative in the temperature range and these values increase as the tempera-ture increases. And all values of εSiSi and ρSi-CSi are positive and these values decrease with increasing temperature. The iso-activity lines of silicon are distributed axisymmetrically to the incident laser beam in the melt pool vertical to the laser scanning direction. And the iso-activity lines of silicon in the front of the melt pool along the laser scanning direction are more intensive than those in the back of the melt pool. The activity of silicon on the bottom of the melt pool is lower than that in the effecting center of laser beam on the top surface of the melt pool and it may be the im-portant reason for the formation of the silicides and excellent metallurgical bonding between the laser cladding coating and the substrate.

  9. Pressure-temperature-time-deformation path of kyanite-bearing migmatitic paragneiss in the Kali Gandaki valley (Central Nepal): Investigation of Late Eocene-Early Oligocene melting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaccarino, Salvatore; Montomoli, Chiara; Carosi, Rodolfo; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Langone, Antonio; Visonà, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Kyanite-bearing migmatitic paragneiss of the lower Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) in the Kali Gandaki transect (Central Himalaya) was investigated. In spite of the intense shearing, it was still possible to obtain many fundamental information for understanding the processes active during orogenesis. Using a multidisciplinary approach, including careful meso- and microstructural observations, pseudosection modelling (with PERPLE_X), trace element thermobarometry and in situ monazite U-Th-Pb geochronology, we constrained the pressure-temperature-time-deformation path of the studied rock, located in a structural key position. The migmatitic gneiss has experienced protracted prograde metamorphism after the India-Asia collision (50-55 Ma) from ~ 43 Ma to 28 Ma. During the late phase (36-28 Ma) of this metamorphism, the gneiss underwent high-pressure melting at "near peak" conditions (710-720 °C/1.0-1.1 GPa) leading to kyanite-bearing leucosome formation. In the time span of 25-18 Ma, the rock experienced decompression and cooling associated with pervasive shearing reaching P-T conditions of 650-670 °C and 0.7-0.8 GPa, near the sillimanite-kyanite transition. This time span is somewhat older than previously reported for this event in the study area. During this stage, additional, but very little melt was produced. Taking the migmatitic gneiss as representative of the GHS, these data demonstrate that this unit underwent crustal melting at about 1 GPa in the Eocene-Early Oligocene, well before the widely accepted Miocene decompressional melting related to its extrusion. In general, kyanite-bearing migmatite, as reported here, could be linked to the production of the high-Ca granitic melts found along the Himalayan belt.

  10. Numerical modeling of temperature and species distributions in hydrocarbon reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Edward W.; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    We examine bulk fluid motion and diffusion of multicomponent hydrocarbon species in porous media in the context of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, with particular focus on the phenomenology induced by horizontal thermal gradients at the upper and lower horizontal boundaries. The problem is formulated with respect to the barycentric (mass-averaged) frame of reference. Thermally induced convection, with fully time-dependent temperature distributions, can lead to nearly constant hydrocarbon composition, with minor unmixing due to thermal gradients near the horizontal boundaries. Alternately, the composition can be vertically segregated due to gravitational effects. Independent and essentially steady solutions have been found to depend on how the compositions are initialized in space and may have implications for reservoir history. We also examine injection (to represent filling) and extraction (to represent leakage) of hydrocarbons at independent points and find a large distortion of the gas-oil contact for low permeability.

  11. The role of the amorphous phase in melting of linear UHMW-PE; implications for chain dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Sanjay [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry/Dutch Polymer Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lippits, Dirk R [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry/Dutch Polymer Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Hoehne, Guenther W H [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry/Dutch Polymer Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mezari, Brahim [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry/Dutch Polymer Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Magusin, Pieter C M M [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry/Dutch Polymer Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2007-05-23

    In ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), it is possible to obtain single chain forming single crystals, where chains are adjacently re-entrant. Depending on the heating rate, it is feasible to melt these crystals either by simple consecutive detachment of chain stems from the crystalline substrate or by cluster melting, where several chain stems are involved. The consecutive detachment of chain stems occurs at the melting point predicted from the Gibbs-Thomson equation, whereas the cluster melting at much higher temperatures. Melting by the consecutive detachment of chain stems from the crystal substrate and their diffusion in the melt ultimately result in a new melt state having a heterogeneous distribution of physical entanglements, which invokes differences in local mobility. With combined DSC, rheology and solid-state NMR studies, it is concluded that the disentangled domains present within the entangled matrix possess higher local mobility than the entangled domains, ultimately causing lower elastic modulus. The fraction of the entangled and disentangled domains is maintained at higher temperatures, leading to a thermodynamically non-equilibrium melt state. In contrast, in cluster melting, where several chain stems (initially disentangled) can simultaneously adopt the random coil state, entanglements that are formed are homogeneously distributed in the melt. The paper invokes the influence of the topological differences present in the amorphous phase of the semi-crystalline polymer on the melting kinetics of crystals. The reported findings have implications for the melting behaviour and the resulting melt state of polymers in general.

  12. Anisotropic Azimuthal Power and Temperature distribution on FuelRod. Impact on Hydride Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Arramova, Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Hales, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-29

    The degradation of the zirconium cladding may limit nuclear fuel performance. In the high temperature environment of a reactor, the zirconium in the cladding corrodes, releasing hydrogen in the process. Some of this hydrogen is absorbed by the cladding in a highly inhomogeneous manner. The distribution of the absorbed hydrogen is extremely sensitive to temperature and stress concentration gradients. The absorbed hydrogen tends to concentrate near lower temperatures. This hydrogen absorption and hydride formation can cause cladding failure. This project set out to improve the hydrogen distribution prediction capabilities of the BISON fuel performance code. The project was split into two primary sections, first was the use of a high fidelity multi-physics coupling to accurately predict temperature gradients as a function of r, θ , and z, and the second was to use experimental data to create an analytical hydrogen precipitation model. The Penn State version of thermal hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF) was successfully coupled to the DeCART neutronics code. This coupled system was verified by testing and validated by comparison to FRAPCON data. The hydrogen diffusion and precipitation experiments successfully calculated the heat of transport and precipitation rate constant values to be used within the hydrogen model in BISON. These values can only be determined experimentally. These values were successfully implemented in precipitation, diffusion and dissolution kernels that were implemented in the BISON code. The coupled output was fed into BISON models and the hydrogen and hydride distributions behaved as expected. Simulations were conducted in the radial, axial and azimuthal directions to showcase the full capabilities of the hydrogen model.

  13. Protein Stability during Hot Melt Extrusion: The Effect of Extrusion Temperature, Hydrophilicity of Polymers and Sugar Glass Pre-stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teekamp, Naomi; Olinga, Peter; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Biodegradable polymers have been widely investigated for controlled release formulations for protein delivery. However, the processing stability of proteins remains a major challenge. The aim of this research is to assess the influence of the hot melt extrusion process on the activity of a m

  14. Protein Stability during Hot Melt Extrusion : The Effect of Extrusion Temperature, Hydrophilicity of Polymers and Sugar Glass Pre-stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teekamp, Naomi; Olinga, Peter; Hinrichs, Wouter; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Biodegradable polymers have been widely investigated for controlled release formulations for protein delivery. However, the processing stability of proteins remains a major challenge. The aim of this research is to assess the influence of the hot melt extrusion process on the activity of a

  15. Monitoring snow melt characteristics on the Greenland ice sheet using a new MODIS land surface temperature and emissivity product (MOD21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulley, G. C.; Hall, D. K.; Hook, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) and emissivity are sensitive energy-balance parameters that control melt and energy exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. MODIS LST is currently used to monitor melt zones on glaciers and can be used for glacier or ice sheet mass balance calculations. Much attention has been paid recently to the warming of the Arctic in the context of global warming, with a focus on the Greenland ice sheet because of its importance with sea-level rise. Various researchers have shown a steady decline in the extent of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice, both the total extent and the extent of the perennial or multiyear ice. Surface melt characteristics over the Greenland ice sheet have been traditionally monitored using the MODIS LST and albedo products (e.g. MOD11 and MOD10A1). Far fewer studies have used thermal emissivity data to monitor surface melt characteristics due to the lack of suitable data. In theory, longwave emissivity combined with LST information should give a more direct measure of snow melt characteristics since the emissivity is an intrinsic property of the surface, whereas the albedo is dependent on other factors such as solar zenith angle, and shadowing effects. Currently no standard emissivity product exists that can dynamically retrieve changes in longwave emissivity consistently over long time periods. This problem has been addressed with the new MOD21 product, which uses the ASTER TES algorithm to dynamically retrieve LST and spectral emissivity (bands 29, 31, 32) at 1-km resolution. In this study we show that using a new proposed index termed the snow emissivity difference index (SEDI) derived from the MOD21 longwave emissivity product, combined with the LST, will improve our understanding of snow melt and freezeup dynamics on ice sheets such as Greenland. The results also suggest that synergistic use of both thermal-based and albedo data will help to improve our understanding of snow melt dynamics on glaciers and ice

  16. Flocculation alters the distribution and flux of melt-water supplied sediments and nutrients in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge

    environment but comparatively little is known about the flocculation processes in the Arctic. We investigated flocculation dynamics from a melt-water river in the inner Disko Fjord, West Greenland. A novel, laser-illuminated camera system significantly improved the particle size measurement capabilities...

  17. Determination of Soil Evaporation Fluxes Using Distributed Temperature Sensing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, J.; Serna, J. L.; Suarez, F. I.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation is the main process for water vapor exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere. Evaporation from shallow groundwater tables is important in arid zones and is influenced by the water table depth and by the soil's hydrodynamic characteristics. Measuring evaporation, however, is still challenging. Thus, it is important to develop new measuring techniques that can better determine evaporation fluxes. The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of using distributed-temperature-sensing (DTS) to study the processes that control evaporation from soils with shallow water tables. To achieve this objective, an experimental column was instrumented with traditional temperature probes, time-domain-reflectometry probes, and an armored fiber-optic cable that allowed the application of heat pulses to estimate the soil moisture profile. The experimental setup also allowed to fix the water table at different depths and to measure evaporation rates at the daily scale. Experiments with different groundwater table depths were carried out. For each experiment, the evaporation rates were measured and the moisture profile was determined using heat pulses all through the DTS cable. These pulses allowed estimation of the moisture content with errors smaller than 0.045 m3/m3 and with a spatial resolution of ~6.5 mm. The high spatial resolution of the moisture profile combined with mathematical modeling permitted to investigate the processes that control evaporation from bare soils with shallow groundwater tables.

  18. Tidal Heating and Melt Segregation and Migration within Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendar, A.; Paty, C. S.; Dufek, J.; Roberts, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Io's volcanic activity is driven by the dissipation of energy in its interior due to tidal forces exerted by Jupiter, maintained by its orbital resonances with Europa and Ganymede. The 2011 discovery of a global partial melt layer beneath Io's surface has raised further questions about the structure of the Galilean moon and the processes that shape it. In this study we use two coupled simulations, the MFIX multiphase dynamics and the TiRADE tidal heating models, to investigate the location and extent, thermal state, melt fraction, stability, and migration of melt Io's viscous asthenosphere. We explore the feedback between melt migration and production, taking into account the rate of tidal heating and melt migration through the magma ocean layer. We begin with an assumed 1D layered internal structure based on previous investigations. This structure is input into TiRADE, which solves the equations of motion for forced oscillations in a layered spherical body using the propagator matrix method to obtain the displacements and strains due to tidal forcing. From this, we obtain the radial distribution of tidal heat generation within Io. This heating profile is then used as input for the MFIX multiphase fluid model in order to obtain the vertical flow of partially molten material, as well as the radial temperature distribution and thus the material properties and melt fractions. In the multiphase model, individual phases (melt and solid residue) separately conserve mass, momentum and enthalpy allowing us to explore melt segregation phenomena. Enthalpy closure is provided by the MELTS thermodynamics algorithm, which is called at each point in space, accounting for the partitioning between latent and sensible heat, and updating the physical properties of the melt and solid phases. This approach allows us to explore the sensitivity of melt generation to internal structure, as well as the time scales that govern melt production and eruption (i.e.: the residence and migration

  19. Melting of major Glaciers in the western Himalayas: evidence of climatic changes from long term MSU derived tropospheric temperature trend (1979–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kafatos

    2009-12-01

    K/year also shows a similar pattern of month-to-month oscillation and six months of enhanced and a statistically significant warming trend. The enhanced warming trend during the winter and pre-monsoon months (December–May may accelerate glacial melt. The unequal distribution of the warming trend over the year is discussed in this study and is partially attributed to a number of controlling factors such as sunlight duration, CO2 trends over the region (2003–2008, water vapor and aerosol distribution.

  20. Melting of major Glaciers in the western Himalayas: evidence of climatic changes from long term MSU derived tropospheric temperature trend (1979-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A. K.; Yang, K.-H. S.; El-Askary, H. M.; Kafatos, M.

    2009-12-01

    a similar pattern of month-to-month oscillation and six months of enhanced and a statistically significant warming trend. The enhanced warming trend during the winter and pre-monsoon months (December-May) may accelerate glacial melt. The unequal distribution of the warming trend over the year is discussed in this study and is partially attributed to a number of controlling factors such as sunlight duration, CO2 trends over the region (2003-2008), water vapor and aerosol distribution.

  1. Transient refractory material dissolution by a volumetrically-heated melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Jean Marie, E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ratel, Gilles [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Combeau, Hervé [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, Lorraine University, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Gaus-Liu, Xiaoyang; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We describe a test investigating ceramic dissolution by a molten non-eutectic melt. • The evolution of the interface temperature between melt and refractory is measured. • A theoretical model describing dissolution kinetics is proposed. • When dissolution stops, interface temperature is the liquidus temperature of the melt. - Abstract: The present work addresses the question of corium–ceramic interaction in a core catcher during a core-melt accident in a nuclear power plant. It provides an original insight into transient aspects concerning dissolution of refractory material by a volumetrically heated pool. An experiment with simulant material (LIVECERAM) is presented. Test results clearly show that dissolution of solid refractory material can occur in a non-eutectic melt at a temperature which is lower than the melting temperature of the refractory material. During the dissolution transient, the interface temperature rises above the liquidus temperature, corresponding to the instantaneous average composition of the melt pool. With constant power dissipation in the melt and external cooling of the core-catcher, a final steady-state situation is reached. Dissolution stops when the heat flux (delivered by the melt to the refractory) can be removed by conduction through the residual thickness of the ceramic, with T{sub interface} = T{sub liquidus} (calculated for the average composition of the final liquid pool). The final steady state corresponds to a uniform pool composition and uniform interface temperature distribution. Convection in the pool is governed by natural thermal convection and the heat flux distribution is therefore similar to what would be obtained for a single component pool. An interpretation of the experiment with two model-based approaches (0D and 1D) is presented. The mass transfer kinetics between the interface and the bulk is controlled by a diffusion sublayer within the boundary layer. During the dissolution transient

  2. Quench Rate Studies of Aluminum Coordination and Oxygen Speciation in Calcium Aluminosilicate Glasses: Implications for Temperature Effects on the Structure of Aluminosilicate Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinsky, E. V.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    The atomic-scale structure of aluminosilicate glasses and melts is subject to temperature-induced rearrangement, which in turn controls variations in measurable thermodynamic properties. In order to investigate the effect of temperature on the structure of calcium aluminosilicate melts, we have used Al-27 MAS NMR, Al-27 3QMAS NMR, and O-17 MAS NMR to study fast- and slow-quenched calcium aluminosilicate glasses. Our previous work using O-17 3QMAS NMR to study lithium and sodium aluminosilicate glasses demonstrates disordering of bridging oxygen species with increasing sample fictive temperature, indicating temperature-induced rearrangement of framework units in the melt. Simple thermodynamic calculations using these results illustrate that while these structural changes may account for a portion of the experimentally-determined heat capacity of the melt, other modifications must occur to produce the observed temperature dependence of this property (Dubinsky and Stebbins 2006). The new data presented here allow us to observe changes in four-and five-coordinated aluminum and bridging and non- bridging oxygen (NBO) populations with fictive temperature in two calcium aluminosilicate glass compositions (CASx.y, where x=mol% Al2O3 and y=mol% SiO2) prepared by slow- and fast-quenching. We find that in CAS25.50 glasses, the percentage of five-coordinated Al per total Al increases from 7.6±1.9 to 9.4±2.4 and the percentage of NBO per total oxygen increases from 7.2±1.8 to 8.9±2.2 over a 150 to 200 degree fictive temperature interval. In CAS10.60 glasses representing a similar fictive temperature interval, we find that the percentage of five-coordinated Al per total Al increases from 4.0±1.0 to 4.9±1.2 and the percentage of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) per total oxygen increases from 22.8±2.3 to 23.0±2.3. Uncertainties in fitting procedures producing overlap in quantification of species in fast- and slow-quenched samples do not preclude the conclusion that robust

  3. Thermal Fatigue Behaviour of Co-Based Alloy Coating Obtained by Laser Surface Melt-Casting on High Temperature Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal fatigue behaviour of C o-based alloy coating obtained by laser surface melt-casting on the high tempe rature alloy GH33 was studied. The results show that after each time of thermal cycling, the final residual stress was formed in the melt-casting layer which is attributed to the thermal stress and structural stress. Through the first 50 times of thermal cycling, the morphology of coating still inherits the laser casting one, but the dendrites get bigger; After the second 50 times of thermal cycling, corrosion pits emerge from coating, and mostly in the places where coating and substrate meet. The fatigue damage type of coating belongs to stress corrosi on.

  4. Size dependence of the melting temperature of metallic nanoclusters from the viewpoint of the thermodynamic theory of similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonov, V. M.; Vasilyev, S. A.; Bembel, A. G.

    2016-08-01

    The generalized Thomson formula T m = T m (∞) (1-δ) R for the melting point of small objects T m has been analyzed from the viewpoint of the thermodynamic theory of similarity, where R is the radius of the particle and T m (∞) is the melting point of the corresponding large crystal. According to this formula, the parameter δ corresponds to the value of the radius of the T m ( R -1) particle obtained by the linear extrapolation of the dependence to the melting point of the particle equal to 0 K. It has been shown that δ = αδ0, where α is the factor of the asphericity of the particle (shape factor). In turn, the redefined characteristic length δ0 is expressed through the interphase tension σ sl at the boundary of the crystal with its own melt, the specific volume of the solid phase v s and the macroscopic value of the heat of fusion λ∞:δ0 = 2σ sl v s /λ∞. If we go from the reduced radius of the particle R/δ to the redefined reduced radius R/ r 1 or R/ d, where r 1 is the radius of the first coordination shell and d ≈ r 1 is the effective atomic diameter, then the simplex δ/ r 1 or δ/ d will play the role of the characteristic criterion of thermodynamic similarity. At a given value of α, this role will be played by the simplex Estimates of the parameters δ0 and δ0/ d have been carried out for ten metals with different lattice types. It has been shown that the values of the characteristic length δ0 are close to 1 nm and that the simplex δ0/ d is close to unity. In turn, the calculated values of the parameter δ agree on the order of magnitude with existing experimental data.

  5. Flocculation alters the distribution and flux of melt-water supplied sediments and nutrients in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge;

    In the Arctic, thawing permafrost and increased melting of glaciers are important drivers for changes in fine-grained sediment supply and biogeochemical fluxes from land to sea. Flocculation of particles is a controlling factor for the magnitude of fluxes and deposition rates in the marine...... environment but comparatively little is known about the flocculation processes in the Arctic. We investigated flocculation dynamics from a melt-water river in the inner Disko Fjord, West Greenland. A novel, laser-illuminated camera system significantly improved the particle size measurement capabilities...... and settling tubes were sampled to enable sub-sampling of different floc size fractions. Flocculation was observed during periods with low turbulent shear and also at the front of the fresh water plume resulting in significant volumes of large sized flocs at depth below the plume. The floc sizes and volumes...

  6. Analysis of temperature and impurity distributions in a unidirectional-solidification process for multi-crystalline silicon of solar cells by a global model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, Koichi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)]. E-mail: kakimoto@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Liu Lijun [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Nakano, Satoshi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2006-10-15

    The unidirectional-solidification process is a key method for large-scale production of multi-crystalline silicon for use in highly efficient solar cells in the photovoltaic industry. Since the efficiency of solar cells depends on the crystal quality of the multi-crystalline silicon, it is necessary to optimize the unidirectional-solidification process to control temperature and impurity distributions in a silicon ingot. We developed a transient global model for the unidirectional-solidification process. We carried out calculations to investigate the temperature and impurity distributions in a silicon ingot during solidification. Conductive heat transfer and radiative heat exchange in a unidirectional-solidification furnace and convective heat transfer in the melt in a crucible are coupled to each other. These heat exchanges were solved iteratively by a finite volume method in a transient condition. Time-dependent distributions of impurity and temperature in a silicon ingot during the unidirectional-solidification process were numerically investigated.

  7. The effect of ultrasonic processing on solidification microstructure and heat transfer in stainless steel melt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Kang, Jinwu; Wang, Shuo; Ma, Jiyu; Huang, Tianyou

    2015-11-01

    The heat transfer in the ultrasonic processing of stainless steel melt is studied in this thesis. The temperature field is simulated when the metal melt is treated with and without ultrasound. In order to avoid the erosion of high temperature melt, ultrasound was introduced from the bottom of melt. It is found that the temperature of melt apparently increases when processed with ultrasound, and the greater the ultrasonic power is, the higher the melt temperature will be; ultrasonic processing can reduce the temperature gradient, leading to more uniform temperature distribution in the melt. The solidification speed is obviously brought down due to the introduction of ultrasound during solidification, with the increasing of ultrasonic power, the melt temperature rises and the solidification speed decreases; as without ultrasound, the interface of solid and mushy zone is arc-shaped, so is the interface of liquid and mushy zone, with ultrasound, the interface of solid and mushy zone is still arc-shaped, but the interface of liquid and mushy zone is almost flat. The simulation results of temperature field are verified in experiment, which also indicates that the dendrite growth direction is in accord with thermal flux direction. The effect of ultrasonic treatment, which improves with the increase of treating power, is in a limited area due to the attenuation of ultrasound.

  8. Using of rank distributions in the study of perennial changes for monthly average temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskiy, V. B.; Stoyanov, A. K.; Tartakovsky, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of comparing the climatic data of various years with using rank distributions is considered in this paper. As a climatic data, the annual variation of temperature on the spatial areas of meteorological observations with high variability in average temperatures is considered. The results of clustering of the monthly average temperatures values by means of a recurrent neural network were used as the basis of comparing. For a given space of weather observations the rank distribution of the clusters cardinality identified for each year of observation, is being constructed. The resulting rank distributions allow you to compare the spatial temperature distributions of various years. An experimental comparison for rank distributions of the annual variation of monthly average temperatures has confirmed the presence of scatter for various years, associated with different spatio-temporal distribution of temperature. An experimental comparison of rank distributions revealed a difference in the integral annual variation of monthly average temperatures of various years for the Northern Hemisphere.

  9. Duration of the Arctic sea ice melt season: Regional and interannual variability, 1979-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Platonov, N.G.

    2004-01-01

    Melt onset dates, freeze onset dates, and melt season duration were estimated over Arctic sea ice, 1979–2001, using passive microwave satellite imagery and surface air temperature data. Sea ice melt duration for the entire Northern Hemisphere varied from a 104-day minimum in 1983 and 1996 to a 124-day maximum in 1989. Ranges in melt duration were highest in peripheral seas, numbering 32, 42, 44, and 51 days in the Laptev, Barents-Kara, East Siberian, and Chukchi Seas, respectively. In the Arctic Ocean, average melt duration varied from a 75-day minimum in 1987 to a 103-day maximum in 1989. On average, melt onset in annual ice began 10.6 days earlier than perennial ice, and freeze onset in perennial ice commenced 18.4 days earlier than annual ice. Average annual melt dates, freeze dates, and melt durations in annual ice were significantly correlated with seasonal strength of the Arctic Oscillation (AO). Following high-index AO winters (January–March), spring melt tended to be earlier and autumn freeze later, leading to longer melt season durations. The largest increases in melt duration were observed in the eastern Siberian Arctic, coincident with cyclonic low pressure and ice motion anomalies associated with high-index AO phases. Following a positive AO shift in 1989, mean annual melt duration increased 2–3 weeks in the northern East Siberian and Chukchi Seas. Decreasing correlations between consecutive-year maps of melt onset in annual ice during 1979–2001 indicated increasing spatial variability and unpredictability in melt distributions from one year to the next. Despite recent declines in the winter AO index, recent melt distributions did not show evidence of reestablishing spatial patterns similar to those observed during the 1979–88 low-index AO period. Recent freeze distributions have become increasingly similar to those observed during 1979–88, suggesting a recurrent spatial pattern of freeze chronology under low-index AO conditions.

  10. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

  11. A Reference Equation of State for the Thermodynamic Properties of Ethane for Temperatures from the Melting Line to 675 K and Pressures up to 900 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, D.; Wagner, W.

    2006-03-01

    A new formulation for the thermodynamic properties of the fluid phase of ethane in the form of a fundamental equation explicit in the Helmholtz energy is presented. The functional form of the residual part was developed using state-of-the-art linear and nonlinear optimization algorithms. It contains 44 coefficients which were fitted to selected data for the thermal and caloric properties of ethane both in the single-phase region and on the liquid-vapor phase boundary. This work provides information on the available experimental data for the thermodynamic properties of ethane and presents all details of the new formulation. The new equation of state describes the pρT surface of ethane with an uncertainty in density of less than 0.02%-0.03% (coverage factor k=2 corresponding to a level of confidence of about 95%) from the melting line up to temperatures of 520 K and pressures of 30 MPa. In the gaseous and supercritical region, high precision speed of sound data are represented generally within less than 0.015%. Other reliable data sets are represented within their experimental uncertainties. The primary data, to which the equation was fitted, cover the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 900 MPa. Beyond this range the equation shows reasonable extrapolation behavior up to very high temperatures and pressures. In addition to the equation of state, independent equations for the vapor pressure, the saturated-liquid and saturated-vapor densities, and the melting pressure are given. Tables of thermodynamic properties calculated from the new formulation are listed in the Appendix.

  12. Assessment of mass fraction and melting temperature for the application of limestone concrete and siliceous concrete to nuclear reactor basemat considering molten core-concrete interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jae; Kim, Do Gyeum [Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Leon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Eui Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung Suk [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Severe accident scenarios in nuclear reactors, such as nuclear meltdown, reveal that an extremely hot molten core may fall into the nuclear reactor cavity and seriously affect the safety of the nuclear containment vessel due to the chain reaction caused by the reaction between the molten core and concrete. This paper reports on research focused on the type and amount of vapor produced during the reaction between a high-temperature molten core and concrete, as well as on the erosion rate of concrete and the heat transfer characteristics at its vicinity. This study identifies the mass fraction and melting temperature as the most influential properties of concrete necessary for a safety analysis conducted in relation to the thermal interaction between the molten core and the basemat concrete. The types of concrete that are actually used in nuclear reactor cavities were investigated. The H2O content in concrete required for the computation of the relative amount of gases generated by the chemical reaction of the vapor, the quantity of CO2 necessary for computing the cooling speed of the molten core, and the melting temperature of concrete are evaluated experimentally for the molten core-concrete interaction analysis.

  13. Temperature distribution in the human body under various conditions of induced hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobko, O. V.; Perelman, T. L.; Fradkin, S. Z.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model based on heat balance equations was developed for studying temperature distribution in the human body under deep hyperthermia which is often induced in the treatment of malignant tumors. The model yields results which are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The distribution of temperature under various conditions of induced hyperthermia, i.e. as a function of water temperature and supply rate, is examined on the basis of temperature distribution curves in various body zones.

  14. Using distributed temperature sensing to monitor field scale dynamics of ground surface temperature and related substrate heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, V.F.; Read, T.; Verhoef, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present one of the first studies of the use of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) along fibre-optic cables to purposely monitor spatial and temporal variations in ground surface temperature (GST) and soil temperature, and provide an estimate of the heat flux at the base of the canopy layer

  15. Effects of volatiles on melt production and reactive flow in the mantle

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Magmatism in the Earth interior has a significant impact on its dynamic, thermal and compositional evolution. Experimental studies of petrology of mantle melting find that small concentrations of water and carbon dioxide have a significant effect on the solidus temperature and distribution of melting in the upper mantle. However, it has remained unclear what effect small fractions of deep, volatile-rich melts have on melting and melt transport in the shallow asthenosphere. We present a method to simulate the thermochemical evolution of the upper mantle in the presence of volatiles. The method is based on a novel, thermodynamically consistent framework for reactive, disequilibrium, multi-component melting/crystallisation. This is coupled with a system of equations representing conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for a partially molten grain aggregate. Application of this method to upwelling-column models demonstrates that it captures leading-order features of hydrated and carbonated peridotite melting. ...

  16. The effect of low temperature thermal annealing on the magnetic properties of Heusler Ni–Mn–Sn melt-spun ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llamazares, J.L. Sánchez, E-mail: jose.sanchez@ipicyt.edu.mx [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a, San Luis Potosí S.L.P. 78216, México (Mexico); Quintana-Nedelcos, A. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a, San Luis Potosí S.L.P. 78216, México (Mexico); Marmara University, Department of Material and Metalurgy Eng., Kadıkoy 34777, Istanbul (Turkey); Ríos-Jara, D. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a, San Luis Potosí S.L.P. 78216, México (Mexico); Sánchez-Valdes, C.F. [Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica A.C., Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a, San Luis Potosí S.L.P. 78216, México (Mexico); Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 14, Ensenada 22860, Baja California, México (Mexico); and others

    2016-03-01

    We report the effect of low temperature vacuum annealing (823 K; 550 °C) on the elemental chemical composition, structural phase transition temperatures, phase structure, and magnetic properties of Ni{sub 50.6}Mn{sub 36.3}Sn{sub 13.1} as-solidified ribbons. Their elemental chemical composition, highly oriented columnar-like microstructure and single-phase character (L2{sub 1}-type crystal structure for austenite) remain unchanged after this low temperature annealing. Annealed ribbons show a reduction of interatomic distances which lead to a small change in the characteristic phase transition temperatures (~3–6 K) but to a significant rise of ~73 and 63% in the saturation magnetization of the martensite and austenite phases, respectively, that can be strictly ascribed to the strengthening of ferromagnetic interactions due to the change in interatomic distances. - Highlights: • We study the effect of low temperature annealing on Ni{sub 50.6}Mn{sub 36.3}Sn{sub 13.1} melt-spun ribbons. • Low temperature annealing preserves the crystal structure, composition and microstructure of the ribbons. • Low temperature annealing reduces the cell volume. • The strengthening of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction significant increases σ{sub S}.

  17. Hydrogen permeation in stationary arc-melted nickel 200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; North, T. H.; Sommerville, I. D.; McLean, A.

    1990-06-01

    A combination of hydrogen permeation experiments and computer simulation was used to evaluate the distributions of temperature and of the hydrogen transfer flux in a stationary arcmelted Nickel 200 disc over the entire hydrogen permeation zone. The results indicate that the markedly nonuniform temperature distribution in the hydrogen permeation zone involves widely varying hydrogen fluxes and even transfer of hydrogen in different directions. At steady state, the hydrogen distribution is determined by a thermally produced dynamic equilibrium. Hydrogen supersaturation occurs in solid nickel at the solid/liquid interface in the arc-melted pool. An increase in hydrogen partial pressure in the shielding gas increases the heat input to the melt and decreases the stability of the arc melting process.

  18. Melting of Ice under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

    2008-07-31

    The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

  19. Characteristics of melt inclusions in skarn minerals from Fe,Cu(Au) and Au(Cu) ore deposits in the region from Daye to Jiujiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵斌; 赵劲松; 李兆麟; 张重泽; 彭卓伦

    2003-01-01

    A vast amount of the melt inclusions and fluid-melt inclusions have been found in skarn minerals from Fe, Cu(Au) and Au(Cu) ore deposits distributed from Daye to Jiujiang along the Yangtze River besides vapor-liquid inclusions. The melt inclusions are many and varied in shape. They mainly consist of crystallized silicate phases (CSi), iron phases (Fe), amorphous silicate phases (ASi) and vapor (V) with different volume percentages, and some of them contain several crystallized silicate phases. These melt inclusion sizes are commonly (10-46)×(6-15) μm2. A difference between the fluid-melt inclusions and melt inclusions is that the liquid phase appears in the former and their homogenization temperatures are lower than the latter. We measured the homogenization temperatures of the melt inclusions, fluid-melt inclusions and fluid inclusions in ten thin sections from eight ore deposits on Leitz microscope heating stage 1350 which was made in Germany. Forty-eight homogenization temperature values have been obtained. Among them, thirty-nine values are homogenization temperatures of the melt inclusions in garnet and pyroxene from skarns, two values are homogenization temperatures of fluid-melt inclusions, others belong to the fluid inclusions. Melt inclusions in garnet and pyroxene have homogenization temperatures of 890-1115℃. Fluid-melt inclusions have homogenization temperatures of 745-750℃. Homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions are between 580℃ and 675℃. The average of thirty- nine homogenization temperatures for the melt inclusions is 1029.9℃. Wethink studied skarns to be magmatic genesis on the basis of available data relative to the characteristic features of phase states within the melt inclusions and the fluid melt inclusions and their homogenization temperatures.

  20. Enhancing melting curve analysis for the discrimination of loop-mediated isothermal amplification products from four pathogenic molds: Use of inorganic pyrophosphatase and its effect in reducing the variance in melting temperature values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tone, Kazuya; Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Makimura, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is widely used for differentiating causative agents in infectious diseases. Melting curve analysis (MCA) in conjunction with the LAMP method reduces both the labor required to conduct an assay and contamination of the products. However, two factors influence the melting temperature (Tm) of LAMP products: an inconsistent concentration of Mg(2+) ion due to the precipitation of Mg2P2O7, and the guanine-cytosine (GC) content of the starting dumbbell-like structure. In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase), an enzyme that inhibits the production of Mg2P2O7, on the Tm of LAMP products, and examined the correlation between the above factors and the Tm value using MCA. A set of LAMP primers that amplify the ribosomal DNA of the large subunit of Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium expansum, Penicillium marneffei, and Histoplasma capsulatum was designed, and the LAMP reaction was performed using serial concentrations of these fungal genomic DNAs as templates in the presence and absence of PPase. We compared the Tm values obtained from the PPase-free group and the PPase-containing group, and the relationship between the GC content of the theoretical starting dumbbell-like structure and the Tm values of the LAMP product from each fungus was analyzed. The range of Tm values obtained for several fungi overlapped in the PPase-free group. In contrast, in the PPase-containing group, the variance in Tm values was smaller and there was no overlap in the Tm values obtained for all fungi tested: the LAMP product of each fungus had a specific Tm value, and the average Tm value increased as the GC% of the starting dumbbell-like structure increased. The use of PPase therefore reduced the variance in the Tm value and allowed the differentiation of these pathogenic fungi using the MCA method.

  1. Melt Energetics of 25-years of Distributed, Physically Based Snowcover Simulations in a Small Headwater Semiarid Mountain Catchment (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reba, M. L.; Marks, D. G.; Winstral, A. H.; Kumar, M.

    2013-12-01

    Water in the western US is over-allocated due to both urban and rural demands. Over the last 20-30 years climate warming in western North America has resulted in a critical shift in patterns of snow deposition and melt. A carefully collected, processed, and validated meteorological dataset for the 1984 - 2008 water years was assembled for a headwater catchment within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in the Owyhee Mountains of Idaho. Data from this catchment are representative of conditions across a large region of the interior western US. These data are used to simulate patterns of snow deposition and melt over the catchment for the 25-year period. The simulation period includes both the wettest (1984) and driest (1992) water years, along with a high degree of inter-annual variability. Energetics of six landcover zones and the average within the catchment are compared. Two of these zones are characterized by wind exposure (drift, scour), and four others by general vegetation cover vegetation (fir/conifer, aspen/willow, big sage, mid-sage). Energetics are compared and analyzed to understand how site characteristics moderate the climatic and atmospheric conditions, which control the establishment, development and ablation of the seasonal snowcover.

  2. Research Progress of Density Measurement for High Temperature Melt%高温熔体密度测量研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱桥; 王秀峰

    2013-01-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of high temperature melt,which can be measured by direct and indirect methods.The direct way includes sessile drop method,dilatometric technique and pycnometric method,while the indirect means includes Archimedes method,maximum bubble pressure method and γ-ray attenuation technique.In this paper,the principles and their recent applications of these methods were firstly introduced.Then the applicable scope,advantages and disadvantages were analyzed.Finally,the current problems and the perspective of the future research of the density measurement for high temperature melt were discussed.%高温熔体的密度是描述其性质的重要物理量之一,可通过直接和间接两种方式测定.静滴法、膨胀计法和比重瓶法属于直接测定,而阿基米德法、气泡最大压力法和γ射线吸收法属于间接测定.本文介绍了各种高温熔体密度测定方法的原理和近期的应用情况,分析了其适用范围和优缺点,并结合目前测试中存在的问题提出了今后的发展方向.

  3. Effect of Melt Temperature and Hold Pressure on the Weld-Line Strength of an Injection Molded Talc-Filled Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanxin Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tensile stress-strain behavior coupled with fractography was used to investigate the weld-line strength of an injection molded 40 w% talc-filled polypropylene. The relationship between processing conditions, microstructure, and tensile strength was established. Fracture surface of the weld line exhibited skin-core morphology with different degrees of talc particle orientations in the core and in the skin. Experimental results also showed that the thickness of the core decreased and the thickness of the skins increased with increasing melt temperature and increasing hold pressure, which resulted in an increase of yield strength and yield strain with increasing melt temperature and increasing hold pressure. Finally, a three-parameter nonlinear constitutive model was developed to describe the strain softening behavior of the weld-line strength of talc-filled polypropylene. The parameters in this model are the modulus E, the strain exponent m, and the compliance factor β. The simulated stress-strain curves from the model are in good agreement with the test data, and both m and β are functions of skin-core thickness ratio.

  4. Evaluation of the Gibbs Free Energy Changes and Melting Temperatures of DNA/DNA Duplexes Using Hybridization Enthalpy Calculated by Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomzov, Alexander A; Vorobjev, Yury N; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V

    2015-12-10

    A molecular dynamics simulation approach was applied for the prediction of the thermal stability of oligonucleotide duplexes. It was shown that the enthalpy of the DNA/DNA complex formation could be calculated using this approach. We have studied the influence of various simulation parameters on the secondary structure and the hybridization enthalpy value of Dickerson-Drew dodecamer. The optimal simulation parameters for the most reliable prediction of the enthalpy values were determined. The thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and entropy changes) of a duplex formation were obtained experimentally for 305 oligonucleotides of various lengths and GC-content. The resulting database was studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation using the optimized simulation parameters. Gibbs free energy changes and the melting temperatures were evaluated using the experimental correlation between enthalpy and entropy changes of the duplex formation and the enthalpy values calculated by the MD simulation. The average errors in the predictions of enthalpy, the Gibbs free energy change, and the melting temperature of oligonucleotide complexes were 11%, 10%, and 4.4 °C, respectively. We have shown that the molecular dynamics simulation gives a possibility to calculate the thermal stability of native DNA/DNA complexes a priori with an unexpectedly high accuracy.

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigations on temperature distribution at the joint interface for copper joints using ultrasonic welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elangovan Sooriya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic welding is a solid-state joining process that produces joints by the application of high frequency vibratory energy in the work pieces held together under pressure without melting. Copper and its alloys are extensively used in electrical and electronic industry because of its excellent electrical and thermal properties. This paper mainly focused on temperature distribution and the influence of process parameters at the joint interface while joining copper sheets using ultrasonic welding process. Experiments are carried out using Cu sheets (0.2 mm and 0.3 mm thickness and the interface temperature is measured using Data Acquisition (DAQ System (thermocouple and thermal imager. Numerical and finite element based model for temperature distribution at the interface are developed and solved the same using Finite Difference Method (FDM and Finite Element Analysis (FEA. The results obtained from FDM and FEA model shows similar trend with experimental results and are found to be in good agreement.

  6. Melting of sodium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Nava, J A; Beltran, M R; Michaelian, K

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stability properties and the melting-like transition of Na_n, n=13-147, clusters are studied through microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The metallic bonding in the sodium clusters is mimicked by a many-body Gupta potential based on the second moment approximation of a tight-binding Hamiltonian. The characteristics of the solid-to-liquid transition in the sodium clusters are analyzed by calculating physical quantities like caloric curves, heat capacities, and root-mean-square bond length fluctuations using simulation times of several nanoseconds. Distinct melting mechanisms are obtained for the sodium clusters in the size range investigated. The calculated melting temperatures show an irregular variation with the cluster size, in qualitative agreement with recent experimental results. However, the calculated melting point for the Na_55 cluster is about 40 % lower than the experimental value.

  7. DIFFUSIVELY ALLOYED COMPOUNDS MADE OF METAL DISCARD WITH A REDUCED MELTING TEMPERATURE FOR OBTAINING WEAR RESISTANT COATINGS USING INDUCTION HARD-FACING TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Shcherbakou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology of obtaining diffusion doped alloys made from metal scrap is reviewed in the article. The influence of short term preprocessing at high temperature on structure formation by concentrated energy sources within the further induction deposit is reviewed. A mechanism of a contact eutectic melting in diffusion doped alloys at short term high temperature treatment is described and suggested in this work. It was shown that such kind of processing of diffusion doped alloys is a perspective way of treatment when using induction hard-facing technologies for obtaining wear resistant coatings. A resource and energy saving technology was developed for obtaining wear resistant coatings based on diffusion doped alloys from metal scrap treated using induction hard-facing process.

  8. Calculation of temperature distribution in adiabatic shear band based on gradient-dependent plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学滨

    2004-01-01

    A method for calculation of temperature distribution in adiabatic shear band is proposed in terms of gradient-dependent plasticity where the characteristic length describes the interactions and interplaying among microstructures. First, the increment of the plastic shear strain distribution in adiabatic shear band is obtained based on gradient-dependent plasticity. Then, the plastic work distribution is derived according to the current flow shear stress and the obtained increment of plastic shear strain distribution. In the light of the well-known assumption that 90% of plastic work is converted into the heat resulting in increase in temperature in adiabatic shear band, the increment of the temperature distribution is presented. Next, the average temperature increment in the shear band is calculated to compute the change in flow shear stress due to the thermal softening effect. After the actual flow shear stress considering the thermal softening effect is obtained according to the Johnson-Cook constitutive relation, the increment of the plastic shear strain distribution, the plastic work and the temperature in the next time step are recalculated until the total time is consumed. Summing the temperature distribution leads to rise in the total temperature distribution. The present calculated maximum temperature in adiabatic shear band in titanium agrees with the experimental observations. Moreover, the temperature profiles for different flow shear stresses are qualitatively consistent with experimental and numerical results. Effects of some related parameters on the temperature distribution are also predicted.

  9. Influence of Low-Temperature Plasma Treatment on The Liquid Filtration Efficiency of Melt-Blown PP Nonwovens in The Conditions of Simulated Use of Respiratory Protective Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majchrzycka Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Filtering nonwovens produced with melt-blown technology are one of the most basic materials used in the construction of respiratory protective equipment (RPE against harmful aerosols, including bio- and nanoaerosols. The improvement of their filtering properties can be achieved by the development of quasi-permanent electric charge on the fibres. Usually corona discharge method is utilized for this purpose. In the presented study, it was assumed that the low-temperature plasma treatment could be applied as an alternative method for the manufacturing of conventional electret nonwovens for the RPE construction. Low temperature plasma treatment of polypropylene nonwovens was carried out with various process gases (argon, nitrogen, oxygen or air in a wide range of process parameters (gas flow velocity, time of treatment and power supplied to the reactor electrodes. After the modification, nonwovens were evaluated in terms of filtration efficiency of paraffin oil mist. The stability of the modification results was tested after 12 months of storage and after conditioning at elevated temperature and relative humidity conditions. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy and ATR-IR spectroscopy were used to assess changes in surface topography and chemical composition of the fibres. The modification of melt-blown nonwovens with nitrogen, oxygen and air plasma did not result in a satisfactory improvement of the filtration efficiency. In case of argon plasma treatment, up to 82% increase of filtration efficiency of paraffin oil mist was observed in relation to untreated samples. This effect was stable after 12 months of storage in normal conditions and after thermal conditioning in (70 ± 3°C for 24 h. The use of low-temperature plasma treatment was proven to be a promising improvement direction of filtering properties of nonwovens used for the protection of respiratory tract against harmful aerosols.

  10. Electrochemical Behaviors of Fe2+ and Sm3+ in Urea-NaBr Low Temperature Melt and Their Inductive Codeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童叶翔; 刘鹏; 刘莉治; 杨绮琴

    2001-01-01

    The cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and chronoamperometry were used to study the behaviors of Fe2+ on Pt, Cu, Ag and Ti electrodes in urea-NaBr melt at 373 K. Electroreduction of Fe2+ to metallic Fe is irreversible in one step. The exchange current density determined on Ti electrode is 2.68×10-5 A·cm-2. Sm3+ does not reduce to Sm alone, but can be inductively codeposited with Fe2+. Sm-Fe alloy film contained over 90% Sm (mass fraction) can be obtained by potentiostatic electrolysis and galvanostatic electrolysis on Cu substrate. The Sm content in the alloy is related to the cathode potential, current density and the Sm3+/Fe2+ molar ratio. The surface state of the Sm-Fe deposit was studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Experimental study on pressure and temperature distributions for low mass flux steam jet in subcooled water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN JunJie; WU XinZhuang; CHONG DaoTong

    2009-01-01

    A low mass flux steam jet in subcooled water was experimentally investigated. The transition of flow pattern from stable jet to condensation oscillation was observed at relatively high water temperature. The axial total pressures, the axial and radial temperature distributions were measured in the jet region. The results indicated that the pressure and temperature distributions were mainly influenced by the water temperature. The correlations corrected with water temperature were given to predict the dimen-sionless axial pressure peak distance and axial temperature distributions in the jet region, the results showed s good agreement between the predictions and experiments. Moreover, the self-similarity property of the radial temperature was obtained, which agreed well with Gauss distribution. In present work, all the dimensionless properties were mainly dependent on the water temperature but weakly on the nozzle size under a certain steam mass flux.

  12. Distribución de elementos traza y grado de fusión parcial en migmatitas de la Sierra de Molinos, Salta Trace element distribution and degree of partial melting in migmatites of Sierra de Molinos, Salta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Sola

    2012-06-01

    evaluate the trace element distribution and the degree of partial melting throughout anatexis, because they preserve much of the structures indicative of an almost perfect separation between melt and solid residuum. The key samples were taken from leucosomes and melanosomes from metatexites (Sil-Kfs zone with a rock core drill machine. Leucosomes were sampled from dilatant sites within a stromatic metatexite, whereas the melanosomes were taken from the boudinaged matrix. This enables getting the maximum separation between the materials that represents pure melt (leucosomes and the residuum left after melt extraction (melanosomes. Major and trace element concentrations were acquired from a metapelite from the Puncoviscana Formation, assumed as the protolith, the leucosome-melanosome pairs, metatexites and diatexites migmatites. The degree of partial melting was calculated by simple mass balance, using the major and trace element composition of leucosome-melanosome pairs, obtaining a result of 17 to 23 wt%. The assessment of trace element distribution allowed to understand the complexity of processes implicated in the evolution and diversification of anatectic magmas which occurred close to the source. Because of this, these processes must be taken into account when modelling partial melting processes using composition of granitic rocks emplaced in crustal levels far from the source.

  13. Low temperature study of micrometric powder of melted Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 10}Al{sub 40} alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Ligia E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Perez Alcazar, G.A., E-mail: gpgeperez@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Tabares, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Valle, A. A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Romero, J.J. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, C/Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, P.O. Box 155, Las Rozas, 28230 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, J.M. [Unidad Asociada ICMM-IMA, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Marco, J.F. [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica Rocasolano, CSIC, c/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-06-15

    Melted Fe{sub 50}Mn{sub 10}Al{sub 40} alloy powder with particle size less than 40 {mu}m was characterized at room temperature by XRD, SEM and XPS; and at low temperatures by Moessbauer spectrometry, ac susceptibility, and magnetization analysis. The results show that the sample is BCC ferromagnetic but with a big contribution of paramagnetic sites, and presents super-paramagnetic and re-entrant spin-glass phases with critical temperatures of 265 and 35 K, respectively. The presence of the different phases detected is due to the disordered character of the sample and the competitive magnetic interactions. The obtained values of the saturation magnetization and the coercive field as a function of temperature present a behavior which indicates a ferromagnetic phase. However, the behavior of the FC curve and that of the coercive field as a function of temperature suggest that the dipolar magnetic interaction between particles contributes to the internal magnetic field in the same way as was reported for nanoparticulate powders.

  14. Study on visualization simulation of temperature distributions in surrounding rock of tunnels in a deep mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Pei-de

    2006-01-01

    Based on the mathematical model for rock temperature distribution in a geothermal field, the properties of rock temperature distribution in geothermal field for four kinds of surrounding rock cross-sections of tunnels in a deep mine were simulated by using finite element method. It is shown that the relationship for rock temperature distribution varied with the geothermal parameters, time and space. Namely, 2-dimensional time-dependent isograms clearly showed the process for rock temperature variation and distribution in a geothermal field which has been redisplayed with visualization numerical simulation.

  15. Effect of Traverse/Rotational Speed on Material Deformations and Temperature Distributions in Friction Stir Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao ZHANG; Jun BIE; Yali LIU; Hongwu ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    A fully coupled thermo-mechanical model was developed to study the temperature fields and the plastic deformations of alloy AL6061-T6 under different process parameters during the friction stir welding (FSW) process.Three-dimensional results under different process parameters were presented.Results indicate that the maximum temperature is lower than the melting point of the welding material.The higher temperature gradient occurs in the leading side of the workpiece.The calculated temperature field can be fitted well with the one from the experimental test.A lower plastic strain region can be found near the welding tool in the trailing side on the bottom surface,which is formed by the specific material flow patterns in FSW.The maximum temperature can be increased with increasing the welding speed and the angular velocity in the current numerical modelling.

  16. Experimental study of temperature distribution in rubber material during microwave heating and vulcanization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Long; Li, Tao; Liang, Yun; Sun, Bin; Li, Qing-Ling

    2017-03-01

    Microwave technology has been employed to heat sheet rubber, the optical fiber temperature online monitor and optical fiber temperature sensor have been employed to measure the temperature in sheet rubber. The temperature of sheet rubber increased with increase of heating time during microwave heating process in which the maximum of temperature was rubber was higher than the rate of temperature rising in marginal zone of sheet rubber, and the final temperature in central zone of sheet rubber was also higher than the final temperature in marginal zone of sheet rubber. In the microwave heating and vulcanization process of sheet rubber, the maximum of rate of temperature rising and the maximum of temperature belong to the central zone of sheet rubber, so the distribution of electric field was uneven in heating chamber, which led to the uneven temperature distribution of sheet rubber. The higher electric field intensity value converges on the central zone of sheet rubber.

  17. Temperature distributed micro-sensor by microwave correlation radiometry; Microcapteur distribue de temperature par radiometrie micro-onde par correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allal, D.; Bocquet, B. [Universite des Sciences et technologies de Lille, Institut d' Electronique et de Microelectronique du Nord, Dept. Hyperfrequences et Semiconducteurs UMR CNRS 9929, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    1999-07-01

    We use a microwave correlation radiometer for determine the temperature on lossy transmission lines. The processing of raw information gives the physical temperature of hot spots with a poor spatial resolution and a non-complete information on the temperature gradient shape. We have developed an inversion process based on a Kalman filtering. We have defined, first, the notion of absolute functions, which allows to linearize the equations. In this paper, we show the possible improvement of the spatial and the temperature resolutions by the concept of a synthetic bandwidth radiometer. The development of a temperature distributed micro-sensor is now available. (authors)

  18. An experimental and computational study of size-dependent contact-angle of dewetted metal nanodroplets below its melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Bruno P.; Yeratapally, Saikumar R.; Kacher, Josh; Ferreira, Placid M.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Decorating 1D nanostructures (e.g., wires and tubes) with metal nanoparticles serves as a hierarchical approach to integrate the functionalities of metal oxides, semiconductors, and metals. This paper examines a simple and low-temperature approach to self-assembling gold nanoparticles (Au-np)—a common catalytic material—onto silicon nanowires (SiNWs). A conformal ultra-thin film (i.e., contact angle. Using transmission electron microscopy imaging, it is found that annealing temperature profile has a strong effect on the particle size. Additionally, the contact angle is found to be dependent on particle size and temperature even below the eutectic temperature of the Au-Si alloy. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate potential explanations for such experimental observation. In this temperature regime, the simulations reveal the formation of an amorphous phase at the interface between the catalyst and SiNW that is sensitive to temperature. This amorphous layer increases the adhesion energy at the interface and explains the contact angle dependence on temperature.

  19. Basal terraces on melting ice shelves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutrieux, Pierre; Stewart, Craig; Jenkins, Adrian; Nicholls, Keith W; Corr, Hugh F. J; Rignot, Eric; Steffen, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Ocean waters melt the margins of Antarctic and Greenland glaciers, and individual glaciers' responses and the integrity of their ice shelves are expected to depend on the spatial distribution of melt...

  20. Investigation of the limits of a fibre optic sensor system for measurement of temperature distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm, Robert; Johnson, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an innovative temperature sensor system which is able to measure the temperature distribution along a fibre optical cable. This technique for temperature measurement is based on Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR). ©2006 IEEE.......The aim of this project is to develop an innovative temperature sensor system which is able to measure the temperature distribution along a fibre optical cable. This technique for temperature measurement is based on Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR). ©2006 IEEE....

  1. Evaluation of Fiber Bragg Grating and Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCary, Kelly Marie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic temperature sensors were evaluated in the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine the accuracy of the measurements at various temperatures. A distributed temperature sensor was evaluated up to 550C and a fiber Bragg grating sensor was evaluated up to 750C. HTTL measurements indicate that there is a drift in fiber Bragg sensor over time of approximately -10C with higher accuracy at temperatures above 300C. The distributed sensor produced some bad data points at and above 500C but produced measurements with less than 2% error at increasing temperatures up to 400C

  2. Force induced DNA melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K [Center for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-12 (India)], E-mail: santosh@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: maiti@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2009-01-21

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f{sub m}, at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  3. Load forecasting method considering temperature effect for distribution network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Xiao Fang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the accuracy of load forecasting, the temperature factor was introduced into the load forecasting in this paper. This paper analyzed the characteristics of power load variation, and researched the rule of the load with the temperature change. Based on the linear regression analysis, the mathematical model of load forecasting was presented with considering the temperature effect, and the steps of load forecasting were given. Used MATLAB, the temperature regression coefficient was calculated. Using the load forecasting model, the full-day load forecasting and time-sharing load forecasting were carried out. By comparing and analyzing the forecast error, the results showed that the error of time-sharing load forecasting method was small in this paper. The forecasting method is an effective method to improve the accuracy of load forecasting.

  4. INTRA URBAN AIR TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN HISTORIC URBAN CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Jamei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the urban heat island effect in Malaysian historic town Malacca through seven mobile traverses, as carried out on 10 December 2011. It aims to identify the intra-urban air temperature differences between heritage core zone, new development area and outskirts of the city. Air temperature variations were also analyzed across three different zones; namely the outskirts, the heritage site and the city center district. Heat index values were then calculated based on air temperature and relative humidity to gauge the level of outdoor thermal comfort within the study area. Based on the indications, one may conclude that the heritage place’s core zone is currently threatened by escalating temperatures and that its current temperature range falls within the “caution” and “extreme caution” categories. Furthermore, no significant difference was observed between the peak temperatures of the old city quarters and newer areas; despite the disparities in their urban forms. Therefore, it is hoped that the study, with its implications, will be able to influence future environmental consideration in heritage city of Melaka.

  5. Alloying influences on low melt temperature SnZn and SnBi solder alloys for electronic interconnections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Guang [Stokes Laboratories, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Department of Civil Engineering and Materials Science, University of Limerick (Ireland); Wilding, Ian J. [Henkel Ltd, Hemel Hempstead (United Kingdom); Collins, Maurice N., E-mail: Maurice.collins@ul.ie [Stokes Laboratories, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland)

    2016-04-25

    Due to its commercial potential and the technological challenges associated with processing, low temperature soldering is a topic gaining widespread interest in both industry and academia in the application space of consumer and “throw away” electronics. This review focuses on the latest metallurgical alloys, tin zinc (Sn–Zn) and tin bismuth (Sn–Bi), for lower temperature processed electronic interconnections. The fundamentals of solder paste production and flux development for these highly surface active metallic powders are introduced. Intermetallic compounds that underpin low temperature solder joint production and reliability are discussed. The influence of alloying on these alloys is described in terms of critical microstructural changes, mechanical properties and reliability. The review concludes with an outlook for next generation electronic interconnect materials. - Highlights: • Review of the latest advances in Sn–Zn and Sn–Bi solder alloys. • Technological developments underpinning low temperature soldering. • Micro alloying influences on next generation interconnect materials.

  6. Study on temperature distribution along wellbore of fracturing horizontal wells in oil reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Cai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of distributed temperature sensors (DTS to monitor producing zones of horizontal well through a real-time measurement of a temperature profile is becoming increasingly popular. Those parameters, such as flow rate along wellbore, well completion method, skin factor, are potentially related to the information from DTS. Based on mass-, momentum-, and energy-balance equations, this paper established a coupled model to study on temperature distribution along wellbore of fracturing horizontal wells by considering skin factor in order to predict wellbore temperature distribution and analyze the factors influencing the wellbore temperature profile. The models presented in this paper account for heat convective, fluid expansion, heat conduction, and viscous dissipative heating. Arriving temperature and wellbore temperature curves are plotted by computer iterative calculation. The non-perforated and perforated sections show different temperature distribution along wellbore. Through the study on the sensitivity analysis of skin factor and flow rate, we come to the conclusion that the higher skin factor generates larger temperature increase near the wellbore, besides, temperature along wellbore is related to both skin factors and flow rate. Temperature response type curves show that the larger skin factor we set, the less temperature augmenter from toe to heel could be. In addition, larger flow rate may generate higher wellbore temperature.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of dynamic strain and temperature distribution using high birefringence PANDA fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengshi; Murayama, Hideaki

    2017-04-01

    New approach in simultaneous measurement of dynamic strain and temperature has been done by using a high birefringence PANDA fiber Bragg grating sensor. By this technique, we have succeeded in discriminating dynamic strain and temperature distribution at the sampling rate of 800 Hz and the spatial resolution of 1 mm. The dynamic distribution of strain and temperature were measured with the deviation of 5mm spatially. In addition, we have designed an experimental setup by which we can apply quantitative dynamic strain and temperature distribution to the fiber under testing without bounding it to a specimen.

  8. Few mode fibers based quasi-single mode Raman distributed temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Meng; Liu, Tongqing; Yang, Chen; Tong, Weijun; Fu, Songnian; Tang, Ming

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate a distributed temperature sensor based on quasi-single mode (QSM) Raman scattering in few mode fibers (FMFs). The FMF allows much larger input pump power before the initiate of stimulated Raman scattering compared with the standard single mode fiber (SSMF) and mitigates the detrimental differential mode group delay (DMGD) existing in the conventional multimode fiber (MMF) based Raman distributed temperature sensor (RDTS). Distributed temperature sensing is realized using conventional RDTS hardware over 20km FMFs within 90s, with a spatial resolution of 3m. The temperature resolution is 2.3°C @10km and 6.7°C @20km, respectively.

  9. MULTIPLE MELTING IN NYLON 1010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Shuren; CHEN Taoyung

    1983-01-01

    Multiple melting behavior of nylon 1010 has been investigated by using DSC instrument. Effects of partial scanning, partial scanning and annealing, heating rate, cooling rate and stepwise annealing on the melting curve were studied. Experimental results indicate that the sample undergoes a process of continuous melting and recrystallization during DSC scanning. Nylon 1010 contains a distribution of crystallites of different degrees of perfection which is strongly dependent on its previous thermal history. From the structural reorganization point of view, the origin of double and multiple peaks of the melting curve is explained.

  10. Distributed Optical Fiber Sensor for Multi-point Temperature Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-tian; LIU Zhan-wei; HOU Pei-guo; SHAN Wei

    2004-01-01

    The distributed optical fiber sensing technology is overviewed, which is based on Raman scattering light theory. Basic operation principle, structure, system characteristics and signal processing are discussed. This structure and method of the signal processing possess of certain spatial resolution, hence will ensure the practicability of system.

  11. A Modeling Approach to Fiber Fracture in Melt Impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Feng; Zhang, Cong; Yu, Yang; Xin, Chunling; Tang, Ke; He, Yadong

    2017-02-01

    The effect of process variables such as roving pulling speed, melt temperature and number of pins on the fiber fracture during the processing of thermoplastic based composites was investigated in this study. The melt impregnation was used in this process of continuous glass fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites. Previous investigators have suggested a variety of models for melt impregnation, while comparatively little effort has been spent on modeling the fiber fracture caused by the viscous resin. Herein, a mathematical model was developed for impregnation process to predict the fiber fracture rate and describe the experimental results with the Weibull intensity distribution function. The optimal parameters of this process were obtained by orthogonal experiment. The results suggest that the fiber fracture is caused by viscous shear stress on fiber bundle in melt impregnation mold when pulling the fiber bundle.

  12. Evaluation of temperature distributions in cadaveric lumbar spine during nucleoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2004-04-01

    In this study, temperature maps were obtained throughout human cadaveric disc specimens (n = 6) during a simulated Nucleoplasty™ treatment. The procedure was performed using the Perc-DL SpineWand™ (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) inserted through a 17 gage needle into the human cadaveric disc. The device uses a dual mode heating technique which employs a high voltage radio frequency (RF) plasma field to vaporize tissue (Coblation®), followed by bipolar RF current heating for thermal coagulation. The device, with a distal 's-curve', is manipulated manually to create a series of six channels at a 60° angular spacing within a period of 3 min. A computer-controlled, motorized translational system was used to reproducibly mimic the insertion (Coblation) and retraction (rf-coagulation) performed during clinical implementation, with rotation performed manually between each Coblation/coagulation cycle. Transient temperature data were obtained using five multi-junction thermocouple probes (5-8 junctions spaced at either 2 or 5 mm intervals, with 0.33 or 0.56 mm probe diameter) spaced throughout the desired heating volume. Transient temperature curves were obtained from 26+ points throughout the disc, and the data used to calculate accumulated thermal doses. Transient peaks of 80-90 °C were recorded within the discs, with temperatures greater than 60-65 °C measured within a radial distance of 3-4 mm from the introducer (applicator centreline). Accumulated thermal doses of t43 > 250 min were produced at radial distances of up to 6 mm from the introducer. Gross inspection of the discs revealed a narrow region of coagulation along the insertion length. Given these radial thermal penetrations and the possibility for unpredictable positioning during current clinical implementation, high temperatures and lethal thermal doses in small regions outside of the nucleus, or within the bone endplates, may be possible in clinical implementation.

  13. Evaluation of temperature distributions in cadaveric lumbar spine during nucleoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nau, William H; Diederich, Chris J [Thermal Therapy Research Group, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2004-04-21

    In this study, temperature maps were obtained throughout human cadaveric disc specimens (n = 6) during a simulated Nucleoplasty [trade mark] treatment. The procedure was performed using the Perc-DL SpineWand [trade mark] (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) inserted through a 17 gage needle into the human cadaveric disc. The device uses a dual mode heating technique which employs a high voltage radio frequency (RF) plasma field to vaporize tissue (Coblation (registered)), followed by bipolar RF current heating for thermal coagulation. The device, with a distal 's-curve', is manipulated manually to create a series of six channels at a 60 deg. angular spacing within a period of 3 min. A computer-controlled, motorized translational system was used to reproducibly mimic the insertion (Coblation) and retraction (rf-coagulation) performed during clinical implementation, with rotation performed manually between each Coblation/coagulation cycle. Transient temperature data were obtained using five multi-junction thermocouple probes (5-8 junctions spaced at either 2 or 5 mm intervals, with 0.33 or 0.56 mm probe diameter) spaced throughout the desired heating volume. Transient temperature curves were obtained from 26+ points throughout the disc, and the data used to calculate accumulated thermal doses. Transient peaks of 80-90 deg. C were recorded within the discs, with temperatures greater than 60-65 deg. C measured within a radial distance of 3-4 mm from the introducer (applicator centreline). Accumulated thermal doses of t{sub 43} > 250 min were produced at radial distances of up to 6 mm from the introducer. Gross inspection of the discs revealed a narrow region of coagulation along the insertion length. Given these radial thermal penetrations and the possibility for unpredictable positioning during current clinical implementation, high temperatures and lethal thermal doses in small regions outside of the nucleus, or within the bone endplates, may be possible in clinical

  14. The effect of temperature on the boundary of polymer melts in the modeling of two-layers flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, A. V.; Kozitsyna, M. V.; Trufanova, N. M.

    2016-10-01

    The article is devoted to determine the velocity fields, temperatures and boundary flows of bi layers of polymer coating when both of them are applied simultaneously. The mathematical model of the flow was developed using finite - elements method with was the part of Ansys Cfx software packet.

  15. Calibration of micro-thermal analysis for the detection of glass transition temperatures and melting points: repeatability and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    Micro-thermal analysis (μTATM) is a technique in which thermal analysis is performed on surfaces of test specimens on a small (ca. 2×2 μm) scale. Like any thermal analysis technique, interpretation of results benefits from accurate temperature information and knowledge of the precision of the result

  16. Calibration of micro-thermal analysis for the detection of glass transition temperatures and melting points: repeatability and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    Micro-thermal analysis (μTATM) is a technique in which thermal analysis is performed on surfaces of test specimens on a small (ca. 2×2 μm) scale. Like any thermal analysis technique, interpretation of results benefits from accurate temperature information and knowledge of the precision of the

  17. Comparison of temperature distributions inside a PEM fuel cell with parallel and interdigitated gas distributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J. J.; Liu, S. J.

    A comparison of the temperature distributions in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell between the parallel-flow gas distributors and the interdigitated gas distributor has been discussed in detail. An electrochemical-thermal coupled numerical model in a five-layer membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) is developed. The temperatures for the reactant fuels as well as the carbon fibers in the porous electrode are predicted by using a CFD technique. The overpotential across the MEA is varied to examine its effect on the temperature distributions of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that both the fuel temperature and the carbon fiber temperature are increased with increasing the total overpotential. In addition, the fuel and carbon-fiber temperature distributions are significantly affected by the flow pattern that cast on the gas distributor. Replacing the parallel-flow gas distributor by the interdigitated gas distributor will increase the local maximum temperature inside the PEM fuel cell.

  18. Simulation study on reconstruction model of three-dimensional temperature distribution within visible range in furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dong; Wang Fei; Huang Qun-Xing; Yan Jian-Hua; Chi Yong; Cen Ke-Fa

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a reconstruction model of three-dimensional temperature distribution in furnace based on radiative energy images captured by charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras within the visible wavelength range. Numerical simulation case was used in this study and a zigzag eccentric temperature distribution was assumed to verify the model. Least square QR-factorization (LSQR) method was introduced to deal with reconstruction equation. It is found that the reconstructed temperature distributions in low-temperature areas had some fluctuations and high-temperature areas were reconstructed well The whole reconstruction relative error was mainly due to errors in low-temperature areas and the relative error for highest-temperature reconstruction was quite small.

  19. Distribution pattern of temperature and biomass in the upwelling area along the NW coast of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekielda, K.-H.

    1973-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions and wind systems are considered together with temperature observations. Data from scanning radiometers in the infrared and television cameras for the visible were applied to derive temperature data over cloudfree regions. From the analyzed spacecraft data it is obvious that the distribution of temperature and nonconservative parameters is much more complicated than one might expect from conventional measurements onboard a ship.

  20. Influence of Ultrasonic Melt Treatment and Cooling Rates on the Microstructural Development and Elevated Temperature Mechanical Properties of a Hypereutectic Al-18Si-4Cu-3Ni Piston Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jea-Hee; Cho, Young-Hee; Jung, Jae-Gil; Lee, Jung-Moo [Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ik Min [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The influence of ultrasonic melt treatment (UST) combined with a change in cooling rates on the microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of a hypereutectic Al-18Si-4Cu-3Ni piston alloy was investigated. Microstructural observation confirmed that UST effectively refined the sizes of primary Si and intermetallic compounds (e.g. ε-Al{sub 3}Ni) while promoting their homogeneous distribution. Besides the refinement of the constituent phases, the size of the dendrite arm spacing (DAS), which was hardly affected by UST, significantly deceased with increasing cooling rates. The refinement of the solidification structure in the alloy achieved through both UST and increased cooling rates resulted in an improvement in tensile properties, ultimate tensile strength and elongation in particular, after T5 heat treatment followed by overaging at 350 ℃. However, the elevated temperature yield strength of the alloy was not associated with the refinement, but was rather correlated with the 3-D interconnectivity, morphology and volume fraction of the primary Si.

  1. Size-dependent melting temperature,melting entropy and melting enthalpy of metallic nanoparticles with ball shape%球形金属纳米颗粒熔化温度、熔化熵及熔化焓的尺寸效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍开拓; 陈晓明

    2014-01-01

    根据结合能的键能模型,研究了球形金属纳米颗粒熔化相关热力学量的尺寸效应。在该模型中引入3个因子:晶体致密度k因子(晶胞中原子总体积与晶胞体积的比值);β因子(晶体中表面原子与内部原子结合能的比值)和qs因子(晶面被表面原子占据的比值)。在考虑上述因子后,通过模型预测具有自由表面球形金属纳米颗粒的熔化温度、熔解熵、熔解焓等热力学量的尺寸依赖性,并将所得结果与相关实验数据、分子动力学模拟结果、液滴模型以及前人提出的模型进行了比较。结果显示,对于Au和Al纳米粒子熔化温度的尺寸效应,该模型相比之前的模型更接近实验结果,与Ag和Cu纳米粒子熔化熵与熔化焓的分子动力学结果吻合较好。%Size-dependent melting thermodynamic quantities of metallic nanoparticles with ball shape are studied theoretically based on bond energy model.Three factors are introduced in the present model. The k factor,i.e.,efficiency of space filling of crystal lattice (the ratio between the volume of the atoms in a crystal cell and that of the crystal cell).Theβfactor (the ratio between the cohesive energy of sur-face atom and interior atom of a crystal).The qs factor (the packing fraction on a surface crystalline plane).With considering these factors,the melting temerature,melting entropy and melting enthalpy of free standing metallic nahoparticles with ball shape are predicated by the present model.The obtained model is also compared with the reported experimental data ,molecular dynamics simulation results and the liquid drop model and the model by Qi.For the size effect on melting temperature of Au and Al nan-oparticles,the results show that the present model is more close to the experimental data compared with the model by Qi.Compared with the molecular dynamics simulation results,it is show that such model can successfully predict the size

  2. In-Situ Observation of Crystallization and Growth in High-Temperature Melts Using the Confocal Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Il; Dippenaar, Rian

    2016-08-01

    This review discusses the innovative efforts initiated by Emi and co-workers for in-situ observation of phase transformations at high temperatures for materials. By using the high-temperature confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), a robust database of the phase transformation behavior during heating and cooling of slags, fluxes, and steel can be developed. The rate of solidification and the progression of solid-state phase transformations can be readily investigated under a variety of atmospheric conditions and be correlated with theoretical predictions. The various research efforts following the work of Emi and co-workers have allowed a deeper fundamental understanding of the elusive solidification and phase transformation mechanisms in materials beyond the ambit of steels. This technique continues to evolve in terms of its methodology, application to other materials, and its contribution to technology.

  3. INTELLIGENT MONITORING SYSTEM WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTED FIBEROPTIC SENSOR FOR POWER PLANT COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boheman

    2004-12-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, improvement was made on the performance of in-fiber grating fabricated in single crystal sapphire fibers, test was performed on the grating performance of single crystal sapphire fiber with new fabrication methods, and the fabricated grating was applied to high temperature sensor. Under Task 2, models obtained from 3-D modeling of the Demonstration Boiler were used to study relationships between temperature and NOx, as the multi-dimensionality of such systems are most comparable with real-life boiler systems. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we investigate a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. The 3D temperature data is furnished by the Penn State Energy Institute using FLUENT. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic

  4. Experimental, in-situ carbon solution mechanisms and isotope fractionation in and between (C-O-H)-saturated silicate melt and silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid to upper mantle temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2017-02-01

    Our understanding of materials transport processes in the Earth relies on characterizing the behavior of fluid and melt in silicate-(C-O-H) systems at high temperature and pressure. Here, Raman spectroscopy was employed to determine structure of and carbon isotope partitioning between melts and fluids in alkali aluminosilicate-C-O-H systems. The experimental data were recorded in-situ while the samples were at equilibrium in a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell at temperatures and pressures to 825 °C and >1300 MPa, respectively. The carbon solution equilibrium in both (C-O-H)-saturated melt and coexisting, silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid is 2CO3 + H2O + 2Qn + 1 = 2HCO3 + 2Qn. In the Qn-notation, the superscript, n, is the number of bridging oxygen in silicate structural units. At least one oxygen in CO3 and HCO3 groups likely is shared with silicate tetrahedra. The structural behavior of volatile components described with this equilibrium governs carbon isotope fractionation factors between melt and fluid. For example, the ΔH equals 3.2 ± 0.7 kJ/mol for the bulk 13C/12C exchange equilibrium between fluid and melt. From these experimental data, it is suggested that at deep crustal and upper mantle temperatures and pressures, the δ13C-differences between coexisting silicate-saturated (C-O-H) fluid and (C-O-H)-saturated silicate melts may change by more than 100‰ as a function of temperature in the range of magmatic processes. Absent information on temperature and pressure, the use of carbon isotopes of mantle-derived magma to derive isotopic composition of magma source regions in the Earth's interior, therefore, should be exercised with care.

  5. Liquidus temperatures of komatiites and the effect of cooling rate on element partitioning between olivine and komatiitic melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2016-05-01

    Archean komatiites are the hottest magmas preserved on Earth and are thus unique probes of its thermal evolution. Estimating their eruption temperatures remains problematic, however, because the uppermost (A1, A2) zones of komatiite flows contain randomly oriented spinifex-textured olivines, indicative of rapid cooling and growth. Fe-Mg partitioning between olivine and assumed komatiitic liquid typically shows departures from equilibrium, extending towards higher K_{{D}}^{{{{Fe}}^{2 + } - {{Mg}}}}. If these higher values are a disequilibrium effect, using them to calculate parental magma composition would lead to errors in estimated liquidus temperatures. In order to investigate this possibility, we have performed experiments on two komatiite compositions, the classic Barberton Aluminium Undepleted Komatiite (AUK) sample 49J (32.2 % MgO) and Munro AUK sample 422/95 (23 % MgO). Isothermal experiments to constrain phase equilibria on 49J at atmospheric pressure, between 1360 and 1600 °C at 1.7 log units below and 1.1 above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer reveal a liquidus temperature ( T liq) of 1616 °C, 40 °C lower than a previous estimate. The K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} ranges between 0.320 and 0.295 at FMQ - 1.7, with a slight negative dependence on temperature. To replicate the conditions that prevailed during the quenching of komatiites in their upper chill zones, experiments with a constant cooling rate at FMQ - 1.7 were performed on 422/95 ( T liq = 1450 °C) at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 6.5 and 16 °C/min. Olivine morphology changes from euhedral to tabular at low cooling rates, hopper at intermediate, and skeletal and chain structures at high rates. Concurrently, the K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} increases monotonically from an equilibrium value of 0.305 to 0.376 at 16 °C/min, reflecting the inability of unwanted cations to diffuse away from the growing olivine. The high K_{{D}}^{{Σ {{Fe}}{-}{{Mg}}}} between olivine and komatiitic liquid caused by

  6. MELTED BUTTER TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Golubeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Melted butter is made from dairy butter by rendering the fat phase. It has specific taste and aroma, high-calorie content and good assimilability. Defects of butter which appeared during the storage causes by the development of microbiological processes or by the chemical oxidation. On the development of these processes influence quality and composition of fresh butter, its physical structure, content of the increased amount of gas phase and content of heavy metals, storage conditions. Microbiological spoilage of butter occurs generally due to damage of plasma which is good environment for the development of microorganisms. Defects of microbiological origin include: unclean, sour, moldy, yeasty, cheesy, bitter taste. Defects of test and smell chemical origin are formed due to hydrolytic digestion of lipids. It's prevailed at long storage of butter in the conditions of freezing temperatures. It's picked out the following main processes of spoiling: souring, acidifying and sallowness. Often these processes take place simultaneously.It has been investigated melted butter with lactated additive. The latter improves the microbiological and toxicological safety, prolongs the storage condition of the products. Technological efficiency of the additives is achieved by a multilayer products formation from the inactive bound water, preventing microorganisms growth and by the barrier layer with lactate inhibiting hydrolytic reactions. Oil samples were obtained with the batch-type butter maker application, then they were melted and after that lactated additive were supplemented. It has been studied organoleptic and physico-chemical indices of the melted butter samples. The fatty-acid composition of melted butter were studied. Comparative analysis of fatty-acid composition of cow's milk fat and produced melted butter has shown their similarity. Also in the last sample there is increased weight fraction of linoleic and linolenic acids. The obtained

  7. Numerical Simulation of the Air Jet Flow Field in the Melt Blowing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ting; HUANG Xiu-bao

    2002-01-01

    The theoretical model of the flow field of the dual slot die in melt blowing process is founded. The model is solved numerically with finite difference method. The distributions of the air velocity component in x direction along x-axis and y-axis and the air temperature distributions along x-axis and y-axis are obtained via numerical computation. The computation results coincide with the experimental data given by Harpham and Shambaugh. The distributions of the air velocity and air temperature are introduced into the air drag model of melt blowing. The model prediction of the fiber diameter agrees with the experimental data well.

  8. Development and Improvement of an Intelligent Cable Monitoring System for Underground Distribution Networks Using Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintae Cho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With power systems switching to smart grids, real-time and on-line monitoring technologies for underground distribution power cables have become a priority. Most distribution components have been developed with self-diagnostic sensors to realize self-healing, one of the smart grid functions in a distribution network. Nonetheless, implementing a real-time and on-line monitoring system for underground distribution cables has been difficult because of high cost and low sensitivity. Nowadays, optical fiber composite power cables (OFCPCs are being considered for communication and power delivery to cope with the increasing communication load in a distribution network. Therefore, the application of distributed temperature sensing (DTS technology on OFCPCs used as underground distribution lines is studied for the real-time and on-line monitoring of the underground distribution power cables. Faults can be reduced and operating ampacity of the underground distribution system can be increased. This paper presents the development and improvement of an intelligent cable monitoring system for the underground distribution power system, using DTS technology and OFCPCs as the underground distribution lines in the field.

  9. Inverse analysis of non-uniform temperature distributions using multispectral pyrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tairan; Duan, Minghao; Tian, Jibin; Shi, Congling

    2016-05-01

    Optical diagnostics can be used to obtain sub-pixel temperature information in remote sensing. A multispectral pyrometry method was developed using multiple spectral radiation intensities to deduce the temperature area distribution in the measurement region. The method transforms a spot multispectral pyrometer with a fixed field of view into a pyrometer with enhanced spatial resolution that can give sub-pixel temperature information from a "one pixel" measurement region. A temperature area fraction function was defined to represent the spatial temperature distribution in the measurement region. The method is illustrated by simulations of a multispectral pyrometer with a spectral range of 8.0-13.0 μm measuring a non-isothermal region with a temperature range of 500-800 K in the spot pyrometer field of view. The inverse algorithm for the sub-pixel temperature distribution (temperature area fractions) in the "one pixel" verifies this multispectral pyrometry method. The results show that an improved Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is effective for this ill-posed inverse problem with relative errors in the temperature area fractions of (-3%, 3%) for most of the temperatures. The analysis provides a valuable reference for the use of spot multispectral pyrometers for sub-pixel temperature distributions in remote sensing measurements.

  10. Mechanism Research on Melting Loss of Coppery Tuyere Small Sleeve in Blast Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Jian-Liang; Ning, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Guang-Yun; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The tuyere small sleeve in blast furnace works under poor conditions. The abnormal damage of it will severely affect the performance of the blast furnace, thus it should be replaced during the damping down period. So it is of great significance that we study and reduce the burnout of tuyere small sleeve. Melting loss is one case of its burnout. This paper studied the reasons of tuyere small sleeve's melting loss, through computational simulation and microscopic analysis of the melting section. The research shows that the temperature of coppery tuyere small sleeve is well distributed when there is no limescale in the lumen, and the temperature increases with the thickness of limescale. In addition, the interruption of circulating water does great harm to the tuyere small sleeve. The melting loss of tuyere small sleeve is caused by iron-slag erosion, with the occurrence of the melt metallurgical bonding and diffusion metallurgical combination.

  11. Investigating the hohlraum radiation properties through the angular distribution of the radiation temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Yang, D.; Song, P.; Zou, S.; Zhao, Y.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Guo, L.; Wang, F.; Zheng, W.; Gu, P.; Pei, W.; Zhu, S.; Jiang, S.; Ding, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The symmetric radiation drive is essential to the capsule implosion in the indirect drive fusion but is hard to achieve due to the non-uniform radiation distribution inside the hohlraum. In this work, the non-uniform radiation properties of both vacuum and gas-filled hohlraums are studied by investigating the angular distribution of the radiation temperature experimentally and numerically. It is found that the non-uniform radiation distribution inside the hohlraum induces the variation of the radiation temperature between different view angles. The simulations show that both the angular distribution of the radiation temperature and the hohlraum radiation distribution can be affected by the electron heat flux. The measured angular distribution of the radiation temperature is more consistent with the simulations when the electron heat flux limiter f e = 0.1 . Comparisons between the experiments and simulations further indicate that the x-ray emission of the blow-off plasma is overestimated in the simulations when it stagnates around the hohlraum axis. The axial position of the laser spot can also be estimated by the angular distribution of the radiation temperature due to their sensitive dependence. The inferred laser spot moves closer to the laser entrance hole in the gas-filled hohlraum than that in the vacuum hohlraum, consisting with the x-ray images taken from the framing camera. The angular distribution of the radiation temperature provides an effective way to investigate the hohlraum radiation properties and introduces more constraint to the numerical modeling of the hohlraum experiments.

  12. Global distribution of total ozone and lower stratospheric temperature variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Steinbrecht

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study gives an overview of interannual variations of total ozone and 50 hPa temperature. It is based on newer and longer records from the 1979 to 2001 Total Ozone Monitoring Spectrometer (TOMS and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV instruments, and on US National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalyses. Multiple linear least squares regression is used to attribute variations to various natural and anthropogenic explanatory variables. Usually, maps of total ozone and 50 hPa temperature variations look very similar, reflecting a very close coupling between the two. As a rule of thumb, a 10 Dobson Unit (DU change in total ozone corresponds to a 1 K change of 50 hPa temperature. Large variations come from the linear trend term, up to -30 DU or -1.5 K/decade, from terms related to polar vortex strength, up to 50 DU or 5 K (typical, minimum to maximum, from tropospheric meteorology, up to 30 DU or 3 K, or from the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO, up to 25 DU or 2.5 K. The 11-year solar cycle, up to 25 DU or 2.5 K, or El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO, up to 10 DU or 1 K, are contributing smaller variations. Stratospheric aerosol after the 1991 Pinatubo eruption lead to warming up to 3 K at low latitudes and to ozone depletion up to 40 DU at high latitudes. Variations attributed to QBO, polar vortex strength, and to a lesser degree to ENSO, exhibit an inverse correlation between low latitudes and higher latitudes. Variations related to the solar cycle or 400 hPa temperature, however, have the same sign over most of the globe. Variations are usually zonally symmetric at low and mid-latitudes, but asymmetric at high latitudes. There, position and strength of the stratospheric anti-cyclones over the Aleutians and south of Australia appear to vary with the phases of solar cycle, QBO or ENSO.

  13. Impact ejecta-induced melting of surface ice deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, David K.; Head, James W.

    2016-12-01

    Fluvial features present around impact craters on Mars can offer insight into the ancient martian climate and its relationship to the impact cratering process. The widespread spatial and temporal distribution of surface ice on Mars suggests that the interaction between impact cratering and surface ice could have been a relatively frequent occurrence. We explore the thermal and melting effects on regional surface ice sheets in this case, where an impact event occurs in regional surface ice deposits overlying a regolith/bedrock target. We provide an estimate for the post-impact temperature of martian ejecta as a function of crater diameter, and conduct thermal modeling to assess the degree to which contact melting of hot ejecta superposed on surface ice deposits can produce meltwater and carve fluvial features. We also evaluate whether fluvial features could form as a result of basal melting of the ice deposits in response to the thermal insulation provided by the overlying impact ejecta. Contact melting is predicted to occur immediately following ejecta emplacement over the course of hundreds of years to tens of kyr. Basal melting initiates when the 273 K isotherm rises through the crust and reaches the base of the ice sheet ∼0.1 to ∼1 Myr following the impact. We assess the range of crater diameters predicted to produce contact and basal melting of surface ice sheets, as well as the melt fluxes, volumes, timescales, predicted locations of melting (relative to the crater), and the associated hydraulic and hydrologic consequences. We find that the heat flux and surface temperature conditions required to produce contact melting are met throughout martian history, whereas the heat flux and surface temperature conditions to produce basal melting are met only under currently understood ancient martian thermal conditions. For an impact into a regional ice sheet, the contact and basal melting mechanisms are predicted to generate melt volumes between ∼10-1 and 105 km3

  14. Experimental study on the free surface deformation in the oxide melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG; Yong; JIN; Weiqing; PAN; Xiuhong; YODA; Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on the thermocapillary convection of high temperature Bi12SiO20 melts have been carried out in the in situ observation system. The steady flow pattern comprises of the main trunk and branches, which is deemed as the surface deformation.The oscillatory thermocapillary convection is characterized by the oscillatory main trunk and traveling branches. The transition of the melt from steady spatial to oscillatory behavior under the temperature differences 120, 60 and 10 K has been considered. The free surface deformation is observed to transform with the change of the applied temperature difference, which manifests that the thermocapillary convection is sensitive to the temperature difference. Moreover, taking the temperature distribution into account,it is noted that the deformation is formed in the colder area of the melt. The oscillatory frequency of the main trunk, which is also sensitive to the applied temperature difference,increases with the rise of temperature.

  15. Experimental study on dehy- dration melting of natural biotite-plagioclase gneiss from High Himalayas and implica- tions for Himalayan crust anatexis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Here we present the results of dehydration melting, melt morphology and fluid migration based on the dehydration melting experiments on natural biotite- plagioclase gneiss performed at the pressure of 1.0-1.4 GPa, and at the temperature of 770-1028℃. Experimental results demonstrate that: (ⅰ) most of melt tends to be distributed along mineral boundaries forming "melt film" even the amount of melt is less than 5 vol%; melt connectivity is con-trolled not only by melt topology but also by melt fraction; (ⅱ) dehydration melting involves a series of subprocesses including subsolidus dehydration reaction, fluid migration, vapor-present melting and vapor-absent melting; (ⅲ) ex-periments produce peraluminous granitic melt whose com-position is similar to that of High Himalayan leucogranites (HHLG) and the residual phase assemblage is Pl+Qz+Gat+Bio+Opx±Cpx+Ilm/Rut±Kfs and can be compa-rable with granulites observed in Himalayas. The experi-ments provide the evidence that biotite-plagioclase gneiss is one of source rocks of HHLG and dehydration melting is an important way to form HHLG and the granulites. Addition-ally, experimental results provide constraints on determining the P-T conditions of Himalayan crustal anatexis.

  16. In-Situ Measurement of Internal Temperature Distribution of Sintered Materials Using Ultrasonic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, I.; Tomomatsu, T.

    2011-03-01

    It is often required to measure internal temperature distribution of a heated material because it is closely related to the materials properties and behavior. In this work, an effective ultrasonic method has been applied to the monitoring of internal temperature distributions of an alumina being heated. The principle of the method is based on the temperature dependence of the velocity of ultrasound propagating through a heated material. In the method, a combined technique of ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements and a finite difference calculation is employed to determine the one-dimensional temperature distribution in a heated material. Shear wave is used for the ultrasonic measurements to improve the accuracy in determining temperature. To verify the feasibility of the method, pulse-echo measurements with a shear wave transducer have been performed for an alumina rod of 14 mm diameter and 25 mm length whose single-end is being heated. The internal temperature distribution and its variation of the alumina are then measured during the heating. The temperature distributions determined by the ultrasonic method almost agree with those obtained by an infrared method. Thus, it is demonstrated that the ultrasonic method has the potential for in-process monitoring of the transient temperature variation of ceramics being processed at high temperatures.

  17. Investigations on 3-dimensional temperature distribution in a FLATCON-type CPV module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenfarth, Maike; Gamisch, Sebastian; Kraus, Harald; Bett, Andreas W.

    2013-09-01

    The thermal flow in a FLATCON®-type CPV module is investigated theoretically and experimentally. For the simulation a model in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software SolidWorks Flow Simulation was established. In order to verify the simulation results the calculated and measured temperatures were compared assuming the same operating conditions (wind speed and direction, direct normal irradiance (DNI) and ambient temperature). Therefore, an experimental module was manufactured and equipped with temperature sensors at defined positions. In addition, the temperature distribution on the back plate of the module was displayed by infrared images. The simulated absolute temperature and the distribution compare well with an average deviation of only 3.3 K to the sensor measurements. Finally, the validated model was used to investigate the influence of the back plate material on the temperature distribution by replacing the glass material by aluminum. The simulation showed that it is important to consider heat dissipation by radiation when designing a CPV module.

  18. Numerical prediction of temperature distribution in thermoset composites during laser curing process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴存真; 孙志坚; 徐剑锋; 秦悦慧

    2002-01-01

    The temperature distribution in the advanced thermoset composite during the laser curing process was predicted with the use of the two-dimensional thermo-chemical model presented in this paper which also gives the governing equations based on the thermal history of the curing process. The finite-difference method was used to get the temperature distribution. This paper also deals with the effect of some factors (such as the winding velocity, the tape thickness and the laser heat source) on the temperature distribution.

  19. Melting hadrons, boiling quarks from Hagedorn temperature to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at CERN : with a tribute to Rolf Hagedorn

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book shows how the study of multi-hadron production phenomena in the years after the founding of CERN culminated in Hagedorn's pioneering idea of limiting temperature, leading on to the discovery of the quark-gluon plasma - announced, in February 2000 at CERN. Following the foreword by Herwig Schopper -- the Director General (1981-1988) of CERN at the key historical juncture -- the first part is a tribute to Rolf Hagedorn (1919-2003) and includes contributions by contemporary friends and colleagues, and those who were most touched by Hagedorn: Tamás Biró, Igor Dremin, Torleif Ericson, Marek Gázdzicki, Mark Gorenstein, Hans Gutbrod, Maurice Jacob, István Montvay, Berndt Müller, Grazyna Odyniec, Emanuele Quercigh, Krzysztof Redlich, Helmut Satz, Luigi Sertorio, Ludwik Turko, and Gabriele Veneziano. The second and third parts retrace 20 years of developments that after discovery of the Hagedorn temperature in 1964 led to its recognition as the melting point of hadrons into boiling quarks, and t...

  20. Calibrating IR Cameras for In-Situ Temperature Measurement During the Electron Beam Melting Process using Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Lowe, Larry E [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides world-leading capabilities in advanced manufacturing (AM) facilities which leverage previous, on-going government investments in materials science research and characterization. MDF contains systems for fabricating components with complex geometries using AM techniques (i.e. 3D-Printing). Various metal alloy printers, for example, use electron beam melting (EBM) systems for creating these components which are otherwise extremely difficult- if not impossible- to machine. ORNL has partnered with manufacturers on improving the final part quality of components and developing new materials for further advancing these devices. One method being used to study (AM) processes in more depth relies on the advanced imaging capabilities at ORNL. High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ process monitoring and temperature measurements. However, standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption. Two techniques for temperature calibrations will be presented and compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ample information can be learned from in-situ IR process monitoring of the EBM process. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.

  1. Characteristics of the spatiotemporal distribution of daily extreme temperature events in China: Minimum temperature records in different climate states against the background of the most probable temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Zhong-Hua; Hu Jing-Guo; Feng Guo-Lin; Cao Yong-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Based on the skewed function,the most probable temperature is defined and the spatiotemporal distributions of the frequencies and strengths of extreme temperature events in different climate states over China are investigated,where the climate states are referred to as State Ⅰ,State Ⅱ and State Ⅲ,i.e.,the daily minimum temperature records of 1961-1990,1971-2000,and 1981-2009.The results show that in space the frequency of high temperature events in summer decreases clearly in the lower and middle reaches of the Yellow River in State Ⅰ and that low temperature events decrease in northern China in State Ⅱ.In the present state,the frequency of high temperature events increases significantly in most areas over China except the north east,while the frequency of low temperature events decreases mainly in north China and the regions between the Yangtze River and the Yellow River.The distributions of frequencies and strengths of extreme temperature events are consistent in space.The analysis of time evolution of extreme events shows that the occurrence of high temperature events become higher with the change in state,while that of low temperature events decreases.High temperature events are becoming stronger as well and deserve to be paid special attention.

  2. The distribution of chromium among orthopyroxene, spinel and silicate liquid at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Cr distributions for a synthetic silicate melt equilibrated with bronzitic orthopyroxene and chromite spinel between 1334 and 1151 C over a range of oxygen fugacities between the nickel-nickel oxide and iron-wuestite buffers are studied. The occurrence, chemical composition, and structure of the orthopyroxene-silicate melt and the spinel-silicate melt are described. It is observed that the Cr content between bronzite and the melt increases with falling temperature along a given oxygen buffer and decreases with falling oxygen fugacity at a given temperature; however, the Cr content of the melt in equilibrium with spinel decreases with falling temperature and increases with lower oxygen fugacity.

  3. TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION MONITORING AND ANALYSES AT DIFFERENT HEATING CONTROL PRINCIPLES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Rode, Carsten; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades significant efforts have been made to reduce energy use in buildings. Heating, cooling and ventilation systems are responsible for 30-40% of the energy consumption in buildings. Although they are evaluated based on the energy performance they should guarantee the desired thermal...... control sensor which was already installed. The room was heated by means of electrical radiators, which should be able to control the indoor environment to guarantee the desired thermal conditions for the occupants and to supply heat according to desired load patterns. Five series of experiments were done...... under different control strategies of the heating system (Pseudo Random Binary Sequence signal controlling all the heaters (PRBS) or thermostatic control of the heaters (THERM)). A comparison of the measured temperatures within the room, for the five series of experiments, shows a better correlation...

  4. A plant distribution shift: temperature, drought or past disturbance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwilk, Dylan W.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2012-01-01

    Simple models of plant response to warming climates predict vegetation moving to cooler and/or wetter locations: in mountainous regions shifting upslope. However, species-specific responses to climate change are likely to be much more complex. We re-examined a recently reported vegetation shift in the Santa Rosa Mountains, California, to better understand the mechanisms behind the reported shift of a plant distribution upslope. We focused on five elevational zones near the center of the gradient that captured many of the reported shifts and which are dominated by fire-prone chaparral. Using growth rings, we determined that a major assumption of the previous work was wrong: past fire histories differed among elevations. To examine the potential effect that this difference might have on the reported upward shift, we focused on one species, Ceanothus greggii: a shrub that only recruits post-fire from a soil stored seedbank. For five elevations used in the prior study, we calculated time series of past per-capita mortality rates by counting growth rings on live and dead individuals. We tested three alternative hypotheses explaining the past patterns of mortality: 1) mortality increased over time consistent with climate warming, 2) mortality was correlated with drought indices, and 3) mortality peaked 40–50 years post fire at each site, consistent with self-thinning. We found that the sites were different ages since the last fire, and that the reported increase in the mean elevation of C. greggii was due to higher recent mortality at the lower elevations, which were younger sites. The time-series pattern of mortality was best explained by the self-thinning hypothesis and poorly explained by gradual warming or drought. At least for this species, the reported distribution shift appears to be an artifact of disturbance history and is not evidence of a climate warming effect.

  5. A plant distribution shift: temperature, drought or past disturbance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan W Schwilk

    Full Text Available Simple models of plant response to warming climates predict vegetation moving to cooler and/or wetter locations: in mountainous regions shifting upslope. However, species-specific responses to climate change are likely to be much more complex. We re-examined a recently reported vegetation shift in the Santa Rosa Mountains, California, to better understand the mechanisms behind the reported shift of a plant distribution upslope. We focused on five elevational zones near the center of the gradient that captured many of the reported shifts and which are dominated by fire-prone chaparral. Using growth rings, we determined that a major assumption of the previous work was wrong: past fire histories differed among elevations. To examine the potential effect that this difference might have on the reported upward shift, we focused on one species, Ceanothus greggii: a shrub that only recruits post-fire from a soil stored seedbank. For five elevations used in the prior study, we calculated time series of past per-capita mortality rates by counting growth rings on live and dead individuals. We tested three alternative hypotheses explaining the past patterns of mortality: 1 mortality increased over time consistent with climate warming, 2 mortality was correlated with drought indices, and 3 mortality peaked 40-50 years post fire at each site, consistent with self-thinning. We found that the sites were different ages since the last fire, and that the reported increase in the mean elevation of C. greggii was due to higher recent mortality at the lower elevations, which were younger sites. The time-series pattern of mortality was best explained by the self-thinning hypothesis and poorly explained by gradual warming or drought. At least for this species, the reported distribution shift appears to be an artifact of disturbance history and is not evidence of a climate warming effect.

  6. Temperature performance of Raman scattering in data fiber and its application in distributed temperature fiber-optic sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deming LIU; Shuang LIU; Hairong LIU

    2009-01-01

    A wavelength division multiplexer (WDM) was used to extract the Raman scattering signal from a data fiber. The temperature performance of Raman scattering spectrum was studied theoretically and experimentally. On the base of this study, a distributed fiber-optic temperature sensor (DFTS) system was developed. The sensing distance was 4 km. The temperature accuracy and the distance resolution reached to ±1℃ and ±1 m, respec-tively. The system is stable and adequate for commercial usage, such as the power industry, the underground tunnel, the subway, and the pipe laying, and also for the mission applications, such as the warship and the airplane.

  7. Intelligent Monitoring System With High Temperature Distributed Fiberoptic Sensor For Power Plant Combustion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boheman

    2005-12-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, we set up a dedicated high power, ultrafast laser system for fabricating in-fiber gratings in harsh environment optical fibers, successfully fabricated gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers by the high power laser system, and developed highly sensitive long period gratings (lpg) by electric arc. Under Task 2, relevant mathematical modeling studies of NOx formation in practical combustors. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we investigate a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. The 3D temperature data is furnished by the Penn State Energy Institute using FLUENT. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic expression, we first develop an analytic description and then extend that model along a single axis. Extrapolation

  8. Importance of light, temperature, zooplankton, and fish in predicting the nighttime vertical distribution of Mysis diluviana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Marilyn K.; ,; Boscarino, Brent T.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Eillenberger, June L.

    2009-01-01

    The opossum shrimp Mysis diluviana (formerly M. relicta) performs large amplitude diel vertical migrations in Lake Ontario and its nighttime distribution is influenced by temperature, light and the distribution of its predators and prey. At one location in southeastern Lake Ontario, we measured the vertical distribution of mysids, mysid predators (i.e. planktivorous fishes) and mysid prey (i.e. zooplankton), in addition to light and temperature, on 8 occasions from May to September, 2004 and 2005. We use these data to test 3 different predictive models of mysid habitat selection, based on: (1) laboratoryderived responses of mysids to different light and temperature gradients in the absence of predator or prey cues; (2) growth rate of mysids, as estimated with a mysid bioenergetics model, given known prey densities and temperatures at different depths in the water column; (3) ratio of growth rates (g) and mortality risk (μ) associated with the distribution of predatory fishes. The model based on light and temperature preferences was a better predictor of mysid vertical distribution than the models based on growth rate and g:μon all 8 occasions. Although mysid temperature and light preferences probably evolved as mechanisms to reduce predation while increasing foraging intake, the response to temperature and light alone predicts mysid vertical distribution across seasons in Lake Ontario.

  9. Temperature Distribution on Inclined plate Caused by Interaction with Supersonic Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TsuyoshiYasunobu; ToshiakiSetoguchi; 等

    2000-01-01

    The phenomena of the interaction between a supersonic jet and an obstcle is a very interesting and important problem relating to the industrial engineering.This paper aims to investigate the characteristics of the two-dimensional temperature distribution on an inclined plate surface and the relation between the temperature distribution and some shock waves formed in the flow field,In this study,the measurement of temperature distribution on an inclined plate suface and the flow visualization has carried out for various conditions using the thermo-sensitive liquid crystal sheet and the schlieren method.The two dimensional temperature distribution on the plate surface is clearly obtained by the thermo-sensitive liquid crystal sheet,The relation between the temperature distribution on an inclined plate surface and some shock waves reached at a plate surface is discussed.In this paper,the characteristics of the temperature distribution and the maximum temperature,and some other experimental evidences are presented.

  10. High temperature measurements in irradiated environment using Raman fiber optics distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Pierre; Blairon, Sylvain; Boldo, Didier; Taillade, Frédéric; Caussanel, Matthieu; Beauvois, Gwendal; Duval, Hervé; Grieu, Stéphane; Laffont, Guillaume; Lainé, Frédéric; Carrel, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Optical fiber temperature sensors using Raman effect are a promising technology for temperature mapping of nuclear power plant pipes. These pipes are exposed to high temperature (350 °C) and gamma radiations, which is a harsh environment for standard telecom fibers. Therefore metal coated fibers are to be used to perform measurement over 300 °C. Temperature variations can affect the attenuation of the metallic coated fiber before irradiation. The latter induces an extra attenuation, due to light absorption along the fiber by radiation-induced defects. The recombination of these defects can be strongly accelerated by the high temperature value. As backscattered Raman signal is weak it is important to test optical fibers under irradiation to observe how it gets attenuated. Different experiments are described in this conference paper: two in situ irradiation campaigns with different dose rates at, both ambient and high temperature. We observe that the tested off-the-shelf metallic coated fibers have a high attenuation under irradiation. We also noticed the fact that thermal annealing plays a massive role in the +300 °C temperature range.

  11. Comparison of Temperature Field Distribution between Cement Preclinkering Technology and Cement Precalcining Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xun; WANG Lan

    2016-01-01

    Through the comparison of calcination conditions between cement preclinkering technology and cement precalcining technology, we studied the characteristics of temperature ifeld distribution of cement preclinkering technology systems including cyclone preheater, preclinkering furnace, and rotary kiln. We used numerical simulation method to obtain data of temperature ifeld distribution.Some results are found by system study. The ratio of tail coal of cement preclinkering technology is about 70%, and raw meal temperature can reach 1070℃. ShorterL/D kiln type of preclinkering technology can obtain more stable calcining zone temperature. The highest solid temperature of cement preclinkering technology is higher than 80℃, and high temperature region (>1450℃) length is 2 times, which is beneifcial for calcining clinker and higher clinker quality. So cement preclinkering technology can obtain more performance temperature ifled, which improves both the solid-phase reaction and liquid-phase reaction.

  12. Heat-conduction error of temperature sensors in a fluid flow with nonuniform and unsteady temperature distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khine, Soe Minn; Houra, Tomoya; Tagawa, Masato

    2013-04-01

    In temperature measurement of non-isothermal fluid flows by a contact-type temperature sensor, heat conduction along the sensor body can cause significant measurement error which is called "heat-conduction error." The conventional formula for estimating the heat-conduction error was derived under the condition that the fluid temperature to be measured is uniform. Thus, if we apply the conventional formula to a thermal field with temperature gradient, the heat-conduction error will be underestimated. In the present study, we have newly introduced a universal physical model of a temperature-measurement system to estimate accurately the heat-conduction error even if a temperature gradient exists in non-isothermal fluid flows. Accordingly, we have been able to successfully derive a widely applicable estimation and/or evaluation formula of the heat-conduction error. Then, we have verified experimentally the effectiveness of the proposed formula using the two non-isothermal fields-a wake flow formed behind a heated cylinder and a candle flame-whose fluid-dynamical characteristics should be quite different. As a result, it is confirmed that the proposed formula can represent accurately the experimental behaviors of the heat-conduction error which cannot be explained appropriately by the existing formula. In addition, we have analyzed theoretically the effects of the heat-conduction error on the fluctuating temperature measurement of a non-isothermal unsteady fluid flow to derive the frequency response of the temperature sensor to be used. The analysis result shows that the heat-conduction error in temperature-fluctuation measurement appears only in a low-frequency range. Therefore, if the power-spectrum distribution of temperature fluctuations to be measured is sufficiently away from the low-frequency range, the heat-conduction error has virtually no effect on the temperature-fluctuation measurements even by the temperature sensor accompanying the heat-conduction error in

  13. Experimental study of temperature distribution in rubber material during microwave heating and vulcanization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Long; Li, Tao; Liang, Yun; Sun, Bin; Li, Qing-Ling

    2016-07-01

    Microwave technology has been employed to heat sheet rubber, the optical fiber temperature online monitor and optical fiber temperature sensor have been employed to measure the temperature in sheet rubber. The temperature of sheet rubber increased with increase of heating time during microwave heating process in which the maximum of temperature was curves of temperature-time presented nonlinearity. The rate of temperature rising in central zone of sheet rubber was higher than the rate of temperature rising in marginal zone of sheet rubber, and the final temperature in central zone of sheet rubber was also higher than the final temperature in marginal zone of sheet rubber. In the microwave heating and vulcanization process of sheet rubber, the maximum of rate of temperature rising and the maximum of temperature belong to the central zone of sheet rubber, so the distribution of electric field was uneven in heating chamber, which led to the uneven temperature distribution of sheet rubber. The higher electric field intensity value converges on the central zone of sheet rubber.

  14. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature distribution of the deep convective clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KONDURU, RAKESH TEJA; KISHTAWAL, C M; SHAH, SHIVANI

    2013-01-01

    ...), for both deep convective and non-deep convective (shallow cloud) cases. It is observed that Johnson SB function is the best continuous distribution function in explaining the histogram of infrared brightness temperatures of the convective clouds...

  15. CUMULATIVE DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS FOR THE TEMPERATURE THRESHOLD FOR THE ONSET OF CARBON STEEL CORROSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    1998-05-15

    The purpose of this calculation is to process the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) characterizing the temperature threshold for the onset of corrosion provided by expert elicitation and minimize the set of values to 200 points for use in WAPDEG.

  16. Evaluation of High-temperature Physicochemical Interactions Between the H282Alloy Melt and Ceramic Material of the Crucible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirowski Z.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nickel alloys belong to the group of most resistant materials when used under the extreme operating conditions, including chemically aggressive environment, high temperature, and high loads applied over a long period of time. Although in the global technology market one can find several standard cast nickel alloys, the vast majority of components operating in machines and equipment are made from alloys processed by the costly metalworking operations. Analysis of the available literature and own studies have shown that the use of casting technology in the manufacture of components from nickel alloys poses a lot of difficulty. This is due to the adverse technological properties of these alloys, like poor fluidity, high casting shrinkage, and above all, high reactivity of liquid metal with the atmospheric air over the bath and with the ceramic material of both the crucible and foundry mold. The scale of these problems increases with the expected growth of performance properties which these alloys should offer to the user.

  17. Temperature of Earth's core constrained from melting of Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongzhou; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Zhao, Jiyong; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. Ercan; Hu, Michael Y.; Toellner, Thomas S.; Murphy, Caitlin A.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-08-01

    The melting points of fcc- and hcp-structured Fe0.9Ni0.1 and Fe are measured up to 125 GPa using laser heated diamond anvil cells, synchrotron Mossbauer spectroscopy, and a recently developed fast temperature readout spectrometer. The onset of melting is detected by a characteristic drop in the time integrated synchrotron Mfissbauer signal which is sensitive to atomic motion. The thermal pressure experienced by the samples is constrained by X-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and temperatures. The obtained best-fit melting curves of fcc-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 fall within the wide region bounded by previous studies. We are able to derive the gamma-is an element of-1 triple point of Fe and the quasi triple point of Fe0.9Ni0.1 to be 110 ± 5 GPa, 3345 ± 120 K and 116 ± 5 GPa, 3260 ± 120 K, respectively. The measured melting temperatures of Fe at similar pressure are slightly higher than those of Fe0.9Ni0.1 while their one sigma uncertainties overlap. Using previously measured phonon density of states of hcp-Fe, we calculate melting curves of hcp-structured Fe and Fe0.9Ni0.1 using our (quasi) triple points as anchors. The extrapolated Fe0.9Ni0.1 melting curve provides an estimate for the upper bound of Earth's inner core-outer core boundary temperature of 5500 ± 200 K. The temperature within the liquid outer core is then approximated with an adiabatic model, which constrains the upper bound of the temperature at the core side of the core -mantle boundary to be 4000 ± 200 K. We discuss a potential melting point depression caused by light elements and the implications of the presented core -mantle boundary temperature bounds on phase relations in the lowermost part of the mantle.

  18. Redox dynamics in multicomponent, iron-bearing silicate melts and glasses: Application to the float-glass processing of high-temperature silicate glassmelts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Glen Bennett

    Processing high-strain-point glasses by the float process is challenged by the relative thermochemical properties of glassmelts and the liquid-metal float medium. As the chemical reaction between the glassmelt and the float metal involves dynamic reduction of the glassmelt, this research has examined the constraints on high-temperature float processing of glassmelts by combining metal-alloy/oxide reaction thermodynamics and Wagnerian kinetic models for redox reactions in silicate melts. The dynamic response of Fe-bearing, p-type (polaronic) semiconducting amorphous silicates to a chemical potential gradient of oxygen has been shown to be rate-limited by the chemical diffusion of network-modifying cations. The persistence of this mechanism to very low Fe concentrations in Fe-doped magnesium aluminosilicate glasses was proven with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Three glasses, with 0.1, 0.5, and 1.25 mol. % FeO were reacted with air at temperatures from 710-845sp°C. For all compositions and temperatures, oxidation was dominated by network modifier diffusion; an activation energy of 475 kJ*molsp{-1} characterized the process. Chemical dynamics in a high-temperature float environment were characterized on liquid-liquid reaction couples between two low-Fe sodium-aluminoborosilicate (NABS) glassmelts (0.01 and 0.08 mol. % FeO) and Au-30Sn and Au-28Ge (atomic basis) alloys. Experiments were performed in the temperature range 1250-1450sp°C for 30 min; wavelength-dispersive and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopies were employed. These exothermic liquid-metal alloys display large negative deviations from ideal solution behavior, with significantly depressed chemical activities. Diffusion of Sn or Ge in the NABS glassmelts (depth and concentration) was limited at all temperatures to levels comparable to conventional soda-lime (NCS) float glass (˜2 min on pure Sn at 1100sp°C). Incorporation of Sn or Ge was reduced significantly in the higher-Fe-content NABS

  19. Melt pool dynamics during selective electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharowsky, T.; Osmanlic, F.; Singer, R. F.; Körner, C.

    2014-03-01

    Electron beam melting is a promising additive manufacturing technique for metal parts. Nevertheless, the process is still poorly understood making further investigations indispensable to allow a prediction of the part's quality. To improve the understanding of the process especially the beam powder interaction, process observation at the relevant time scale is necessary. Due to the difficult accessibility of the building area, the high temperatures, radiation and the very high scanning speeds during the melting process the observation requires an augmented effort in the observation equipment. A high speed camera in combination with an illumination laser, band pass filter and mirror system is suitable for the observation of the electron beam melting process. The equipment allows to observe the melting process with a high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper the adjustment of the equipment and results of the lifetime and the oscillation frequencies of the melt pool for a simple geometry are presented.

  20. Simultaneous imaging of magnetic field and temperature distributions by magneto optical indicator microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanju; Jeon, Sunghoon; Friedman, Barry; Lee, Kiejin

    2017-01-01

    We report a simultaneous imaging method of the temperature and the magnetic field distributions based on the magneto optical indicator microscopy. The present method utilizes an optical indicator composed of a bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet thin film, and visualizes the magnetic field and temperature distributions through the magneto-optical effect and the temperature dependent optical absorption of the garnet thin film. By using a printed circuit board that carries an electric current as a device under test, we showed that the present method can visualize the magnetic field and temperature distribution simultaneously with a comparable temperature sensitivity (0.2 K) to that of existing conventional thermal imagers. The present technique provides a practical way to get a high resolution magnetic and thermal image at the same time, which is valuable in investigating how thermal variation results in a change of the operation state of a micrometer sized electronic device or material. PMID:28252018

  1. [Measurement on gas temperature distribution by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Yan, Jian-hua; Wang, Fei; Chi, Yong; Cen, Ke-fa

    2008-08-01

    The technique of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) can be used for gas temperature distribution measurement by scanning multiple gas absorption lines with a tunable diode laser. The fundamental of gas temperature distribution measurement by TDLAS is introduced in the present paper, and the discretization strategy of equation for gas absorption is also given here. Using constrained linear least-square fitting method, the gas temperature distribution can be calculated with the help of physical constraints under the condition of uniform gas concentration and pressure. Based on the spectral parameters of four CO absorption lines near 6330 cm(-1) from HITRAN database, the model of two-temperature distribution at 300 and 600 K with each path length of 55 cm was set up. The effects of relative measurement error and different path length constraints of temperature bins on the gas temperature distribution measurement results were simulated by constrained linear least-square fitting. The results show that the temperature distribution calculation error increases as the relative measurement error rises. A measurement error of 5% could lead to a maximum relative error of 11%, and an average relative error of 2.2% for calculation result. And the weak physical constraints of path length for temperature bins could increase the calculation result error during the process of constrained linear least-square fitting. By setting up the model of two-temperature distribution with gas cells at room temperature as the cold section and in tube furnace as the hot section, the experiment of gas temperature distribution measurement in lab was carried out. Using four absorption lines of CO near 6330 cm(-1) scanned by VCSEL diode laser, and fitting the background laser intensity without absorption by the cubic polynomial to get the baseline signal, the integrals of spectral absorbance for gas temperature distribution measurement can be calculated. The relative calculation

  2. Analytical Investigation On Temperature Distribution Of High Wattage White Light Lamp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Andhare

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent times the usage of floodlight is increasing. But for developing high power more than 200W of power consumption floodlight the problem on radiant heat has not been resolved clearly as ever. So in this paper the numerical study was conducted to analyze the temperature distributions of general 500 W floodlights. The temperature distribution on lamp was calculated at the instance where lamp gives white light under ideal conditions to see optimum conditions of the life.

  3. Intelligent Monitoring System with High Temperature Distributed Fiberoptic Sensor for Power Plant Combustion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boehman

    2006-09-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, we have set up a dedicated high power, ultrafast laser system for fabricating in-fiber gratings in harsh environment optical fibers, successfully fabricated gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers by the high power laser system, and developed highly sensitive long period gratings (lpg) by electric arc. Under Task 2, relevant mathematical modeling studies of NOx formation in practical combustors have been completed. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we have investigated a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic expression, we first developed an analytic description and then extended that model along a single axis.

  4. Brillouin suppression in a fiber optical parametric amplifier by combining temperature distribution and phase modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny; Nielsen, Carsten Vandel

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate an increased gain in optical parametric amplier through suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering by applying a temperature distribution along the fiber resulting in a reduction of the required phase modulation.......We demonstrate an increased gain in optical parametric amplier through suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering by applying a temperature distribution along the fiber resulting in a reduction of the required phase modulation....

  5. Analysis and optimization of temperature distribution in carbon fiber reinforced composite materials during microwave curing process

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum assisted microwave curing technologies and modified optical sensing systems have been employed to investigate the influence of ply orientation and thickness on through-thickness temperature distribution of carbon fiber reinforced composite laminates. Two different types of epoxy systems have been studied. The results demonstrated that the ply orientation did not affect the temperature distribution of composite materials. However, the thickness was an important influencing factor. Nearl...

  6. Study on the melting process of phase change materials in metal foams using lattice Boltzmann method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal lattice Boltzmann model is developed for the melting process of phase change material (PCM) embedded in open-cell metal foams. Natural convection in the melt PCM is considered. Under the condition of local thermal non-equilibrium between the metal matrix and PCM, two evolution equations of temperature distribution function are pre-sented through selecting an equilibrium distribution function and a nonlinear source term properly. The enthalpy-based method is employed to copy with phase change problem. Melting process in a cavity of the metal foams is simulated using the present model. The melting front locations and the temperature distributions in the metal foams filled with PCM are obtained by the lattice Boltzmann method. The effects of the porosity and pore size on the melting are also investigated and discussed. The re-sults indicate that the effects of foam porosity play important roles in the overall heat transfer. For the lower porosity foams, the melting rate is comparatively greater than the higher porosity foams, due to greater heat conduction from metal foam with high heat conductivity. The foam pore size has a limited effect on the melting rate due to two counteracting effects between conduction and convection heat transfer.

  7. Uniform distribution of TiCp in TiCp/Zn-Al composites prepared by XDTM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王香; 马旭梁; 李庆芬; 曾松岩

    2002-01-01

    The prefabricated Al/TiC alloy with high TiC particle content was prepared by XDTM process. The uniform distribution process of TiC particles in the stationary zinc melt was studied and analyzed using self-made experimental equipment, and the model of the uniform distribution process was built. The results show that zinc diffuses into the prepared Al/TiC alloy after it is placed in the zinc melt at temperatures below the melting point of aluminum, which leads to the decrease of the liquidus temperature of Al-Zn alloy in the surface layer of Al/TiC alloy. When the liquidus temperature of Al-Zn alloy is equal to or below the temperature of zinc melt, Al-Zn alloy melts and TiC particles drop with it from the Al/TiC alloy and then transfer into the zinc melt and finally distribute uniformly in it.

  8. Effect of melting conditions on striae in iron-bearing silicate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Chemical striae are present in a broad range of glass products, but due to their negative impact on e.g., the optical and mechanical properties, elimination of striae from melts is a key issue in glass technology. By varying melting temperatures, retentions times and redox conditions of an iron......-bearing calciumaluminosilicate melt, we quantify the effect of each of the three melting parameters on the stria content in the melt. The quantification of the stria content in the melt is conducted by means of image analysis on casted melt samples. We find that in comparison to an extension of retention time an increase...... factors such as compositional fluctuation of melts and bubbling due to iron reduction on the stria content. During the melting process, striae with a chemical gradient in a more mobile species equilibrate faster than striae caused by a chemical gradient in a less mobile species. The temperature and time...

  9. Two-dimensional simulations of temperature and current-density distribution in electromigrated structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kießig, Birgit; Schäfer, Roland; von Löhneysen, Hilbert

    2014-01-01

    We report on the application of a feedback-controlled electromigration technique for the formation of nanometre-sized gaps in mesoscopic gold wires and rings. The effect of current density and temperature, linked via Joule heating, on the resulting gap size is investigated. Our experiments include in situ measurements of the evolution of the electrical resistance and of the structure of the device during electromigration. Experimentally, a good thermal coupling to the substrate turned out to be crucial to reach electrode spacings below 10 nm and to avoid overall melting of the nanostructures. This finding is supported by numerical calculations of the current-density and temperature profiles for structure layouts subjected to electromigration. The numerical method can be used for optimizing the layout so as to predetermine the location where electromigration leads to the formation of a gap.

  10. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION ON PREDICTING QUALITY OF MICROWAVE DEHYDRATED FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad U. H. Joardder

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During food drying, many other changes occur simultaneously, resulting in an improved overall quality. Among the quality attributes, the structure and its corresponding color influence directly or indirectly other properties of food. In addition, these quality attributes are affected by process conditions, material components and the raw structure of the foodstuff. In this work, the temperature distribution within food materials during microwave drying has been taken into consideration to observe its role in color modification. In order to determine the temperature distribution of microwave-dried food (apple, a thermal imaging camera has been used. The image acquired from the digital camera has been analysed using image J software in order to get the color change of fresh and dried apple. The results show that temperature distribution plays an important role in determining the quality of the food. The thermal imaging camera was deployed to observe the temperature distribution within food materials during drying. It is clearly observed from the higher value of (ERGB =102 and the uneven color change that uneven temperature distribution can influence customer perceptions of the quality of dried food. Simulation of a mathematical model of temperature distribution during microwave drying can make it possible to predict the colour and texture of the microwaved food.

  11. Agglomeration and size distribution of debris in DEFOR-A experiments with Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}–WO{sub 3} corium simulant melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se; Karbojian, Aram, E-mail: aram@safety.sci.kth.se; Tran, Chi-Thanh, E-mail: thanh@safety.sci.kth.se; Villanueva, Walter, E-mail: walter@safety.sci.kth.se

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Debris agglomeration in case of melt pouring into a coolant is experimentally investigated. • The effects of jet diameter, melt superheat and water subcooling are addressed. • Most influential factor which can significantly increase fraction of agglomerates is melt superheat. • Rapid decrease of the fraction of agglomerates as a function of water depth is obtained in all cases. • Provided data is valuable for model development and code validation. -- Abstract: Flooding of lower drywell has been adopted as a cornerstone of severe accident management strategy in Nordic type Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). It is assumed that the melt ejected into a deep pool of water will fragment, quench and form a porous debris bed coolable by natural circulation. If debris bed is not coolable, then dryout and possibly re-melting of the debris can occur. Melt attack on the containment basemat can threaten containment integrity. Agglomeration of melt debris and formation of solid “cake” regions provide a negative impact on coolability of the porous debris bed. In this work we present results of experimental investigation on the fraction of agglomerated debris obtained in the process of hot binary oxidic melt pouring into a pool of water. The Debris Bed Formation and Agglomeration (DEFOR-A) experiments provide data about the effects of the pool depth and water subcooling, melt jet diameter, and initial melt superheat on the fraction of agglomerated debris. The data presents first systematic study of the debris agglomeration phenomena and facilitates understanding of underlying physics which is necessary for development and validation of computational codes to enable prediction of the debris bed coolability in different scenarios of melt release.

  12. Preparation of Wear Resistant Materials by Melting and Diffusion Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shihao; WEI Xueping; ZENG Hui

    2012-01-01

    A wear-resistant material reinforced with VCp was manufactured by the in-mold melting process,in which the high-vanadium alloy-rods were melted by high temperature liquid steel and elements diffused into the liquid.Microstructure of the material was examined by OM,SEM,and XRD,and alloy elements in the diffusion layer were studied by EDS,and the hardness of the material was tested by HRS.The experimental results show that the material gradually changes hardness,which is due to the uniformly existents of carbide particles on martensite matrix and the gradient distribution of vanadium and carbide.

  13. Stability Analysis of Distributed Parameter Systems on Temperature Measurement of Large-scale Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenliang DING; Li ZHONG; Feng YUAN

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the mechanical construction, thermal regulator design and temperature measurement system of a local area were set up for large-scale linear measurement. Numerical analysis based on temperature correlated characteristic is discussed to obtain optimal observation points for the measurements. The horizontal temperature distribution of the measured area is compared with the measurement of the variation of temperature at 15℃ and 20℃ over time, and characteristic of dynamic response is also discussed. In addition, the long-time stability of measured temperature is analyzed by means of using the standard deviation. It characterizes the temperature distribution performance of a large area and how it may impact the measurement of a large-scale object.

  14. Imaging of local temperature distributions in mesas of high-Tc superconducting terahertz sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Kambara, H.; Maeda, Y.; Yoshioka, Y.; Nakagawa, Y.; Kakeya, I.

    2014-12-01

    Stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions in high-Tc superconductors are a promising source of intense, continuous, and monochromatic terahertz waves. In this paer, we establish a fluorescence-based temperature imaging system to directly image the surface temperature on a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ mesa sample. Intense terahertz emissions are observed in both high- and low-bias regimes, where the mesa voltage satisfies the cavity resonance condition. In the high- bias regime, the temperature distributions are shown to be inhomogeneous with a considerable temperature rise. In contrast, in the low-bias regime, the distributions are rather uniform and the local temperature is close to the bath temperature over the entire sample.

  15. LUBRICATION BASIS THEORY OF WORM PAIR AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION ON WORM GEAR SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The lubrication basis theory of worm pair is given. The lubrication state of worm gear is analyzed. It is found that the temperature distribution on the tooth surface of worm gear is closely related with the lubrication state and that the temperature on the tooth surface of worm gear is consistent with the characteristic term of mesh and motion of worm pair.

  16. Calculation of Temperature Distribution in Capsule for Neutron Exposure of the Cold Moderator Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ro Du Min

    2004-01-01

    Methods and results of the numerical calculation of temperature distribution in the spherical segmented small capsule filled with heat-generating substance are presented. Variable finite-difference method allowed one to evaluate a small drop of temperature near the boundary between the filling substance and the thermocouple installed inside the capsule, which originates from the difference in thermal conductivity.

  17. SULCUS TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE ABSENCE AND PRESENCE OF ORAL HYGIENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PERDOK, JF; LUKACOVIC, M; MAJETI, S; ARENDS, J; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1992-01-01

    In this study we investigated the possibility of using sulcus temperature measurements as an early indicator for the beginning of gingival inflammation. Sulcus temperature distributions over the arches appeared to obey a quadratic polynomial. With a test group of 10 volunteers, all dental students,

  18. Modulation of Transmission Spectra of Anodized Alumina Membrane Distributed Bragg Reflector by Controlling Anodization Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng WenJun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have successfully prepared anodized alumina membrane distributed Bragg reflector (DBR using electrochemical anodization method. The transmission peak of this distributed Bragg reflector could be easily and effectively modulated to cover almost any wavelength range of the whole visible spectrum by adjusting anodization temperature.

  19. Conformational Fluctuations of Polymers in a Melt Associated with Glass Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaoka, Nobuyuki; Takano, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    The conformational fluctuations of a glassy short polymer melt are studied by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and principal component analysis (PCA). The distribution of PCA eigenvalues, which measure static fluctuations of the polymers, shows a clear difference between above and below the conventional glass transition temperature Tg. The approximate conformational entropy of the polymers also indicates a transition near Tg. This is evidence that the static properties of polymers in the melt signal the glass transition.

  20. Discrete particle modeling of granular temperature distribution in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yurong He; Tianyu Wang; Niels Deen; Martin van Sint Annaland; Hans Kuipers; Dongsheng Wen

    2012-01-01

    The discrete hard sphere particle model (DPM) is applied in this work to study numerically the distributions of particle and bubble granular temperatures in a bubbling fluidized bed.The dimensions of the bed and other parameters are set to correspond to those of Müller et al.(2008).Various drag models and operational parameters are investigated to find their influence on particle and bubble granular temperatures.Various inlet superficial gas velocities are used in this work to obtain their effect on flow characteristics.It is found that the superficial gas velocity has the most important effect on granular temperatures including bubble granular temperature,particle translational granular temperature and particle rotational granular temperature.The drag force model affects more seriously the large scale variables such as the bubble granular temperature.Restitution coefficient influences all granular temperatures to some degree.Simulation results are compared with experimental results by Müller et al.(2008) showing reasonable agreement.

  1. Coercivity of the Nd–Fe–B hot-deformed magnets diffusion-processed with low melting temperature glass forming alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelam, U.M.R. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Liu, Lihua [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Akiya, T.; Sepehri-Amin, H.; Ohkubo, T. [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Sakuma, N.; Yano, M.; Kato, A. [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono 410-1193 (Japan); Hono, K., E-mail: kazuhiro.hono@nims.go.jp [Elements Strategy Initiative Center for Magnetic Materials (ESICMM), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Nd- and Pr-based alloys with bulk glass forming ability and low melting temperatures, Nd{sub 60}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 20} and Pr{sub 60}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 20}, were used for grain boundary diffusion process to enhance the coercivity of hot-deformed magnets. The coercivity increment was proportional to the weight gain after the diffusion process. For the sample with 64% weight gain, the coercivity increased up to 2.8 T, which is the highest value for bulk Nd–Fe–B magnets that do not contain heavy rare-earth elements, Dy or Tb. Approximately half of the intergranular regions were amorphous and the remaining regions were crystalline. Magnetic isolation of the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains by the Nd-rich amorphous/crystalline intergranular phases is attributed to the large coercivity enhancement. The coercivity does not change after the crystallization of the intergranular phase, indicating that the coercivity is not influenced by the strain at the interface with the crystalline intergranular phase. - Highlights: • Bulk-glass forming alloys were infiltrated into hot-deformed Nd–Fe–B magnets. • Very high coercivity of 2.8 T was attained without heavy rare-earth elements. • Approximately half of the inter-granular regions were amorphous. • Crystallization of amorphous intergranular phase does not change coercivity.

  2. Temperature-induced melting of double-stranded DNA in the absence and presence of covalently bonded antitumour drugs: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A; Giraudon, Christophe; Galmarini, Carlos M; Egly, Jean Marc; Gago, Federico

    2011-10-01

    The difference in melting temperature of a double-stranded (ds) DNA molecule in the absence and presence of bound ligands can provide experimental information about the stabilization brought about by ligand binding. By simulating the dynamic behaviour of a duplex of sequence 5'-d(TAATAACGGATTATT)·5'-d(AATAATCCGTTATTA) in 0.1 M NaCl aqueous solution at 400 K, we have characterized in atomic detail its complete thermal denaturation profile in PM01183. Progressive helix unzipping was clearly interspersed with some reannealing events, which were most noticeable in the oligonucleotides containing the monoadducts, which maintained an average of 6 bp in the central region at the end of the simulations. These significant differences attest to the demonstrated ability of these drugs to stabilize dsDNA, stall replication and transcription forks, and recruit DNA repair proteins. This stabilization, quantified here in terms of undisrupted base pairs, supports the view that these monoadducts can functionally mimic a DNA interstrand crosslink.

  3. Effect of tissue and atmosphere's parameters on human eye temperature distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozan, Mohammad Sadegh; Porkhial, Soheil; Nejad, Ali Salmani

    2015-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element method analysis was employed to investigate the effect of tissue and atmosphere parameters namely, ambient temperature, ambient convection coefficient, local blood temperature, and blood convection coefficient upon temperature distribution of human eyes. As a matter of simplification, only eye ball and skull bone are considered as the system of eye modeling. Decreasing the local blood temperature and keeping it cool is one of the most important ways to control bleeding during surgeries. By lower temperature of body organs such as the eye, the need for oxygenated blood is reduced, allowing for an extension in time for surgery. With this in mind, this study is done to see which one of parameters, such as ambient temperature, ambient convection coefficient, local blood temperature, and blood convection coefficient, has an effective role in decreasing the temperature of the eye. To this end, 3 different paths were employed to find out about the temperature distribution through the eye. The analysis of the three paths demonstrates the interaction of ambient and blood temperature in modeling temperature changes in specific locations of the eye. These data will be important in applications such as eye surgery, relaxation, and sleep therapy.

  4. Dependence of the depth distribution of implanted silver ions on the temperature of irradiated glass

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of the glass ion implantation by the silver ions in dependence on the substrate temperature within the interval of 20-100 deg C are studied. Modeling the profiles of the implanted ions distribution in depth with an account of the thermostimulated increase in the admixture diffusion mobility is carried out. It is shown, that increase in the substrate temperature leads to the diffusion wash-out of the introduced admixture ions distribution. The analysis of the modeling results indicates the necessity of strict control of the substrate temperature by the dielectrics implantation for obtaining the conditions for the metal nanoparticles synthesis

  5. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  6. Retrieval of Temperature and Species Distributions from Multispectral Image Data of Surface Flame Spread in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annen, K. D.; Conant, John A.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2001-01-01

    Weight, size, and power constraints severely limit the ability of researchers to fully characterize temperature and species distributions in microgravity combustion experiments. A powerful diagnostic technique, infrared imaging spectrometry, has the potential to address the need for temperature and species distribution measurements in microgravity experiments. An infrared spectrum imaged along a line-of-sight contains information on the temperature and species distribution in the imaged path. With multiple lines-of-sight and approximate knowledge of the geometry of the combustion flowfield, a three-dimensional distribution of temperature and species can be obtained from one hyperspectral image of a flame. While infrared imaging spectrometers exist for collecting hyperspectral imagery, the remaining challenge is retrieving the temperature and species information from this data. An initial version of an infrared analysis software package, called CAMEO (Combustion Analysis Model et Optimizer), has been developed for retrieving temperature and species distributions from hyperspectral imaging data of combustion flowfields. CAMEO has been applied to the analysis of multispectral imaging data of flame spread over a PMMA surface in microgravity that was acquired in the DARTFire program. In the next section of this paper, a description of CAMEO and its operation is presented, followed by the results of the analysis of microgravity flame spread data.

  7. Development of ex vivo model for determining temperature distribution in tumor tissue during photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaojie; Doughty, Austin; Mesiya, Sana; Pettitt, Alex; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    Temperature distribution in tissue is a crucial factor in determining the outcome of photothermal therapy in cancer treatment. In order to investigate the temperature distribution in tumor tissue during laser irradiation, we developed a novel ex vivo device to simulate the photothermal therapy on tumors. A 35°C, a thermostatic incubator was used to provide a simulation environment for body temperature of live animals. Different biological tissues (chicken breast and bovine liver) were buried inside a tissue-simulating gel and considered as tumor tissues. An 805-nm laser was used to irradiate the target tissue. A fiber with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser (10 mm) was directly inserted in the center of the tissue, and the needle probes of a thermocouple were inserted into the tissue paralleling the laser fiber at different distances to measure the temperature distribution. All of the procedures were performed in the incubator. Based on the results of this study, the temperature distribution in bovine liver is similar to that of tumor tissue under photothermal therapy with the same doses. Therefore, the developed model using bovine liver for determining temperature distribution can be used during interstitial photothermal therapy.

  8. A cost-effective melting temperature assay for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphism in the MBL2 gene of HIV-1-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arraes L.C.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a fast (less than 3 h and cost-effective melting temperature assay method for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. The protocol, which is based on the Corbett Rotor Gene real time PCR platform and SYBR Green I chemistry, yielded, in the cohorts studied, sensitive (100% and specific (100% PCR amplification without the use of costly fluorophore-labeled probes or post-PCR manipulation. At the end of the PCR, the dissociation protocol included a slow heating from 60º to 95ºC in 0.2ºC steps, with an 8-s interval between steps. Melting curve profiles were obtained using the dissociation software of the Rotor Gene-3000 apparatus. Samples were analyzed in duplicate and in different PCR runs to test the reproducibility of this technique. No supplementary data handling is required to determine the MBL2 genotype. MBL2 genotyping performed on a cohort of 164 HIV-1-positive Brazilian children and 150 healthy controls, matched for age and sex and ethnic origin, yielded reproducible results confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicon performed in blind. The three MBL2 variants (Arg52Cys, Gly54Asp, Gly57Glu were grouped together and called allele 0, while the combination of three wild-type alleles was called allele A. The frequency of the A/A homozygotes was significantly higher among healthy controls (0.68 than in HIV-infected children (0.55; P = 0.0234 and the frequency of MBL2 0/0 homozygotes was higher among HIV-1-infected children than healthy controls (P = 0.0296. The 0 allele was significantly more frequent among the 164 HIV-1-infected children (0.29 than among the 150 healthy controls (0.18; P = 0.0032. Our data confirm the association between the presence of the mutated MBL2 allele (allele 0 and HIV-1 infection in perinatally exposed children. Our results are in agreement with the literature data which indicate that the presence of the allele 0 confers a relative risk of 1.37 for HIV-1 infection through

  9. Modeling of end-pumped Yb:YAG thin-disk lasers with nonuniform temperature distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangzhi; Zhu, Xiao; Zhu, Changhong; Shang, Jianli; Wan, Hailin; Guo, Fei; Qi, Lijun

    2012-05-10

    A plane wave model with nonuniform temperature distribution in the thin-disk crystal is developed to describe the dynamic behavior of an end-pumped Yb:YAG thin-disk laser. A set of couple-rate equations and 2D stationary heat-conduction equations are derived. The stable temperature distribution in the disk crystal is calculated using a numerical iterative method. The analytic expression is capable of dealing with more practical laser systems than previous works on this subject as it allows for nonuniform temperature distribution in the disk crystal. Based on these results, we examined laser output intensity as a function of pump intensity, dopant concentration, resonator coupler reflectivity, crystal thickness and temperature of cooling liquid.

  10. The three dimensional laser induced temperature distribution in photo-thermal displacement spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Soltanolkotabi, M

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed theoretical treatment of 3-D temperature distribution induced by laser beam in photothermal displacement spectroscopy. We assume that a solid sample, which is deposited on a substrate and is in contact with a fluid, is irradiated by an intensity modulated cw laser source. By using a technique based on Green's function and integral transformations we find the explicit expression for temperature distribution function. This function which depends on the properties of the laser beam and optical and thermal properties of the sample, the substrate and the fluid, exhibits the characteristics of a damped thermal wave. Numerical analysis of the temperature distribution for a certain sample (GaAs) reveals that the behavior of thermal wave is not so sensitive with respect to the variation of the modulation frequency. On the other hand, we find that the temperature of the sample surface decreases with increasing modulation frequency because of the thermal inter tia of the sample. Furth...

  11. Simulation of Temperature Distribution In a Rectangular Cavity using Finite Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Naa, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the study and implementation of finite element method to find the temperature distribution in a rectangular cavity which contains a fluid substance. The fluid motion is driven by a sudden temperature difference applied to two opposite side walls of the cavity. The remaining walls were considered adiabatic. Fluid properties were assumed incompressible. The problem has been approached by two-dimensional transient conduction which applied on the heated sidewall and one-dimensional steady state convection-diffusion equation which applied inside the cavity. The parameters which investigated are time and velocity. These parameters were computed together with boundary conditions which result in temperature distribution in the cavity. The implementation of finite element method was resulted in algebraic equation which is in vector and matrix form. Therefore, MATLAB programs used to solve this algebraic equation. The final temperature distribution results were presented in contour map within the re...

  12. Temperature distribution of air source heat pump barn with different air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X.; Li, J. C.; Zhao, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    There are two type of airflow form in tobacco barn, one is air rising, the other is air falling. They are different in the structure layout and working principle, which affect the tobacco barn in the distribution of temperature field and velocity distribution. In order to compare the temperature and air distribution of the two, thereby obtain a tobacco barn whose temperature field and velocity distribution are more uniform. Taking the air source heat pump tobacco barn as the investigated subject and establishing relevant mathematical model, the thermodynamics of the two type of curing barn was analysed and compared based on Fluent. Provide a reasonable evidence for chamber arrangement and selection of outlet for air source heat pump tobacco barn.

  13. A New Algorithm for Reconstructing Two-Dimensional Temperature Distribution by Ultrasonic Thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehua Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature, especially temperature distribution, is one of the most fundamental and vital parameters for theoretical study and control of various industrial applications. In this paper, ultrasonic thermometry to reconstruct temperature distribution is investigated, referring to the dependence of ultrasound velocity on temperature. In practical applications of this ultrasonic technique, reconstruction algorithm based on least square method is commonly used. However, it has a limitation that the amount of divided blocks of measure area cannot exceed the amount of effective travel paths, which eventually leads to its inability to offer sufficient temperature information. To make up for this defect, an improved reconstruction algorithm based on least square method and multiquadric interpolation is presented. And then, its reconstruction performance is validated via numerical studies using four temperature distribution models with different complexity and is compared with that of algorithm based on least square method. Comparison and analysis indicate that the algorithm presented in this paper has more excellent reconstruction performance, as the reconstructed temperature distributions will not lose information near the edge of area while with small errors, and its mean reconstruction time is short enough that can meet the real-time demand.

  14. The distribution shifts of Pinus armandii and its response to temperature and precipitation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The changing climate, particularly in regard to temperature and precipitation, is already affecting tree species’ distributions. Pinus armandii, which dominates on the Yungui Plateau and in the Qinba Mountains in China, is of economic, cultural and ecological value. We wish to test the correlations between the distribution shift of P. armandii and changing climate, and figure out how it tracks future climate change. Methods We sampled the surface soil at sites throughout the distribution of P. armandii to compare the relative abundance of pollen to the current percent cover of plant species. This was used to determine possible changes in the distribution P. armandii. Given the hilly terrain, elevation was considered together with temperature and precipitation as variables correlated with distribution shifts of P. armandii. Results We show that P. armandii is undergoing change in its geographic range, including retraction, a shift to more northern areas and from the upper high part of the mountains to a lower-altitude part in hilly areas. Temperature was the strongest correlate of this distribution shift. Elevation and precipitation were also both significantly correlated with distribution change of P. armandii, but to a lesser degree than temperature. Conclusion The geographic range of P. armandii has been gradually decreasing under the influence of climate change. This provides evidence of the effect of climate change on trees at the species level and suggests that at least some species will have a limited ability to track the changing climate.

  15. Thermal contraction phenomenon of cluster structure of indium melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程素娟; 秦绪波; 边秀房; 孙民华; 王忠华

    2002-01-01

    The structure of liquid indium was studied at 280, 390, 550, 650, 750℃, respectively, by using an elevated temperature X-ray diffractometer. The diffraction intensity, structure factor, pair distribution function, radial distribution function, nearest interatomic distance and coordination number were obtained. The results show that the structure of In melt can be approximately described by the random closed packed hard-sphere model with hard-sphere diameter d=2.86, packing density η=0.45. The cluster structure of In melt transforms from quasi-face-centered-cubic lattice into random closed packed structure above melting point. It has been found that the nearest interatomic distance r1 and coordination number Ns decrease with increasing temperature from 280℃ to 750℃, r1 decreases from 3.25 to 3.18 and Ns decreases from 12.771 to 6.648, and thermal contraction phenomenon of atom cluster occurs. Thermal contraction of In melt cluster is not homogeneous in whole measured temperature range. The sudden transformation and the biggest contraction have been found in the range of 390~550℃.

  16. Study on the distribution of strata rock temperature around a driving head with auxiliary ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian-liang

    2004-01-01

    The distributions of strata rock temperature around a driving head with auxiliary ventilation were analyzed theoretically based on a program which was developed by the authors to predict the thermal environmental conditions in a development heading with forcing auxiliary ventilation. The influences of wetnessof the airway surface were discussed on the cooled zone of the strata rock and on the temperature distribution in the surrounding rock. It is shown that the advancing speed and driving time have little influence on the temperature profile in front of the working face of a driving airway, and the rock temperature 1.5 m ahead of the working face can be taken as the virgin rock temperature.

  17. Tissue temperature distribution measurement by MRI and laser immunology for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yichao; Gnyawali, Surya C.; Wu, Feng; Liu, Hong; Tesiram, Yasvir A.; Abbott, Andrew; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2007-02-01

    In cancer treatment and immune response enhancement research, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an ideal method for non-invasive, three-dimensional temperature measurement. We used a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager for ex vivo tissues and small animal to determine temperature distribution of target tissue during laser irradiation. The feasibility of imaging is approved with high spatial resolution and high signal-noise- ratio. Tissue-simulating gel phantom gel, biological tissues, and tumor-bearing animals were used in the experiments for laser treatment and MR imaging. Thermal couple measurement of temperature in target samples was used for system calibration. An 805-nm laser was used to irradiate the samples with a laser power in the range of 1 to 2.5 watts. Using the MRI system and a specially developed processing algorithm, a clear temperature distribution matrix in the target tissue and surrounding tissue was obtained. The temperature profiles show that the selective laser photothermal effect could result in tissue temperature elevation in a range of 10 to 45 °C. The temperature resolution of the measurement was about 0.37°C including the total system error. The spatial resolution was 0.4 mm (128x128 pixels with field of view of 5.5x5.5 cm). The temperature distribution provided in vivo thermal information and future reference for optimizing dye concentration and irradiation parameters to achieve optimal thermal effects in cancer treatment.

  18. Methods for Prediction of Temperature Distribution in Flashover Caused by Backdraft Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurately predicting temperature distribution in flashover fire is a key issue for evacuation and fire-fighting. Now many good flashover fire experiments have be conducted, but most of these experiments are proceeded in enclosure with fixed openings; researches on fire development and temperature distribution in flashover caused by backdraft fire did not receive enough attention. In order to study flashover phenomenon caused by backdraft fire, a full-scale fire experiment was conducted in one abandoned office building. Process of fire development and temperature distribution in room and corridor were separately recorded during the experiment. The experiment shows that fire development in enclosure is closely affected by the room ventilation. Unlike existing temperature curves which have only one temperature peak, temperature in flashover caused by backdraft may have more than one peak value and that there is a linear relationship between maximum peak temperature and distance away from fire compartment. Based on BFD curve and experimental data, mathematical models are proposed to predict temperature curve in flashover fire caused by backdraft at last. These conclusions and experiment data obtained in this paper could provide valuable reference to fire simulation, hazard assessment, and fire protection design.

  19. Resolving the electron temperature discrepancies in HII Regions and Planetary Nebulae: kappa-distributed electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholls, David C; Sutherland, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of electron temperatures and metallicities in H ii regions and Planetary Nebulae (PNe) has-for several decades-presented a problem: results obtained using different techniques disagree. What it worse, they disagree consistently. There have been numerous attempts to explain these discrepancies, but none has provided a satisfactory solution to the problem. In this paper, we explore the possibility that electrons in H ii regions and PNe depart from a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium energy distribution. We adopt a "kappa-distribution" for the electron energies. Such distributions are widely found in Solar System plasmas, where they can be directly measured. This simple assumption is able to explain the temperature and metallicity discrepancies in H ii regions and PNe arising from the different measurement techniques. We find that the energy distribution does not need to depart dramatically from an equilibrium distribution. From an examination of data from Hii regions and PNe it appears that kappa ~ ...

  20. MELTS_Excel: A Microsoft Excel-based MELTS interface for research and teaching of magma properties and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    thermodynamic modeling software MELTS is a powerful tool for investigating crystallization and melting in natural magmatic systems. Rhyolite-MELTS is a recalibration of MELTS that better captures the evolution of silicic magmas in the upper crust. The current interface of rhyolite-MELTS, while flexible, can be somewhat cumbersome for the novice. We present a new interface that uses web services consumed by a VBA backend in Microsoft Excel©. The interface is contained within a macro-enabled workbook, where the user can insert the model input information and initiate computations that are executed on a central server at OFM Research. Results of simple calculations are shown immediately within the interface itself. It is also possible to combine a sequence of calculations into an evolutionary path; the user can input starting and ending temperatures and pressures, temperature and pressure steps, and the prevailing oxidation conditions. The program shows partial updates at every step of the computations; at the conclusion of the calculations, a series of data sheets and diagrams are created in a separate workbook, which can be saved independently of the interface. Additionally, the user can specify a grid of temperatures and pressures and calculate a phase diagram showing the conditions at which different phases are present. The interface can be used to apply the rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer. We demonstrate applications of the interface using an example early-erupted Bishop Tuff composition. The interface is simple to use and flexible, but it requires an internet connection. The interface is distributed for free from http://melts.ofm-research.org.

  1. A Study on Solidification and Melting of Water around Spine-fin Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, Yoshio; Takegoshi, Eisyun; Konya, Hiroshi; Tajima, Ikuo

    The authors have studied the phase change process of composite materials containing conductive solids in order to improve the heat transfer characteristics of phase change materials. In this study, experiments for the solidification and melting of water around a spine-fin tube are carried out, and the phase change volume and temperature distribution in the water are measured. As a result, the solidification and melting process are promoted considerably by the heat conduction of the fin and the natural convection in the lower side of the spine-fin tube for the melting process.

  2. Investigation of molybdate melts as an alternative method of reprocessing used nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Amber L.; Tkac, Peter; Paulenova, Alena; Willit, James L.; Williamson, Mark A.

    2017-04-01

    An investigation of molybdate melts containing sodium molybdate (Na2MoO4) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) to achieve the separation of uranium from fission products by crystallization has been performed. The separation is based on the difference in solubility of the fission product metal oxides compared to the uranium oxide or molybdate in the molybdate melt. The molybdate melt dissolves uranium dioxide at high temperatures, and upon cooling, uranium precipitates as uranium dioxide or molybdate, whereas the fission product metals remain soluble in the melt. Small-scale experiments using gram quantities of uranium dioxide have been performed to investigate the feasibility of UO2 purification from the fission products. The composition of the uranium precipitate as well as data for partitioning of several fission product surrogates between the uranium precipitate and molybdate melt for various melt compositions are presented and discussed. The fission products Cs, Sr, Ru and Rh all displayed very large distribution ratios. The fission products Zr, Pd, and the lanthanides also displayed good distribution ratios (D > 10). A melt consisting of 20 wt% MoO3- 50 wt% Na2MoO4-30 wt% UO2 heated to 1313 K and cooled to 1123 K for the physical separation of the UO2 product from the melt, and washed once with Na2MoO4 displays optimum conditions for separation of the UO2 from the fission products.

  3. A new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature distribution of the deep convective clouds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rakesh Teja Konduru; C M Kishtawal; Shivani Shah

    2013-10-01

    We are proposing a statistical technique to analyze the best fit of the histogram of infrared brightness temperature of convective cloud pixels. For this we have utilized the infrared brightness temperatures (IRTB) of Kalpana-1 (8 km resolution) and globally merged infrared brightness temperatures of Climate Prediction Centre NCEP/NWS (4 km resolution, merged from all the available geostationary satellites GOES-8/10, METEOSAT-7/5 and GMS), for both deep convective and non-deep convective (shallow cloud) cases. It is observed that Johnson SB function is the best continuous distribution function in explaining the histogram of infrared brightness temperatures of the convective clouds. The best fit is confirmed by Kolmogorov–Smirnov statistic. Johnson SB’s distribution of histogram of infrared brightness temperatures clearly discriminates the cloud pixels of deep convective and non-deep convective cases. It also captures the asymmetric nature in histogram of infrared brightness temperatures. We also observed that Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures for deep convective systems is different in each of the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. And Johnson SB parameters are observed to be best in discriminating the Johnson SB distribution of infrared brightness temperatures of deep convective systems for each season. Due to these properties of Johnson SB function, it can be utilized in the modelling of the histogram of infrared brightness temperature of deep convective and non-deep convective systems. It focuses a new perspective on the infrared brightness temperature that will be helpful in cloud detection, classification and modelling.

  4. Temperature and Thermal Stress Distribution for Metal Mold in Squeeze Casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.H.Chang; G.C.Jang; C.H.Lee; S.H.Lee

    2008-01-01

    In the squeeze casting process, loaded high pressure (over approximately 100 MPa) and high temperature influence the thermo-mechanical behavior and performance of the used metal mold. Therefore, to safely maintain the metal molds, the thermo-mechanical characteristics (temperature and thermal stress) of metal mold in the squeeze casting must be investigated. In this paper, temperature and thermal stress distribution of steel mold in squeeze casting process were investigated by using a three-dimensional non-steady heat conduction analysis and a three-dimensional thermal elastic-plastic analysis considering temperature-dependent thermo- physical and mechanical properties of the steel mold.