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Sample records for melting analysis hrma

  1. A novel typing method for Listeria monocytogenes using high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) of tandem repeat regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Chihiro; Takahashi, Hajime; Iwakawa, Ai; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2017-07-17

    Listeria monocytogenes, which is responsible for causing food poisoning known as listeriosis, infects humans and animals. Widely distributed in the environment, this bacterium is known to contaminate food products after being transmitted to factories via raw materials. To minimize the contamination of products by food pathogens, it is critical to identify and eliminate factory entry routes and pathways for the causative bacteria. High resolution melting analysis (HRMA) is a method that takes advantage of differences in DNA sequences and PCR product lengths that are reflected by the disassociation temperature. Through our research, we have developed a multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) using HRMA as a simple and rapid method to differentiate L. monocytogenes isolates. While evaluating our developed method, the ability of MLVA-HRMA, MLVA using capillary electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was compared for their ability to discriminate between strains. The MLVA-HRMA method displayed greater discriminatory ability than MLST and MLVA using capillary electrophoresis, suggesting that the variation in the number of repeat units, along with mutations within the DNA sequence, was accurately reflected by the melting curve of HRMA. Rather than relying on DNA sequence analysis or high-resolution electrophoresis, the MLVA-HRMA method employs the same process as PCR until the analysis step, suggesting a combination of speed and simplicity. The result of MLVA-HRMA method is able to be shared between different laboratories. There are high expectations that this method will be adopted for regular inspections at food processing facilities in the near future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The potential of high resolution melting analysis (hrma) to streamline, facilitate and enrich routine diagnostics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskova, Lenka; Raclavsky, Vladislav

    2011-09-01

    Routine medical microbiology diagnostics relies on conventional cultivation followed by phenotypic techniques for identification of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. This is not only due to tradition and economy but also because it provides pure culture needed for antibiotic susceptibility testing. This review focuses on the potential of High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) of double-stranded DNA for future routine medical microbiology. Search of MEDLINE database for publications showing the advantages of HRMA in routine medical microbiology for identification, strain typing and further characterization of pathogenic bacteria and fungi in particular. The results show increasing numbers of newly-developed and more tailor-made assays in this field. For microbiologists unfamiliar with technical aspects of HRMA, we also provide insight into the technique from the perspective of microbial characterization. We can anticipate that the routine availability of HRMA in medical microbiology laboratories will provide a strong stimulus to this field. This is already envisioned by the growing number of medical microbiology applications published recently. The speed, power, convenience and cost effectiveness of this technology virtually predestine that it will advance genetic characterization of microbes and streamline, facilitate and enrich diagnostics in routine medical microbiology without interfering with the proven advantages of conventional cultivation.

  3. Competitive PCR-High Resolution Melting Analysis (C-PCR-HRMA) for large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) detection: A new approach to assess quantitative status of BRCA1 gene in a reference laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minucci, Angelo; De Paolis, Elisa; Concolino, Paola; De Bonis, Maria; Rizza, Roberta; Canu, Giulia; Scaglione, Giovanni Luca; Mignone, Flavio; Scambia, Giovanni; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2017-07-01

    Evaluation of copy number variation (CNV) in BRCA1/2 genes, due to large genomic rearrangements (LGRs), is a mandatory analysis in hereditary breast and ovarian cancers families, if no pathogenic variants are found by sequencing. LGRs cannot be detected by conventional methods and several alternative methods have been developed. Since these approaches are expensive and time consuming, identification of alternative screening methods for LGRs detection is needed in order to reduce and optimize the diagnostic procedure. The aim of this study was to investigate a Competitive PCR-High Resolution Melting Analysis (C-PCR-HRMA) as molecular tool to detect recurrent BRCA1 LGRs. C-PCR-HRMA was performed on exons 3, 14, 18, 19, 20 and 21 of the BRCA1 gene; exons 4, 6 and 7 of the ALB gene were used as reference fragments. This study showed that it is possible to identify recurrent BRCA1 LGRs, by melting peak height ratio between target (BRCA1) and reference (ALB) fragments. Furthermore, we underline that a peculiar amplicon-melting profile is associated to a specific BRCA1 LGR. All C-PCR-HRMA results were confirmed by Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. C-PCR-HRMA has proved to be an innovative, efficient and fast method for BRCA1 LGRs detection. Given the sensitivity, specificity and ease of use, c-PCR-HRMA can be considered an attractive and powerful alternative to other methods for BRCA1 CNVs screening, improving molecular strategies for BRCA testing in the context of Massive Parallel Sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid Determination of Lymphogranuloma Venereum Serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis by Quantitative High-Resolution Melt Analysis (HRMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Matthew P.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Zaia, Angelo M.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative high-resolution melt analysis assay was developed to differentiate lymphogranuloma venereum-causing serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis (L1 to L3) from other C. trachomatis serovars (D to K). The detection limit of this assay is approximately 10 copies per reaction, comparable to the limits of other quantitative-PCR-based methods. PMID:22933594

  5. Validation of high-resolution DNA melting analysis for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene: identification of novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Laure; Diebold, Bertrand; Leroux, Céline; Maurey, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Delahaye, Andre; Dulac, Olivier; Metreau, Julia; Melikishvili, Gia; Toutain, Annick; Rivier, François; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been predominantly described in epileptic encephalopathies of female, including infantile spasms with Rett-like features. Up to now, detection of mutations in this gene was made by laborious, expensive and/or time consuming methods. Here, we decided to validate high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for mutation scanning of the CDKL5 gene. Firstly, using a large DNA bank consisting to 34 samples carrying different mutations and polymorphisms, we validated our analytical conditions to analyse the different exons and flanking intronic sequences of the CDKL5 gene by HRMA. Secondly, we screened CDKL5 by both HRMA and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) in a cohort of 135 patients with early-onset seizures. Our results showed that point mutations and small insertions and deletions can be reliably detected by HRMA. Compared to dHPLC, HRMA profiles are more discriminated, thereby decreasing unnecessary sequencing. In this study, we identified eleven novel sequence variations including four pathogenic mutations (2.96% prevalence). HRMA appears cost-effective, easy to set up, highly sensitive, non-toxic and rapid for mutation screening, ideally suited for large genes with heterogeneous mutations located along the whole coding sequence, such as the CDKL5 gene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High-resolution melt analysis for species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci derived from bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajitkumar, Praseeda; Barkema, Herman W; Zadoks, Ruth N; Morck, Douglas W; van der Meer, Frank J U M; De Buck, Jeroen

    2013-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most frequently isolated pathogens isolated from bovine milk. In this study, we report a rapid assay for species identification of CNS using high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) of 16S rDNA sequences. Real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragment, spanning the variable region V1 and V2, was performed with a resulting amplicon of 215 bp. A library of distinct melt curves of reference strains of 13 common CNS species was created using HRMA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, and, when needed, tuf gene, of 100 CNS isolates obtained from Canadian Bovine Mastitis Research Network was done to determine their species identity, allowing for subsequent evaluation of the performance of HRMA for field isolates of bovine CNS. A combination of HRMA and sequencing revealed that Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. xylosus, S. simulans, and S. sciuri had multiple genotypes, complicating their resolution by HRMA. As the 3 genotypes of S. chromogenes had distinct melt curves, the 3 distinct genotypes were employed as reference strains in a blinded trial of 156 CNS isolates to identify S. chromogenes. HRMA correctly identified all S. chromogenes isolates which were later confirmed by sequencing. Staphylococcus chromogenes (68%) was most frequently found among the CNS isolates, followed by S. haemolyticus (10%) and S. xylosus (6%). The present study revealed that HRMA of 16S rRNA gene (V1-V2) could be used as a rapid, efficient, low-cost, and minimally cumbersome technique for S. chromogenes identification, the most common CNS derived from bovine milk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Automated Microfluidic Platform for Serial Polymerase Chain Reaction and High-Resolution Melting Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weidong; Bean, Brian; Corey, Scott; Coursey, Johnathan S; Hasson, Kenton C; Inoue, Hiroshi; Isano, Taisuke; Kanderian, Sami; Lane, Ben; Liang, Hongye; Murphy, Brian; Owen, Greg; Shinoda, Nobuhiko; Zeng, Shulin; Knight, Ivor T

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an automated genetic analyzer for human sample testing based on microfluidic rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The integrated DNA microfluidic cartridge was used on a platform designed with a robotic pipettor system that works by sequentially picking up different test solutions from a 384-well plate, mixing them in the tips, and delivering mixed fluids to the DNA cartridge. A novel image feedback flow control system based on a Canon 5D Mark II digital camera was developed for controlling fluid movement through a complex microfluidic branching network without the use of valves. The same camera was used for measuring the high-resolution melt curve of DNA amplicons that were generated in the microfluidic chip. Owing to fast heating and cooling as well as sensitive temperature measurement in the microfluidic channels, the time frame for PCR and HRMA was dramatically reduced from hours to minutes. Preliminary testing results demonstrated that rapid serial PCR and HRMA are possible while still achieving high data quality that is suitable for human sample testing. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  8. Establishment of a simple and rapid identification method for Listeria spp. by using high-resolution melting analysis, and its application in food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Chihiro; Takahashi, Hajime; Phraephaisarn, Chirapiphat; Vesaratchavest, Mongkol; Keeratipibul, Suwimon; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative bacteria of listeriosis, which has a higher mortality rate than that of other causes of food poisoning. Listeria spp., of which L. monocytogenes is a member, have been isolated from food and manufacturing environments. Several methods have been published for identifying Listeria spp.; however, many of the methods cannot identify newly categorized Listeria spp. Additionally, they are often not suitable for the food industry, owing to their complexity, cost, or time consumption. Recently, high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA), which exploits DNA-sequence differences, has received attention as a simple and quick genomic typing method. In the present study, a new method for the simple, rapid, and low-cost identification of Listeria spp. has been presented using the genes rarA and ldh as targets for HRMA. DNA sequences of 9 Listeria species were first compared, and polymorphisms were identified for each species for primer design. Species specificity of each HRM curve pattern was estimated using type strains of all the species. Among the 9 species, 7 were identified by HRMA using rarA gene, including 3 new species. The remaining 2 species were identified by HRMA of ldh gene. The newly developed HRMA method was then used to assess Listeria isolates from the food industry, and the method efficiency was compared to that of identification by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The 2 methods were in coherence for 92.6% of the samples, demonstrating the high accuracy of HRMA. The time required for identifying Listeria spp. was substantially low, and the process was considerably simplified, providing a useful and precise method for processing multiple samples per day. Our newly developed method for identifying Listeria spp. is highly valuable; its use is not limited to the food industry, and it can be used for the isolates from the natural environment.

  9. Transmission and selection of macrolide resistant Mycoplasma genitalium infections detected by rapid high resolution melt analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Twin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycoplasma genitalium (MG causes urethritis, cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease. The MG treatment failure rate using 1 g azithromycin at an Australian Sexual Health clinic in 2007-9 was 31% (95%CI 23-40%. We developed a rapid high resolution melt analysis (HRMA assay targeting resistance mutations in the MG 23S rRNA gene, and validated it against DNA sequencing by examining pre- and post-treatment archived samples from MG-infected patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Available MG-positive pre-treatment (n = 82 and post-treatment samples from individuals with clinical treatment failure (n = 20 were screened for 23S rRNA gene mutations. Sixteen (20% pre-treatment samples possessed resistance mutations (A2058G, A2059G, A2059C, which were significantly more common in patients with symptomatic azithromycin-treatment failure (12/26; 44% than in those clinically cured (4/56; 7%, p<0.001. All 20 patients experiencing azithromycin-failure had detectable mutations in their post-treatment samples. In 9 of these cases, the same mutational types were present in both pre- and post-treatment samples indicating transmitted resistance, whilst in 11 of these cases (55%, mutations were absent in pre-treatment samples indicating likely selection of resistant isolates have occurred. HRMA was able to detect all mutational changes determined in this study by DNA sequencing. An additional HRMA assay incorporating an unlabelled probe was also developed to detect type 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms found in other populations, with a slightly lower sensitivity of 90%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Treatment failure is associated with the detection of macrolide resistance mutations, which appear to be almost equally due to selection of resistant isolates following exposure to 1 g azithromycin and pre-existing transmitted resistance. The application of a rapid molecular assay to detect resistance at the time of initial detection of infection allows

  10. Characterization CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 polymorphisms using HRMA in Psychiatry patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disease for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenilmez, Ebru Dundar; Tamam, Lut; Karaytug, Onur; Tuli, Abdullah

    2018-06-19

    The interindividual genetic variations in drug metabolizing enzymes effects the impact and toxicity in plenty of drugs. The CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 gene polymorphisms characterized using high resolution melting analysis (HRMA) in follow-up patients in psychiatry clinic as a preliminary preparation for personalized medicine. Genotyping of CYP1A2*1F, CYP2C9 *2, *3, CYP2C19 *2, *3 and *17 and CYP2D6 *3, *4 was conducted in 101 patients using HRMA. Genotype and allele frequencies of the CYP variants were found to be in equilibrium with the Hardy-Weinberg equation. The frequency of the CYP1A2*1F allele in schizophrenia and bipolar disease was 0.694 and 0.255, respectively. The CYP2C9 allele frequencies were 0.087 (CYP2C9*2), and 0.549 (CYP2C9*3) for bipolar; 0.278 (CYP2C9*2) and 0.648 (CYP2C9*3) in schizophrenias. The CYP2C19*2 and *17 allele frequencies was 0.111 and 0.185 in schizophrenia and variant *2 was 0.117 and variant *17 was 0.255 in bipolar group. The frequency of the CYP2D6*3 allele was 0.027 in schizophrenias. The frequencies for the CYP2D6*4 variant was 0.092 and 0.096 in schizophrenia and bipolar groups, respectively. The knowledge in pharmacogenomics and also the developments in molecular genetics are growing rapidly. In the future this can be expected to provide new methodologies in the prediction of the activity in drug metabolizing enzymes. The HRMA is a rapid and useful technique to identify the genotypes for drug dosage adjustment before therapy in psychiatry patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. SNP discovery and High Resolution Melting Analysis from massive transcriptome sequencing in the California red abalone Haliotis rufescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Araya-Garay, José Miguel; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2013-06-01

    The California red abalone, Haliotis rufescens that belongs to the Haliotidae family, is the largest species of abalone in the world that has sustained the major fishery and aquaculture production in the USA and Mexico. This native mollusk has not been evaluated or assigned a conservation category even though in the last few decades it was heavily exploited until it disappeared in some areas along the California coast. In Chile, the red abalone was introduced in the 1970s from California wild abalone stocks for the purposes of aquaculture. Considering the number of years that the red abalone has been cultivated in Chile crucial genetic information is scarce and critical issues remain unresolved. This study reports and validates novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers for the red abalone H. rufescens using cDNA pyrosequencing. A total of 622 high quality SNPs were identified in 146 sequences with an estimated frequency of 1 SNP each 1000bp. Forty-five SNPs markers with functional information for gene ontology were selected. Of these, 8 were polymorphic among the individuals screened: Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), vitellogenin (VTG), lysin, alginate lyase enzyme (AL), Glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA), sulfatase 1A precursor (S1AP) and ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (ODC). Two additional sequences were also identified with polymorphisms but no similarities with known proteins were achieved. To validate the putative SNP markers, High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) was conducted in a wild and hatchery-bred population. Additionally, SNP cross-amplifications were tested in two further native abalone species, Haliotis fulgens and Haliotis corrugata. This study provides novel candidate genes that could be used to evaluate loss of genetic diversity due to hatchery selection or inbreeding effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  13. CtGEM typing: Discrimination of Chlamydia trachomatis ocular and urogenital strains and major evolutionary lineages by high resolution melting analysis of two amplified DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffard, Philip M; Andersson, Patiyan; Wilson, Judith; Buckley, Cameron; Lilliebridge, Rachael; Harris, Tegan M; Kleinecke, Mariana; O'Grady, Kerry-Ann F; Huston, Wilhelmina M; Lambert, Stephen B; Whiley, David M; Holt, Deborah C

    2018-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infects the urogenital tract (UGT) and eyes. Anatomical tropism is correlated with variation in the major outer membrane protein encoded by ompA. Strains possessing the ocular ompA variants A, B, Ba and C are typically found within the phylogenetically coherent "classical ocular lineage". However, variants B, Ba and C have also been found within three distinct strains in Australia, all associated with ocular disease in children and outside the classical ocular lineage. CtGEM genotyping is a method for detecting and discriminating ocular strains and also the major phylogenetic lineages. The rationale was facilitation of surveillance to inform responses to C. trachomatis detection in UGT specimens from young children. CtGEM typing is based on high resolution melting analysis (HRMA) of two PCR amplified fragments with high combinatorial resolving power, as defined by computerised comparison of 65 whole genomes. One fragment is from the hypothetical gene defined by Jali-1891 in the C. trachomatis B_Jali20 genome, while the other is from ompA. Twenty combinatorial CtGEM types have been shown to exist, and these encompass unique genotypes for all known ocular strains, and also delineate the TI and T2 major phylogenetic lineages, identify LGV strains and provide additional resolution beyond this. CtGEM typing and Sanger sequencing were compared with 42 C. trachomatis positive clinical specimens, and there were no disjunctions. CtGEM typing is a highly efficient method designed and tested using large scale comparative genomics. It divides C. trachomatis into clinically and biologically meaningful groups, and may have broad application in surveillance.

  14. Microstructure analysis of magnesium alloy melted by laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, S.Y.; Hu, J.D.; Yang, Y.; Guo, Z.X.; Wang, H.Y.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of laser surface melting (LSM) on microstructure of magnesium alloy containing Al8.57%, Zn 0.68%, Mn0.15%, Ce0.52% were investigated. In the present work, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to melt and rapidly solidify the surface of the magnesium alloy with the objective of changing microstructure and improving the corrosion resistance. The results indicate that laser-melted layer contains the finer dendrites and behaviors good resistance corrosion compared with the untreated layer. Furthermore, the absorption coefficient of the magnesium alloy has been estimated according to the numeral simulation of the thermal conditions. The formation process of fine microstructure in melted layers was investigated based on the experimental observation and the theoretical analysis. Some simulation results such as the re-solidification velocities are obtained. The phase constitutions of the melted layers determined by X-ray diffraction were β-Mg 17 Al 12 and α-Mg as well as some phases unidentified

  15. Image analysis as an improved melting criterion in laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Ran; Matityahu, Shlomi; Melchior, Aviva; Nikolaevsky, Mark; Noked, Ori; Sterer, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The precision of melting curve measurements using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) is largely limited by the correct and reliable determination of the onset of melting. We present a novel image analysis of speckle interference patterns in the LHDAC as a way to define quantitative measures which enable an objective determination of the melting transition. Combined with our low-temperature customized IR pyrometer, designed for measurements down to 500K, our setup allows studying the melt...

  16. Ceramic filters analysis for aluminium melting through microtomography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Henrique de Souza; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Jesus, Edgar Francisco Oliveira de; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de; Duhm, Rainer; Feiste, Karsten L.; Reichert, Christian; Reimche, Wilfried; Stegemann, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    In this work a ceramic filters analysis is done through the microtomography for improvement of the aluminium melting process through the filter porosity control. Microtomography were obtained of ceramic filters with pore dimensions of 10, 20 and 30 ppi. The data were calculated by using an reconstruction algorithm for divergent beam implemented in the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory of COPPE/UFRJ and analysed through cells and windows separation according to the defined by Ray. For the analyses the Image Pro program were used where the cells have been detached by sphere inserted, adjusting by nine points, in the filter cavities. So, the size of the answer sphere were considered as the cell size. The windows were measured by straight lines secant to the window intersections

  17. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis of DNA--its role and potential in food analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druml, Barbara; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2014-09-01

    DNA based methods play an increasing role in food safety control and food adulteration detection. Recent papers show that high resolution melting (HRM) analysis is an interesting approach. It involves amplification of the target of interest in the presence of a saturation dye by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequent melting of the amplicons by gradually increasing the temperature. Since the melting profile depends on the GC content, length, sequence and strand complementarity of the product, HRM analysis is highly suitable for the detection of single-base variants and small insertions or deletions. The review gives an introduction into HRM analysis, covers important aspects in the development of an HRM analysis method and describes how HRM data are analysed and interpreted. Then we discuss the potential of HRM analysis based methods in food analysis, i.e. for the identification of closely related species and cultivars and the identification of pathogenic microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High Resolution Melting Analysis for fast and cheap polymorphism screening of marine populations

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Anne-Leila Meistertzheim, Isabelle Calves, Sébastien Artigaud, Carolyn S. Friedman, Christine Paillard, Jean Laroche & Claude Ferec ### Abstract This protocol permits the mutation scanning of PCR products by high-resolution DNA melting analysis requiring the inclusion of a saturating intercalating dye in the PCR mix without labelled probe. During a scanning process, fluorescent melting curves of PCR amplicons are analyzed. Mutations modifying melting curve shapes, are allowed...

  19. Rapid and accurate identification of isolates of Candida species by melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decat, E.; van Mechelen, E.; Saerens, B.; Vermeulen, S.J.T.; Boekhout, T.; de Blaiser, S.; Vaneechoutte, M.; Deschaght, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid identification of clinically important yeasts can facilitate the initiation of anti-fungal therapy, since susceptibility is largely species-dependent. We evaluated melting peak and melting curve analysis of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 fragment (ITS2-MCA) as an identification

  20. Crystallization and Melt Removal at Arenal Volcano, Polytopic Vector Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, P. J.; Vogel, T. A.; Bolge, L. L.; Ehrlich, R.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    Tephra sequences ET3 and ET4 from Arenal volcano in Costa Rica have recently been interpreted to be a product of crystal fractionation by Bolge and coworkers in a series of papers (2004, 2006). The two tephra units are part of a sequence of 22 tephra units that represent a 7000 year span of the Arenal volcano activity. The tephro- stratigraphy has been described extensively by Melson (1982; 1994). The ET3 and ET4 tephras were interpreted (based on major- and trace-element, isotopic analyses of whole rocks and microchemical analyses of individual phases) as clear evidence of crystal separation by gravity settling (Bolge et al., 2004, 2006). The lower ET4 tephra sequence (andesitic and crystal poor) and the upper ET3 tephra (basaltic and crystal rich) represent an inverted snapshot of the magma chamber with contrasting geochemical properties. The ET3 sequence (deeper part of the magma chamber) has nearly constant composition with only a few elements varying stratigraphically (best represented by CaO). This is consistent with gradually decreasing amounts of melt in the upper part of ET3. The lower ET4 tephra (upper part of the magma chamber) contains large chemical gradients in both incompatible and compatible elements. In the present study we use whole-rock geochemical data from the recent tephra sequences ET3 and ET4 as inputs to Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA) (for a review of this method see Vogel and coworkers, in press). With this method we produce a three end member solution that is consistent with crystallization of Olivine, plagioclase and pyroxene from the most mafic end member (EM1) resulting in a crystal rich mush zone. As crystallization progresses the compositions of the liquids are driven towards an intermediate end member (EM3), which has an intermediate composition liquid. At EM3 composition, rapid depletion of FeO, MgO and TiO2 by crystallization of Fe-Ti oxides, rapidly drives the liquid composition towards the silicic EM1 (incompatible element

  1. Product differentiation by analysis of DNA melting curves during the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ririe, K M; Rasmussen, R P; Wittwer, C T

    1997-02-15

    A microvolume fluorometer integrated with a thermal cycler was used to acquire DNA melting curves during polymerase chain reaction by fluorescence monitoring of the double-stranded DNA specific dye SYBR Green I. Plotting fluorescence as a function of temperature as the thermal cycler heats through the dissociation temperature of the product gives a DNA melting curve. The shape and position of this DNA melting curve are functions of the GC/AT ratio, length, and sequence and can be used to differentiate amplification products separated by less than 2 degrees C in melting temperature. Desired products can be distinguished from undesirable products, in many cases eliminating the need for gel electrophoresis. Analysis of melting curves can extend the dynamic range of initial template quantification when amplification is monitored with double-stranded DNA specific dyes. Complete amplification and analysis of products can be performed in less than 15 min.

  2. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation

  3. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  4. Heat transfer modelling and stability analysis of selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusarov, A.V.; Yadroitsev, I.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    2007-01-01

    The process of direct manufacturing by selective laser melting basically consists of laser beam scanning over a thin powder layer deposited on a dense substrate. Complete remelting of the powder in the scanned zone and its good adhesion to the substrate ensure obtaining functional parts with improved mechanical properties. Experiments with single-line scanning indicate, that an interval of scanning velocities exists where the remelted tracks are uniform. The tracks become broken if the scanning velocity is outside this interval. This is extremely undesirable and referred to as the 'balling' effect. A numerical model of coupled radiation and heat transfer is proposed to analyse the observed instability. The 'balling' effect at high scanning velocities (above ∼20 cm/s for the present conditions) can be explained by the Plateau-Rayleigh capillary instability of the melt pool. Two factors stabilize the process with decreasing the scanning velocity: reducing the length-to-width ratio of the melt pool and increasing the width of its contact with the substrate

  5. Identification of squid species by melting temperature shifts on fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) using single dual-labeled probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eunjung; Song, Ha Jeong; Kwon, Na Young; Kim, Gi Won; Lee, Kwang Ho; Jo, Soyeon; Park, Sujin; Park, Jihyun; Park, Eun Kyeong; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2017-06-01

    Real time PCR is a standard method for identification of species. One of limitations of the qPCR is that there would be false-positive result due to mismatched hybridization between target sequence and probe depending on the annealing temperature in the PCR condition. As an alternative, fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) could be applied for species identification. FMCA is based on a dual-labeled probe. Even with subtle difference of target sequence, there are visible melting temperature (Tm) shift. One of FMCA applications is distinguishing organisms distributed and consumed globally as popular food ingredients. Their prices are set by species or country of origin. However, counterfeiting or distributing them without any verification procedure are becoming social problems and threatening food safety. Besides distinguishing them in naked eye is very difficult and almost impossible in any processed form. Therefore, it is necessary to identify species in molecular level. In this research three species of squids which have 1-2 base pair differences each are selected as samples since they have the same issue. We designed a probe which perfectly matches with one species and the others mismatches 2 and 1 base pair respectively and labeled with fluorophore and quencher. In an experiment with a single probe, we successfully distinguished them by Tm shift depending on the difference of base pair. By combining FMCA and qPCR chip, smaller-scale assay with higher sensitivity and resolution could be possible, andc furthermore, enabling results analysis with smart phone would realize point-of-care testing (POCT).

  6. Analysis of Water Recovery Rate from the Heat Melt Compactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Hegde, U.; Gokoglu, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human space missions generate trash with a substantial amount of plastic (20% or greater by mass). The trash also contains water trapped in food residue and paper products and other trash items. The Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) under development by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) compresses the waste, dries it to recover water and melts the plastic to encapsulate the compressed trash. The resulting waste disk or puck represents an approximately ten-fold reduction in the volume of the initial trash loaded into the HMC. In the current design concept being pursued, the trash is compressed by a piston after it is loaded into the trash chamber. The piston face, the side walls of the waste processing chamber and the end surface in contact with the waste can be heated to evaporate the water and to melt the plastic. Water is recovered by the HMC in two phases. The first is a pre-process compaction without heat or with the heaters initially turned on but before the waste heats up. Tests have shown that during this step some liquid water may be expelled from the chamber. This water is believed to be free water (i.e., not bound with or absorbed in other waste constituents) that is present in the trash. This phase is herein termed Phase A of the water recovery process. During HMC operations, it is desired that liquid water recovery in Phase A be eliminated or minimized so that water-vapor processing equipment (e.g., condensers) downstream of the HMC are not fouled by liquid water and its constituents (i.e., suspended or dissolved matter) exiting the HMC. The primary water recovery process takes place next where the trash is further compacted while the heated surfaces reach their set temperatures for this step. This step will be referred to herein as Phase B of the water recovery process. During this step the waste chamber may be exposed to different selected pressures such as ambient, low pressure (e.g., 0.2 atm), or vacuum. The objective for this step is to remove both bound and

  7. Detonation waves in melt-coolant interaction. Part 2. Applied analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.; Hulin, H.

    2001-01-01

    Making use of the detonation theory presented in part 1 for melt-water interaction, detonation solutions for different melt-water pairs at different conditions are compared to each other. Discussion is provided on the existence of detonation solutions for water droplet - melt droplet - gas systems. The conclusion is made that even if such solution can be realized in the nature, which is highly questionable, the resulting detonation pressures will be below 200 bar. This is an important result for judging the risk of the melt-water disperse mixtures in nuclear safety analysis. In addition, the detonation pressures for alumna-continuous water systems have been found to be stronger then those for urania-continuous water systems, in agreement with the experimental observations and seems to give finally the searched for a long time explanation why alumna-water systems detonate much more violent than urania-water systems. (orig.) [de

  8. Analysis of elementary process steps in industrial glass melting tanks: some ideas on innovations in industrial glass melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional industrial glass furnaces show broad glass melt residence time distributions in the melting tanks and average residence times may be up to more than two days for high quality glass products, such as float glass or TV glass, despite the minimum residence times of 8-10 hours (or even less

  9. The Melting Point of Palladium Using Miniature Fixed Points of Different Ceramic Materials: Part II—Analysis of Melting Curves and Long-Term Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, F.; Huang, K.

    2016-12-01

    Fifteen miniature fixed-point cells made of three different ceramic crucible materials (Al2O3, ZrO2, and Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %)) were filled with pure palladium and used to calibrate type B thermocouples (Pt30 %Rh/Pt6 %Rh). A critical point by using miniature fixed points with small amounts of fixed-point material is the analysis of the melting curves, which are characterized by significant slopes during the melting process compared to flat melting plateaus obtainable using conventional fixed-point cells. The method of the extrapolated starting point temperature using straight line approximation of the melting plateau was applied to analyze the melting curves. This method allowed an unambiguous determination of an electromotive force (emf) assignable as melting temperature. The strict consideration of two constraints resulted in a unique, repeatable and objective method to determine the emf at the melting temperature within an uncertainty of about 0.1 μ V. The lifetime and long-term stability of the miniature fixed points was investigated by performing more than 100 melt/freeze cycles for each crucible of the different ceramic materials. No failure of the crucibles occurred indicating an excellent mechanical stability of the investigated miniature cells. The consequent limitation of heating rates to values below {± }3.5 K min^{-1} above 1100° C and the carefully and completely filled crucibles (the liquid palladium occupies the whole volume of the crucible) are the reasons for successfully preventing the crucibles from breaking. The thermal stability of the melting temperature of palladium was excellent when using the crucibles made of Al2O3(86 %)+ZrO2(14 %) and ZrO2. Emf drifts over the total duration of the long-term investigation were below a temperature equivalent of about 0.1 K-0.2 K.

  10. Analysis of HIV using a high resolution melting (HRM) diversity assay: automation of HRM data analysis enhances the utility of the assay for analysis of HIV incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Matthew M; Swan, David; Magaret, Craig A; Hoover, Donald R; Eshleman, Susan H

    2012-01-01

    HIV diversity may be a useful biomarker for discriminating between recent and non-recent HIV infection. The high resolution melting (HRM) diversity assay was developed to quantify HIV diversity in viral populations without sequencing. In this assay, HIV diversity is expressed as a single numeric HRM score that represents the width of a melting peak. HRM scores are highly associated with diversity measures obtained with next generation sequencing. In this report, a software package, the HRM Diversity Assay Analysis Tool (DivMelt), was developed to automate calculation of HRM scores from melting curve data. DivMelt uses computational algorithms to calculate HRM scores by identifying the start (T1) and end (T2) melting temperatures for a DNA sample and subtracting them (T2 - T1 =  HRM score). DivMelt contains many user-supplied analysis parameters to allow analyses to be tailored to different contexts. DivMelt analysis options were optimized to discriminate between recent and non-recent HIV infection and to maximize HRM score reproducibility. HRM scores calculated using DivMelt were compared to HRM scores obtained using a manual method that is based on visual inspection of DNA melting curves. HRM scores generated with DivMelt agreed with manually generated HRM scores obtained from the same DNA melting data. Optimal parameters for discriminating between recent and non-recent HIV infection were identified. DivMelt provided greater discrimination between recent and non-recent HIV infection than the manual method. DivMelt provides a rapid, accurate method of determining HRM scores from melting curve data, facilitating use of the HRM diversity assay for large-scale studies.

  11. Multivariate data analysis for finding the relevant fatty acids contributing to the melting fractions of cream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buldo, Patrizia; Larsen, Mette Krogh; Wiking, Lars

    2013-01-01

    :0 and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) in milk fat, whereas it decreased the amount of stearic acid (C18:0) and C18:1 trans fatty acid. Average data on the melting behaviour of cream separated the farms into two groups where the main differences in feeding were the amounts of maize silage and rapeseed cake used. CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: The melting behaviour and fatty acid composition of cream from a total of 33 cows from four farms were analysed. Multivariate data analysis was used to identify the fatty acids that contributed most to the melting points and to differentiate between creams from different practical...... feeding regimes. RESULTS: It was demonstrated that the melting point of the medium melting fraction of milk fat was positively correlated with palmitic acid (C16:0), whereas it was negatively correlated with oleic acid (C18:1 cis9), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA cis9 trans11), vaccenic acid (C18:1 trans11...

  12. Greenland inland ice melt-off: Analysis of global gravity data from the GRACE satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Svendsen, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an introductory analysis of gravity data from the GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) twin satellites. The data consist of gravity data in the form of 10-day maximum values of 1◦ by 1◦ equivalent water height (EWH) in meters starting at 29 July 2002 and ending at 25...... August 2010. Results focussing on Greenland show statistically significant mass loss interpreted as inland ice melt-off to the SE and NW with an acceleration in the melt-off occurring to the NW and a possible deceleration to the SE. Also, there are strong indications of a transition taking place...

  13. Melt analysis of mismatch amplification mutation assays (Melt-MAMA: a functional study of a cost-effective SNP genotyping assay in bacterial models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn N Birdsell

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are abundant in genomes of all species and biologically informative markers extensively used across broad scientific disciplines. Newly identified SNP markers are publicly available at an ever-increasing rate due to advancements in sequencing technologies. Efficient, cost-effective SNP genotyping methods to screen sample populations are in great demand in well-equipped laboratories, but also in developing world situations. Dual Probe TaqMan assays are robust but can be cost-prohibitive and require specialized equipment. The Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay, coupled with melt analysis (Melt-MAMA, is flexible, efficient and cost-effective. However, Melt-MAMA traditionally suffers from high rates of assay design failures and knowledge gaps on assay robustness and sensitivity. In this study, we identified strategies that improved the success of Melt-MAMA. We examined the performance of 185 Melt-MAMAs across eight different pathogens using various optimization parameters. We evaluated the effects of genome size and %GC content on assay development. When used collectively, specific strategies markedly improved the rate of successful assays at the first design attempt from ~50% to ~80%. We observed that Melt-MAMA accurately genotypes across a broad DNA range (~100 ng to ~0.1 pg. Genomic size and %GC content influence the rate of successful assay design in an independent manner. Finally, we demonstrated the versatility of these assays by the creation of a duplex Melt-MAMA real-time PCR (two SNPs and conversion to a size-based genotyping system, which uses agarose gel electrophoresis. Melt-MAMA is comparable to Dual Probe TaqMan assays in terms of design success rate and accuracy. Although sensitivity is less robust than Dual Probe TaqMan assays, Melt-MAMA is superior in terms of cost-effectiveness, speed of development and versatility. We detail the parameters most important for the successful application of

  14. High-Resolution Melt Analysis for Rapid Comparison of Bacterial Community Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmsø, Mathis Hjort; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Bælum, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    In the study of bacterial community composition, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing is today among the preferred methods of analysis. The cost of nucleotide sequence analysis, including requisite computational and bioinformatic steps, however, takes up a large part of many research budgets. High......-resolution melt (HRM) analysis is the study of the melt behavior of specific PCR products. Here we describe a novel high-throughput approach in which we used HRM analysis targeting the 16S rRNA gene to rapidly screen multiple complex samples for differences in bacterial community composition. We hypothesized...... that HRM analysis of amplified 16S rRNA genes from a soil ecosystem could be used as a screening tool to identify changes in bacterial community structure. This hypothesis was tested using a soil microcosm setup exposed to a total of six treatments representing different combinations of pesticide...

  15. Usage of energy- dispersial analysis in studying rocks melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudelas Dušan

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available EDS analysis of constituent minerals of nefelitic basanite from locality Konrádovce – lava stream of ceric basalt formation of upper Phocene-Pleistocene age was carried out using the electron microscope JEOL JSM-840 and the energy-dispersive microanalyser KEVEX DELTA+ with MIRROR QUANTEX+ software.Based on the results of EDS microanalysis, the primary rock can be, from the petrographic point of view, described as nefelitic basanite. The following substances were determined in the primer matter and porfiric phenocrysts:- isometric grainsof pyroxene-augite (point A1,- grainsof nepheline-kalsite (point A2,- cryptocrystallic glassy matter (point A3,- grainsof olivine (point A4,- microlite of basic plagioclase (point A5.The energy-dispersive analysis is fast and full spectrum is taken at the same time. In common, a required time is less than one minute. Results of the measurement donot depend significantly on the topography of sample and it is also possible to analyze a rough surface which makes easier the preparation of samples. A very important aspect of the mentioned method is the precision of obtained results in order to identify the chemical composition of analyzed point which, in a subsequent step, allows to determine the type of mineral. EDS is a convenient and powerful supplement of microscopic studies which are, sometime, unable to distinguish exactly the complete composition of the analyzed rocks.

  16. Image analysis of speckle patterns as a probe of melting transitions in laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ran; Matityahu, Shlomi; Melchior, Aviva; Nikolaevsky, Mark; Noked, Ori; Sterer, Eran

    2015-09-01

    The precision of melting curve measurements using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) is largely limited by the correct and reliable determination of the onset of melting. We present a novel image analysis of speckle interference patterns in the LHDAC as a way to define quantitative measures which enable an objective determination of the melting transition. Combined with our low-temperature customized IR pyrometer, designed for measurements down to 500 K, our setup allows studying the melting curve of materials with low melting temperatures, with relatively high precision. As an application, the melting curve of Te was measured up to 35 GPa. The results are found to be in good agreement with previous data obtained at pressures up to 10 GPa.

  17. Constraints on the Parental Melts of Enriched Shergottites from Image Analysis and High Pressure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, M.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Peslier, A.

    2012-01-01

    Martian basalts can be classified in at least two geochemically different families: enriched and depleted shergottites. Enriched shergottites are characterized by higher incompatible element concentrations and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 and lower initial Nd-143/Nd-144 and Hf-176/Hf-177 than depleted shergottites [e.g. 1, 2]. It is now generally admitted that shergottites result from the melting of at least two distinct mantle reservoirs [e.g. 2, 3]. Some of the olivine-phyric shergottites (either depleted or enriched), the most magnesian Martian basalts, could represent primitive melts, which are of considerable interest to constrain mantle sources. Two depleted olivine-phyric shergottites, Yamato (Y) 980459 and Northwest Africa (NWA) 5789, are in equilibrium with their most magnesian olivine (Fig. 1) and their bulk rock compositions are inferred to represent primitive melts [4, 5]. Larkman Nunatak (LAR) 06319 [3, 6, 7] and NWA 1068 [8], the most magnesian enriched basalts, have bulk Mg# that are too high to be in equilibrium with their olivine megacryst cores. Parental melt compositions have been estimated by subtracting the most magnesian olivine from the bulk rock composition, assuming that olivine megacrysts have partially accumulated [3, 9]. However, because this technique does not account for the actual petrography of these meteorites, we used image analysis to study these rocks history, reconstruct their parent magma and understand the nature of olivine megacrysts.

  18. STR melting curve analysis as a genetic screening tool for crime scene samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang; McKinney, Jason; Johnson, Donald J; Roberts, Katherine A; Hardy, Winters R

    2012-07-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, high-resolution melt curve (HRMC) analysis was investigated as a postquantification screening tool to discriminate human CSF1PO and THO1 genotypes amplified with mini-STR primers in the presence of SYBR Green or LCGreen Plus dyes. A total of 12 CSF1PO and 11 HUMTHO1 genotypes were analyzed on the LightScanner HR96 and LS-32 systems and were correctly differentiated based upon their respective melt profiles. Short STR amplicon melt curves were affected by repeat number, and single-source and mixed DNA samples were additionally differentiated by the formation of heteroduplexes. Melting curves were shown to be unique and reproducible from DNA quantities ranging from 20 to 0.4 ng and distinguished identical from nonidentical genotypes from DNA derived from different biological fluids and compromised samples. Thus, a method is described which can assess both the quantity and the possible probative value of samples without full genotyping. 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  19. Effect Of Turbulence Modelling In Numerical Analysis Of Melting Process In An Induction Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buliński P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the velocity field and turbulence effects that occur inside a crucible of a typical induction furnace were investigated. In the first part of this work, a free surface shape of the liquid metal was measured in a ceramic crucible. Then a numerical model of aluminium melting process was developed. It took into account coupling of electromagnetic and thermofluid fields that was performed using commercial codes. In the next step, the sensitivity analysis of turbulence modelling in the liquid domain was performed. The obtained numerical results were compared with the measurement data. The performed analysis can be treated as a preliminary approach for more complex mathematical modelling for the melting process optimisation in crucible induction furnaces of different types.

  20. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) for the assessment of clonality in feline B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Manfred; Scheffold, Svenja; Hecht, Werner; Reinacher, Manfred

    2018-06-01

    Analysis of clonality is gaining importance in diagnosing lymphomas in veterinary medicine. Usually, PCR for the analysis of antigen receptor rearrangement (PARR) is followed by electrophoretic separation of the PCR products. Aim of this study was to test the feasibility of HRM for the assessment of clonality in B-cell lymphomas of cats. High resolution melting analysis differentiates PCR products by their different melting point using the decrease in fluorescence of an intercalating dye during melting of the PCR product. Additionally, the method is easy to use with no post-PCR manipulation of the samples. Forty-seven feline B-cell lymphomas and 31 reactive lymphatic proliferations of cats were investigated by PARR followed either by capillary electrophoresis or an HRM assay. To objectify the interpretation of the HRM results a recently published mathematical approach was applied to the melting curve. To overcome discrepancies between the visual interpretation and the mathematical approach, the latter was modified to include testing of reproducibility and recognition of pseudoclonality. In 11 of 47 lymphoma cases clonal populations were detectable by HRM assay compared to 14 of 47 lymphomas in which clonal populations were detected by capillary electrophoresis assay. Neither of the methods showed a clonal pattern in any of the reactive samples. However, the HRM assay showed a unique pattern in cases of follicular lymphatic hyperplasia that had no corresponding pattern in capillary electrophoresis. The capillary electrophoresis assay could identify 3 lymphomas that were not detected by the HRM assay and is therefore regarded superior to the HRM assay. The comparison however, was hampered by the overall bad performance of the PARR, that might be the consequence of insufficient primer binding due to somatic hypermutation of the binding sites during antigen stimulated proliferation of the B lymphocytes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Downstream processing from melt granulation towards tablets: In-depth analysis of a continuous twin-screw melt granulation process using polymeric binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grymonpré, W; Verstraete, G; Vanhoorne, V; Remon, J P; De Beer, T; Vervaet, C

    2018-03-01

    The concept of twin-screw melt granulation (TSMG) has steadily (re)-gained interest in pharmaceutical formulation development as an intermediate step during tablet manufacturing. However, to be considered as a viable processing option for solid oral dosage forms there is a need to understand all critical sources of variability which could affect this granulation technique. The purpose of this study was to provide an in-depth analysis of the continuous TSMG process in order to expose the critical process parameters (CPP) and elucidate the impact of process and formulation parameters on the critical quality attributes (CQA) of granules and tablets during continuous TSMG. A first part of the study dealt with the screening of various amorphous polymers as binder for producing high-dosed melt granules of two model drug (i.e. acetaminophen and hydrochlorothiazide). The second part of this study described a quality-by-design (QbD) approach for melt granulation of hydrochlorothiazide in order to thoroughly evaluate TSMG, milling and tableting stage of the continuous TSMG line. Using amorphous polymeric binders resulted in melt granules with high milling efficiency due to their brittle behaviour without producing excessive amounts of fines, providing high granule yields with low friability. Therefore, it makes them extremely suitable for further downstream processing. One of the most important CPP during TSMG with polymeric binders was the granulation-torque, which - in case of polymers with high T g - increased during longer granulation runs to critical levels endangering the continuous process flow. However, by optimizing both screw speed and throughput or changing to polymeric binders with lower T g it was possible to significantly reduce this risk. This research paper highlighted that TSMG must be considered as a viable option during formulation development of solid oral dosage forms based on the robustness of the CQA of both melt granules and tablets. Copyright © 2017

  2. Differentiation of minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus by high resolution melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Dan; Wu, Miaoli; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Wen; Zhu, Yujun; Cong, Feng; Xu, Fengjiao; Lian, Yuexiao; Huang, Bihong; Wu, Qiwen; Chen, Meili; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Ren; Guo, Pengju

    2017-12-01

    Murine parvovirus is one of the most prevalent infectious pathogens in mouse colonies. A specific primer pair targeting the VP2 gene of minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV) was utilized for high resolution melting (HRM) analysis. The resulting melting curves could distinguish these two virus strains and there was no detectable amplification of the other mouse pathogens which included rat parvovirus (KRV), ectromelia virus (ECT), mouse adenovirus (MAD), mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV), polyoma virus (Poly), Helicobactor hepaticus (H. hepaticus) and Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). The detection limit of the standard was 10 copies/μL. This study showed that the PCR-HRM assay could be an alternative useful method with high specificity and sensitivity for differentiating murine parvovirus strains MVM and MPV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical analysis of the heating phase and densification mechanism in polymers selective laser melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrane, Aoulaiche; Boutaous, M'hamed; Xin, Shihe

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this work is to address a modeling of the SLS process at the scale of the part in PA12 polymer powder bed. The powder bed is considered as a continuous medium with homogenized properties, meanwhile understanding multiple physical phenomena occurring during the process and studying the influence of process parameters on the quality of final product. A thermal model, based on enthalpy approach, will be presented with details on the multiphysical couplings that allow the thermal history: laser absorption, melting, coalescence, densification, volume shrinkage and on numerical implementation using FV method. The simulations were carried out in 3D with an in-house developed FORTRAN code. After validation of the model with comparison to results from literature, a parametric analysis will be proposed. Some original results as densification process and the thermal history with the evolution of the material, from the granular solid state to homogeneous melted state will be discussed with regards to the involved physical phenomena.

  4. The system analysis of temperature and melting enthalpy of intermetallic compounds of antimony-lanthanoids system of Sb Ln, Sb2Ln composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalova, M.A.; Chamanova, M.; Dodkhoev, E.S.; Badalov, A.; Abdusalyamova, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to system analysis of temperature and melting enthalpy of intermetallic compounds of antimony-lanthanoids system of Sb Ln, Sb 2 Ln composition. The melting enthalpy was estimated. The temperature value was determined.

  5. Evaluation of PCR and high-resolution melt curve analysis for differentiation of Salmonella isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidabadi, Mohammad Sadegh; Nili, Hassan; Dadras, Habibollah; Sharifiyazdi, Hassan; Connolly, Joanne; Valcanis, Mary; Raidal, Shane; Ghorashi, Seyed Ali

    2017-06-01

    Consumption of poultry products contaminated with Salmonella is one of the major causes of foodborne diseases worldwide and therefore detection and differentiation of Salmonella spp. in poultry is important. In this study, oligonucleotide primers were designed from hemD gene and a PCR followed by high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was developed for rapid differentiation of Salmonella isolates. Amplicons of 228 bp were generated from 16 different Salmonella reference strains and from 65 clinical field isolates mainly from poultry farms. HRM curve analysis of the amplicons differentiated Salmonella isolates and analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the amplicons from selected isolates revealed that each melting curve profile was related to a unique DNA sequence. The relationship between reference strains and tested specimens was also evaluated using a mathematical model without visual interpretation of HRM curves. In addition, the potential of the PCR-HRM curve analysis was evaluated for genotyping of additional Salmonella isolates from different avian species. The findings indicate that PCR followed by HRM curve analysis provides a rapid and robust technique for genotyping of Salmonella isolates to determine the serovar/serotype.

  6. A phenomenological analysis of melt progression in the lower head of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tourniaire, B. [EDF/Septen, Lyon (France)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • We propose a phenomenological description of melt progression into the lower head. • We examine changes in heat loads on the vessel. • Heat loads are more severe than emphasized by the bounding situation assumption. • Both primary circuit and ex-vessel reflooding are necessary for in-vessel retention. • Vessel failure conditions are examined. - Abstract: The analysis of in-vessel corium cooling (IVC) and retention (IVR) involves the description of very complex and transient physical phenomena. To get round this difficulty, “bounding” situations are often emphasized for the demonstration of corium coolability, by vessel flooding and/or by reactor pit flooding. This approach however comes up against its own limitations. More realistic melt progression scenarios are required to provide plausible corium configurations and vessel failure conditions. Work to develop more realistic melt progression scenarios has been done at CEA, in collaboration with EDF. Development has concentrated on the French 1300 MWe PWR, considering both dry scenarios and the possibility of flooding of the RPC (reactor primary circuit) and/or the reactor pit. The models used for this approach have been derived from the analysis of the TMI2 accident and take benefit from the lessons derived from several programs related to pool thermal hydraulics (BALI, COPO, ACOPO, etc.), material interactions (RASPLAV, MASCA), critical heat flux (CHF) on the external surface of the vessel (KAIST, SULTAN, ULPU), etc. Important conclusions of this work are as follows: (a)After the start of corium melting and onset of melt formation in the core at low pressure (∼1 to 5 bars), it seems questionable that RPV (reactor pressure vessel) reflooding alone would be sufficient to achieve corium retention in the vessel; (b)If the vessel is not cooled externally, it may fail due to local heat-up before the whole core fuel inventory is relocated in the lower head; (c)Even if the vessel is

  7. Genotyping of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from poultry carcasses using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaridis, Ioannis; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Argiriou, Anagnostis

    2014-01-02

    An outbreak situation of human listeriosis requires a fast and accurate protocol for typing Listeria monocytogenes . Existing techniques are either characterized by low discriminatory power or are laborious and require several days to give a final result. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was investigated in this study as an alternative tool for a rapid and precise genotyping of L. monocytogenes isolates. Fifty-five isolates of L. monocytogenes isolated from poultry carcasses and the environment of four slaughterhouses were typed by HRM analysis using two specific markers, internalin B and ssrA genes. The analysis of genotype confidence percentage of L. monocytogenes isolates produced by HRM analysis generated dendrograms with two major groups and several subgroups. Furthermore, the analysis of the HRM curves revealed that all L. monocytogenes isolates could easily be distinguished. In conclusion, HRM was proven to be a fast and powerful tool for genotyping isolates of L. monocytogenes .

  8. Thermal analysis as an aid to forensics: Alkane melting and oxidative stability of wool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alan Riga, D.

    1998-01-01

    Interdisciplinary methods and thermal analytical techniques in particular are effective tools in aiding the identification and characterization of materials in question involved in civil or criminal law. Forensic material science uses systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through analysis, observation and experimentation. Thermal analytical data can be used to aid the legal system in interpreting technical variations in quite often a complex system.Calorimetry and thermal microscopic methods helped define a commercial product composed of alkanes that was involved in a major law suit. The solid-state structures of a number of normal alkanes have unique crystal structures. These alkanes melt and freeze below room temperature to more than 60C below zero. Mixtures of specific alkanes have attributes of pure chemicals. The X-ray diffraction structure of a mixture of alkanes is the same as a pure alkane, but the melting and freezing temperature are significantly lower than predicted. The jury ruled that the product containing n-alkanes had the appropriate melting characteristics. The thermal-physical properties made a commercial fluid truly unique and there was no advertising infringement according to the law and the jury trialA combination of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and macrophotography were used to conduct an extensive modeling and analysis of physical evidence obtained in a mobile home fire and explosion. A person's death was allegedly linked to the misuse of a kerosene space heater. The thermal analytical techniques showed that external heating was the cause of the space heater's deformation, not a firing of the heater with gasoline and kerosene. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Thermal analysis as an aid to forensics: Alkane melting and oxidative stability of wool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Riga, D. [Professor of Chemistry, Cleveland State University and TechCon Inc., 6325 Aldenham Dr., Cleveland, OH 44143-3331 (United States)

    1998-12-21

    Interdisciplinary methods and thermal analytical techniques in particular are effective tools in aiding the identification and characterization of materials in question involved in civil or criminal law. Forensic material science uses systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through analysis, observation and experimentation. Thermal analytical data can be used to aid the legal system in interpreting technical variations in quite often a complex system.Calorimetry and thermal microscopic methods helped define a commercial product composed of alkanes that was involved in a major law suit. The solid-state structures of a number of normal alkanes have unique crystal structures. These alkanes melt and freeze below room temperature to more than 60C below zero. Mixtures of specific alkanes have attributes of pure chemicals. The X-ray diffraction structure of a mixture of alkanes is the same as a pure alkane, but the melting and freezing temperature are significantly lower than predicted. The jury ruled that the product containing n-alkanes had the appropriate melting characteristics. The thermal-physical properties made a commercial fluid truly unique and there was no advertising infringement according to the law and the jury trialA combination of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and macrophotography were used to conduct an extensive modeling and analysis of physical evidence obtained in a mobile home fire and explosion. A person's death was allegedly linked to the misuse of a kerosene space heater. The thermal analytical techniques showed that external heating was the cause of the space heater's deformation, not a firing of the heater with gasoline and kerosene. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Differentiation of five enterohepatic Helicobacter species by nested PCR with high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miaoli; Rao, Dan; Zhu, Yujun; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Ren; Guo, Pengju

    2017-04-01

    Enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS) are widespread in rodent species around the world. Several studies have demonstrated that infection with EHS can interfere with the outcomes of animal experiments in cancer research and significantly influence the study results. Therefore, it is essential to establish a rapid detection and identification of EHS for biomedical research using laboratory rodents. Our study aimed to develop a rapid and sensitive method to detect and distinguish five enterohepatic Helicobacter species. Nested PCR followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) was developed for identification of H. bilis, H. rodentium, H. muridarum, H. typhlonius, as well as H. hepaticus. To validate the accuracy of nested PCR-HRM analysis, quantitative real-time PCR methods for five different enterohepatic Helicobacter species were developed. A total of 50 cecal samples were tested using both nested PCR-HRM analysis and qPCR method. The nested PCR-HRM method could distinguish five enterohepatic Helicobacter species by different melting temperatures. The melting curve were characterized by peaks of 78.7 ± 0.12°C for H. rodentium, 80.51 ± 0.09°C for H. bilis, 81.6 ± 0.1°C for H. typhlonius, 82.11 ± 0.18°C for H. muridarum, and 82.95 ± 0.09°C for H. hepaticus. The nested PCR-HRM assay is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective assay. This assay could be a useful tool for molecular epidemiology study of enterohepatic Helicobacter infection and an attractive alternative for genotyping of enterohepatic Helicobacter species. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Analysis of soft wall AdS/QCD potentials to obtain the melting temperature of scalar hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Alfredo; Ibanez, Adolfo [Universidad de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-11-15

    We consider an analysis of potentials related to Schroedinger-type equations for scalar fields in a 5D AdS black hole background with dilaton in order to obtain melting temperatures for different hadrons in a thermal bath. The approach does not consider calculations of spectral functions, and it is easy to yield results for hadrons with an arbitrary number of constituents. We present results for scalar mesons, glueballs, hybrid mesons and tetraquarks, and we show that mesons are more resistant to being melted in a thermal bath than other scalar hadrons, and in general the melting temperature increases when hadrons contain heavy quarks. (orig.)

  12. ‘‘Blind'' mapping of genic DNA sequence polymorphisms in Lolium perenne L. by high resolution melting curve analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Jensen, Louise Bach; Fiil, Alice

    2009-01-01

    High resolution melting curve analysis (HRM) measures dissociation of double stranded DNA of a PCR product amplified in the presence of a saturating fluorescence dye. Recently, HRM proved successful to genotype DNA sequence polymorphisms such as SSRs and SNPs based on the shape of the melting...... curves. In this study, HRM was used for simultaneous screening and genotyping of genic DNA sequence polymorphisms identified in the Lolium perenne F2 mapping population VrnA. Melting profiles of PCR products amplified from previously published gene loci and from a novel gene putatively involved...

  13. Analysis of core melt accident in Fukushima Daiichi-Unit 1 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Fumiya

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain a profound understanding of the serious situation in Unit 1 and Unit 2/3 reactors of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (hereafter abbreviated as 1F1 and 1F2/3, respectively), which was directly caused by tsunami due to a huge earthquake on 11 March 2011, analyses of severe core damage are performed. In the present report, the analysis method and 1F1 analysis are described. The analysis is essentially based on the total energy balance in the core. In the analysis, the total energy vs. temperature curve is developed for each reactor, which is based on the estimated core materials inventory and material property data. Temperature and melt fraction are estimated by comparing the total energy curve with the total stored energy in the core material. The heat source is the decay heat of fission products and actinides together with reaction heat from the zirconium steam reaction. (author)

  14. High-resolution melt PCR analysis for genotyping of Ureaplasma parvum isolates directly from clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Matthew S; Tabone, Tania; Kemp, Matthew W; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Spiller, O Brad; Newnham, John P

    2014-02-01

    Ureaplasma sp. infection in neonates and adults underlies a variety of disease pathologies. Of the two human Ureaplasma spp., Ureaplasma parvum is clinically the most common. We have developed a high-resolution melt (HRM) PCR assay for the differentiation of the four serovars of U. parvum in a single step. Currently U. parvum strains are separated into four serovars by sequencing the promoter and coding region of the multiple-banded antigen (MBA) gene. We designed primers to conserved sequences within this region for PCR amplification and HRM analysis to generate reproducible and distinct melt profiles that distinguish clonal representatives of serovars 1, 3, 6, and 14. Furthermore, our HRM PCR assay could classify DNA extracted from 74 known (MBA-sequenced) test strains with 100% accuracy. Importantly, HRM PCR was also able to identify U. parvum serovars directly from 16 clinical swabs. HRM PCR performed with DNA consisting of mixtures of combined known serovars yielded profiles that were easily distinguished from those for single-serovar controls. These profiles mirrored clinical samples that contained mixed serovars. Unfortunately, melt curve analysis software is not yet robust enough to identify the composition of mixed serovar samples, only that more than one serovar is present. HRM PCR provides a single-step, rapid, cost-effective means to differentiate the four serovars of U. parvum that did not amplify any of the known 10 serovars of Ureaplasma urealyticum tested in parallel. Choice of reaction reagents was found to be crucial to allow sufficient sensitivity to differentiate U. parvum serovars directly from clinical swabs rather than requiring cell enrichment using microbial culture techniques.

  15. Numerical analysis of melting/solidification phenomena using a moving boundary problem analysis method X-FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchibori, Akihiro; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    A numerical analysis method for melting/solidification phenomena has been developed to evaluate a feasibility of several candidate techniques in the nuclear fuel cycle. Our method is based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) which has been used for moving boundary problems. Key technique of the X-FEM is to incorporate signed distance function into finite element interpolation to represent a discontinuous gradient of the temperature at a moving solid-liquid interface. Construction of the finite element equation, the technique of quadrature and the method to solve the equation are reported here. The numerical solutions of the one-dimensional Stefan problem, solidification in a two-dimensional square corner and melting of pure gallium are compared to the exact solutions or to the experimental data. Through these analyses, validity of the newly developed numerical analysis method has been demonstrated. (author)

  16. Origin of migmatites by deformation-enhanced melt infiltration of orthogneiss: a new model based on quantitative microstructural analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasalová, P.; Schulmann, K.; Lexa, O.; Štípská, P.; Hrouda, F.; Ulrich, Stanislav; Haloda, J.; Týcová, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 1 (2008), s. 29-53 ISSN 0263-4929 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3111401; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/04/2065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : crystal size distribution * melt infiltration * melt topology * migmatites * quantitative textural analysis Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.340, year: 2008

  17. High-resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis for C. meleagridis identification in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelbi, Hanen; Essid, Rym; Jelassi, Refka; Bouzekri, Nesrine; Zidi, Ines; Ben Salah, Hamza; Mrad, Ilhem; Ben Sghaier, Ines; Abdelmalek, Rym; Aissa, Sameh; Bouratbine, Aida; Aoun, Karim

    2018-02-01

    Cryptosporidiosis represents a major public health problem. This infection, caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Cryptosporidium, has been reported worldwide as a frequent cause of diarrhoea. In the immunocompetent host, the typical watery diarrhea can be self-limiting. However, it is severe and chronic, in the immunocompromised host and may cause death. Cryptosporidium spp. are coccidians, which complete their life cycle in both humans and animals. The two species C. hominis and C. parvum are the major cause of human infection. Compared to studies on C. hominis and C. parvum, only a few studies have developed methods to identify C. meleagridis. To develop a new real time PCR-coupled High resolution melting assay allowing the detection for C. meleagridis, in addition of the other dominant species (C. hominis and C. parvum). The polymorphic sequence on the dihydrofolate reductase gene (DHFR) of three species was sequenced to design primers pair and establish a sensitive real-time PCR coupled to a high-resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis method, allowing the detection of Cryptosporidium sp. and discrimination between three prevalent species in Tunisia. We analyzed a collection of 42 archived human isolates of the three studied species. Real-time PCR coupled to HRM assay allowed detection of Cryptosporidium, using the new designed primers, and basing on melting profile, we can distinguish C. meleagridis species in addition to C. parvum and C. hominis. We developed a qPCR-HRM assay that allows Cryptosporidium genotyping. This method is sensitive and able to distinguish three Cryptosporidium species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Role of Melt Curve Analysis in Interpretation of Nutrigenomics' MicroRNA Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farid E; Gouda, Mostafa M; Hussein, Laila A; Ahmed, Nancy C; Vos, Paul W; Mohammad, Mahmoud A

    2017-01-01

    This article illustrates the importance of melt curve analysis (MCA) in interpretation of mild nutrogenomic micro(mi)RNA expression data, by measuring the magnitude of the expression of key miRNA molecules in stool of healthy human adults as molecular markers, following the intake of Pomegranate juice (PGJ), functional fermented sobya (FS), rich in potential probiotic lactobacilli, or their combination. Total small RNA was isolated from stool of 25 volunteers before and following a three-week dietary intervention trial. Expression of 88 miRNA genes was evaluated using Qiagen's 96 well plate RT 2 miRNA qPCR arrays. Employing parallel coordinates plots, there was no observed significant separation for the gene expression (Cq) values, using Roche 480® PCR LightCycler instrument used in this study, and none of the miRNAs showed significant statistical expression after controlling for the false discovery rate. On the other hand, melting temperature profiles produced during PCR amplification run, found seven significant genes (miR-184, miR-203, miR-373, miR-124, miR-96, miR-373 and miR-301a), which separated candidate miRNAs that could function as novel molecular markers of relevance to oxidative stress and immunoglobulin function, for the intake of polyphenol (PP)-rich, functional fermented foods rich in lactobacilli (FS), or their combination. We elaborate on these data, and present a detailed review on use of melt curves for analyzing nutigenomic miRNA expression data, which initially appear to show no significant expressions, but are actually more subtle than this simplistic view, necessitating the understanding of the role of MCA for a comprehensive understanding of what the collective expression and MCA data collectively imply. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. High-throughput gender identification of penguin species using melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Yung-Ting; Chiu, Hui-Tzu; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Cheng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Ming-Hui; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-04-03

    Most species of penguins are sexual monomorphic and therefore it is difficult to visually identify their genders for monitoring population stability in terms of sex ratio analysis. In this study, we evaluated the suitability using melting curve analysis (MCA) for high-throughput gender identification of penguins. Preliminary test indicated that the Griffiths's P2/P8 primers were not suitable for MCA analysis. Based on sequence alignment of Chromo-Helicase-DNA binding protein (CHD)-W and CHD-Z genes from four species of penguins (Pygoscelis papua, Aptenodytes patagonicus, Spheniscus magellanicus, and Eudyptes chrysocome), we redesigned forward primers for the CHD-W/CHD-Z-common region (PGU-ZW2) and the CHD-W-specific region (PGU-W2) to be used in combination with the reverse Griffiths's P2 primer. When tested with P. papua samples, PCR using P2/PGU-ZW2 and P2/PGU-W2 primer sets generated two amplicons of 148- and 356-bp, respectively, which were easily resolved in 1.5% agarose gels. MCA analysis indicated the melting temperature (Tm) values for P2/PGU-ZW2 and P2/PGU-W2 amplicons of P. papua samples were 79.75°C-80.5°C and 81.0°C-81.5°C, respectively. Females displayed both ZW-common and W-specific Tm peaks, whereas male was positive only for ZW-common peak. Taken together, our redesigned primers coupled with MCA analysis allows precise high throughput gender identification for P. papua, and potentially for other penguin species such as A. patagonicus, S. magellanicus, and E. chrysocome as well.

  20. External cooling: The SWR 1000 severe accident management strategy. Part 1: motivation, strategy, analysis: melt phase, vessel integrity during melt-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides the description of the basics behind design features for the severe accident management strategy of the SWR 1000. The hydrogen detonation/deflagration problem is avoided by containment inertization. In-vessel retention of molten core debris via water cooling of the external surface of the reactor vessel is the severe accident management concept of the SWR 1000 passive plant. During postulated bounding severe accidents, the accident management strategy is to flood the reactor cavity with Core Flooding Pool water and to submerge the reactor vessel, thus preventing vessel failure in the SWR 1000. Considerable safety margins have determined by using state of the art experiment and analysis: regarding (a) strength of the vessel during the melt relocation and its interaction with water; (b) the heat flux at the external vessel wall; (c) the structural resistance of the hot structures during the long term period. Ex-vessel events are prevented by preserving the integrity of the vessel and its penetrations and by assuring positive external pressure at the predominant part of the external vessel in the region of the molten corium pool. Part 1 describes the motivation for selecting this strategy, the general description of the strategy and the part of the analysis associated with the vessel integrity during the melt-water interaction. (author)

  1. A Real-Time PCR with Melting Curve Analysis for Molecular Typing of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peiyan; Wang, Henghui; Luo, Jianyong; Yan, Yong; Chen, Zhongwen

    2018-05-23

    Foodborne disease caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a serious public health problem in many countries. Molecular typing has a great scientific significance and application value for epidemiological research of V. parahaemolyticus. In this study, a real-time PCR with melting curve analysis was established for molecular typing of V. parahaemolyticus. Eighteen large variably presented gene clusters (LVPCs) of V. parahaemolyticus which have different distributions in the genome of different strains were selected as targets. Primer pairs of 18 LVPCs were distributed into three tubes. To validate this newly developed assay, we tested 53 Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains, which were classified in 13 different types. Furthermore, cluster analysis using NTSYS PC 2.02 software could divide 53 V. parahaemolyticus strains into six clusters at a relative similarity coefficient of 0.85. This method is fast, simple, and conveniently for molecular typing of V. parahaemolyticus.

  2. The spa typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates by High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasihi, Yasser; Fooladi, Saba; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Emaneini, Mohammad; Kalantar-Neyestanaki, Davood

    2017-09-06

    Molecular typing is an important tool for control and prevention of infection. A suitable molecular typing method for epidemiological investigation must be easy to perform, highly reproducible, inexpensive, rapid and easy to interpret. In this study, two molecular typing methods including the conventional PCR-sequencing method and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis were used for staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing of 30 Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates recovered from clinical samples. Based on PCR-sequencing method results, 16 different spa types were identified among the 30 MRSA isolates. Among the 16 different spa types, 14 spa types separated by HRM method. Two spa types including t4718 and t2894 were not separated from each other. According to our results, spa typing based on HRM analysis method is very rapid, easy to perform and cost-effective, but this method must be standardized for different regions, spa types, and real-time machinery.

  3. Rapid detection and identification of four major Schistosoma species by high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Lin, RuiQing; Blair, David; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by blood flukes belonging to several species of the genus Schistosoma, is a serious and widespread parasitic disease. Accurate and rapid differentiation of these etiological agents of animal and human schistosomiasis to species level can be difficult. We report a real-time PCR assay coupled with a high-resolution melt (HRM) assay targeting a portion of the nuclear 18S rDNA to detect, identify, and distinguish between four major blood fluke species (Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium, and Schistosoma mekongi). Using this system, the Schistosoma spp. was accurately identified and could also be distinguished from all other trematode species with which they were compared. As little as 10(-5) ng genomic DNA from a Schistosoma sp. could be detected. This process is inexpensive, easy, and can be completed within 3 h. Examination of 21 representative Schistosoma samples from 15 geographical localities in seven endemic countries validated the value of the HRM detection assay and proved its reliability. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 83.65 °C for S. japonicum and S. mekongi, 85.65 °C for S. mansoni, and 85.85 °C for S. haematobium. The present study developed a real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis assay for detection and differential identification of S. mansoni, S. haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mekongi. This method is rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive. It has important implications for epidemiological studies of Schistosoma.

  4. Multiplex fluorescence melting curve analysis for mutation detection with dual-labeled, self-quenched probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Huang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA is a powerful tool for mutation detection based on melting temperature generated by thermal denaturation of the probe-target hybrid. Nevertheless, the color multiplexing, probe design, and cross-platform compatibility remain to be limited by using existing probe chemistries. We hereby explored two dual-labeled, self-quenched probes, TaqMan and shared-stem molecular beacons, in their ability to conduct FMCA. Both probes could be directly used for FMCA and readily integrated with closed-tube amplicon hybridization under asymmetric PCR conditions. Improved flexibility of FMCA by using these probes was illustrated in three representative applications of FMCA: mutation scanning, mutation identification and mutation genotyping, all of which achieved improved color-multiplexing with easy probe design and versatile probe combination and all were validated with a large number of real clinical samples. The universal cross-platform compatibility of these probes-based FMCA was also demonstrated by a 4-color mutation genotyping assay performed on five different real-time PCR instruments. The dual-labeled, self-quenched probes offered unprecedented combined advantage of enhanced multiplexing, improved flexibility in probe design, and expanded cross-platform compatibility, which would substantially improve FMCA in mutation detection of various applications.

  5. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis in multiple cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Calcei, Jacob; Wei, Jun S; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sherman, Mark E; Hewitt, Stephen; Vockley, Joseph; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah P; Khan, Javed; Chanock, Stephen

    2011-01-17

    Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each). HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  6. Detection of somatic mutations by high-resolution DNA melting (HRM analysis in multiple cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Gonzalez-Bosquet

    Full Text Available Identification of somatic mutations in cancer is a major goal for understanding and monitoring the events related to cancer initiation and progression. High resolution melting (HRM curve analysis represents a fast, post-PCR high-throughput method for scanning somatic sequence alterations in target genes. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis for tumor mutation screening in a range of tumor samples, which included 216 frozen pediatric small rounded blue-cell tumors as well as 180 paraffin-embedded tumors from breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers (60 of each. HRM analysis was performed in exons of the following candidate genes known to harbor established commonly observed mutations: PIK3CA, ERBB2, KRAS, TP53, EGFR, BRAF, GATA3, and FGFR3. Bi-directional sequencing analysis was used to determine the accuracy of the HRM analysis. For the 39 mutations observed in frozen samples, the sensitivity and specificity of HRM analysis were 97% and 87%, respectively. There were 67 mutation/variants in the paraffin-embedded samples, and the sensitivity and specificity for the HRM analysis were 88% and 80%, respectively. Paraffin-embedded samples require higher quantity of purified DNA for high performance. In summary, HRM analysis is a promising moderate-throughput screening test for mutations among known candidate genomic regions. Although the overall accuracy appears to be better in frozen specimens, somatic alterations were detected in DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded samples.

  7. Ex-Vessel Steam Explosion Analysis of Central Melt Pour Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursic, M.; Leskovar, M.

    2008-01-01

    gained at 2 bar primary system overpressure and water sub-cooling of 50 degree C. The purpose of the work presented in the paper is to perform a detailed analysis of the central melt pour scenario at 2 bar primary system overpressure and water sub-cooling of 50 degree C, where the strongest steam explosion occurred. The steam explosion analysis will be performed with the computer code MC3D, which is build mainly for the simulation of the complex FCI phenomena. The MC3D is being developed by IRSN, France. The reasons for the obtained so high pressure loads during the steam explosion in the selected scenario will be highlighted and discussed in details.(author)

  8. Design and analysis of high current DC power supply for vacuum arc melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikary, Santu; Sharma, Vishnu Kumar; Sharma, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum Arc furnace (VAR), is used for melting of ingot in many industrial units. Till now in many industries the existing power supply for VAR is based on magnetic amplifier, which is a lossy component. Thus an efficient topology is needed to develop as a suitable alternative for the existing power supply. Basically Arc in electrical furnace is an unstable phenomena, it has drooping characteristic in nature so to stabilize the arc we need a power supply across the load (arc), which is more drooping in nature than arc characteristics. So this paper highlights the stability and response analysis of several alternative topologies and Stabilization of arc using the feedback and firing angle control in MATLAB. The work also covers comparison among those topologies to choose the optimized topology as a suitable alternative of the existing magnetic amplifier based power supply and the detail design of the proposed topology with a tested trail circuit in PROTEUS. (author)

  9. Rapid Detection and Identification of Human Hookworm Infections through High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A. L.; Chua, Kek Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background Hookworm infections are still endemic in low and middle income tropical countries with greater impact on the socioeconomic and public health of the bottom billion of the world's poorest people. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with high resolution melting-curve (HRM) analysis was evaluated for an accurate, rapid and sensitive tool for species identification focusing on the five human hookworm species. Methods Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA as the genetic marker was used to identify and distinguish hookworm species in human samples. Unique and distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were produced for each of the five hookworm species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 79.24±0.05°C and 83.00±0.04°C for Necator americanus, 79.12±0.10°C for Ancylostoma duodenale, 79.40±0.10°C for Ancylostoma ceylanicum, 79.63±0.05°C for Ancylostoma caninum and 79.70±0.14°C for Ancylostoma braziliense. An evaluation of the method's sensitivity and specificity revealed that this assay was able to detect as low as 0.01 ng/µl hookworm DNA and amplification was only recorded for hookworm positive samples. Conclusion The HRM assay developed in this study is a rapid and straightforward method for the diagnosis, identification and discrimination of five human hookworms. This assay is simple compared to other probe-based genotyping methods as it does not require multiplexing, DNA sequencing or post-PCR processing. Therefore, this method offers a new alternative for rapid detection of human hookworm species. PMID:22844538

  10. Rapid detection and identification of human hookworm infections through high resolution melting (HRM analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Ngui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hookworm infections are still endemic in low and middle income tropical countries with greater impact on the socioeconomic and public health of the bottom billion of the world's poorest people. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR coupled with high resolution melting-curve (HRM analysis was evaluated for an accurate, rapid and sensitive tool for species identification focusing on the five human hookworm species. METHODS: Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2 of nuclear ribosomal DNA as the genetic marker was used to identify and distinguish hookworm species in human samples. Unique and distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were produced for each of the five hookworm species. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 79.24±0.05°C and 83.00±0.04°C for Necator americanus, 79.12±0.10°C for Ancylostoma duodenale, 79.40±0.10°C for Ancylostoma ceylanicum, 79.63±0.05°C for Ancylostoma caninum and 79.70±0.14°C for Ancylostoma braziliense. An evaluation of the method's sensitivity and specificity revealed that this assay was able to detect as low as 0.01 ng/µl hookworm DNA and amplification was only recorded for hookworm positive samples. CONCLUSION: The HRM assay developed in this study is a rapid and straightforward method for the diagnosis, identification and discrimination of five human hookworms. This assay is simple compared to other probe-based genotyping methods as it does not require multiplexing, DNA sequencing or post-PCR processing. Therefore, this method offers a new alternative for rapid detection of human hookworm species.

  11. Genome-wide SNP discovery in tetraploid alfalfa using 454 sequencing and high resolution melting analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Patrick X

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the most common type of sequence variation among plants and are often functionally important. We describe the use of 454 technology and high resolution melting analysis (HRM for high throughput SNP discovery in tetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., a species with high economic value but limited genomic resources. Results The alfalfa genotypes selected from M. sativa subsp. sativa var. 'Chilean' and M. sativa subsp. falcata var. 'Wisfal', which differ in water stress sensitivity, were used to prepare cDNA from tissue of clonally-propagated plants grown under either well-watered or water-stressed conditions, and then pooled for 454 sequencing. Based on 125.2 Mb of raw sequence, a total of 54,216 unique sequences were obtained including 24,144 tentative consensus (TCs sequences and 30,072 singletons, ranging from 100 bp to 6,662 bp in length, with an average length of 541 bp. We identified 40,661 candidate SNPs distributed throughout the genome. A sample of candidate SNPs were evaluated and validated using high resolution melting (HRM analysis. A total of 3,491 TCs harboring 20,270 candidate SNPs were located on the M. truncatula (MT 3.5.1 chromosomes. Gene Ontology assignments indicate that sequences obtained cover a broad range of GO categories. Conclusions We describe an efficient method to identify thousands of SNPs distributed throughout the alfalfa genome covering a broad range of GO categories. Validated SNPs represent valuable molecular marker resources that can be used to enhance marker density in linkage maps, identify potential factors involved in heterosis and genetic variation, and as tools for association mapping and genomic selection in alfalfa.

  12. Rapid Simultaneous Amplification and Detection of the MBR/JH Chromosomal Translocation by Fluorescence Melting Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, Sandra D.; King, Thomas C.; Wittwer, Carl T.; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and product analysis for the detection of chromosomal translocations, such as the t(14;18), has traditionally been a two-step process. PCR product detection has generally entailed gel electrophoresis and/or hybridization or sequencing for confirmation of assay specificity. Using a microvolume fluorimeter integrated with a thermal cycler and a PCR-compatible double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding fluorescent dye (SYBR Green I), we investigated the feasibility of simultaneous thermal amplification and detection of MBR/JH translocation products by fluorescence melting curve analysis. We analyzed DNA from 30 cases of lymphoproliferative disorders comprising 19 cases of previously documented MBR/JH-positive follicle center lymphoma and 11 reactive lymphadenopathies. The samples were coded and analyzed blindly for the presence of MBR/JH translocations by fluorescence melting curve analysis. We also performed dilutional assays using the MBR/JH-positive cell line SUDHL-6. Multiplex PCR for MBR/JH and β-globin was used to simultaneously assess sample adequacy. All (100%) of the 19 cases previously determined to be MBR/JH positive by conventional PCR analysis showed a characteristic sharp decrease in fluorescence at ∼90°C by melting curve analysis after amplification. Fluorescence melting peaks obtained by plotting the negative derivative of fluorescence over temperature (−dF/dT) versus temperature (T) showed melting temperatures (Tm) at 88.85 ± 1.15°C. In addition, multiplex assays using both MBR/JH and β-globin primers yielded easily distinguishable fluorescence melting peaks at ∼90°C and 81.2°C, respectively. Dilutional assays revealed that fluorescence melting curve analysis was more sensitive than conventional PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis with ultraviolet transillumination by as much as 100-fold. Simultaneous amplification and fluorescence melting curve analysis is a simple, reliable, and sensitive method

  13. [Restriction endonuclease digest - melting curve analysis: a new SNP genotyping and its application in traditional Chinese medicine authentication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Huang, Lu-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Hou, Jing-Yi; Wu, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Shu-Fang

    2014-04-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) is an important molecular marker in traditional Chinese medicine research, and it is widely used in TCM authentication. The present study created a new genotyping method by combining restriction endonuclease digesting with melting curve analysis, which is a stable, rapid and easy doing SNP genotyping method. The new method analyzed SNP genotyping of two chloroplast SNP which was located in or out of the endonuclease recognition site, the results showed that when attaching a 14 bp GC-clamp (cggcgggagggcgg) to 5' end of the primer and selecting suited endonuclease to digest the amplification products, the melting curve of Lonicera japonica and Atractylodes macrocephala were all of double peaks and the adulterants Shan-yin-hua and A. lancea were of single peaks. The results indicated that the method had good stability and reproducibility for identifying authentic medicines from its adulterants. It is a potential SNP genotyping method and named restriction endonuclease digest - melting curve analysis.

  14. High-resolution melting analysis for prenatal diagnosis of beta-thalassemia in northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Phusua, Arunee; Suanta, Sudjai; Fanhchaksai, Kanda; Sae-Tung, Rattika; Sanguansermsri, Torpong

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is a rapid mutation analysis which assesses the pattern of reduction of fluorescence signal after subjecting the amplified PCR product with saturated fluorescence dye to an increasing temperature. We used HRM analysis for prenatal diagnosis of beta-thalassemia disease in northern Thailand. Five PCR-HRM protocols were used to detect point mutations in five different segments of the beta-globin gene, and one protocol to detect the 3.4 kb beta-globin deletion. We sought to characterize the mutations in carriers and to enable prenatal diagnosis in 126 couples at risk of having a fetus with beta-thalassemia disease. The protocols identified 18 common mutations causing beta-thalassemia, including the rare codon 132 (A-T) mutation. Each mutation showed a specific HRM pattern and all results were in concordance with those from direct DNA sequencing or gap-PCR methods. In cases of beta-thalassemia disease resulting from homozygosity for a mutation or compound heterozygosity for two mutations on the same amplified segment, the HRM patterns were different to those of a single mutation and were specific for each combination. HRM analysis is a simple and useful method for mutation identification in beta-thalassemia carriers and prenatal diagnosis of beta-thalassemia in northern Thailand.

  15. GEOMETRIC COMPLEXITY ANALYSIS IN AN INTEGRATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION MODEL (ITEM FOR SELECTIVE LASER MELTING (SLM#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Merkt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Selective laser melting (SLM is becoming an economically viable choice for manufacturing complex serial parts. This paper focuses on a geometric complexity analysis as part of the integrative technology evaluation model (ITEM presented here. In contrast to conventional evaluation methodologies, the ITEM considers interactions between product and process innovations generated by SLM. The evaluation of manufacturing processes that compete with SLM is the main goal of ITEM. The paper includes a complexity analysis of a test part from Festo AG. The paper closes with a discussion of how the expanded design freedom of SLM can be used to improve company operations, and how the complexity analysis presented here can be seen as a starting point for feature-based complexity analysis..

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Selektiewe lasersmelting word geleidelik ’n gangbare ekonomiese keuse vir die vervaar-diging van opeenvolgende komplekse onderdele. Die navorsing is toegespits op die ontleding van meetkundige kompleksiteit as ’n gedeelte van ’n integrerende tegnologiese evalueringsmodel. Gemeet teen konvensionele evalueringsmodelle behandel die genoemde metode interaksies tussen produkte- en prosesinnovasies wat gegenereer word. Die navorsing behandel ’n kompleksiteitsontleding van ’n toetsonderdeel van die firma FESTO AG. Die resultaat toon hoe kompleksiteits-analise gebruik kan word as die vertrekpunt vir eienskapsgebaseerde analise.

  16. Identification of Uvaria sp by barcoding coupled with high-resolution melting analysis (Bar-HRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osathanunkul, M; Madesis, P; Ounjai, S; Pumiputavon, K; Somboonchai, R; Lithanatudom, P; Chaowasku, T; Wipasa, J; Suwannapoom, C

    2016-01-13

    DNA barcoding, which was developed about a decade ago, relies on short, standardized regions of the genome to identify plant and animal species. This method can be used to not only identify known species but also to discover novel ones. Numerous sequences are stored in online databases worldwide. One of the ways to save cost and time (by omitting the sequencing step) in species identification is to use available barcode data to design optimized primers for further analysis, such as high-resolution melting analysis (HRM). This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the hybrid method Bar-HRM (DNA barcoding combined with HRM) to identify species that share similar external morphological features, rather than conduct traditional taxonomic identification that require major parts (leaf, flower, fruit) of the specimens. The specimens used for testing were those, which could not be identified at the species level and could either be Uvaria longipes or Uvaria wrayias, indicated by morphological identification. Primer pairs derived from chloroplast regions (matK, psbA-trnH, rbcL, and trnL) were used in the Bar-HRM. The results obtained from psbA-trnH primers were good enough to help in identifying the specimen while the rest were not. Bar-HRM analysis was proven to be a fast and cost-effective method for plant species identification.

  17. Application of high-resolution melting analysis for authenticity testing of valuable Dendrobium commercial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoman; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Daiyin; Luo, Yuqin; Zhao, Yuyang; Huang, Luqi

    2018-01-01

    The accurate identification of botanical origin in commercial products is important to ensure food authenticity and safety for consumers. The Dendrobium species have long been commercialised as functional food supplements and herbal medicines in Asia. Three valuable Dendrobium species, namely Dendrobium officinale, D. huoshanense and D. moniliforme, are often mutually adulterated in trade products in pursuit of higher profit. In this paper, a rapid and reliable semi-quantitative method for identifying the botanical origin of Dendrobium products in terminal markets was developed using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis with specific primer pairs to target the trnL-F region. The HRM analysis method detected amounts of D. moniliforme adulterants as low as 1% in D. huoshanense or D. officinale products. The results have demonstrated that HRM analysis is a fast and effective tool for the differentiation of these Dendrobium species both for their authenticity as well as for the semi-quantitative determination of the purity of their processed products. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. High-resolution melt-curve analysis of random-amplified-polymorphic-DNA markers, for the characterisation of pathogenic Leptospira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulsiani, Suhella; Craig, S B; Graham, G C

    2010-01-01

    A new test for pathogenic Leptospira isolates, based on RAPD-PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis (which measures the melting temperature of amplicons in real time, using a fluorescent DNA-binding dye), has recently been developed. A characteristic profile of the amplicons can be used...... typed against 13 previously published RAPD primers, using a real-time cycler (the Corbett Life Science RotorGene 6000) and the optimised reagents from a commercial kit (Quantace SensiMix). RAPD-HRM at specific temperatures generated defining amplicon melt profiles for each of the tested serovars....... These profiles were evaluated as difference-curve graphs generated using the RotorGene software package, with a cut-off of at least 8 'U' (plus or minus). The results demonstrated that RAPD-HRM can be used to measure serovar diversity and establish identity, with a high degree of stability. The characterisation...

  19. High resolution melting analysis: a rapid and accurate method to detect CALR mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Bilbao-Sieyro

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of CALR mutations in essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF patients without JAK2/MPL mutations has emerged as a relevant finding for the molecular diagnosis of these myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN. We tested the feasibility of high-resolution melting (HRM as a screening method for rapid detection of CALR mutations.CALR was studied in wild-type JAK2/MPL patients including 34 ET, 21 persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN and 98 suspected secondary thrombocytosis. CALR mutation analysis was performed through HRM and Sanger sequencing. We compared clinical features of CALR-mutated versus 45 JAK2/MPL-mutated subjects in ET.Nineteen samples showed distinct HRM patterns from wild-type. Of them, 18 were mutations and one a polymorphism as confirmed by direct sequencing. CALR mutations were present in 44% of ET (15/34, 14% of persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN (3/21 and none of the secondary thrombocytosis (0/98. Of the 18 mutants, 9 were 52 bp deletions, 8 were 5 bp insertions and other was a complex mutation with insertion/deletion. No mutations were found after sequencing analysis of 45 samples displaying wild-type HRM curves. HRM technique was reproducible, no false positive or negative were detected and the limit of detection was of 3%.This study establishes a sensitive, reliable and rapid HRM method to screen for the presence of CALR mutations.

  20. Temperature calibration procedure for thin film substrates for thermo-ellipsometric analysis using melting point standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappert, Emiel J.; Raaijmakers, Michiel J.T.; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Nijmeijer, Arian; Huiskes, Cindy; Benes, Nieck E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Facile temperature calibration method for thermo-ellipsometric analysis. • The melting point of thin films of indium, lead, zinc, and water can be detected by ellipsometry. • In-situ calibration of ellipsometry hot stage, without using any external equipment. • High-accuracy temperature calibration (±1.3 °C). - Abstract: Precise and accurate temperature control is pertinent to studying thermally activated processes in thin films. Here, we present a calibration method for the substrate–film interface temperature using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The method is adapted from temperature calibration methods that are well developed for thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry instruments, and is based on probing a transition temperature. Indium, lead, and zinc could be spread on a substrate, and the phase transition of these metals could be detected by a change in the Ψ signal of the ellipsometer. For water, the phase transition could be detected by a loss of signal intensity as a result of light scattering by the ice crystals. The combined approach allowed for construction of a linear calibration curve with an accuracy of 1.3 °C or lower over the full temperature range

  1. Melt pool and keyhole behaviour analysis for deep penetration laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbro, R

    2010-01-01

    One usually defines the main characteristic of the welding performances of a given laser system by its 'penetration curve' that corresponds to the welding depth as a function of the welding speed V w for a given set of operating parameters. Analysis of a penetration curve is interesting and gives very fruitful results. Coupled with high-speed video imaging of melt pool surface and ejected plume behaviour, the analysis of this penetration curve on a very large range of welding speeds, typically from 0 to 50 m min -1 , has allowed us to observe very different and characteristic regimes. These regimes are mainly characterized by the physical processes by which they impede the laser beam penetration inside the material. We show that it is only at rather high welding speeds that these limiting processes are reduced. Consequently, the scaling law of welding depth with welding speed is in agreement with adapted modelling of this process. On the other hand, as the welding speed is reduced, different effects depending on the weld pool dynamics and plume interaction strongly disturb the keyhole stability and are responsible for the deviation of the penetration curve from the previous modelling that agrees with a 1/V w scaling law. A corresponding criterion for the occurrence of this effect is defined.

  2. Simplifying the detection of MUTYH mutations by high resolution melting analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Villar, Isabel; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Ayala, Rosa; Wesselink, Jan; Morillas, Juan Diego; López, Elena; Marín, José Carlos; Díaz-Tasende, José; González, Sara; Robles, Luis

    2010-01-01

    MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) is a disorder caused by bi-allelic germline MUTYH mutation, characterized by multiple colorectal adenomas. In order to identify mutations in MUTYH gene we applied High Resolution Melting (HRM) genotyping. HRM analysis is extensively employed as a scanning method for the detection of heterozygous mutations. Therefore, we applied HRM to show effectiveness in detecting homozygous mutations for these clinically important and frequent patients. In this study, we analyzed phenotype and genotype data from 82 patients, with multiple (>= 10) synchronous (19/82) or metachronous (63/82) adenomas and negative APC study (except one case). Analysis was performed by HRM-PCR and direct sequencing, in order to identify mutations in MUTYH exons 7, 12 and 13, where the most prevalent mutations are located. In monoallelic mutation carriers, we evaluated entire MUTYH gene in search of another possible alteration. HRM-PCR was performed with strict conditions in several rounds: the first one to discriminate the heteroduplex patterns and homoduplex patterns and the next ones, in order to refine and confirm parameters. The genotypes obtained were correlated to phenotypic features (number of adenomas (synchronous or metachronous), colorectal cancer (CRC) and family history). MUTYH germline mutations were found in 15.8% (13/82) of patients. The hot spots, Y179C (exon 7) and G396D (exon 13), were readily identified and other mutations were also detected. Each mutation had a reproducible melting profile by HRM, both heterozygous mutations and homozygous mutations. In our study of 82 patients, biallelic mutation is associated with being a carrier of ≥10 synchronous polyps (p = 0.05) and there is no association between biallelic mutation and CRC (p = 0.39) nor family history (p = 0.63). G338H non-pathogenic polymorphism (exon 12) was found in 23.1% (19/82) of patients. In all cases there was concordance between HRM (first and subsequent rounds) and sequencing

  3. Simultaneous Profiling of DNA Mutation and Methylation by Melting Analysis Using Magnetoresistive Biosensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Dahl, Christina

    2017-01-01

    specificity. Genomic (mutation) or bisulphite-treated (methylation) DNA is amplified using nondiscriminatory primers, and the amplicons are then hybridized to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor array followed by melting curve measurements. The GMR biosensor platform offers scalable multiplexed detection...

  4. The high resolution melting analysis (HRM) as a molecular tool for monitoring parasites of the wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héritier, Laurent; Verneau, Olivier; Breuil, Gregory; Meistertzheim, Anne-Leila

    2017-04-01

    In an interconnected world, the international pet trade on wild animals is becoming increasingly important. As a consequence, non-native parasite species are introduced, which affect the health of wildlife and contribute to the loss of biodiversity. Because the investigation of parasite diversity within vulnerable host species implies the molecular identification of large samples of parasite eggs, the sequencing of DNA barcodes is time-consuming and costly. Thereby, the objectives of our study were to apply the high resolution melting (HRM) approach for species determination from pools of parasite eggs. Molecular assays were validated on flatworm parasites (polystomes) infecting the Mediterranean pond turtle Mauremys leprosa and the invasive red-eared slider Trachemys scripta elegans in French natural environments. HRM analysis results indicated that double or multiple parasitic infections could be detected from wild animal populations. They also showed that the cycle of parasite eggs production was not regular over time and may depend on several factors, among which the ecological niche and the target species. Thereby, monitoring parasites from wild endangered animals implies periodic parasitological surveys to avoid false negative diagnostics, based solely on eggs production.

  5. A custom-made temporomandibular joint prosthesis for fabrication by selective laser melting: Finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangliang; Luo, Danmei; Guo, Chuanbin; Rong, Qiguo

    2017-08-01

    A novel and custom-made selective laser melting (SLM) 3D-printed alloplastic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis is proposed. The titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) condyle component and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fossa component comprised the total alloplastic TMJ replacement prosthesis. For the condyle component, an optimized tetrahedral open-porous scaffold with combined connection structures, i.e. an inlay rod and an onlay plate, between the prosthesis and remaining mandible was designed. The trajectory of movement of the intact condyle was assessed via kinematic analysis to facilitate the design of the fossa component. The behaviours of the intact mandible and mandible with the prosthesis were compared. The biomechanical behaviour was analysed by assessing the stress distribution on the prosthesis and strain distribution on the mandible. After muscle force was applied, the magnitude of the compressive strain on the condyle neck of the mandible with the prosthesis was lower than that on the condyle neck of the intact mandible, with the exception of the area about the screws; additionally, the magnitude of the strain at the scaffold-bone interface was relatively high. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Numerical analysis of radiation propagation in innovative volumetric receivers based on selective laser melting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Fabrizio; Santiago, Sergio; Roccabruna, Mattia; Luque, Salvador; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose; Crema, Luigi; Romero, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Volumetric absorbers constitute one of the key elements in order to achieve high thermal conversion efficiencies in concentrating solar power plants. Regardless of the working fluid or thermodynamic cycle employed, design trends towards higher absorber output temperatures are widespread, which lead to the general need of components of high solar absorptance, high conduction within the receiver material, high internal convection, low radiative and convective heat losses and high mechanical durability. In this context, the use of advanced manufacturing techniques, such as selective laser melting, has allowed for the fabrication of intricate geometries that are capable of fulfilling the previous requirements. This paper presents a parametric design and analysis of the optical performance of volumetric absorbers of variable porosity conducted by means of detailed numerical ray tracing simulations. Sections of variable macroscopic porosity along the absorber depth were constructed by the fractal growth of single-cell structures. Measures of performance analyzed include optical reflection losses from the absorber front and rear faces, penetration of radiation inside the absorber volume, and radiation absorption as a function of absorber depth. The effects of engineering design parameters such as absorber length and wall thickness, material reflectance and porosity distribution on the optical performance of absorbers are discussed, and general design guidelines are given.

  7. Microwave melt and offgas analysis results from a Ferro Corporation reg-sign glass frit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.A.; Hoffman, C.R.; Knutson, P.T.

    1995-03-01

    In support of the Residue Treatment Technology (RTT) Microwave Solidification project, Waste Projects and Surface Water personnel conducted a series of experiments to determine the feasibility of encapsulating a surrogate sludge waste using the microwave melter. The surrogate waste was prepared by RTT and melted with five varying compositions of low melting glass frit supplied by the Ferro Corporation. Samples were melted using a 50% waste/50% glass frit and a 47.5% waste/47.5% glass frit/5% carbon powder. This was done to evaluate the effectiveness of carbon at reducing a sulfate-based surface scale which has been observed in previous experiments and in full-scale testing. These vitrified samples were subsequently submitted to Environmental Technology for toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. Two of the five frits tested in this experiment merit further evaluation as raw materials for the microwave melter. Ferro frit 3110 with and without carbon powder produced a crystalline product which passed TCLP testing. The quality of the melt product could be improved by increasing the melting temperature from 900 degrees C to approximately 1150-1200 degrees C. Ferro frit 3249 produced the optimal quality of glass based on visual observations, but failed TCLP testing for silver when melted without carbon powder. This frit requires a slightly higher melting temperature (≥ 1200 degrees C) compared to frit 3110 and produces a superior product. In conjunction with this work, Surface Water personnel conducted offgas analyses using a Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (TDMS) on selected formulations. The offgas analyses identified and quantified water vapor (H 2 O), oxygen (O 2 ) and carbon oxides (CO and CO 2 ), sulfur (S) and sulfur oxides (SO and SO 2 ), and nitrogen (N 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO 2 ) that volatilized during glass formation

  8. Numerical analysis of the induction melting process of oxide fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondala Rao, R.; Mangarjuna Rao, P.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    For the experimental simulation of Molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction (MFCI) phenomenon under hypothetical core meltdown accident scenario in a nuclear reactor, it is required to generate the molten pool of core materials. For this purpose, a laboratory scale Cold wall Crucible induction melting system has been developed. To optimize the system for efficient and reliable melting process, it is required to have comprehensive knowledge on the heat and mass transfer processes along with electromagnetic process that occur during the melting of core materials. Hence, a 2D axi-symmetric numerical model has been developed using a multiphysics software to simulate the induction melting process. The phase change phenomenon is taken into account by using enthalpy formulation. The experimental data available in literature for magnetic field and flow field are used for model validation. The model predicted temperatures are also in good agreement with experimentally measured values. The validated model has been used to study the induction melting behavior of UO_2 fuel material. (author)

  9. Identification of the GST-T1 and GST-M1 null genotypes using high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobná, Zuzana; Del Razo, Luz Maria; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; González-Horta, Carmen; Ballinas-Casarrubias, Lourdes; Loomis, Dana; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2012-01-13

    Glutathione S-transferases, including GST-T1 and GST-M1, are known to be involved in the phase II detoxification pathways for xenobiotics as well as in the metabolism of endogenous compounds. Polymorphisms in these genes have been linked to an increased susceptibility to carcinogenesis and associated with risk factors that predispose to certain inflammatory diseases. In addition, GST-T1 and GST-M1 null genotypes have been shown to be responsible for interindividual variations in the metabolism of arsenic, a known human carcinogen. To assess the specific GST genotypes in the Mexican population chronically exposed to arsenic, we have developed a multiplex High Resolution Melting PCR (HRM-PCR) analysis using a LightCycler480 instrument. This method is based on analysis of the PCR product melting curve that discriminates PCR products according to their lengths and base sequences. Three pairs of primers that specifically recognize GST-T1, GST-M1, and β-globin, an internal control, to produce amplicons of different length were designed and combined with LightCycler480 High Resolution Melting Master Mix containing ResoLight, a completely saturating DNA dye. Data collected from melting curve analysis were evaluated using LightCycler480 software to determine specific melting temperatures of individual melting curves representing target genes. Using this newly developed multiplex HRM-PCR analysis, we evaluated GST-T1 and GST-M1 genotypes in 504 DNA samples isolated from the blood of individuals residing in Zimapan, Lagunera, and Chihuahua regions in Mexico. We found that the Zimapan and Lagunera populations have similar GST-T1 and GST-M1 genotype frequencies which differ from those of the Chihuahua population. In addition, 14 individuals have been identified as carriers of the double null genotype, i.e., null genotypes in both GST-T1 and GST-M1 genes. Although this procedure does not distinguish between biallelic (+/+) and monoallelic (+/-) genotypes, it can be used in an

  10. Testing and Analysis of the First Plastic Melt Waste Compactor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Gregory S.; Fisher, John W.

    2005-01-01

    A half scale Plastic Melt Waste Compactor prototype has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The half scale prototype unit will lead to the development of a full scale Plastic Melt Waste Compactor prototype that is representative of flight hardware that would be used on near and far term space missions. This report details the testing being done on the prototype Plastic Melt Waste Compactor by the Solid Waste Management group at NASA Ames Research Center. The tests are designed to determine the prototype's functionality, simplicity of operation, ability to contain and control noxious off-gassing, biological stability of the processed waste, and water recovery potential using a waste composite that is representative of the types of wastes produced on the International Space Station, Space Shuttle, MIR and Skylab missions.

  11. Molecular identification of broomrape species from a single seed by High Resolution Melting analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Rolland

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Broomrapes are holoparasitic plants spreading through seeds. Each plant produces hundreds of thousands of seeds which remain viable in the soils for decades. To limit their spread, drastic measures are being taken and the contamination of a commercial seed lot by a single broomrape seed can lead to its rejection. Considering that broomrapes species identification from a single seed is extremely difficult even for trained botanists and that among all the described species, only a few are really noxious for the crops, numerous seed lots are rejected because of the contamination by seeds of non-noxious broomrape species. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a High Resolution Melting assay identifying the eight most noxious and common broomrape species (P. aegyptiaca, O. cernua, O. crenata, O. cumana, O. foetida, O. hederae, O. minor, and P. ramosa from a single seed. Based on trnL and rbcL plastidial genes amplification, the designed assay successfully identifies O. cumana, O. cernua, O. crenata, O. minor, O. hederae, and O. foetida; P. ramosa and P. aegyptiaca can be differentiated from other species but not from each other. Tested on 50 seed lots, obtained results perfectly matched identifications performed by sequencing. Through the analysis of common seed lots by different analysts, the reproducibility of the assay was evaluated at 90 %. Despite an original sample preparation process it was not possible to extract enough DNA from some seeds (10% of the samples. The described assay fulfils its objectives and allows an accurate identification of the targeted broomrape species. It can be used to identify contaminants in commercial seed lots or for any other purpose. The assay might be extended to vegetative material.

  12. Rapid Detection and Differentiation of Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini Using Real-Time PCR and High Resolution Melting Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Xian-Quan; Yu, Hai-Qiong; Li, Rong; Yue, Qiao-Yun; Liu, Guo-Hua; Bai, Jian-Shan; Deng, Yan; Qiu, De-Yi; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini are both important fish-borne pathogens, causing serious public health problem in Asia. The present study developed an assay integrating real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the specific detection and rapid identification of C. sinensis and O. viverrini. Primers targeting COX1 gene were highly specific for these liver flukes, as evidenced by the negative amplification of closely related trematodes. Assays using genomic DNA...

  13. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Henriksen, Anders Dahl

    2014-01-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches....... The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover...

  14. The analysis of environmental impact in electromagnetic radiation of melting equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baozeng; Xia Zitong

    2012-01-01

    High or medium-frequency electromagnetic melting equipment is always used in metals refining, but it will creates electromagnetic fields of powerful high-frequency in operation. With the development of our national economy and the raising of environmental awareness among the people, the electromagnetic pollution of industrial electromagnetic has aroused great concern in administrative department, analyzing the effects scope and influencing depth of electromagnetic radiation by field monitoring for the electromagnetic melting equipment in a steel mills, this paper discussed the protective key for this project on radiation and putforward some corresponding preventive measures. (authors)

  15. On-chip magnetic bead-based DNA melting curve analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Henriksen, Anders D.; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2015-01-01

    We present real-time measurements of DNA melting curves in a chip-based system that detects the amount of surface-bound magnetic beads using magnetoresistive magnetic field sensors. The sensors detect the difference between the amount of beads bound to the top and bottom sensor branches of the differential sensor geometry. The sensor surfaces are functionalized with wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) capture probes, differing by a single base insertion (a single nucleotide polymorphism, SNP). Complementary biotinylated targets in suspension couple streptavidin magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The beads are magnetized by the field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors. We demonstrate the first on-chip measurements of the melting of DNA hybrids upon a ramping of the temperature. This overcomes the limitation of using a single washing condition at constant temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that a single sensor bridge can be used to genotype a SNP. - Highlights: • We apply magnetoresistive sensors to study solid-surface hybridization kinetics of DNA. • We measure DNA melting profiles for perfectly matching DNA duplexes and for a single base mismatch. • We present a procedure to correct for temperature dependencies of the sensor output. • We reliably extract melting temperatures for the DNA hybrids. • We demonstrate direct measurement of differential binding signal for two probes on a single sensor

  16. XCT analysis of the influence of melt strategies on defect population in Ti–6Al–4V components manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammas-Williams, S.; Zhao, H.; Léonard, F.; Derguti, F.; Todd, I.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2015-01-01

    Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) is a promising powder bed Additive Manufacturing technique for near-net-shape manufacture of high-value titanium components. However without post-manufacture HIPing the fatigue life of SEBM parts is currently dominated by the presence of porosity. In this study, the size, volume fraction, and spatial distribution of the pores in model samples have been characterised in 3D, using X-ray Computed Tomography, and correlated to the process variables. The average volume fraction of the pores (< 0.2%) was measured to be lower than that usually observed in competing processes, such as selective laser melting, but a strong relationship was found with the different beam strategies used to contour, and infill by hatching, a part section. The majority of pores were found to be small spherical gas pores, concentrated in the infill hatched region; this was attributed to the lower energy density and less focused beam used in the infill strategy allowing less opportunity for gas bubbles to escape the melt pool. Overall, increasing the energy density or focus of the beam was found to correlate strongly to a reduction in the level of gas porosity. Rarer irregular shaped pores were mostly located in the contour region and have been attributed to a lack of fusion between powder particles. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Vast majority of defects detected were small spherical gas pores. • Gas bubbles trapped in the powder granules expand and coalesce in the melt pool. • Pores have been shown not to be randomly distributed. • Larger and deeper melt pools give more opportunity for gas to escape. • Minor changes to melt strategy result in significant reductions in pore population

  17. XCT analysis of the influence of melt strategies on defect population in Ti–6Al–4V components manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammas-Williams, S., E-mail: Samuel.tammas-wiliams@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Zhao, H. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Léonard, F. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Derguti, F.; Todd, I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Prangnell, P.B. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) is a promising powder bed Additive Manufacturing technique for near-net-shape manufacture of high-value titanium components. However without post-manufacture HIPing the fatigue life of SEBM parts is currently dominated by the presence of porosity. In this study, the size, volume fraction, and spatial distribution of the pores in model samples have been characterised in 3D, using X-ray Computed Tomography, and correlated to the process variables. The average volume fraction of the pores (< 0.2%) was measured to be lower than that usually observed in competing processes, such as selective laser melting, but a strong relationship was found with the different beam strategies used to contour, and infill by hatching, a part section. The majority of pores were found to be small spherical gas pores, concentrated in the infill hatched region; this was attributed to the lower energy density and less focused beam used in the infill strategy allowing less opportunity for gas bubbles to escape the melt pool. Overall, increasing the energy density or focus of the beam was found to correlate strongly to a reduction in the level of gas porosity. Rarer irregular shaped pores were mostly located in the contour region and have been attributed to a lack of fusion between powder particles. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Vast majority of defects detected were small spherical gas pores. • Gas bubbles trapped in the powder granules expand and coalesce in the melt pool. • Pores have been shown not to be randomly distributed. • Larger and deeper melt pools give more opportunity for gas to escape. • Minor changes to melt strategy result in significant reductions in pore population.

  18. High resolution melt curve analysis based on methylation status for human semen identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachet, Caitlyn; Quarino, Lawrence; Karnas, K Joy

    2017-03-01

    A high resolution melt curve assay to differentiate semen from blood, saliva, urine, and vaginal fluid based on methylation status at the Dapper Isoform 1 (DACT1) gene was developed. Stains made from blood, saliva, urine, semen, and vaginal fluid were obtained from volunteers and DNA was isolated using either organic extraction (saliva, urine, and vaginal fluid) or Chelex ® 100 extraction (blood and semen). Extracts were then subjected to bisulfite modification in order to convert unmethylated cytosines to uracil, consequently creating sequences whose amplicons have melt curves that vary depending on their initial methylation status. When primers designed to amplify the promoter region of the DACT1 gene were used, DNA from semen samples was distinguishable from other fluids by a having a statistically significant lower melting temperature. The assay was found to be sperm-significant since semen from a vasectomized man produced a melting temperature similar to the non-semen body fluids. Blood and semen stains stored up to 5 months and tested at various intervals showed little variation in melt temperature indicating the methylation status was stable during the course of the study. The assay is a more viable method for forensic science practice than most molecular-based methods for body fluid stain identification since it is time efficient and utilizes instrumentation common to forensic biology laboratories. In addition, the assay is advantageous over traditional presumptive chemical methods for body fluid identification since results are confirmatory and the assay offers the possibility of multiplexing which may test for multiple body fluids simultaneously.

  19. MeltMan: Optimization, Evaluation, and Universal Application of a qPCR System Integrating the TaqMan qPCR and Melting Analysis into a Single Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Alexander; Černíková, Lenka; Vitásková, Eliška; Křivda, Vlastimil; Dán, Ádám; Dirbáková, Zuzana; Jiřincová, Helena; Procházka, Bohumír; Sedlák, Kamil; Havlíčková, Martina

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we optimised and evaluated a qPCR system integrating 6-FAM (6-carboxyfluorescein)-labelled TaqMan probes and melting analysis using the SYTO 82 (S82) DNA binding dye in a single reaction. We investigated the influence of the S82 on various TaqMan and melting analysis parameters and defined its optimal concentration. In the next step, the method was evaluated in 36 different TaqMan assays with a total of 729 paired reactions using various DNA and RNA templates, including field specimens. In addition, the melting profiles of interest were correlated with the electrophoretic patterns. We proved that the S82 is fully compatible with the FAM-TaqMan system. Further, the advantages of this approach in routine diagnostic TaqMan qPCR were illustrated with practical examples. These included solving problems with flat or other atypical amplification curves or even false negativity as a result of probe binding failure. Our data clearly show that the integration of the TaqMan qPCR and melting analysis into a single assay provides an additional control option as well as the opportunity to perform more complex analyses, get more data from the reactions, and obtain analysis results with higher confidence. PMID:27031831

  20. Detection of Anti-Hepatitis B Virus Drug Resistance Mutations Based on Multicolor Melting Curve Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yi; Athar, Muhammad Ammar; Wu, Yuzhen; Xu, Ye; Wu, Jianhua; Xu, Zhenxing; Hayder, Zulfiqar; Khan, Saeed; Idrees, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad Israr; Liao, Yiqun; Li, Qingge

    2016-11-01

    Detection of anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) drug resistance mutations is critical for therapeutic decisions for chronic hepatitis B virus infection. We describe a real-time PCR-based assay using multicolor melting curve analysis (MMCA) that could accurately detect 24 HBV nucleotide mutations at 10 amino acid positions in the reverse transcriptase region of the HBV polymerase gene. The two-reaction assay had a limit of detection of 5 copies per reaction and could detect a minor mutant population (5% of the total population) with the reverse transcriptase M204V amino acid mutation in the presence of the major wild-type population when the overall concentration was 10 4 copies/μl. The assay could be finished within 3 h, and the cost of materials for each sample was less than $10. Clinical validation studies using three groups of samples from both nucleos(t)ide analog-treated and -untreated patients showed that the results for 99.3% (840/846) of the samples and 99.9% (8,454/8,460) of the amino acids were concordant with those of Sanger sequencing of the PCR amplicon from the HBV reverse transcriptase region (PCR Sanger sequencing). HBV DNA in six samples with mixed infections consisting of minor mutant subpopulations was undetected by the PCR Sanger sequencing method but was detected by MMCA, and the results were confirmed by coamplification at a lower denaturation temperature-PCR Sanger sequencing. Among the treated patients, 48.6% (103/212) harbored viruses that displayed lamivudine monoresistance, adefovir monoresistance, entecavir resistance, or lamivudine and adefovir resistance. Among the untreated patients, the Chinese group had more mutation-containing samples than did the Pakistani group (3.3% versus 0.56%). Because of its accuracy, rapidness, wide-range coverage, and cost-effectiveness, the real-time PCR assay could be a robust tool for the detection if anti-HBV drug resistance mutations in resource-limited countries. Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  1. Identification of Brucella spp. isolated from human brucellosis in Malaysia using high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Zahidi, Jama'ayah; Bee Yong, Tay; Hashim, Rohaidah; Mohd Noor, Azura; Hamzah, Siti Hawa; Ahmad, Norazah

    2015-04-01

    Molecular approaches have been investigated to overcome difficulties in identification and differentiation of Brucella spp. using conventional phenotypic methods. In this study, high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis was used for rapid identification and differentiation of members of Brucella genus. A total of 41 Brucella spp. isolates from human brucellosis were subjected to HRM analysis using 4 sets of primers, which identified 40 isolates as Brucella melitensis and 1 as Brucella canis. The technique utilized low DNA concentration and was highly reproducible. The assay is shown to be a useful diagnostic tool, which can rapidly differentiate Brucella up to species level. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Applying of isoconversional analysis to calorimetric data on the gel melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranca, I.; Lupascu, T.; Povar, I.

    2012-02-01

    The present study is concerned to the thermal stability of gelatin gels that is defined that their resistance to melting or, in other words, to the thermally stimulated transitions from gel to sol. The both sol-gel and gel-sol transitions were followed by regular Mettler-Toledo DSC 823e and stochastically modulated multi-frequency DSC (TOPEM® by Mettler-Toledo). The DSC data have been treated by using an advanced isoconversional method developed by Vyazovkin [1,2]. The method allows revealing a variation in the effective activation energy (Eα) with the extent of conversion (α). It has been discovered that an increase in the concentration of gelatin solutions causes an increase in the energy barrier to melting of non-isothermally prepared gels.

  3. Analysis and optimisation of vertical surface roughness in micro selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abele, Eberhard; Kniepkamp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Surface roughness is a major disadvantage of many additive manufacturing technologies like selective laser melting (SLM) compared to established processes like milling or drilling. With recent advancements the resolution of the SLM process could be increased to layer heights of less than 10 μm leading to a new process called micro selective laser melting (μSLM). The purpose of this paper is to analyze the influence of the μSLM process parameters and exposure strategies on the morphology of vertical surfaces. Contour scanning using varying process parameters was used to increase the surface quality. It is shown that it is possible to achieve average surface roughness of less than 1.7 μm using low scan speeds compared to 8–10 μm without contour scanning. Furthermore it is shown that a contour exposure prior to the core exposure leads to surface defects and thus increased roughness. (paper)

  4. A novel method of multiple nucleic acid detection: Real-time RT-PCR coupled with probe-melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Hou, Shao-Yang; Ji, Shang-Zhi; Cheng, Juan; Zhang, Meng-Yue; He, Li-Juan; Ye, Xiang-Zhong; Li, Yi-Min; Zhang, Yi-Xuan

    2017-11-15

    A novel method, real-time reverse transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) coupled with probe-melting curve analysis, has been established to detect two kinds of samples within one fluorescence channel. Besides a conventional TaqMan probe, this method employs another specially designed melting-probe with a 5' terminus modification which meets the same label with the same fluorescent group. By using an asymmetric PCR method, the melting-probe is able to detect an extra sample in the melting stage effectively while it almost has little influence on the amplification detection. Thus, this method allows the availability of united employment of both amplification stage and melting stage for detecting samples in one reaction. The further demonstration by simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in one channel as a model system is presented in this essay. The sensitivity of detection by real-time RT-PCR coupled with probe-melting analysis was proved to be equal to that detected by conventional real-time RT-PCR. Because real-time RT-PCR coupled with probe-melting analysis can double the detection throughputs within one fluorescence channel, it is expected to be a good solution for the problem of low-throughput in current real-time PCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A study on structural analysis of highly corrosive melts at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtori, N

    2002-01-01

    When sodium is burned at high temperature in the atmosphere, it reacts simultaneously with H sub 2 O in the atmosphere so that it can produce high temperature melt of sodium hydroxide as a solvent. If this melt includes peroxide ion (O sub 2 sup 2 sup -), it will be a considerably active and corrosive for iron so that several sodium iron double oxides will be produced as corrosion products after the reaction with steel structures. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the ability of presence of peroxide ion in sodium hydroxide solvent at high temperature and that of identification of the several corrosion products using laser Raman spectroscopy. The measurement system with ultraviolet laser was developed simultaneously in the present work to improve the ability of the measurement at high temperature. As results from the measurements, the possibility of the presence of peroxide ion was shown up to 823K in sodium peroxide and 823K in the melt of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium peroxide. A...

  6. Melt Inclusion Analysis of RBT 04262 with Relationship to Shergottites and Mars Surface Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. A.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Martian meteorite RBT 04262 is in the shergottite class. It displays the two lithologies typically found in "lherzolitic shergottites": one with a poikilitic texture of large pyroxene enclosing olivine and another with non-poikilitic texture. In the case of RBT 04262, the latter strongly ressembles an olivine- phyric shergottite which led the initial classification of this meteorite in that class. RBT 04262 has been studied with regards to its petrology, geochemistry and cosmic ray exposure and belongs to the enriched oxidized end-member of the shergottites. Studies on RBT 04262 have primarily focused on the bulk rock composition or each of the lithologies independently. To further elucidate RBT 04262's petrology and use it to better understand Martian geologic history, an in-depth study of its melt inclusions (MI) is being conducted. The MI chosen for this study are found within olivine grains. MI are thought to be trapped melts of the crystallizing magma preserved by the encapsulating olivine and offer snapshots of the composition of the magma as it evolves. Some MI, in the most Mg-rich part of the olivine of olivine-pyric shergottites, may even be representative of the meteorite parent melt.

  7. Verification of IVA5 computer code for melt-water interaction analysis. Pt. 2. Three-phase flows with melt fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.

    1999-01-01

    In order to qualify IVA5 for applications in the field of the melt-water interactions in nuclear reactor safety, we analyzed the achievable accuracy by predicting phenomena that are within this class. Comparison with FARO and PREMIX experiments characterized with dynamic fragmentation of the participating materials together With the comparison with the variety of experiments documented in part 1 of this work qualified IVA5 as a code representing the state-of-the-art in the field of the multiphase flows. The code is capable of predicting multi-phase flow behavior in complicated 3D geometries and industrial networks. The code is able to predict melt-water interaction in well quantified uncertainty region. Reducing the uncertainty band needs future sophistication in the directions specified in this work. (author)

  8. Identification of TNIP1 Polymorphisms by High Resolution Melting Analysis with Unlabelled Probe: Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. TNFα-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3 interacting with protein 1 (TNIP1 acts as a negative regulator of NF-κB and plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of immune system. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS showed that the polymorphism of TNIP1 was associated with the disease risk of SLE in Caucasian. In this study, we investigated whether the association of TNIP1 with SLE was replicated in Chinese population. Methods. The association of TNIP1 SNP rs7708392 (G/C was determined by high resolution melting (HRM analysis with unlabeled probe in 285 SLE patients and 336 healthy controls. Results. A new SNP rs79937737 located on 5 bp upstream of rs7708392 was discovered during the HRM analysis. No association of rs7708392 or rs79937737 with the disease risk of SLE was found. Furthermore, rs7708392 and rs79937737 were in weak linkage disequilibrium (LD. Hypotypes analysis of the two SNPs also showed no association with SLE in Chinese population. Conclusions. High resolution melting analysis with unlabeled probes proves to be a powerful and efficient genotyping method for identifying and screening SNPs. No association of rs7708392 or rs79937737 with the disease risk of SLE was observed in Chinese population.

  9. High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis for mutation screening of RGSL1,RGS16 and RGS8 in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiechec, Emilia; Wiuf, Carsten Henrik; Overgaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    coding exons of RGSL1, RGS16, and RGS8 in tumors from 200 breast cancer patients. All sequence variants detected by HRM resulted in abnormal shape of the melting curves. The identified mutations and known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were subsequently confirmed by sequencing, and distribution...... cancer patients. In addition, a total of seven known SNPs were identified in this study. Genotype distributions were not significantly different between breast cancer patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPACT: Identification of novel mutations within RGSL1 provides a new insight...... into the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Moreover, the HRM analysis represents a reliable and highly sensitive method for mutation scanning of multiple exons....

  10. On the analysis of the activation mechanisms of sub-melt laser anneals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarysse, T.; Bogdanowicz, J.; Goosens, J.

    2008-01-01

    electrically active concentration level as well as the concurrent mobility is dependent on the dopant concentration level. This implies that the activation of B through the laser anneal process in the explored temperature–time space is governed by kinetic processes (i.e. the dissolution of B–I pairs......In order to fabricate carrier profiles with a junction depth (15 nm) and sheet resistance value suited for sub-32 nm Si-CMOS technology, the usage of sub-melt laser anneal is a promising route to explore. As laser annealed junctions seem to outperform standard anneal approaches, a detailed......) and not by the (temperature related) solid solubility....

  11. Simultaneous detection of Fusarium culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material by duplex PCR with melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandfass, Christoph; Karlovsky, Petr

    2006-01-23

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a disease of cereal crops, which has a severe impact on wheat and barley production worldwide. Apart from reducing the yield and impairing grain quality, FHB leads to contamination of grain with toxic secondary metabolites (mycotoxins), which pose a health risk to humans and livestock. The Fusarium species primarily involved in FHB are F. graminearum and F. culmorum. A key prerequisite for a reduction in the incidence of FHB is an understanding of its epidemiology. We describe a duplex-PCR-based method for the simultaneous detection of F. culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material. Species-specific PCR products are identified by melting curve analysis performed in a real-time thermocycler in the presence of the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I. In contrast to multiplex real-time PCR assays, the method does not use doubly labeled hybridization probes. PCR with product differentiation by melting curve analysis offers a cost-effective means of qualitative analysis for the presence of F. culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material. This method is particularly suitable for epidemiological studies involving a large number of samples.

  12. Identification case of evidence in timber tracing of Pinus radiate, using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Jaime; Anabalón, Leonardo; Encina, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    Fast, accurate detection of plant species and their hybrids using molecular tools will facilitate assessment and monitoring of timber tracing evidence. In this study the origin of unknown pine samples is determined for a case of timber theft in the region of Araucania southern Chile. We evaluate the utility of the trnL marker region for species identification applied to pine wood based on High Resolution Melting. This efficient tracing methods can be incorporated into forestry applications such as certification of origin. The object of this work was genotype identification using high-resolution melting (HRM) and trnL approaches for Pinus radiata (Don) in timber tracing evidence. Our results indicate that trnL is a very sensitive marker for delimiting species and HRM analysis was used successfully for genotyping Pinus samples for timber tracing purposes. Genotyping samples by HRM analysis with the trnL1 approach allowed us to differentiate two wood samples from the Pinaceae family: Pinus radiata (Don) and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco. The same approach with Pinus trnL wood was not able to discriminate between samples of Pinus radiata, indicating that the samples were genetically indistinguishable, possibly because they have the same genotype at this locus. Timber tracing with HRM analysis is expected to contribute to future forest certification schemes, control of illegal trading, and molecular traceability of Pinus spp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous detection of Fusarium culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material by duplex PCR with melting curve analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlovsky Petr

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusarium head blight (FHB is a disease of cereal crops, which has a severe impact on wheat and barley production worldwide. Apart from reducing the yield and impairing grain quality, FHB leads to contamination of grain with toxic secondary metabolites (mycotoxins, which pose a health risk to humans and livestock. The Fusarium species primarily involved in FHB are F. graminearum and F. culmorum. A key prerequisite for a reduction in the incidence of FHB is an understanding of its epidemiology. Results We describe a duplex-PCR-based method for the simultaneous detection of F. culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material. Species-specific PCR products are identified by melting curve analysis performed in a real-time thermocycler in the presence of the fluorescent dye SYBR Green I. In contrast to multiplex real-time PCR assays, the method does not use doubly labeled hybridization probes. Conclusion PCR with product differentiation by melting curve analysis offers a cost-effective means of qualitative analysis for the presence of F. culmorum and F. graminearum in plant material. This method is particularly suitable for epidemiological studies involving a large number of samples.

  14. Decoding DNA labels by melting curve analysis using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, József A; Fehér, Liliána Z; Puskás, László G

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic DNA has been used as an authentication code for a diverse number of applications. However, existing decoding approaches are based on either DNA sequencing or the determination of DNA length variations. Here, we present a simple alternative protocol for labeling different objects using a small number of short DNA sequences that differ in their melting points. Code amplification and decoding can be done in two steps using quantitative PCR (qPCR). To obtain a DNA barcode with high complexity, we defined 8 template groups, each having 4 different DNA templates, yielding 158 (>2.5 billion) combinations of different individual melting temperature (Tm) values and corresponding ID codes. The reproducibility and specificity of the decoding was confirmed by using the most complex template mixture, which had 32 different products in 8 groups with different Tm values. The industrial applicability of our protocol was also demonstrated by labeling a drone with an oil-based paint containing a predefined DNA code, which was then successfully decoded. The method presented here consists of a simple code system based on a small number of synthetic DNA sequences and a cost-effective, rapid decoding protocol using a few qPCR reactions, enabling a wide range of authentication applications.

  15. Bounding analysis of containment of high pressure melt ejection in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additon, S.L.; Fontana, M.H.; Carter, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the loadings on containment due to direct containment heating (DCH) as a result of high pressure melt ejection (HPME) in advanced light water reactors (ALWR) which were estimated using conservative, bounding analyses. The purpose of the analyses was to scope the magnitude of the possible loadings and to indicate the performance needed from potential mitigation methods, such as a cavity configuration that limits energy transfer to the upper containment volume. Analyses were performed for three cases which examined the effect of availability of high pressure reactor coolant system water at the time of reactor vessel melt through and the effect of preflooding of the reactor cavity. The amount of core ejected from the vessel was varied from 100% to 0% for all cases. Results indicate that all amounts of core debris dispersal could be accommodated by the containment for the case where the reactor cavity was preflooded. For the worst case, all the energy from in-vessel hydrogen generation and combustion plus that from 45% of the entire molten core would be required to equilibrate with the containment upper volume in order to reach containment failure pressure

  16. Reliable discrimination of 10 ungulate species using high resolution melting analysis of faecal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ramón-Laca

    Full Text Available Identifying species occupying an area is essential for many ecological and conservation studies. Faecal DNA is a potentially powerful method for identifying cryptic mammalian species. In New Zealand, 10 species of ungulate (Order: Artiodactyla have established wild populations and are managed as pests because of their impacts on native ecosystems. However, identifying the ungulate species present within a management area based on pellet morphology is unreliable. We present a method that enables reliable identification of 10 ungulate species (red deer, sika deer, rusa deer, fallow deer, sambar deer, white-tailed deer, Himalayan tahr, Alpine chamois, feral sheep, and feral goat from swabs of faecal pellets. A high resolution melting (HRM assay, targeting a fragment of the 12S rRNA gene, was developed. Species-specific primers were designed and combined in a multiplex PCR resulting in fragments of different length and therefore different melting behaviour for each species. The method was developed using tissue from each of the 10 species, and was validated in blind trials. Our protocol enabled species to be determined for 94% of faecal pellet swabs collected during routine monitoring by the New Zealand Department of Conservation. Our HRM method enables high-throughput and cost-effective species identification from low DNA template samples, and could readily be adapted to discriminate other mammalian species from faecal DNA.

  17. Cold Spray Deposition of Freestanding Inconel Samples and Comparative Analysis with Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherifard, Sara; Roscioli, Gianluca; Zuccoli, Maria Vittoria; Hadi, Mehdi; D'Elia, Gaetano; Demir, Ali Gökhan; Previtali, Barbara; Kondás, Ján; Guagliano, Mario

    2017-10-01

    Cold spray offers the possibility of obtaining almost zero-porosity buildups with no theoretical limit to the thickness. Moreover, cold spray can eliminate particle melting, evaporation, crystallization, grain growth, unwanted oxidation, undesirable phases and thermally induced tensile residual stresses. Such characteristics can boost its potential to be used as an additive manufacturing technique. Indeed, deposition via cold spray is recently finding its path toward fabrication of freeform components since it can address the common challenges of powder-bed additive manufacturing techniques including major size constraints, deposition rate limitations and high process temperature. Herein, we prepared nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 samples with cold spray technique and compared them with similar samples fabricated by selective laser melting method. The samples fabricated using both methods were characterized in terms of mechanical strength, microstructural and porosity characteristics, Vickers microhardness and residual stresses distribution. Different heat treatment cycles were applied to the cold-sprayed samples in order to enhance their mechanical characteristics. The obtained data confirm that cold spray technique can be used as a complementary additive manufacturing method for fabrication of high-quality freestanding components where higher deposition rate, larger final size and lower fabrication temperatures are desired.

  18. High-resolution melting analysis using unlabeled probe and amplicon scanning simultaneously detects several lactase persistence variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janukonyté, Jurgita; Vestergaard, Else M; Ladefoged, Søren A

    2010-01-01

    Lactase persistence and thereby tolerance to lactose is a common trait in people of Northern European descent. It is linked to the LCT -13910C>T variant located in intron 13 of the MCM6 gene 13.9 kb upstream of the lactase (LCT) gene. In people of African and Middle Eastern descent, lactase...... persistence can be associated with other variants nearby the -13910C>T variant, limiting the use of the -13910C>T-based SNP analysis, e.g. TaqMan assays for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance. Using high-resolution melting analysis, we identified five samples that were heterozygous for the -13915T>G variant...... the -13910C>T and -13915T>G variants in addition to rarer variants surrounding the -13910 site. This new method may contribute to improve the diagnostic performance of the genetic analysis for lactose intolerance....

  19. Barcoding melting curve analysis for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating authentication of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) from its adulterants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Cao, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Min; Jin, Yan; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA) that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C) and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C), C. tinctorius (80.10°C), C. officinalis (79.92°C), Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat.) Tzvel. (79.62°C), N. nucifera (80.58°C), Hemerocallis fulva (L.) L. (84.78°C), and Z. mays (84.33°C). The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants.

  20. Barcoding Melting Curve Analysis for Rapid, Sensitive, and Discriminating Authentication of Saffron (Crocus sativus L. from Its Adulterants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Saffron (Crocus sativus L. is one of the most important and expensive medicinal spice products in the world. Because of its high market value and premium price, saffron is often adulterated through the incorporation of other materials, such as Carthamus tinctorius L. and Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hemerocallis L. petals, Daucus carota L. fleshy root, Curcuma longa L. rhizomes, Zea may L., and Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. stigmas. To develop a straightforward, nonsequencing method for rapid, sensitive, and discriminating detection of these adulterants in traded saffron, we report here the application of a barcoding melting curve analysis method (Bar-MCA that uses the universal chloroplast plant DNA barcoding region trnH-psbA to identify adulterants. When amplified at DNA concentrations and annealing temperatures optimized for the curve analysis, peaks were formed at specific locations for saffron (81.92°C and the adulterants: D. carota (81.60°C, C. tinctorius (80.10°C, C. officinalis (79.92°C, Dendranthema morifolium (Ramat. Tzvel. (79.62°C, N. nucifera (80.58°C, Hemerocallis fulva (L. L. (84.78°C, and Z. mays (84.33°C. The constructed melting curves for saffron and its adulterants have significantly different peak locations or shapes. In conclusion, Bar-MCA could be a faster and more cost-effective method to authenticate saffron and detect its adulterants.

  1. Detection of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli by use of melting-curve analysis and real-time multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guion, Chase E; Ochoa, Theresa J; Walker, Christopher M; Barletta, Francesca; Cleary, Thomas G

    2008-05-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains are important causes of diarrhea in children from the developing world and are now being recognized as emerging enteropathogens in the developed world. Current methods of detection are too expensive and labor-intensive for routine detection of these organisms to be practical. We developed a real-time fluorescence-based multiplex PCR for the detection of all six of the currently recognized classes of diarrheagenic E. coli. The primers were designed to specifically amplify eight different virulence genes in the same reaction: aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli, stIa/stIb and lt for enterotoxigenic E. coli, eaeA for enteropathogenic E. coli and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), stx(1) and stx(2) for STEC, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and daaD for diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC). Eighty-nine of ninety diarrheagenic E. coli and 36/36 nonpathogenic E. coli strains were correctly identified using this approach (specificity, 1.00; sensitivity, 0.99). The single false negative was a DAEC strain. The total time between preparation of DNA from E. coli colonies on agar plates and completion of PCR and melting-curve analysis was less than 90 min. The cost of materials was low. Melting-point analysis of real-time multiplex PCR is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and inexpensive method for detection of diarrheagenic E. coli.

  2. [Energy dispersive spectrum analysis of surface compositions of selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by different processing parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liang; Zeng, Li; Wei, Bin; Gong, Yao

    2015-06-01

    To fabricate selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples by different processing parameters, and to analyze the changes of energy dispersive spectrum(EDS) on their surface. Nine groups were set up by orthogonal experimental design according to different laser powers,scanning speeds and powder feeding rates(laser power:2500-3000 W, scanning speed: 5-15 mm/s, powder feeding rate: 3-6 r/min). Three cylinder specimens(10 mm in diameter and 3 mm in thickness) were fabricated in each group through Rofin DL 035Q laser cladding system using cobalt-chromium alloy powders which were developed independently by our group.Their surface compositions were then measured by EDS analysis. Results of EDS analysis of the 9 groups fabricated by different processing parameters(Co:62.98%-67.13%,Cr:25.56%-28.50%,Si:0.49%-1.23%) were obtained. They were similar to the compositions of cobalt-chromium alloy used in dental practice. According to EDS results, the surface compositions of the selective laser melting cobalt-chromium alloy samples are stable and controllable, which help us gain a preliminary sight into the range of SLM processing parameters. Supported by "973" Program (2012CB910401) and Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (12441903001 and 13140902701).

  3. Study of the Formation of Eutectic Melt of Uranium and Thermal Analysis for the Salt Distillation of Uranium Deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Hwang, Sung Chan; Kang, Young Ho; Park, Ki Min; Jun, Wan Gi; Lee, Han Soo; Cho, Dong Wook

    2010-01-01

    Uranium deposits from an electrorefining process contain about 30% salt. In order to recover pure uranium and transform it into an ingot, the salts have to be removed from the uranium deposits. Major process variables for the salt distillation process of the uranium deposits are hold temperature and vacuum pressure. Effects of the variables on the salt removal efficiency were studied in the previous study 1. By applying the Hertz-Langmuir relation to the salt evaporation of the uranium deposits, the evaporation coefficients were obtained at the various conditions. The operational conditions for achieving above 99% salt removal were deduced. The salt distilled uranium deposits tend to form the eutectic melt with iron, nickel, chromium for structural material of salt evaporator. In this study, we investigated the hold temperature limitation in order to prevent the formation of the eutectic melt between uranium and other metals. The reactions between the uranium metal and stainless steel were tested at various conditions. And for enhancing the evaporation rate of the salt and the efficient recovery of the distilled salt, the thermal analysis of the salt distiller was conducted by using commercial CFX software. From the thermal analysis, the effect of Ar gas flow on the evaporation of the salt was studied.

  4. The use of high resolution melting analysis to detect Fabry mutations in heterozygous females via dry bloodspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chang-Long; Liu, Mei-Ying; Yu, Hsiao-Chi; Chiang, Chiang-Chuan; Chiang, Hung; Suen, Jeng-Hung; Kao, Shu-Min; Huang, Yu-Hsiu; Wu, Tina Jui-Ting; Yang, Chia-Feng; Tsai, Fang-Chih; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chen, Hong-Duo; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2012-02-18

    As an X-linked genetic disorder, Fabry disease was first thought to affect males only, and females were generally considered to be asymptomatic carriers. However, recent research suggests that female carriers of Fabry disease may still develop vital organ damage causing severe morbidity and mortality. In the previous newborn screening, from 299,007 newborns, we identified a total of 20 different Fabry mutations and 121 newborns with Fabry mutations. However, we found that most female carriers are not detected by enzyme assays. A streamlined method for high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was designed to screen for GLA gene mutations using a same PCR and melting program. Primer sets were designed to cover the 7 exons and the Chinese common intronic mutation, IVS4+919G>A of GLA gene. The HRM analysis was successful in identifying heterozygous and hemizygous patients with the 20 surveyed mutations. We were also successful in using this method to test dry blood spots of newborns afflicted with Fabry mutations without having to determine DNA concentration before PCR amplification. The results of this study show that HRM could be a reliable and sensitive method for use in the rapid screening of females for GLA mutations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High resolution melting curve analysis as a new tool for rapid identification of canine parvovirus type 2 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingga, Gali; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yujun; Lin, Lifeng; Ding, Shuangyang; Guo, Pengju

    2014-01-01

    A high resolution melting (HRM) curve method was developed to identify canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) strains by nested PCR. Two sets of primers, CPV-426F/426R and CPV-87R/87F, were designed that amplified a 52 bp and 53 bp product from the viral VP2 capsid gene. The region amplified by CPV-426F/426R included the A4062G and T4064A mutations in CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. The region amplified by CPV-87F/87R included the A3045T mutation in the vaccine strains of CPV-2 and CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Faecal samples were obtained from 30 dogs that were CPV antigen-positive. The DNA was isolated from the faecal samples and PCR-amplified using the two sets of primers, and genotyped by HRM curve analysis. The PCR-HRM assay was able to distinguish single nucleotide polymorphisms between CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c using CPV-426F/426R. CPV-2a was distinguished from CPV-2b and CPV-2c by differences in the melting temperature. CPV-2b and CPV-2c could be distinguished based on the shape of the melting curve after generating heteroduplexes using a CPV-2b reference sample. The vaccine strains of CPV-2 were identified using CPV-87F/87R. Conventional methods for genotyping CPV strains are labor intensive, expensive or time consuming; the present PCR-based HRM assay might be an attractive alternative. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Strength analysis and modeling of cellular lattice structures manufactured using selective laser melting for tooling applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahshid, Rasoul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Loft Højbjerre, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is rapidly developing and gaining popularity for direct metal fabrication systems like selective laser melting (SLM). The technology has shown significant improvement for high-quality fabrication of lightweight design-efficient structures such as conformal cooling channels...... in injection molding tools and lattice structures. This research examines the effect of cellular lattice structures on the strength of workpieces additively manufactured from ultra high-strength steel powder. Two commercial SLM machines are used to fabricate cellular samples based on four architectures— solid......, hollow, lattice structure and rotated lattice structure. Compression test is applied to the specimens while they are deformed. The analytical approach includes finite element (FE), geometrical and mathematical models for prediction of collapse strength. The results from the the models are verified...

  7. Structural analysis of nanocrystalline ZnTe alloys synthesized by melt quenching technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Singh, Tejbir; Thakur, Anup; Sharma, Jeewan

    2018-05-01

    Nanocrystalline ZnxTe100-x (x=0, 5, 20, 30, 40, 50) alloys have been synthesized using melt quenching technique. Energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDS) has been used to verify the elemental composition of samples. Various absorption modes are recorded from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirming the formation of ZnTe. The structural study has been performed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) method. All synthesized samples have been found to be nanocrystalline in nature with average crystallite size in the range from 49.3 nm to 77.1 nm. Results have shown that Zn0Te100 exhibits hexagonal phase that transforms into a cubic ZnTe phase as the amount of zinc is increased. Pure ZnTe phase has been obtained for x = 50. The texture coefficient (Tc) has been calculated to find the prominent orientations of different planes.

  8. Melting the diquark condensate in two-color QCD: A renormalization group analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirstam, J.; Lenaghan, J.T.; Splittorff, K.

    2003-01-01

    We use a Landau theory and the ε expansion to study the superfluid phase transition of two-color QCD at a nonzero temperature T and baryonic chemical potential μ. At low T, and for N f flavors of massless quarks, the global SU(N f )xSU(N f )xU(1) symmetry is spontaneously broken by a diquark condensate down to Sp(N f )xSp(N f ) for any μ>0. As the temperature increases, the diquark condensate melts, and at sufficiently large T the symmetry is restored. Using renormalization group arguments, we find that in the presence of the chiral anomaly term there can be a second order phase transition when N f =2 or N f ≥6, while the transition is first order for N f =4. We discuss the relevance of these results for the emergence of a tricritical point recently observed in lattice simulations

  9. Numerical analysis on thermal characteristics and ice melting efficiency for microwave deicing vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Yang, Bo; Tan, Gangfeng; Guo, Xuexun; Zhou, Li; Xiong, Shengguang

    2016-05-01

    In the high latitudes, the icy patches on the road are frequently generated and have a wide distribution, which are difficult to remove and obviously affect the normal usage of the highways, bridges and airport runways. Physical deicing, such as microwave (MW) deicing, help the ice melt completely through heating mode and then the ice layer can be swept away. Though it is no pollution and no damage to the ground, the low efficiency hinders the development of MW deicing vehicle equipped without sufficient speed. In this work, the standard evaluation of deicing is put forward firstly. The intensive MW deicing is simplified to ice melting process characterized by one-dimensional slab with uniform volumetric energy generation, which results in phase transformation and interface motion between ice and water. The heating process is split into the superposition of three parts — non-heterogeneous heating for ground without phase change, heat transfer with phase change and the heat convection between top surface of ice layer and flow air. Based on the transient heat conduction theory, a mathematical model, combining electromagnetic and two-phase thermal conduction, is proposed in this work, which is able to reveal the relationship between the deicing efficiency and ambient conditions, as well as energy generation and material parameters. Using finite difference time-domain, this comprehensive model is developed to solve the moving boundary heat transfer problem in a one-dimensional structured gird. As a result, the stimulation shows the longitudinal temperature distributions in all circumstances and quantitative validation is obtained by comparing simulated temperature distributions under different conditions. In view of the best economy and fast deicing, these analytic solutions referring to the complex influence factors of deicing efficiency demonstrate the optimal matching for the new deicing design.

  10. Rapid screening for targeted genetic variants via high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, Allison B; Resnick, Molly; Petrides, Athena K; Clarke, William A; Marzinke, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    Current methods for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with aberrant drug-metabolizing enzyme function are hindered by long turnaround times and specialized techniques and instrumentation. In this study, we describe the development and validation of a high-resolution melting (HRM) curve assay for the rapid screening of variant genotypes for targeted genetic polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A5. Sequence-specific primers were custom-designed to flank nine SNPs within the genetic regions of aforementioned drug metabolizing enzymes. PCR amplification was performed followed by amplicon denaturation by precise temperature ramping in order to distinguish genotypes by melting temperature (Tm). A standardized software algorithm was used to assign amplicons as 'reference' or 'variant' as compared to duplicate reference sequence DNA controls for each SNP. Intra-assay (n=5) precision of Tms for all SNPs was ≤0.19%, while inter-assay (n=20) precision ranged from 0.04% to 0.21%. When compared to a reference method of Sanger sequencing, the HRM assay produced no false negative results, and overcall frequency ranged from 0% to 26%, depending on the SNP. Furthermore, HRM genotyping displayed accuracy over input DNA concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 ng/μL. The presented assay provides a rapid method for the screening for genetic variants in targeted CYP450 regions with a result of 'reference' or 'variant' available within 2 h from receipt of extracted DNA. The method can serve as a screening approach to rapidly identify individuals with variant sequences who should be further investigated by reflexed confirmatory testing for aberrant cytochrome P450 enzymatic activity. Rapid knowledge of variant status may aid in the avoidance of adverse clinical events by allowing for dosing of normal metabolizer patients immediately while identifying the need to wait for confirmatory testing in those patients who are

  11. Molecular differentiation of Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis eggs by multiplex real-time PCR with high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewkong, Worasak; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Doanh, Pham Ngoc; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis are parasites known to be carcinogenic and causative agents of cholangiocarcinoma in Asia. The standard method for diagnosis for those parasite infections is stool examination to detect parasite eggs. However, the method has low sensitivity, and eggs of O. viverrini and C. sinensis are difficult to distinguish from each other and from those of some other trematodes. Here, we report a multiplex real-time PCR coupled with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the differentiation of O. viverrini and C. sinensis eggs in fecal samples. Using 2 pairs of species-specific primers, DNA sequences from a portion of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (nad 2) gene, were amplified to generate 209 and 165 bp products for O. viverrini and C. sinensis, respectively. The distinct characteristics of HRM patterns were analyzed, and the melting temperatures peaked at 82.4±0.09℃ and 85.9±0.08℃ for O. viverrini and C. sinensis, respectively. This technique was able to detect as few as 1 egg of O. viverrini and 2 eggs of C. sinensis in a 150 mg fecal sample, which is equivalent to 7 and 14 eggs per gram of feces, respectively. The method is species-specific, rapid, simple, and does not require fluorescent probes or post-PCR processing for discrimination of eggs of the 2 species. It offers a new tool for differentiation and detection of Asian liver fluke infections in stool specimens.

  12. Diagnosis of genetic predisposition for lactose intolerance by high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Hervé; Leduc, Amandine; Louçano-Perdriat, Andréa; Plantamura, Julie; Ceppa, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Lactose, the principle sugar in milk, is a disaccharide hydrolyzed by intestinal lactase into glucose and galactose, which are absorbed directly by diffusion in the intestine. The decline of lactase expression (or hypolactasia) in intestinal microvilli after weaning is a normal phenomenon in mammals known as lactase deficiency. It is observed in nearly 75% of the world population and is an inherited autosomal recessive trait with incomplete penetrance. It is caused by SNPs in a regulatory element for lactase gene. In Indo-European, lactase deficiency is associated with rs4982235 SNP (or -13910C>T). The aim of this study is to describe a method based on high resolution melting for rapidly detecting genetic predisposition to lactose intolerance. Analytical performance of the assay was assessed by evaluating within and betwwen-run precision and by comparing the results (n = 50 patients) obtained with the HRM assay to those obtained with the gold standard (Sanger sequencing of the region of interest). In silico prediction of HRM curves was performed to evaluate the potential impact of the other SNPs described within the PCR product on the HRM analytical performances. The assay has good performance (CV lactose intolerance.

  13. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis as a feasible method for detecting spinal muscular atrophy via dried blood spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Tze-Kiong; Kan, Tzu-Min; Su, Yu-Fa; Liu, Ta-Chih; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Hung, Shih-Ya; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2012-11-12

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease with the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. More than 95% of patients with SMA have a homozygous disruption in the survival motor neuron1 (SMN1) gene, caused by mutation, deletion, or rearrangement. Recently, treatment in humans in the immediate postnatal period, prior to the development of weakness or very early in the course of the disease, may be effective. Therefore, our objective was to establish a feasible method for SMA screening. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is rapidly becoming the most important mutation-scanning methodology that allows mutation scanning and genotyping without the need for costly labeled oligonucleotides. In the current study, we aim to develop a method for identifying the substitution of single nucleotide in SMN1 exon 7 (c.840C>T) by HRM analysis. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples and dried blood spots obtained from 30 patients with SMA and 30 normal individuals. All results were previously confirmed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). In order to identify the substitution of single nucleotide in SMN1 exon 7 (c.840C>T) by HRM analysis, a primer set was used in HRM analysis. At first, we failed to identify the substitution of single nucleotide in SMN1 exon 7 (c.840C>T) by HRM analysis because the homozygous CC and homozygous TT cannot be distinguished by HRM analysis. Therefore, all samples were mixed with a known SMN1/SMN2 copy number (SMN1/SMN2=0:3), which we may call driver. This strategy is used to differentiate between homozygous CC and homozygous TT. After mixing with driver, the melting profile of homozygous CC becomes heteroduplex; however, the homozygous TT remains the same in the normalized and temperature-shifted difference plots. HRM analysis can be successfully applied to screen SMA via DNA obtained from whole blood and dried blood spots. We strongly believe that HRM analysis, a high-throughput method

  14. High-resolution melting curve analysis for rapid detection of mutations in a Medaka TILLING library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguchi Tomonori

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last two decades, DNA sequencing has led to the identification of numerous genes in key species; however, in most cases, their functions are still unknown. In this situation, reverse genetics is the most suitable method to assign function to a gene. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes is a reverse-genetic strategy that combines random chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput discovery of the induced mutations in target genes. The method has been applied to a variety of plant and animal species. Screening of the induced mutations is the most important step in TILLING. Currently, direct sequencing or nuclease-mediated screening of heteroduplexes is widely used for detection of mutations in TILLING. Both methods are useful, but the costs are substantial and turnaround times are relatively long. Thus, there is a need for an alternative method that is of higher throughput and more cost effective. Results In this study, we developed a high resolution melting (HRM assay and evaluated its effectiveness for screening ENU-induced mutations in a medaka TILLING library. We had previously screened mutations in the p53 gene by direct sequencing. Therefore, we first tested the efficiency of the HRM assay by screening mutations in p53, which indicated that the HRM assay is as useful as direct sequencing. Next, we screened mutations in the atr and atm genes with the HRM assay. Nonsense mutations were identified in each gene, and the phenotypes of these nonsense mutants confirmed their loss-of-function nature. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the HRM assay is useful for screening mutations in TILLING. Furthermore, the phenotype of the obtained mutants indicates that medaka is an excellent animal model for investigating genome stability and gene function, especially when combined with TILLING.

  15. On the analysis of the activation mechanisms of sub-melt laser anneals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarysse, T.; Bogdanowicz, J.; Goossens, J.; Moussa, A.; Rosseel, E.; Vandervorst, W.; Petersen, D.H.; Lin, R.; Nielsen, P.F.; Hansen, Ole; Merklin, G.; Bennett, N.S.; Cowern, N.E.B.

    2008-01-01

    In order to fabricate carrier profiles with a junction depth (∼15 nm) and sheet resistance value suited for sub-32 nm Si-CMOS technology, the usage of sub-melt laser anneal is a promising route to explore. As laser annealed junctions seem to outperform standard anneal approaches, a detailed assessment of the basics of laser induced activation seem appropriate. In this work the electrical activation is studied from a comparison between the dopant profiles as measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, and the electrically active fraction as extracted from sheet resistance and mobility measurements. The latter is based on a large variety of techniques. For the sheet resistance we use conventional Four-Point Probe (FPP), Variable Probe Spacing (VPS), contactless junction photo voltage (JPV), Micro Four-Point Probe (M4PP) and an optical technique, namely Model Based Infra-red spectroscopic Reflectrometry (MBIR). For the sheet carrier density and sheet mobility extraction we use conventional Hall (without cloverleaf van der Pauw patterning, to reflect the need for fast turn-round sheet measurements), MBIR, and a recently developed new Hall-like capability using M4PP. By recognizing the interaction between the various parameters as they are not completely independent, it is possible to test the consistency of the various methods and to identify potential short comings. This concept is applied to the activation behavior of low and high implanted Boron doses and indicates that the obtained electrically active concentration level as well as the concurrent mobility is dependent on the dopant concentration level. This implies that the activation of B through the laser anneal process in the explored temperature-time space is governed by kinetic processes (i.e. the dissolution of B-I pairs) and not by the (temperature related) solid solubility

  16. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Positive identification of the nature of biological material present on evidentiary items can be crucial for understanding the circumstances surrounding a crime. However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues need to be developed. Messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is an example of such a molecular-based approach. Current mRNA body fluid identification assays involve capillary electrophoresis (CE) or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) platforms, each with its own limitations. Both platforms require the use of expensive fluorescently labeled primers or probes. CE-based assays require separate amplification and detection steps thus increasing the analysis time. For qRT-PCR assays, only 3-4 markers can be included in a single reaction since each requires a different fluorescent dye. To simplify mRNA profiling assays, and reduce the time and cost of analysis, we have developed single- and multiplex body fluid High Resolution Melt (HRM) assays for the identification of common forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues. The incorporated biomarkers include IL19 (vaginal secretions), IL1F7 (skin), ALAS2 (blood), MMP10 (menstrual blood), HTN3 (saliva) and TGM4 (semen).  The HRM assays require only unlabeled PCR primers and a single saturating intercalating fluorescent dye (Eva Green). Each body-fluid-specific marker can easily be identified by the presence of a distinct melt peak. Usually, HRM assays are used to detect variants or isoforms for a single gene target. However, we have uniquely developed duplex and triplex HRM assays to permit the simultaneous detection of multiple targets per reaction. Here we describe the development and initial performance evaluation of the developed HRM assays. The results demonstrate the potential use of HRM assays for rapid, and relatively inexpensive

  17. Simulated glass-forming polymer melts: dynamic scattering functions, chain length effects, and mode-coupling theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S; Weysser, F; Meyer, H; Farago, J; Fuchs, M; Baschnagel, J

    2015-02-01

    We present molecular-dynamics simulations for a fully flexible model of polymer melts with different chain length N ranging from short oligomers (N = 4) to values near the entanglement length (N = 64). For these systems we explore the structural relaxation of the supercooled melt near the critical temperature T c of mode-coupling theory (MCT). Coherent and incoherent scattering functions are analyzed in terms of the idealized MCT. For temperatures T > T c we provide evidence for the space-time factorization property of the β relaxation and for the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) of the α relaxation, and we also discuss deviations from these predictions for T ≈ T c. For T larger than the smallest temperature where the TTSP holds we perform a quantitative analysis of the dynamics with the asymptotic MCT predictions for the late β regime. Within MCT a key quantity, in addition to T c, is the exponent parameter λ. For the fully flexible polymer models studied we find that λ is independent of N and has a value (λ = 0.735 ) typical of simple glass-forming liquids. On the other hand, the critical temperature increases with chain length toward an asymptotic value T c (∞) . This increase can be described by T c (∞) - T c(N) ∼ 1/N and may be interpreted in terms of the N dependence of the monomer density ρ, if we assume that the MCT glass transition is ruled by a soft-sphere-like constant coupling parameter Γ c = ρ c T c (-1/4), where ρ c is the monomer density at T c. In addition, we also estimate T c from a Hansen-Verlet-like criterion and MCT calculations based on structural input from the simulation. For our polymer model both the Hansen-Verlet criterion and the MCT calculations suggest T c to decrease with increasing chain length, in contrast to the direct analysis of the simulation data.

  18. Analysis of ex-vessel melt jet breakup and coolability. Part 1: Sensitivity on model parameters and accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr; Hwang, Byoungcheol; Jung, Woo Hyun

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of JASMINE code to melt jet breakup and coolability in APR1400 condition. • Coolability indexes for quasi steady state breakup and cooling process. • Typical case in complete breakup/solidification, film boiling quench not reached. • Significant impact of water depth and melt jet size; weak impact of model parameters. - Abstract: The breakup of a melt jet falling in a water pool and the coolability of the melt particles produced by such jet breakup are important phenomena in terms of the mitigation of severe accident consequences in light water reactors, because the molten and relocated core material is the primary heat source that governs the accident progression. We applied a modified version of the fuel–coolant interaction simulation code, JASMINE, developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to a plant scale simulation of melt jet breakup and cooling assuming an ex-vessel condition in the APR1400, a Korean advanced pressurized water reactor. Also, we examined the sensitivity on seven model parameters and five initial/boundary condition variables. The results showed that the melt cooling performance of a 6 m deep water pool in the reactor cavity is enough for removing the initial melt enthalpy for solidification, for a melt jet of 0.2 m initial diameter. The impacts of the model parameters were relatively weak and that of some of the initial/boundary condition variables, namely the water depth and melt jet diameter, were very strong. The present model indicated that a significant fraction of the melt jet is not broken up and forms a continuous melt pool on the containment floor in cases with a large melt jet diameter, 0.5 m, or a shallow water pool depth, ≤3 m.

  19. Hybrid analysis (barcode-high resolution melting) for authentication of Thai herbal products, Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall.ex Nees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Suwannapoom, Chatmongkon; Khamyong, Nuttaluck; Pintakum, Danupol; Lamphun, Santisuk Na; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Osathanunkul, Kitisak; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata Nees is a medicinal plant with multiple pharmacological properties. It has been used over many centuries as a household remedy. A. paniculata products sold on the markets are in processed forms so it is difficult to authenticate. Therefore buying the herbal products poses a high-risk of acquiring counterfeited, substituted and/or adulterated products. Due to these issues, a reliable method to authenticate products is needed. High resolution melting analysis coupled with DNA barcoding (Bar-HRM) was applied to detect adulteration in commercial herbal products. The rbcL barcode was selected to use in primers design for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profile of A. paniculata species. DNA of the tested commercial products was isolated and their melting profiles were then generated and compared with the standard A. paniculata. The melting profiles of the rbcL amplicons of the three closely related herbal species (A. paniculata, Acanthus ebracteatus and Rhinacanthus nasutus) are clearly separated so that they can be distinguished by the developed method. The method was then used to authenticate commercial herbal products. HRM curves of all 10 samples tested are similar to A. paniculata which indicated that all tested products were contained the correct species as labeled. The method described in this study has been proved to be useful in aiding identification and/or authenticating A. paniculata. This Bar-HRM analysis has allowed us easily to determine the A. paniculata species in herbal products on the markets even they are in processed forms. We propose the use of DNA barcoding combined with High Resolution Melting analysis for authenticating of Andrographis paniculata products.The developed method can be used regardless of the type of the DNA template (fresh or dried tissue, leaf, and stem).rbcL region was chosen for the analysis and work well with our samplesWe can easily determine the A. paniculata species in herbal products tested

  20. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium by Real-Time PCR with High Resolution Melting Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany Sady

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes a real-time PCR approach with high resolution melting-curve (HRM assay developed for the detection and differentiation of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium in fecal and urine samples collected from rural Yemen. The samples were screened by microscopy and PCR for the Schistosoma species infection. A pair of degenerate primers were designed targeting partial regions in the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1 gene of S. mansoni and S. haematobium using real-time PCR-HRM assay. The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.8%; 23.8% of the participants were infected with S. haematobium and 9.3% were infected with S. mansoni. With regards to the intensity of infections, 22.1% and 77.9% of S. haematobium infections were of heavy and light intensities, respectively. Likewise, 8.1%, 40.5% and 51.4% of S. mansoni infections were of heavy, moderate and light intensities, respectively. The melting points were distinctive for S. mansoni and S. haematobium, categorized by peaks of 76.49 ± 0.25 °C and 75.43 ± 0.26 °C, respectively. HRM analysis showed high detection capability through the amplification of Schistosoma DNA with as low as 0.0001 ng/µL. Significant negative correlations were reported between the real-time PCR-HRM cycle threshold (Ct values and microscopic egg counts for both S. mansoni in stool and S. haematobium in urine (p < 0.01. In conclusion, this closed-tube HRM protocol provides a potentially powerful screening molecular tool for the detection of S. mansoni and S. haematobium. It is a simple, rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method. Hence, this method is a good alternative approach to probe-based PCR assays.

  1. Numerical analysis of the effects of non-conventional laser beam geometries during laser melting of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdar, Shakeel; Li, Lin; Sheikh, M A

    2007-01-01

    Laser melting is an important industrial activity encountered in a variety of laser manufacturing processes, e.g. selective laser melting, welding, brazing, soldering, glazing, surface alloying, cladding etc. The majority of these processes are carried out by using either circular or rectangular beams. At present, the melt pool characteristics such as melt pool geometry, thermal gradients and cooling rate are controlled by the variation of laser power, spot size or scanning speed. However, the variations in these parameters are often limited by other processing conditions. Although different laser beam modes and intensity distributions have been studied to improve the process, no other laser beam geometries have been investigated. The effect of laser beam geometry on the laser melting process has received very little attention. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of different beam geometries including circular, rectangular and diamond shapes on laser melting of metallic materials. The finite volume method has been used to simulate the transient effects of a moving beam for laser melting of mild steel (EN-43A) taking into account Marangoni and buoyancy convection. The temperature distribution, melt pool geometry, fluid flow velocities and heating/cooling rates have been calculated. Some of the results have been compared with the experimental data

  2. "Textbook as a Contradictory Melting-Pot": An Analysis of Multicultural Content in Korean Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngdal; Park, Yunkyoung

    2016-01-01

    In this study we will observe how multicultural content is covered in elementary and secondary schools in Korea. For this purpose, a total of 52 textbooks (social studies, ethics and Korean language from third to ninth grade) were analysed using two analysis frames. The first frame is the "multicultural content analysis frame (MCAF)"…

  3. Bayesian inference as a tool for analysis of first-principles calculations of complex materials: an application to the melting point of Ti2GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    We present a systematic implementation of the recently developed Z-method for computing melting points of solids, augmented by a Bayesian analysis of the data obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The use of Bayesian inference allows us to extract valuable information from limited data, reducing the computational cost of drawing the isochoric curve. From this Bayesian Z-method we obtain posterior distributions for the melting temperature T m , the critical superheating temperature T LS and the slopes dT/dE of the liquid and solid phases. The method therefore gives full quantification of the errors in the prediction of the melting point. This procedure is applied to the estimation of the melting point of Ti 2 GaN (one of the so-called MAX phases), a complex, laminar material, by density functional theory molecular dynamics, finding an estimate T m of 2591.61 ± 89.61 K, which is in good agreement with melting points of similar ceramics. (paper)

  4. First report of Tasmanian sheep strain (G2) genotype isolated from Iranian goat using the high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Safa, Ahmad; Mohag Hegh, Mohammad Ali; Pestechian, Nader; Ganji, Maryam; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Mahmoudi Lamouki, Reza; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate E. granulosus genotypes isolated from goats using HRM analysis in Isfahan province. Cystic echincoccosis, so-called hydatidosis, is widespread infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus . This is an important zoonotic disease worldwide, especially in the developing countries such as Iran. To date, molecular studies mainly based on the mitochondrial DNA sequences have identified distinct genotypes termed G1-G10 which can differ in some characteristics such as the growth and infectivity to different intermediate hosts or the survival rate in the definitive hosts that are important for the development of control strategies. From August to December 2014, 1341 goats were investigated and hydatid cysts were collected from the liver and lungs of 43 infected goats in Isfahan province abattoirs, Isfahan, Iran. Total genomic DNA was extracted from each sample, amplified for the presence of polymorphism of mitochondrial gene coding for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), using high resolution melting curve (HRM) method. the results of HRM analysis using the sequence of CO1 gene for 43 Echinococcus granulosus isolates from goats showed 31, 2 and 10 isolates were identified as G1, G2, and G3 genotypes, respectively. G1 is the predominant genotype in the isolated goat samples in Isfahan province, and the presence of G2 strain was reported for the first time in goat in Iran.

  5. Integrated System of Thermal/Dimensional Analysis for Quality Control of Metallic Melt and Ductile Iron Casting Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Stelian; Chisamera, Mihai; Riposan, Iulian; Neacsu, Loredana; Cojocaru, Ana Maria; Stan, Iuliana

    2018-03-01

    The main objective of the present work is to introduce a specific experimental instrument and technique for simultaneously evaluating cooling curves and expansion or contraction of cast metals during solidification. Contraction/expansion analysis illustrates the solidification parameters progression, according to the molten cast iron characteristics, which are dependent on the melting procedure and applied metallurgical treatments, mold media rigidity and thermal behavior [heat transfer parameters]. The first part of the paper summarizes the performance of this two-mold device. Its function is illustrated by representative shrinkage tendency results in ductile cast iron as affected by mold rigidity (green sand and furan resin sand molds) and inoculant type (FeSi-based alloys), published in part previously. The second part of the paper illustrates an application of this equipment adapted for commercial foundry use. It conducts thermal analysis and volume change measurements in a single ceramic cup so that mold media as well as solidification conditions are constants, with cast iron quality as the variable. Experiments compared gray and ductile cast iron solidification patterns. Gray iron castings are characterized by higher undercooling at the beginning and at the end of solidification and lower graphitic expansion. Typically, ductile cast iron exhibits higher graphitic, initial expansion, conducive for shrinkage formation in soft molds.

  6. Quantitative analysis of retained austenite in laser melted martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Seleka, T

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available of this study was to determine if X-ray diffraction (XRD) was sufficient for quantifying the volume percentage of retained austenite. After a preliminary qualitative analysis, a Rietveld full pattern refinement program was used to quantify the volume percentage...

  7. High-resolution melting analysis (HRM) for differentiation of four major Taeniidae species in dogs Taenia hydatigena, Taenia multiceps, Taenia ovis, and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Mansoureh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Rostami, Sima; Shamsaddini, Saeedeh; Mirbadie, Seyed Reza; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2016-07-01

    Tapeworms of the genus Taenia include several species of important parasites with considerable medical and veterinary significance. Accurate identification of these species in dogs is the prerequisite of any prevention and control program. Here, we have applied an efficient method for differentiating four major Taeniid species in dogs, i.e., Taenia hydatigena, T. multiceps, T. ovis, and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto. High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is simpler, less expensive, and faster technique than conventional DNA-based assays and enables us to detect PCR amplicons in a closed system. Metacestode samples were collected from local abattoirs from sheep. All the isolates had already been identified by PCR-sequencing, and their sequence data were deposited in the GenBank. Real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis targeting mitochondrial cox1 and ITS1 genes was used to differentiate taeniid species. Distinct melting curves were obtained from ITS1 region enabling accurate differentiation of three Taenia species and E. granulosus in dogs. The HRM curves of Taenia species and E .granulosus were clearly separated at Tm of 85 to 87 °C. In addition, double-pick melting curves were produced in mixed infections. Cox1 melting curves were not decisive enough to distinguish four taeniids. In this work, the efficiency of HRM analysis to differentiate four major taeniid species in dogs has been demonstrated using ITS1 gene.

  8. Melting temperature and enthalpy variations of phase change materials (PCMs): a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqin; Lee, Kyoung Ok; Medina, Mario A.; Chu, Youhong; Li, Chuanchang

    2018-06-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis is a standard thermal analysis technique used to determine the phase transition temperature, enthalpy, heat of fusion, specific heat and activation energy of phase change materials (PCMs). To determine the appropriate heating rate and sample mass, various DSC measurements were carried out using two kinds of PCMs, namely N-octadecane paraffin and calcium chloride hexahydrate. The variations in phase transition temperature, enthalpy, heat of fusion, specific heat and activation energy were observed within applicable heating rates and sample masses. It was found that the phase transition temperature range increased with increasing heating rate and sample mass; while the heat of fusion varied without any established pattern. The specific heat decreased with the increase of heating rate and sample mass. For accuracy purpose, it is recommended that for PCMs with high thermal conductivity (e.g. hydrated salt) the focus will be on heating rate rather than sample mass.

  9. High Resolution Melt (HRM) analysis is an efficient tool to genotype EMS mutants in complex crop genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochlainn, Seosamh Ó; Amoah, Stephen; Graham, Neil S; Alamer, Khalid; Rios, Juan J; Kurup, Smita; Stoute, Andrew; Hammond, John P; Østergaard, Lars; King, Graham J; White, Phillip J; Broadley, Martin R

    2011-12-08

    Targeted Induced Loci Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING) is increasingly being used to generate and identify mutations in target genes of crop genomes. TILLING populations of several thousand lines have been generated in a number of crop species including Brassica rapa. Genetic analysis of mutants identified by TILLING requires an efficient, high-throughput and cost effective genotyping method to track the mutations through numerous generations. High resolution melt (HRM) analysis has been used in a number of systems to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletions (IN/DELs) enabling the genotyping of different types of samples. HRM is ideally suited to high-throughput genotyping of multiple TILLING mutants in complex crop genomes. To date it has been used to identify mutants and genotype single mutations. The aim of this study was to determine if HRM can facilitate downstream analysis of multiple mutant lines identified by TILLING in order to characterise allelic series of EMS induced mutations in target genes across a number of generations in complex crop genomes. We demonstrate that HRM can be used to genotype allelic series of mutations in two genes, BraA.CAX1a and BraA.MET1.a in Brassica rapa. We analysed 12 mutations in BraA.CAX1.a and five in BraA.MET1.a over two generations including a back-cross to the wild-type. Using a commercially available HRM kit and the Lightscanner™ system we were able to detect mutations in heterozygous and homozygous states for both genes. Using HRM genotyping on TILLING derived mutants, it is possible to generate an allelic series of mutations within multiple target genes rapidly. Lines suitable for phenotypic analysis can be isolated approximately 8-9 months (3 generations) from receiving M3 seed of Brassica rapa from the RevGenUK TILLING service.

  10. High Resolution Melt (HRM analysis is an efficient tool to genotype EMS mutants in complex crop genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lochlainn Seosamh Ó

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted Induced Loci Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING is increasingly being used to generate and identify mutations in target genes of crop genomes. TILLING populations of several thousand lines have been generated in a number of crop species including Brassica rapa. Genetic analysis of mutants identified by TILLING requires an efficient, high-throughput and cost effective genotyping method to track the mutations through numerous generations. High resolution melt (HRM analysis has been used in a number of systems to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and insertion/deletions (IN/DELs enabling the genotyping of different types of samples. HRM is ideally suited to high-throughput genotyping of multiple TILLING mutants in complex crop genomes. To date it has been used to identify mutants and genotype single mutations. The aim of this study was to determine if HRM can facilitate downstream analysis of multiple mutant lines identified by TILLING in order to characterise allelic series of EMS induced mutations in target genes across a number of generations in complex crop genomes. Results We demonstrate that HRM can be used to genotype allelic series of mutations in two genes, BraA.CAX1a and BraA.MET1.a in Brassica rapa. We analysed 12 mutations in BraA.CAX1.a and five in BraA.MET1.a over two generations including a back-cross to the wild-type. Using a commercially available HRM kit and the Lightscanner™ system we were able to detect mutations in heterozygous and homozygous states for both genes. Conclusions Using HRM genotyping on TILLING derived mutants, it is possible to generate an allelic series of mutations within multiple target genes rapidly. Lines suitable for phenotypic analysis can be isolated approximately 8-9 months (3 generations from receiving M3 seed of Brassica rapa from the RevGenUK TILLING service.

  11. Development and inter-laboratory validation of unlabeled probe melting curve analysis for detection of JAK2 V617F mutation in polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Xinju; Liu, Weiwei; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Wei; Guan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    JAK2 V617F, a somatic point mutation that leads to constitutive JAK2 phosphorylation and kinase activation, has been incorporated into the WHO classification and diagnostic criteria of myeloid neoplasms. Although various approaches such as restriction fragment length polymorphism, amplification refractory mutation system and real-time PCR have been developed for its detection, a generic rapid closed-tube method, which can be utilized on routine genetic testing instruments with stability and cost-efficiency, has not been described. Asymmetric PCR for detection of JAK2 V617F with a 3'-blocked unlabeled probe, saturate dye and subsequent melting curve analysis was performed on a Rotor-Gene® Q real-time cycler to establish the methodology. We compared this method to the existing amplification refractory mutation systems and direct sequencing. Hereafter, the broad applicability of this unlabeled probe melting method was also validated on three diverse real-time systems (Roche LightCycler® 480, Applied Biosystems ABI® 7500 and Eppendorf Mastercycler® ep realplex) in two different laboratories. The unlabeled probe melting analysis could genotype JAK2 V617F mutation explicitly with a 3% mutation load detecting sensitivity. At level of 5% mutation load, the intra- and inter-assay CVs of probe-DNA heteroduplex (mutation/wild type) covered 3.14%/3.55% and 1.72%/1.29% respectively. The method could equally discriminate mutant from wild type samples on the other three real-time instruments. With a high detecting sensitivity, unlabeled probe melting curve analysis is more applicable to disclose JAK2 V617F mutation than conventional methodologies. Verified with the favorable inter- and intra-assay reproducibility, unlabeled probe melting analysis provided a generic mutation detecting alternative for real-time instruments.

  12. Development and inter-laboratory validation of unlabeled probe melting curve analysis for detection of JAK2 V617F mutation in polycythemia vera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: JAK2 V617F, a somatic point mutation that leads to constitutive JAK2 phosphorylation and kinase activation, has been incorporated into the WHO classification and diagnostic criteria of myeloid neoplasms. Although various approaches such as restriction fragment length polymorphism, amplification refractory mutation system and real-time PCR have been developed for its detection, a generic rapid closed-tube method, which can be utilized on routine genetic testing instruments with stability and cost-efficiency, has not been described. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Asymmetric PCR for detection of JAK2 V617F with a 3'-blocked unlabeled probe, saturate dye and subsequent melting curve analysis was performed on a Rotor-Gene® Q real-time cycler to establish the methodology. We compared this method to the existing amplification refractory mutation systems and direct sequencing. Hereafter, the broad applicability of this unlabeled probe melting method was also validated on three diverse real-time systems (Roche LightCycler® 480, Applied Biosystems ABI® 7500 and Eppendorf Mastercycler® ep realplex in two different laboratories. The unlabeled probe melting analysis could genotype JAK2 V617F mutation explicitly with a 3% mutation load detecting sensitivity. At level of 5% mutation load, the intra- and inter-assay CVs of probe-DNA heteroduplex (mutation/wild type covered 3.14%/3.55% and 1.72%/1.29% respectively. The method could equally discriminate mutant from wild type samples on the other three real-time instruments. CONCLUSIONS: With a high detecting sensitivity, unlabeled probe melting curve analysis is more applicable to disclose JAK2 V617F mutation than conventional methodologies. Verified with the favorable inter- and intra-assay reproducibility, unlabeled probe melting analysis provided a generic mutation detecting alternative for real-time instruments.

  13. Strength analysis and modeling of cellular lattice structures manufactured using selective laser melting for tooling applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahshid, Rasoul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Loft Højbjerre, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    in injection molding tools and lattice structures. This research examines the effect of cellular lattice structures on the strength of workpieces additively manufactured from ultra high-strength steel powder. Two commercial SLM machines are used to fabricate cellular samples based on four architectures— solid...... with experimental data and it is shown that they agree well. The results from this research show that using lattice structures significantly reduces the strength of material with respect to solid samples while indicating no serious increase of strength compared to hollow structures. In combination with an analysis...

  14. Genetic high throughput screening in Retinitis Pigmentosa based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anasagasti, Ander; Barandika, Olatz; Irigoyen, Cristina; Benitez, Bruno A; Cooper, Breanna; Cruchaga, Carlos; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2013-11-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) involves a group of genetically determined retinal diseases caused by a large number of mutations that result in rod photoreceptor cell death followed by gradual death of cone cells. Most cases of RP are monogenic, with more than 80 associated genes identified so far. The high number of genes and variants involved in RP, among other factors, is making the molecular characterization of RP a real challenge for many patients. Although HRM has been used for the analysis of isolated variants or single RP genes, as far as we are concerned, this is the first study that uses HRM analysis for a high-throughput screening of several RP genes. Our main goal was to test the suitability of HRM analysis as a genetic screening technique in RP, and to compare its performance with two of the most widely used NGS platforms, Illumina and PGM-Ion Torrent technologies. RP patients (n = 96) were clinically diagnosed at the Ophthalmology Department of Donostia University Hospital, Spain. We analyzed a total of 16 RP genes that meet the following inclusion criteria: 1) size: genes with transcripts of less than 4 kb; 2) number of exons: genes with up to 22 exons; and 3) prevalence: genes reported to account for, at least, 0.4% of total RP cases worldwide. For comparison purposes, RHO gene was also sequenced with Illumina (GAII; Illumina), Ion semiconductor technologies (PGM; Life Technologies) and Sanger sequencing (ABI 3130xl platform; Applied Biosystems). Detected variants were confirmed in all cases by Sanger sequencing and tested for co-segregation in the family of affected probands. We identified a total of 65 genetic variants, 15 of which (23%) were novel, in 49 out of 96 patients. Among them, 14 (4 novel) are probable disease-causing genetic variants in 7 RP genes, affecting 15 patients. Our HRM analysis-based study, proved to be a cost-effective and rapid method that provides an accurate identification of genetic RP variants. This approach is effective for

  15. Core melt progression and consequence analysis methodology development in support of the Savannah River Reactor PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kula, K.R.; Sharp, D.A.; Amos, C.N.; Wagner, K.C.; Bradley, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A three-level Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of production reactor operation has been underway since 1985 at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The goals of this analysis are to: Analyze existing margins of safety provided by the heavy-water reactor (HWR) design challenged by postulated severe accidents; Compare measures of risk to the general public and onsite workers to guideline values, as well as to those posed by commercial reactor operation; and Develop the methodology and database necessary to prioritize improvements to engineering safety systems and components, operator training, and engineering projects that contribute significantly to improving plant safety. PSA technical staff from the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) have performed the assessment despite two obstacles: A variable baseline plant configuration and power level; and a lack of technically applicable code methodology to model the SRS reactor conditions. This paper discusses the detailed effort necessary to modify the requisite codes before accident analysis insights for the risk assessment were obtained

  16. Simulation Analysis and Performance Study of CoCrMo Porous Structure Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoqing, Zhang; Junxin, Li; Jin, Li; Chengguang, Zhang; Zefeng, Xiao

    2018-04-01

    To fabricate porous implants with improved biocompatibility and mechanical properties that are matched to their application using selective laser melting (SLM), flow within the mold and compressive properties and performance of the porous structures must be comprehensively studied. Parametric modeling was used to build 3D models of octahedron and hexahedron structures. Finite element analysis was used to evaluate the mold flow and compressive properties of the parametric porous structures. A DiMetal-100 SLM molding apparatus was used to manufacture the porous structures and the results evaluated by light microscopy. The results showed that parametric modeling can produce robust models. Square structures caused higher blood cell adhesion than cylindrical structures. "Vortex" flow in square structures resulted in chaotic distribution of blood elements, whereas they were mostly distributed around the connecting parts in the cylindrical structures. No significant difference in elastic moduli or compressive strength was observed in square and cylindrical porous structures of identical characteristics. Hexahedron, square and cylindrical porous structures had the same stress-strain properties. For octahedron porous structures, cylindrical structures had higher stress-strain properties. Using these modeling and molding results, an important basis for designing and the direct manufacture of fixed biological implants is provided.

  17. High Resolution Melting Analysis Targeting hsp70 as a Fast and Efficient Method for the Discrimination of Leishmania Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Stocco de Lima, Ana Carolina; Shaw, Jeffrey Jon; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania cause a large spectrum of clinical manifestations known as Leishmaniases. These diseases are increasingly important public health problems in many countries both within and outside endemic regions. Thus, an accurate differential diagnosis is extremely relevant for understanding epidemiological profiles and for the administration of the best therapeutic protocol. Exploring the High Resolution Melting (HRM) dissociation profiles of two amplicons using real time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) targeting heat-shock protein 70 coding gene (hsp70) revealed differences that allowed the discrimination of genomic DNA samples of eight Leishmania species found in the Americas, including Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum chagasi, L. (L.) amazonensis, L. (L.) mexicana, L. (Viannia) lainsoni, L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) guyanensis, L. (V.) naiffi and L. (V.) shawi, and three species found in Eurasia and Africa, including L. (L.) tropica, L. (L.) donovani and L. (L.) major. In addition, we tested DNA samples obtained from standard promastigote culture, naturally infected phlebotomines, experimentally infected mice and clinical human samples to validate the proposed protocol. HRM analysis of hsp70 amplicons is a fast and robust strategy that allowed for the detection and discrimination of all Leishmania species responsible for the Leishmaniases in Brazil and Eurasia/Africa with high sensitivity and accuracy. This method could detect less than one parasite per reaction, even in the presence of host DNA.

  18. High Resolution Melting Analysis Targeting hsp70 as a Fast and Efficient Method for the Discrimination of Leishmania Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andrade Zampieri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania cause a large spectrum of clinical manifestations known as Leishmaniases. These diseases are increasingly important public health problems in many countries both within and outside endemic regions. Thus, an accurate differential diagnosis is extremely relevant for understanding epidemiological profiles and for the administration of the best therapeutic protocol.Exploring the High Resolution Melting (HRM dissociation profiles of two amplicons using real time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR targeting heat-shock protein 70 coding gene (hsp70 revealed differences that allowed the discrimination of genomic DNA samples of eight Leishmania species found in the Americas, including Leishmania (Leishmania infantum chagasi, L. (L. amazonensis, L. (L. mexicana, L. (Viannia lainsoni, L. (V. braziliensis, L. (V. guyanensis, L. (V. naiffi and L. (V. shawi, and three species found in Eurasia and Africa, including L. (L. tropica, L. (L. donovani and L. (L. major. In addition, we tested DNA samples obtained from standard promastigote culture, naturally infected phlebotomines, experimentally infected mice and clinical human samples to validate the proposed protocol.HRM analysis of hsp70 amplicons is a fast and robust strategy that allowed for the detection and discrimination of all Leishmania species responsible for the Leishmaniases in Brazil and Eurasia/Africa with high sensitivity and accuracy. This method could detect less than one parasite per reaction, even in the presence of host DNA.

  19. Rapid detection and differentiation of Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini using real-time PCR and high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xian-Quan; Yu, Hai-Qiong; Li, Rong; Yue, Qiao-Yun; Liu, Guo-Hua; Bai, Jian-Shan; Deng, Yan; Qiu, De-Yi; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini are both important fish-borne pathogens, causing serious public health problem in Asia. The present study developed an assay integrating real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the specific detection and rapid identification of C. sinensis and O. viverrini. Primers targeting COX1 gene were highly specific for these liver flukes, as evidenced by the negative amplification of closely related trematodes. Assays using genomic DNA extracted from the two flukes yielded specific amplification and their identity was confirmed by sequencing, having the accuracy of 100% in reference to conventional methods. The assay was proved to be highly sensitive with a detection limit below 1 pg of purified genomic DNA, 5 EPG, or 1 metacercaria of C. sinensis. Moreover, C. sinensis and O. viverrini were able to be differentiated by their HRM profiles. The method can reduce labor of microscopic examination and the contamination of agarose electrophoresis. Moreover, it can differentiate these two flukes which are difficult to be distinguished using other methods. The established method provides an alternative tool for rapid, simple, and duplex detection of C. sinensis and O. viverrini.

  20. Rapid Detection and Differentiation of Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini Using Real-Time PCR and High Resolution Melting Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Quan Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini are both important fish-borne pathogens, causing serious public health problem in Asia. The present study developed an assay integrating real-time PCR and high resolution melting (HRM analysis for the specific detection and rapid identification of C. sinensis and O. viverrini. Primers targeting COX1 gene were highly specific for these liver flukes, as evidenced by the negative amplification of closely related trematodes. Assays using genomic DNA extracted from the two flukes yielded specific amplification and their identity was confirmed by sequencing, having the accuracy of 100% in reference to conventional methods. The assay was proved to be highly sensitive with a detection limit below 1 pg of purified genomic DNA, 5 EPG, or 1 metacercaria of C. sinensis. Moreover, C. sinensis and O. viverrini were able to be differentiated by their HRM profiles. The method can reduce labor of microscopic examination and the contamination of agarose electrophoresis. Moreover, it can differentiate these two flukes which are difficult to be distinguished using other methods. The established method provides an alternative tool for rapid, simple, and duplex detection of C. sinensis and O. viverrini.

  1. Melted Paraffin Wax as an Innovative Liquid and Solid Extractant for Elemental Analysis by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papai, Rodrigo; Sato, Roseli Hiromi; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Krug, Francisco José; Gaubeur, Ivanise

    2017-03-07

    This work proposes a new development in the use of melted paraffin wax as a new extractant in a procedure designed to aggregate the advantages of liquid phase extraction (extract homogeneity, fast, and efficient transfer, low cost and simplicity) to solid phase extraction. As proof of concept, copper(II) in aqueous samples was converted into a hydrophobic complex of copper(II) diethyldithiocarbamate and subsequently extracted into paraffin wax. Parameters which affect the complexation and extraction (pH, DDTC, and Triton X-100 concentration, vortex agitation time and complexation time) were optimized in a univariate way. The combination of the extraction proposed procedure with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy allowed the precise copper determination (coefficient of variation = 3.1%, n = 10) and enhanced detectability because of the concentration factor of 18 times. A calibration curve was obtained with a linear range of 0.50-10.00 mg L -1 (R 2 = 0.9990, n = 7), LOD = 0.12 mg L -1 , and LOQ = 0.38 mg L -1 under optimized conditions. An extraction procedure efficiency of 94% was obtained. The accuracy of the method was confirmed through the analysis of a reference material of human blood serum, by the spike and recovery trials with seawater, tap water, mineral water, and alcoholic beverages and by comparing with those results obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

  2. Simulation Analysis and Performance Study of CoCrMo Porous Structure Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoqing, Zhang; Junxin, Li; Jin, Li; Chengguang, Zhang; Zefeng, Xiao

    2018-05-01

    To fabricate porous implants with improved biocompatibility and mechanical properties that are matched to their application using selective laser melting (SLM), flow within the mold and compressive properties and performance of the porous structures must be comprehensively studied. Parametric modeling was used to build 3D models of octahedron and hexahedron structures. Finite element analysis was used to evaluate the mold flow and compressive properties of the parametric porous structures. A DiMetal-100 SLM molding apparatus was used to manufacture the porous structures and the results evaluated by light microscopy. The results showed that parametric modeling can produce robust models. Square structures caused higher blood cell adhesion than cylindrical structures. "Vortex" flow in square structures resulted in chaotic distribution of blood elements, whereas they were mostly distributed around the connecting parts in the cylindrical structures. No significant difference in elastic moduli or compressive strength was observed in square and cylindrical porous structures of identical characteristics. Hexahedron, square and cylindrical porous structures had the same stress-strain properties. For octahedron porous structures, cylindrical structures had higher stress-strain properties. Using these modeling and molding results, an important basis for designing and the direct manufacture of fixed biological implants is provided.

  3. High-resolution Melting Analysis for Gene Scanning of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) Gene With Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Sian; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yang, Shu-Fen; Ho, Cheng Mao; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2016-02-01

    There have been many different mutations reported for the large adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene. APC mutations result in inactivation of APC tumor suppressor action, allowing the progression of tumorigenesis. The present study utilized a highly efficient method to identify APC mutations and investigated the association between the APC genetic variants Y486Y, A545A, T1493T, and D1822V and susceptibility to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). High-resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to characterize APC mutations. Genomic DNA was extracted from 83 patient specimens of OSCC and 50 blood samples from healthy control subjects. The 14 exons and mutation cluster region of exon 15 were screened by HRM analysis. All mutations were confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. Three mutations and 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in this study. The mutations were c.573T>C (Y191Y) in exon 5, c.1005A>G (L335L) in exon 9, and c.1488A>T (T496T) in exon 11. Two SNPs, c.4479G>A (T1493T) and c.5465A>T (D1822V), were located in exon 15, whereas c.1458T>C (Y486Y) and c.1635G>A (A545A) were located in exon 11 and 13, respectively. There was no observed association between OSCC risk and genotype for any of the 4 APC SNPs. The mutation of APC is rare in Taiwanese patients with OSCC. HRM analysis is a reliable, accurate, and fast screening method for APC mutations.

  4. High resolution melting curve analysis, a rapid and affordable method for mutation analysis in childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin eLiu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular genetic alterations with prognostic significance have been described in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The aim of this study was to establish cost-effective techniques to detect mutations of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1, and a partial tandem duplication within the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-PTD genes in childhood AML. Procedure: Ninety-nine children with newly diagnosed AML were included in this study. We developed a fluoresent dye SYTO-82 based high resolution melting curve (HRM anaylsis to detect FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD, FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations. MLL-PTD was screened by real-time quantitative PCR. Results: The HRM methodology correlated well with gold standard Sanger sequencing with less cost. Among the 99 patients studied, the FLT3-ITD mutation was associated with significantly worse event free survival (EFS. Patients with the NPM1 mutation had significantly better EFS and overall survival. However, HRM was not sensitive enough for minimal residual disease monitoring. Conclusions: HRM was a rapid and efficient method for screening of FLT3 and NPM1 gene mutations. It was both affordable and accurate, especially in resource underprivileged regions. Our results indicated that HRM could be a useful clinical tool for rapid and cost effective screening of the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in AML patients.

  5. Comparative analysis of the possibility of applying low-melting metals with the capillary-porous system in tokamak conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyublinski, I. E., E-mail: lyublinski@yandex.ru; Vertkov, A. V., E-mail: avertkov@yandex.ru; Semenov, V. V., E-mail: darkfenix2006@mail.ru [OAO Krasnaya Zvezda (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The use of capillary-porous systems (CPSs) with liquid Li, Ga, and Sn is considered as an alternative for solving the problem of creating plasma-facing elements (PFEs) of the fusion neutron source (FNS) and the DEMO-type reactor. The main advantages of CPSs with liquid metal compared with hard materials are their stability with respect to the degradation of properties in tokamak conditions and capability of surface self-restoration. The evaluation of applicability of liquid metals is performed on the basis of the analysis of their physical and chemical properties, the interaction with the tokamak plasma, and constructive and process features of in-vessel elements with CPSs implementing the application of these metals in a tokamak. It is shown that the upper limit of the PFE working temperature for all low-melting metals under consideration lies in the range of 550–600°Ð¡. The decisive factor for PFEs with Li is the limitation on the admissible atomic flux into plasma, while for those with Ga and Sn it is the corrosion resistance of construction materials. The upper limit of thermal loads in the steady-state operating mode for the considered promising PFE design with the use of Li, Ga, and Sn is close to 18–20 MW/m{sup 2}. It is seen from the analysis that the use of metals with a low equilibrium vapor pressure of (Ga, Sn) gives no gain in extension of the region of admissible working temperatures of PFEs. However, with respect to the totality of properties, the possibility of implementing the self-restoration and stabilization effect of the liquid surface, the influence on the plasma discharge parameters, and the ability to protect the PFE surface in conditions of plasma perturbations and disruption, lithium is the most attractive liquid metal to create CPS-based PFEs for the tokamak.

  6. Detecting differential allelic expression using high-resolution melting curve analysis: application to the breast cancer susceptibility gene CHEK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinilnikova Olga

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene CHEK2 encodes a checkpoint kinase playing a key role in the DNA damage pathway. Though CHEK2 has been identified as an intermediate breast cancer susceptibility gene, only a small proportion of high-risk families have been explained by genetic variants located in its coding region. Alteration in gene expression regulation provides a potential mechanism for generating disease susceptibility. The detection of differential allelic expression (DAE represents a sensitive assay to direct the search for a functional sequence variant within the transcriptional regulatory elements of a candidate gene. We aimed to assess whether CHEK2 was subject to DAE in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs from high-risk breast cancer patients for whom no mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 had been identified. Methods We implemented an assay based on high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis and developed an analysis tool for DAE assessment. Results We observed allelic expression imbalance in 4 of the 41 LCLs examined. All four were carriers of the truncating mutation 1100delC. We confirmed previous findings that this mutation induces non-sense mediated mRNA decay. In our series, we ruled out the possibility of a functional sequence variant located in the promoter region or in a regulatory element of CHEK2 that would lead to DAE in the transcriptional regulatory milieu of freely proliferating LCLs. Conclusions Our results support that HRM is a sensitive and accurate method for DAE assessment. This approach would be of great interest for high-throughput mutation screening projects aiming to identify genes carrying functional regulatory polymorphisms.

  7. High resolution melting analysis for the detection of EMS induced mutations in wheat SbeIIa genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botticella Ermelinda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manipulation of the amylose-amylopectin ratio in cereal starch has been identified as a major target for the production of starches with novel functional properties. In wheat, silencing of starch branching enzyme genes by a transgenic approach reportedly caused an increase of amylose content up to 70% of total starch, exhibiting novel and interesting nutritional characteristics. In this work, the functionality of starch branching enzyme IIa (SBEIIa has been targeted in bread wheat by TILLING. An EMS-mutagenised wheat population has been screened using High Resolution Melting of PCR products to identify functional SNPs in the three homoeologous genes encoding the target enzyme in the hexaploid genome. Results This analysis resulted in the identification of 56, 14 and 53 new allelic variants respectively for SBEIIa-A, SBEIIa-B and SBEIIa-D. The effects of the mutations on protein structure and functionality were evaluated by a bioinformatic approach. Two putative null alleles containing non-sense or splice site mutations were identified for each of the three homoeologous SBEIIa genes; qRT-PCR analysis showed a significant decrease of their gene expression and resulted in increased amylose content. Pyramiding of different single null homoeologous allowed to isolate double null mutants showing an increase of amylose content up to 21% compared to the control. Conclusion TILLING has successfully been used to generate novel alleles for SBEIIa genes known to control amylose content in wheat. Single and double null SBEIIa genotypes have been found to show a significant increase in amylose content.

  8. Melting and evaporation analysis of the first wall in a water-cooled breeding blanket module under vertical displacement event by using the MARS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung-Kyu, E-mail: chohk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Material phase change of first wall was simulated for vertical displacement event. • An in-house first wall module was developed to simulate melting and evaporation. • Effective heat capacity method and evaporation model were proposed. • MARS code was proposed to predict two-phase phenomena in coolant channel. • Phase change simulation was performed by coupling MARS and in-house module. - Abstract: Plasma facing components of tokamak reactors such as ITER or the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) can be subjected to damage by plasma instabilities. Plasma disruptions like vertical displacement event (VDE) with high heat flux, can cause melting and vaporization of plasma facing materials and burnout of coolant channels. In this study, to simulate melting and vaporization of the first wall in a water-cooled breeding blanket under VDE, one-dimensional heat equations were solved numerically by using an in-house first wall module, including phase change models, effective heat capacity method, and evaporation model. For thermal-hydraulics, the in-house first wall analysis module was coupled with the nuclear reactor safety analysis code, MARS, to take advantage of its prediction capability for two-phase flow and critical heat flux (CHF) occurrence. The first wall was proposed for simulation according to the conceptual design of the K-DEMO, and the heat flux of plasma disruption with a value of 600 MW/m{sup 2} for 0.1 s was applied. The phase change simulation results were analyzed in terms of the melting and evaporation thicknesses and the occurrence of CHF. The thermal integrity of the blanket first wall is discussed to confirm whether the structural material melts for the given conditions.

  9. Rapid analysis of heterogeneously methylated DNA using digital methylation-sensitive high resolution melting: application to the CDKN2B (p15) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candiloro, Ida Lm; Mikeska, Thomas; Hokland, Peter

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) methodology is able to recognise heterogeneously methylated sequences by their characteristic melting profiles. To further analyse heterogeneously methylated sequences, we adopted a digital approach to MS-HRM (dMS-HRM) t......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) methodology is able to recognise heterogeneously methylated sequences by their characteristic melting profiles. To further analyse heterogeneously methylated sequences, we adopted a digital approach to MS-HRM (d......MS-HRM) that involves the amplification of single templates after limiting dilution to quantify and to determine the degree of methylation. We used this approach to study methylation of the CDKN2B (p15) cell cycle progression inhibitor gene which is inactivated by DNA methylation in haematological malignancies...... the methylated alleles and assess the degree of methylation. Direct sequencing of selected dMS-HRM products was used to determine the exact DNA methylation pattern and confirmed the degree of methylation estimated by dMS-HRM. CONCLUSION: dMS-HRM is a powerful technique for the analysis of methylation in CDKN2B...

  10. Authenticity analyses of Rhizoma Paridis using barcoding coupled with high resolution melting (Bar-HRM) analysis to control its quality for medicinal plant product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bao-Zhong; Wang, Ya-Ping; Fang, Hai-Lan; Xiong, Chao; Li, Xi-Wen; Wang, Ping; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2018-01-01

    Rhizoma Paridis (Chonglou) is a commonly used and precious traditional Chinese medicine. Paris polyphylla Smith var. yunnanensis (Franch.) Hand. -Mazz. and Paris polyphylla Smith var . chinensis (Franch.) Hara are the two main sources of Chonglou under the monograph of Rhizoma Paridis in Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In the local marketplace, however, this medicine is prone to be accidentally contaminated, deliberately substituted or admixed with other species that are similar to Rhizoma Paridis in shape and color. Consequently, these adulterations might compromise quality control and result in considerable health concerns for consumers. This study aims to develop a rapid and sensitive method for accurate identification of Rhizoma Paridis and its common adulterants. DNA barcoding coupled with high resolution melting analysis was applied in this research to distinguish Rhizoma Paridis from its adulteration. The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) barcode was selected for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profile of the selected species. DNA of the tested herbal medicines was isolated and their melting profiles were generated and compared with the standard melting profile of P. polyphylla var. chinensis . The results indicate that the ITS2 molecular regions coupled with HRM analysis can effectively differentiate nine herbal species, including two authentic origins of Chonglou and their seven common adulterants. Ten herbal medicines labeled "Chonglou" obtained from a local market were collected and identified with our methods, and their sequence information was analyzed to validate the accuracy of HRM analysis. DNA barcoding coupled with HRM analysis is a accurate, reliable, rapid, cost-effective and robust tool, which could contribute to the quality control of Rhizoma Paridis in the supply chain of the natural health product industry (NHP).

  11. Miltenberger blood group typing by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) melting curve analysis in Thai population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsakulyanon, A; Kitpoka, P; Kunakorn, M; Srikhirin, T

    2015-12-01

    To develop reliable and convenient methods for Miltenberger (Mi(a) ) blood group typing. To apply real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) melting curve analysis to Mi(a) blood group typing. The Mi(a) blood group is the collective set of glycophorin hybrids in the MNS blood group system. Mi(a+) blood is common among East Asians and is also found in the Thai population. Incompatible Mi(a) blood transfusions pose the risk of life-threatening haemolysis; therefore, Mi(a) blood group typing is necessary in ethnicities where the Mi(a) blood group is prevalent. One hundred and forty-three blood samples from Thai blood donors were used in the study. The samples included 50 Mi(a+) samples and 93 Mi(a-) samples, which were defined by serology. The samples were typed by Mi(a) typing qPCR, and 50 Mi(a+) samples were sequenced to identify the Mi(a) subtypes. Mi(a) subtyping qPCR was performed to define GP.Mur. Both Mi(a) typing and Mi(a) subtyping were tested on a conventional PCR platform. The results of Mi(a) typing qPCR were all concordant with serology. Sequencing of the 50 Mi(a+) samples revealed 47 GP.Mur samples and 3 GP.Hop or Bun samples. Mi(a) subtyping qPCR was the supplementary test used to further define GP.Mur from other Mi(a) subtypes. Both Mi(a) typing and Mi(a) subtyping performed well using a conventional PCR platform. Mi(a) typing qPCR correctly identified Mi(a) blood groups in a Thai population with the feasibility of Mi(a) subtype discrimination, and Mi(a) subtyping qPCR was able to further define GP.Mur from other Mi(a) subtypes. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  12. Silver ion-mediated killing of a food pathogen: Melting curve analysis data of silver resistance genes and growth curve data

    OpenAIRE

    Kuppan Gokulan; Katherine Williams; Sangeeta Khare

    2017-01-01

    Limited antibacterial activity of silver ions leached from silver-impregnated food contact materials could be due to: 1) the presence of silver resistance genes in tested bacteria; or 2) lack of susceptibility to silver ion-mediated killing in the bacterial strain (K. Williams, L. Valencia, K. Gokulan, R. Trbojevich, S. Khare, 2016 [1]). This study contains data to address the specificity of silver resistance genes in Salmonella Typhimurium during the real time PCR using melting curve analysi...

  13. High-resolution melting analysis for detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism and the genotype of the myostatin gene in warmblood horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpa, Priscila B S; Garbade, Petra; Natalini, Cláudio C; Pires, Ananda R; Tisotti, Tainor M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop a high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to detect the g.66493737C>T polymorphism in the myostatin gene (MSTN) and determine the frequency of 3 previously defined g.66493737 genotypes (T/T, T/C, and C/C) in warmblood horses. SAMPLES Blood samples from 23 horses. PROCEDURES From each blood sample, DNA was extracted and analyzed by standard PCR methods and an HRM assay to determine the MSTN genotype. Three protocols (standard protocol, protocol in which a high-salt solution was added to the reaction mixture before the first melting cycle, and protocol in which an unlabeled probe was added to the reaction mixture before analysis) for the HRM assay were designed and compared. Genotype results determined by the HRM protocol that generated the most consistent melting curves were compared with those determined by sequencing. RESULTS The HRM protocol in which an unlabeled probe was added to the reaction mixture generated the most consistent melting curves. The genotypes of the g.66493737C>T polymorphism were determined for 22 horses (16 by HRM analysis and 20 by sequencing); 14, 7, and 1 had the T/T, T/C, and C/C genotypes, respectively. The genotype determined by HRM analysis agreed with that determined by sequencing for 14 of 16 horses. The frequency of alleles T and C was 79.5% and 20.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HRM analysis may be a faster and more economical alternative than PCR methods for genotyping. Genotyping results might be useful as predictors of athletic performance for horses.

  14. Assessment of genetic mutations in the XRCC2 coding region by high resolution melting curve analysis and the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Fayaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is the major pathway for repairing double strand breaks (DSBs in eukaryotes and XRCC2 is an essential component of the HR repair machinery. To evaluate the potential role of mutations in gene repair by HR in individuals susceptible to differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC we used high resolution melting (HRM analysis, a recently introduced method for detecting mutations, to examine the entire XRCC2 coding region in an Iranian population. HRM analysis was used to screen for mutations in three XRCC2 coding regions in 50 patients and 50 controls. There was no variation in the HRM curves obtained from the analysis of exons 1 and 2 in the case and control groups. In exon 3, an Arg188His polymorphism (rs3218536 was detected as a new melting curve group (OR: 1.46; 95%CI: 0.432-4.969; p = 0.38 compared with the normal melting curve. We also found a new Ser150Arg polymorphism in exon 3 of the control group. These findings suggest that genetic variations in the XRCC2 coding region have no potential effects on susceptibility to DTC. However, further studies with larger populations are required to confirm this conclusion.

  15. Rainfall and snow-melt triggered glacial lake outbursts: a systematic analysis of the Kedarnath (Uttarakhand, India), June 2013 disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Simon; Rastner, Philipp; Arora, Manohar; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Heavy rainfall in early June 2013 triggered flash flooding and landslides throughout the Indian Himalayan state of Uttarakhand, killing more than 6000 people. The destruction of roads and trekking routes left around 100,000 pilgrims and tourists stranded. Most fatalities and damages resulted directly from a lake outburst and debris flow disaster originating from above the village of Kedarnath on June 16 and 17. Here we provide a first systematic analysis of the contributing factors leading to the Kedarnath disaster, both in terms of hydro-meteorological triggering (rainfall, snowmelt, and temperature) and topographic predisposition. Specifically, the topographic characteristics of the Charobari lake watershed above Kedarnath are compared with other glacial lakes across the northwestern Indian Himalayan states of Uttarakhand and Himachal Pradesh, and implications for glacier lake outburst hazard assessment in a changing climate are discussed. Our analysis suggests that the early onset of heavy monsoon rainfall (390 mm, June 10 - 17) immediately following a prolonged four week period of unusually rapid snow cover depletion and elevated streamflow is the crucial hydro-meteorological factor, resulting in slope saturation and significant runoff into the small seasonal glacial lake. Over a four week period the MODIS-derived snow covered area above Kedarnath decreased nearly 50%, from above average coverage in mid-May to well below average coverage by the second week of June. Such a rapid decrease has not been observed in the previous 13-year record, where the average decrease in snow covered area over the same four week window is only 15%. The unusual situation of the lake being dammed in a steep, unstable paraglacial environment, but fed entirely from snow-melt and rainfall within a fluvial dominated watershed is important in the context of this disaster. A simple scheme enabling large-scale recognition of such an unfavorable topographic setting is presented, and on the

  16. Detection of plant oil DNA using high resolution melting (HRM) post PCR analysis: a tool for disclosure of olive oil adulteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietina, Michelangelo; Agrimonti, Caterina; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-12-15

    Extra virgin olive oil is frequently subjected to adulterations with addition of oils obtained from plants other than olive. DNA analysis is a fast and economic tool to identify plant components in oils. Extraction and amplification of DNA by PCR was tested in olives, in milled seeds and in oils, to investigate its use in olive oil traceability. DNA was extracted from different oils made of hazelnut, maize, sunflower, peanut, sesame, soybean, rice and pumpkin. Comparing the DNA melting profiles in reference plant materials and in the oils, it was possible to identify any plant components in oils and mixtures of oils. Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) platform has been added of the new methodology of high resolution melting (HRM), both were used to analyse olive oils mixed with different percentage of other oils. Results showed HRM a cost effective method for efficient detection of adulterations in olive oils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  18. Species identification in meat products: A new screening method based on high resolution melting analysis of cyt b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Oceja, A; Nuñez, C; Baeta, M; Gamarra, D; de Pancorbo, M M

    2017-12-15

    Meat adulteration by substitution with lower value products and/or mislabeling involves economic, health, quality and socio-religious issues. Therefore, identification and traceability of meat species has become an important subject to detect possible fraudulent practices. In the present study the development of a high resolution melt (HRM) screening method for the identification of eight common meat species is reported. Samples from Bos taurus, Ovis aries, Sus scrofa domestica, Equus caballus, Oryctolagus cuniculus, Gallus gallus domesticus, Meleagris gallopavo and Coturnix coturnix were analyzed through the amplification of a 148 bp fragment from the cyt b gene with a universal primer pair in HRM analyses. Melting profiles from each species, as well as from several DNA mixtures of these species and blind samples, allowed a successful species differentiation. The results demonstrated that the HRM method here proposed is a fast, reliable, and low-cost screening technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Roughness Analysis for AlSi10Mg Produced by Selective Laser Melting (SLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarudin K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective Laser Melting (SLM is an Additive Manufacturing (AM technique that built 3D part in a layer-by-layer method by melting the top surface layer of a powder bed with a high intensity laser according to sliced 3D CAD data. AlSi10Mg alloy is a traditional cast alloy that is broadly used for die-casting process and used in automotive industry due its good mechanical properties. This paper seeks to investigate the requirement SLM in rapid tooling application. The feasibility study is done by examining the surface roughness and dimensional accuracy as compared to the benchmark part produced through the SLM process with constant parameters. The benchmark produced by SLM shows the potential of SLM in a manufacturing application particularly in moulds.

  20. Identification and discrimination of Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora spp., and Cryptosporidium spp. by righ-resolution melting analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hllytchaikra Ferraz Fehlberg

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to standardize the high-resolution melting method for identification and discrimination of Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora spp., and Cryptosporidium spp. by amplification of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA using a single primer pair. The analyses were performed on individual reactions (containing DNA from a single species of a protozoan, on duplex reactions (containing DNA from two species of protozoa in each reaction, and on a multiplex reaction (containing DNA of four parasites in a single reaction. The proposed method allowed us to identify and discriminate the four species by analyzing the derivative, normalized, and difference melting curves, with high reproducibility among and within the experiments, as demonstrated by low coefficients of variation (less than 2.2% and 2.0%, respectively. This is the first study where this method is used for discrimination of these four species of protozoa in a single reaction.

  1. Analysis and evaluation of the ASTEC model basis on fission product and aerosol release phenomena from melts. 3. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agethen, K.; Koch, M.K.

    2016-04-01

    The present report is the 3 rd Technical Report within the research project ''ASMO'' founded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi 1501433) and projected at the Chair of Energy Systems and Energy Economics (LEE) within the workgroup Reactor Simulation and Safety at the Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB). The focus in this report is set on the release of fission products and the contribution to the source term, which is formed in the late phase after failure of the reactor pressure vessel during MCCI. By comparing the RUB simulation results including the fission product release rates with further simulations of GRS and VEIKI it can be indicated that the simulations have a high sensitivity in respect to the melting point temperature. It can be noted that the release rates are underestimated for most fission product species with the current model. Especially semi-volatile fission products and the lanthanum release is underestimated by several orders of magnitude. Based on the ACE experiment L2, advanced considerations are presented concerning the melt temperature, the gas temperature, the segregation and a varied melt configuration. Furthermore, the influence of the gas velocity is investigated. This variation of the gas velocity causes an underestimation of the release rates compared to the RUB base calculation. A model extension to oxidic species for lanthanum and ruthenium shows a significant improvement of the simulation results. In addition, the MEDICIS module has been enhanced to document the currently existing species, are displayed in a *.ist-file. This expansion shows inconsistencies between the melt composition and the fission product composition. Based on these results, there are still some difficulties regarding the release of fission products in the MEDICIS module and the interaction with the material data base (MOB) which needs further investigation.

  2. A study on the impact of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose on the viscosity of PEG melt suspensions using surface plots and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ching Mien; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-04-01

    An understanding of the rheological behaviour of polymer melt suspensions is crucial in pharmaceutical manufacturing, especially when processed by spray congealing or melt extruding. However, a detailed comparison of the viscosities at each and every temperature and concentration between the various grades of adjuvants in the formulation will be tedious and time-consuming. Therefore, the statistical method, principal component analysis (PCA), was explored in this study. The composite formulations comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) of ten different grades (K100 LV, K4M, K15M, K100M, E15 LV, E50 LV, E4M, F50 LV, F4M and Methocel VLV) at various concentrations were prepared and their viscosities at different temperatures determined. Surface plots showed that concentration of HPMC had a greater effect on the viscosity compared to temperature. Particle size and size distribution of HPMC played an important role in the viscosity of melt suspensions. Smaller particles led to a greater viscosity than larger particles. PCA was used to evaluate formulations of different viscosities. The complex viscosity profiles of the various formulations containing HPMC were successfully classified into three clusters of low, moderate and high viscosity. Formulations within each group showed similar viscosities despite differences in grade or concentration of HPMC. Formulations in the low viscosity cluster were found to be sprayable. PCA was able to differentiate the complex viscosity profiles of different formulations containing HPMC in an efficient and time-saving manner and provided an excellent visualisation of the data.

  3. Features of melting of indium monohalides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitriev, V S; Smirniv, V A [AN SSSR, Chernogolovka. Inst. Fiziki Tverdogo Tela

    1980-12-01

    The character of InCl, InBr and InI melting is investigated by the methods of DTA, calorimetry, conductometry and chemical analysis. Partial decomposition of monohalogenides during melting according to the reactions of disproportionation is shown. The presence of disproportionation products (In/sup 0/ and In/sup 3 +/) is manifested in the properties of solid monohalogenides, prepared by the crystallization from melt, in their photosensitivity and electroconductivity.

  4. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  5. Melting of Dense Sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoryanz, Eugene; Degtyareva, Olga; Hemley, Russell J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Somayazulu, Maddury

    2005-01-01

    High-pressure high-temperature synchrotron diffraction measurements reveal a maximum on the melting curve of Na in the bcc phase at ∼31 GPa and 1000 K and a steep decrease in melting temperature in its fcc phase. The results extend the melting curve by an order of magnitude up to 130 GPa. Above 103 GPa, Na crystallizes in a sequence of phases with complex structures with unusually low melting temperatures, reaching 300 K at 118 GPa, and an increased melting temperature is observed with further increases in pressure

  6. Identification and Differentiation of Monilinia Species Causing Brown Rot of Pome and Stone Fruit using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasileiou, Antonios; Madesis, Panagiotis B; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2016-09-01

    Brown rot is a devastating disease of stone fruit caused by Monilinia spp. Among these species, Monilinia fructicola is a quarantine pathogen in Europe but has recently been detected in several European countries. Identification of brown rot agents relies on morphological differences or use of molecular methods requiring fungal isolation. The current study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM) method for the identification of the Monilinia spp. and for the detection of M. fructicola among other brown rot pathogens. Based on the sequence of the cytb intron from M. laxa, M. fructicola, M. fructigena, M. mumecola, M. linhartiana, and M. yunnanensis isolates originating from several countries, a pair of universal primers for species identification and a pair of primers specific to M. fructicola were designed. The specificity of the primers was verified to ensure against cross-reaction with other fungal species. The melting curve analysis using the universal primers generated six different HRM curve profiles, each one specific for each species. Τhe HRM analysis primers specific to M. fructicola amplified a 120-bp region with a distinct melt profile corresponding to the presence of M. fructicola, regardless of the presence of other species. HRM analysis can be a useful tool for rapid identification and differentiation of the six Monilinia spp. using a single primer pair. This novel assay has the potential for simultaneous identification and differentiation of the closely related Monilinia spp. as well as for the differentiation of M. fructicola from other common pathogens or saprophytes that may occur on the diseased fruit.

  7. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-01

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of intense research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to reach understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties in their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors, and to evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of severe accidents. In a hypothetical severe accident there is likelihood that the core materials will be relocated to the lower plenum and form a decay-heated debris bed (debris cake) or a melt pool. Interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend to a large extent on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. In case of inadequate cooling, the excessive heat would drive the structures' overheating and ablation, and hence govern the vessel failure mode and timing. In turn, threats to containment integrity associated with potential ex-vessel steam explosions and ex-vessel debris uncoolability depend on the composition, superheat, and amount of molten corium available for discharge upon the vessel failure. That is why predictions of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower head, subsequent vessel failure modes and melt characteristics upon the discharge are of paramount importance for plant safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to develop a method for reliable prediction of melt pool thermal hydraulics, namely to establish a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. To achieve the goal, an approach to efficient use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been proposed to guide and support the development of models suitable for accident analysis. The CFD method, on the one hand, is

  8. Permeability and 3-D melt geometry in shear-induced high melt fraction conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Cordonnier, B.; Qi, C.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of dunite channels in ophiolites and uranium-series disequilibria in mid-ocean ridge basalt suggest that melt transport in the upper mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is strongly channelized. Formation of high melt fraction conduits could result from mechanical shear, pyroxene dissolution, and lithological partitioning. Deformation experiments (e.g. Holtzman et al., 2003) demonstrate that shear stress causes initially homogeneously distributed melt to segregate into an array of melt-rich bands, flanked by melt-depleted regions. At the same average melt fraction, the permeability of high melt fraction conduits could be orders of magnitude higher than that of their homogenous counterparts. However, it is difficult to determine the permeability of melt-rich bands. Using X-ray synchrotron microtomography, we obtained high-resolution images of 3-dimensional (3-D) melt distribution in a partially molten rock containing shear-induced high melt fraction conduits. Sample CQ0705, an olivine-alkali basalt aggregate with a nominal melt fraction of 4%, was deformed in torsion at a temperature of 1473 K and a confining pressure of 300 MPa to a shear strain of 13.3. A sub-volume of CQ0705 encompassing 3-4 melt-rich bands was imaged. Microtomography data were reduced to binary form so that solid olivine is distinguishable from basalt glass. At a spatial resolution of 160 nm, the 3-D images reveal the shape and connectedness of melt pockets in the melt-rich bands. Thin melt channels formed at grain edges are connected at large melt nodes at grain corners. Initial data analysis shows a clear preferred orientation of melt pockets alignment subparallel to the melt-rich band. We use the experimentally determined geometrical parameters of melt topology to create a digital rock with identical 3-D microstructures. Stokes flow simulations are conducted on the digital rock to obtain the permeability tensor. Using this digital rock physics approach, we determine how deformation

  9. Quality Control of Laser-Beam-Melted Parts by a Correlation Between Their Mechanical Properties and a Three-Dimensional Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, T.; Wiora, G.; Witt, G.

    2017-03-01

    Good correlations between three-dimensional surface analyses of laser-beam-melted parts of nickel alloy HX and their mechanical properties were found. The surface analyses were performed with a confocal microscope, which offers a more profound surface data basis than a conventional, two-dimensional tactile profilometry. This new approach results in a wide range of three-dimensional surface parameters, which were each evaluated with respect to their feasibility for quality control in additive manufacturing. As a result of an automated surface analysis process by the confocal microscope and an industrial six-axis robot, the results are an innovative approach for quality control in additive manufacturing.

  10. Silver ion-mediated killing of a food pathogen: Melting curve analysis data of silver resistance genes and growth curve data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppan Gokulan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Limited antibacterial activity of silver ions leached from silver-impregnated food contact materials could be due to: 1 the presence of silver resistance genes in tested bacteria; or 2 lack of susceptibility to silver ion-mediated killing in the bacterial strain (K. Williams, L. Valencia, K. Gokulan, R. Trbojevich, S. Khare, 2016 [1]. This study contains data to address the specificity of silver resistance genes in Salmonella Typhimurium during the real time PCR using melting curve analysis and an assessment of the minimum inhibitory concentration of silver ions for Salmonella.

  11. Silver ion-mediated killing of a food pathogen: Melting curve analysis data of silver resistance genes and growth curve data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Williams, Katherine; Khare, Sangeeta

    2017-04-01

    Limited antibacterial activity of silver ions leached from silver-impregnated food contact materials could be due to: 1) the presence of silver resistance genes in tested bacteria ; or 2) lack of susceptibility to silver ion-mediated killing in the bacterial strain (K. Williams, L. Valencia, K. Gokulan, R. Trbojevich, S. Khare, 2016 [1]). This study contains data to address the specificity of silver resistance genes in Salmonella Typhimurium during the real time PCR using melting curve analysis and an assessment of the minimum inhibitory concentration of silver ions for Salmonella .

  12. Status of the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code for the analysis of transient spreading of core debris melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Chu, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    A transient, one dimensional, finite difference computer code (MELTSPREAD-1) has been developed to predict spreading behavior of high temperature melts flowing over concrete and/or steel surfaces submerged in water, or without the effects of water if the surface is initially dry. This paper provides a summary overview of models and correlations currently implemented in the code, code validation activities completed thus far, LWR spreading-related safety issues for which the code has been applied, and the status of documentation for the code

  13. Quantitative detection and typing of hepatitis D virus in human serum by real-time polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Joerg; Frenzel, Katrin; Minh, Bui Q; von Haeseler, Arndt; Edelmann, Anke; Ross, Stefan R; Berg, Thomas; Krüger, Detlev H; Meisel, Helga

    2010-06-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection is an important etiologic agent of fulminant hepatitis and may aggravate the clinical course of chronic hepatitis B infection resulting in cirrhosis and liver failure. This report describes the establishment of a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method that allows the quantitative detection of HDV-1 and HDV-3 with a sensitivity in a linear range of 2 x 10(3) to 10(8) copies/mL. Additionally, the new assay provides the opportunity to distinguish HDV-1 from HDV-3 by a subsequent melting curve analysis, an important option because these HDV types are highly associated with severe clinical outcome. The results of the melting curve analysis of 42 HDV sequences obtained in this study and the phylogenetic analysis based on 139 full-length sequences from GenBank were consistent and showed that all sequences described here cluster within the HDV-1 clade. Therefore, this assay is useful for monitoring of antiviral treatment and molecular epidemiologic studies of HDV distribution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid detection of Opisthorchis viverrini and Strongyloides stercoralis in human fecal samples using a duplex real-time PCR and melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janwan, Penchom; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Anamnart, Witthaya; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2011-12-01

    Human opisthorchiasis caused by the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is an endemic disease in Southeast Asian countries including the Lao People's Democratic Republic, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Thailand. Infection with the soil-transmitted roundworm Strongyloides stercoralis is an important problem worldwide. In some areas, both parasitic infections are reported as co-infections. A duplex real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR merged with melting curve analysis was developed for the rapid detection of O. viverrini and S. stercoralis in human fecal samples. Duplex real-time FRET PCR is based on fluorescence melting curve analysis of a hybrid of amplicons generated from two genera of DNA elements: the 162 bp pOV-A6 DNA sequence specific to O. viverrini and the 244 bp 18S rRNA sequence specific to S. stercoralis, and two pairs of specific fluorophore-labeled probes. Both O. viverrini and S. stercoralis can be differentially detected in infected human fecal samples by this process through their different fluorescence channels and melting temperatures. Detection limit of the method was as little as two O. viverrini eggs and four S. stercoralis larvae in 100 mg of fecal sample. The assay could distinguish the DNA of both parasites from the DNA of negative fecal samples and fecal samples with other parasite materials, as well as from the DNA of human leukocytes and other control parasites. The technique showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. The introduced duplex real-time FRET PCR can reduce labor time and reagent costs and is not prone to carry over contamination. The method is important for simultaneous detection especially in areas where both parasites overlap incidence and is useful as the screening tool in the returning travelers and immigrants to industrialized countries where number of samples in the diagnostic units will become increasing.

  15. Analysis of In-Vessel Late Phase Melt Progression Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D.

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure in-vessel melt progressions of the KSNP (Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant) have been analyzed using the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 computer code. The total loss of feed water (LOFW) to the steam generators with/without intentional RCS depressurization using the safety depressurization system (SDS) and the station blackout (SBO) have been simulated from transient initiation to reactor vessel failure. The SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 results have shown that the pressure boundary of the reactor coolant system did not fail before reactor vessel failure in the high-pressure sequences of the LOFW and the SBO transients of the KSNP. In all the high-pressure transients, approximately 20-30 % of the core material was melted and relocated to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel at the time of reactor vessel failure. Intentional RCS depressurization using the SDS for the total LOFW delays reactor vessel failure for approximately 5 hours by actuation of the safety injection tanks. At the time of reactor vessel failure, approximately 50-60 % of the fuel rod cladding was oxidized for the total LOFW and the SBO transients of the KSNP. (authors)

  16. Analysis of grain growth process in melt spun Fe-B alloys under the initial saturated grain boundary segregation condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.; Liu, F.; Yang, X.Q.; Fan, Y.; Shen, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → We compared pure kinetic, pure thermodynamic and extended thermo-kinetic models. → An initial saturated GB segregation condition of nanoscale Fe-B alloys was determined. → The controlled-mechanism was proposed using two characteristic times (t 1 and t 2 ). - Abstract: A grain growth process in the melt spun low-solid-solubility Fe-B alloys was analyzed under the initial saturated grain boundary (GB) segregation condition. Applying melt spinning technique, single-phase supersaturated nanograins were prepared. Grain growth behavior of the single-phase supersaturated nanograins was investigated by performing isothermal annealing at 700 deg. C. Combined with the effect of GB segregation on the initial GB excess amount, the thermo-kinetic model [Chen et al., Acta Mater. 57 (2009) 1466] was extended to describe the initial GB segregation condition of nanoscale Fe-B alloys. In comparison of pure kinetic model, pure thermodynamic model and the extended thermo-kinetic model, an initial saturated GB segregation condition was determined. The controlled-mechanism of grain growth under initial saturated GB segregation condition was proposed using two characteristic annealing times (t 1 and t 2 ), which included a mainly kinetic-controlled process (t ≤ t 1 ), a transition from kinetic-mechanism to thermodynamic-mechanism (t 1 2 ) and pure thermodynamic-controlled process (t ≥ t 2 ).

  17. High-Resolution Melting Curve Analysis of the 16S Ribosomal Gene to Detect and Identify Pathogenic and Saprophytic Leptospira Species in Colombian Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez Sánchez, Ronald G; Quintero, Juan Álvaro López; Pereira, Martha María; Agudelo-Flórez, Piedad

    2017-05-01

    AbstractIt is important to identify the circulating Leptospira agent to enhance the performance of serodiagnostic tests by incorporating specific antigens of native species, develop vaccines that take into account the species/serovars circulating in different regions, and optimize prevention and control strategies. The objectives of this study were to develop a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-high-resolution melting (HRM) assay for differentiating between species of the genus Leptospira and to verify its usefulness in identifying unknown samples to species level. A set of primers from the initial region of the 16S ribosomal gene was designed to detect and differentiate the 22 species of Leptospira . Eleven reference strains were used as controls to establish the reference species and differential melting curves. Twenty-five Colombian Leptospira isolates were studied to evaluate the usefulness of the PCR-HRM assay in identifying unknown samples to species level. This identification was confirmed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S ribosomal gene. Eleven Leptospira species were successfully identified, except for Leptospira meyeri / Leptospira yanagawae because the sequences were 100% identical. The 25 isolates from humans, animals, and environmental water sources were identified as Leptospira santarosai (twelve), Leptospira interrogans (nine), and L. meyeri / L. yanagawae (four). The species verification was 100% concordant between PCR-HRM and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S ribosomal gene. The PCR-HRM assay designed in this study is a useful tool for identifying Leptospira species from isolates.

  18. Photometric analysis of the structure evolution on the Pb-19.4%Sn melt surface in the S-L temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyakhovitskii M.M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution of alloys in solidification range is considered as the first-order phase transformation from the solid state to the liquid one, which occurs by the mechanism of nucleation and growth of more symmetrical phase to less symmetrical crystalline phase. The kinetic regularities of this transformation are studied by the method of the photometric analysis of structure images (PHASI, which makes it possible to establish the temperature dependence of the relationship between the solid and liquid phases and their distribution on the melt surface. The PHASI method is based on the combined analysis of the brightness spectra of the visible light reflections from the sample surface and of the distribution of its scattering centers in different intensity intervals. The data on the structure evolution of the Sn+19.4%Pb alloy upon melting and solidification were considered in parallel with the measured spectra of sound signals. It was revealed that a distinct maximum is observed in the temperature dependence of radiation energy in the temperature range of phase transformation from the liquid into the solid state and hot crack formation occurs near the transition zone in the region of the contact of the ingot with the crucible.

  19. Model of interfacial melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is proposed to describe systems with phase transitions which take place in terms of crystalline as well as internal degrees of freedom. Computer simulation of the model shows that the interplay between the two sets of degrees of freedom permits observation of grain-boundar......-boundary formation and interfacial melting, a nonequilibrium process by which the system melts at the boundaries of a polycrystalline domain structure. Lipid membranes are candidates for systems with pronounced interfacial melting behavior....

  20. Candidate DNA Barcode Tags Combined With High Resolution Melting (Bar-HRM Curve Analysis for Authentication of Senna alexandrina Mill. With Validation in Crude Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Mishra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Senna alexandrina (Fabaceae is a globally recognized medicinal plant for its laxative properties as well as the only source of sennosides, and is highly exported bulk herb from India. Its major procurement is exclusively from limited cultivation, which leads to risks of deliberate or unintended adulteration. The market raw materials are in powdered or finished product form, which lead to difficulties in authentication. Here, DNA barcode tags based on chloroplast genes (rbcL and matK and intergenic spacers (psbA-trnH and ITS were developed for S. alexandrina along with the allied species. The ability and performance of the ITS1 region to discriminate among the Senna species resulted in the present proposal of the ITS1 tags as successful barcode. Further, these tags were coupled with high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis in a real-time PCR genotyping method to derive Bar-HRM (Barcoding-HRM assays. Suitable HRM primer sets were designed through SNP detection and mutation scanning in genomic signatures of Senna species. The melting profiles of S. alexandrina and S. italica subsp. micrantha were almost identical and the remaining five species were clearly separated so that they can be differentiated by HRM method. The sensitivity of the method was utilized to authenticate market samples [Herbal Sample Assays (HSAs]. HSA01 (S. alexandrina crude drug sample from Bangalore and HSA06 (S. alexandrina crude drug sample from Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu, India were found to be highly contaminated with S. italica subsp. micrantha. Species admixture samples mixed in varying percentage was identified sensitively with detection of contamination as low as 1%. The melting profiles of PCR amplicons are clearly distinct, which enables the authentic differentiation of species by the HRM method. This study reveals that DNA barcoding coupled with HRM is an efficient molecular tool to authenticate Senna herbal products in the market for quality control in the drug

  1. Candidate DNA Barcode Tags Combined With High Resolution Melting (Bar-HRM) Curve Analysis for Authentication of Senna alexandrina Mill. With Validation in Crude Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Priyanka; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Sundaresan, Velusamy

    2018-01-01

    Senna alexandrina (Fabaceae) is a globally recognized medicinal plant for its laxative properties as well as the only source of sennosides, and is highly exported bulk herb from India. Its major procurement is exclusively from limited cultivation, which leads to risks of deliberate or unintended adulteration. The market raw materials are in powdered or finished product form, which lead to difficulties in authentication. Here, DNA barcode tags based on chloroplast genes ( rbcL and matK ) and intergenic spacers ( psbA-trnH and ITS ) were developed for S. alexandrina along with the allied species. The ability and performance of the ITS1 region to discriminate among the Senna species resulted in the present proposal of the ITS1 tags as successful barcode. Further, these tags were coupled with high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis in a real-time PCR genotyping method to derive Bar-HRM (Barcoding-HRM) assays. Suitable HRM primer sets were designed through SNP detection and mutation scanning in genomic signatures of Senna species. The melting profiles of S. alexandrina and S . italica subsp. micrantha were almost identical and the remaining five species were clearly separated so that they can be differentiated by HRM method. The sensitivity of the method was utilized to authenticate market samples [Herbal Sample Assays (HSAs)]. HSA01 ( S. alexandrina crude drug sample from Bangalore) and HSA06 ( S. alexandrina crude drug sample from Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu, India) were found to be highly contaminated with S . italica subsp. micrantha . Species admixture samples mixed in varying percentage was identified sensitively with detection of contamination as low as 1%. The melting profiles of PCR amplicons are clearly distinct, which enables the authentic differentiation of species by the HRM method. This study reveals that DNA barcoding coupled with HRM is an efficient molecular tool to authenticate Senna herbal products in the market for quality control in the drug supply

  2. Digital image correlation analysis of local strain fields on Ti6Al4V manufactured by electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Joakim; Sjögren, Torsten; Snis, Anders; Engqvist, Håkan; Lausmaa, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D-printing as it is often called, build parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. A common concern, regardless of the specific additive manufacturing technique used, is the risk of inadequate fusion between the adjacent layers which in turn may cause inferior mechanical properties. In this work, the local strain properties of titanium parts produced by Electron Beam Melting (EBM ® ) were studied in order to gain information about the quality of fusion of the stock powder material used in the process. By using Digital Image Correlation (DIC) the strain fields in the individual layers were analyzed, as well as the global strain behavior of the bulk material. The results show that fully solid titanium parts manufactured by EBM are homogenous and do not experience local deformation behavior, neither on local nor on a global level

  3. Topological analysis of polymeric melts: chain-length effects and fast-converging estimators for entanglement length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Robert S; Foteinopoulou, Katerina; Kröger, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Primitive path analyses of entanglements are performed over a wide range of chain lengths for both bead spring and atomistic polyethylene polymer melts. Estimators for the entanglement length N_{e} which operate on results for a single chain length N are shown to produce systematic O(1/N) errors. The mathematical roots of these errors are identified as (a) treating chain ends as entanglements and (b) neglecting non-Gaussian corrections to chain and primitive path dimensions. The prefactors for the O(1/N) errors may be large; in general their magnitude depends both on the polymer model and the method used to obtain primitive paths. We propose, derive, and test new estimators which eliminate these systematic errors using information obtainable from the variation in entanglement characteristics with chain length. The new estimators produce accurate results for N_{e} from marginally entangled systems. Formulas based on direct enumeration of entanglements appear to converge faster and are simpler to apply.

  4. Digital image correlation analysis of local strain fields on Ti6Al4V manufactured by electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Joakim, E-mail: Joakim.karlsson@sp.se [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Box 857, SE-501 15, Borås (Sweden); Division of Applied Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Sjögren, Torsten [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Box 857, SE-501 15, Borås (Sweden); Snis, Anders [Arcam AB, Krokslätts fabriker 27 A, SE-431 37, Mölndal (Sweden); Engqvist, Håkan [Division of Applied Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Lausmaa, Jukka [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Box 857, SE-501 15, Borås (Sweden)

    2014-11-17

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D-printing as it is often called, build parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. A common concern, regardless of the specific additive manufacturing technique used, is the risk of inadequate fusion between the adjacent layers which in turn may cause inferior mechanical properties. In this work, the local strain properties of titanium parts produced by Electron Beam Melting (EBM{sup ®}) were studied in order to gain information about the quality of fusion of the stock powder material used in the process. By using Digital Image Correlation (DIC) the strain fields in the individual layers were analyzed, as well as the global strain behavior of the bulk material. The results show that fully solid titanium parts manufactured by EBM are homogenous and do not experience local deformation behavior, neither on local nor on a global level.

  5. A comparison of PCR assays for beak and feather disease virus and high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis of replicase associated protein and capsid genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shubhagata; Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed Ali; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2016-11-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) threatens a wide range of endangered psittacine birds worldwide. In this study, we assessed a novel PCR assay and genetic screening method using high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis for BFDV targeting the capsid (Cap) gene (HRM-Cap) alongside conventional PCR detection as well as a PCR method that targets a much smaller fragment of the virus genome in the replicase initiator protein (Rep) gene (HRM-Rep). Limits of detection, sensitivity, specificity and discriminatory power for differentiating BFDV sequences were compared. HRM-Cap had a high positive predictive value and could readily differentiate between a reference genotype and 17 other diverse BFDV genomes with more discriminatory power (genotype confidence percentage) than HRM-Rep. Melt curve profiles generated by HRM-Cap correlated with unique DNA sequence profiles for each individual test genome. The limit of detection of HRM-Cap was lower (2×10 -5 ng/reaction or 48 viral copies) than that for both HRM-Rep and conventional BFDV PCR which had similar sensitivity (2×10 -6 ng or 13 viral copies/reaction). However, when used in a diagnostic setting with 348 clinical samples there was strong agreement between HRM-Cap and conventional PCR (kappa=0.87, PHRM-Cap demonstrated higher specificity (99.9%) than HRM-Rep (80.3%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acid Based Molecular Authentication for Identification of Four Medicinal Paeonia Species Using Melting Array Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jin Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate taxonomic identification of plant materials in herbal medicines is important for product quality control. The genus Paeonia (Saxifragales is the source of the herbal preparations Paeoniae Radix (Paeoniae Radix Alba and Paeoniae Radix Rubra and Moutan Radicis Cotex. However, confusion has arisen regarding their contents due to linguistic and taxonomic ambiguities, similar morphologies and different definitions of Paeoniae Radix in the Korean and Chinese national pharmacopoeias, leading to the distribution of adulterated products. To develop a method for identifying the four Paeonia species used in these medicines, three fluorescently-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA probes were designed against ITS2 sequences containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and used in a real-time PCR melting curve assay. Each of the four Paeonia species was accurately identified using this analysis. The accuracy and analytical stability of the PNA melting curve assay was confirmed using commercially available samples of the four Paeonia species. This assay is a reliable genetic tool to distinguish between different Paeonia-derived herbal medicines and identify the botanical origins of Paeoniae Radix and Moutan Radicis Cortex. This technique may also contribute to quality control and standardization of herbal medicines by providing a reliable authentication tool and preventing the distribution of inauthentic adulterants.

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acid Based Molecular Authentication for Identification of Four Medicinal Paeonia Species Using Melting Array Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wook Jin; Yang, Sungyu; Choi, Goya; Moon, Byeong Cheol

    2017-11-07

    Accurate taxonomic identification of plant materials in herbal medicines is important for product quality control. The genus Paeonia (Saxifragales) is the source of the herbal preparations Paeoniae Radix (Paeoniae Radix Alba and Paeoniae Radix Rubra) and Moutan Radicis Cotex. However, confusion has arisen regarding their contents due to linguistic and taxonomic ambiguities, similar morphologies and different definitions of Paeoniae Radix in the Korean and Chinese national pharmacopoeias, leading to the distribution of adulterated products. To develop a method for identifying the four Paeonia species used in these medicines, three fluorescently-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes were designed against ITS2 sequences containing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and used in a real-time PCR melting curve assay. Each of the four Paeonia species was accurately identified using this analysis. The accuracy and analytical stability of the PNA melting curve assay was confirmed using commercially available samples of the four Paeonia species. This assay is a reliable genetic tool to distinguish between different Paeonia -derived herbal medicines and identify the botanical origins of Paeoniae Radix and Moutan Radicis Cortex. This technique may also contribute to quality control and standardization of herbal medicines by providing a reliable authentication tool and preventing the distribution of inauthentic adulterants.

  8. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  9. Detection and characterization of Newcastle disease virus in clinical samples using real time RT-PCR and melting curve analysis based on matrix and fusion genes amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Sharawi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Newcastle disease is still one of the major threats for poultry industry allover the world. Therefore, attempt was made in this study to use the SYBR Green I real-time PCR with melting curves analysis as for detection and differentiation of NDV strains in suspected infected birds. Materials and Methods: Two sets of primers were used to amplify matrix and fusion genes in samples collected from suspectly infected birds (chickens and pigeons. Melting curve analysis in conjunction with real time PCR was conducted for identifying different pathotypes of the isolated NDVs. Clinical samples were propagated on specific pathogen free ECE and tested for MDT and ICIP. Results: The velogenic NDVs isolated from chickens and pigeons were distinguished with mean T 85.03±0.341 and m 83.78±0.237 respectively for M-gene amplification and for F-gene amplification the mean T were 84.04±0.037 and m 84.53±0.223. On the other hand the lentogenic NDV isolates including the vaccinal strains (HB1 and LaSota have a higher mean T (86.99±0.021 for M-gene amplification and 86.50±0.063 for F-gene amplification. The test showed no reaction with m unrelated RNA samples. In addition, the results were in good agreement with both virus isolation and biological pathotyping (MDT and ICIP. The assay offers an attractive alternative method for the diagnosis of NDV that can be easily applied in laboratory diagnosis as a screening test for the detection and differentiation of NDV infections. Conclusion: As was shown by the successful rapid detection and pathotyping of 15 NDV strains in clinical samples representing velogenic and lentogenic NDV strains, and the agreement with the results of virus isolation , biological pathotyping and pathogenicity indices. The results of this report suggests that the described SybrGreen I real-time RT-PCR assay in conjunction with Melting curve analysis used as a rapid, specific and simple diagnostic tools for detection and pathotyping of

  10. Development of LILAC-meltpool for the thermo-hydraulic analysis of core melt relocated in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Hee Dong

    2002-03-01

    LILAC-meltpool has been developed to study thermo-hydraulic behavior of molten pool and thermal behavior of vessel wall during severe accident. To validate LILAC-meltpool code several two and three dimensional thermo-hydraulic problems were selected and solved. The benchmark problems have experimental results or verified numerical results. Through the validation it was found that LILAC-meltpool reproduces very accurate numerical results. Two-layered semicircular pool was solved to study thermal and hydraulic characteristics of pool stratification. The LAVA experiment using alumina/ferrite molten pool was calculated and compared with computed results. Cooling of alumina/ferrite two-layered pool was affected by stratification. In the numerical results temperature of vessel inner was highest at a location below the interface. Crust was developed from upper surface and lower outer surface, but in the area near the interface corium simulant existed as molten state for long time. LAVA-4 experiment was studied using gap-cooling model in LILAC-meltpool code. Temperature increase of LAVA vessel after alumina melt relocation was strongly dependent on gap formation mechanism. Calculated cooling rates of the vessel were very similar to experimental results. For LAVA experiments which do not have heat generation coolant penetrates easily into a gap and it is found that gap-cooling is very effective for cooling of vessel, but it is thought that coolant penetration could be limited near upper part of gap because of decay heat and high temperature of corium crust

  11. Melting curve analysis after T allele enrichment (MelcaTle as a highly sensitive and reliable method for detecting the JAK2V617F mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soji Morishita

    Full Text Available Detection of the JAK2V617F mutation is essential for diagnosing patients with classical myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. However, detection of the low-frequency JAK2V617F mutation is a challenging task due to the necessity of discriminating between true-positive and false-positive results. Here, we have developed a highly sensitive and accurate assay for the detection of JAK2V617F and named it melting curve analysis after T allele enrichment (MelcaTle. MelcaTle comprises three steps: 1 two cycles of JAK2V617F allele enrichment by PCR amplification followed by BsaXI digestion, 2 selective amplification of the JAK2V617F allele in the presence of a bridged nucleic acid (BNA probe, and 3 a melting curve assay using a BODIPY-FL-labeled oligonucleotide. Using this assay, we successfully detected nearly a single copy of the JAK2V617F allele, without false-positive signals, using 10 ng of genomic DNA standard. Furthermore, MelcaTle showed no positive signals in 90 assays screening healthy individuals for JAK2V617F. When applying MelcaTle to 27 patients who were initially classified as JAK2V617F-positive on the basis of allele-specific PCR analysis and were thus suspected as having MPNs, we found that two of the patients were actually JAK2V617F-negative. A more careful clinical data analysis revealed that these two patients had developed transient erythrocytosis of unknown etiology but not polycythemia vera, a subtype of MPNs. These findings indicate that the newly developed MelcaTle assay should markedly improve the diagnosis of JAK2V617F-positive MPNs.

  12. Detection and characterization of Leishmania (Leishmania and Leishmania (Viannia by SYBR green-based real-time PCR and high resolution melt analysis targeting kinetoplast minicircle DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Ceccarelli

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease with a broad clinical spectrum which includes asymptomatic infection. A thorough diagnosis, able to distinguish and quantify Leishmania parasites in a clinical sample, constitutes a key step in choosing an appropriate therapy, making an accurate prognosis and performing epidemiological studies. Several molecular techniques have been shown to be effective in the diagnosis of leishmaniasis. In particular, a number of PCR methods have been developed on various target DNA sequences including kinetoplast minicircle constant regions. The first aim of this study was to develop a SYBR green-based qPCR assay for Leishmania (Leishmania infantum detection and quantification, using kinetoplast minicircle constant region as target. To this end, two assays were compared: the first used previously published primer pairs (qPCR1, whereas the second used a nested primer pairs generating a shorter PCR product (qPCR2. The second aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility to discriminate among subgenera Leishmania (Leishmania and Leishmania (Viannia using the qPCR2 assay followed by melting or High Resolution Melt (HRM analysis. Both assays used in this study showed good sensitivity and specificity, and a good correlation with standard IFAT methods in 62 canine clinical samples. However, the qPCR2 assay allowed to discriminate between Leishmania (Leishmania and Leishmania (Viannia subgenera through melting or HRM analysis. In addition to developing assays, we investigated the number and genetic variability of kinetoplast minicircles in the Leishmania (L. infantum WHO international reference strain (MHOM/TN/80/IPT1, highlighting the presence of minicircle subclasses and sequence heterogeneity. Specifically, the kinetoplast minicircle number per cell was estimated to be 26,566±1,192, while the subclass of minicircles amplifiable by qPCR2 was estimated to be 1,263±115. This heterogeneity, also observed in canine clinical

  13. Rapid detection of most frequent Slovenian germ-line mutations in BRCA1 gene using real-time PCR and melting curve analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, S.; Stegel, V.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Detection of inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes is of great importance in some types of cancers including the colorectal cancer (mutations of APC gene in familial adenomatous polyposis - FAP, mutations in mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - HNPCC), malignant melanoma (mutations in CDKN2A and CDK4 genes) and breast cancer (mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes). Methods. This article presents the technical data for the detection of five mutations in BRCA1 gene in breast cancer patients and their relatives. The mutations - 1806C>T, 300T>G, 300T>A, 310G>A, 5382insC - were determined by the real-time PCR and the melting curve analysis. Results and conclusion. In comparison to direct sequencing, this method proved to be sensitive and rapid enough for the routine daily determination of mutations in DNA isolated from the peripheral blood. (author)

  14. Real-time polymerase chain reaction with melting analysis of positive blood culture specimens in bloodstream infections: diagnostic value and turnaround time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Silvia; Gherardi, Giovanni; De Florio, Lucia; Avola, Alessandra; Crea, Francesca; Riva, Elisabetta; Vitali, Massimiliano Andrea; Galluzzo, Sara; Dicuonzo, Giordano

    2013-01-01

    A Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with melting analysis was devised to target bacterial and fungal genes together with the most prevalent antimicrobial resistance genes in 250 positive blood culture broths. This method allowed the blood culture cultivated pathogens to be classified into clinically relevant groups such as Enterobacteriaceae, oxidase-positive bacilli, oxidase-positive coccobacilli, S. aureus and yeast. Enterococci and streptococci could be distinguished from CoNS only by the Gram stain. Gram-positive bacilli were discriminated from Gram-positive cocci by Gram stain. Furthermore, the most important antimicrobial resistant genes such as mecA, vanA, bla TEM , bla SHV and bla CTX-M could be identified. All results were obtained with a turnaround time of three hours from the moment of blood culture positivity compared to 24-72 hours for phenotypic methods. In conclusion, the proposed approach can allow the clinician to implement proper early management of sepsis patients.

  15. Ceramic filters analysis for aluminium melting through microtomography technique; Analise de filtros ceramicos para fundicao de aluminio atraves da tecnica de microtomografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Henrique de Souza; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Jesus, Edgar Francisco Oliveira de; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Duhm, Rainer; Feiste, Karsten L.; Reichert, Christian; Reimche, Wilfried; Stegemann, Dieter [Universidade de Hannover (Germany). IKPH

    2000-07-01

    In this work a ceramic filters analysis is done through the microtomography for improvement of the aluminium melting process through the filter porosity control. Microtomography were obtained of ceramic filters with pore dimensions of 10, 20 and 30 ppi. The data were calculated by using an reconstruction algorithm for divergent beam implemented in the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory of COPPE/UFRJ and analysed through cells and windows separation according to the defined by Ray. For the analyses the Image Pro program were used where the cells have been detached by sphere inserted, adjusting by nine points, in the filter cavities. So, the size of the answer sphere were considered as the cell size. The windows were measured by straight lines secant to the window intersections.

  16. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Detecting p53 Gene Mutations in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong CHEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that p53 gene was related to many human cancers. The mutations in p53 gene play an important role in carcinogensis and mostly happened in exon 5-8. The aim of this study is to establish a high resolution melting (HRM assay to detect p53 mutations from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, to investigate the characteristics of p53 gene mutations, and to analyze the relationship between p53 mutations and evolution regularity of pathogenesis. Methods p53 mutations in exon 5-8 were detected by HRM assay on DNA insolated from 264 NSCLC samples derived from tumor tissues and 54 control samples from pericancerous pulmonary tissues. The mutation samples by the HRM assay were confirmed by sequencing technique. Samples which were positive by HRM but wild type by sequencing were further confirmed by sub-clone and sequencing. Results No mutation was found in 54 pericancerous pulmonary samples by HRM assay. 104 of the 264 tumor tissues demonstrated mutation curves by HRM assay, 102 samples were confirmed by sequencing, including 95 point mutations and 7 frame shift mutations by insertion or deletion. The mutation rate of p53 gene was 39.4%. The mutation rate from exon 5-8 were 11.7%, 8%, 12.5% and 10.6%, respectively and there was no statistically significant difference between them (P=0.35. p53 mutations were significantly more frequent in males than that in females, but not related to the other clinicopathologic characteristics. Conclusion The results indicate that HRM is a sensitive in-tube methodology to detect for mutations in clinical samples. The results suggest that the arising p53 mutations in NSCLC may be due to spontaneous error in DNA synthesis and repair.

  17. High resolution, high sensitivity imaging and analysis of minerals and inclusions (fluid and melt) using the new CSIRO-GEMOC nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, C.G.; McInnes, B.M.; Van Achterbergh, E.; Williams, P.J.; Dong, G.; Zaw, K.

    1999-01-01

    .g. Yankee Lode, Mole Granite, NSW [Heinrich el al., 1993] and Batu Hijau, Indonesia [McInnes et al., 1999]), and the high concentrations of some elements in many ore-related fluid inclusions [e.g. Pb ∼4 wt% at Hellyer, Tasmania (Khin Zaw et al., 1996) and Ba ∼9 wt% at Starra, Cloncurry district, Queensland (Williams et al., 2000)]. Now, using the NMP, the internal contents of individual fluid inclusions can be imaged to show clearly that these elements reside within the fluid inclusions, and to discrimination against solid phases outside the inclusion volume. Melt Inclusion Analysis and Imaging Samples of melts and fluids, responsible for metasomatic change and evolution of the earth's upper mantle are often preserved as inclusions in xenoliths. However, their quench textures can often conceal rare minor phases that concentrate important trace elements (e.g. HFSE and REE). The penetration of MeV protons enables the detection of these contributions to ∼40 μm depth, thus providing a tool to determine reliable melt composition, with detection sensitivities down to 0.2 ppm, and to image spatial variation in component elements at 1-2 μm resolution. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  18. Calibration of micro-thermal analysis for the detection of glass transition temperatures and melting points: repeatability and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    Micro-thermal analysis (μTATM) is a technique in which thermal analysis is performed on surfaces of test specimens on a small (ca. 2×2 μm) scale. Like any thermal analysis technique, interpretation of results benefits from accurate temperature information and knowledge of the precision of the

  19. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    and their diameter. The variation in melting temperature has little influence on the overall bubble volume. However, the size distribution of the bubbles varies with the melting temperature. When the melt is slowly cooled, the bubble volume increases, implying decreased solubility of the gaseous species. Mass...... spectroscopy analysis of gases liberated during heating of the glass reveals that small bubbles contain predominantly CH4, CO and CO2, whereas large bubbles bear N2, SO2 and H2S. The methodology utilised in this work can, besides mapping the bubbles in a glass, be applied to shed light on the sources of bubble...

  20. Melting point of yttria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, S.R.

    1977-06-01

    Fourteen samples of 99.999 percent Y 2 O 3 were melted near the focus of a 250-W CO 2 laser. The average value of the observed melting point along the solid-liquid interface was 2462 +- 19 0 C. Several of these same samples were then melted in ultrahigh-purity oxygen, nitrogen, helium, or argon and in water vapor. No change in the observed temperature was detected, with the exception of a 20 0 C increase in temperature from air to helium gas. Post test examination of the sample characteristics, clarity, sphericity, and density is presented, along with composition. It is suggested that yttria is superior to alumina as a secondary melting-point standard

  1. Detection of sdhB Gene Mutations in SDHI-Resistant Isolates of Botrytis cinerea Using High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Anastasios; Madesis, Panagiotis; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea , is a high risk pathogen for fungicide resistance development. Pathogen' resistance to SDHIs is associated with several mutations in sdh gene. The diversity of mutations and their differential effect on cross-resistance patterns among SDHIs and the fitness of resistant strains necessitate the availability of a tool for their rapid identification. This study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the identification of P225H/F/L//T, N230I, and H272L/R/Y mutations. Based on the sequence of sdh B subunit of resistant and sensitive isolates, a universal primer pair was designed. The specificity of the HRM analysis primers was verified to ensure against the cross-reaction with other fungal species and its sensitivity was evaluated using concentrations of known amounts of mutant's DNA. The melting curve analysis generated nine distinct curve profiles, enabling the discrimination of all the four mutations located at codon 225, the N230I mutation, the three mutations located in codon 272, and the non-mutated isolates (isolates of wild-type sensitivity). Similar results were obtained when DNA was extracted directly from artificially inoculated strawberry fruit. The method was validated by monitoring the presence of sdh B mutations in samples of naturally infected strawberry fruits and stone fruit rootstock seedling plants showing damping-off symptoms. HRM analysis data were compared with a standard PIRA-PCR technique and an absolute agreement was observed suggesting that in both populations the H272R mutation was the predominant one, while H272Y, N230I, and P225H were detected in lower frequencies. The results of the study suggest that HRM analysis can be a useful tool for sensate, accurate, and rapid identification of several sdh B mutations in B. cinerea and it is expected to contribute in routine fungicide resistance monitoring or assessments of the effectiveness of anti-resistance strategies implemented in

  2. Detection of sdhB gene mutations in SDHI-resistant isolates of Botrytis cinerea using high resolution melting (HRM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Samaras

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea, is a high-risk pathogen for fungicide resistance development. Pathogen` resistance to SDHIs is associated with several mutations in sdh gene. The diversity of mutations and their differential effect on cross-resistance patterns among SDHIs and the fitness of resistant strains necessitate the availability of a tool for their rapid identification. This study was initiated to develop and validate a high-resolution melting (HRM analysis for the identification of P225H/F/L//T, N230I and H272L/R/Y mutations. Based on the sequence of sdhB subunit of resistant and sensitive isolates, a universal primer pair was designed. The specificity of the HRM analysis primers was verified to ensure against the cross-reaction with other fungal species and its sensitivity was evaluated using concentrations of known amounts of mutant`s DNA. The melting curve analysis generated nine distinct curve profiles, enabling the discrimination of all the 4 mutations located at codon 225, the N230I mutation, the 3 mutations located in codon 272 and the non mutated isolates (isolates of wild type sensitivity. Similar results were obtained when DNA was extracted directly from artificially inoculated strawberry fruit. The method was validated by monitoring the presence of sdhB mutations in samples of naturally infected strawberry fruits and stone fruit rootstock seedling plants showing damping off symptoms. HRM analysis data were compared with a standard PIRA-PCR technique and an absolute agreement was observed suggesting that in both populations the H272R mutation was the predominant one, while H272Y, N230I and P225H were detected in lower frequencies. The results of the study suggest that HRM analysis can be a useful tool for sensate, accurate and rapid identification of several sdhB mutations in B. cinerea and it is expected to contribute in routine fungicide resistance monitoring or assessments of the effectiveness of antiresistance strategies implemented in

  3. Force induced DNA melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K

    2009-01-01

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f m , at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  4. The analysis of the mechanical properties of F75 Co-Cr alloy for use in selective laser melting (SLM manufacturing of removable partial dentures (RPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jevremovic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The presented work discusses the applicability of the selective laser melting technique (SLM in manufacture of removable partial denture (RPD frameworks with the emphasis on material properties. The paper presents initial results of a conducted test of the mechanical properties of the F75 Co-Cr dental alloy used with selective laser melting.

  5. Melting temperature of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobenko, V.N.; Savvatimskiy, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text: Pulse of electrical current is used for fast heating (∼ 1 μs) of metal and graphite specimens placed in dielectric solid media. Specimen consists of two strips (90 μm in thick) placed together with small gap so they form a black body model. Quasy-monocrystal graphite specimens were used for uniform heating of graphite. Temperature measurements were fulfilled with fast pyrometer and with composite 2-strip black body model up to melting temperature. There were fulfilled experiments with zirconium and tungsten of the same black body construction. Additional temperature measurements of liquid zirconium and liquid tungsten are made. Specific heat capacity (c P ) of liquid zirconium and of liquid tungsten has a common feature in c P diminishing just after melting. It reveals c P diminishing after melting in both cases over the narrow temperature range up to usual values known from steady state measurements. Over the next wide temperature range heat capacity for W (up to 5000 K) and Zr (up to 4100 K) show different dependencies of heat capacity on temperature in liquid state. The experiments confirmed a high quality of 2-strip black body model used for graphite temperature measurements. Melting temperature plateau of tungsten (3690 K) was used for pyrometer calibration area for graphite temperature measurement. As a result, a preliminary value of graphite melting temperature of 4800 K was obtained. (author)

  6. High-resolution melting (HRM) re-analysis of a polyposis patients cohort reveals previously undetected heterozygous and mosaic APC gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Out, Astrid A; van Minderhout, Ivonne J H M; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Bommel, Lysette S R; Kluijt, Irma; Aalfs, Cora; Voorendt, Marsha; Vossen, Rolf H A M; Nielsen, Maartje; Vasen, Hans F A; Morreau, Hans; Devilee, Peter; Tops, Carli M J; Hes, Frederik J

    2015-06-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis is most frequently caused by pathogenic variants in either the APC gene or the MUTYH gene. The detection rate of pathogenic variants depends on the severity of the phenotype and sensitivity of the screening method, including sensitivity for mosaic variants. For 171 patients with multiple colorectal polyps without previously detectable pathogenic variant, APC was reanalyzed in leukocyte DNA by one uniform technique: high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Serial dilution of heterozygous DNA resulted in a lowest detectable allelic fraction of 6% for the majority of variants. HRM analysis and subsequent sequencing detected pathogenic fully heterozygous APC variants in 10 (6%) of the patients and pathogenic mosaic variants in 2 (1%). All these variants were previously missed by various conventional scanning methods. In parallel, HRM APC scanning was applied to DNA isolated from polyp tissue of two additional patients with apparently sporadic polyposis and without detectable pathogenic APC variant in leukocyte DNA. In both patients a pathogenic mosaic APC variant was present in multiple polyps. The detection of pathogenic APC variants in 7% of the patients, including mosaics, illustrates the usefulness of a complete APC gene reanalysis of previously tested patients, by a supplementary scanning method. HRM is a sensitive and fast pre-screening method for reliable detection of heterozygous and mosaic variants, which can be applied to leukocyte and polyp derived DNA.

  7. Rapid Identification of Echinococcus granulosus and E. canadensis Using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis by Focusing on a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Ahmad Hosseini; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Tajaddini, Mohammadhasan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Mohtashami-Pour, Mehdi; Pestehchian, Nader

    2016-07-22

    High-resolution melting (HRM) is a reliable and sensitive scanning method to detect variation in DNA sequences. We used this method to better understand the epidemiology and transmission of Echinococcus granulosus. We tested the use of HRM to discriminate the genotypes of E. granulosus and E. canadensis. One hundred forty-one hydatid cysts were collected from slaughtered animals in different parts of Isfahan-Iran in 2013. After DNA extraction, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene was amplified using PCR coupled with the HRM curve. The result of HRM analysis using partial the sequences of cox1 gene revealed that 93, 35, and 2 isolates were identified as G1, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in locus 9867 of the cox1 gene. This is a critical locus for the differentiation between the G6 and G7 genotypes. In the phylogenic tree, the sample with a SNP was located between the G6 and G7 genotypes, which suggest that this isolate has a G6/G7 genotype. The HRM analysis developed in the present study provides a powerful technique for molecular and epidemiological studies on echinococcosis in humans and animals.

  8. Mutation analysis of SLC26A4 for Pendred syndrome and nonsyndromic hearing loss by high-resolution melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Neng; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl

    2011-01-01

    Pendred syndrome and DFNB4 (autosomal recessive nonsyndromic congenital deafness, locus 4) are associated with autosomal recessive congenital sensorineural hearing loss and mutations in the SLC26A4 gene. Extensive allelic heterogeneity, however, necessitates analysis of all exons and splice sites...

  9. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  10. Melting of gold microclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, I.L.; Jellinek, J.

    1991-01-01

    The transition from solid-like to liquid-like behavior in Au n , n=6, 7, 13, clusters is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. A Gupta-type potential with all-neighbour interactions is employed to incorporate n-body effects. The melting-like transition is described in terms of short-time averages of the kinetic energy per particle, root-mean-square bond length fluctuations and mean square displacements. A comparison between melting temperatures of Au n and Ni n clusters is presented. (orig.)

  11. Simulation of melt spreading in consideration of phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spengler, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The analysis of melt spreading and relocation phenomena in the containment of LWR power plants in case of hypothetical severe accidents leading to core melting is an important issue for reactor safety investigations. For the simulation of melt spreading the code LAVA has been developed on the basis of a method from the related subject of volcanology by adding more detailed models for heat transfer phenomena and flow rheology. The development is supported by basic analysis of the spreading of gravity currents as well as experimental investigations of the rheology of solidifying melts. These exhibit strong non-Newtonian effects in case of a high content of solids in the freezing melt. The basic model assumption in LAVA is the ideal Bingham plastic approach to the non-Newtonian, shear-thinning characteristic of solidifying melts. For the recalculation of melt spreading experiments, the temperature-dependent material properties for solidifying melt mixtures have been calculated using correlations from the literature. With the parameters and correlations for the rheological material properties approached by results from literature, it was possible to recalculate successfully recent spreading experiments with simulant materials and prototypic reactor core materials. An application to the behaviour of core melt in the reactor cavity assumed a borderline case for the issue of spreading. This limit is represented by melt conditions (large solid fraction, low volume flux), under which the melt is hardly spreadable. Due to the persistent volume flux the reactor cavity is completely, but inhomogeneously filled with melt. The degree of inhomogeneity is rather small, so it is concluded, that for the long-term coolability of a melt pool in narrow cavities the spreading of melt will probably have only negligible influence. (orig.)

  12. GLASS MELTING PHENOMENA, THEIR ORDERING AND MELTING SPACE UTILISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Němec L.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four aspects of effective glass melting have been defined – namely the fast kinetics of partial melting phenomena, a consideration of the melting phenomena ordering, high utilisation of the melting space, and effective utilisation of the supplied energy. The relations were defined for the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption of the glass melting process which involve the four mentioned aspects of the process and indicate the potentials of effective melting. The quantity “space utilisation” has been treated in more detail as an aspect not considered in practice till this time. The space utilisation was quantitatively defined and its values have been determined for the industrial melting facility by mathematical modelling. The definitions of the specific melting performance and specific energy consumption have been used for assessment of the potential impact of a controlled melt flow and high space utilisation on the melting process efficiency on the industrial scale. The results have shown that even the partial control of the melt flow, leading to the partial increase of the space utilisation, may considerably increase the melting performance, whereas a decrease of the specific energy consumption was determined to be between 10 - 15 %.

  13. ITS2 barcoding DNA region combined with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis of Hyoscyami Semen, the mature seed of Hyoscyamus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chao; Hu, Zhi-Gang; Tu, Yuan; Liu, He-Gang; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Ming-Ming; SHIi, Yu-Hua; Wu, Lan; Sun, Wei; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2016-12-01

    Hyoscyami Semen, the mature dried seed of Hyoscyamus niger L., has long been used as a traditional Chinese medicine to treat human diseases. Hyoscyami Semen is found in local markets in China. In markets, sellers and buyers commonly inadvertently mix the seeds of H. niger with the seeds of related species such as Hygrophila salicifolia (Vahl) Nees, Astragalus complanatus R. Br., Cuscuta australis R. Br., Cuscuta chinensis Lam., and Impatiens balsamina L. because of their similar morphologies or similar names. Thus, developing a reliable method for discriminating H. niger seeds from its adulterants is necessary to reduce confusion and ensure the safe use of Hyoscyami Semen. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of high-resolution melting analysis combined with DNA barcoding (Bar-HRM) with internal transcribed spacer 2 to discriminate H. niger. Our results show that Bar-HRM successfully identified the adulterants and detected the proportion of H. niger DNA extract within an admixture. In particular, HRM detected H. niger DNA extract in A. complanatus DNA extract at concentrations as low as 1%. In conclusion, the Bar-HRM method developed in the present study for authenticating H. niger is rapid and cost-effective. It can be used in the future to guarantee the purity of Hyoscyami Semen for the clinical use. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Learning to classify organic and conventional wheat - a machine-learning driven approach using the MeltDB 2.0 metabolomics analysis platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas eKessler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present results of our machine learning approach to the problem of classifying GC-MS data originating from wheat grains of different farming systems. The aim is to investigate the potential of learning algorithms to classify GC-MS data to be either from conventionally grown or from organically grown samples and considering different cultivars. The motivation of our work is rather obvious on the background of nowadays increased demand for organic food in post-industrialized societies and the necessity to prove organic food authenticity. The background of our data set is given by up to eleven wheat cultivars that have been cultivated in both farming systems, organic and conventional, throughout three years. More than 300 GC-MS measurements were recorded and subsequently processed and analyzed in the MeltDB 2.0 metabolomics analysis platform, being briefly outlined in this paper. We further describe how unsupervised (t-SNE, PCA and supervised (RF, SVM methods can be applied for sample visualization and classification. Our results clearly show that years have most and wheat cultivars have second-most influence on the metabolic composition of a sample. We can also show, that for a given year and cultivar, organic and conventional cultivation can be distinguished by machine-learning algorithms.

  15. Mutation Scanning in a Single and a Stacked Genetically Modified (GM) Event by Real-Time PCR and High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ali, Sina-Elisabeth; Madi, Zita Erika; Hochegger, Rupert; Quist, David; Prewein, Bernhard; Haslberger, Alexander G.; Brandes, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations must be avoided during the production and use of seeds. In the European Union (EU), Directive 2001/18/EC requires any DNA construct introduced via transformation to be stable. Establishing genetic stability is critical for the approval of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, genetic stability of two GMOs was examined using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) employing Scorpion primers for amplification. The genetic variability of the transgenic insert and that of the flanking regions in a single oilseed rape variety (GT73) and a stacked maize (MON88017 × MON810) was studied. The GT73 and the 5' region of MON810 showed no instabilities in the examined regions. However; two out of 100 analyzed samples carried a heterozygous point mutation in the 3' region of MON810 in the stacked variety. These results were verified by direct sequencing of the amplified PCR products as well as by sequencing of cloned PCR fragments. The occurrence of the mutation suggests that the 5' region is more suitable than the 3' region for the quantification of MON810. The identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a stacked event is in contrast to the results of earlier studies of the same MON810 region in a single event where no DNA polymorphism was found. PMID:25365178

  16. Evaluation of the Capacity of PCR and High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis for Identification of Mixed Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed A Ghorashi

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity and presentation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG infection may differ from one strain to another and this may have implications on control measures. Infection of individual birds with more than one MG strain has been reported. A PCR followed by high resolution melt (HRM curve analysis has been developed in our laboratory and routinely used for detection and differentiation of MG strains. However the potential of this test for identification of MG strains in a mixed specimen has not been evaluated. In the present study, the capability of PCR-HRM curve analysis technique, targeting vlhA and pvpA genes was assessed for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed population. Different DNA ratios of two MG strains from 1 to 10(-4 ng were tested with some generated conventional and normalized curves distinct from those of individual strains alone. Using genotype confidence percentages (GCP generated from HRM curve analysis, it was found that vlhA PCR-HRM was more consistent than pvpA PCR-HRM for the detection of MG ts-11 vaccine strain mixed with any of the MG strains 6/85, F, S6 or a field isolate. The potential of vlhA PCR-HRM to detect mixed MG strains in a specimen was found to be primarily dependent on quantity and proportion of the target DNAs in the mixture. This is the first study examining the capacity of PCR-HRM technique for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed strain population.

  17. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  18. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  19. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, B. J., E-mail: brendan.florio@ul.ie [University of Limerick, Mathematics Applications Consortium for Science and Industry (MACSI), Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Ireland); Myers, T. G., E-mail: tmyers@crm.cat [Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  20. Basal melting driven by turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbanipour Esfahani, Babak; Hirata, Silvia C.; Berti, Stefano; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2018-05-01

    Melting and, conversely, solidification processes in the presence of convection are key to many geophysical problems. An essential question related to these phenomena concerns the estimation of the (time-evolving) melting rate, which is tightly connected to the turbulent convective dynamics in the bulk of the melt fluid and the heat transfer at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, we consider a convective-melting model, constructed as a generalization of the Rayleigh-Bénard system, accounting for the basal melting of a solid. As the change of phase proceeds, a fluid layer grows at the heated bottom of the system and eventually reaches a turbulent convection state. By means of extensive lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations employing an enthalpy formulation of the governing equations, we explore the model dynamics in two- and three-dimensional configurations. The focus of the analysis is on the scaling of global quantities like the heat flux and the kinetic energy with the Rayleigh number, as well as on the interface morphology and the effects of space dimensionality. Independently of dimensionality, we find that the convective-melting system behavior shares strong resemblances with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard one, and that the heat flux is only weakly enhanced with respect to that case. Such similarities are understood, at least to some extent, considering the resulting slow motion of the melting front (with respect to the turbulent fluid velocity fluctuations) and its generally little roughness (compared to the height of the fluid layer). Varying the Stefan number, accounting for the thermodynamical properties of the material, also seems to have only a mild effect, which implies the possibility of extrapolating results in numerically delicate low-Stefan setups from more convenient high-Stefan ones. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the geophysically relevant problem of modeling Arctic ice melt ponds.

  1. MELT-IIIB: an updated version of the melt code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabb, K.K.; Lewis, C.H.; O'Dell, L.D.; Padilla, A. Jr.; Smith, D.E.; Wilburn, N.P.

    1979-04-01

    The MELT series is a reactor modeling code designed to investigate a wide variety of hypothetical accident conditions, particularly the transient overpower sequence. MELT-IIIB is the latest in the series

  2. ANALYSIS OF PERIODIC NANOSTRUCTURES FORMATION ON A GOLD SURFACE UNDER EXPOSURE TO ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES NEAR THE MELTING THRESHOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Ivanov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The mechanism of surface restructuring by ultrashort laser pulses involves a lot of fast, non-equilibrium, and interrelated processes while the solid is in a transient state. As a result, the analysis of the experimental data cannot cover all the mechanisms of nanostructuring. We present a direct comparison of a simulation and experimental results of surface nanomodification induced by a single laser pulse. Method. The experimental results were obtained by using a mask projection setup with a laser wavelength equal to 248 nm and a pulse length equal to 1.6 ps. This setup is used to produce an intensity grating on a gold surface with a sinusoidal shape and a period of 500 nm. The formed structures were analyzed by a scanning and transmission electron microscope, respectively. Then a hybrid atomistic-continuum model capable of capturing the essential mechanisms responsible for the nanostructuring process was used for modeling the interaction of the laser pulse with a thick gold target. Main Results. A good agreement between simulation and experimental data justifies the proposed approach as a powerful tool revealing the physics behind the nanostructuring process at a gold surface and providing a microscopic insight into the dynamics of the structuring processes of metals in general. The presented model, therefore, is an important step towards a new computational tool in predicting materials response to an ultrashort laser pulse on the atomic scale and properties of the modified surfaces. Practical Relevance. This detailed understanding of the dynamics of the process will pave the way towards pre-designed topologies for functionalized surfaces on the nano- and micro-scales.

  3. Analysis of malaria associated genetic traits in Cabo Verde, a melting pot of European and sub Saharan settlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Joana; Machado, Patrícia; Silva, João; Gonçalves, Nilza; Ribeiro, Letícia; Faustino, Paula; do Rosário, Virgílio Estólio; Manco, Licínio; Gusmão, Leonor; Amorim, António; Arez, Ana Paula

    2010-01-15

    Malaria has occurred in the Cabo Verde archipelago with epidemic characteristics since its colonization. Nowadays, it occurs in Santiago Island alone and though prophylaxis is not recommended by the World Health Organization, studies have highlight the prospect of malaria becoming a serious public health problem as a result of the presence of antimalarial drug resistance associated with mutations in the parasite populations and underscore the need for tighter surveillance. Despite the presumptive weak immune status of the population, severe symptoms of malaria are not observed and many people present a subclinical course of the disease. No data on the prevalence of sickle-cell trait and red cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (two classical genetic factors associated with resistance to severe malaria) were available for the Cabo Verde archipelago and, therefore, we studied the low morbidity from malaria in relation to the particular genetic characteristics of the human host population. We also included the analysis of the pyruvate kinase deficiency associated gene, reported as putatively associated with resistance to the disease. Allelic frequencies of the polymorphisms examined are closer to European than to African populations and no malaria selection signatures were found. No association was found between the analyzed human factors and infection but one result is of high interest: a linkage disequilibrium test revealed an association of distant loci in the PKLR gene and adjacent regions, only in non-infected individuals. This could mean a more conserved gene region selected in association to protection against the infection and/or the disease. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Towards a pathogenic Escherichia coli detection platform using multiplex SYBR®Green Real-time PCR methods and high resolution melting analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafni-Maria Kagkli

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a group of bacteria which has raised a lot of safety concerns in recent years. Five major intestinal pathogenic groups have been recognized amongst which the verocytotoxin or shiga-toxin (stx1 and/or stx2 producing E. coli (VTEC or STEC respectively have received a lot of attention recently. Indeed, due to the high number of outbreaks related to VTEC strains, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA has requested the monitoring of the "top-five" serogroups (O26, O103, O111, O145 and O157 most often encountered in food borne diseases and addressed the need for validated VTEC detection methods. Here we report the development of a set of intercalating dye Real-time PCR methods capable of rapidly detecting the presence of the toxin genes together with intimin (eae in the case of VTEC, or aggregative protein (aggR, in the case of the O104:H4 strain responsible for the outbreak in Germany in 2011. All reactions were optimized to perform at the same annealing temperature permitting the multiplex application in order to minimize the need of material and to allow for high-throughput analysis. In addition, High Resolution Melting (HRM analysis allowing the discrimination among strains possessing similar virulence traits was established. The development, application to food samples and the flexibility in use of the methods are thoroughly discussed. Together, these Real-time PCR methods facilitate the detection of VTEC in a new highly efficient way and could represent the basis for developing a simple pathogenic E. coli platform.

  5. Rapid screening of rpoB and katG mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by high-resolution melting curve analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haeili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is essential to prevent its transmission in the community and initiate effective anti-TB treatment regimen. Materials and Methods: High-resolution melting curve (HRM analysis was evaluated for rapid detection of resistance conferring mutations in rpoB and katG genes. We screened 95 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates including 20 rifampin resistant (RIF-R, 21 isoniazid resistant (INH-R and 54 fully susceptible (S isolates determined by proportion method of drug susceptibility testing. Nineteen M. tuberculosis isolates with known drug susceptibility genotypes were used as references for the assay validation. The nucleotide sequences of the target regions rpoB and katG genes were determined to investigate the frequency and type of mutations and to confirm HRM results. Results: HRM analysis of a 129-bp fragment of rpoB allowed correct identification of 19 of the 20 phenotypically RIF-R and all RIF-S isolates. All INH-S isolates generated wild-type HRM curves and 18 out of 21 INH-R isolates harboured any mutation in 109-bp fragment of katG exhibited mutant type HRM curves. However, 1 RIF-R and 3 INH-R isolates were falsely identified as susceptible which were confirmed for having no mutation in their target regions by sequencing. The main mutations involved in RIF and INH resistance were found at codons rpoB531 (60% of RIF-R isolates and katG315 (85.7% of INH-R isolates, respectively. Conclusion: HRM was found to be a reliable, rapid and low cost method to characterise drug susceptibility of clinical TB isolates in resource-limited settings.

  6. Peptide nucleic acid probe-based fluorescence melting curve analysis for rapid screening of common JAK2, MPL, and CALR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joonhong; Song, Minsik; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Lee, Gun Dong; Kim, KyungTak; Park, Heekyung; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo

    2017-02-01

    We developed and evaluated the feasibility of peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-based fluorescence melting curve analysis (FMCA) to detect common mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We have set up two separate reactions of PNA-based FMCA: JAK2 V617F &CALR p.Leu367fs*46 (set A) and MPL W515L/K &CALR p.Lys385fs*47 (set B). Clinical usefulness was validated with allele-specific real-time PCR, fragment analysis, Sanger sequencing in 57 BCR-ABL1-negative MPNs. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-based FMCA was approximately 10% for each mutation and interference reactions using mixtures of different mutations were not observed. Non-specific amplification was not observed in normal control. PNA-based FMCA was able to detect all JAK2 V617F (n=20), CALR p.Leu367fs*46 (n=10) and p.Lys385fs*47 (n=8). Three of six MPL mutations were detected except three samples with low mutant concentration in out of LOD. JAK2 exon 12 mutations (n=7) were negative without influencing V617F results. Among six variant CALR exon 9 mutations, two were detected by this method owing to invading of probe binding site. PNA-based FMCA for detecting common JAK2, MPL, and CALR mutations is a rapid, simple, and sensitive technique in BCR-ABL1-negative MPNs with >10% mutant allele at the time of initial diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find

  8. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply…

  9. Pavement Snow Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The design of pavement snow melting systems is presented based on criteria established by ASHRAE. The heating requirements depends on rate of snow fall, air temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity. Piping materials are either metal or plastic, however, due to corrosion problems, cross-linked polyethylene pipe is now generally used instead of iron. Geothermal energy is supplied to systems through the use of heat pipes, directly from circulating pipes, through a heat exchanger or by allowing water to flow directly over the pavement, by using solar thermal storage. Examples of systems in New Jersey, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Switzerland and Oregon are presented. Key words: pavement snow melting, geothermal heating, heat pipes, solar storage, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Klamath Falls.

  10. Transient fuel melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, L.; Schmitz, F.

    1982-10-01

    The observation of micrographic documents from fuel after a CABRI test leads to postulate a specific mode of transient fuel melting during a rapid nuclear power excursion. When reaching the melt threshold, the bands which are characteristic for the solid state are broken statistically over a macroscopic region. The time of maintaining the fuel at the critical enthalpy level between solid and liquid is too short to lead to a phase separation. A significant life-time (approximately 1 second) of this intermediate ''unsolide'' state would have consequences on the variation of physical properties linked to the phase transition solid/liquid: viscosity, specific volume and (for the irradiated fuel) fission gas release [fr

  11. qPCR-High resolution melt analysis for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium leprae directly from clinical specimens of leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Sergio; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Truman, Richard W; Goulart, Isabela Maria B; Vissa, Varalakshmi; Li, Wei; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suffys, Philip; Fontes, Amanda B; Rosa, Patricia S; Scollard, David M; Williams, Diana L

    2017-06-01

    Real-Time PCR-High Resolution Melting (qPCR-HRM) analysis has been recently described for rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium leprae. The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate the validity, reliability, and accuracy of this assay for M. leprae DST in clinical specimens. The specificity and sensitivity for determining the presence and susceptibility of M. leprae to dapsone based on the folP1 drug resistance determining region (DRDR), rifampin (rpoB DRDR) and ofloxacin (gyrA DRDR) was evaluated using 211 clinical specimens from leprosy patients, including 156 multibacillary (MB) and 55 paucibacillary (PB) cases. When comparing the results of qPCR-HRM DST and PCR/direct DNA sequencing, 100% concordance was obtained. The effects of in-house phenol/chloroform extraction versus column-based DNA purification protocols, and that of storage and fixation protocols of specimens for qPCR-HRM DST, were also evaluated. qPCR-HRM results for all DRDR gene assays (folP1, rpoB, and gyrA) were obtained from both MB (154/156; 98.7%) and PB (35/55; 63.3%) patients. All PCR negative specimens were from patients with low numbers of bacilli enumerated by an M. leprae-specific qPCR. We observed that frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues or archival Fite's stained slides were suitable for HRM analysis. Among 20 mycobacterial and other skin bacterial species tested, only M. lepromatosis, highly related to M. leprae, generated amplicons in the qPCR-HRM DST assay for folP1 and rpoB DRDR targets. Both DNA purification protocols tested were efficient in recovering DNA suitable for HRM analysis. However, 3% of clinical specimens purified using the phenol/chloroform DNA purification protocol gave false drug resistant data. DNA obtained from freshly frozen (n = 172), formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues (n = 36) or archival Fite's stained slides (n = 3) were suitable for qPCR-HRM DST analysis. The HRM-based assay was also able to

  12. Numerical analysis of transport phenomena in Y-Ba-Cu-O melt during growth of superconducting crystal Y123 by Czochralski method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyd, J. S.; Suzuki, K.

    2003-10-01

    In 1993, at the Superconductivity Research Laboratory (SRL), International Superconductivity Technology Centre (ISTEC), in Tokyo, continuous growth of large single crystals of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x (Y123) was achieved by the application of a modified Czochralski method. This paper presents the numerical computations of the flow, thermal and Y concentration fields in the Ba-Cu-O melt for Y123 single crystal growth by this modified method. The finite volume method was used to calculate the fluid flow, heat transfer and yttrium distribution in the melt with staggered numerical grid. The flow in the melt was modelled as an incompressible Newtonian and Boussinesque fluid. Calculations are presented for a combined flow regime of buoyancy-driven natural convection and crystal-rotation-driven forced convection.

  13. Analysis of a Lennard-Jones fcc structure melting to the corresponding frozen liquid: Differences between the bulk and the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivi-Tran, N.; Faivre, A.

    2009-01-01

    We computed a Lennard-Jones frozen liquid with a free surface using classical molecular dynamics. The structure factor curves on the free surface of this sample were calculated for different depths knowing that we have periodic boundary conditions on the other parts of the sample. The resulting structure factor curves show an horizontal shift of their first peak depending on how deep in the sample the curves are computed. We analyze our resulting curves in the light of spatial correlation functions during melting. The conclusion is that the differences between bulk and surface are quite small during melting and that at the end of melting, only the very surface happens to be less dense than the bulk. This result is intrinsic to the shape of the Lennard-Jones potential and does not depend on any other parameter.

  14. Fuel Rod Melt Progression Simulation Using Low-Temperature Melting Metal Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung Dong Lee; Suh, Kune Y.; GoonCherl Park; Un Chul Lee

    2002-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident and various severe fuel damage experiments have shown that core damage is likely to proceed through various states before the core slumps into the lower head. Numerous experiments were conducted to address when and how the core can lose its original geometry, what geometries are formed, and in what processes the core materials are transported to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. Core degradation progresses along the line of clad ballooning, clad oxidation, material interaction, metallic blockage, molten pool formation, melt progression, and relocation to the lower head. Relocation into the lower plenum may occur from the lateral periphery or from the bottom of the core depending upon the thermal and physical states of the pool. Determining the quantities and rate of molten material transfer to the lower head is important since significant amounts of molten material relocated to the lower head can threaten the vessel integrity by steam explosion and thermal and mechanical attack of the melt. In this paper the focus is placed on the melt flow regime on a cylindrical fuel rod utilizing the LAMDA (Lumped Analysis of Melting in Degrading Assemblies) facility at the Seoul National University. The downward relocation of the molten material is a combination of the external film flow and the internal pipe flow. The heater rods are 0.8 m long and are coated by a low-temperature melting metal alloy. The electrical internal heating method is employed during the test. External heating is adopted to simulate the exothermic Zircaloy-steam reaction. Tests are conducted in several quasi-steady-state conditions. Given the variable boundary conditions including the heat flux and the water level, observation is made for the melting location, progression, and the mass of molten material. Finally, the core melt progression model is developed from the visual inspection and quantitative analysis of the experimental data. As the core material relocates

  15. Identification and Evaluation of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Allotetraploid Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Based on Amplicon Sequencing Combined with High Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yanbin; Pandey, Manish K; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Hong; Varshney, Rajeev K; Liang, Xuanqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an allotetraploid (AABB) species derived from the A-genome (Arachis duranensis) and B-genome (Arachis ipaensis) progenitors. Presence of two versions of a DNA sequence based on the two progenitor genomes poses a serious technical and analytical problem during single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker identification and analysis. In this context, we have analyzed 200 amplicons derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and genome survey sequences (GSS) to identify SNPs in a panel of genotypes consisting of 12 cultivated peanut varieties and two diploid progenitors representing the ancestral genomes. A total of 18 EST-SNPs and 44 genomic-SNPs were identified in 12 peanut varieties by aligning the sequence of A. hypogaea with diploid progenitors. The average frequency of sequence polymorphism was higher for genomic-SNPs than the EST-SNPs with one genomic-SNP every 1011 bp as compared to one EST-SNP every 2557 bp. In order to estimate the potential and further applicability of these identified SNPs, 96 peanut varieties were genotyped using high resolution melting (HRM) method. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for EST-SNPs ranged between 0.021 and 0.413 with a mean of 0.172 in the set of peanut varieties, while genomic-SNPs ranged between 0.080 and 0.478 with a mean of 0.249. Total 33 SNPs were used for polymorphism detection among the parents and 10 selected lines from mapping population Y13Zh (Zhenzhuhei × Yueyou13). Of the total 33 SNPs, nine SNPs showed polymorphism in the mapping population Y13Zh, and seven SNPs were successfully mapped into five linkage groups. Our results showed that SNPs can be identified in allotetraploid peanut with high accuracy through amplicon sequencing and HRM assay. The identified SNPs were very informative and can be used for different genetic and breeding applications in peanut.

  16. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis as a new tool for rapid identification of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Pullorum and Gallinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xingxing; Fu, Ying; Xu, Chenggang; Feng, Zhou; Li, Miao; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Jianmin; Liao, Ming

    2017-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Pullorum and Gallinarum represent the most common causative agents of chicken salmonellosis, which result in high mortality and morbidity throughout the world. It is difficult and laborious to discriminate these diseases based on biochemical or phenotypic methods. Herein, we report the development of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PCR-high resolution melt (PCR-HRM) assay for the detection and discrimination of both S. Pullorum and S. Gallinarun. The gene rfbS, which encodes a factor involved in the biosynthesis of ADP paratose in serogroup D of Salmonella, has been identified as a robust genetic marker for the identification of S. Pullorum and S. Gallinarun based on polymorphisms at positions 237 and 598. Therefore, PCR-HRM analyses were used to characterize this gene. A total of 15 reference and 33 clinical isolates of Salmonella and related Gram-negative bacteria were detected using 2 sets of primers. Our PCR-HRM assay could distinguish S. Pullorum from S. Gallinarun and other strains using the primer pair SP-237F/237R. Similarly, S. Gallinarun could be distinguished from S. Pullorum and other strains using primer set SG-598F/598R. These 2 assays showed high specificity (100%) for both S. Pullorum and S. Gallinarun; the sensitivity of these 2 assays was at least 100-fold greater than that of the allele-specific PCR assay. This present study demonstrated that HRM analysis represents a potent, simple, and economic tool for the rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of S. Pullorum and S. Gallinarun. Our approach also may aid efforts for purification of Avian Salmonella disease. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. A simple, high throughput method to locate single copy sequences from Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC libraries using High Resolution Melt analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caligari Peter DS

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high-throughput anchoring of genetic markers into contigs is required for many ongoing physical mapping projects. Multidimentional BAC pooling strategies for PCR-based screening of large insert libraries is a widely used alternative to high density filter hybridisation of bacterial colonies. To date, concerns over reliability have led most if not all groups engaged in high throughput physical mapping projects to favour BAC DNA isolation prior to amplification by conventional PCR. Results Here, we report the first combined use of Multiplex Tandem PCR (MT-PCR and High Resolution Melt (HRM analysis on bacterial stocks of BAC library superpools as a means of rapidly anchoring markers to BAC colonies and thereby to integrate genetic and physical maps. We exemplify the approach using a BAC library of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Super pools of twenty five 384-well plates and two-dimension matrix pools of the BAC library were prepared for marker screening. The entire procedure only requires around 3 h to anchor one marker. Conclusions A pre-amplification step during MT-PCR allows high multiplexing and increases the sensitivity and reliability of subsequent HRM discrimination. This simple gel-free protocol is more reliable, faster and far less costly than conventional PCR screening. The option to screen in parallel 3 genetic markers in one MT-PCR-HRM reaction using templates from directly pooled bacterial stocks of BAC-containing bacteria further reduces time for anchoring markers in physical maps of species with large genomes.

  18. Development of a two-step high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for screening sequence variants associated with resistance to the QoIs, benzimidazoles and dicarboximides in airborne inoculum of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidimopoulos, Michael; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Vellios, Evangelos; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Pappas, Athanassios C

    2014-11-01

    A rapid, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis protocol was developed to detect sequence variations associated with resistance to the QoIs, benzimidazoles and dicarboximides in Botrytis cinerea airborne inoculum. HRM analysis was applied directly in fungal DNA collected from air samplers with selective medium. Three and five different genotypes were detected and classified according to their melting profiles in BenA and bos1 genes associated with resistance to benzimidazoles and dicarboximides, respectively. The sensitivity of the methodology was evident in the case of the QoIs, where genotypes varying either by a single nucleotide polymorphism or an additional 1205-bp intron were separated accurately with a single pair of primers. The developed two-step protocol was completed in 82 min and showed reduced variation in the melting curves' formation. HRM analysis rapidly detected the major mutations found in greenhouse strains providing accurate data for successfully controlling grey mould. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microstructures define melting of molybdenum at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Meng, Yue; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-03-01

    High-pressure melting anchors the phase diagram of a material, revealing the effect of pressure on the breakdown of the ordering of atoms in the solid. An important case is molybdenum, which has long been speculated to undergo an exceptionally steep increase in melting temperature when compressed. On the other hand, previous experiments showed nearly constant melting temperature as a function of pressure, in large discrepancy with theoretical expectations. Here we report a high-slope melting curve in molybdenum by synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis of crystalline microstructures, generated by heating and subsequently rapidly quenching samples in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Distinct microstructural changes, observed at pressures up to 130 gigapascals, appear exclusively after melting, thus offering a reliable melting criterion. In addition, our study reveals a previously unsuspected transition in molybdenum at high pressure and high temperature, which yields highly textured body-centred cubic nanograins above a transition temperature.

  20. Simulation of steam explosion in stratified melt-coolant configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, Matjaž; Centrih, Vasilij; Uršič, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Strong steam explosions may develop spontaneously in stratified configurations. • Considerable melt-coolant premixed layer formed in subcooled water with hot melts. • Analysis with MC3D code provided insight into stratified steam explosion phenomenon. • Up to 25% of poured melt was mixed with water and available for steam explosion. • Better instrumented experiments needed to determine dominant mixing process. - Abstract: A steam explosion is an energetic fuel coolant interaction process, which may occur during a severe reactor accident when the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. In nuclear reactor safety analyses steam explosions are primarily considered in melt jet-coolant pool configurations where sufficiently deep coolant pool conditions provide complete jet breakup and efficient premixture formation. Stratified melt-coolant configurations, i.e. a molten melt layer below a coolant layer, were up to now believed as being unable to generate strong explosive interactions. Based on the hypothesis that there are no interfacial instabilities in a stratified configuration it was assumed that the amount of melt in the premixture is insufficient to produce strong explosions. However, the recently performed experiments in the PULiMS and SES (KTH, Sweden) facilities with oxidic corium simulants revealed that strong steam explosions may develop spontaneously also in stratified melt-coolant configurations, where with high temperature melts and subcooled water conditions a considerable melt-coolant premixed layer is formed. In the article, the performed study of steam explosions in a stratified melt-coolant configuration in PULiMS like conditions is presented. The goal of this analytical work is to supplement the experimental activities within the PULiMS research program by addressing the key questions, especially regarding the explosivity of the formed premixed layer and the mechanisms responsible for the melt-water mixing. To

  1. Emerging melt quality control solution technologies for aluminium melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Pascual, Jr

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed “MTS 1500” Melt Treatment System is performing the specifi cally required melt treatment operations like degassing, cleaning, modification and/or grain refinement by an automated process in one step and at the same location. This linked process is saving time, energy and metal losses allowing - by automated dosage of the melt treatment agents - the production of a consistent melt quality batch after batch. By linking the MTS Metal Treatment System with sensors operating on-line in the melt, i.e., with a hydrogen sensor “Alspek H”, a fully automated control of parts of the process chain like degassing is possible. This technology does guarantee a pre-specifi ed and documented melt quality in each melt treatment batch. Furthermore, to ensure that castings are consistent and predictable there is a growing realization that critical parameters such as metal cleanliness must be measured prior to casting. There exists accepted methods for measuring the cleanliness of an aluminum melt but these can be both slow and costly. A simple, rapid and meaningful method of measuring and bench marking the cleanliness of an aluminum melt has been developed to offer the foundry a practical method of measuring melt cleanliness. This paper shows the structure and performance of the integrated MTS melt treatment process and documents achieved melt quality standards after degassing, cleaning, modifi cation and grain refi nement operations under real foundry conditions. It also provides an insight on a melt cleanliness measuring device “Alspek MQ” to provide foundry men better tools in meeting the increasing quality and tighter specifi cation demand from the industry.

  2. High-resolution melting analysis, a simple and effective method for reliable mutation scanning and frequency studies in the ACADVL gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Kjeldsen, Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    -long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD), the second most common fatty acid oxidation disorder detected by expanded newborn screening, to demonstrate accurate and fast diagnostic evaluation of the ACADVL gene utilizing DNA extracted from the newborn screening dried blood spot and high resolution melt...

  3. TIMS analysis of Sr and Nd isotopes in melt inclusions from Italian potassium-rich lavas using prototype 1013Ω amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, Janne M.; Nikogosian, Igor; van Bergen, Manfred J.; Smeets, Richard; Bouman, Claudia; Davies, Gareth R.

    2015-01-01

    Sr and Nd isotopes were determined using new thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) techniques for a suite of 21 olivine-hosted (85-92mol% Fo) melt inclusions selected from potassic and ultra-potassic lavas from the Italian peninsula. Sr isotopes were measured using default 1011Ω resistors,

  4. Real-time RT-PCR high-resolution melting curve analysis and multiplex RT-PCR to detect and differentiate grapevine leafroll-associated associated virus 3 variant groups I, II, III and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bester Rachelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3 is the main contributing agent of leafroll disease worldwide. Four of the six GLRaV-3 variant groups known have been found in South Africa, but their individual contribution to leafroll disease is unknown. In order to study the pathogenesis of leafroll disease, a sensitive and accurate diagnostic assay is required that can detect different variant groups of GLRaV-3. Methods In this study, a one-step real-time RT-PCR, followed by high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and identification of GLRaV-3 variants of groups I, II, III and VI, was developed. A melting point confidence interval for each variant group was calculated to include at least 90% of all melting points observed. A multiplex RT-PCR protocol was developed to these four variant groups in order to assess the efficacy of the real-time RT-PCR HRM assay. Results A universal primer set for GLRaV-3 targeting the heat shock protein 70 homologue (Hsp70h gene of GLRaV-3 was designed that is able to detect GLRaV-3 variant groups I, II, III and VI and differentiate between them with high-resolution melting curve analysis. The real-time RT-PCR HRM and the multiplex RT-PCR were optimized using 121 GLRaV-3 positive samples. Due to a considerable variation in melting profile observed within each GLRaV-3 group, a confidence interval of above 90% was calculated for each variant group, based on the range and distribution of melting points. The intervals of groups I and II could not be distinguished and a 95% joint confidence interval was calculated for simultaneous detection of group I and II variants. An additional primer pair targeting GLRaV-3 ORF1a was developed that can be used in a subsequent real-time RT-PCR HRM to differentiate between variants of groups I and II. Additionally, the multiplex RT-PCR successfully validated 94.64% of the infections detected with the real-time RT-PCR HRM

  5. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...... and into the terminal relaxation regime for Z=10. Using the known (Rouse) mobility of unentangled chains and the melt entanglement length determined via the primitive path analysis of the microscopic topological state of our systems, we have performed parameter-free tests of several different tube models. We find...

  6. Electrochemistry of uranium in sodium chloroaluminate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'olieslager, W.; Meuris, F.; Heerman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of uranium was studied in basic, NaCl-saturated NaAlCl 4 melts at 175 deg C. Solutions of UO 3 exhibit two oxidation/reduction waves (cyclic voltammetry). Analysis of the peak currents (cyclic voltammetry), the limiting currents (pulse polarography) and the non-linear log i-t curves (anodic controlled potential coulometry) leads to the conclusion that uranium(IV) in the basic chloroaluminate melt exists as two different species in slow equilibrium with one another, of which only one species can be oxidized to U(VI). (author) 16 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Selective Laser Melting of Pure Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshoji, Toshi-Taka; Nakamura, Kazuya; Yonehara, Makiko; Imai, Ken; Kyogoku, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Appropriate building parameters for selective laser melting of 99.9% pure copper powder were investigated at relatively high laser power of 800 W for hatch pitch in the range from 0.025 mm to 0.12 mm. The highest relative density of the built material was 99.6%, obtained at hatch pitch of 0.10 mm. Building conditions were also studied using transient heat analysis in finite element modeling of the liquidation and solidification of the powder layer. The estimated melt pool length and width were comparable to values obtained by observations using a thermoviewer. The trend for the melt pool width versus the hatch pitch agreed with experimental values.

  8. A new method for simultaneous detection and discrimination of Bovine herpesvirus types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) using real time PCR with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, M S; Quintana, S; Leunda, M R; Recavarren, M; Pagnuco, I; Späth, E; Pérez, S; Odeón, A

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) are antigenically and genetically similar. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable one-step real time PCR assay with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of BoHV-1 and BoHV-5. Optimization of assay conditions was performed with DNA from reference strains. Then, DNA from field isolates, clinical samples and tissue samples of experimentally infected animals were studied by real time PCR-HRM. An efficient amplification of real time PCR products was obtained, and a clear melting curve and appropriate melting peaks for both viruses were achieved in the HRM curve analysis for BoHV type identification. BoHV was identified in all of the isolates and clinical samples, and BoHV types were properly differentiated. Furthermore, viral DNA was detected in 12/18 and 7/18 samples from BoHV-1- and BoHV-5-infected calves, respectively. Real time PCR-HRM achieved a higher sensitivity compared with virus isolation or conventional PCR. In this study, HRM was used as a novel procedure. This method provides rapid, sensitive, specific and simultaneous detection of bovine alpha-herpesviruses DNA. Thus, this technique is an excellent tool for diagnosis, research and epidemiological studies of these viruses in cattle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid detection of pathological mutations and deletions of the haemoglobin beta gene (HBB) by High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis and Gene Ratio Analysis Copy Enumeration PCR (GRACE-PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew; Sasse, Jurgen; Varadi, Aniko

    2016-10-19

    Inherited disorders of haemoglobin are the world's most common genetic diseases, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The large number of mutations associated with the haemoglobin beta gene (HBB) makes gene scanning by High Resolution Melting (HRM) PCR an attractive diagnostic approach. However, existing HRM-PCR assays are not able to detect all common point mutations and have only a very limited ability to detect larger gene rearrangements. The aim of the current study was to develop a HBB assay, which can be used as a screening test in highly heterogeneous populations, for detection of both point mutations and larger gene rearrangements. The assay is based on a combination of conventional HRM-PCR and a novel Gene Ratio Analysis Copy Enumeration (GRACE) PCR method. HRM-PCR was extensively optimised, which included the use of an unlabelled probe and incorporation of universal bases into primers to prevent interference from common non-pathological polymorphisms. GRACE-PCR was employed to determine HBB gene copy numbers relative to a reference gene using melt curve analysis to detect rearrangements in the HBB gene. The performance of the assay was evaluated by analysing 410 samples. A total of 44 distinct pathological genotypes were detected. In comparison with reference methods, the assay has a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 98 %. We have developed an assay that detects both point mutations and larger rearrangements of the HBB gene. This assay is quick, sensitive, specific and cost effective making it suitable as an initial screening test that can be used for highly heterogeneous cohorts.

  10. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    -1300°C, and a trend of higher fusion temperatures with increasing contents of Al-silicates and quartz was found.c) Fly ashes, bottom ashes and deposits from coal/straw co-firing were all found to consist mainly of metal-alumina and alumina-silicates. These ashes all melt in the temperature range 1000......The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction......, the biggest deviations being found for salt rich (i.e. straw derived) ashes.A simple model assuming proportionality between fly ash fusion and deposit formation was found to be capable of ranking deposition rates for the different straw derived fly ashes, whereas for the fly ashes from coal/straw co-firing...

  11. Method of melting solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuka, Katsuyuki; Mizuno, Ryokichi; Kuwana, Katsumi; Sawada, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Fumiaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the volume reduction treatment of a HEPA filter containing various solid wastes, particularly acid digestion residue, or an asbestos separator at a relatively low temperature range. Method: Solid waste to be heated and molten is high melting point material treated by ''acid digestion treatment'' for treating solid waste, e.g. a HEPA filter or polyvinyl chloride, etc. of an atomic power facility treated with nitric acid or the like. When this material is heated and molten by an electric furnace, microwave melting furnace, etc., boron oxide, sodium boride, sodium carbonate, etc. is added as a melting point lowering agent. When it is molten in this state, its melting point is lowered, and it becomes remarkably fluid, and the melting treatment is facilitated. Solidified material thus obtained through the melting step has excellent denseness and further large volume reduction rate of the solidified material. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting II. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Fractional Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirone, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In this second installment of a series that aims to investigate the dynamic interaction between the composition and abundance of the solid mantle and its melt products, the classic interpretation of fractional melting is extended to account for the dynamic nature of the process. A multiphase numerical flow model is coupled with the program AlphaMELTS, which provides at the moment possibly the most accurate petrological description of melting based on thermodynamic principles. The conceptual idea of this study is based on a description of the melting process taking place along a 1-D vertical ideal column where chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply in two local sub-systems separately on some spatial and temporal scale. The solid mantle belongs to a local sub-system (ss1) that does not interact chemically with the melt reservoir which forms a second sub-system (ss2). The local melt products are transferred in the melt sub-system ss2 where the melt phase eventually can also crystallize into a different solid assemblage and will evolve dynamically. The main difference with the usual interpretation of fractional melting is that melt is not arbitrarily and instantaneously extracted from the mantle, but instead remains a dynamic component of the model, hence the process is named dynamic fractional melting (DFM). Some of the conditions that may affect the DFM model are investigated in this study, in particular the effect of temperature, mantle velocity at the boundary of the mantle column. A comparison is made with the dynamic equilibrium melting (DEM) model discussed in the first installment. The implications of assuming passive flow or active flow are also considered to some extent. Complete data files of most of the DFM simulations, four animations and two new DEM simulations (passive/active flow) are available following the instructions in the supplementary material.

  13. High-resolution melt PCR analysis for rapid identification of Chlamydia abortus live vaccine strain 1B among C. abortus strains and field isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorimore, Fabien; Cavanna, Noémie; Vicari, Nadia; Magnino, Simone; Willems, Hermann; Rodolakis, Annie; Siarkou, Victoria I; Laroucau, Karine

    2012-09-01

    We describe a novel high-resolution melt assay that clearly differentiates Chlamydia abortus live vaccine strain 1B from field C. abortus strains and field wild-type isolates based on previously described single nucleotide polymorphisms. This modern genotyping technique is inexpensive, easy to use, and less time-consuming than PCR-RFLP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular field analysis for melt-spun amorphous Fe sub 1 sub 0 sub 0 sub - sub x Gd sub x alloys (18<=60)

    CERN Document Server

    Yano, K

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic properties for the melt-spun amorphous Fe sub 1 sub 0 sub 0 sub - sub x Gd sub x alloys were analyzed using the molecular field theory (MFT). A concentration dependence of three exchange interaction constants was derived over a wide concentration range (18=T sub c sub o sub m sub p. Curvature of the Arrott plot in Gd-rich region was qualitatively simulated.

  15. Logistics Reduction: Heat Melt Compactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction (LR) project Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) technology is a waste management technology. Currently, there are...

  16. Melting in trivalent metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboungi, M.L.; Price, D.L.; Scamehorn, C.; Tosi, M.P.

    1990-11-01

    We report a neutron diffraction study of the liquid structure of YCl 3 and combine the structural data with macroscopic melting and transport data to contrast the behaviour of this molten salt with those of SrCl 2 , ZnCl 2 and AlCl 3 as prototypes of different melting mechanisms for ionic materials. A novel melting mechanism for trivalent metal chlorides, leading to a loose disordered network of edge-sharing octahedral units in the liquid phase, is thereby established. The various melting behaviours are related to bonding character with the help of Pettifor's phenomenological chemical scale. (author). 25 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Melting of contaminated metallic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.-S.; Cheng, S.-Y.; Kung, H.-T.; Lin, L.-F.

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 100 tons of contaminated metallic wastes were produced each year due to maintenance for each TPC's nuclear power reactor and it was roughly estimated that there will be 10,000 tons of metallic scraps resulted from decommissioning of each reactor in the future. One means of handling the contaminated metal is to melt it. Melting process owns not only volume reduction which saves the high cost of final disposal but also resource conservation and recycling benefits. Melting contaminated copper and aluminum scraps in the laboratory scale have been conducted at INER. A total of 546 kg copper condenser tubes with a specific activity of about 2.7 Bq/g was melted in a vacuum induction melting facility. Three types of products, ingot, slag and dust were derived from the melting process, with average activities of 0.10 Bq/g, 2.33 Bq/g and 84.3 Bq/g respectively. After the laboratory melting stage, a pilot plant with a 500 kg induction furnace is being designed to melt the increasingly produced contaminated metallic scraps from nuclear facilities and to investigate the behavior of different radionuclides during melting. (author)

  18. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase and carbapenemase genes using melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Mustapha, Azlin

    2016-05-01

    Real-time PCR melt curve assays for the detection of β-lactamase, extended-spectrum β-lactamase and carbapenemase genes in Gram-negative bacteria were developed. Two multiplex real-time PCR melt curve assays were developed for the detection of ten common β-lactamase genes: blaKPC-like, blaOXA-48-like, blaNDM-like, blaVIM-like, blaIMP-like, blaCTX-M-1+2-group, blaCMY-like, blaACC-like, blaSHV-like and blaTEM-like. The assays were evaluated using 25 bacterial strains and 31 DNA samples (total n=56) comprising different Enterobacteriaceae genera and Pseudomonas spp. These strains were previously characterized at five research institutes. Each resistance gene targeted in this study generated a non-overlapping and distinct melt curve peak. The assay worked effectively and detected the presence of additional resistance genes in 23 samples. The assays developed in this study offer a simple, low cost method for the detection of prevalent β-lactamase, ESBL and carbapenemase genes among Gram-negative pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Melting method for miscellaneous radioactive solid waste and melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaki, Toru; Furukawa, Hirofumi; Uda, Nobuyoshi; Katsurai, Kiyomichi

    1998-01-01

    A vessel containing miscellaneous solid wastes is inserted in a crucible having a releasable material on the inner surface, they are induction-heated from the outside of the crucible by way of low temperature heating coils to melt low melting point materials in the miscellaneous wastes within a temperature range at which the vessel does not melt. Then, they are induction-heated by way of high temperature heating coils to melt the vessel and not yet melted materials, those molten materials are cooled, solidified molten material and the releasable material are taken out, and then the crucible is used again. Then, the crucible can be used again, so that it can be applied to a large scaled melting furnace which treats wastes by a unit of drum. In addition, since the cleaning of the used crucible and the application of the releasable material can be conducted without interrupting the operation of the melting furnace, the operation cycle of the melting furnace can be shortened. (N.H.)

  20. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1994-01-01

    Three simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentru Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. The behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied. 2 refs., 8 tabs

  1. Waste glass melting stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Three different simulated nuclear waste glass feeds, consisting of dried waste and glass frit, were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600 degrees C--1000 degrees C. Simulated melter feeds from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany were used. The samples were thin-sectioned and examined by optical microscopy to investigate the stages of the conversion from feed to glass. Various phenomena were seen, such as frit softening, bubble formation, foaming, bubble motion and removal, convective mixing, and homogenization. Behavior of different feeds was similar, although the degree of gas generation and melt homogenization varied

  2. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  3. UNCONSTRAINED MELTING AND SOLIDIFICATION INSIDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... There is a large number of experimental and numerical works on melting and solidification of PCM[6-10], and also its usage as thermal management in building [11-14], electronic devices [15-16] and solar energy. [17-20].Most investigated geometries in melting and freezing process are sphere (spherical.

  4. Realization of Copper Melting Point for Thermocouple Calibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. ABDELAZIZ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the temperature stability and uncertainty of the freezing plateau is better than that of the melting plateau in most of the thermometry fixed points, but realization of melting plateaus are easier than that of freezing plateaus for metal fixed points. It will be convenient if the melting points can be used instead of the freezing points in calibration of standard noble metal thermocouples because of easier realization and longer plateau duration of melting plateaus. In this work a comparison between the melting and freezing points of copper (Cu was carried out using standard noble metal thermocouples. Platinum - platinum 10 % rhodium (type S, platinum – 30 % rhodium / platinum 6 % rhodium (type B and platinum - palladium (Pt/Pd thermocouples are used in this study. Uncertainty budget analysis of the melting points and freezing points is presented. The experimental results show that it is possible to replace the freezing point with the melting point of copper cell in the calibration of standard noble metal thermocouples in secondary-level laboratories if the optimal methods of realization of melting points are used.

  5. Advantages and limitations of potential methods for the analysis of bacteria in milk: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabit, Frederick Tawi

    2016-01-01

    Contamination concerns in the dairy industry are motivated by outbreaks of disease in humans and the inability of thermal processes to eliminate bacteria completely in processed products. HACCP principles are an important tool used in the food industry to identify and control potential food safety hazards in order to meet customer demands and regulatory requirements. Milk testing is of importance to the milk industry regarding quality assurance and monitoring of processed products by researchers, manufacturers and regulatory agencies. Due to the availability of numerous methods used for analysing the microbial quality of milk in literature and differences in priorities of stakeholders, it is sometimes confusing to choose an appropriate method for a particular analysis. The objective of this paper is to review the advantages and disadvantages of selected techniques that can be used in the analysis of bacteria in milk. SSC, HRMA, REP, and RAPD are the top four techniques which are quick and cost-effective and possess adequate discriminatory power for the detection and profiling of bacteria. The following conclusions were arrived at during this review: HRMA, REP and RFLP are the techniques with the most reproducible results, and the techniques with the most discriminatory power are AFLP, PFGE and Raman Spectroscopy.

  6. DEPENDENCY OF SULFATE SOLUBILITY ON MELT COMPOSITION AND MELT POLYMERIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JANTZEN, CAROL M.

    2004-01-01

    Sulfate and sulfate salts are not very soluble in borosilicate waste glass. When sulfate is present in excess it can form water soluble secondary phases and/or a molten salt layer (gall) on the melt pool surface which is purported to cause steam explosions in slurry fed melters. Therefore, sulfate can impact glass durability while formation of a molten salt layer on the melt pool can impact processing. Sulfate solubility has been shown to be compositionally dependent in various studies, (e.g. , B2O3, Li2O, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and Fe2O3 were shown to increase sulfate solubility while Al2O3 and SiO2 decreased sulfate solubility). This compositional dependency is shown to be related to the calculated melt viscosity at various temperatures and hence the melt polymerization

  7. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming

  8. Effect of cavity inclination on a temperature and concentration controlled double diffusive convection at ice plate melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, M.; Ishikura, T. [Akita University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Akita (Japan); Beer, H. [Technische Unversitat Darmstadt, Institut fur Technische Thermodynamik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the double diffusive convection due to the melting of an ice plate into a calcium chloride aqueous solution inside a rectangular cavity. It is mainly considered the effect of the cavity inclination {theta} on the melting rate and the mean melting Nusselt- and Sherwood-numbers, experimentally as well as numerically. The ice plate melts spontaneously with decreasing temperature at the melting front even if initially there does not exist a temperature difference between the ice and the liquid. The concentration- and temperature-gradients near the melting front induce double diffusive convection in the liquid, which will affect the melting rate. Experiments reveal that the mean melting mass increases monotonically with increasing cavity inclination. The numerical analysis based on the laminar assumption predicts well the melting mass in the range of {theta}=0-90 , however, under-predicts the melting mass in the range of {theta}=90-180 as compared with the experimental results. (orig.)

  9. Study on severe fuel damage and in-vessel melt progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Dong; Kim, Sang Baik; Lee, Gyu Jung

    1992-06-01

    In-vessel core melt progression describes the progression of the state of a reactor core from core uncovery up to reactor vessel melt through in uncovered accidents or through temperature stabilization in accidents recovered by core reflooding. Melt progression can be thought as two parts; early melt progression and late melt progression. Early phase of core melt progression includes the progression of core material melting and relocation, which mostly consist of metallic materials. On the other hand, the late phase of core melt progression involves ceramic material melt and relocation to the lower plenum and heat-up the reactor vessel lower head. A large number of information are available for the early melt progression through experiments such as SFD, DF, FLHT test and utilized in the severe accident analysis codes. However, understanding of the late phase melt progression phenomenology is based primary on TMI-2 core examinations and not much experimental information is available. Especilally, the great uncertainties exist in vessel failure mode, melt composition, mass, and temperature. Further research is planned to perform to reduce the uncertainties in understanding of core melt down accidents as parts of long term melt progression research program. A study on the core melt progression at KAERI has been being performed through the Severe Accident Research Program with USNRC. KAERI staff had participated in the PBF SFD experiments at INEL and analyses of experiments were performed using SCDAP code. Experiments of core melt program have not been carried out at KAERI yet. It is planned that further research on core melt down accidents will be performed, which is related to design of future generations of nuclear reactors as parts of long-term project for improvement of nuclear reactor safety. (Author)

  10. Detection of Babesia canis vogeli and Hepatozoon canis in canine blood by a single-tube real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction assay and melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongklieng, Amornmas; Intapan, Pewpan M; Boonmars, Thidarut; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Janwan, Penchom; Sanpool, Oranuch; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Taweethavonsawat, Piyanan; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2015-03-01

    A real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer polymerase chain reaction (qFRET PCR) coupled with melting curve analysis was developed for detection of Babesia canis vogeli and Hepatozoon canis infections in canine blood samples in a single tube assay. The target of the assay was a region within the 18S ribosomal RNA gene amplified in either species by a single pair of primers. Following amplification from the DNA of infected dog blood, a fluorescence melting curve analysis was done. The 2 species, B. canis vogeli and H. canis, could be detected and differentiated in infected dog blood samples (n = 37) with high sensitivity (100%). The detection limit for B. canis vogeli was 15 copies of a positive control plasmid, and for H. canis, it was 150 copies of a positive control plasmid. The assay could simultaneously distinguish the DNA of both parasites from the DNA of controls. Blood samples from 5 noninfected dogs were negative, indicating high specificity. Several samples can be run at the same time. The assay can reduce misdiagnosis and the time associated with microscopic examination, and is not prone to the carryover contamination associated with the agarose gel electrophoresis step of conventional PCR. In addition, this qFRET PCR method would be useful to accurately determine the range of endemic areas or to discover those areas where the 2 parasites co-circulate. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. High-resolution melting-curve analysis of ligation-mediated real-time PCR for rapid evaluation of an epidemiological outbreak of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woksepp, Hanna; Jernberg, Cecilia; Tärnberg, Maria; Ryberg, Anna; Brolund, Alma; Nordvall, Michaela; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Wisell, Karin Tegmark; Monstein, Hans-Jürg; Nilsson, Lennart E; Schön, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Methods for the confirmation of nosocomial outbreaks of bacterial pathogens are complex, expensive, and time-consuming. Recently, a method based on ligation-mediated PCR (LM/PCR) using a low denaturation temperature which produces specific melting-profile patterns of DNA products has been described. Our objective was to further develop this method for real-time PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) in a single-tube system optimized in order to achieve results within 1 day. Following the optimization of LM/PCR for real-time PCR and HRM (LM/HRM), the method was applied for a nosocomial outbreak of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and ST131-associated Escherichia coli isolates (n = 15) and control isolates (n = 29), including four previous clusters. The results from LM/HRM were compared to results from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), which served as the gold standard. All isolates from the nosocomial outbreak clustered by LM/HRM, which was confirmed by gel electrophoresis of the LM/PCR products and PFGE. Control isolates that clustered by LM/PCR (n = 4) but not by PFGE were resolved by confirmatory gel electrophoresis. We conclude that LM/HRM is a rapid method for the detection of nosocomial outbreaks of bacterial infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli strains. It allows the analysis of isolates in a single-tube system within a day, and the discriminatory power is comparable to that of PFGE.

  12. High-Resolution Melting-Curve Analysis of Ligation-Mediated Real-Time PCR for Rapid Evaluation of an Epidemiological Outbreak of Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woksepp, Hanna; Jernberg, Cecilia; Tärnberg, Maria; Ryberg, Anna; Brolund, Alma; Nordvall, Michaela; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Wisell, Karin Tegmark; Monstein, Hans-Jürg; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Schön, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Methods for the confirmation of nosocomial outbreaks of bacterial pathogens are complex, expensive, and time-consuming. Recently, a method based on ligation-mediated PCR (LM/PCR) using a low denaturation temperature which produces specific melting-profile patterns of DNA products has been described. Our objective was to further develop this method for real-time PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) in a single-tube system optimized in order to achieve results within 1 day. Following the optimization of LM/PCR for real-time PCR and HRM (LM/HRM), the method was applied for a nosocomial outbreak of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and ST131-associated Escherichia coli isolates (n = 15) and control isolates (n = 29), including four previous clusters. The results from LM/HRM were compared to results from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), which served as the gold standard. All isolates from the nosocomial outbreak clustered by LM/HRM, which was confirmed by gel electrophoresis of the LM/PCR products and PFGE. Control isolates that clustered by LM/PCR (n = 4) but not by PFGE were resolved by confirmatory gel electrophoresis. We conclude that LM/HRM is a rapid method for the detection of nosocomial outbreaks of bacterial infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli strains. It allows the analysis of isolates in a single-tube system within a day, and the discriminatory power is comparable to that of PFGE. PMID:21956981

  13. Arctic melt ponds and bifurcations in the climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakov, I.; Vakulenko, S. A.; Golden, K. M.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding how sea ice melts is critical to climate projections. In the Arctic, melt ponds that develop on the surface of sea ice floes during the late spring and summer largely determine their albedo - a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a conceptual sea ice climate model passing through a bifurcation point - an irreversible critical threshold as the system warms, by incorporating geometric information about melt pond evolution. This study is based on a bifurcation analysis of the energy balance climate model with ice-albedo feedback as the key mechanism driving the system to bifurcation points.

  14. In vessel core melt progression phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtaud, M.

    1993-01-01

    For all light water reactor (LWR) accidents, including the so called severe accidents where core melt down can occur, it is necessary to determine the amount and characteristics of fission products released to the environment. For existing reactors this knowledge is used to evaluate the consequences and eventual emergency plans. But for future reactors safety authorities demand decrease risks and reactors designed in such a way that fission products are retained inside the containment, the last protective barrier. This requires improved understanding and knowledge of all accident sequences. In particular it is necessary to be able to describe the very complex phenomena occurring during in vessel core melt progression because they will determine the thermal and mechanical loads on the primary circuit and the timing of its rupture as well as the fission product source term. On the other hand, in case of vessel failure, knowledge of the physical and chemical state of the core melt will provide the initial conditions for analysis of ex-vessel core melt progression and phenomena threatening the containment. Finally a good understanding of in vessel phenomena will help to improve accident management procedures like Emergency Core Cooling System water injection, blowdown and flooding of the vessel well, with their possible adverse effects. Research and Development work on this subject was initiated a long time ago and is still in progress but now it must be intensified in order to meet the safety requirements of the next generation of reactors. Experiments, limited in scale, analysis of the TMI 2 accident which is a unique source of global information and engineering judgment are used to establish and assess physical models that can be implemented in computer codes for reactor accident analysis

  15. Unraveling Host-Vector-Arbovirus Interactions by Two-Gene High Resolution Melting Mosquito Bloodmeal Analysis in a Kenyan Wildlife-Livestock Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Omondi

    Full Text Available The blood-feeding patterns of mosquitoes are directly linked to the spread of pathogens that they transmit. Efficient identification of arthropod vector bloodmeal hosts can identify the diversity of vertebrate species potentially involved in disease transmission cycles. While molecular bloodmeal analyses rely on sequencing of cytochrome b (cyt b or cytochrome oxidase 1 gene PCR products, recently developed bloodmeal host identification based on high resolution melting (HRM analyses of cyt b PCR products is more cost-effective. To resolve the diverse vertebrate hosts that mosquitoes may potentially feed on in sub-Saharan Africa, we utilized HRM profiles of both cyt b and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Among 445 blood-fed Aedeomyia, Aedes, Anopheles, Culex, Mansonia, and Mimomyia mosquitoes from Kenya's Lake Victoria and Lake Baringo regions where many mosquito-transmitted pathogens are endemic, we identified 33 bloodmeal hosts including humans, eight domestic animal species, six peridomestic animal species and 18 wildlife species. This resolution of vertebrate host species was only possible by comparing profiles of both cyt b and 16S markers, as melting profiles of some pairs of species were similar for either marker but not both. We identified mixed bloodmeals in a Culex pipiens from Mbita that had fed on a goat and a human and in two Mansonia africana mosquitoes from Baringo that each had fed on a rodent (Arvicanthis niloticus in addition to a human or baboon. We further detected Sindbis and Bunyamwera viruses in blood-fed mosquito homogenates by Vero cell culture and RT-PCR in Culex, Aedeomyia, Anopheles and Mansonia mosquitoes from Baringo that had fed on humans and livestock. The observed mosquito feeding on both arbovirus amplifying hosts (including sheep and goats and possible arbovirus reservoirs (birds, porcupine, baboons, rodents informs arbovirus disease epidemiology and vector control strategies.

  16. Nitrogen Control in VIM Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, P. D.; Hawk, J. A.

    NETL has developed a design and control philosophy for the addition of nitrogen to austenitic and ferritic steels. The design approach uses CALPHAD as the centerpiece to predict the level to which nitrogen is soluble in both the melt and the solid. Applications of this technique have revealed regions of "exclusion" in which the alloy, while within specification limits of prescribed, cannot be made by conventional melt processing. Furthermore, other investigations have found that substantial retrograde solubility of nitrogen exists, which can become problematic during subsequent melt processing and/or other finishing operations such as welding. Additionally, the CALPHAD method has been used to adjust primary melt conditions. To that end, nitrogen additions have been made using chrome nitride, silicon nitride, high-nitrogen ferrochrome as well as nitrogen gas. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach will be discussed and NETL experience in this area will be summarized with respect to steel structure.

  17. Theoretical melting curve of caesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simozar, S.; Girifalco, L.A.; Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia

    1983-01-01

    A statistical-mechanical model is developed to account for the complex melting curve of caesium. The model assumes the existence of three different species of caesium defined by three different electronic states. On the basis of this model, the free energy of melting and the melting curve are computed up to 60 kbar, using the solid-state data and the initial slope of the fusion curve as input parameters. The calculated phase diagram agrees with experiment to within the experimental error. Other thermodynamic properties including the entropy and volume of melting were also computed, and they agree with experiment. Since the theory requires only one adjustable constant, this is taken as strong evidence that the three-species model is satisfactory for caesium. (author)

  18. Melting curves of gammairradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, H.; Altmann, H.; Kehrer, M.

    1978-08-01

    Melting curves of gammairradiated DNA and data derived of them, are reported. The diminished stability is explained by basedestruction. DNA denatures completely at room temperature, if at least every fifth basepair is broken or weakened by irradiation. (author)

  19. Pressure melting and ice skating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbeck, S. C.

    1995-10-01

    Pressure melting cannot be responsible for the low friction of ice. The pressure needed to reach the melting temperature is above the compressive failure stress and, if it did occur, high squeeze losses would result in very thin films. Pure liquid water cannot coexist with ice much below -20 °C at any pressure and friction does not increase suddenly in that range. If frictional heating and pressure melting contribute equally, the length of the wetted contact could not exceed 15 μm at a speed of 5 m/s, which seems much too short. If pressure melting is the dominant process, the water films are less than 0.08 μm thick because of the high pressures.

  20. Endmembers of Ice Shelf Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, A.; Child, S. F.; Kingslake, J.; Tedesco, M.; Bell, R. E.; Alexandrov, O.; McMichael, S.

    2017-12-01

    observing a pond and river reemerge after apparently freezing during the 2016-17 melt season. Using the ponds/rivers endmember scheme helps us to constrain the role storage and transport play on stabilizing ice shelves. By extending this analysis to other ice tongues and shelves we can better understand their vulnerability to a warming world.

  1. Melting in super-earths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stixrude, Lars

    2014-04-28

    We examine the possible extent of melting in rock-iron super-earths, focusing on those in the habitable zone. We consider the energetics of accretion and core formation, the timescale of cooling and its dependence on viscosity and partial melting, thermal regulation via the temperature dependence of viscosity, and the melting curves of rock and iron components at the ultra-high pressures characteristic of super-earths. We find that the efficiency of kinetic energy deposition during accretion increases with planetary mass; considering the likely role of giant impacts and core formation, we find that super-earths probably complete their accretionary phase in an entirely molten state. Considerations of thermal regulation lead us to propose model temperature profiles of super-earths that are controlled by silicate melting. We estimate melting curves of iron and rock components up to the extreme pressures characteristic of super-earth interiors based on existing experimental and ab initio results and scaling laws. We construct super-earth thermal models by solving the equations of mass conservation and hydrostatic equilibrium, together with equations of state of rock and iron components. We set the potential temperature at the core-mantle boundary and at the surface to the local silicate melting temperature. We find that ancient (∼4 Gyr) super-earths may be partially molten at the top and bottom of their mantles, and that mantle convection is sufficiently vigorous to sustain dynamo action over the whole range of super-earth masses.

  2. Melting the vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafelski, J.

    1998-01-01

    Results presented at the Quark Matter 97 conference, held in December in Tsukuba, Japan, have provided new insights into the confinement of quarks in matter. The current physics paradigm is that the inertial masses of protons and neutrons, and hence of practically all of the matter around us, originate in the zero-point energy caused by the confinement of quarks inside the small volume of the nucleon. Today, 25 years after Harald Fritzsch, Heinrich Leutwyler and Murray Gell-Mann proposed quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as a means for understanding strongly interacting particles such as nucleons and mesons, our understanding of strong interactions and quark confinement remains incomplete. Quarks and the gluons that bind them together have a ''colour'' charge that may be red, green or blue. But quarks are seen in particles that are white: baryons such as protons and neutrons consist of three quarks with different colour charges, while mesons consist of a quark and an antiquark, and again the colour charge cancels out. To prove that confinement arises from quark-gluon fluctuations in the vacuum that quantum theories dictate exists today, we need to find a way of freeing the colour charge of quarks. Experiments must therefore ''melt'' the vacuum to deconfine quarks and the colour charge. By colliding nuclei at high energies, we hope to produce regions of space filled with free quarks and gluons. This deconfined phase is known as the quark-gluon plasma. At the Tsukuba meeting, Scott Pratt of Michigan State University in the US discussed measurements that show that the hot dense state of matter created in these collisions exists for only 2x10 -23 s. So does the quark gluon plasma exist? No-one doubts that it did at one time, before the vacuum froze into its current state about 20 into the life of the universe, causing the nucleons to form as we know them today. The issue is whether we can recreate this early stage of the universe in laboratory experiments. And if we did

  3. Glacial melting in Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Tariyal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mountains are amongst the most flimsy environments on Earth. They are prosperous repositories of biodiversity, water and providers of ecosystem goods and services on which downstream communities, both regional and global, rely. The transport of atmospheric pollutants and climate-altering substances can significantly impact high mountain areas, which are generally considered “clean” regions. The snow glaciers of the Himalayas, considered the “third pole”, one of the largest stores of water on the planet and accelerated melting could have far-reaching effects, such as flooding in the short-term and water shortages in the long-term as the glaciers shrink. The data available on temperature in Himalayas indicate that warming during last 3-4 decades has been more than the global average over the last century. Some of the values indicate that the Himalayas are warming 5-6 times more than the global average. Mountain systems are seen globally as the prime sufferers from climate change. There is a severe gap in the knowledge of the short and long-term implications of the impact of climate change on water and hazards in the Himalayas, and their downstream river basins. Most studies have excluded the Himalayan region because of its extreme and complex topography and the lack of adequate rain gauge data. There is an urgent need to close the knowledge gap by establishing monitoring schemes for snow, ice and water; downscaling climate models; applying hydrological models to predict water availability; and developing basin wide scenarios, which also take water demand and socioeconomic development into account. Climate change induced hazards such as floods, landslides and droughts will impose considerable stresses on the livelihoods of mountain people and downstream populations. Enhancing resilience and promoting adaptation in mountain areas have thus become among the most important priorities of this decade. It is important to strengthen local

  4. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  5. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety

  6. Experiments on melt droplets falling into a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data and analysis related to melt droplets falling into a water pool. A binary CaO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt mixture is used to study the influence of melt superheat and water subcooling on droplet deformation and fragmentation. For the conditions studied (We {<=} 1000), the surface tension of the melt droplet and the film boiling stability greatly affect the fragmentation behaviour. If the melt temperature is between the liquidus and solidus point (mushy zone) or if the film boiling is stable due to a relatively low subcooling, the droplet deformation and fragmentation are mitigated. This behaviour can be related to the effective Weber number (We) of the melt droplet upon entry into the water pool. Similar phenomena can be expected also for interactions of corium (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) and water, which are characterized by a potentially fast transformation of melt into the mushy zone and by particularly stable film boiling. (author)

  7. Controllable irregular melting induced by atomic segregation in bimetallic clusters with fabricating different initial configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guojian; Liu Tie; Wang Qiang; Lue Xiao; Wang Kai; He Jicheng

    2010-01-01

    The melting process of Co, Co-Cu and Co-Ni clusters with different initial configurations is studied in molecular dynamics by a general embedded atom method. An irregular melting, at which energy decreases as the temperature increase near the melting point, is found in the onion-like Co-Cu-Co clusters, but not in the mixed Co-Cu and onion-like Co-Ni-Co clusters. From the analysis of atomic distributions and energy variation, the results indicate the irregular melting is induced by Cu atomic segregation. Furthermore, this melting can be controlled by doping hetero atoms with different surface energies and controlling their distributions.

  8. The effect of melting temperature and time on the TiC particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Kun [Key Laboratory of Materials Liquid Structure and Heredity, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China); Liu Xiangfa, E-mail: xfliu@sdu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Materials Liquid Structure and Heredity, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji' nan 250061 (China)

    2009-09-18

    In the present work, the microstructure formation process and particle size distribution of TiC in Al-Ti-C master alloys are investigated by particle size analysis, which is based on the morphology characterizing from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The TiC particle size distributions at different melting temperatures and during different melting times are researched. It is demonstrated that the TiC particle sizes increase with melting temperature and melting time elapsed. The micro size particles appear when the melting temperature is high enough.

  9. The effect of melting temperature and time on the TiC particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Kun; Liu Xiangfa

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, the microstructure formation process and particle size distribution of TiC in Al-Ti-C master alloys are investigated by particle size analysis, which is based on the morphology characterizing from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The TiC particle size distributions at different melting temperatures and during different melting times are researched. It is demonstrated that the TiC particle sizes increase with melting temperature and melting time elapsed. The micro size particles appear when the melting temperature is high enough.

  10. What goes up might come down: Backflow in the conduits of persistently degassing volcanoes and ramifications for melt-inclusion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, J.; Qin, Z.; Picchi, D.; Keller, T.

    2017-12-01

    Many active volcanoes erupt significantly less magma than they degas, implying that large quantities of magma must descend back into the plumbing system after degassing. The resulting bidirectional flow field in the volcanic conduit is fundamentally unstable. These instabilities are important to understand, because they likely control the episodicity of eruptive behavior observed at persistently degassing volcanoes. Laboratory experiments have provided invaluable insights into the flow regimes that may arise in volcanic conduits, but are not straightforward to scale up to volcanic systems. The goal of this study is to use direct numerical simulations to virtually reproduce the analogue experiments by Stevenson and Blake, 1998, compare them to simple analytical models and gain insights into the different flow regimes and interface instabilities observed in actual volcanic conduits. Direct numerical simulations provide a compelling complement to analogue experiments, because they are not constrained by the scales or flow properties achievable in a laboratory setting. By linking virtual and analogue experiments, we show that the interface between ascending and descending fluid is not usually stationary in volcanic conduits (see fig). The intuition that buoyant, volatile-rich magma moves up while heavy, degassed magma moves down is hence not generally true in bidirectional conduit flow. Instead, our results show that a potentially significant portion of the volatile-rich magma flows downwards despite its positive buoyancy - a process commonly referred to as backflow. The existence of backflow in volcanic conduits has potentially important ramifications for understanding melt-inclusion trends, because it affects exsolved and dissolved volatile components differently. Our preliminary results suggest that carbon dioxide bubbles exsolved at depth tend to decouple from the backflow and escape into the upward moving portion of the fluid, while dissolved water is recycled

  11. Nonspecific amplification of human DNA by Streptococcus pneumoniae LytA primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hencida Thangamony

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determination of various analytical parameters is essential for the validation of primers used for in-house nucleic acid amplification tests. While standardising a high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae in acute pyogenic meningitis, we encountered non-specific amplification of certain base pair sequences of human DNA by Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, USA recommended S. pneumoniae LytA primer. Materials and Methods: HRMA was standardised using DNA extracted from an ATCC strain of S. pneumoniae using SP LytA F373 primer and Type-it HRMTM polymerase chain reaction kit in Rotor-Gene Q Thermal Cycler according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specificity of the primers was determined in dry and wet laboratory experiments against diverse related and unrelated microbial pathogens by HRMA and on DNA extracted from unspiked clinical samples negative for SP DNA. Sensitivity was determined by calculating lower limit of detection threshold in experiments with spiked samples. The amplicon from spiked experiments was sequenced and analysed through Gene Bank. Results: Our dry/wet laboratory experiments showed two separate curves and different Tm values indicating certain non-specific amplification by the primer. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST analysis of the amplicon obtained in the spiked experiment showed sequences of human chromosome 20 associated with Homo sapiens protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type T gene. The problem was resolved by stopping the reaction at 30th Ct cycle and observing the Tm values. Conclusion: Since HRMA is done without a specific probe, one should be aware of non-specific amplifications while using primers for HRMA of human clinical samples.

  12. High-resolution melting analysis of the single nucleotide polymorphism hot-spot region in the rpoB gene as an indicator of reduced susceptibility to rifaximin in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecavar, Verena; Blaschitz, Marion; Hufnagl, Peter; Zeinzinger, Josef; Fiedler, Anita; Allerberger, Franz; Maass, Matthias; Indra, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacterium, is the main causative agent of hospital-acquired diarrhoea worldwide. In addition to metronidazole and vancomycin, rifaximin, a rifamycin derivative, is a promising antibiotic for the treatment of recurring C. difficile infections (CDI). However, exposure of C. difficile to this antibiotic has led to the development of rifaximin-resistance due to point mutations in the β-subunit of the RNA polymerase (rpoB) gene. In the present study, 348 C. difficile strains with known PCR-ribotypes were investigated for respective single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the proposed rpoB hot-spot region by using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. This method allows the detection of SNPs by comparing the altered melting behaviour of dsDNA with that of wild-type DNA. Discrimination between wild-type and mutant strains was enhanced by creating heteroduplexes by mixing sample DNA with wild-type DNA, leading to characteristic melting curve shapes from samples containing SNPs in the respective rpoB section. In the present study, we were able to identify 16 different rpoB sequence-types (ST) by sequencing analysis of a 325 bp fragment. The 16 PCR STs displayed a total of 24 different SNPs. Fifteen of these 24 SNPs were located within the proposed 151 bp SNP hot-spot region, resulting in 11 different HRM curve profiles (CP). Eleven SNPs (seven of which were within the proposed hot-spot region) led to amino acid substitutions associated with reduced susceptibility to rifaximin and 13 SNPs (eight of which were within the hot-spot region) were synonymous. This investigation clearly demonstrates that HRM analysis of the proposed SNP hot-spot region in the rpoB gene of C. difficile is a fast and cost-effective method for the identification of C. difficile samples with reduced susceptibility to rifaximin and even allows simultaneous SNP subtyping of the respective C. difficile isolates.

  13. Comparative Analysis of the Oxygen Supply and Viability of Human Osteoblasts in Three-Dimensional Titanium Scaffolds Produced by Laser-Beam or Electron-Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Jonitz-Heincke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic materials for bone replacement must ensure a sufficient mechanical stability and an adequate cell proliferation within the structures. Hereby, titanium materials are suitable for producing patient-individual porous bone scaffolds by using generative techniques. In this in vitro study, the viability of human osteoblasts was investigated in porous 3D Ti6Al4V scaffolds, which were produced by electron-beam (EBM or laser-beam melting (LBM. For each examination, two cylindrical scaffolds (30 mm × 10 mm in size, 700 µm × 700 µm macropores were placed on each other and seeded with cells. The oxygen consumption and the acidification in the center of the structures were investigated by means of microsensors. Additionally, the synthesis of pro-collagen type 1 was analyzed. On the LBM titanium scaffolds, vital bone cells were detected in the center and in the periphery after 8 days of cultivation. In the EBM titanium constructs, however, vital cells were only visible in the center. During the cultivation period, the cells increasingly produced procollagen type 1 in both scaffolds. In comparison to the periphery, the oxygen content in the center of the scaffolds slightly decreased. Furthermore, a slight acidification of the medium was detectable. Compared to LBM, the EBM titanium scaffolds showed a less favorable behavior with regard to cell seeding.

  14. Heat transport analysis in a district heating and snow melting system in Sapporo and Ishikari, Hokkaido applying waste heat from GTHTR300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Seiji; Kamiji, Yu; Terada, Atsuhiko; Yan Xing; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Murata, Tetsuya; Mori, Michitsugu

    2015-01-01

    A district heating and snow melting system utilizing waste heat from Gas Turbine High temperature Gas Reactor of 300 MW_e (GTHTR300), a heat-electricity cogeneration design of high temperature gas-cooled reactor, was analyzed. Application areas are set in Sapporo and Ishikari, the heavy snowfall cities in Northern Japan. The heat transport analyses are carried out by modeling the components in the system; pipelines of the secondary water loops between GTHTR300s and heat demand district and heat exchangers to transport the heat from the secondary water loops to the tertiary loops in the district. Double pipe for the secondary loops are advantageous for less heat loss and smaller excavation area. On the other hand, these pipes has disadvantage of more electricity consumption for pumping. Most of the heat demand in the month of maximum requirement can be supplied by 2 GTHTR300s and delivered by 9 secondary loops and around 5000 heat exchangers. Closer location of GTHTR300 site to the heat demand district is largely advantageous economically. Less decrease of the distance from 40 km to 20 km made the heat loss half and cost of the heat transfer system 22% smaller. (author)

  15. Laser beam melting 3D printing of Ti6Al4V based porous structured dental implants: fabrication, biocompatibility analysis and photoelastic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Chen; Zhou, Qianrong; Gong, Yiming; Li, Ruixue; Li, Chichi; Klämpfl, Florian; Freund, Sebastian; Wu, Xingwen; Sun, Yang; Li, Xiang; Schmidt, Michael; Ma, Duan; Yu, Youcheng

    2017-03-01

    Fabricating Ti alloy based dental implants with defined porous scaffold structure is a promising strategy for improving the osteoinduction of implants. In this study, we use Laser Beam Melting (LBM) 3D printing technique to fabricate porous Ti6Al4V dental implant prototypes with three controlled pore sizes (200, 350 and 500 μm). The mechanical stress distribution in the surrounding bone tissue is characterized by photoelastography and associated finite element simulation. For in-vitro studies, experiments on implants’ biocompatibility and osteogenic capability are conducted to evaluate the cellular response correlated to the porous structure. As the preliminary results, porous structured implants show a lower stress-shielding to the surrounding bone at the implant neck and a more densed distribution at the bottom site compared to the reference implant. From the cell proliferation tests and the immunofluorescence images, 350 and 500 μm pore sized implants demonstrate a better biocompatibility in terms of cell growth, migration and adhesion. Osteogenic genes expression of the 350 μm group is significantly increased alone with the ALP activity test. All these suggest that a pore size of 350 μm provides an optimal provides an optimal potential for improving the mechanical shielding to the surrounding bones and osteoinduction of the implant itself.

  16. Viscous Dissipation Effects on the Motion of Casson Fluid over an Upper Horizontal Thermally Stratified Melting Surface of a Paraboloid of Revolution: Boundary Layer Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Ajayi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a non-Newtonian fluid flow past an upper surface of an object that is neither a perfect horizontal/vertical nor inclined/cone in which dissipation of energy is associated with temperature-dependent plastic dynamic viscosity is considered. An attempt has been made to focus on the case of two-dimensional Casson fluid flow over a horizontal melting surface embedded in a thermally stratified medium. Since the viscosity of the non-Newtonian fluid tends to take energy from the motion (kinetic energy and transform it into internal energy, the viscous dissipation term is accommodated in the energy equation. Due to the existence of internal space-dependent heat source; plastic dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity of the non-Newtonian fluid are assumed to vary linearly with temperature. Based on the boundary layer assumptions, suitable similarity variables are applied to nondimensionalized, parameterized and reduce the governing partial differential equations into a coupled ordinary differential equations. These equations along with the boundary conditions are solved numerically using the shooting method together with the Runge-Kutta technique. The effects of pertinent parameters are established. A significant increases in Rex1/2Cfx is guaranteed with St when magnitude of β is large. Rex1/2Cfx decreases with Ec and m.

  17. The kinetic fragility of natural silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, Daniele; Dingwell, Donald B

    2003-01-01

    Newtonian viscosities of 19 multicomponent natural and synthetic silicate liquids, with variable contents of SiO 2 (41-79 wt%), Al 2 O 3 (10-19 wt%), TiO 2 (0-3 wt%), FeO tot (0-11 wt%); alkali oxides (5-17 wt%), alkaline-earth oxides (0-35 wt%), and minor oxides, obtained at ambient pressure using the high-temperature concentric cylinder, the low-temperature micropenetration, and the parallel plates techniques, have been analysed. For each silicate liquid, regression of the experimentally determined viscosities using the well known Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation allowed the viscosity of all these silicates to be accurately described. The results of these fits, which provide the basis for the subsequent analysis here, permit qualitative and quantitative correlations to be made between the VFT adjustable parameters (A VFT , B VFT , and T 0 ). The values of B VFT and T 0 , calibrated via the VFT equation, are highly correlated. Kinetic fragility appears to be correlated with the number of non-bridging oxygens per tetrahedrally coordinated cation (NBO/T). This is taken to infer that melt polymerization controls melt fragility in liquid silicates. Thus NBO/T might form an useful ingredient of a structure-based model of non-Arrhenian viscosity in multicomponent silicate melts

  18. Melting of superheated molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeta, Ulyana; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2017-07-01

    Melting dynamics of micrometer scale, polycrystalline samples of isobutane, dimethyl ether, methyl benzene, and 2-propanol were investigated by fast scanning calorimetry. When films are superheated with rates in excess of 105 K s-1, the melting process follows zero-order, Arrhenius-like kinetics until approximately half of the sample has transformed. Such kinetics strongly imply that melting progresses into the bulk via a rapidly moving solid-liquid interface that is likely to originate at the sample's surface. Remarkably, the apparent activation energies for the phase transformation are large; all exceed the enthalpy of vaporization of each compound and some exceed it by an order of magnitude. In fact, we find that the crystalline melting kinetics are comparable to the kinetics of dielectric α-relaxation in deeply supercooled liquids. Based on these observations, we conclude that the rate of non-isothermal melting for superheated, low-molecular-weight crystals is limited by constituent diffusion into an abnormally dense, glass-like, non-crystalline phase.

  19. Improved capacitive melting curve measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebedash, Alexander; Tuoriniemi, Juha; Pentti, Elias; Salmela, Anssi

    2009-01-01

    Sensitivity of the capacitive method for determining the melting pressure of helium can be enhanced by loading the empty side of the capacitor with helium at a pressure nearly equal to that desired to be measured and by using a relatively thin and flexible membrane in between. This way one can achieve a nanobar resolution at the level of 30 bar, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the best gauges with vacuum reference. This extends the applicability of melting curve thermometry to lower temperatures and would allow detecting tiny anomalies in the melting pressure, which must be associated with any phenomena contributing to the entropy of the liquid or solid phases. We demonstrated this principle in measurements of the crystallization pressure of isotopic helium mixtures at millikelvin temperatures by using partly solid pure 4 He as the reference substance providing the best possible universal reference pressure. The achieved sensitivity was good enough for melting curve thermometry on mixtures down to 100 μK. Similar system can be used on pure isotopes by virtue of a blocked capillary giving a stable reference condition with liquid slightly below the melting pressure in the reference volume. This was tested with pure 4 He at temperatures 0.08-0.3 K. To avoid spurious heating effects, one must carefully choose and arrange any dielectric materials close to the active capacitor. We observed some 100 pW loading at moderate excitation voltages.

  20. Automatic Control of Silicon Melt Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Stickel, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    A new circuit, when combined with melt-replenishment system and melt level sensor, offers continuous closed-loop automatic control of melt-level during web growth. Installed on silicon-web furnace, circuit controls melt-level to within 0.1 mm for as long as 8 hours. Circuit affords greater area growth rate and higher web quality, automatic melt-level control also allows semiautomatic growth of web over long periods which can greatly reduce costs.

  1. Holographic picture of heavy vector meson melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Nelson R.F.; Diles, Saulo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Martin Contreras, Miguel Angel [Universidad de los Andes, High Energy Group, Department of Physics, Bogota (Colombia)

    2016-11-15

    The fraction of heavy vector mesons produced in a heavy ion collision, as compared to a proton-proton collision, serves as an important indication of the formation of a thermal medium, the quark-gluon plasma. This sort of analysis strongly depends on understanding the thermal effects of a medium like the plasma on the states of heavy mesons. In particular, it is crucial to know the temperature ranges where they undergo a thermal dissociation, or melting. AdS/QCD models are know to provide an important tool for the calculation of hadronic masses, but in general are not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with excitation level. It has recently been shown that this problem can be overcome using a soft wall background and introducing an extra energy parameter, through the calculation of correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space. This approach leads to the evaluation of masses and decay constants of S wave quarkonium states with just one flavor dependent and one flavor independent parameter. Here we extend this more realistic model to finite temperatures and analyze the thermal behavior of the states 1S, 2S and 3S of bottomonium and charmonium. The corresponding spectral function exhibits a consistent picture for the melting of the states where, for each flavor, the higher excitations melt at lower temperatures. We estimate for these six states the energy ranges in which the heavy vector mesons undergo a transition from a well-defined peak in the spectral function to complete melting in the thermal medium. A very clear distinction between the heavy flavors emerges, with the bottomonium state Υ(1S) surviving a deconfinement transition at temperatures much larger than the critical deconfinement temperature of the medium. (orig.)

  2. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  3. Numerical and experimental investigation of the melt casting of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Dawei; Garimella, Suresh V. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088 (United States); Singh, Sanjeev; Naik, Neelam [US Army Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Melt casting of energetic materials is investigated, and a numerical model is formulated for the analysis of the coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress fields involved in this phase-change process. The numerical model is based on a conservative multi block control volume method. The SIMPLE algorithm is employed along with an enthalpy method approach to model the solidification process. Results from the model are verified against analytical solutions, experimental results, and published numerical results for simplified cases. In the melt casting of RDX-binder mixtures, the very high viscosity of the melt limits the influence of melt convection. The impacts of different cooling conditions on the velocity, temperature and stress distributions, as well as on the solidification time, are discussed. The present model can be used to improve the quality of cast explosives, by optimizing and controlling the processing conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of semiconductor melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutvitskij, V.A.; Shurygin, P.M.

    1975-01-01

    The temperature dependences chi of various alloys confirm the existence of cluster formations in molten semiconductors, the stability of these formations in melts being considerably affected by the anion nature. The concentrational dependences of the magnetic susceptibility for all the investigated systems exhibit the diamagnetism maxima corresponding to the compound compositions. Heating the melt causes ''smearing'' the maxima, which is related with the cluster structure dissociation. The existence of the maxima concentrational dependence chi corresponding to BiTe and BiSe is found in the isotherms. The non-linear dependence of chi on the composition shows the absence of a single-valued relation between the phase diagram and the chi-diagram for melts

  5. The Intensity, Directionality, and Statistics of Underwater Noise From Melting Icebergs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Oskar; Deane, Grant B.; Moskalik, Mateusz

    2018-05-01

    Freshwater fluxes from melting icebergs and glaciers are important contributors to both sea level rise and anomalies of seawater salinity in polar regions. However, the hazards encountered close to icebergs and glaciers make it difficult to quantify their melt rates directly, motivating the development of cryoacoustics as a remote sensing technique. Recent studies have shown a qualitative link between ice melting and the accompanying underwater noise, but the properties of this signal remain poorly understood. Here we examine the intensity, directionality, and temporal statistics of the underwater noise radiated by melting icebergs in Hornsund Fjord, Svalbard, using a three-element acoustic array. We present the first estimate of noise energy per unit area associated with iceberg melt and demonstrate its qualitative dependence on exposure to surface current. Finally, we show that the analysis of noise directionality and statistics makes it possible to distinguish iceberg melt from the glacier terminus melt.

  6. Ribo HRM--detection of inter- and intra-species polymorphisms within ribosomal DNA by high resolution melting analysis supported by application of artificial allelic standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masny, Aleksander; Jagiełło, Agata; Płucienniczak, Grażyna; Golab, Elzbieta

    2012-09-01

    Ribo HRM, a single-tube PCR and high resolution melting (HRM) assay for detection of polymorphisms in the large subunit ribosomal DNA expansion segment V, was developed on a Trichinella model. Four Trichinella species: T. spiralis (isolates ISS3 and ISS160), T. nativa (isolates ISS10 and ISS70), T. britovi (isolates ISS2 and ISS392) and T. pseudospiralis (isolates ISS13 and ISS1348) were genotyped. Cloned allelic variants of the expansion segment V were used as standards to prepare reference HRM curves characteristic for single sequences and mixtures of several cloned sequences imitating allelic composition detected in Trichinella isolates. Using the primer pair Tsr1 and Trich1bi, it was possible to amplify a fragment of the ESV and detect PCR products obtained from the genomic DNA of pools of larvae belonging to the four investigated species: T. pseudospiralis, T. spiralis, T. britovi and T. nativa, in a single tube Real-Time PCR reaction. Differences in the shape of the HRM curves of Trichinella isolates suggested the presence of differences between examined isolates of T. nativa, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis species. No differences were observed between T. spiralis isolates. The presence of polymorphisms within the amplified ESV sequence fragment of T. nativa T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis was confirmed by sequencing of the cloned PCR products. Novel sequences were discovered and deposited in GenBank (GenBank IDs: JN971020-JN971027, JN120902.1, JN120903.1, JN120904.1, JN120906.1, JN120905.1). Screening the ESV region of Trichinella for polymorphism is possible using the genotyping assay Ribo HRM at the current state of its development. The Ribo HRM assay could be useful in phylogenetic studies of the Trichinella genus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In-vessel core melt retention by RPV external cooling for high power PWR. MAAP 4 analysis on a LBLOCA scenario without SI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognet, C.; Gandrille, P.

    1999-01-01

    In-, ex-vessel reflooding or both simultaneously can be envisaged as Accident Management Measures to stop a Severe Accident (SA) in vessel. This paper addresses the possibility of in-vessel core melt retention by RPV external flooding for a high power PWR (4250 MWth). The reactor vessel is assumed to have no lower head penetration and thermal insulation is neglected. The effects of external cooling of high power density debris, where the margin for such a strategy is low, are investigated with the MAAP4 code. MAAP4 code is used to verify the system capability to flood the reactor pit and to predict simultaneously the corium relocation into the lower head with the thermal and mechanical response of the RPV in transient conditions. The corium pool cooling and holding in the RPV lower head is analysed. Attention is paid to the internal heat exchanges between corium components. This paper focuses particularly the heat transfer between oxidic and metallic phases as well as between the molten metallic phase and the RPV wall of utmost importance for challenging the RPV integrity in vicinity of the metallic phase. The metal segregation has a decisive influence upon the attack of the vessel wall due to a very strong peaking of the lateral flux ('focusing effect'). Thus, the dynamics of the formation of the metallic layer characterized by a growing inventory of steel, both from a partial vessel ablation and the degradation of internals steel structures by the radiative heat flux from the debris, is displayed. The analysed sequence is a surge line rupture near the hot leg (LBLOCA) leading to the fastest accident progression

  8. Selective Laser Melting Technique of Co-Cr Dental Alloys: A Review of Structure and Properties and Comparative Analysis with Other Available Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoukis, Theodoros; Zinelis, Spiros; Eliades, George; Al-Wazzan, Khalid; Rifaiy, Mohammed Al; Al Jabbari, Youssef S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to review the effect of selective laser melting (SLM) procedure on the properties of dental structures made of Co-Cr alloys and to evaluate its quality and compare it to those produced by conventional casting and milling fabrication techniques. A computerized database search using PubMed and Scopus was conducted for peer-reviewed scientific research studies regarding the use of SLM in Co-Cr dental alloys with no restrictions for publication years. The search engines provided hundreds of results, and only 48 scientific research papers, case studies, or literature reviews were considered relevant for this review. The innovative manufacturing concept of SLM offers many advantages compared with casting and milling fabrication techniques. SLM provides different microstructure from casting and milling with minimal internal porosity and internal fitting, marginal adaptation, and comparable bond strength to porcelain. Mechanical and electrochemical properties of SLM structures are enhanced compared to cast, while clinical longevity of single-metal ceramic crowns is comparable to Au-Pt dental alloy. The SLM technique provides dental prosthetic restorations more quickly and less expensively without compromising their quality compared with restorations prepared by casting and milling techniques. The current SLM devices provide metallic restorations made of Co-Cr alloys for removable and fixed partial dentures without compromising the alloy or restoration properties at a fraction of the time and cost, showing great potential to replace the aforementioned fabrication techniques in the long term; however, further clinical studies are essential to increase the acceptance of this technology by the worldwide dental community. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  9. Multiplex real-time PCR assays for detection of eight Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in food samples by melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Mustapha, Azlin

    2015-12-23

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are pathogenic strains of E. coli that can cause bloody diarrhea and kidney failure. Seven STEC serogroups, O157, O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145 are responsible for more than 71% of the total infections caused by this group of pathogens. All seven serogroups are currently considered as adulterants in non-intact beef products in the U.S. In this study, two multiplex melt curve real-time PCR assays with internal amplification controls (IACs) were standardized for the detection of eight STEC serogroups. The first multiplex assay targeted E. coli serogroups O145, O121, O104, and O157; while the second set detected E. coli serogroups O26, O45, O103 and O111. The applicability of the assays was tested using 11 different meat and produce samples. For food samples spiked with a cocktail of four STEC serogroups with a combined count of 10 CFU/25 g food, all targets of the multiplex assays were detected after an enrichment period of 6h. The assays also worked efficiently when 325 g of food samples were spiked with 10 CFU of STECs. The assays are not dependent on fluorescent-labeled probes or immunomagnetic beads, and can be used for the detection of eight STEC serogroups in less than 11h. Routine preliminary screening of STECs in food samples is performed by testing for the presence of STEC virulence genes. The assays developed in this study can be useful as a first- or second-tier test for the identification of the eight O serogroup-specific genes in suspected food samples. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Rapid and inexpensive body fluid identification by RNA profiling-based multiplex High Resolution Melt (HRM analysis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2hj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K. Hanson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Positive identification of the nature of biological material present on evidentiary items can be crucial for understanding the circumstances surrounding a crime. However, traditional protein-based methods do not permit the identification of all body fluids and tissues, and thus molecular based strategies for the conclusive identification of all forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues need to be developed. Messenger RNA (mRNA profiling is an example of such a molecular-based approach. Current mRNA body fluid identification assays involve capillary electrophoresis (CE or quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR platforms, each with its own limitations. Both platforms require the use of expensive fluorescently labeled primers or probes. CE-based assays require separate amplification and detection steps thus increasing the analysis time. For qRT-PCR assays, only 3-4 markers can be included in a single reaction since each requires a different fluorescent dye. To simplify mRNA profiling assays, and reduce the time and cost of analysis, we have developed single- and multiplex body fluid High Resolution Melt (HRM assays for the identification of common forensically relevant biological fluids and tissues. The incorporated biomarkers include IL19 (vaginal secretions, IL1F7 (skin, ALAS2 (blood, MMP10 (menstrual blood, HTN3 (saliva and TGM4 (semen.  The HRM assays require only unlabeled PCR primers and a single saturating intercalating fluorescent dye (Eva Green. Each body-fluid-specific marker can easily be identified by the presence of a distinct melt peak. Usually, HRM assays are used to detect variants or isoforms for a single gene target. However, we have uniquely developed duplex and triplex HRM assays to permit the simultaneous detection of multiple targets per reaction. Here we describe the development and initial performance evaluation of the developed HRM assays. The results demonstrate the potential use of HRM assays for rapid, and relatively

  11. On the rapid melt quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usatyuk, I.I.; Novokhatskij, I.A.; Kaverin, Yu.F.

    1994-01-01

    Specific features of instrumentation of traditionally employed method of melt spinning (rapid quenching), its disadvantages being discussed, were analyzed. The necessity of the method upgrading as applied to the problems of studying fine structure of molten metals and glasses was substantiated. The principle flowsheet of experimental facility for extremely rapid quenching of the melts of metals is described, specificity of its original functional units being considered. The sequence and character of all the principal stages of the method developed were discussed. 18 refs.; 3 figs

  12. Acoustic detection of melt particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costley, R.D. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Research Department at Sandia National Laboratories is investigating a type of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). In this particular type of accident, core meltdown occurs while the pressure within the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is high. If one of the instrument tube penetrations in the lower head fails, melt particles stream through the cavity and into the containment vessel. This experiment, which simulates this type accident, was performed in the Surtsev Direct Heating Test Facility which is approximately a 1:10 linear scaling of a large dry containment volume. A 1:10 linear scale model of the reactor cavity was placed near the bottom of the Surtsey vessel so that the exit of the cavity was at the vertical centerline of the vessel. A pressure vessel used to create the simulated molten core debris was located at the scaled height of the RPV. In order to better understand how the melt leaves the cavity and streams into the containment an array of five acoustic sensors was placed directly in the path of the melt particles about 30 feet from the exit of the sealed cavity. Highly damped, broadband sensors were chosen to minimize ringing so that individual particle hits could be detected. The goal was to count the signals produced by the individual particle hits to get some idea of how the melt particles left the cavity. This document presents some of the results of the experiment. 9 figs

  13. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio...

  14. Improved detection of genetic markers of antimicrobial resistance by hybridization probe-based melting curve analysis using primers to mask proximal mutations: examples include the influenza H275Y substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiley, David M; Jacob, Kevin; Nakos, Jennifer; Bletchly, Cheryl; Nimmo, Graeme R; Nissen, Michael D; Sloots, Theo P

    2012-06-01

    Numerous real-time PCR assays have been described for detection of the influenza A H275Y alteration. However, the performance of these methods can be undermined by sequence variation in the regions flanking the codon of interest. This is a problem encountered more broadly in microbial diagnostics. In this study, we developed a modification of hybridization probe-based melting curve analysis, whereby primers are used to mask proximal mutations in the sequence targets of hybridization probes, so as to limit the potential for sequence variation to interfere with typing. The approach was applied to the H275Y alteration of the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 strain, as well as a Neisseria gonorrhoeae mutation associated with antimicrobial resistance. Assay performances were assessed using influenza A and N. gonorrhoeae strains characterized by DNA sequencing. The modified hybridization probe-based approach proved successful in limiting the effects of proximal mutations, with the results of melting curve analyses being 100% consistent with the results of DNA sequencing for all influenza A and N. gonorrhoeae strains tested. Notably, these included influenza A and N. gonorrhoeae strains exhibiting additional mutations in hybridization probe targets. Of particular interest was that the H275Y assay correctly typed influenza A strains harbouring a T822C nucleotide substitution, previously shown to interfere with H275Y typing methods. Overall our modified hybridization probe-based approach provides a simple means of circumventing problems caused by sequence variation, and offers improved detection of the influenza A H275Y alteration and potentially other resistance mechanisms.

  15. A singleplex real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR with melting curve analysis for the differential detection of Paragonimus heterotremus, Echinostoma malayanum and Fasciola gigantica eggs in faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Saijuntha, Weerachai; Manochantr, Sirikul; Kheolamai, Pakpoom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Intapan, Pewpan M; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-01-01

    Because the eggs of Paragonimus, Echinostoma and Fasciola are very similar in size and shape, it is difficult to distinguish and accurately identify species by the morphology of their eggs, which is a standard diagnostic method. In this study, a novel assay combining a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR and melting curve analysis using one set of primers and fluorophore-labelled hybridization probes specific for the 28S rDNA region was developed for the molecular detection of Paragonimus heterotremus, Echinostoma malayanum and Fasciola gigantica eggs. This assay could detect and distinguish P. heterotremus, E. malayanum and F. gigantica DNA with the distinct melting temperature (Tm) values of 57.99±0.08, 62.12±0.15 and 74.10±0.18, respectively. The assay can also be used to detect and distinguish DNA from P. bangkokensis, P. harinasutai, P. machorchis, E. revolutum, Hypodereum conoideum and F. hepatica, which have different Tm values. The sensitivity of this assay enabled the detection of one egg of P. heterotremus, E. malayanum or F. gigantica per 100 mg of faeces. In addition, the specificity testing showed no fluorescence signal for other parasites. Due to the sensitivity and specificity of our assay in detecting P. heterotremus, E. malayanum and F. gigantica, our method could be used to accurately diagnose these three medically important parasitic groups and has potential implications for molecular epidemiological investigations of human and/or animal infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Experiments and analyses on melt-structure-water interactions during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seghal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Okkonen, T.O.; Dinh, A.T.

    1998-04-01

    This report is the final report for the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI). It describes results of analytical and experimental studies concerning MSWI during the course of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in a LWR. Emphasis has been placed on phenomena which govern vessel failure mode and timing and the mechanisms and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets. It was found that: 2-D effects significantly diminished the focusing effect of an overlying metallic layer on top of an oxide melt pool. This result improves the feasibility of in-vessel retention of a melt pool through external cooling of the lower head; phenomena related to hole ablation and melt discharge, in the event of vessel failure, are affected significantly by crust formation; the jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from liquid to solid temperature; film boiling was investigated by developing a two-phase flow model and inserting it in a multi-D fluid dynamics code. It was concluded that the thickness of the film on the surface of a melt jet would be small and that the effects of the film on the process should not be large. This conclusion is contrary to the modeling employed in some other codes. The computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis code describes the process of melt pool formation and convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. In addition, several innovative models were developed to describe the melt-water interaction process. The code MELT-3D treats the melt jet as a collection of particles whose movement is described with a three-dimensional Eulerian formulation. The model (SIPHRA) tracks the melt jet with an additional equation, using the

  17. Melting of fuel element racks and their recycling as granulate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, U.; Kluth, T.; Kreh, R.

    1998-01-01

    In order to increase the storage capacity for spent fuel elements in the Spanish NPPs of Almaraz and Asco, the existing racks were replaced by compact one in 1991/1993. The 28 racks from Almaraz NPP were cut on site, packed in 200-I-drums and taken to intermediate storage. For the remaining 28 racks of Asco NPP, ENRESA preferred the melting alternative. To demonstrate the recycling path melting in Germany, a test campaign with six racks was performed in 1997. As a result of this test melt, the limits for Carla melting plant were modified to 200 Bq/g total, α, β, γ 100 Bq/g nuclear fuels, max. 3g/100 kg 2,000 Bq/g total Fe55, H 3 , C-14 and Ni63. After the test melt campaign, the German authorities licensed the import and treatment of the remaining 22 racks on the condition that the waste resulting from the melting process as well as the granules produced were taken back to Spain. The shipment from Asco via France to Germany has been carried out in F 20-ft-IPII containers in accordance with ADR. Size reduction to chargeable dimensions was carried out by a plasma burner and hydraulic shears. For melting, a 3.2 Mg medium frequency induction furnace, operated in a separate housing, was used. For granules production outside this housing, the liquid iron was cast into a 5Mg ladle and then, through a water jet, into the granulating basin. The total mass of 287,659 Kg of 28 fuel elements racks and components of the storage basin yielded 297,914 kg of iron granulate. Secondary waste from melting amounted to 9,920 kg, corresponding to 3.45% of the input mass. The granulating process produced 6,589 kg, corresponding to 2.28% of the total mass to be melted. Radiological analysis of samples taken from the melt and different waste components confirmed the main nuclides Co60, Cs134 and Cs137. Fe55 was highly overestimated by the preliminary analysis. (Author) 2 refs

  18. Transient induced tungsten melting at the Joint European Torus (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Matthews, G. F.; Krieger, K.; Iglesias, D.; Bunting, P.; Corre, Y.; Silburn, S.; Balboa, I.; Bazylev, B.; Conway, N.; Coffey, I.; Dejarnac, R.; Gauthier, E.; Gaspar, J.; Jachmich, S.; Jepu, I.; Makepeace, C.; Scannell, R.; Stamp, M.; Petersson, P.; Pitts, R. A.; Wiesen, S.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Baron-Wiechec, A.; Contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    successfully reproduced the findings from the original leading edge exposure. Since the ILW-1 experiments, the exposed misaligned lamella has now been retrieved from the JET machine and post mortem analysis has been performed. No obvious mass loss is observed. Profilometry of the ILW-1 lamella shows the structure of the melt damage which is in line with the modell predictions thus allowing further model validation. Nuclear reaction analysis shows a tenfold reduction in surface deuterium concentration in the molten surface in comparison to the non-molten part of the lamella.

  19. On high-pressure melting of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian; Swift, Damian C.

    2007-01-01

    The issues related to high-pressure melting of Ta are discussed within the context of diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave experiments, theoretical calculations and common melting models. The discrepancies between the extrapolations of the DAC melting curve and the melting point inferred from shock wave experiments, cannot be reconciled either by superheating or solid-solid phase transition. The failure to reproduce low-pressure DAC melting curve by melting models such as dislocation-mediated melting and the Lindemann law, and molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics-based calculations, undermines their predictions at moderate and high pressures. Despite claims to the contrary, the melting curve of Ta (as well as Mo and W) remains inconclusive at high pressures.

  20. On melting of boron phosphide under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Solozhenko, Vladimir; Mukhanov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Melting of cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied at pressures to 9 GPa using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity measurements. It has been found that above 2.6 GPa BP melts congruently, and the melting curve exhibits negative slope (–60 ± 7 K/GPa), which is indicative of a higher density of the melt as compared to the solid phase.

  1. A model for the latent heat of melting in free standing metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jeong-Heon; Deinert, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles of many metals are known to exhibit scale dependent latent heats of melting. Analytical models for this phenomenon have so far failed to completely capture the observed phenomena. Here we present a thermodynamic analysis for the melting of metal nanoparticles in terms of their internal energy and a scale dependent surface tension proposed by Tolman. The resulting model predicts the scale dependence of the latent heat of melting and is confirmed using published data for tin and aluminum

  2. Petrological Geodynamics of Mantle Melting I. AlphaMELTS + Multiphase Flow: Dynamic Equilibrium Melting, Method and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Tirone

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex process of melting in the Earth's interior is studied by combining a multiphase numerical flow model with the program AlphaMELTS which provides a petrological description based on thermodynamic principles. The objective is to address the fundamental question of the effect of the mantle and melt dynamics on the composition and abundance of the melt and the residual solid. The conceptual idea is based on a 1-D description of the melting process that develops along an ideal vertical column where local chemical equilibrium is assumed to apply at some level in space and time. By coupling together the transport model and the chemical thermodynamic model, the evolution of the melting process can be described in terms of melt distribution, temperature, pressure and solid and melt velocities but also variation of melt and residual solid composition and mineralogical abundance at any depth over time. In this first installment of a series of three contributions, a two-phase flow model (melt and solid assemblage is developed under the assumption of complete local equilibrium between melt and a peridotitic mantle (dynamic equilibrium melting, DEM. The solid mantle is also assumed to be completely dry. The present study addresses some but not all the potential factors affecting the melting process. The influence of permeability and viscosity of the solid matrix are considered in some detail. The essential features of the dynamic model and how it is interfaced with AlphaMELTS are clearly outlined. A detailed and explicit description of the numerical procedure should make this type of numerical models less obscure. The general observation that can be made from the outcome of several simulations carried out for this work is that the melt composition varies with depth, however the melt abundance not necessarily always increases moving upwards. When a quasi-steady state condition is achieved, that is when melt abundance does not varies significantly

  3. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  4. Estimation of structural strength of 38KhN3MFA steel, melted using different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudrya, A.V.; Mochalov, B.V.; Fadeev, Yu.I.

    1982-01-01

    Quantity of steel melted by different methods using criteria of fracture mechanics is evaluated. Three technological variants of the 38KhN3MFA steel melting: acid Martin steel prepared by the duplex-process (melt 1); the main Martin steel melting with deoxidation and alloying in a ladle by liquid alloy and treatment with synthetic slag with argon purging after production (melt 2) and its electroslag remelt - ESP process (melt 3) are investigated. The analysis of the investigated melts has revealed that crack resistances of the acid Martin steel is higher than that of other melts at practically similar standard mechanical properties with 0.35 probability at 0.05 significance level in the low-tempered state; in the tempered state the best crack resistance is observed in the ESP main Martin steel. Metal of the main Martin melting has lower crack resistance as compared with other meltings at both strength levels. The results of the work point out the necessity of applying the criteria of fracture mechanics for obtaining an objective evaluation of the steel quality

  5. High-resolution melt-curve analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-HRM) for the characterisation of pathogenic leptospires: intra-serovar divergence, inter-serovar convergence, and evidence of attenuation in Leptospira reference collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsiani, S M; Craig, S B; Graham, G C; Cobbold, R C; Dohnt, M F; Burns, M-A; Jansen, C C; Leung, L K-P; Field, H E; Smythe, L D

    2010-07-01

    High-resolution melt-curve analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-HRM) is a novel technology that has emerged as a possible method to characterise leptospires to serovar level. RAPD-HRM has recently been used to measure intra-serovar convergence between strains of the same serovar as well as inter-serovar divergence between strains of different serovars. The results indicate that intra-serovar heterogeneity and inter-serovar homogeneity may limit the application of RAPD-HRM in routine diagnostics. They also indicate that genetic attenuation of aged, high-passage-number isolates could undermine the use of RAPD-HRM or any other molecular technology. Such genetic attenuation may account for a general decrease seen in titres of rabbit hyperimmune antibodies over time. Before RAPD-HRM can be further advanced as a routine diagnostic tool, strains more representative of the wild-type serovars of a given region need to be identified. Further, RAPD-HRM analysis of reference strains indicates that the routine renewal of reference collections, with new isolates, may be needed to maintain the genetic integrity of the collections.

  6. Supercoil Formation During DNA Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Mehmet; Avsaroglu, Baris; Kabakcioglu, Alkan

    2009-03-01

    Supercoil formation plays a key role in determining the structure-function relationship in DNA. Biological and technological processes, such as protein synthesis, polymerase chain reaction, and microarrays relys on separation of the two strands in DNA, which is coupled to the unwinding of the supercoiled structure. This problem has been studied theoretically via Peyrard-Bishop and Poland-Scheraga type models, which include a simple representation of the DNA structural properties. In recent years, computational models, which provide a more realtistic representaion of DNA molecule, have been used to study the melting behavior of short DNA chains. Here, we will present a new coarse-grained model of DNA which is capable of simulating sufficiently long DNA chains for studying the supercoil formation during melting, without sacrificing the local structural properties. Our coarse-grained model successfully reproduces the local geometry of the DNA molecule, such as the 3'-5' directionality, major-minor groove structure, and the helical pitch. We will present our initial results on the dynamics of supercoiling during DNA melting.

  7. Postaccident heat removal. II. Heat transfer from an internally heated liquid to a melting solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faw, R.E.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Microwave heating has been used in studies of heat transfer from a horizontal layer of internally heated liquid to a melting solid. Experiments were designed to simulate heat transfer and meltthrough processes of importance in the analysis of postaccident heat removal capabilities of nuclear reactors. Glycerin, heated by 2.45-GHz microwave radiation, was used to simulate molten fuel. Paraffin wax was used to simulate a melting barrier confining the fuel. Experimentally measured heat fluxes and melting rates were consistent with a model based on downward heat transfer by conduction through a stagnant liquid layer and upward heat transfer augmented by natural convection. Melting and displacement of the barrier material occurred by upward-moving droplets randomly distributed across the melting surface. Results indicated that the melting and displacement process had no effect on the heat transfer process

  8. Two phase modeling of nanofluid flow in existence of melting heat transfer by means of HAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Jafaryar, M.; Bateni, K.; Ganji, D. D.

    2018-02-01

    In this article, Buongiorno Model is applied for investigation of nanofluid flow over a stretching plate in existence of magnetic field. Radiation and Melting heat transfer are taken into account. Homotopy analysis method (HAM) is selected to solve ODEs which are obtained from similarity transformation. Roles of Brownian motion, thermophoretic parameter, Hartmann number, porosity parameter, Melting parameter and Eckert number are presented graphically. Results indicate that nanofluid velocity and concentration enhance with rise of melting parameter. Nusselt number reduces with increase of porosity and melting parameters.

  9. Industrial opportunities of controlled melt flow during glass melting, part 1: Melt flow evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyrčíková, Petra; Hrbek, Lukáš; Němec, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2014), s. 111-117 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melting * controlled flow * space utilization Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2014 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2014/pdf/2014_02_111.pdf

  10. Genome Survey Sequencing of Luffa Cylindrica L. and Microsatellite High Resolution Melting (SSR-HRM) Analysis for Genetic Relationship of Luffa Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jianyu; Yin, Mengqi; Zhang, Qin; Gong, Dongting; Jia, Xiaowen; Guan, Yajing; Hu, Jin

    2017-09-11

    Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem. is an economically important vegetable crop in China. However, the genomic information on this species is currently unknown. In this study, for the first time, a genome survey of L. cylindrica was carried out using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. In total, 43.40 Gb sequence data of L. cylindrica , about 54.94× coverage of the estimated genome size of 789.97 Mb, were obtained from HiSeq 2500 sequencing, in which the guanine plus cytosine (GC) content was calculated to be 37.90%. The heterozygosity of genome sequences was only 0.24%. In total, 1,913,731 contigs (>200 bp) with 525 bp N 50 length and 1,410,117 scaffolds (>200 bp) with 885.01 Mb total length were obtained. From the initial assembled L. cylindrica genome, 431,234 microsatellites (SSRs) (≥5 repeats) were identified. The motif types of SSR repeats included 62.88% di-nucleotide, 31.03% tri-nucleotide, 4.59% tetra-nucleotide, 0.96% penta-nucleotide and 0.54% hexa-nucleotide. Eighty genomic SSR markers were developed, and 51/80 primers could be used in both "Zheda 23" and "Zheda 83". Nineteen SSRs were used to investigate the genetic diversity among 32 accessions through SSR-HRM analysis. The unweighted pair group method analysis (UPGMA) dendrogram tree was built by calculating the SSR-HRM raw data. SSR-HRM could be effectively used for genotype relationship analysis of Luffa species.

  11. Molecular thermodynamics of polymer melts at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorou, D.N.

    1988-09-01

    A lattice model is developed for the prediction of structure and thermodynamic properties at free polymer melt surfaces and polymer melt/solid interfaces. Density variations in the interfacial region are taken into account by introducing voids in the lattice, in the spirit of the equation of state theory of Sanchez and Lacombe. Intramolecular energy (chain stiffness) effects are explicitly incorporated. The model is derived through a rigorous statistical mechanical and thermodynamic analysis, which is based on the concept of availability. Two cases are considered: ''full equilibrium,'' whereby the interfacial polymer is taken as free to exchange heat, work and mass with a bulk polymer phase at given temperature and pressure; and ''restricted equilibrium,'' whereby a thin polymer film is allowed to equilibrate locally in response to ambient temperature and pressure, but in which chains do not necessarily have the same chemical potential as in the unconstrained bulk. Techniques are developed for calculating surface tension, adhesion tension, density profiles, chain shape, bond orientation, as well as the distribution of segments of various orders in the interfacial region. 28 refs., 6 figs

  12. Evaluation of methods for characterizing the melting curves of a high temperature cobalt-carbon fixed point to define and determine its melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, David; Machin, Graham

    2012-06-01

    The future mise en pratique for the realization of the kelvin will be founded on the melting temperatures of particular metal-carbon eutectic alloys as thermodynamic temperature references. However, at the moment there is no consensus on what should be taken as the melting temperature. An ideal melting or freezing curve should be a completely flat plateau at a specific temperature. Any departure from the ideal is due to shortcomings in the realization and should be accommodated within the uncertainty budget. However, for the proposed alloy-based fixed points, melting takes place over typically some hundreds of millikelvins. Including the entire melting range within the uncertainties would lead to an unnecessarily pessimistic view of the utility of these as reference standards. Therefore, detailed analysis of the shape of the melting curve is needed to give a value associated with some identifiable aspect of the phase transition. A range of approaches are or could be used; some purely practical, determining the point of inflection (POI) of the melting curve, some attempting to extrapolate to the liquidus temperature just at the end of melting, and a method that claims to give the liquidus temperature and an impurity correction based on the analytical Scheil model of solidification that has not previously been applied to eutectic melting. The different methods have been applied to cobalt-carbon melting curves that were obtained under conditions for which the Scheil model might be valid. In the light of the findings of this study it is recommended that the POI continue to be used as a pragmatic measure of temperature but where required a specified limits approach should be used to define and determine the melting temperature.

  13. Gamma irradiation of melt processed biomedical PDLLA/HAP nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadbin, Susan; Kheirkhah, Yahya

    2014-01-01

    Poly(D-L lactide) PDLLA/hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocomposites at various compositions were prepared by melt-compounding process and then subjected to gamma irradiation at a dose of 30 kGy. The morphology of the nanocomposites, characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), displayed HAP nanoparticles at various sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm distributed almost evenly within the polymer matrix. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis of the irradiated nanocomposites showed an increase in the degree of crystallinity along with a melting peak split. The double melting peak suggested formation of different crystalline structures in the radiation exposed nanocomposites. Also the cold crystallization peak shifted to lower temperatures and became much sharper upon irradiation, indicating higher crystallization rate. The irradiated nanocomposites showed lower tensile strength and elongation at break, suggesting occurrence of some chain scission reactions in the PLA. - Highlights: • Biomedical polylactic acid/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites prepared by melt-compounding were gamma irradiated. • Transmission electron microscopy showed hydroxyapatite nanoparticles evenly distributed within polylactic acid ranging from 10 to 100 nm. • A halo appeared around hydroxyapatite particles showing interfacial interactions between polylactic acid and the particles. • Double melting peak appeared for polylactic acid in DSC thermograms upon gamma irradiation of the nanocomposites

  14. Temperatures and enthalpies of melting of alkali-metal perrhenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukas, W.; Gaune-Escard, M.

    1982-01-01

    Melting temperatures and enthalpies of melting were determined for alkali-metal perrhenates by differential enthalpic analysis using a high-temperature Calvet microcalorimeter. The following values were obtained: for LiReO 4 : 692 K and 24.9 kJ.mol -1 ; for NaReO 4 : 693 K and 33 kJ.mol -1 ; for KReO 4 : 828 K and 36 kJ.mol -1 ; for RbReO 4 : 878 K and 34 kJ.mol -1 ; for CsReO 4 : 893 K and 34 kJ.mol -1 . (author)

  15. A new method for the continuous production of single dosed controlled release matrix systems based on hot-melt extruded starch: analysis of relevant process parameters and implementation of an in-process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, Thomas; Rein, Hubert

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, we evaluated a novel processing technique for the continuous production of hot-melt extruded controlled release matrix systems. A cutting technique derived from plastics industry, where it is widely used for cutting of cables and wires was adapted into the production line. Extruded strands were shaped by a rotary fly cutter. Special focus is laid on the development of a process analytical technology by evaluating signals obtained from the servo control of the rotary fly cutter. The intention is to provide a better insight into the production process and to offer the ability to detect small variations in process-variables. A co-rotating twin-screw extruder ZSE 27 HP-PH from Leistritz (Nürnberg, Germany) was used to plasticize the starch; critical extrusion parameters were recorded. Still elastic strands were shaped by a rotary fly-cutter type Dynamat 20 from Metzner (Neu-Ulm, Germany). Properties of the final products were analyzed via digital image analysis to point out critical parameters influencing the quality. Important aspects were uniformity of diameter, height, roundness, weight, and variations in the cutting angle. Stability of the products was measured by friability tests and by determining the crushing strength of the final products. Drug loading studies up to 70% were performed to evaluate the capacity of the matrix and to prove the technological feasibility. Changes in viscosities during API addition were analyzed by a Haake Minilab capillary rheometer. X-ray studies were performed to investigate molecular structures of the matrices. External shapes of the products were highly affected by die-swelling of the melt. Reliable reproducibility concerning uniformity of mass could be achieved even for high production rates (>2500cuts/min). Both mechanical strength and die-swelling of the products could be linked to the ratio of amylose to amylopectin. Formulations containing up to 70% of API could still be processed. Viscosity

  16. Analysis of materials in connection with corium melt retention in WWER reactor vessels. Final report for the period 15 October 1995 - 14 October 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efanov, A.D.

    1997-02-01

    Analysis of the state of severe accident codes being developed in Russia describing processes of corium - reactor pressure vessel interaction during severe accidents showed that at present there is no reliable validated and verified code. This study considered some of the most advanced severe accident codes which include models of heat generating liquid convections and RPV tolerance capacity however the possibility of physico-chemical interactions is not being considered. The final report demonstrates one of the examples for the settlement modelling of processes of reactor core debris cooling and corium pool mirror cooling with the use of the KOSTER 2 Code developed at IPPE. It was shown that cooling by water spray within some definite region of drop dimensions (0.5 / 4 mm in diameter) could provide the opportunity of the WWER type RPV integrity preservation under the accepted conditions. Due to some uncertainties in calculation modules obtained results are recommended to be treated as preliminary. (author). 26 refs, figs, tabs

  17. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: High-resolution melting curve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy: High-resolution melting curve analysis as an affordable diagnostic mutation scanning tool in a South African cohort. ... Genetic screening for D/BMD in South Africa currently includes multiple ligase-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for exonic deletions and duplications and linkage ...

  18. Numerical Model based Reliability Estimation of Selective Laser Melting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    Selective laser melting is developing into a standard manufacturing technology with applications in various sectors. However, the process is still far from being at par with conventional processes such as welding and casting, the primary reason of which is the unreliability of the process. While...... of the selective laser melting process. A validated 3D finite-volume alternating-direction-implicit numerical technique is used to model the selective laser melting process, and is calibrated against results from single track formation experiments. Correlation coefficients are determined for process input...... parameters such as laser power, speed, beam profile, etc. Subsequently, uncertainties in the processing parameters are utilized to predict a range for the various outputs, using a Monte Carlo method based uncertainty analysis methodology, and the reliability of the process is established....

  19. Chrono-amperometric studies in melt alkaline nitrates and chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stemmelin, Jean-Claude

    1969-01-01

    This research thesis proposes a large overview of the electrochemical behaviour of a number of metals and alloys in melt alkaline chlorides and nitrates at various temperatures. These salts are generally pure but, in some experiments, contain humidity or gases. The author addresses and discusses all the reactions which may occur at the electrode between the salt decomposition potentials. After having recalled and commented some definitions and fundamental principles of thermodynamics and electrochemical kinetics, presented the methods (polarization curves, measurements and additional analysis), the experimental apparatus and the reference electrodes in melt salts, the author reports the results obtained with the studied melt salts, and proposes an interpretation of Log i/U curves

  20. Effect of melting technique on grain size and heat resistance of the 12Kh1MF steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanskaya, K.A.; Kulikova, L.V.; Butneva, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated are the 12Kh1MF steel melted in open-hearth and arc furnaces (deoxidation by aluminium in 1.0 kg/t quantity) and then subjected to electroslag melting. The size of an austenitic grain depends on the residual contents of nitrogen and aluminium in steel. The open-hearth metal subjected to electroslag melting and containing a small quantity of nitrogen (0.006%) and aluminium (0.013%) has coarse austenitic grains and higher heat resistance compared to the steel melted in an arc furnace and also sub ected to electroslag melting. The nitride analysis of steel is carried out

  1. UGT1A1 (TA)n genotyping in sickle-cell disease: high resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis or direct sequencing, what is the best way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Vincent; Mazard, Blandine; Garcia, Caroline; Lacan, Philippe; Gagnieu, Marie-Claude; Joly, Philippe

    2013-09-23

    Minucci et al. have proposed in 2010 a rapid, simple and cost-effective HRM method on the LightCycler 480® apparatus (Roche) for the determination of the 6/6, 6/7 and 7/7 genotypes of the (TA)n UGT1A1 promoter polymorphism. However, they have not studied the n=5 and n=8 alleles which can be quite frequent in sickle-cell disease patients. The aim of our study was to test this HRM protocol to all the 10 possible (TA)n UGT1A1 genotypes (i.e. 5/5, 5/6, 5/7, 5/8, 6/6, 6/7, 6/8, 7/7, 7/8 and 8/8) by using our SCD cohort of patients. All genotypes could be unambiguously identified except 6/7 and 6/8 which give a similar HRM profile. For those two genotypes, the differentiation necessitates either a direct Sanger sequencing or a second PCR protocol followed by a 3% agarose gel migration. For the (TA)n UGT1A1 promoter genotyping of African patients, each lab has to wonder what is the best way between (i) direct Sanger sequencing of all patients and (ii) HRM protocol for all patients followed by a complementary analysis to differentiate the 6/7 and 6/8 genotypes. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electron beam melting of sponge titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Hiroshi; Kusamichi, Tatsuhiko; Muraoka, Tetsuhiro; Onouye, Toshio; Nishimura, Takashi

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental investigations were done on electron beam (EB) melting of sponge titanium by using 80 kW EB melting furnace. Results obtained are as follows: (1) To increase the melting yield of titanium in EB melting of sponge titanium, it is important to recover splashed metal by installation of water-cooled copper wall around the hearth and to decrease evaporation loss of titanium by keeping the surface temperature of molten metal just above the melting temperature of titanium without local heating. (2) Specific power consumption of drip melting of pressed sponge titanium bar and hearth melting of sponge titanium are approximately 0.9 kWh/kg-Ti and 0.5-0.7 kWh/kg-Ti, respectively. (3) Ratios of the heat conducted to water-cooled mould in the drip melting and to water-cooled hearth in the hearth melting to the electron beam input power are 50-65% and 60-65%, respectively. (4) Surface defects of EB-melted ingots include rap which occurs when the EB output is excessively great, and transverse cracks when the EB output is excessively small. To prevent surface defects, the up-down withdrawal method is effective. (author)

  3. A Feasibility Study on UO2/ZrO2 Mixture Melting using Induction Skull Melting Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. D.

    1998-01-01

    Using ISM(Induction Skull Melting) method, which is usually used for the crystallization of refractory materials, a feasibility study on melting of the UO 2 /ZrO 2 mixture(w/o 8:2) is carried out. Frequency, one of main design parameters for ISM, is determined from electrical resistance of UO 2 /ZrO 2 mixture. Heat loss from the crucible for UO 2 /ZrO 2 20kg melting is predicted by comparison with the existing experimental data for UO , ZrO 2 , and ThO 2 . The analysis shows that melting and superheating of the UO 2 /ZrO 2 mixture using induction skull melting method is possible. To attain the superheat of 300K for 20 kg of UO 2 /ZrO 2 , 100kHz, 100 kW power input for induction coil, and 570L/min coolant flow rate are found to be required. The results of this feasibility study will be adopted for designing UO 2 /ZrO 2 furnace using actual corium material at KAERI

  4. Double melting in polytetrafluoroethylene γ-irradiated above its melting point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serov, S.A.; Khatipov, S.A.; Sadovskaya, N.V.; Tereshenkov, A.V.; Chukov, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PTFE irradiation leads to formation of double melting peaks in DSC curves. ► This is connected to dual crystalline morphology typical for PTFE. ► Two crystalline types exist in the PTFE irradiated in the melt. - Abstract: PTFE irradiation above its melting point leads to formation of double melting and crystallization peaks in DSC curves. Splitting of melting peaks is connected to dual crystalline morphology typical for PTFE irradiated in the melt. According to electron microscopy, two crystalline types with different size and packing density exist in the irradiated PTFE.

  5. Tin in granitic melts: The role of melting temperature and protolith composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Mathias; Romer, Rolf L.; Franz, Leander; López-Moro, Francisco Javier

    2018-06-01

    Granite bound tin mineralization typically is seen as the result of extreme magmatic fractionation and late exsolution of magmatic fluids. Mineralization, however, also could be obtained at considerably less fractionation if initial melts already had enhanced Sn contents. We present chemical data and results from phase diagram modeling that illustrate the dominant roles of protolith composition, melting conditions, and melt extraction/evolution for the distribution of Sn between melt and restite and, thus, the Sn content of melts. We compare the element partitioning between leucosome and restite of low-temperature and high-temperature migmatites. During low-temperature melting, trace elements partition preferentially into the restite with the possible exception of Sr, Cd, Bi, and Pb, that may be enriched in the melt. In high-temperature melts, Ga, Y, Cd, Sn, REE, Pb, Bi, and U partition preferentially into the melt whereas Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Mo, and Ba stay in the restite. This contrasting behavior is attributed to the stability of trace element sequestering minerals during melt generation. In particular muscovite, biotite, titanite, and rutile act as host phases for Sn and, therefore prevent Sn enrichment in the melt as long as they are stable phases in the restite. As protolith composition controls both the mineral assemblage and modal contents of the various minerals, protolith composition eventually also controls the fertility of a rock during anatexis, restite mineralogy, and partitioning behavior of trace metals. If a particular trace element is sequestered in a phase that is stable during partial melting, the resulting melt is depleted in this element whereas the restite becomes enriched. Melt generation at high temperature may release Sn when Sn-hosts become unstable. If melt has not been lost before the breakdown of Sn-hosts, Sn contents in the melt will increase but never will be high. In contrast, if melt has been lost before the decomposition of Sn

  6. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of UO2 nanocrystals melting under isolated and periodic boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarchenkov, A.S.; Potashnikov, S.I.; Nekrasov, K.A.; Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We perform MD simulation of UO 2 nanocrystals melting (in range of 768–49 152 ions). ► T(P) melting curves intersect zero near −20 GPa and saturate near 25 GPa. ► Reciprocal size dependences of nanocrystal melting point decrease nonlinearly. ► Linear and parabolic extrapolations to macroscopic values are considered. ► Melting point and density jump are reproduced, but heat of fusion is underestimated. - Abstract: Melting of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) nanocrystals has been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Ten recent and widely used sets of pair potentials were assessed in the rigid ion approximation. Both isolated (in vacuum) and periodic boundary conditions (PBC) were explored. Using barostat under PBC the pressure dependences of melting point were obtained. These curves intersected zero near −20 GPa, saturated near 25 GPa and increased nonlinearly in between. Using simulation of surface under isolated boundary conditions (IBC) recommended melting temperature and density jump were successfully reproduced. However, the heat of fusion is still underestimated. These melting characteristics were calculated for nanocrystals of cubic shape in the range of 768–49 152 particles (volume range of 10–1000 nm 3 ). The obtained reciprocal size dependences decreased nonlinearly. Linear and parabolic extrapolations to macroscopic values are considered. The parabolic one is found to be better suited for analysis of the data on temperature and heat of melting.

  8. Chemical decontamination and melt densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.L.; Griggs, B.; Kemper, R.S.; Nelson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies on the chemical decontamination and densification of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel undissolved residues remaining after dissolution of the UO 2 --PuO 2 spent fuel material from sheared fuel bundles are reported. The studies were made on cold or very small samples to demonstrate the feasibility of the processes developed before proceeding to hot cell demonstrations with kg level of the sources. A promising aqueous decontamination method for Zr alloy cladding was developed in which oxidized surfaces are conditioned with HF prior to leaching with ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. Feasibility of molten salt decontamination of oxidized Zircaloy was demonstrated. A low melting alloy of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel was obtained in induction heated graphite crucibles. Segregated Zircaloy cladding sections were directly melted by the inductoslag process to yield a metal ingot suitable for storage. Both Zircaloy and Zircaloy--stainless steel--Inconel alloys proved to be highly satisfactory getters and sinks for recovered tritium

  9. Monitoring of polymer melt processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alig, Ingo; Steinhoff, Bernd; Lellinger, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The paper reviews the state-of-the-art of in-line and on-line monitoring during polymer melt processing by compounding, extrusion and injection moulding. Different spectroscopic and scattering techniques as well as conductivity and viscosity measurements are reviewed and compared concerning their potential for different process applications. In addition to information on chemical composition and state of the process, the in situ detection of morphology, which is of specific interest for multiphase polymer systems such as polymer composites and polymer blends, is described in detail. For these systems, the product properties strongly depend on the phase or filler morphology created during processing. Examples for optical (UV/vis, NIR) and ultrasonic attenuation spectra recorded during extrusion are given, which were found to be sensitive to the chemical composition as well as to size and degree of dispersion of micro or nanofillers in the polymer matrix. By small-angle light scattering experiments, process-induced structures were detected in blends of incompatible polymers during compounding. Using conductivity measurements during extrusion, the influence of processing conditions on the electrical conductivity of polymer melts with conductive fillers (carbon black or carbon nanotubes) was monitored. (topical review)

  10. Multiscale Models of Melting Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Sea ice reflectance or albedo , a key parameter in climate modeling, is primarily determined by melt pond and ice floe configurations. Ice - albedo ...determine their albedo - a key parameter in climate modeling. Here we explore the possibility of a conceptual sea ice climate model passing through a...bifurcation points. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Y. Ma, I. Sudakov, and K. M. Golden Abstract: The albedo of melting

  11. Lattice cluster theory for polymer melts with specific interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the long-recognized fact that chemical structure and specific interactions greatly influence the thermodynamic properties of polymer systems, a predictive molecular theory that enables systematically addressing the role of chemical structure and specific interactions has been slow to develop even for polymer melts. While the lattice cluster theory (LCT) provides a powerful vehicle for understanding the influence of various molecular factors, such as monomer structure, on the thermodynamic properties of polymer melts and blends, the application of the LCT has heretofore been limited to the use of the simplest polymer model in which all united atom groups within the monomers of a species interact with a common monomer averaged van der Waals energy. Thus, the description of a compressible polymer melt involves a single van der Waals energy. As a first step towards developing more realistic descriptions to aid in the analysis of experimental data and the design of new materials, the LCT is extended here to treat models of polymer melts in which the backbone and side groups have different interaction strengths, so three energy parameters are present, namely, backbone-backbone, side group-side group, and backbone-side group interaction energies. Because of the great algebraic complexity of this extension, we retain maximal simplicity within this class of models by further specializing this initial study to models of polymer melts comprising chains with poly(n-α-olefin) structures where only the end segments on the side chains may have different, specific van der Waals interaction energies with the other united atom groups. An analytical expression for the LCT Helmholtz free energy is derived for the new model. Illustrative calculations are presented to demonstrate the degree to which the thermodynamic properties of polymer melts can be controlled by specific interactions

  12. Calculation of melting points of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobkova, O.S.; Voskobojnikov, V.G.; Kozin, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    The correlation between the melting point and thermodynamic parameters characterizing the strength of oxides and compounds is given. Such thermodynamic paramters include the energy and antropy of atomization

  13. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhong-Li; Li Rui; Sun Jun-Sheng; Zhang Xiu-Lu; Cai Ling-Cang

    2016-01-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. (paper)

  14. Phase behavior and reactive transport of partial melt in heterogeneous mantle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The reactive transport of partial melt is the key process that leads to the chemical and physical differentiation of terrestrial planets and smaller celestial bodies. The essential role of the lithological heterogeneities during partial melting of the mantle is increasingly recognized. How far can enriched melts propagate while interacting with the ambient mantle? Can the melt flow emanating from a fertile heterogeneity be localized through a reactive infiltration feedback in a model without exogenous factors or contrived initial conditions? A full understanding of the role of heterogeneities requires reactive melt transport models that account for the phase behavior of major elements. Previous work on reactive transport in the mantle focuses on trace element partitioning; we present the first nonlinear chromatographic analysis of reactive melt transport in systems with binary solid solution. Our analysis shows that reactive melt transport in systems with binary solid solution leads to the formation of two separate reaction fronts: a slow melting/freezing front along which enthalpy change is dominant and a fast dissolution/precipitation front along which compositional changes are dominated by an ion-exchange process over enthalpy change. An intermediate state forms between these two fronts with a bulk-rock composition and enthalpy that are not necessarily bounded by the bulk-rock composition and enthalpy of either the enriched heterogeneity or the depleted ambient mantle. The formation of this intermediate state makes it difficult to anticipate the porosity changes and hence the stability of reaction fronts. Therefore, we develop a graphical representation for the solution that allows identification of the intermediate state by inspection, for all possible bulk-rock compositions and enthalpies of the heterogeneity and the ambient mantle. We apply the analysis to the partial melting of an enriched heterogeneity. This leads to the formation of moving precipitation

  15. Modelling of the controlled melt flow in a glass melting space – Its melting performance and heat losses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jebavá, Marcela; Dyrčíková, Petra; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 430, DEC 15 (2015), s. 52-63 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilizatios * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  16. Identification of a new genetic marker in Mycoplasma synoviae vaccine strain MS-H and development of a strategy using polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting curve analysis for differentiating MS-H from field strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Konsak, Barbara M; Olaogun, Olusola M; Agnew-Crumptona, Rebecca; Kanci, Anna; Marenda, Marc S; Browning, Glenn F; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2017-10-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) is an economically important avian pathogen worldwide, causing subclinical respiratory tract infection and infectious synovitis in chickens and turkeys. A temperature-sensitive (ts + ) live attenuated vaccine MS-H, derived from the Australian field strain 86079/7NS, is now widely used in many countries to control the disease induced by MS. Differentiation of MS-H vaccine from field strains is crucial for monitoring vaccination programs in commercial poultry. Comparison of genomic sequences of MS-H and its parent strain revealed an adenine deletion at nucleotide position 468 of the MS-H oppF-1 gene. This mutation was shown to be unique to MS-H in further comparative analyses of oppF-1 genes of MS-H re-isolates and field strains from Australia and other countries. Based on this single nucleotide, a combination of nested PCR and high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis was used to evaluate its potential for use in differentiation of MS-H from field strains. The mean genotype confidence percentages of 99.27 and 48.20 for MS-H and field strains, respectively, demonstrated the high discriminative power of the newly developed assay (oppF PCR-HRM). A set of 13 tracheal swab samples collected from MS-H vaccinated specific pathogen free birds and commercial chicken flocks infected with MS were tested using the oppF PCR-HRM test and results were totally consistent with those obtained using vlhA genotyping. The nested-PCR HRM method established in this study proved to be a rapid, simple and cost effective tool for discriminating the MS-H vaccine strain from Australian and international strains in pure cultures and on tracheal swabs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative PCR high-resolution melting (qPCR-HRM) curve analysis, a new approach to simultaneously screen point mutations and large rearrangements: application to MLH1 germline mutations in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Etienne; Lefol, Cédrick; Bourdon, Violaine; Coulet, Florence; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Soubrier, Florent; Bièche, Ivan; Olschwang, Sylviane; Sobol, Hagay; Lidereau, Rosette

    2009-06-01

    Several techniques have been developed to screen mismatch repair (MMR) genes for deleterious mutations. Until now, two different techniques were required to screen for both point mutations and large rearrangements. For the first time, we propose a new approach, called "quantitative PCR (qPCR) high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis (qPCR-HRM)," which combines qPCR and HRM to obtain a rapid and cost-effective method suitable for testing a large series of samples. We designed PCR amplicons to scan the MLH1 gene using qPCR HRM. Seventy-six patients were fully scanned in replicate, including 14 wild-type patients and 62 patients with known mutations (57 point mutations and five rearrangements). To validate the detected mutations, we used sequencing and/or hybridization on a dedicated MLH1 array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). All point mutations and rearrangements detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC)+multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were successfully detected by qPCR HRM. Three large rearrangements were characterized with the dedicated MLH1 array-CGH. One variant was detected with qPCR HRM in a wild-type patient and was located within the reverse primer. One variant was not detected with qPCR HRM or with dHPLC due to its proximity to a T-stretch. With qPCR HRM, prescreening for point mutations and large rearrangements are performed in one tube and in one step with a single machine, without the need for any automated sequencer in the prescreening process. In replicate, its reagent cost, sensitivity, and specificity are comparable to those of dHPLC+MLPA techniques. However, qPCR HRM outperformed the other techniques in terms of its rapidity and amount of data provided.

  18. Reaction of soda-lime-silica glass melt with water vapour at melting temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vernerová, Miroslava; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Němec, Lubomír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 416, MAY 15 (2015), s. 21-30 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt * sulfate * water vapour * bubble nucleation * melt foaming * glass melting Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  19. High-pressure melting curve of KCl: Evidence against lattice-instability theories of melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; Wolf, G.

    1986-01-01

    We show that the large curvature in the T-P melting curve of KCl is the result of a reordering of the liquid to a more densely packed arrangement. As a result theories of melting, such as the instability model, which do not take into account the structure of the liquid fail to predict the correct pressure dependence of the melting curve

  20. Recent Changes in the Arctic Melt Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Markus, Thorsten; Meier, Walter N.; Miller, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Melt-season duration, melt-onset and freeze-up dates are derived from satellite passive microwave data and analyzed from 1979 to 2005 over Arctic sea ice. Results indicate a shift towards a longer melt season, particularly north of Alaska and Siberia, corresponding to large retreats of sea ice observed in these regions. Although there is large interannual and regional variability in the length of the melt season, the Arctic is experiencing an overall lengthening of the melt season at a rate of about 2 weeks decade(sup -1). In fact, all regions in the Arctic (except for the central Arctic) have statistically significant (at the 99% level or higher) longer melt seasons by greater than 1 week decade(sup -1). The central Arctic shows a statistically significant trend (at the 98% level) of 5.4 days decade(sup -1). In 2005 the Arctic experienced its longest melt season, corresponding with the least amount of sea ice since 1979 and the warmest temperatures since the 1880s. Overall, the length of the melt season is inversely correlated with the lack of sea ice seen in September north of Alaska and Siberia, with a mean correlation of -0.8.

  1. Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1996-01-01

    Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melt NaCl-KCl-K 2 CO 3 (5 mass %) in the temperature range of 973-1123 K has been studied. The products and niobium corrosion rate have been ascertained, depending on the temperature of melt and time of allowance. Potentials of niobium corrosion have been measured. Refs. 11, figs. 3, tabs. 2

  2. Attenuation in Melting Layer of Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the melting layer is employed on radar measurements to simulate the attenuation of radio waves at 12, 20 and 30GHz. The attenuation in the melting layer is simulated to be slightly larger than that of rain with the same path length and precipitation intensity. The result appears to depend

  3. Multiscale approach to equilibrating model polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Ali Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein; Hojdis, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present an effective and simple multiscale method for equilibrating Kremer Grest model polymer melts of varying stiffness. In our approach, we progressively equilibrate the melt structure above the tube scale, inside the tube and finally at the monomeric scale. We make use of models designed...

  4. Disordering and Melting of Aluminum Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoltze, Per; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Landman, U.

    1988-01-01

    We report on a molecular-dynamics simulation of an Al(110) surface using the effective-medium theory to describe the interatomic interactions. The surface region is found to start melting ≅200 K below the bulk melting temperature with a gradual increase in the thickness of the disordered layer as...

  5. Shape evolution of a melting nonspherical particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintea, Daniel M.; Hauk, Tobias; Roisman, Ilia V.; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-09-01

    In this study melting of irregular ice crystals was observed in an acoustic levitator. The evolution of the particle shape is captured using a high-speed video system. Several typical phenomena have been discovered: change of the particle shape, appearance of a capillary flow of the melted liquid on the particle surface leading to liquid collection at the particle midsection (where the interface curvature is smallest), and appearance of sharp cusps at the particle tips. No such phenomena can be observed during melting of spherical particles. An approximate theoretical model is developed which accounts for the main physical phenomena associated with melting of an irregular particle. The agreement between the theoretical predictions for the melting time, for the evolution of the particle shape, and the corresponding experimental data is rather good.

  6. Nanotexturing of surfaces to reduce melting point.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Zubia, David (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Mireles, Jose (Universidad Aut%C3%94onoma de Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez Ciudad Ju%C3%94arez, Mexico); Marquez, Noel (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX); Quinones, Stella (University of Texas at El Paso El Paso, TX)

    2011-11-01

    This investigation examined the use of nano-patterned structures on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) material to reduce the bulk material melting point (1414 C). It has been found that sharp-tipped and other similar structures have a propensity to move to the lower energy states of spherical structures and as a result exhibit lower melting points than the bulk material. Such a reduction of the melting point would offer a number of interesting opportunities for bonding in microsystems packaging applications. Nano patterning process capabilities were developed to create the required structures for the investigation. One of the technical challenges of the project was understanding and creating the specialized conditions required to observe the melting and reshaping phenomena. Through systematic experimentation and review of the literature these conditions were determined and used to conduct phase change experiments. Melting temperatures as low as 1030 C were observed.

  7. Melting Can Hinder Impact-Induced Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani-Gangaraj, Mostafa; Veysset, David; Nelson, Keith A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2017-10-01

    Melting has long been used to join metallic materials, from welding to selective laser melting in additive manufacturing. In the same school of thought, localized melting has been generally perceived as an advantage, if not the main mechanism, for the adhesion of metallic microparticles to substrates during a supersonic impact. Here, we conduct the first in situ supersonic impact observations of individual metallic microparticles aimed at the explicit study of melting effects. Counterintuitively, we find that under at least some conditions melting is disadvantageous and hinders impact-induced adhesion. In the parameter space explored, i.e., ˜10 μ m particle size and ˜1 km /s particle velocity, we argue that the solidification time is much longer than the residence time of the particle on the substrate, so that resolidification cannot be a significant factor in adhesion.

  8. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Mikael; Feltham, D.L.; Taylor, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mathematical model describing the summer melting of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt rate beneath the melt ponds...

  9. Volatile diffusion in silicate melts and its effects on melt inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scarlato

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A compendium of diffusion measurements and their Arrhenius equations for water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, fluorine, and chlorine in silicate melts similar in composition to natural igneous rocks is presented. Water diffusion in silicic melts is well studied and understood, however little data exists for melts of intermediate to basic compositions. The data demonstrate that both the water concentration and the anhydrous melt composition affect the diffusion coefficient of water. Carbon dioxide diffusion appears only weakly dependent, at most, on the volatilefree melt composition and no effect of carbon dioxide concentration has been observed, although few experiments have been performed. Based upon one study, the addition of water to rhyolitic melts increases carbon dioxide diffusion by orders of magnitude to values similar to that of 6 wt% water. Sulfur diffusion in intermediate to silicic melts depends upon the anhydrous melt composition and the water concentration. In water-bearing silicic melts sulfur diffuses 2 to 3 orders of magnitude slower than water. Chlorine diffusion is affected by both water concentration and anhydrous melt composition; its values are typically between those of water and sulfur. Information on fluorine diffusion is rare, but the volatile-free melt composition exerts a strong control on its diffusion. At the present time the diffusion of water, carbon dioxide, sulfur and chlorine can be estimated in silicic melts at magmatic temperatures. The diffusion of water and carbon dioxide in basic to intermediate melts is only known at a limited set of temperatures and compositions. The diffusion data for rhyolitic melts at 800°C together with a standard model for the enrichment of incompatible elements in front of growing crystals demonstrate that rapid crystal growth, greater than 10-10 ms-1, can significantly increase the volatile concentrations at the crystal-melt interface and that any of that melt trapped

  10. Analysis of Apoptosis in Ultraviolet-Induced Sea Cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) Melting Using Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl-Transferase-Mediated dUTP Nick End-Labeling Assay and Cleaved Caspase-3 Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing-Feng; Gao, Rong-Chun; Wu, Hai-Tao; Li, Peng-Fei; Hu, Xian-Shu; Zhou, Da-Yong; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-04

    The sea cucumber body wall melting phenomenon occurs under certain circumstances, and the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear. This study investigated the apoptosis in the ultraviolet (UV)-induced sea cucumber melting phenomenon. Fresh sea cucumbers (Stichopus japonicus) were exposed to UV radiation for half an hour at an intensity of 0.056 mW/cm(2) and then held at room temperature for melting development. The samples were histologically processed into formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. The apoptosis of samples was analyzed with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. The emergence of TUNEL-positive cells speeds up between 0.5 and 2 h after UV irradiation. Cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were obviously detected in sample tissues immediately after the UV irradiation. These results demonstrated that sea cucumber melting induced by UV irradiation was triggered by the activation of caspase-3 followed by DNA fragmentation in sea cucumber tissue, which was attributed to apoptosis but was not a consequence of autolysis activity.

  11. Chemical and electrochemical behaviour of halides in nitrate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkalenko, D.A.; Kudrya, S.A.; Delimarskij, Yu.K.; Antropov, L.I.

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of improving the positive electrode characteristics of medium temperature lithium-nitrate element by means of adding alkali metal halogenides into nitrate melt is considered. The experiments have been made at the temperature of 150 deg C in (K, Na, Li) NO 3 melts of eutectic composition. It has been found that only at temperatures higher than 250 deg C in nitrate melts containing Li + and Na + cations, an interaction of nitrate ions with the added iodides is possible. The interaction does not take place in case of chloride, bromide, and fluoride additions. The waves of halogenide oxidation and reduction of the corresponding halogens have been identified. The analysis of the obtained experimental data shows that halogenide addition into nitrate melt does not result in speed increase of cathodic reduction of nitrate ions or in formation of a new cathode process at more positive potentials. A conclusion is made that halogenide addition into electrolyte of lithium-nitrate current source is inexpedient

  12. Validation of the THIRMAL-1 melt-water interaction code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, C.C.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The THIRMAL-1 computer code has been used to calculate nonexplosive LWR melt-water interactions both in-vessel and ex-vessel. To support the application of the code and enhance its acceptability, THIRMAL-1 has been compared with available data from two of the ongoing FARO experiments at Ispra and two of the Corium Coolant Mixing (CCM) experiments performed at Argonne. THIRMAL-1 calculations for the FARO Scoping Test and Quenching Test 2 as well as the CCM-5 and -6 experiments were found to be in excellent agreement with the experiment results. This lends confidence to the modeling that has been incorporated in the code describing melt stream breakup due to the growth of both Kelvin-Helmholtz and large wave instabilities, the sizes of droplets formed, multiphase flow and heat transfer in the mixing zone surrounding and below the melt metallic phase. As part of the analysis of the FARO tests, a mechanistic model was developed to calculate the prefragmentation as it may have occurred when melt relocated from the release vessel to the water surface and the model was compared with the relevant data from FARO.

  13. Stability and erosion of melt layers formed during plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Melting and vaporization of metallic reactor components such as the first wall and the limiter/divertor may be expected in fusion reactors due to the high energy deposition resulting from plasma instabilities occuring during both normal and off-normal operating conditions. Off-normal operating conditions result from plasma disruptions where the plasma losses confinement and dumps its energy on parts of reactor components. High heat flux may also result during normal operating conditions due to fluctuations in plasma edge conditions. Of particular significance is the stability and erosion of the resulting melt layer which directly impacts the total expected lifetime of the reactor. The loss of the melt layer during the disruption could have a serious impact on the required safe and economic operation of the reactor. A model is developed to describe the behavior of the melt layer during the time evolution of the disruption. The analysis is done parametrically for a range of disruption times, energy densities and various acting forces

  14. Phenomenological Studies on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during Postulated Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Park, H.S.; Giri, A.; Karbojian, A.; Jasiulevicius, A.; Hansson, R.C.; Chikkanagoudar, U.; Shiferaw, D.; Stepanyan, A.

    2004-01-01

    This is the annual report for the work performed in year 2003 in the research project 'Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) During Severe Accidents in LWRs', under the auspices of the APRI Project, jointly funded by SKI, HSK, and the Swedish and Finnish power companies. The emphasis of the work was placed on phenomena and parameters, which govern the droplet fragmentation in steam explosions, in-vessel and ex-vessel melt/debris coolability, melt pool convection, and the thermal and mechanical loadings of a pressure vessel during melt-vessel interaction. Most research projects in 2002, such as the COMECO, POMECO and MISTEE programs, were continued. An analysis of the FOREVER experiments using the RELAP code to investigate the melt coolability, bubble dynamics and bubble stability to investigate the dynamic behavior of vapor bubble during steam explosions and associated melt fragmentation, quenching boiling experiment to investigate the thermal behavior of single melt droplet were newly initiated. The SIMECO experiment to investigate the three-layer melt pool convection was restarted. The experimental facilities for these projects were fully functional during year 2003. Many of the investigations performed during the course of the MSWI project have produced papers, which have been published in the proceedings of technical meetings and Journals. Significant technical advances were achieved during the course of these studies. These were: A series of experiments on single drop steam explosions was performed to investigate the fine fragmentation process of a metallic melt drop in various thermal conditions. For the first time, transient fine fragmentation process of a melt drop during explosion phase of a steam explosion was visualized continuously and quantified. Different triggering behavior with respect to the coolant subcooling was observed. The analyses on bubble dynamics during a single drop steam explosion and vapor bubble stability estimated the dynamic

  15. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  16. ELM-induced transient tungsten melting in the JET divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Arnoux, G.; Bazylev, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Autricque, A.; Balboa, I.; Clever, M.; Dejarnac, R.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Devaux, S.; Frassinetti, L.; Gauthier, E.; Horacek, J.; Jachmich, S.; Komm, M.; Knaup, M.; Krieger, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Pitts, R. A.; Puetterich, T.; Rack, M.; Stamp, M.; Sergienko, G.; Tamain, P.; Thompson, V.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2015-02-01

    from spectroscopy is 100 times less than expected from steady state melting and is thus consistent only with transient melting during the individual ELMs. Analysis of IR data and spectroscopy together with modelling using the MEMOS code Bazylev et al 2009 J. Nucl. Mater. 390-391 810-13 point to transient melting as the main process. 3D MEMOS simulations on the consequences of multiple ELMs on damage of tungsten castellated armour have been performed. These experiments provide the first experimental evidence for the absence of significant melt splashing at transient events resembling mitigated ELMs on ITER and establish a key experimental benchmark for the MEMOS code.

  17. ELM-induced transient tungsten melting in the JET divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, J.W.; Clever, M.; Knaup, M.; Arnoux, G.; Matthews, G.F.; Balboa, I.; Meigs, A.; Bazylev, B.; Autricque, A.; Dejarnac, R.; Horacek, J.; Komm, M.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Gauthier, E.; Devaux, S.; Krieger, K.; Frassinetti, L.; Jachmich, S.; Marsen, S.

    2015-01-01

     × B forces. The evaporation rate determined from spectroscopy is 100 times less than expected from steady state melting and is thus consistent only with transient melting during the individual ELMs. Analysis of IR data and spectroscopy together with modelling using the MEMOS code Bazylev et al 2009 J. Nucl. Mater. 390–391 810–13 point to transient melting as the main process. 3D MEMOS simulations on the consequences of multiple ELMs on damage of tungsten castellated armour have been performed. These experiments provide the first experimental evidence for the absence of significant melt splashing at transient events resembling mitigated ELMs on ITER and establish a key experimental benchmark for the MEMOS code. (paper)

  18. Reaction- and melting behaviour of LWR-core components UO2, Zircaloy and steel during the meltdown period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1976-07-01

    The reaction behaviour of the UO 2 , Zircaloy-4 and austenitic steel core components was investigated as a function of temperature (till melting temperatures) under inert and oxidizing conditions. Component concentrations varied between that of Corium-A (65 wt.% UO 2 , 18% Zry, 17% steel) and that of Corium-E (35 wt.% UO 2 , 10% Zry, 55% steel). In addition, Zircaloy and stainless steel were used with different degrees of oxidation. The paper describes systematically the phases that arise during heating and melting. The integral composition of the melts and the qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of the phases present in solidified corium are given. In some cases melting points have been determined. The reaction and melting behaviour of the corium specimens strongly depends on the concentration and on the degree of oxidation of the core components. First liquid phases are formed at the Zry-steel interface at about 1,350 0 C. The maximum temperatures of about 2,500 0 C for the complete melting of the corium-specimens are well below the UO 2 melting point. Depending on the steel content and/or degree of oxidation of Zry and steel, a homogeneous metallic or oxide melt or two immiscible melts - one oxide and the other metallic - are obtained. During the melting experiments performed under inert gas conditions the chemical composition of the molten specimens generally change by evaporation losses of single elements, especially of uranium, zirconium and oxygen. The total weight losses go up to 30%; under oxidizing conditions they are substantially smaller due to the occurrence of different phases. In air or water vapor, the occurrence of the phases and the melting behaviour of the core components are strongly influenced by the oxidation rate and the oxygen supply to the surface of the melt. In the case of the hypothetical core melting accident, a heterogeneous melt (oxide and metallic) is probable after the meltdown period. (orig./RW) [de

  19. Experimental results for TiO2 melting and release using cold crucible melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. W.; Min, B. T.; Park, I. G.; Kim, H. D.

    2000-01-01

    To simulate the severe accident phenomena using the real reactor material which melting point is about 2,800K, the melting and release method for materials with high melting point should be developed. This paper discusses the test results for TiO 2 materials using the cold crucible melting method to study the melting and release method of actual corium. To melt and release of few kg of TiO2, the experimental facility is manufactured through proper selection of design parameters such as frequency and capacity of R.F generator, crucible size and capacity of coolant. The melting and release of TiO 2 has been successfully performed in the cold crucible of 15cm in inner diameter and 30cm in height with 30kW RF power generator of 370 KHz. In the melt delivery experiment, about 2.6kg of molten TiO2, 60% of initial charged mass, is released. Rest of it is remained in the watercage in form of the rubble crust formed at the top of crucible and melt crust formed at the interface between the water-cage and melt. Especially, in the melt release test, the location of the working coil is important to make the thin crust at the bottom of the crucible

  20. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1999-08-01

    to fragment. The molten fuel-coolant mixtures with a binary oxidic core melt (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) may feature low triggerability and low explosivity. The mechanical-to-thermal conversion ratio may be very low. The presence of metallic component in the melt may significantly enhance triggerability and explosivity of molten corium. The characteristics of melt spreading into 2-D channel are much different from those into 1-D channel. The evaluations of spreading parameters in reactor accident situations would be strongly affected by the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the melt spreading process, such as downward heat removal and of upward heat removal in case of core melt spreading under water. Computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The Multiphase Eulerian Lagrangian Transport code (MELT-313) was validated to investigate the hydrodynamics during the premixing process of jet penetrating into a water pool. The FlowLab code employing the multi-fluid multi-phase Lattice-Boltzmann method was developed and validated. In the Lattice-Boltzmann approach, no special treatment is needed to track the interface. A scaling technology was developed to describe the spreading efficiency of melt into I -D channel. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis (MVITA) code describes the process of melt pool formation, melt pool convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. A gap cooling model and model representing penetrations were incorporated into this code. The code was coupled with ANSYS code, which performs structure analysis. Thus a coupled thermal and mechanical analysis of the loadings of a pressure vessel during the melt-vessel interaction, could be performed.

  1. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H

    1999-08-01

    to fragment. The molten fuel-coolant mixtures with a binary oxidic core melt (UO 2 -ZrO 2 ) may feature low triggerability and low explosivity. The mechanical-to-thermal conversion ratio may be very low. The presence of metallic component in the melt may significantly enhance triggerability and explosivity of molten corium. The characteristics of melt spreading into 2-D channel are much different from those into 1-D channel. The evaluations of spreading parameters in reactor accident situations would be strongly affected by the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the melt spreading process, such as downward heat removal and of upward heat removal in case of core melt spreading under water. Computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The Multiphase Eulerian Lagrangian Transport code (MELT-313) was validated to investigate the hydrodynamics during the premixing process of jet penetrating into a water pool. The FlowLab code employing the multi-fluid multi-phase Lattice-Boltzmann method was developed and validated. In the Lattice-Boltzmann approach, no special treatment is needed to track the interface. A scaling technology was developed to describe the spreading efficiency of melt into I -D channel. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis (MVITA) code describes the process of melt pool formation, melt pool convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. A gap cooling model and model representing penetrations were incorporated into this code. The code was coupled with ANSYS code, which performs structure analysis. Thus a coupled thermal and mechanical analysis of the loadings of a pressure vessel during the melt-vessel interaction, could be performed

  2. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  3. Evaluation of Melt Behavior with initial Melt Velocity under SFR Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Hyo; Bang, In Cheol; Jerng, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    In the current Korean sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) program, early dispersion of the molten metallic fuel within a subchannel is suggested as one of the inherent safety strategies for the initiating phase of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA). The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. Thus, it could be worthwhile to study the horizontal melt injections at lower temperature as a preliminary study in order to identify the melt dispersion phenomena. For this reason, it is required to clarify whether the coolant vapor pressure is the driving force of the melt dispersion with the core region. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition. As the results, the following results are remarked: 1. The upward melt dispersion did not occur for a given melt and coolant temperature in the nonboiling range. Over current range of conditions

  4. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana; Vasilakopoulos, Thodoris C.; Jeong, Youncheol; Lee, Hyojoon; Rogers, Simon A.; Sakellariou, Georgios; Allgaier, Jü rgen B.; Takano, Atsushi; Brá s, Ana Rita E; Chang, Taihyun; Gooß en, Sebastian; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Wischnewski, Andreas; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos; Richter, Dieter R.; Rubinstein, Michael H.; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. Dynamics of Melting and Melt Migration as Inferred from Incompatible Trace Element Abundance in Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q.; Liang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    To better understand the melting processes beneath the mid-ocean ridge, we developed a simple model for trace element fractionation during concurrent melting and melt migration in an upwelling steady-state mantle column. Based on petrologic considerations, we divided the upwelling mantle into two regions: a double- lithology upper region where high permeability dunite channels are embedded in a lherzolite/harzburgite matrix, and a single-lithology lower region that consists of partially molten lherzolite. Melt generated in the single lithology region migrates upward through grain-scale diffuse porous flow, whereas melt in the lherzolite/harzburgite matrix in the double-lithology region is allowed to flow both vertically through the overlying matrix and horizontally into its neighboring dunite channels. There are three key dynamic parameters in our model: degree of melting experienced by the single lithology column (Fd), degree of melting experienced by the double lithology column (F), and a dimensionless melt suction rate (R) that measures the accumulated rate of melt extraction from the matrix to the channel relative to the accumulated rate of matrix melting. In terms of trace element fractionation, upwelling and melting in the single lithology column is equivalent to non-modal batch melting (R = 0), whereas melting and melt migration in the double lithology region is equivalent to a nonlinear combination of non-modal batch and fractional melting (0 abyssal peridotite, we showed, with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, that it is difficult to invert for all three dynamic parameters from a set of incompatible trace element data with confidence. However, given Fd, it is quite possible to constrain F and R from incompatible trace element abundances in residual peridotite. As an illustrative example, we used the simple melting model developed in this study and selected REE and Y abundance in diopside from abyssal peridotites to infer their melting and melt migration

  7. Determination of the heavy rare earth radionuclides in melted rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yinming; Wang Yalong; Zhang Quanshi

    1995-01-01

    There are some heavy rare earth radionuclides in the melted rocks, such as 160 Tb, 168,170 Tm, 88,91 Y, 174,177 Lu, 169 Yb, etc.. Because their contents are very low in the melted rocks and the light rare earth fission products are interfered with their determination, it is very complicated to measure them quantitatively. So a new method has been studied in which P507 resin is used to separate and purify the rare earths. Radioactive sources are prepared by the pieces of filter paper for determining chemical yield with X-fluorescence analysis, and radioactive activity is determined with the γ-spectra analysis. It is proved that this method has satisfied the demands of experiments

  8. Effects of Melt Processing on Evolution of Structure in PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Dai, Patrick Shuanghua; Oyebode, Elizabeth; Cebe, Peggy; Capel, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    We report on the effects of melt processing temperature on structure formation in Poly(ether-ether-ketone), PEEK. Real time Small Angle X-ray Scattering, SAXS, and thermal analysis are used to follow the melting behavior after various stages of processing. Assignment of peaks to structural entities within the material, the relative perfection of the crystals, and the possibility of their reorganization, are all influenced by the melt processing history. With the advent of high intensity synchrotron sources of X-radiation, polymer scientists gain a research tool which, when used along with thermal analysis, provides additional structural information about the crystals during growth and subsequent melting. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic polymer with a very high glass transition temperature (145 C) and crystal melting point (337 C). PEEK has been the subject of recent studies by X-ray scattering in which melt and cold crystallization were followed in real-time. X-ray scattering and thermal studies have been used to address the formation of dual endothermic response which has been variously ascribed to lamellar insertion, dual crystal populations, or melting followed by re-crystallization. Another important issue is whether all of the amorphous phase is located in interlamellar regions, or alternatively whether some is located in "pockets" away from the crystalline lamellar stacks. The interpretation of scattering from lamellar stacks varies depending upon whether such amorphous pockets are formed. Some groups believe all of the amorphous phase is interlamellar. This leads to selection of a smaller thickness for the crystals. Other groups suggest that most amorphous phase is not interlamellar, and this leads to the suggestion that the crystal thickness is larger than the amorphous layer within the stacks. To investigate these ideas, we used SAXS and Differential Scanning Calorimetry to compare results of single and dual stage melt crystallization of PEEK using a

  9. Analysis of RET promoter CpG island methylation using methylation-specific PCR (MSP), pyrosequencing, and methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM): impact on stage II colon cancer patient outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draht, Muriel X G; Smits, Kim M; Jooste, Valérie; Tournier, Benjamin; Vervoort, Martijn; Ramaekers, Chantal; Chapusot, Caroline; Weijenberg, Matty P; van Engeland, Manon; Melotte, Veerle

    2016-01-01

    Already since the 1990s, promoter CpG island methylation markers have been considered promising diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive cancer biomarkers. However, so far, only a limited number of DNA methylation markers have been introduced into clinical practice. One reason why the vast majority of methylation markers do not translate into clinical applications is lack of independent validation of methylation markers, often caused by differences in methylation analysis techniques. We recently described RET promoter CpG island methylation as a potential prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients of two independent series. In the current study, we analyzed the RET promoter CpG island methylation of 241 stage II colon cancer patients by direct methylation-specific PCR (MSP), nested-MSP, pyrosequencing, and methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM). All primers were designed as close as possible to the same genomic region. In order to investigate the effect of different DNA methylation assays on patient outcome, we assessed the clinical sensitivity and specificity as well as the association of RET methylation with overall survival for three and five years of follow-up. Using direct-MSP and nested-MSP, 12.0 % (25/209) and 29.6 % (71/240) of the patients showed RET promoter CpG island methylation. Methylation frequencies detected by pyrosequencing were related to the threshold for positivity that defined RET methylation. Methylation frequencies obtained by pyrosequencing (threshold for positivity at 20 %) and MS-HRM were 13.3 % (32/240) and 13.8 % (33/239), respectively. The pyrosequencing threshold for positivity of 20 % showed the best correlation with MS-HRM and direct-MSP results. Nested-MSP detected RET promoter CpG island methylation in deceased patients with a higher sensitivity (33.1 %) compared to direct-MSP (10.7 %), pyrosequencing (14.4 %), and MS-HRM (15.4 %). While RET methylation frequencies detected by nested

  10. Validation of High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRM of the Amplified ITS2 Region for the Detection and Identification of Yeasts from Clinical Samples: Comparison with Culture and MALDI-TOF Based Identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Duyvejonck

    Full Text Available Candida species are known as opportunistic pathogens, and a possible cause of invasive infections. Because of their species-specific antimycotic resistance patterns, reliable techniques for their detection, quantification and identification are needed. We validated a DNA amplification method for direct detection of Candida spp. from clinical samples, namely the ITS2-High Resolution Melting Analysis (direct method, by comparing it with a culture and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry based method (indirect method to establish the presence of Candida species in three different types of clinical samples.A total of 347 clinical samples, i.e. throat swabs, rectal swabs and vaginal swabs, were collected from the gynaecology/obstetrics, intensive care and haematology wards at the Ghent University Hospital, Belgium. For the direct method, ITS2-HRM was preceded by NucliSENS easyMAG DNA extraction, directly on the clinical samples. For the indirect method, clinical samples were cultured on Candida ID and individual colonies were identified by MALDI-TOF.For 83.9% of the samples there was complete concordance between both techniques, i.e. the same Candida species were detected in 31.1% of the samples or no Candida species were detected in 52.8% of the samples. In 16.1% of the clinical samples, discrepant results were obtained, of which only 6.01% were considered as major discrepancies. Discrepancies occurred mostly when overall numbers of Candida cells in the samples were low and/or when multiple species were present in the sample.Most of the discrepancies could be decided in the advantage of the direct method. This is due to samples in which no yeast could be cultured whereas low amounts could be detected by the direct method and to samples in which high quantities of Candida robusta according to ITS2-HRM were missed by culture on Candida ID agar. It remains to be decided whether the diagnostic advantages of the direct method compensate for its disadvantages.

  11. Corium melt researches at VESTA test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan Yeol Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available VESTA (Verification of Ex-vessel corium STAbilization and VESTA-S (-small test facilities were constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute in 2010 to perform various corium melt experiments. Since then, several tests have been performed for the verification of an ex-vessel core catcher design for the EU-APR1400. Ablation tests of an impinging ZrO2 melt jet on a sacrificial material were performed to investigate the ablation characteristics. ZrO2 melt in an amount of 65–70 kg was discharged onto a sacrificial material through a well-designed nozzle, after which the ablation depths were measured. Interaction tests between the metallic melt and sacrificial material were performed to investigate the interaction kinetics of the sacrificial material. Two types of melt were used: one is a metallic corium melt with Fe 46%, U 31%, Zr 16%, and Cr 7% (maximum possible content of U and Zr for C-40, and the other is a stainless steel (SUS304 melt. Metallic melt in an amount of 1.5–2.0 kg was delivered onto the sacrificial material, and the ablation depths were measured. Penetration tube failure tests were performed for an APR1400 equipped with 61 in-core instrumentation penetration nozzles and extended tubes at the reactor lower vessel. ZrO2 melt was generated in a melting crucible and delivered down into an interaction crucible where the test specimen is installed. To evaluate the tube ejection mechanism, temperature distributions of the reactor bottom head and in-core instrumentation penetration were measured by a series of thermocouples embedded along the specimen. In addition, lower vessel failure tests for the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are being performed. As a first step, the configuration of the molten core in the plant was investigated by a melting and solidification experiment. Approximately 5 kg of a mixture, whose composition in terms of weight is UO2 60%, Zr 10%, ZrO2 15%, SUS304 14%, and B4C 1%, was melted in a

  12. Melting technique for vanadium containing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishanov, M P; Gutovskij, I B; Vakhrushev, A S

    1980-04-28

    To descrease cost price of high-quality vanadium steels a method of their melting in open-hearth furnaces with acid lining using slag-metal fraction of vanadium, which is loaded in the content of 2.1-4.7% of melting mass, is suggested. Introduction of slag-metal fraction of vanadium ensures the formation of slag with composition that guarantees the necessary content of vanadium in steel and does not require introduction of expensive vanadium-containing ferroalloys into the melt.

  13. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  14. Technological properties and structure of titanate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Power substantiation of existence of tough stream of complex anion ([TiO 6 ] 8- ) as a prevalent unit in titanate melts is given on the base of up-to-date knowledge about structure of metallurgical slags and results of investigations of thermophysical properties of these melts. It is shown that high crystallization ability of titanate melts at technological temperatures is determined by heterogeneity of liquid state - by presence up to 30 % of dispersed particles of solid phase solutions in matrix liquid [ru

  15. Bayesian estimation of core-melt probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    A very simple application of the canonical Bayesian algorithm is made to the problem of estimation of the probability of core melt in a commercial power reactor. An approximation to the results of the Rasmussen study on reactor safety is used as the prior distribution, and the observation that there has been no core melt yet is used as the single experiment. The result is a substantial decrease in the mean probability of core melt--factors of 2 to 4 for reasonable choices of parameters. The purpose is to illustrate the procedure, not to argue for the decrease

  16. Numerical and experimental investigation of melting with internal heat generation within cylindrical enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amber Shrivastava; Brian Williams; Ali S. Siahpush; Bruce Savage; John Crepeau

    2014-06-01

    There have been significant efforts by the heat transfer community to investigate the melting phenomenon of materials. These efforts have included the analytical development of equations to represent melting, numerical development of computer codes to assist in modeling the phenomena, and collection of experimental data. The understanding of the melting phenomenon has application in several areas of interest, for example, the melting of a Phase Change Material (PCM) used as a thermal storage medium as well as the melting of the fuel bundle in a nuclear power plant during an accident scenario. The objective of this research is two-fold. First a numerical investigation, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), of melting with internal heat generation for a vertical cylindrical geometry is presented. Second, to the best of authors knowledge, there are very limited number of engineering experimental results available for the case of melting with Internal Heat Generation (IHG). An experiment was performed to produce such data using resistive, or Joule, heating as the IHG mechanism. The numerical results are compared against the experimental results and showed favorable correlation. Uncertainties in the numerical and experimental analysis are discussed. Based on the numerical and experimental analysis, recommendations are made for future work.

  17. Applicability of low-melting-point microcrystalline wax to develop temperature-sensitive formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kohei; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-10-30

    Low-melting-point substances are widely used to develop temperature-sensitive formulations. In this study, we focused on microcrystalline wax (MCW) as a low-melting-point substance. We evaluated the drug release behavior of wax matrix (WM) particles using various MCW under various temperature conditions. WM particles containing acetaminophen were prepared using a spray congealing technique. In the dissolution test at 37°C, WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs whose melting was starting at approx. 40°C (Hi-Mic-1045 or 1070) released the drug initially followed by the release of only a small amount. On the other hand, in the dissolution test at 20 and 25°C for WM particles containing Hi-Mic-1045 and at 20, 25, and 30°C for that containing Hi-Mic-1070, both WM particles showed faster drug release than at 37°C. The characteristic drug release suppression of WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs at 37°C was thought attributable to MCW melting, as evidenced by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Taken together, low-melting-point MCWs may be applicable to develop implantable temperature-sensitive formulations that drug release is accelerated by cooling at administered site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Frictional melting dynamics in the upper conduit: A chemical answer to a complex physical question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henton De Angelis, S.; Lavallee, Y.; Kendrick, J. E.; Hornby, A.; von Aulock, F. W.; Clesham, S.; Hirose, T.; Perugini, D.

    2013-12-01

    During volcanic eruptions the generation of frictional heat along the walls of the shallow conduit leads to melting of the rocks along the slip interface. Frictional melting has previously been described as a process out of thermodynamic equilibrium, but upon slip and mingling of the melt batches, homogeneity can be achieved, and may have an h important rheological control on the dynamics of slip. To test melt homogenization in the frictional melt zones of volcanic conduits we performed constant-rate slip experiments under controlled stress conditions using a high-velocity rotary shear apparatus. Volcanic dome samples from three different volcanoes (Volcán De Colima, Soufrière Hills Volcano and Santiaguito Volcano) were investigated. Each sample was subjected to a stress of 1 MPa and slip rate of 1 m/s. For each sample set 5 experiments were conducted: 1) experiment stopped at the onset of melting; 2) experiment stopped on the formation of a full melt layer; 3) experiment stopped after 5m of slip at steady state conditions; 4) experiment stopped after 10m of slip at steady state conditions; 5) experiment stopped after 15m of slip at steady state conditions. We analyzed the resulting proto-melt zones using micron sized X-ray spectroscopy in the high-brightness synchrotron beamline I18 (at Diamond Light Source UK). Particular focus was given to the concentration variance analysis of Rare Earth Elements as their mobilities can be used to precisely quantify the degree and timescale of homogenisation involved during frictional melting. This study refines our understanding of the chemical process of melting and mixing which carry important consequences for the rheological control on the physical dynamics of slip.

  19. Resistance–temperature relation and atom cluster estimation of In–Bi system melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Haoran; Wang Zhiming; Zhou Yongzhi; Li Cancan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A testing device was adopted to measure the electrical resistivity of In–Bi system melts. ► A basically linear relation exists between the resistivity and temperature of In x Bi 100−x melts in measured temperature range. ► Based on Novakovic's assumption, the content of InBi atomic cluster in In x Bi 100−x melt is estimated with ρ ≈ ρ InBi x InBi + ρ m (1 − x InBi ) equation. - Abstract: A testing device for the resistivity of high-temperature melt was adopted to measure the l resistivity of In–Bi system melts at different temperatures. It can be concluded from the analysis and calculation of the experimental results that the resistivity of In x Bi 100−x (x = 0–100) melt is in linear relationship with temperature within the experiment temperature range. The resistivity of the melt decreases with the increasing content of In. The fair consistency of resistivity of In–Bi system melt is found in the heating and cooling processes. On the basis of Novakovic's assumption, we approximately estimated the content of InBi atom clusters in In x Bi 100−x melts with the resistivity data by equation ρ ≈ ρ InBi x InBi + ρ m (1 − x InBi ). In the whole components interval, the content corresponds well with the mole fraction of InBi clusters calculated by Novakovic in the thermodynamic approach. The mole fraction of InBi type atom clusters in the melts reaches the maximum at the point of stoichiometric composition In 50 Bi 50 .

  20. Development of a multiplex amplification refractory mutation system reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the differential diagnosis of Feline leukemia virus vaccine and wild strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chia-Fang; Chan, Kun-Wei; Yang, Wei-Cheng; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chung, Yang-Tsung; Kuo, James; Wang, Chi-Young

    2014-07-01

    A multiplex amplification refractory mutation system reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (ARMS RT-PCR) was developed for the differential diagnosis of Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) vaccine and wild-type strains based on a point mutation between the vaccine strain (S) and the wild-type strain (T) located in the p27 gene. This system was further upgraded to obtain a real-time ARMS RT-PCR (ARMS qRT-PCR) with a high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) platform. The genotyping of various strains of FeLV was determined by comparing the HRMA curves with the defined wild-type FeLV (strain TW1), and the results were expressed as a percentage confidence. The detection limits of ARMS RT-PCR and ARMS qRT-PCR combined with HRMA were 100 and 1 copies of transcribed FeLV RNA per 0.5 ml of sample, respectively. No false-positive results were obtained with 6 unrelated pathogens and 1 feline cell line. Twelve FeLV Taiwan strains were correctly identified using ARMS qRT-PCR combined with HRMA. The genotypes of the strains matched the defined FeLV wild-type strain genotype with at least 91.17% confidence. A higher degree of sequence polymorphism was found throughout the p27 gene compared with the long terminal repeat region. In conclusion, the current study describes the phylogenetic relationship of the FeLV Taiwan strains and demonstrates that the developed ARMS RT-PCR assay is able to be used to detect the replication of a vaccine strain that has not been properly inactivated, thus acting as a safety check for the quality of FeLV vaccines.

  1. Cloud screening and melt water detection over melting sea ice using AATSR/SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomina, Larysa; Heygster, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With the onset of melt in the Arctic Ocean, the fraction of melt water on sea ice, the melt pond fraction, increases. The consequences are: the reduced albedo of sea ice, increased transmittance of sea ice and affected heat balance of the system with more heat passing through the ice into the ocean, which facilitates further melting. The onset of melt, duration of melt season and melt pond fraction are good indicators of the climate state of the Arctic and its change. In the absence of reliable sea ice thickness retrievals in summer, melt pond fraction retrieval from satellite is in demand as input for GCM as an indicator of melt state of the sea ice. The retrieval of melt pond fraction with a moderate resolution radiometer as AATSR is, however, a non-trivial task due to a variety of subpixel surface types with very different optical properties, which give non-unique combinations if mixed. In this work this has been solved by employing additional information on the surface and air temperature of the pixel. In the current work, a concept of melt pond detection on sea ice is presented. The basis of the retrieval is the sensitivity of AATSR reflectance channels 550nm and 860nm to the amount of melt water on sea ice. The retrieval features extensive usage of a database of in situ surface albedo spectra. A tree of decisions is employed to select the feasible family of in situ spectra for the retrieval, depending on the melt stage of the surface. Reanalysis air temperature at the surface and brightness temperature measured by the satellite sensor are analyzed in order to evaluate the melting status of the surface. Case studies for FYI and MYI show plausible retrieved melt pond fractions, characteristic for both of the ice types. The developed retrieval can be used to process the historical AATSR (2002-2012) dataset, as well as for the SLSTR sensor onboard the future Sentinel-3 mission (scheduled for launch in 2015), to keep the continuity and obtain longer time sequence

  2. Electron beam melting of bearing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmied, G.; Schuler, A. (Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik); Elsinger, G.; Koroschetz, F. (MIBA Gleitlager AG, Laakirchen (Austria)); Tschegg, E.K. (Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Technische Physik)

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports on a surface treatment method for the bearing materials AlSn6 which permits the use of this material without the overlay usually required. Microstructural refinement is achieved by means of a surface melting technique using an electron beam with successive rapid solidification. Extremely fine tin precipitates are formed in the melted surface layer which lead to significantly better tribological properties of the bearing material. Tests compared the tribological properties for AlSn6 bearings treated by the surface melting technique with those of untreated bearings. Whereas all untreated bearings failed by seizure after only 2 h of testing, 30% of the tested bearings which had been surface melted survived the entire testing program without damage.

  3. Extraction of scandium by organic substance melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyshev, V.P.; Lobanov, F.I.; Zebreva, A.I.; Andreeva, N.N.; Manuilova, O.A.; Il'yukevich, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    Regularities of scandium extraction by the melts of octadecanicoic acid, n-carbonic acids of C 17 -C 20 commerical fraction and mixtures of tributylphosphate (TBP) with paraffin at (70+-1) deg C have been studied. The optimum conditions for scandium extraction in the melt of organic substances are determined. A scheme of the extraction by the melts of higher carbonic acids at ninitial metal concentrations of 10 -5 to 10 -3 mol/l has been suggested. The scandium compound has been isolated in solid form, its composition having been determined. The main advantages of extraction by melts are as follows: a possibility to attain high distribution coefficients, distinct separation of phases after extraction, the absence of emulsions, elimination of employing inflammable and toxic solvents, a possibility of rapid X-ray fluorescence determinatinon of scandium directly in solid extract

  4. Vertical melting of a stack of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, M. E. S.; Kleinert, H.; Schakel, A. M. J.

    2001-02-01

    A stack of tensionless membranes with nonlinear curvature energy and vertical harmonic interaction is studied. At low temperatures, the system forms a lamellar phase. At a critical temperature, the stack disorders vertically in a melting-like transition.

  5. Selective Laser Ablation and Melting, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project Advratech will develop a new additive manufacturing (AM) process called Selective Laser Ablation and Melting (SLAM). The key innovation in this...

  6. Thermal interaction of core melt debris with the TMI-2 baffle, core-former, and lower head structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Tolman, E.L.

    1987-09-01

    Recent inspection of the TMI-2 core-former baffle walls (vertical), former plates (horizontal), and lower plenum has been conducted to assess potential damage to these structures. Video observations show evidence of localized melt failure of the baffle walls, whereas fiberoptics data indicate the presence of resolidified debris on the former plates. Lower plenum inspection also confirms the presence of 20 tons or more of core debris in the lower plenum. These data indicate massive core melt relocation and the potential for melt attack on vessel structural components. This report presents analyses aimed at developing an understanding of melt relocation behavior and damage progression to TMI-2 vessel components. Thermal analysis indicates melt-through of the baffle plates, but maintenance of structural integrity of the former plates and lower head. Differences in the damage of these structures is attributed largely to differences in contact time with melt debris and pressure of water. 29 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PI’s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

    2012-07-31

    Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

  8. Uniaxial Elongational viscosity of bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The startup and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for three bidisperse polystyrene (PS) melts, consisting of blends of monodisperse PS with molecular weights of 52 kg/mole or 103 kg/mole and 390 kg/mole. The bidisperse melts have a maximum in the steady elongational...... viscosity, of up to a factor of 7 times the Trouton limit of 3 times the zero-shear viscosity....

  9. Shock induced melting of lead (experimental study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabire, Catherine; Hereil, Pierre L.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate melting on release of lead, two shock compression measurements have been carried out at 51 GPa. In the first one, a pyrometric measurement has been performed at the Pb/LiF interface. In the second one, the Pb/LiF interface velocity has been recorded using VISAR measurement technique. VISAR and radiance profile are in good agreement and seem to show melting on release of lead

  10. Vacancies in quantal Wigner crystals near melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barraza, N.; Colletti, L.; Tosi, M.P.

    1999-04-01

    We estimate the formation energy of lattice vacancies in quantal Wigner crystals of charged particles near their melting point at zero temperature, in terms of the crystalline Lindemann parameter and of the static dielectric function of the fluid phase near freezing. For both 3D and 2D crystals of electrons our results suggest the presence of vacancies in the ground state at the melting density. (author)

  11. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in Alkali Halide Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Surface layers of tantalum metal were electrodeposited on steel from K2TaF7-LiF-NaF-KF melts. With careful control of the oxide contents dense and adherent deposits could be obtained by pulse plating. In NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 and NaCl-KCl-Na2CO3 melts carbonate ions seems to be reduced to carbon in...

  12. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in alkali halide melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Surface layers of tantalum metal were electrodeposited on steel from K 2TaF7-LiF-NaF-KF melts. With careful control of the oxide contents dense and adherent deposits could be obtained by pulse plating. In NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 and NaCl-KCl-Na2CO 3 melts carbonate ions seems to be reduced to carbon ...

  13. Depth and degree of melting of komatiites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Claude

    1992-04-01

    High pressure melting experiments have permitted new constraints to be placed on the depth and degree of partial melting of komatiites. Komatiites from Gorgona Island were formed by relatively low degrees of pseudoinvariant melting involving L + Ol + Opx + Cpx + Gt on the solidus at 40 kbar, about 130 km depth. Munro-type komatiites were separated from a harzburgite residue (L + Ol + Opx) at pressures that were poorly constrained, but were probably around 50 kbar, about 165 km depth; the degree of partial melting was less than 40 percent. Secular variations in the geochemistry of komatiites could have formed in response to a reduction in the temperature and pressure of melting with time. The 3.5 Ga Barberton komatiites and the 2.7 Ga Munro-type komatiities could have formed in plumes that were hotter than the present-day mantle by 500 deg and 300 deg, respectively. When excess temperatures are this size, melting is deeper and volcanism changes from basaltic to momatiitic. The komatiities from Gorgona Island, which are Mesozoic in age, may be representative of komatiities that are predicted to occur in oceanic plateaus of Cretaceous age throughout the Pacific (Storey et al., 1991).

  14. On melting criteria for complex plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumov, Boris A

    2011-01-01

    The present paper considers melting criteria for a plasma crystal discovered in dust plasma in 1994. Separate discussions are devoted to three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) systems. In the 3D case, melting criteria are derived based on the properties of local order in a system of microparticles. The order parameters are constructed from the cumulative distributions of the microparticle probability distributions as functions of various rotational invariants. The melting criteria proposed are constructed using static information on microparticle positions: a few snapshots of the system that allow for the determination of particle coordinates are enough to determine the phase state of the system. It is shown that criteria obtained in this way describe well the melting and premelting of 3D complex plasmas. In 2D systems, a system of microparticles interacting via a screened Coulomb (i.e., Debye-Hueckel or Yukawa) potential is considered as an example, using molecular dynamics simulations. A number of new order parameters characterizing the melting of 2D complex plasmas are proposed. The order parameters and melting criteria proposed for 2D and 3D complex plasmas can be applied to other systems as well. (methodological notes)

  15. Rapakivi texture formation via disequilibrium melting in a contact partial melt zone, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    In the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, a Jurassic aged dolerite sill induced partial melting of granite in the shallow crust. The melt zone can be traced in full, from high degrees of melting (>60%) along the dolerite contact, to no apparent signs of melting, 10s of meters above the contact. Within this melt zone, the well-known rapakivi texture is found, arrested in various stages of development. High above the contact, and at low degrees of melting, K-feldspar crystals are slightly rounded and unmantled. In the lower half of the melt zone, mantles of cellular textured plagioclase appear on K-feldspar, and thicken towards the contact heat source. At the highest degrees of melting, cellular-textured plagioclase completely replaces restitic K-feldspar. Because of the complete exposure and intact context, the leading models of rapakivi texture formation can be tested against this system. The previously proposed mechanisms of subisothermal decompression, magma-mixing, and hydrothermal exsolution all fail to adequately describe rapakivi generation in this melt zone. Preferred here is a closed system model that invokes the production of a heterogeneous, disequilibrium melt through rapid heating, followed by calcium and sodium rich melt reacting in a peritectic fashion with restitic K-feldspar crystals. This peritectic reaction results in the production of plagioclase of andesine-oligoclase composition—which is consistent with not just mantles in the melt zone, but globally as well. The thickness of the mantle is diffusion limited, and thus a measure of the diffusive length scale of sodium and calcium over the time scale of melting. Thermal modeling provides a time scale of melting that is consistent with the thickness of observed mantles. Lastly, the distribution of mantled feldspars is highly ordered in this melt zone, but if it were mobilized and homogenized—mixing together cellular plagioclase, mantled feldspars, and unmantled feldspars—the result would be

  16. Physical properties of some Sn-based melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilinykh N.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties (viscosity, density, electroresistivity and magnetic susceptibility of pure tin, copper, silver, some binary (Sn - Ag, Sn - Cu, Sn - Bi, Sn - Zn and ternary (Sn-Ag-Cu, Sn-BiAg, Sn-Bi-Zn alloys with near eutectic compositions are investigated in wide temperature ranges. The irreversible decrease of viscosity in pure tin melt is discovered at 820 °С during heating. The similar anomaly with the following hysteresis of dynamic viscosity was fixed for binary and ternary alloys but at higher temperatures – 900 °С and 950 °С respectively. For all the systems it was shown that the alloys with eutectic compositions differ significantly in their electric and magnetic properties from hypo- and hypereutectic ones. Qualitative and quantitative metallographic analysis for Sn-3.8wt.%Ag-0.7wt.%Cu samples, heated low and above characteristic temperatures, showed the influence of melt overheating on crystallization kinetics.

  17. Melt and vapor characteristics in an electron beam evaporator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenfeld, L.; Fleche, J.L.; Gonella, C.; Soubbaramayer

    1994-12-31

    Two different approaches have been compared for the calculation of the free surface temperature Ts in cerium or copper evaporation experiments: the first method considers properties of the melt: an empirical law is used to take into account turbulent thermal convection, instabilities and characterization of the free surface. The second method considers the vapor flow expansion and connects Ts to the measured terminal temperature and terminal mean parallel velocity of the vapor jet, by direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations including an atom-atom inelastic collision algorithm. The agreement between the two approaches is better for cerium than for copper in the high characterization case. The analysis, from the point of view of the properties of the melt, of the terminal parameters of the vapor jet for the high beam powers shows that Ts and the Knudsen number at the vapour source reach a threshold when the beam power increases. (author). 12 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  18. Low-Frequency Internal Friction Study on the Structural Changes in Polymer Melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue-Bang, Wu; Qiao-Ling, Xu; Shu-Ying, Shang; Jia-Peng, Shui; Chang-Song, Liu; Zhen-Gang, Zhu

    2008-01-01

    With the help of the low-frequency internal friction method, we investigate the structural properties of polymer melts, such as amorphous polystyrene (PS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and semi-crystalline poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). An obvious peak of relaxation type is found in each of the internal friction curves. The peak temperature T p follows the relation T p ≈ (1.15 – 1.18) T g for PS and PMMA melts, while it follows T p ≈ 1.22T m for PEO melt, with T g being the glass transition temperature and T m the melting temperature. Based on the analysis of the features of this peak, it is found that this peak is related to the liquid-liquid transition temperature T u of polymer melts. Mechanism of the liquid-liquid transition is suggested to be thermally-activated collective relaxation through cooperation. This finding may be helpful to understand the structural changes in polymer melts. In addition, the internal friction technique proves to be effective in studying dynamics in polymer melts

  19. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Kaitlin M; Albert, Mary R; McConnell, Joseph R; Baker, Ian

    2014-06-03

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting.

  20. Melting temperature of H2, D2, N2 and СH4 under high pressure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the analysis indicates the presence of the melting maximum in these solids. ... values of the melting temperature in case of hydrogen up to a pressure of 4800 ... temperature, Tm, will rise with the increase in pressure, reach to a maximum and.

  1. Melt migration modeling in partially molten upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, Abdolreza

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the importance of melt migration in shaping major characteristics of geological features associated with the partial melting of the upper mantle, such as sea-floor spreading, continental flood basalts and rifting. The partial melting produces permeable partially molten rocks and a buoyant low viscosity melt. Melt migrates through the partially molten rocks, and transfers mass and heat. Due to its much faster velocity and appreciable buoyancy, melt migration has the potential to modify dynamics of the upwelling partially molten plumes. I develop a 2-D, two-phase flow model and apply it to investigate effects of melt migration on the dynamics and melt generation of upwelling mantle plumes and focusing of melt migration beneath mid-ocean ridges. Melt migration changes distribution of the melt-retention buoyancy force and therefore affects the dynamics of the upwelling plume. This is investigated by modeling a plume with a constant initial melt of 10% where no further melting is considered. Melt migration polarizes melt-retention buoyancy force into high and low melt fraction regions at the top and bottom portions of the plume and therefore results in formation of a more slender and faster upwelling plume. Allowing the plume to melt as it ascends through the upper mantle also produces a slender and faster plume. It is shown that melt produced by decompressional melting of the plume migrates to the upper horizons of the plume, increases the upwelling velocity and thus, the volume of melt generated by the plume. Melt migration produces a plume which lacks the mushroom shape observed for the plume models without melt migration. Melt migration forms a high melt fraction layer beneath the sloping base of the impermeable oceanic lithosphere. Using realistic conditions of melting, freezing and melt extraction, I examine whether the high melt fraction layer is able to focus melt from a wide partial melting zone to a narrow region

  2. The WAIS Melt Monitor: An automated ice core melting system for meltwater sample handling and the collection of high resolution microparticle size distribution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, D. J.; Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimate data are often extracted from ice cores by careful geochemical analysis of meltwater samples. The analysis of the microparticles found in ice cores can also yield unique clues about atmospheric dust loading and transport, dust provenance and past environmental conditions. Determination of microparticle concentration, size distribution and chemical makeup as a function of depth is especially difficult because the particle size measurement either consumes or contaminates the meltwater, preventing further geochemical analysis. Here we describe a microcontroller-based ice core melting system which allows the collection of separate microparticle and chemistry samples from the same depth intervals in the ice core, while logging and accurately depth-tagging real-time electrical conductivity and particle size distribution data. This system was designed specifically to support microparticle analysis of the WAIS Divide WDC06A deep ice core, but many of the subsystems are applicable to more general ice core melting operations. Major system components include: a rotary encoder to measure ice core melt displacement with 0.1 millimeter accuracy, a meltwater tracking system to assign core depths to conductivity, particle and sample vial data, an optical debubbler level control system to protect the Abakus laser particle counter from damage due to air bubbles, a Rabbit 3700 microcontroller which communicates with a host PC, collects encoder and optical sensor data and autonomously operates Gilson peristaltic pumps and fraction collectors to provide automatic sample handling, melt monitor control software operating on a standard PC allowing the user to control and view the status of the system, data logging software operating on the same PC to collect data from the melting, electrical conductivity and microparticle measurement systems. Because microparticle samples can easily be contaminated, we use optical air bubble sensors and high resolution ice core density

  3. Future projections of the Greenland ice sheet energy balance driving the surface melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simulations at 25 km resolution are performed over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, using the regional climate model MAR forced by four RCP scenarios from three CMIP5 global circulation models (GCMs, in order to investigate the projected changes of the surface energy balance (SEB components driving the surface melt. Analysis of 2000–2100 melt anomalies compared to melt results over 1980–1999 reveals an exponential relationship of the GrIS surface melt rate simulated by MAR to the near-surface air temperature (TAS anomalies, mainly due to the surface albedo positive feedback associated with the extension of bare ice areas in summer. On the GrIS margins, the future melt anomalies are preferentially driven by stronger sensible heat fluxes, induced by enhanced warm air advection over the ice sheet. Over the central dry snow zone, the surface albedo positive feedback induced by the increase in summer melt exceeds the negative feedback of heavier snowfall for TAS anomalies higher than 4 °C. In addition to the incoming longwave flux increase associated with the atmosphere warming, GCM-forced MAR simulations project an increase of the cloud cover decreasing the ratio of the incoming shortwave versus longwave radiation and dampening the albedo feedback. However, it should be noted that this trend in the cloud cover is contrary to that simulated by ERA-Interim–forced MAR for recent climate conditions, where the observed melt increase since the 1990s seems mainly to be a consequence of more anticyclonic atmospheric conditions. Finally, no significant change is projected in the length of the melt season, which highlights the importance of solar radiation absorbed by the ice sheet surface in the melt SEB.

  4. Integral analysis of cavity pressurization in a fuel rod during an ULOF driven TOP with inclusion of surface tension effects on froth gas bubbles and variable cavity conditions due to fuel melting and ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.

    1984-02-01

    The transient cavity pressurization in an ULOF driven TOP excursion has been analyzed for the SPX-1 reactor with an equation of state that allows to simulate the contribution of small froth gas bubbles to the pressure build-up in a fuel pin with inclusion of restraints from surface tension. Calculations were performed for various bubble parameters. Estimates are made for effective gas availabilities at fuel melting which can be used in a cavity model with an ideal gas equation to arrive at similar pressure transients

  5. Melt spreading code assessment, modifications, and application to the EPR core catcher design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    of: (1) comparison to an analytical solution for the dam break problem, (2) water spreading tests in a 1/10 linear scale model of the Mark I containment by Theofanous et al., and (3) steel spreading tests by Suzuki et al. that were also conducted in a geometry similar to the Mark I. The objective of this work was to utilize the MELTSPREAD code to check the assumption of uniform melt spreading in the EPR core catcher design. As a starting point for the project, the code was validated against the worldwide melt spreading database that emerged after the code was originally written in the very early 1990's. As part of this exercise, the code was extensively modified and upgraded to incorporate findings from these various analytical and experiment programs. In terms of expanding the ability of the code to analyze various melt simulant experiments, the options to input user-specified melt and/or substrate material properties was added. The ability to perform invisicid and/or adiabatic spreading analysis was also added so that comparisons with analytical solutions and isothermal spreading tests could be carried out. In terms of refining the capability to carry out reactor material melt spreading analyses, the code was upgraded with a new melt viscosity model; the capability was added to treat situations in which solid fraction buildup between the liquidus-solidus is non-linear; and finally, the ability to treat an interfacial heat transfer resistance between the melt and substrate was incorporated. This last set of changes substantially improved the predictive capability of the code in terms of addressing reactor material melt spreading tests. Aside from improvements and upgrades, a method was developed to fit the model to the various melt spreading tests in a manner that allowed uncertainties in the model predictions to be statistically characterized. With these results, a sensitivity study was performed to investigate the assumption of uniform spreading in the EPR core

  6. Shock melting method to determine melting curve by molecular dynamics: Cu, Pd, and Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-01-01

    A melting simulation method, the shock melting (SM) method, is proposed and proved to be able to determine the melting curves of materials accurately and efficiently. The SM method, which is based on the multi-scale shock technique, determines melting curves by preheating and/or prepressurizing materials before shock. This strategy was extensively verified using both classical and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). First, the SM method yielded the same satisfactory melting curve of Cu with only 360 atoms using classical MD, compared to the results from the Z-method and the two-phase coexistence method. Then, it also produced a satisfactory melting curve of Pd with only 756 atoms. Finally, the SM method combined with ab initio MD cheaply achieved a good melting curve of Al with only 180 atoms, which agrees well with the experimental data and the calculated results from other methods. It turned out that the SM method is an alternative efficient method for calculating the melting curves of materials

  7. Shock melting method to determine melting curve by molecular dynamics: Cu, Pd, and Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-09-21

    A melting simulation method, the shock melting (SM) method, is proposed and proved to be able to determine the melting curves of materials accurately and efficiently. The SM method, which is based on the multi-scale shock technique, determines melting curves by preheating and/or prepressurizing materials before shock. This strategy was extensively verified using both classical and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD). First, the SM method yielded the same satisfactory melting curve of Cu with only 360 atoms using classical MD, compared to the results from the Z-method and the two-phase coexistence method. Then, it also produced a satisfactory melting curve of Pd with only 756 atoms. Finally, the SM method combined with ab initio MD cheaply achieved a good melting curve of Al with only 180 atoms, which agrees well with the experimental data and the calculated results from other methods. It turned out that the SM method is an alternative efficient method for calculating the melting curves of materials.

  8. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam

    2012-12-15

    This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

  9. Olivine/melt transition metal partitioning, melt composition, and melt structure—Melt polymerization and Qn-speciation in alkaline earth silicate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysen, Bjorn O.

    2008-10-01

    The two most abundant network-modifying cations in magmatic liquids are Ca 2+ and Mg 2+. To evaluate the influence of melt structure on exchange of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ with other geochemically important divalent cations ( m-cations) between coexisting minerals and melts, high-temperature (1470-1650 °C), ambient-pressure (0.1 MPa) forsterite/melt partitioning experiments were carried out in the system Mg 2SiO 4-CaMgSi 2O 6-SiO 2 with ⩽1 wt% m-cations (Mn 2+, Co 2+, and Ni 2+) substituting for Ca 2+ and Mg 2+. The bulk melt NBO/Si-range ( NBO/Si: nonbridging oxygen per silicon) of melt in equilibrium with forsterite was between 1.89 and 2.74. In this NBO/Si-range, the NBO/Si(Ca) (fraction of nonbridging oxygens, NBO, that form bonds with Ca 2+, Ca 2+- NBO) is linearly related to NBO/Si, whereas fraction of Mg 2+- NBO bonds is essentially independent of NBO/Si. For individual m-cations, rate of change of KD( m-Mg) with NBO/Si(Ca) for the exchange equilibrium, mmelt + Mg olivine ⇌ molivine + Mg melt, is linear. KD( m-Mg) decreases as an exponential function of increasing ionic potential, Z/ r2 ( Z: formal electrical charge, r: ionic radius—here calculated with oxygen in sixfold coordination around the divalent cations) of the m-cation. The enthalpy change of the exchange equilibrium, Δ H, decreases linearly with increasing Z/ r2 [Δ H = 261(9)-81(3)· Z/ r2 (Å -2)]. From existing information on (Ca,Mg)O-SiO 2 melt structure at ambient pressure, these relationships are understood by considering the exchange of divalent cations that form bonds with nonbridging oxygen in individual Qn-species in the melts. The negative ∂ KD( m-Mg) /∂( Z/ r2) and ∂(Δ H)/∂( Z/ r2) is because increasing Z/ r2 is because the cations forming bonds with nonbridging oxygen in increasingly depolymerized Qn-species where steric hindrance is decreasingly important. In other words, principles of ionic size/site mismatch commonly observed for trace and minor elements in crystals, also

  10. Assessment for Melting Temperature Measurement of Nucleic Acid by HRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Pan, Xiaoming; Liang, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM), with a high sensitivity to distinguish the nucleic acid species with small variations, has been widely applied in the mutation scanning, methylation analysis, and genotyping. For the aim of extending HRM for the evaluation of thermal stability of nucleic acid secondary structures on sequence dependence, we investigated effects of the dye of EvaGreen, metal ions, and impurities (such as dNTPs) on melting temperature ( T m ) measurement by HRM. The accuracy of HRM was assessed as compared with UV melting method, and little difference between the two methods was found when the DNA T m was higher than 40°C. Both insufficiency and excessiveness of EvaGreen were found to give rise to a little bit higher T m , showing that the proportion of dye should be considered for precise T m measurement of nucleic acids. Finally, HRM method was also successfully used to measure T m s of DNA triplex, hairpin, and RNA duplex. In conclusion, HRM can be applied in the evaluation of thermal stability of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or secondary structural elements (even when dNTPs are present).

  11. Melt electrospinning of biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchin, Ari; Simonovsky, Felix I.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Sanders, Joan E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning from the melt, in contrast to from solution, is an attractive tissue engineering scaffold manufacturing process as it allows for the formation of small diameter fibers while eliminating potentially cytotoxic solvents. Despite this, there is a dearth of literature on scaffold formation via melt electrospinning. This is likely due to the technical challenges related to the need for a well-controlled high temperature setup and the difficulty in developing an appropriate polymer. In this paper, a biodegradable and thermally stable polyurethane (PU) is described specifically for use in melt electrospinning. Polymer formulations of aliphatic PUs based on (CH2)4-content diisocyanates, polycaprolactone (PCL), 1,4-butanediamine and 1,4-butanediol (BD) were evaluated for utility in the melt electrospinning process. The final polymer formulation, a catalyst-purified PU based on 1,4-butane diisocyanate, PCL and BD in a 4/1/3 molar ratio with a weight-average molecular weight of about 40 kDa, yielded a nontoxic polymer that could be readily electrospun from the melt. Scaffolds electrospun from this polymer contained point bonds between fibers and mechanical properties analogous to many in vivo soft tissues. PMID:21640853

  12. Viscosity characteristics of selected volcanic rock melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Manuel; Sonder, Ingo; Büttner, Ralf; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2011-02-01

    A basic experimental study of the behavior of magma rheology was carried out on remelted volcanic rocks using wide gap viscometry. The complex composition of magmatic melts leads to complicated rheologic behavior which cannot be described with one simple model. Therefore, measurement procedures which are able to quantify non-Newtonian behavior have to be employed. Furthermore, the experimental apparatus must be able to deal with inhomogeneities of magmatic melts. We measured the viscosity of a set of materials representing a broad range of volcanic processes. For the lower viscous melts (low-silica compositions), non-Newtonian behavior is observed, whereas the high-silica melts show Newtonian behavior in the measured temperature and shear rate range (T = 1423 K - 1623 K, γ˙ = 10 - 2 s - 1 - 20 s - 1 ). The non-Newtonian materials show power-law behavior. The measured viscosities η and power-law indexes m lie in the intervals 8 Pa s ≤ η ≤ 210 3 Pa s, 0.71 ≤ m ≤ 1.0 (Grímsvötn basalt), 0.9 Pa s ≤ η ≤ 350 Pa s, 0.61 ≤ m ≤ 0.93 (Hohenstoffeln olivine-melilitite), and 8 Pa s ≤ η ≤ 1.510 4 Pa s, 0.55 ≤ m ≤ 1.0 (Sommata basalt). Measured viscosities of the Newtonian high-silica melts lie in the range 10 4 Pa s ≤ η ≤ 310 5 Pa s.

  13. Load histories from steam explosions during core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, H.; Kolev, N.I.

    1992-01-01

    For the analysis of steam explosions a multicomponent multiphase thermohydraulic code is required which describes at least the motions of melt, water, and steam by separate velocity fields. One example of these very rare codes is the IVA3 code the development of which was brought to an interim close in 1991. As an example of a typical application of this code, precalculations of the FARO LWR Scoping Test 2 performed at Ispra are discussed. Unfortunately, the calculation results cannot be compared directly to the test results because of important differences between planned and achieved test parameters. Above all, only about one third of the planned melt mass actually entered the water. The test was performed in a closed vessel at an initial pressure of 50 bar. The water was saturated at this temperature and its level was at 1 m height. The simulation starts with the release of 50 kg of simulated corium from an intermediate catcher at about 3.2 m height. The calculation predicts a gradual pressure rise without fast transients worth mentioning from 50 to about 76 bar within roughly one second and stabilizes slightly below the maximum. Also described are the material distributions predicted during the process and the 'mixed' masses according to two different criteria. The former indicate that the melt jet penetrates the water without desintegrating while being surrounded by a thick vapor layer. Subsequently the melt collects at the level bottom and much of the liquid water is blown upwards by the steam being produced. The amounts of mass being 'mixed' with liquid water (and thus are thought to potentially participate in a steam explosion) remain below 10% for the known Theofanous criterion and below 30% for a more conservative criterion. It is however more important that the calculation demonstrates that further mixing could be the result of the onset of a steam explosion. This may strongly limit the usefulness of local mixing criteria. (orig./DG)

  14. Evolution of Shock Melt Compositions in Lunar Regoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, A. M.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Noble, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Space weathering processes - driven primarily by solar wind ion and micrometeorite bombardment, are constantly changing the surface regoliths of airless bodies, such as the Moon. It is essential to study lunar soils in order to fully under-stand the processes of space weathering, and how they alter the optical reflectance spectral properties of the lunar surface relative to bedrock. Lunar agglutinates are aggregates of regolith grains fused together in a glassy matrix of shock melt produced during micrometeorite impacts into the lunar regolith. The formation of the shock melt component in agglutinates involves reduction of Fe in the target material to generate nm-scale spherules of metallic Fe (nanophase Fe0 or npFe0). The ratio of elemental Fe, in the form of npFe0, to FeO in a given bulk soil indicates its maturity, which increases with length of surface exposure as well as being typically higher in the finer-size fraction of soils. The melting and mixing process in agglutinate formation remain poorly understood. This includes incomplete knowledge regarding how the homogeneity and overall compositional trends of the agglutinate glass portions (agglutinitic glass) evolve with maturity. The aim of this study is to use sub-micrometer scale X-ray compositional mapping and image analysis to quantify the chemical homogeneity of agglutinitic glass, correlate its homogeneity to its parent soil maturity, and identify the principal chemical components contributing to the shock melt composition variations. An additional focus is to see if agglutinitic glass contains anomalously high Fe sub-micron scale compositional domains similar to those recently reported in glassy patina coatings on lunar rocks.

  15. Sediment plume response to surface melting and supraglacial lake drainages on the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Vena W.; Smith, Laurence C; Rennermalm, Asa K.

    2009-01-01

    ) supraglacial lake drainage events from MODIS. Results confirm that the origin of the sediment plume is meltwater release from the ice sheet. Interannual variations in plume area reflect interannual variations in surface melting. Plumes appear almost immediately with seasonal surface-melt onset, provided...... the estuary is free of landfast sea ice. A seasonal hysteresis between melt extent and plume area suggests late-season exhaustion in sediment supply. Analysis of plume sensitivity to supraglacial events is less conclusive, with 69% of melt pulses and 38% of lake drainage events triggering an increase in plume...... area. We conclude that remote sensing of sediment plume behavior offers a novel tool for detecting the presence, timing and interannual variability of meltwater release from the ice sheet....

  16. Study of ultrasonic melt treatment on the quality of horizontal continuously cast Al-1%Si alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Tao; Li, Ting-Ju; Li, Xi-Meng; Jin, Jun-Ze

    2006-02-01

    The fluctuation of the melt temperature in a tundish was measured during casting and experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of ultrasonic melt treatment on the surface quality and solidification structures of Al-1%Si ingots. The results show that the uniformity of melt temperature was enhanced with the application of ultrasonic melt treatment. When the ultrasonic power is 1,000W, the surface quality was evidently improved and grains of cast ingots were refined. Moreover, EPMA analysis was adopted to study the relationship between the ultrasonic power and boundary segregation of Si element. The result shows that boundary segregation is suppressed with the increase of ultrasonic power and the phenomenon was theoretically interpreted.

  17. Melting point of polymers under high pressure Part I: Influence of the polymer properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, Andreas; Freitag, Detlef; Freidel, Frank; Luft, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the melting point of various polymers including homo- and copolymers (HDPE, LDPE, PP and ethylene vinyl acetate copolymers (EVA)) was investigated under nitrogen atmosphere up to 330 MPa within a high pressure differential thermal analysis cell designed by our group. The properties of the polymers (vinylacetate content, melt flow index, molecular weight, isotactic index, crystallinity, density, and frequency of branching) have been correlated with the change of the melting point under pressure (dT m /dp). It could be shown that the melting point always increases linearly with pressure up to 330 MPa. The pressure dependence was found to be in the range of 11-17 K/(100 MPa). From these results it is possible to approximate dT m /dp using the enthalpy of fusion of the polymers at ambient pressure

  18. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  19. Microstructural evolution and thixoformability of semi-solid aluminum 319s alloy during re-melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, X.G.; Zhu, Q.; Lu, H.X.; Zhang, F.; Li, D.Q.; Midson, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to characterize both microstructural evolution and thixoformability during partial melting of semi-solid 319s alloy. The thixoformability criteria of 319s was initially investigated by thermodynamic analysis. In-situ observation of partial re-melting was performed by a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope to determine the effect of heating rate on melting characteristics. Meanwhile, the microstructural evolution of 319s alloy at extremely low heating rate was also investigated in order to understand the mechanism of re-melting process. The studies demonstrated that 319s alloy is suitable for thixocasting because of the controllable liquid fraction in the operating window of 15 °C. The process window was effected by both temperature and heating time. The primary particles evolution in 319s alloy can be divided into four stages, and the coarsening rate during isothermal test is 227 μm 3 /s. The effective method to obtain desirable microstructure is to manage the time in the semi-solid state by controlling heating rate and soaking time. - Highlights: • The thixoformability of 319s is discussed by using SPSC and thermodynamic analysis. • The re-melting processes at different heating rate are in-situ observed. • We identified the four stages of microstructural evolution during re-melting. • The coarsening rate K for 319s during isothermal test is identified. • The variation tendency of Si particle size with increasing time is reported

  20. Onset and end of the summer melt season over sea ice: thermal structure and surface energy perspective from SHEBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, P.O.G. [University of Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), Boulder, CO (United States); National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Physical Sciences Division (NOAA/ESRL/PSD), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Various measurements from the Surface Heat Flux of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment have been combined to study structures and processes producing the onset and end of summer melt over Arctic sea ice. The analysis links the surface energy budget to free-troposphere synoptic variables, clouds, precipitation, and in-ice temperatures. The key results are (1) SHEBA melt-season transitions are associated with atmospheric synoptic events (2) onset of melt clearly occurs on May 28, while the end of melt is produced by a sequence of three atmospheric storm events over a 28-day period producing step-like reductions in the net surface energy flux. The last one occurs on August 22.; (3) melt onset is primarily due to large increases in the downwelling longwave radiation and modest decreases in the surface albedo; (4) decreases in the downwelling longwave radiation occur for all end-of-melt transition steps, while increases in surface albedo occur for the first two; (5) decreases in downwelling shortwave radiation contribute only to the first end-of-melt transition step; (6) springtime free-tropospheric warming preconditions the atmosphere-ice system for the subsequent melt onset; and (7) melt-season transitions also mark transitions in system responses to radiative energy flux changes because of invariant melt-season surface temperatures. The extensive SHEBA observations enable an understanding of the complex processes not available from other field program data. The analysis provides a basis for future testing of the generality of the results, and contributes to better physical understanding of multi-year analyses of melt-season trends from less extensive data sets. (orig.)

  1. Monitoring device for glass melting furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Noboru; Asano, Naoki; Higuchi, Tatsuo; Koyama, Mayumi; Hanado, Shinji.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention can monitor, from a remote place, a liquid surface in a glass melting furnace for use in a solidification treatment, for example, of high level radioactive wastes. Namely, a vertical sleeve is disposed penetrating a ceiling wall of a melting vessel. A reflection mirror is disposed above the vertical sleeve and flex an optical axis. A monitoring means is disposed on the optical axis of the reflecting mirror at a spaced position. The monitoring means may have an optical telescopic means, a monitoring camera by way of a half mirror and an illumination means. The reflection mirror may be made of a metal. The monitoring device thus constituted suffer from no effects of high temperature and high radiation dose rate, thereby enabling to easily monitor the liquid surface in the melting furnace. (I.S.)

  2. Entangled Polymer Melts in Extensional Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengeller, Ludovica

    Many commercial materials derived from synthetic polymers exhibit a complex response under different processing operations such as fiber formation, injection moulding,film blowing, film casting or coatings. They can be processed both in the solid or in the melted state. Often they may contain two...... or more different polymers in addition to additives, fillers or solvents in order to modify the properties of the final product. Usually, it is also desired to improve the processability. For example the supplement of a high molecular weight component improves the stability in elongational flows....... Understanding the behaviour of polymer melts and solutions in complex non-linearflows is crucial for the design of polymeric materials and polymer processes. Through rheological characterization, in shear and extensional flow, of model polymer systems,i.e. narrow molar mass distribution polymer melts...

  3. APPARATUS FOR MELTING AND POURING METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, F.A.

    1958-02-25

    This patent relates to a crucible for melting and pouring a metal under controlled atmospheric conditions. The crucible has a frangible plug in the bottom and a retaining device to prevent the entrance of the broken portions of the plug into the mold without interfering with the flow of the melt. After the charge has been melted, a knockout rod is lowered through the charge and forced against the frangible plug sufficiently to break off the closure disk along a previously scored line. The disk drops onto a retaining grid large enough to permit the flow of metal around the disk and into the mold below. Thts arrangement elimnates the entry of broken portions of the plug into the mold, thereby elimnating a common cause of imperfect castings.

  4. Prereduction and melting of domestic titaniferous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafziger, R. H.; Jordan, R. R.

    1983-03-01

    Two domestic ilmenites and one titaniferous magnetite were prereduced by the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, in a batch rotary kiln with coal char to assess the feasibility of this technique in improving melting operations and subsequent electric furnace processing. All three prereduced titaniferous materials were melted satisfactorily in an electric arc furnace to produce iron as a metal suitable for further refining to steel; metallizations ranging from 63 to 83 pct of the iron oxides were achieved. The ilmenites yielded titanium enriched slags that were amenable to further processing by conventional methods. Prereduction decreased electrode consumption during furnace operation and also conserved expensive electrical energy that otherwise must be used to reduce and melt totally the entire titaniferous materials charge.

  5. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R ampersand D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility

  6. Mathematical model of melt flow channel granulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kiselev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulation of carbohydrate-vitamin-mineral supplements based on molasses is performed at a high humidity (26 %, so for a stable operation of granulator it is necessary to reveal its melt flow pattern. To describe melt non-isothermal flow in the granulator a mathematical model with following initial equations: continuity equation, motion equation and rheological equation – was developed. The following assumptions were adopted: the melt flow in the granulator is a steady laminar flow; inertial and gravity forces can be ignored; melt is an incompressible fluid; velocity gradient in the flow direction is much smaller than in the transverse direction; the pressure gradient over the cross section of the channel is constant; the flow is hydrodynamically fully developed; effects impact on the channel inlet and outlet may be neglected. Due to the assumptions adopted, it can be considered that in this granulator only velocity components in the x-direction are significant and all the members of the equation with the components and their derivatives with respect to the coordinates y and z can be neglected. The resulting solutions were obtained: the equation for the mean velocity, the equation for determining the volume flow, the formula for calculating of mean time of the melt being in the granulator, the equation for determining the shear stress, the equation for determining the shear rate and the equation for determining the pressure loss. The results of calculations of the equations obtained are in complete agreement with the experimental data; deviation range is 16–19 %. The findings about the melt movement pattern in granulator allowed developing a methodology for calculating a rational design of the granulator molding unit.

  7. Structure of polyvalent metal halide melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1990-12-01

    A short review is given of recent progress in determining and understanding the structure of molten halide salts involving polyvalent metal ions. It covers the following three main topics: (i) melting mechanisms and types of liquid structure for pure polyvalent-metal chlorides; (ii) geometry and stability of local coordination for polyvalent metal ions in molten mixtures of their halides with alkali halides; and (iii) structure breaking and electron localization on addition of metal to the melt. (author). 28 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  8. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  9. Evaluation of feeds for melt and dilute process using an analytical hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company was requested to evaluate whether nuclear materials other than aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel should be considered for treatment to prepare them for disposal in the melt and dilute facility as part of the Treatment and Storage Facility currently projected for construction in the L-Reactor process area. The decision analysis process used to develop this analysis considered many variables and uncertainties, including repository requirements that are not yet finalized. The Analytical Hierarchy Process using a ratings methodology was used to rank potential feed candidates for disposition through the Melt and Dilute facility proposed for disposition of Savannah River Site aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel. Because of the scoping nature of this analysis, the expert team convened for this purpose concentrated on technical feasibility and potential cost impacts associated with using melt and dilute versus the current disposition option. This report documents results of the decision analysis

  10. Evaluation of feeds for melt and dilute process using an analytical hierarchy process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupa, J.F.

    2000-03-22

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company was requested to evaluate whether nuclear materials other than aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel should be considered for treatment to prepare them for disposal in the melt and dilute facility as part of the Treatment and Storage Facility currently projected for construction in the L-Reactor process area. The decision analysis process used to develop this analysis considered many variables and uncertainties, including repository requirements that are not yet finalized. The Analytical Hierarchy Process using a ratings methodology was used to rank potential feed candidates for disposition through the Melt and Dilute facility proposed for disposition of Savannah River Site aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel. Because of the scoping nature of this analysis, the expert team convened for this purpose concentrated on technical feasibility and potential cost impacts associated with using melt and dilute versus the current disposition option. This report documents results of the decision analysis.

  11. Universal viscosity growth in metallic melts at megabar pressures: the vitreous state of the Earth's inner core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazhkin, Vadim V; Lyapin, A G

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on and theoretical models for the viscosity of various types of liquids and melts under pressure are reviewed. Experimentally, the least studied melts are those of metals, whose viscosity is considered to be virtually constant along the melting curve. The authors' new approach to the viscosity of melts involves the measurement of the grain size in solidified samples. Measurements on liquid metals at pressures up to 10 GPa using this method show, contrary to the empirical approach, that the melt viscosity grows considerably along the melting curves. Based on the experimental data and on the critical analysis of current theories, a hypothesis of a universal viscosity behavior is introduced for liquids under pressure. Extrapolating the liquid iron results to the pressures and temperatures at the Earth's core reveals that the Earth's outer core is a very viscous melt with viscosity values ranging from 10 2 Pa s to 10 11 Pa s depending on the depth. The Earth's inner core is presumably an ultraviscous (>10 11 Pa s) glass-like liquid - in disagreement with the current idea of a crystalline inner core. The notion of the highly viscous interior of celestial bodies sheds light on many mysteries of planetary geophysics and astronomy. From the analysis of the pressure variation of the melting and glass-transition temperatures, an entirely new concept of a stable metallic vitreous state arises, calling for further experimental and theoretical study. (reviews of topical problems)

  12. Composition and origin of rhyolite melt intersected by drilling in the Krafla geothermal field, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, R.A.; Schiffman, P.; Barfod, G.H.; Lesher, C.E.; Marks, N.E.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Mortensen, A.K.; Pope, E.C.; Bird, D.K.; Reed, M.H.; Friðleifsson, G.O.; Elders, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    the felsite, accompanied locally by partial assimilation. The interstitial melt in the felsite has similar normalized SiO2 content as the rhyolite melt but is distinguished by higher K2O and lower CaO and plots near the minimum melt composition in the granite system. Augite in the partially melted felsite has re-equilibrated to more calcic metamorphic compositions. Rare quenched glass fragments containing glomeroporphyritic crystals derived from the felsite show textural evidence for resorption of alkali feldspar and quartz. The glass in these fragments is enriched in SiO2 relative to the rhyolite melt or the interstitial felsite melt, consistent with the textural evidence for quartz dissolution. The quenching of these melts by drilling fluids at in situ conditions preserves details of the melt–wall rock interaction that would not be readily observed in rocks that had completely crystallized. However, these processes may be recognizable by a combination of textural analysis and in situ analytical techniques that document compositional heterogeneity due to partial melting and local assimilation.

  13. FARO tests corium-melt cooling in water pool: Roles of melt superheat and sintering in sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gisuk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67260 (United States); Kaviany, Massoud [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Division of Advance Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Moriyama, Kiyofumi [Division of Advance Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Sun, E-mail: hejsunny@postech.ac.kr [Division of Advance Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Byoungcheol; Lee, Mooneon; Kim, Eunho; Park, Jin Ho [Division of Advance Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Nasersharifi, Yahya [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67260 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The numerical approach for FARO experimental data is suggested. • The cooling mechanism of ex-vessel corium is suggested. • The predicted minimum pool depth for no cake formation is suggested. - Abstract: The FARO tests have aimed at understanding an important severe accident mitigation action in a light water reactor when the accident progresses from the reactor pressure vessel boundary. These tests have aimed to measure the coolability of a molten core material (corium) gravity dispersed as jet into a water pool, quantifying the loose particle diameter distribution and fraction converted to cake under range of initial melt superheat and pool temperature and depth. Under complete hydrodynamic breakup of corium and consequent sedimentation in the pool, the initially superheated corium can result in debris bed consisting of discrete solid particles (loose debris) and/or a solid cake at the bottom of the pool. The success of the debris bed coolability requires cooling of the cake, and this is controlled by the large internal resistance. We postulate that the corium cake forms when there is a remelting part in the sediment. We show that even though a solid shell forms around the melt particles transiting in the water pool due to film-boiling heat transfer, the superheated melt allows remelting of the large particles in the sediment (depending on the water temperature and the transit time) using the COOLAP (Coolability Analysis with Parametric fuel-cooant interaction models) code. With this remelting and its liquid-phase sintering of the non-remelted particles, we predict the fraction of the melt particles converting to a cake through liquid sintering. Our predictions are in good agreement with the existing results of the FARO experiments. We address only those experiments with pool depths sufficient/exceeding the length required for complete breakup of the molten jet. Our analysis of the fate of molten corium aimed at devising the effective

  14. The Microwave Properties of Simulated Melting Precipitation Particles: Sensitivity to Initial Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. T.; Olson, W. S.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.

    2016-01-01

    A simplified approach is presented for assessing the microwave response to the initial melting of realistically shaped ice particles. This paper is divided into two parts: (1) a description of the Single Particle Melting Model (SPMM), a heuristic melting simulation for ice-phase precipitation particles of any shape or size (SPMM is applied to two simulated aggregate snow particles, simulating melting up to 0.15 melt fraction by mass), and (2) the computation of the single-particle microwave scattering and extinction properties of these hydrometeors, using the discrete dipole approximation (via DDSCAT), at the following selected frequencies: 13.4, 35.6, and 94.0GHz for radar applications and 89, 165.0, and 183.31GHz for radiometer applications. These selected frequencies are consistent with current microwave remote-sensing platforms, such as CloudSat and the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. Comparisons with calculations using variable-density spheres indicate significant deviations in scattering and extinction properties throughout the initial range of melting (liquid volume fractions less than 0.15). Integration of the single-particle properties over an exponential particle size distribution provides additional insight into idealized radar reflectivity and passive microwave brightness temperature sensitivity to variations in size/mass, shape, melt fraction, and particle orientation.

  15. Recent Changes in Arctic Sea Ice Melt Onset, Freeze-Up, and Melt Season Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Thorsten; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Miller, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In order to explore changes and trends in the timing of Arctic sea ice melt onset and freeze-up and therefore melt season length, we developed a method that obtains this information directly from satellite passive microwave data, creating a consistent data set from 1979 through present. We furthermore distinguish between early melt (the first day of the year when melt is detected) and the first day of continuous melt. A similar distinction is made for the freeze-up. Using this method we analyze trends in melt onset and freeze-up for 10 different Arctic regions. In all regions except for the Sea of Okhotsk, which shows a very slight and statistically insignificant positive trend (O.4 days/decade), trends in melt onset are negative, i.e. towards earlier melt. The trends range from -1.0day/decade for the Bering Sea to -7.3 days/decade for the East Greenland Sea. Except for the Sea of Okhotsk all areas also show a trend towards later autumn freeze onset. The Chukchi/Beaufort Seas and Laptev/East Siberian Seas observe the strongest trends with 7 days/decade. For the entire Arctic, the melt season length has increased by about 20 days over the last 30 years. Largest trends of over 1O days/decade are seen for Hudson Bay, the East Greenland Sea the Laptev/East Siberian Seas, and the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas. Those trends are statistically significant a1 the 99% level.

  16. Magnetic Control in Crystal Growth from a Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue

    Control of bulk melt crystal growth techniques is desirable for producing semiconductors with the highest purity and ternary alloys with tunable electrical properties. Because these molten materials are electrically conducting, external magnetic fields are often employed to regulate the flow in the melt. However, complicated by the coupled flow, thermal, electromagnetic and chemical physics, such magnetic control is typically empirical or even an educated guess. Two magnetic flow control mechanisms: flow damping by steady magnetic fields, and flow stirring by alternating magnetic fields, are investigated numerically. Magnetic damping during optically-heated float-zone crystal growth is modeled using a spectral collocation method. The Marangoni convection at the free melt-gas interface is suppressed when exposed to a steady axial magnetic field, measured by the Hartmann number Ha. As a result, detrimental flow instabilities are suppressed, and an almost quiescent region forms in the interior, ideal for single crystal growth. Using normal mode linear stability analyses, dominant flow instabilities are determined in a range applicable to experiments (up to Ha = 300 for Pr = 0.02, and up to Ha = 500 for Pr = 0.001). The hydrodynamic nature of the instability for small Prandtl number Pr liquid bridges is confirmed by energy analyses. Magnetic stirring is modeled for melt crystal growth in an ampule exposed to a transverse rotating magnetic field. Decoupled from the flow field at small magnetic Reynolds number, the electromagnetic field is first solved via finite element analysis. The flow field is then solved using the spectral element method. At low to moderate AC frequencies (up to a few kHz), the electromagnetic body force is dominant in the azimuthal direction, which stirs a steady axisymmetric flow primarily in the azimuthal direction. A weaker secondary flow develops in the meridional plane. However, at high AC frequencies (on the order of 10 kHz and higher), only

  17. Production, pathways and budgets of melts in mid-ocean ridges: An enthalpy based thermo-mechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Nibir; Sarkar, Shamik; Baruah, Amiya; Dutta, Urmi

    2018-04-01

    Using an enthalpy based thermo-mechanical model we provide a theoretical evaluation of melt production beneath mid-ocean ridges (MORs), and demonstrate how the melts subsequently develop their pathways to sustain the major ridge processes. Our model employs a Darcy idealization of the two-phase (solid-melt) system, accounting enthalpy (ΔH) as a function of temperature dependent liquid fraction (ϕ). Random thermal perturbations imposed in this model set in local convection that drive melts to flow through porosity controlled pathways with a typical mushroom-like 3D structure. We present across- and along-MOR axis model profiles to show the mode of occurrence of melt-rich zones within mushy regions, connected to deeper sources by single or multiple feeders. The upwelling of melts experiences two synchronous processes: 1) solidification-accretion, and 2) eruption, retaining a large melt fraction in the framework of mantle dynamics. Using a bifurcation analysis we determine the threshold condition for melt eruption, and estimate the potential volumes of eruptible melts (∼3.7 × 106 m3/yr) and sub-crustal solidified masses (∼1-8.8 × 106 m3/yr) on an axis length of 500 km. The solidification process far dominates over the eruption process in the initial phase, but declines rapidly on a time scale (t) of 1 Myr. Consequently, the eruption rate takes over the solidification rate, but attains nearly a steady value as t > 1.5 Myr. We finally present a melt budget, where a maximum of ∼5% of the total upwelling melt volume is available for eruption, whereas ∼19% for deeper level solidification; the rest continue to participate in the sub-crustal processes.

  18. Beryllium electrodeposition on aluminium cathode from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichkov, I.F.; Novikov, E.A.; Serebryakov, G.A.; Kanashin, Yu.P.; Sardyko, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Cathodic processes during beryllium deposition on liquid and solid aluminium cathodes are investigated. Mixture of sodium, potassium and beryllium chloride melts served as an lectrolyte. Beryllium ion discharge at the expense of alloy formation takes place at more positive potentials than on an indifferent cathode at low current densities ( in the case of liquid aluminium cathode). Metallographic analysis and measurements of microhardness have shown, that the cathodic product includes two phases: beryllium solid solution in aluminium and metallic beryllium. It is concluded, that aluminium-beryllium alloys with high cathodic yield by current can be obtained by the electrolytic method

  19. Quantifying DNA melting transitions using single-molecule force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, Christopher P; Chen, W-H; Harris, Nolan C; Kiang, C-H; Lin, K-J

    2009-01-01

    We stretched a DNA molecule using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and quantified the mechanical properties associated with B and S forms of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), molten DNA, and single-stranded DNA. We also fit overdamped diffusion models to the AFM time series and used these models to extract additional kinetic information about the system. Our analysis provides additional evidence supporting the view that S-DNA is a stable intermediate encountered during dsDNA melting by mechanical force. In addition, we demonstrated that the estimated diffusion models can detect dynamical signatures of conformational degrees of freedom not directly observed in experiments.

  20. Quantifying DNA melting transitions using single-molecule force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, Christopher P [Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Chen, W-H; Harris, Nolan C; Kiang, C-H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Lin, K-J [Department of Chemistry, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chkiang@rice.edu

    2009-01-21

    We stretched a DNA molecule using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and quantified the mechanical properties associated with B and S forms of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), molten DNA, and single-stranded DNA. We also fit overdamped diffusion models to the AFM time series and used these models to extract additional kinetic information about the system. Our analysis provides additional evidence supporting the view that S-DNA is a stable intermediate encountered during dsDNA melting by mechanical force. In addition, we demonstrated that the estimated diffusion models can detect dynamical signatures of conformational degrees of freedom not directly observed in experiments.

  1. Iron single crystal growth from a lithium-rich melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, M.; Schumann, H.; Jantz, S. G.; Breitner, F. A.; Leineweber, A.; Jesche, A.

    2018-03-01

    α -Fe single crystals of rhombic dodecahedral habit were grown from a Li84N12Fe∼3 melt. Crystals of several millimeter along a side form at temperatures around T ≈ 800 ° C. Upon further cooling the growth competes with the formation of Fe-doped Li3N. The b.c.c. structure and good sample quality of α -Fe single crystals were confirmed by X-ray and electron diffraction as well as magnetization measurements and chemical analysis. A nitrogen concentration of 90 ppm was detected by means of carrier gas hot extraction. Scanning electron microscopy did not reveal any sign of iron nitride precipitates.

  2. Rotational melting in displacive quantum paraelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martonak, R.; Tosatti, E.

    1994-06-01

    Displacive quantum paraelectrics are discussed as possible realizations of rotational quantum melting. The phenomenology of SrTiO 3 and KTaO 3 is discussed in this light. Both old and fresh theoretical work on two-dimensional lattice models for quantum paraelectricity is reviewed. (author). 73 refs, 15 figs

  3. Using Melting Ice to Teach Radiometric Dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Donald Underkofler

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which a mystery setting is used to motivate students to construct their own decay curves of melting ice used as an analogy to radioactive decay. Procedures, materials, apparatus, discussion topics, presentation, and thermodynamics are discussed. (CW)

  4. Models and observations of Arctic melt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a striking transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is largely determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice-albedo feedback has played a significant role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a challenge to improving climate projections. It has been found that as the ponds grow and coalesce, the fractal dimension of their boundaries undergoes a transition from 1 to about 2, around a critical length scale of 100 square meters in area. As the ponds evolve they take complex, self-similar shapes with boundaries resembling space-filling curves. I will outline how mathematical models of composite materials and statistical physics, such as percolation and Ising models, are being used to describe this evolution and predict key geometrical parameters that agree very closely with observations.

  5. Erythritol: crystal growth from the melt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Jesus, A J; Nunes, Sandra C C; Ramos Silva, M; Matos Beja, A; Redinha, J S

    2010-03-30

    The structural changes occurring on erythritol as it is cooled from the melt to low temperature, and then heated up to the melting point have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarized light thermal microscopy (PLTM), X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). By DSC, it was possible to set up the conditions to obtain an amorphous solid, a crystalline solid, or a mixture of both materials in different proportions. Two crystalline forms have been identified: a stable and a metastable one with melting points of 117 and 104 degrees C, respectively. The fusion curve decomposition of the stable form revealed the existence of three conformational structures. The main paths of the crystallization from the melt were followed by PLTM. The texture and colour changes allowed the characterization of the different phases and transitions in which they are involved on cooling as well as on heating processes. The type of crystallization front and its velocity were also followed by microscopic observation. These observations, together with the data provided by PXRD, allowed elucidating the transition of the metastable form into the stable one. The structural changes occurring upon the cooling and subsequent heating processes, namely those arising from intermolecular hydrogen bonds, were also accompanied by infrared spectroscopy. Particular attention was given to the spectral changes occurring in the OH stretching region. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Melting Metal on a Playing Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Many of us are familiar with the demonstration of boiling water in a paper cup held over a candle or a Bunsen burner; the ignition temperature of paper is above the temperature of 100°C at which water boils under standard conditions. A more dramatic demonstration is melting tin held in a playing card. This illustration is from Tissandier's book on…

  7. The atmospheric boundary layer over melting glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1998-01-01

    Results from a number of glacio-meteorological experiments carried out over melting glaciers are summarized. It is shown that in summer the microclimate of a glacier tongue is dominated by katabatic flow, initiated by the downward sensible heat flux. Characteristic obstacle height is an

  8. Radiation polymerized hot melt pressure sensitive adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, S.D.; Skoultchi, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    Hot melt pressure sensitive adhesive compositions formed by copolymerizing at least one 3-(chlorinated aryloxy)-2-hydroxypropyl ester of an alpha, beta unsaturated carboxylic acid with acrylate based copolymerizable monomers, are described. The resultant ethylenically saturated prepolymer is heated to a temperature sufficient to render it fluid and flowable. This composition is coated onto a substrate and exposed to ultraviolet radiation

  9. Can Text Messages Mitigate Summer Melt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Benjamin L.; Page, Lindsay C.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education officials have long been f