WorldWideScience

Sample records for meltdown

  1. Reconstruction: Meltdown in the Midst of Beauty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    fraud … like no one in Reggio Emilia (a place. I revere and have visited on many occasions) would hire me to work with children because I don't know how to work with them in this way! It just seems so hard to understand what to do or say with these children in the studio. My meltdown feels profound and as I go to bed that.

  2. Baby Boom, Asset Market Meltdown and Liquidity Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Junning Cai

    2004-01-01

    A so-called “asset market meltdown hypothesis” predicts that baby boomers’ large savings will drive asset market booms that will eventually collapse because of the boomers’ large retirement dissavings. As good news to baby boomers, our analysis shows that this meltdown hypothesis is fundamentally flawed; and baby-boom-driven asset market booms may not necessarily collapse. However, bad news is that, in the case where meltdowns are about to happen, forward-looking baby boomers’ attempts to esc...

  3. Reaction behaviour of reactor materials, including concrete during core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleck, H.; Hofmann, P.; Skokan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The problems dealt with in the studies on the material behaviour of core meltdowns are sketched, and an outline is given on the experimental investigations now in progress. These studies aim at establishing a model which is as realistic as possible, and the paper tries to show that knowledge on the reaction behaviour is a basic prerequisite for this. (orig./TK) [de

  4. Reconstruction: Meltdown in the Midst of Beauty | Parnell | Indo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Watching a dramatic musical television episode reminded me of my own meltdown and reconstruction during the collection of my dissertation research. This stir of memory led me to write down my story. Seeking meaning in the experience of the studio teacher in an early childhood school, I co-participated in events that led ...

  5. Global economic meltdown and the Nigerian economy | Lawrence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to counteract the impacts as well as protect the economy from the measures taken by the developed countries to cushion their economies against the meltdown. Among its recommendations include the need to rely less on the advice of Bretton Woods Institutions and on the international currency exchange reserve system.

  6. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarz, Krzysztof

    2007-04-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  7. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Malarz, K.

    2006-01-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  8. A Primer on Financial System Meltdown. The Economists' View

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Franz R.

    2008-01-01

    Ideologues are quick to explain the current financial meltdown: it's the markets, stupid. Economists agree but add: it's politics too, stupid. Ideologues agree but counter: first and foremost it's capitalism, stupid. Economists agree but reply: §$%&?!, stupid. This is where this short paper takes us: it makes an attempt to give a brief overview of the economists' views on the ongoing financial system crisis explaining "§$%&?!, stupid".

  9. Analysis of core meltdown accidents and containment performance in the Super Phenix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffres, R.; Natta, M.

    1987-12-01

    In spite of the feeble probability of core meltdown the Super Phenix containment has been conceived for a mechanical energy of 800 MJ. The studies on core meltdown show that this energy is envelop for the different accidents studied and that the post accidental cooling for the reactor is realized [fr

  10. A theory of modern cultural shifts and meltdowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Michael E

    2004-08-07

    Many cultural attributes such as adornment, language slang, mannerisms and rituals are thought to have little or no influence on individual survival and reproduction, functioning rather as markers of cultural identity that promote group cohesion. Here, I show that if cultural markers are under weak selection and subject to loss or substitution, then the breakdown of cultural cohesiveness may proceed without stabilizing reactions until many or most of a culture's identifiers are forever lost. This may culminate in a 'cultural meltdown', whereby the culture is caught in a vortex of ever-decreasing membership and insufficient selection against the accumulation of unfamiliar markers. In progressively altering the topology of communication from diffusion to broadcasting, globalization may be both accelerating the erosion of cultural identities and amplifying dominance behaviours above their normal adaptive levels.

  11. Mutational meltdown in primary endosymbionts: selection limits Muller's ratchet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Allen

    Full Text Available Primary bacterial endosymbionts of insects (p-endosymbionts are thought to be undergoing the process of Muller's ratchet where they accrue slightly deleterious mutations due to genetic drift in small populations with negligible recombination rates. If this process were to go unchecked over time, theory predicts mutational meltdown and eventual extinction. Although genome degradation is common among p-endosymbionts, we do not observe widespread p-endosymbiont extinction, suggesting that Muller's ratchet may be slowed or even stopped over time. For example, selection may act to slow the effects of Muller's ratchet by removing slightly deleterious mutations before they go to fixation thereby causing a decrease in nucleotide substitutions rates in older p-endosymbiont lineages.To determine whether selection is slowing the effects of Muller's ratchet, we determined the age of the Candidatus Riesia/sucking louse assemblage and analyzed the nucleotide substitution rates of several p-endosymbiont lineages that differ in the length of time that they have been associated with their insect hosts. We find that Riesia is the youngest p-endosymbiont known to date, and has been associated with its louse hosts for only 13-25 My. Further, it is the fastest evolving p-endosymbiont with substitution rates of 19-34% per 50 My. When comparing Riesia to other insect p-endosymbionts, we find that nucleotide substitution rates decrease dramatically as the age of endosymbiosis increases.A decrease in nucleotide substitution rates over time suggests that selection may be limiting the effects of Muller's ratchet by removing individuals with the highest mutational loads and decreasing the rate at which new mutations become fixed. This countering effect of selection could slow the overall rate of endosymbiont extinction.

  12. The consequences from liquid pathways after a reactor meltdown accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemczyk, S.J.; Adams, K.G.; Murfin, W.B.; Ritchie, L.T.; Eppel, E.W.; Johnson, J.D.

    1981-06-01

    The potential radiological impact of a core-melt accident on the human population has been investigated. In particular, the radiation dose received from radioactivity which could reach the population via liquid pathways has been considered. Radioactivity could be released directly to the hydrosphere after a core-melt accident as a result of melt-through of the containment basemat followed by any of three processes: (1) leaching of the melt debris; 2 escape of sumpwater through the hole formed by the melt (or from passage out of the containment by an alternate route); and 3) depressurization of the containment atmosphere through the melt hole. The three types of releases would differ primarily in their rates, their magnitudes and their radioactive compositions. Both the containment atmosphere and the sumpwater releases would occur relatively rapidly. However, most of the radionuclides present in these two releases in substantial quantities would be expected to be rather short-lived. Therefore, such releases could have a significant impact at a specific site only if the travel times of the important radionuclides to the human population were small. In contrast, leaching of radionuclides from the melt debris would be expected to occur relatively slowly. Most of the long-lived isotopes would be expected to be found primarily in the melt debris. Consequently, even though this release occurred relatively slowly, the impact could still be significant. In contrast to the situation for releases to the atmosphere, accidents corresponding to the most probable RSS (Reactor Safety Study) meltdown categories would result in the largest releases to the hydrosphere. Furthermore, substantial amounts of radioactivity would generally be expected to be released to the hydrosphere during any meltdown accident involving complete melt-through of the containment basemat. On the basis of subsurface hydrologies alone, sites range from those that essentially preclude any impacts to the human

  13. Lessons from the Russian meltdown : the economics of soft legal constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.

    2002-01-01

    On August 17, 1998, Russia defaulted on its domestic public debt, declared a moratorium on the private banks foreign liabilities which was equivalent to an outright default, and abandoned its exchange rate regime. The depth of the Russian meltdown shocked the international markets, and precipitated

  14. Lessons from the Russian meltdown : the economics of soft legal constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.

    2002-01-01

    On 17 August 1998 Russia abandoned its exchange rate regime, defaulted on its domestic public debt and declared a moratorium on banks' foreign liabilities. This was equivalent to an outright default. The depth and speed of the Russian meltdown shocked the international markets and precipitated a

  15. Why Competent Persons Have Meltdowns Working with Troubled Students: A Personal Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    How do otherwise competent helpers "lose it" in work with certain troubled children and youth? Drawing on extensive research and practice expertise, this article identifies four causes of these predictable professional "meltdowns"--(1) Caught in the Conflict Cycle; (2) Violation of cherished values and beliefs; (3) Tap-in issues; and (4) Carry-in…

  16. Lessons from the Russian meltdown : the economics of soft legal constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.

    2001-01-01

    On August 17, 1998, Russia defaulted on its domestic public debt, declared a moratorium on the private banks foreign liabilities which was equivalent to an outright default, and abandoned its exchange rate regime. The depth of the Russian meltdown shocked the international markets, and precipitated

  17. Will Bequests Attenuate The Predicted Meltdown In Stock Prices When Baby Boomers Retire?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew B. Abel

    2001-01-01

    Jim Poterba finds that consumers do not spend all of their assets during retirement, and he projects that the demand for assets will remain high when the baby boomers retire. Based on his forecast of continued high demand for capital, Poterba rejects the asset market meltdown hypothesis, which predicts a fall in stock prices when the baby boomers retire. ; The author develops a rational expectations general equilibrium model with a bequest motive and an aggregate supply curve for capital. In ...

  18. Evaluation of Effect of Global Economic Meltdown on Capital Market Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ONAOLAPO ADEKUNLE RAHMAN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent financial crisis that loomed the global economy was considered more inclusive than any other period of financial turmoil in the past 60 years. This paper evaluates the implications of the global economic meltdown on the Nigerian Capital Market Performance using the market capitalization of the Nigerian Stock Exchange as a major indicator. When the global economic meltdown came, it poses a recession on the Market Capitalization and the volume of share index of the Nation. This study depends entirely on secondary data in form of annual aggregate time series data of Market capitalization (dependent variable, exchange rate, interest rate, inflation rate, market share index with Dummy variable to represent the period of economic crisis. Ordinary least square of multiple regressions was used to analyze the data into econometric model while F-statistics was used to test for the formulated hypothesis. This study depicts that the global economic meltdown has a negative effect on the Capital Market Performance. It was therefore recommended that the Federal government and the regulatory agencies (CBN, NSE, SEC etc. should come up with intervention and fiscal policies that will suppress these effects and jumpstart the capital market and that the policies should be properly implemented and monitored.

  19. Quench cooling of superheated debris beds in containment during LWR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Chen, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Light water reactor core meltdown accident sequence studies suggest that superheated debris beds may settle on the concrete floor beneath the reactor vessel. A model for the heat transfer processes during quench of superheated debris beds cooled by an overlying pool of water has been presented in a prior paper. This paper discusses the coolability of decay-heated debris beds from the standpoint of their transient quench characteristics. It is shown that even though a debris bed configuration may be coolable from the point of view of steady-state decay heat removal, the quench behavior from an initially elevated temperature may lead to bed melting prior to quench of the debris

  20. Numerical model of melting, liquid migration and deformation during an ice cream meltdown test

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, G.; Warren, M.; Hartel, R.; Flick, D.

    2016-01-01

    4th IIR International Conference on Sustainability and the Cold Chain 2016 , Auckland, NZL, 07-/04/2016 - 09/04/2016; International audience; A numerical model was developed which describes the combined phenomena occurring during an ice cream meltdown test which is a test used by ice cream producers to estimate the quality of ice cream. It is based on the measurement of the drip loss and the deformation during melting of an ice cream block placed onto a grid at ambient temperature. This infor...

  1. Stability Analysis of the EBR-I Mark-II Core Meltdown Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae-Yong; Kang, Chang Mu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the stability of the EBR-I core meltdown accident using the NuSTAB code. The result of NuSTAB analysis is compared with previous stability analysis by Sandmeier using the root locus method. The Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-1) at Argonne National Laboratory was designed to demonstrate fast reactor breeding and to prove the use of liquid-metal coolant for power production and reached criticality in August 1951. The EBR-I reactor was undergoing a series of physics experiments and the Mark-II core was melted accidentally on Nov. 29, 1955. The experiment was going to increase core temperature to 500C to see if the reactor loses reactivity, and scram when the power reached 1500 kW or doubling of fission rate per second. However the operator scrammed with a slow moving control and missed the shutdown by two seconds and caused the core meltdown. The NuSTAB code has an advantage of analyzing space-dependent fast reactors and predicting regional oscillations compared to the point kinetics. Also, NuSTAB can be useful when the coupled neutronic-thermal-hydraulic codes cannot be used for stability analysis. Future work includes analyses of the PGSFR for various operating conditions as well as further validation of the NuSTAB calculations against SFR stability experiments when such experiments become available.

  2. The acute effects of the thermogenic supplement Meltdown on energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and hemodynamic responses in young, healthy males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooke Matt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a thermogenic supplement, Meltdown, on energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and hemodynamics before and after maximal treadmill exercise. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design, 12 male participants underwent two testing sessions after consuming either the Meltdown or placebo supplement. While in a fasted state, participants rested for one hour, orally ingested either Meltdown or placebo and rested for another hour, performed a maximal treadmill exercise test, and then rested for another hour. Throughout the testing protocol, resting energy expenditure (REE and respiratory exchange ratio (RER were assessed. In addition, heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP were assessed before and after exercise. Meltdown increased REE significantly more than placebo at 45 min (1.44 ± 0.25 vs. 1.28 ± 0.23 kcal/min; p = 0.003, 60 min (1.49 ± 0.28 vs. 1.30 ± 0.22 kcal/min; p = 0.025, and 120 min (1.51 ± 0.26 vs. 1.33 ± 0.27 kcals/min; p = 0.014 post-ingestion. Meltdown significantly decreased RER at 30 min (0.84 ± 0.03 vs. 0.91 ± 0.04; p = 0.022 and 45 min post-ingestion (0.82 ± 0.04 vs. 0.89 ± 0.05; p = 0.042, and immediately post-exercise (0.83 ± 0.05 vs. 0.90 ± 0.07; p = 0.009. Furthermore, over the course of the evaluation period, area under the curve assessment demonstrated that REE was significantly increased with Meltdown compared to placebo (992.5 ± 133.1 vs. 895.1 ± 296.1 kcals; p = 0.043, while RER was significantly less than placebo (5.55 ± 0.61 vs. 5.89 ± 0.44; p = 0.002 following ingestion. HR and BP were not significantly affected prior to exercise with either supplement (p > 0.05 and the exercise-induced increases for HR and BP decreased into recovery and were not different between supplements (p > 0.05. These data suggest that Meltdown enhances REE and fat oxidation more than placebo for several hours after ingestion in fully rested and

  3. Asset Meltdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marekwica, Marcel; Maurer, Raimond; Sebastian, Steffen P.

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary. This paper analyzes the relation between demographic structure and real asset returns on Treasury bills, bonds, and stocks for the G7 countries (United States, Canada, Japan, Italy, France, the United Kingdom, and Germany). A macroeconomic multifactor model is used to examine...

  4. Safety analysis of a stratified reactor foundation subject to core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laermann, K.H.; Berhalter, D.; Wieching, G.

    1983-01-01

    Comprehensive calculations were made to examine a foundation plate under static load with non-linear material behaviour. In particular, deformation and crack behaviour of the plate were observed. The calculations hereunder, made to calculate the time of rupture of the plate with the foundation exposed to high temperatures, with and without cavity formation, prove that high temperatures are not as relevant as the melt-down of the layers of armour on top of the middle of the plate. The consequences of this survey are: to protect the top armour of the plate centre and not to use it as support for any structural components. This free space could then be used to instal said multi-layer plate. (orig./HP) [de

  5. How did Fukushima-Dai-ichi core meltdown change the probability of nuclear accidents?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Rangel, Lina; Leveque, Francois

    2012-10-01

    How to predict the probability of a nuclear accident using past observations? What increase in probability the Fukushima Dai-ichi event does entail? Many models and approaches can be used to answer these questions. Poisson regression as well as Bayesian updating are good candidates. However, they fail to address these issues properly because the independence assumption in which they are based on is violated. We propose a Poisson Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (PEWMA) based in a state-space time series approach to overcome this critical drawback. We find an increase in the risk of a core meltdown accident for the next year in the world by a factor of ten owing to the new major accident that took place in Japan in 2011. (authors)

  6. Concepts for passive heat removal and filtration systems under core meltdown conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.; Neitzel, H.-J.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the new containment concept being developed by KfK is the complete passive enclosure of a power reactor after a core meltdown accident by means of a solid containment structure and passive removal of the decay heat. This is to be accomplished by cooling the containment walls with ambient air, with thermoconvection as the driving force. The concept of the containment is described. Data are given of the heat removal and the requirements for filtration of the exhaust air, which is contaminated due to the leak rate assumed for the inner containment. The concept for the filter system is described. Various solutions for reduction of the large volumetric flow to be filtered are discussed. 3 refs., 8 figs

  7. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1978-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide state of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (DG) [de

  8. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1985-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide states of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (orig./PW)

  9. "It feels like something difficult is coming back to haunt me": An exploration of 'meltdowns' associated with autistic spectrum disorder from a parental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaque, Indiana; Dallos, Rudi; McKenzie, Becky

    2018-01-01

    The research explored the experience and understandings expressed by parents of children with autism concerning 'meltdowns', which are commonly described as distressing, escalating episodes of conflicts. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six parents of children with a diagnosis of autism regarding their experience of 'meltdowns'. Parents were asked to track the process of the meltdowns as well as to describe their experiences. Three over-arching themes emerged which encapsulated their experience: Living in Dread: Anxiety and fear of escalating patterns, Attempting to Correct for Negative Childhood Experiences and Condemnation from the Self and Others. The findings suggested that the meltdowns were perceived as having an escalating and predictable process, that parents anticipated meltdowns with anxiety, experienced feelings of helplessness and felt condemned by others. Importantly, it also appeared that parents' responses were influenced by their own childhood experiences of parenting and that they attempted to 'correct' these to be better parents. A model of the meltdowns is suggested along with a discussion of clinical implications for early intervention with families.

  10. Dose estimation for nuclear power plant 4 accident in Taiwan at Fukushima nuclear meltdown emission level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Mei-Ling; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Kuo, Pei-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    An advanced Gaussian trajectory dispersion model is used to evaluate the evacuation zone due to a nuclear meltdown at the Nuclear Power Plant 4 (NPP4) in Taiwan, with the same emission level as that occurred at Fukushima nuclear meltdown (FNM) in 2011. Our study demonstrates that a FNM emission level would pollute 9% of the island's land area with annual effective dose ≥50 mSv using the meteorological data on 11 March 2011 in Taiwan. This high dose area is also called permanent evacuation zone (denoted as PEZ). The PEZ as well as the emergency-planning zone (EPZ) are found to be sensitive to meteorological conditions on the event. In a sunny day under the dominated NE wind conditions, the EPZ can be as far as 100 km with the first 7-day dose ≥20 mSv. Three hundred sixty-five daily events using the meteorological data from 11 March 2011 to 9 March 2012 are evaluated. It is found that the mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the PEZ is 11%. Especially, the probabilities of the northern counties/cities (Keelung, New Taipei, Taipei, Taoyuan, Hsinchu City, Hsinchu County and Ilan County) to be PEZs are high, ranging from 15% in Ilan County to 51% in Keelung City. Note that the total population of the above cities/counties is as high as 10 million people. Moreover, the western valleys of the Central Mountain Range are also found to be probable being PEZs, where all of the reservoirs in western Taiwan are located. For example, the probability can be as high as 3% in the far southern-most tip of Taiwan Island in Pingtung County. This shows that the entire populations in western Taiwan can be at risk due to the shortage of clean water sources under an event at FNM emission level, especially during the NE monsoon period. - Highlights: • An advanced Gaussian-type trajectory model to evaluate the evacuation zone at Nuclear Power Plant 4 in Taiwan. • Mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the permanent evacuation zone is 11%. • The probabilities of the northern

  11. Effect of Fuel Structure Materials on Radiation Source Term in Reactor Core Meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Ha, Kwang Soon

    2014-01-01

    The fission product (Radiation Source) releases from the reactor core into the containment is obligatorily evaluated to guarantee the safety of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) under the hypothetical accident involving a core meltdown. The initial core inventory is used as a starting point of all radiological consequences and effects on the subsequent results of accident assessment. Hence, a proper evaluation for the inventory can be regarded as one of the most important part over the entire procedure of accident analysis. The inventory of fission products is typically evaluated on the basis of the uranium material (e.g., UO2 and USi2) loaded in nuclear fuel assembly, except for the structure materials such as the end fittings, grids, and some kinds of springs. However, the structure materials are continually activated by the neutrons generated from the nuclear fission, and some nuclides of them (e.g., 14 C and 60 Co) can significantly influence on accident assessment. During the severe core accident, the structure components can be also melted with the melting points of temperature relatively lower than uranium material. A series of the calculation were performed by using ORIGEN-S module in SCALE 6.1 package code system. The total activity in each part of structure materials was specifically analyzed from these calculations. The fission product inventory is generally evaluated based on the uranium materials of fuel only, even though the structure components of the assembly are continually activated by the neutrons generated from the nuclear fission. In this study, the activation calculation of the fuel structure materials was performed for the initial source term assessment in the accident of reactor core meltdown. As a result, the lower end fitting and the upper plenum greatly contribute to the total activity except for the cladding material. The nuclides of 56 Mn, '5 1 Cr, 55 Fe, 58 Co, 54 Mn, and 60 Co are analyzed to mainly effect on the activity. This result

  12. Consequence analysis of core meltdown accidents in liquid metal fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, S.D.; Hahn, D.

    2001-01-01

    Core disruptive accidents have been investigated at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) as part of work to demonstrate the inherent and ultimate safety of the conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor(KALIMER), a 150 Mw pool-type sodium cooled prototype fast reactor that uses U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel. In this study, a simple method was developed using a modified Bethe-Tait method to simulate the kinetics and hydraulic behavior of a homogeneous spherical core over the period of the super-prompt critical power excursion induced by the ramp reactivity insertion. Calculations of energy release during excursions in the sodium-voided core of the KALIMER were subsequently performed using the method for various reactivity insertion rates up to 100 $/s, which has been widely considered to be the upper limit of ramp rates due to fuel compaction. Benchmark calculations were made to compare with the results of more detailed analysis for core meltdown energetics of the oxide fuelled fast reactor. A set of parametric studies was also performed to investigate the sensitivity of the results on the various thermodynamics and reactor parameters. (author)

  13. Sensitivity analysis of thermal hydraulic response in containment at core meltdown accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kensuke; Ishigami, Tsutomu; Horii, Hideo; Chiba, Takemi.

    1985-01-01

    A sensitivity analysis of thermal hydraulic response in a containment during a 'station blackout' (the loss of all AC power) accident at Browns Ferry unit one plant was performed with the computer code MARCH 1.0. In the analysis, the plant station batteries were assumed to be available for 4h after the initiation of the accident. The thermal hydraulic response in the containment was calculated by varying several input data for MARCH 1.0 independently and the deviation among calculated results were investigated. The sensitivity analysis showed that (a) the containment would fail due to the overtemperature without any operator actions for plant recovery, which would be strongly dependent on the model of the debris-concrete interaction and the input parameters for specifying the containment failure modes in MARCH 1.0, (b) a core melting temperature and an amount of water left in a primary system at the end of the meltdown were identified as important parameters which influenced the time of the containment failure, and (c) experimental works regarding the parameters mentioned above could be recommended. (author)

  14. The heartland no more: Russia’s weakness and Eurasia’s meltdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei P. Tsygankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Eurasian region continues to disintegrate, and neither Russia nor the West has been able to arrest the destabilizing dynamics. Evidence of rising instability throughout the region include the August 2008 Russia-Georgia war, terrorist attacks in the Northern Caucasus, the persistent failure of Western forces to stabilize Afghanistan, the inability of Central Asian rulers to reign in local clans and drug lords, and the paralysis of legitimately elected bodies of power in Ukraine and Moldova. The West’s attempts to secure and stabilize Eurasia after the end of the Cold War have not led to success. Russia too has greatly contributed to the Eurasian meltdown. The Soviet collapse and the subsequent retreat of Russia from the region have greatly destabilized the area. The relative recovery of the Russian economy during the post-Yeltsin decade began to revive Russia’s standing in Eurasia, yet Moscow could ill afford serious efforts to stabilize and pacify the region. Russia’s resurgence is a response to its lacking recognition as a vital power and partner of the West. If Russia chooses to dedicate itself to obstructing Western policies in Eurasia, we will see more of the collapsing dynamics in the region. Preventing this requires recognizing Russia’s role in stabilizing the region and working with Russia in developing a joint assessment of threat and establishing a collective security arrangement in Eurasia.

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT ASSESSMENT OF A MELT-DOWN PROOF MODULAR MICRO REACTOR (MDP-MMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Venneri, Francesco

    2018-04-02

    The objective of this project is to perform feasibility assessment and technology gap analysis and establish a development roadmap for an innovative and highly compact Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) concept that integrates power production, power conversion and electricity generation in a single unit. The MMR is envisioned to use fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a particularly robust form of TRISO fuel, and to be gas-cooled (e.g., He or CO2) and capable of generating power in the range of 10 to 40 MW-thermal. It is designed to be absolutely melt-down proof (MDP) under all circumstances including complete loss of coolant scenarios with no possible release of radioactive material, to be factory produced, to have a cycle length of greater than 20 years, and to be highly proliferation resistant. In addition, it will be transportable, retrievable and suitable for use in remote areas. As such, the MDP-MMR will represent a versatile reactor concept that is suitable for use in various applications including electricity generation, process heat utilization and propulsion.

  16. On the failure modes of alternative containment designs following postulated core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.K.; Knee, H.E.; Okrent, D.

    1977-01-01

    The containment response to a postulated core meltdown accident in a PWR ice condenser containment, a BWR Mark III containment and a BWR non-inerted Mark I containment has been examined to see if the WASH-1400 containment failure mode judgement for the Surry large, dry containment and the Peach Bottom Mark I inerted-containment are likely to be appropriate for these alternative containment plant designs. For the PWR, the representative accident chosen for the analysis is a large cold leg break accompanied by a loss of all electric power while the BWR respresentative event chosen is a recirculation line break without adequate core cooling function. Two containment event paths are studied for each of these two cases, depending on whether or not containment vapor suppression function is assumed to be available. Both the core and the containment pressure and temperature response to the accident events are computed for the four time intervals which characterize (a) blowdown of the pipe break, (b) core melt, (c) vessel melt-through, and (d) containment foundation penetration. The calculations are based on a best esimate of the most probable sequence, but certain phenomena and events were followed down multiple tracks. It appears that the non-inerted Mark I containment is not so vulnerable to overpressurization from hydrogen burning as the Mark III; however, acceptable temperatures may be exceeded. (Auth.)

  17. Lack of Critical Slowing Down Suggests that Financial Meltdowns Are Not Critical Transitions, yet Rising Variability Could Signal Systemic Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Vishwesha; Raghavendra, Srinivas; Goel, Nikunj; Hoarau, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Complex systems inspired analysis suggests a hypothesis that financial meltdowns are abrupt critical transitions that occur when the system reaches a tipping point. Theoretical and empirical studies on climatic and ecological dynamical systems have shown that approach to tipping points is preceded by a generic phenomenon called critical slowing down, i.e. an increasingly slow response of the system to perturbations. Therefore, it has been suggested that critical slowing down may be used as an early warning signal of imminent critical transitions. Whether financial markets exhibit critical slowing down prior to meltdowns remains unclear. Here, our analysis reveals that three major US (Dow Jones Index, S&P 500 and NASDAQ) and two European markets (DAX and FTSE) did not exhibit critical slowing down prior to major financial crashes over the last century. However, all markets showed strong trends of rising variability, quantified by time series variance and spectral function at low frequencies, prior to crashes. These results suggest that financial crashes are not critical transitions that occur in the vicinity of a tipping point. Using a simple model, we argue that financial crashes are likely to be stochastic transitions which can occur even when the system is far away from the tipping point. Specifically, we show that a gradually increasing strength of stochastic perturbations may have caused to abrupt transitions in the financial markets. Broadly, our results highlight the importance of stochastically driven abrupt transitions in real world scenarios. Our study offers rising variability as a precursor of financial meltdowns albeit with a limitation that they may signal false alarms.

  18. Radioactivity material release mechanism and emergency radiation monitor requirements of personnel in core meltdown accident for submarine nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Wang Yuexing; Ma Xingtian

    1999-01-01

    Some release mechanism of fission products from core meltdown accident of submarine nuclear power plants is described, which include gas-gap, melting, vaporization, steam and explosion. The further release process of them to cabins and environment is described too. The basic requirements and contents of emergency radiation monitor for personnel are approached. A tentative idea of forming emergency radiation monitor net of submarine nuclear power plants and the issue of neutron monitor and protect in the nuclear accident emergency rescue are put forward

  19. The Causes and Ramifications of the 2008- 2009 Meltdown of the Financial Markets on the Global Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raquibuz ZAMAN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The sub- prime mortgage crisis of the summer of 2007 was the first salvo of the impending global meltdown of the financial markets. This study presents a brief review of the factors that led to the collapse of the financial markets and the magnitude of the damage it caused around the globe. It then discusses the measures that need to be taken to stabilize the markets and to create conditions for the resumption of growth. It examines the prospects for financial markets recovery and economic growth in the emerging economies of Asia, Europe and Latin America, with a special reference to BRIC countries, Turkey, and the Middle East. It emphasizes the linkages between nations’ economies and asserts that economic growth cannot be sustained by individual or block of countries, without an overall global effort, to reign in greed and unethical conduct by the operatives of financial markets

  20. On-site releases of noble gases and iodine in the event of core meltdown in a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaignac, E. de.

    1976-10-01

    Research aimed at defining a standard model accident for swimming pool type reactors, has led to the adoption to the so-called BORAX accident which involves complete meltdown of the reactor core. This type of accident-an accident related to dimensional problems- is useful for calculations concerning reactor components which have to withstand the mechanical forces resulting from the accident. A study of the radiobiological consequences of this type of accident, involving the entire reactor core, required research to determine as accurately as possible how the iodine, noble gases and solid fission products are distributed between the melted core and the site. The joint document in the annexure served as the basis for discussion at the meeting (BEVS/SESR) on 9th March 1973, at which the SESR set the standard parameter values to be used for estimating fission product distributions on the site. (author)

  1. In-Core-Instrumentation Methods for 3-Dimensional Distribution Information of Reactor Core Temperatures and Melt-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yeong Cheol [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Myoung; Kim, Sung Jun [Woojin Inc., Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The tsunami-induced nuclear accident at Japanese Fukushima power plants in March 2011 has revealed some weaknesses in the severe accident monitoring system. The plant instrumentation did not provide utility, safety experts, and government officials with adequate and reliable information. The information on the reactor core damage and coolability is critical for making decisions correctly as well as in a timely manner during the course of the mitigation of severe accidents. Current Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)s have an In-Core-Instrumentation (ICI) system that measures the temperature distribution of the top surface (i.e. Core Exit Temperatures) of the reactor core mainly to indicate when to begin Severe Accident Mitigation Guidelines (SAMG). This design concept giving only the core exit temperature has limitations in terms of sufficiency as well as availability of the information necessary for diagnosis on the status of the degraded core and the effectiveness of the measures taken as mitigation strategies. The reactor core exit temperatures are not sufficient to support the assessment of the degree of the core damage and the location of the molten core debris and recognition whether the core damage progresses on or it is mitigated. The ICI location being at the top of the reactor core also makes the ICI thermocouples vulnerable to melt-down because the upper part of the reactor core uncovers first, thereby melt down at the early stage of the accident. This means that direct indication of reactor core temperature will be lost and unavailable during the later stages of severe accident. To address the aforementioned weaknesses of the current ICIs, it is necessary to develop a new ICI system that provides information that is more expanded and more reliable for accident mitigation. With the enhanced information available, the SAMG can be prepared in more refined and effective way based on the direct and suitable indication of status of damages and the 3-dimensional

  2. Numerical investigation on turbulent natural convection in partially connected cylindrical enclosures for analysing SFR safety under core meltdown scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Dijo K.; Mangarjuna Rao, P.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Under the unlikely event of severe core meltdown accident in pool type SFR, the molten core materials may rupture the grid plate which supports the fuel subassemblies and it can get relocated in to the lower pool. These debris may eventually settle on the debris collector (i.e., core catcher) installed above the bottom wall of the lower pool. The bed thus formed generates heat due to radioactive decay which has to be passively removed for maintaining the structural integrity of main vessel. By means of natural convection, the heat generated in the debris bed will be transferred to the top pool where the heat sink (i.e., Decay heat exchanger (DHX)) is installed. Heat transfer to the DHX (which is a part of safety grade decay heat removal system) can take place through the opening created in the grid plate which connects the two liquid pools (i.e., the top pool and the lower pool). Heat transfer can also take place through the lateral wall of the lower cylindrical pool to the side pool and eventually to the top pool, and thus to the DHX. This study numerically investigates the effectiveness of heat transfer between lower pool and top pool during PARR by considering them as partially connected cylindrical enclosures. The governing equations have been numerically solved using finite volume method in cylindrical co-ordinates using SIMPLE algorithm. Turbulence has been modeled using k-ω model and the model is validated against benchmark problems of natural convection found in literature. The effect of parameters such as the heat generation rate in the bed and the size of the grid plate opening are evaluated. Also PAHR in SFR pool is modeled using an axi-symmetric model to fund out the influence of grid plate opening on heat removal from core catcher. The results obtained are useful for improving the cooling capability of in-vessel tray type core catcher for handling the whole core meltdown scenarios in SFR. (author)

  3. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control the reactivity during a postulated core meltdown accident in generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevacova, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B 4 C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic points of view. Concerning B 4 C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B 4 C - UO 2 system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B 4 C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu 2 O 3 or HfO 2 as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO 2 , first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 - UO 2 system, the Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 - UO 2 mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author)

  4. Thermohydraulic status and component behavior in the PWR during the selected meltdown scenario station blackout (SBO); Thermohydraulisches Verhalten und Komponentenverhalten eines DWR bei ausgewaehltem Kernschmelzszenarium infolge Station Blackout (SBO). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, Sebastian; Blaesius, Christoph; Scheuerer, Martina; Steinroetter, Thomas

    2017-09-15

    The report on the thermohydraulic status and component behavior in the PWR during the selected meltdown scenario station blackout (SBO) includes the following issues: status of science and technology on this topic, analysis of a high-pressure meltdown scenario using ATHLET-CD for a German PWR starting from the initiating event station blackout, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the pressurizer coolant loop in a generic German PWR, evaluation of the thermohydraulic steam generator behavior and its effect on the involved primary circuit components.

  5. Guidelines and avoiding meltdown

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-10-01

    The provision of medical care has become more complex and correspondingly more stressful. Patients’ expectations of doctors are high. Poor medical outcomes are in many cases likely to be perceived as physician or surgeon failure rather than the inevitable consequences of the underlying disease. Both the substance and the process of individual cases are closely scrutinised. It is about how you do it as well as what you do.

  6. Meltdown on Long Island

    CERN Multimedia

    Lawler, A

    2000-01-01

    The closure of the neutron-scattering facility at Brookhaven after it was discovered that radioactive water had been leaking into the ground for more than a decade, shows what can happen if researchers do not take public feeling seriously (7 p).

  7. Thermogenic effect of meltdown RTD™ energy drink in young healthy women: a double blind, cross-over design study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faigenbaum Avery D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the acute metabolic effects of a high-energy drink in healthy, physically-active women. Methods Ten women (20.4 ± 0.70 y; 166.9 ± 7.2 cm; 67.0 ± 7.0 kg; 29.6 ± 6.5% body fat underwent two testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. Subjects reported to the laboratory in a 3-hr post-absorptive state and were provided either 140 ml of the high-energy drink (SUP; commercially marketed as Meltdown RTD™ or placebo (P. Subjects consumed two 70 ml doses of SUP or P, separated by 30 min and rested in a semi-recumbent position for 3 hours. Resting oxygen consumption (VO2 and heart rate (HR were determined every 5 min during the first 30 min and every 10 min during the next 150 min. Blood pressure (BP was determined every 15 min during the first 30 min and every 30 min thereafter. Area under the curve (AUC analysis was computed for VO2, whereas a 3-hour average and hourly averages were calculated for respiratory quotient (RQ, total kcal, HR, BP, and profile of mood states (POMS. Results AUC analysis revealed a 10.8% difference (p = 0.03 in VO2 between SUP and P. No difference in VO2 was seen between the groups in the first hour, but VO2 in SUP was significantly greater than P in the second (13.9%, p = 0.01 and third hours (11.9%, p = 0.03. A difference (p = 0.03 in energy expenditure was seen between SUP (1.09 ± 0.10 kcal·min-1 and P (0.99 ± 0.09 kcal·min-1 for the 3-hour period. Although no difference in energy expenditure was seen in the first hour, significant differences between SUP and P were observed in the second (1.10 ± 0.11 kcal·min-1 and 0.99 ± 0.09 kcal·min-1, respectively; p = 0.02 and third hour (1.08 ± 0.11 kcal·min-1 and 0.99 ± 0.09 kcal·min-1, respectively; p = 0.05. Average systolic BP was significantly higher (p = 0.007 for SUP (110.0 ± 3.9 mmHg compared to P (107.3 ± 4.4 mmHg. No differences were seen in HR, diastolic BP, or POMS

  8. Analysis of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations in genetically different strains of Drosophila melanogaster ms and w irradiated in the five-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, M.M.; Kim, A.I.; Magomedova, M.A.; Fatkulbayanova, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of induced and spontaneous recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) in Drosophila melanogaster strains w and ms was estimated after their chronic irradiation in the five-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl' meltdown. The mutagenic effect of relatively low radiation doses was analyzed. In an experiment conducted in 1990, a significant increase in the RSLLM frequency was recorded, while, in 1991, no significant difference between the experiment and control was found

  9. Entomopathogenic fungi and invasional meltdown

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive non-native (alien) species are considered to be one of the greatest threats to biodiversity (Millenium Ecosystem Assessment 2005) through predation, competition, hybridisation or as vectors of disease (Hulme et al., 2009). The movement of peole and goods is increasing the rate of invasive alien species arriving in countries around the globe. A recent inventory of alien species in Europe revealed a figure of 11000 species (Hulme et al., 2009) but it is recognised that this is a firs...

  10. Simulation experiments concerning core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werle, H.

    1979-01-01

    A gas stream causes a remarkable increase in the interfacial heat flux (by a factor of 8 for v = 0.63 cm/s, v = gas volume flux/horizontal area). The most important characteristics of the system investigated (silicon oil/wood metal) are relatively similar to those of a core melt, Therefore a remarkable increase of the interfacial heat transfer by the gas release may be expected also for a core melt, compared with earlier investigations at the system silicon oil/water the influence of a gas stream is nevertheless remarkably lower for silicon oil/wood metal. This shows that the density ratio plays an important role. (orig./RW) [de

  11. Iceland's Economic Eruption and Meltdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsson, Ulf; Torfason, Bjarni K.

    2012-01-01

    background that lead to an initially flourishing banking sector. In doing so, the paper elaborates on the economic oversights that were made during the financial build-up of the country and how such mistakes contributed to the crash. The focus is thus on identifying the main factors that contributed...... that any fast growing market may be exposed to. It concludes that the economic collapse was primarily home-brewed and a consequence of an unbound, risk-seeking banking sector and ineffective (or non-existent) actions of the Icelandic authorities....

  12. Market Meltdown: Recruiting Qualified Business Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, James E.; Swartz, Teresa A.; Liang, Priscilla

    2007-01-01

    University business programs have been facing a growing dilemma concerning how to address increasing shortages of doctoral-level faculty. In this study, the authors examine the challenges facing business schools because of the identified shortage, especially in light of pending baby boomer retirements. With the California State University system…

  13. Three Mile Island: meltdown of democracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, E.J.

    1983-03-01

    Strong local opposition to a start-up of Unit 1 at Three Mile Island continues because citizen distrust of General Public Utilities was found in post-accident studies to have been justified. Several citizen groups have monitored the Unit 2 clean-up activities and have not been reassured by either the President's Commission or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Efforts to improve public relations by distributing radiation kits or other strategies have been outweighed by evidence of government manipulation of early bomb test data and poor industry planning. Arguments over who is responsible for the accident and who is liable for the cost have further undermined credibility. Area residents have received three recent legal signals that their position may prevail. (DCK)

  14. GLOBAL ECONOMIC MELTDOWN AND THE NIGERIAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    counterproductive measure. At least in part, the Great Depression was caused by underlying weaknesses and imbalance within the U.S capitalist economy that had been obscured by the boom psychology and euphoria of the 1920s. The Depression exposed those weaknesses, as it did the inability of the American political ...

  15. The subprime meltdown: who knew what when?

    OpenAIRE

    Kai-yan Lee

    2010-01-01

    Today there is a frequent refrain that the subprime collapse came as a surprise. We contend that, on the contrary, many saw it coming. Starting in the 1990s, there were white papers by consumer organizations and articles in newspapers about abuses in the subprime market. Consumer advocates repeatedly testified before House and Senate committees, citing evidence that, for example, home foreclosures had tripled between 1982 and 1997, high-cost subprime loans accounted for 22 percent of all fore...

  16. Zimbabwe: Internally or Externally Driven Meltdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Mugabe and his top generals personally acquired diamond and cobalt mining resources from southern Congo, Zimbabwe’s economy paid $5 million per week for...2000), 53; Marian Tupy, “ Botswana and Zimbabwe: a Tale of Two Countries,” CATO Institute, March 14, 2008, http://www.cat.org/pub_display.php?pub_id...to Botswana in fear for their lives.61 In February 1984 the government imposed a food embargo on Matabeleland South, the home of Nkomo and largely

  17. Reconstruction: Meltdown in the Midst of Beauty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    beauty of courage, time, and deep listening, as examined through the experiences of fear of the new and of my reconstruction into something more. Recounting a Tale Tailored to Experience. Most people may not be 'into' television and may never even have heard of an old television show called Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

  18. Force Projection, Strategic Agility and the Big Meltdown

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, David

    2001-01-01

    .... force projection and strategic agility. Inter-theater movement of forces over the top of the world would provide a supported combatant commander both flexibility in operational design and advantages in operational functions...

  19. Proposal for computer investigation of LMFBR core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreau, J.E.; Harlow, F.H.; Reed, W.H.; Barnes, J.F.

    1974-01-01

    The environmental consequences of an LMFBR accident involving breach of containment are so severe that such accidents must not be allowed to happen. Present methods for analyzing hypothetical core disruptive accidents like a loss of flow with failure to scram cannot show conclusively that such accidents do not lead to a rupture of the pressure vessel. A major deficiency of present methods is their inability to follow large motions of a molten LMFBR core. Such motions may lead to a secondary supercritical configuration with a subsequent energy release that is sufficient to rupture the pressure vessel. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory proposes to develop a computer program for describing the dynamics of hypothetical accidents. This computer program will utilize implicit Eulerian fluid dynamics methods coupled with a time-dependent transport theory description of the neutronic behavior. This program will be capable of following core motions until a stable coolable configuration is reached. Survey calculations of reactor accidents with a variety of initiating events will be performed for reactors under current design to assess the safety of such reactors

  20. How to arrest a core meltdown accident (doing nothing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Jorge H.

    2000-01-01

    In the eventual situation of a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the molten core is able to relocate inside the pressure vessel. This may lead to the vessel failure, due to the thermal attack of the molten core (at approximation of 3000K) on the vessel steel wall. The vessel failure implies the failure of a very important barrier that contains the radioactive materials generated during the reactor operation, with a significant risk of producing high radiation doses both on operators and on the public. It is expected, for the new generation of nuclear reactors, that these will be required to withstand (by design) a core melt down accident, without the need for an immediate evacuation of the surrounding population. In this line, the use of a totally passive system is postulated, which fulfills the objective of containing the molten core inside the pressure vessel, at low temperature (approximation 1200K) precluding its failure. The conceptual design of a passive in-vessel core catcher is presented in this paper, built up of zinc, and designed for the CAREM-25 nuclear power plant. (author)

  1. Measuring the meltdown: drivers of global amphibian extinction and decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Navjot S; Bickford, David; Diesmos, Arvin C; Lee, Tien Ming; Koh, Lian Pin; Brook, Barry W; Sekercioglu, Cagan H; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2008-02-20

    Habitat loss, climate change, over-exploitation, disease and other factors have been hypothesised in the global decline of amphibian biodiversity. However, the relative importance of and synergies among different drivers are still poorly understood. We present the largest global analysis of roughly 45% of known amphibians (2,583 species) to quantify the influences of life history, climate, human density and habitat loss on declines and extinction risk. Multi-model Bayesian inference reveals that large amphibian species with small geographic range and pronounced seasonality in temperature and precipitation are most likely to be Red-Listed by IUCN. Elevated habitat loss and human densities are also correlated with high threat risk. Range size, habitat loss and more extreme seasonality in precipitation contributed to decline risk in the 2,454 species that declined between 1980 and 2004, compared to species that were stable (n = 1,545) or had increased (n = 28). These empirical results show that amphibian species with restricted ranges should be urgently targeted for conservation.

  2. Measuring the meltdown: drivers of global amphibian extinction and decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navjot S Sodhi

    Full Text Available Habitat loss, climate change, over-exploitation, disease and other factors have been hypothesised in the global decline of amphibian biodiversity. However, the relative importance of and synergies among different drivers are still poorly understood. We present the largest global analysis of roughly 45% of known amphibians (2,583 species to quantify the influences of life history, climate, human density and habitat loss on declines and extinction risk. Multi-model Bayesian inference reveals that large amphibian species with small geographic range and pronounced seasonality in temperature and precipitation are most likely to be Red-Listed by IUCN. Elevated habitat loss and human densities are also correlated with high threat risk. Range size, habitat loss and more extreme seasonality in precipitation contributed to decline risk in the 2,454 species that declined between 1980 and 2004, compared to species that were stable (n = 1,545 or had increased (n = 28. These empirical results show that amphibian species with restricted ranges should be urgently targeted for conservation.

  3. Globalisation and the Global Economic Meltdown; Prospects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coming at the heels of the demise of the USSR, globalisation portends the unbridled spread of capitalist tendencies across geographic and ideological boundaries. In Nigeria, globalisation has translated into deregulation and privatisation of public corporations with the attendant lay off of workers. Increased unemployment ...

  4. Contagious parthenogenesis, automixis, and a sex determination meltdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelstädter, Jan; Sandrock, Christoph; Vorburger, Christoph

    2011-02-01

    Because of the twofold cost of sex, genes conferring asexual reproduction are expected to spread rapidly in sexual populations. However, in reality this simple prediction is often confounded by several complications observed in natural systems. Motivated by recent findings in the Cape honey bee and in the parasitoid wasp Lysiphlebus fabarum, we explore through mathematical models the spread of a recessive, parthenogenesis inducing allele in a haplodiploid population. The focus of these models is on the intricate interactions between the mode of parthenogenesis induction through automixis and complementary sex determination (CSD) systems. These interactions may result in asexual production of diploid male offspring and the spread of the parthenogenesis-inducing allele through these males. We demonstrate that if parthenogenetic females produce a substantial proportion of male offspring, this may prevent the parthenogenesis-inducing allele from spreading. However, this effect is weakened if these diploid males are at least partially fertile. We also predict a degradation of multilocus CSD systems during the spread of parthenogenesis, following which only a single polymorphic CSD locus is maintained. Finally, based on empirical parameter estimates from L. fabarum we predict that male production in parthenogens is unlikely to prevent the eventual loss of sexual reproduction in this system. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Rescuing the subprime meltdown in insulin exocytosis in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Edwin P; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2009-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic islet beta-cells secrete the hormone insulin in response to glucose stimulation and adapt efficiently to increased demand by peripheral tissues to maintain glucose homeostasis. Insulin is packed within dense-core granules, which traffic and dock onto the plasma membrane whereby a Ca(2+) stimulus evokes exocytosis by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE), complex-mediated, membrane fusion. Recent studies have unveiled postdocking steps mediated by "priming" factors that influence SNARE complex assembly to confer fusion readiness to the docked granules. This review will summarize recent insights into the priming role for Munc13 in the exocytosis of insulin granules. We present evidence for the interaction of Munc13-1 with exocytotic substrates involved in cAMP-mediated potentiation of insulin release, the latter we show to mediate enhanced granule-to-granule fusion events underlying compound exocytosis. We thus also further review the current understanding of granule-to-granule fusion. As agents acting on cAMP signaling are clinically used to augment insulin release in diabetes, this better understanding of priming steps may reveal additional novel therapeutic strategies to increase the capacity for insulin release to improve the treatment of diabetes.

  6. Rebranding Nigerian Arts In The Twilight Of Economic Meltdown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Arts has come a long way emanating from the people's life style and their total existence as an entity and has undergone several developmental stages from utilitarian arts to representational arts, with themes and styles, reflected as body decorations, potteries, carvings, textiles, folklore and wall decorations.

  7. Global economic meltdown and the Nigerian economy | Lawrence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Development and Management Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Core catcher for nuclear reactor core meltdown containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Bowman, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    A bed of graphite particles is placed beneath a nuclear reactor core outside the pressure vessel but within the containment building to catch the core debris in the event of failure of the emergency core cooling system. Spray cooling of the debris and graphite particles together with draining and flooding of coolant fluid of the graphite bed is provided to prevent debris slump-through to the bottom of the bed

  9. The political economy of global finamcial meltdown (Depression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It submitted that the global economy was indeed in depression. The implication of mono-economy based on crude oil, purchased only by the west whose economy is shrinking is very dire to the Nigeria it observed. It recommended the adaptation of the Keynesian principles of economic management which involved massive ...

  10. Chemical Bank v. WPPSS: a case of judicial meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamietti, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The Washington Supreme Court excused Washington cities and public utility districts from their contractual obligation to repay a portion of $2.25 billion in revenue bonds issued to build two cancelled nuclear power plants on the ground that they were take or pay contracts. Because of this ruling, the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) defaulted on repayment of the bonds in the largest single incident of municipal default in US history. The voided contracts, however, are virtually identical to those used by other large-scale energy projects, raising questions about the financial security of revenue bonds in general. The author outlines the WPPSS history and analyzes the court decision. He criticizes the court's method, and suggests that it deliberately obfuscated the equity and public policy issues upon which the case should have been decided. 153 references

  11. Development of CHF models for inner and outer RPV gaps in a meltdown severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Tian, W.X.; Feng, K.; Yu, H.X.; Zhang, Y.P.; Su, G.H.; Qiu, S.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A CHF model was developed to predict the CHF in hemispherical narrow gap. • The computed result was validated by the test data of Park and Köhler. • An analytical CHF model was developed to predict the CHF on the outer surface of the lower head. • The predicted CHF was compared with the experimental data of ULPU-V. • Two CHF models developed for the inner and outer CHF predict the CHF well. - Abstract: During a severe accident, the core melt relocates in the lower head and a hemispherical narrow gap may appear between the crust and the lower head because of the different material expansion ratio. The existence of this gap is very important to the integrity of the lower head. Based on the counter current flow limitation (CCFL) between the vapor phase and the liquid phase, a CHF model was developed to predict the CHF in hemispherical narrow gap. The CHF model developed was validated by the test data of Park and Köhler. The effect of key parameters, including the system pressure, radius of melt, and gap size, on the CHF were investigated. And the TMI-2 accident was also calculated by using the CHF formula. Moreover, based on the interface separation model, an analytical CHF model was developed to predict the CHF on the outer surface of the lower head. The predicted CHF was compared with the experimental data of ULPU-V. It indicated that the CHF models developed for the inner and outer CHF could predict the CHF well

  12. Invasional meltdown in northern lakes: Common carp invasion favors non-native plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disturbances can lead to nonrandom changes in community composition due to interactions between the disturbance and the characteristics of species found in the community or available to colonize, producing both winners and losers of disturbance. When the disturbance is a biologic...

  13. Sex determination meltdown upon biological control introduction of the parasitoid Cotesia rubecula?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de J.G.; Kuijper, B.; Heimpel, G.E.; Beukeboom, L.W.

    2012-01-01

    Natural enemies may go through genetic bottlenecks during the process of biological control introductions. Such bottlenecks are expected to be particularly detrimental in parasitoid Hymenoptera that exhibit complementary sex determination (CSD). CSD is associated with a severe form of inbreeding

  14. Sex determination meltdown upon biological control introduction of the parasitoid Cotesia rubecula?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jetske G.; Kuijper, Bram; Heimpel, George E.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    Natural enemies may go through genetic bottlenecks during the process of biological control introductions. Such bottlenecks are expected to be particularly detrimental in parasitoid Hymenoptera that exhibit complementary sex determination (CSD). CSD is associated with a severe form of inbreeding

  15. From pragmatism to dogmatism: European Union governance, policy paradigms, and financial meltdown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mügge, D.

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary analyses commonly attribute the global credit crisis to faulty regulation. What have been the roots of these deficient rules, particularly in Europe, where rapid spill-over from US markets took policy makers and observers by surprise? This article focuses on regulatory liberalism as the

  16. Global economic meltdown and its effects on human capital development in Nigeria: Lessons and way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehinde Oladele Joseph

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Global economies around the world have experienced the most traumatic moments in the last one-decade. The crisis has been described by scholars, as perhaps been the worst financial crisis since the great economic depression of the 1930s. This paper lucidly examines the effects of global economic recession on the development of human capital with reference to Nigeria nation. The objectives of the paper among others are (i To establish the level of the impact of global economic recession on development of skills of human capital in Nigeria (ii To examine if there is any significant relationship between global economic recession and the motivation of human capital development in Nigeria among others. The paper uses survey method with two research hypotheses. Questionnaires were administered among academic staff of two Nigerian universities in the southwest part of Nigeria. Findings showed that the global economic recession has great impact on the development of skills of human capital in Nigeria. Findings also revealed that there exists a positive relationship between global economic recession and training and development of human capital in Nigeria. The paper offers useful policy recommendations, which include the need for government and appropriate agencies to put in place policies such as enabling environment that will lead to the growth and development of human capital in Nigeria. Government needs to put forward policies that minimize cost at all levels, maximize efficiency of output, training and retraining of goods hands; and that there is need to encourage better motivation of workers at every sector of the economy amongst others.

  17. Teaching Business Ethics after the Financial Meltdown: Is It Time for Ethics with a Sermon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Frank J.; Mulvaney, Toni P.; Swerdlow, Marleen R.

    2010-01-01

    Our country is faced with a financial crisis of mammoth proportions: a crisis rooted in ethics, or rather, the lack of ethics. Critics are increasingly complaining that business schools focus too much teaching effort on maximizing shareholder value, with only a limited understanding of ethical and social aspects of business leadership. Business…

  18. Robust scaling in ecosystems and the meltdown of patch size distributions before extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kefi, S.; Rietkerk, M.G.; Roy, M.; Franc, A.; Ruiter, P.C. de; Pascual, M.

    2011-01-01

    Robust critical systems are characterized by power laws which occur over a broad range of conditions. Their robust behaviour has been explained by local interactions. While such systems could be widespread in nature, their properties are not well understood. Here, we study three robust critical

  19. Millisecond-Period Meltdown Experiments on Prompt - Burst Effects and Molten-Tin-Water Dropping Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Coats, R.L.; Schmidt, T.R.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program of confirmatory research for the safety assessment of LMFBR plants. In the sodium-fuel interactions area, this research includes a series of real-time in-pile experiments on the pressure and work potential of prompt-burst excursions as well as laboratory dropping experiments with molten tin and water. The in-pile experiments are performed by Sandia Laboratories in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR), which has a minimum period of 1.3 milliseconds. These single-pin experiments are performed in a piston-loaded, stagnant-sodium autoclave, that is conceptually similar to the one used in the S-11 TREAT test. Unlike the S-11 test, however, realistic radial temperature profiles are obtained in the fuel, the cladding, and the sodium by pre-pulsing the reactor about 1/2 second before the main pulse. A series of preparatory runs have been made with helium-filled capsules and at low energy with sodium-filled capsules. The first significant fuel-coolant interaction run is scheduled for late March 1976. This will be a double-pulsed run at 2700 j/gm UO 2 . A continuing series of experiments is planned with oxide and advanced fuels in both fresh and irradiated form. In molten-tin-water dropping experiments at UCLA, microsecond duration multi-flash photography has been used for event diagnostics. Transition or nucleate boiling was found to trigger energetic interactions or vapor explosions. Temperature stratification in the water was found to reduce the threshold tin temperature necessary to produce vapor explosions below that the predicted by the coolant homogeneous nucleation hypothesis. Interaction zone growth times of a few msec were measured

  20. Contamination transfer in the meltdown of a fast reactor. Inverse Leidenfrost phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddi, Michel.

    1980-12-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in so-called breeder reactors. The safety problems encountered with this type of reactor are due to the high power densities dissipated in the medium at high temperatures. The consequences to the plant and the environment of the inability to evacuate such power coupled with a failure in the system used to shut down the reactor has evidently been studied in safety analyses. The reactor must be calculated and built so that the integrity of the containment is guaranteed and no contamination whatsoever observed outside the buildings of the plant. Such a sequence (designated: overall accident) would lead to the melting or vaporization of part of the fuel followed by a violent interaction between the sodium and UO 2 powder. The conditions of this violent interaction (also designated: vapor explosion) are examined in the text. A single or several bubbles containing sodium in two phases, incondensable fission gases (xenon, krypton and argon), fission products together with UO 2 , PuO 2 , steels and structural materials in the form of highly contamined liquid or solid aerosols would then be formed. If the leaktightness of the roof slab was no longer assured (explosive phase), a leak involving sodium and radioactive products would occur. The aim of the work described was to study the behavior of the aerosols present in the reacting medium in order to determine the quantity of contamination transported by the bubble to the roof of the vessel. This quantity will be the source term for a possible pollution outside the vessel [fr

  1. Modeling of BWR core meltdown accidents - for application in the MELRPI. MOD2 computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, B R; Kim, S H; Taleyarkhan, R P; Podowski, M Z; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes improvements and modifications made in the MELRPI computer code. A major difference between this new, updated version of the code, called MELRPI.MOD2, and the one reported previously, concerns the inclusion of a model for the BWR emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). This model and its computer implementation, the ECCRPI subroutine, account for various emergency injection modes, for both intact and rubblized geometries. Other changes to MELRPI deal with an improved model for canister wall oxidation, rubble bed modeling, and numerical integration of system equations. A complete documentation of the entire MELRPI.MOD2 code is also given, including an input guide, list of subroutines, sample input/output and program listing.

  2. Metallographic post-test investigations for the scaled core-meltdown-experiments FOREVER-1 and -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.; Boehmert, J.

    2000-08-01

    FOREVER (Failure Of Reactor Vessel Rentention) experiments have been carried out in order to simulate the behaviour the lower head of a reactor pressure vessel under the conditions of a depressurized core melt down scenario. In particular the creep behaviour and the vessel failure mode have been investigated. Metallographic post test investigations have complemented the experimental programme. Samples of different height positions of the vessel of the FOREVER-C1 and -C2 experiments were metallographically examined and characteristic microstructural appearances were identified. Additionally samples with ineffected microstructure were annealed at different temperatures and cooled by different rates and afterwards investigated. In this way the microstructural effects of the temperature regime, the thermomechanical loads and the environmental attack could be characterized. Remarkable effects were characteristic for the FOREVER-C2 experiment where the highest-loaded region below the welding joint reached temperatures of approx. 1100 C and a strong creep damage occurred. In the FOREVER-C1 experiment creep damage could not be observed and the maximum temperature did not exceed 900 C. Environmental attack generated decarburization and oxidation but the effect was restricted to a narrow surface layer. There was almost no chemical interaction between the oxidic melt and the vessel material. (orig.)

  3. Investigation on multilayer failure mechanism of RPV with a high temperature gradient from core meltdown scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianfeng, Mao, E-mail: jianfeng-mao@163.com [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Xiangqing, Li [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Shiyi, Bao, E-mail: bsy@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Lijia, Luo [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Zengliang, Gao [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The multilayer failure mechanism is investigated for RPV under CHF. • Failure time and location of RPV are predicted under various SA scenarios. • The structural behaviors are analyzed in depth for creep and plasticity. • The effect of internal pressure and temperature gradient is considered. • The structural integrity of RPV is secured within the required 72 creep hours. - Abstract: The Fukushima accident shows that in-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris has not been appropriately assessed, and a certain pressure (up to 8.0 MPa) still exists inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the traditional concept of IVR, the pressure is supposed to successfully be released, and the temperature distributed among the wall thickness is assumed to be uniform. However, this concept is seriously challenged by reality of Fukushima accident with regard to the existence of both internal pressure and high temperature gradient. Therefore, in order to make the IVR mitigation strategy succeed, the numerical investigation of the lower head behavior and its failure has been performed for several internal pressures under high temperature gradient. According to some requirements in severe accident (SA) management of RPV, it should be ensured that the IVR mitigation takes effect in preventing the failure of the structure within a period of 72 h. Subsequently, the failure time and location have to be predicted under the critical heat flux (CHF) loading condition for lower head, since the CHF is limit thermal boundary before the melt-through of RPV. In illustrating the so called ‘multilayer failure mechanism’, the structural behaviors of RPV are analyzed in terms of the stress, creep strain, deformation, damage on selected paths.

  4. Insider Information, the Bane of Financial Melt-Down? (Pp. 111-121)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    etc, for their benefit to the detriment of investors and therefore caused the financial ... need for investment. But the investors are at risk of losing their investment or capital on account of mis-management by managers of the investments, the ... managers to run the firm, stocks, etc, their own way (risky for quick profits).

  5. Investigation on multilayer failure mechanism of RPV with a high temperature gradient from core meltdown scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianfeng, Mao; Xiangqing, Li; Shiyi, Bao; Lijia, Luo; Zengliang, Gao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The multilayer failure mechanism is investigated for RPV under CHF. • Failure time and location of RPV are predicted under various SA scenarios. • The structural behaviors are analyzed in depth for creep and plasticity. • The effect of internal pressure and temperature gradient is considered. • The structural integrity of RPV is secured within the required 72 creep hours. - Abstract: The Fukushima accident shows that in-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris has not been appropriately assessed, and a certain pressure (up to 8.0 MPa) still exists inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the traditional concept of IVR, the pressure is supposed to successfully be released, and the temperature distributed among the wall thickness is assumed to be uniform. However, this concept is seriously challenged by reality of Fukushima accident with regard to the existence of both internal pressure and high temperature gradient. Therefore, in order to make the IVR mitigation strategy succeed, the numerical investigation of the lower head behavior and its failure has been performed for several internal pressures under high temperature gradient. According to some requirements in severe accident (SA) management of RPV, it should be ensured that the IVR mitigation takes effect in preventing the failure of the structure within a period of 72 h. Subsequently, the failure time and location have to be predicted under the critical heat flux (CHF) loading condition for lower head, since the CHF is limit thermal boundary before the melt-through of RPV. In illustrating the so called ‘multilayer failure mechanism’, the structural behaviors of RPV are analyzed in terms of the stress, creep strain, deformation, damage on selected paths.

  6. Modeling of BWR core meltdown accidents - for application in the MELRPI.MOD2 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, B.R.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    This report summarizes improvements and modifications made in the MELRPI computer code. A major difference between this new, updated version of the code, called MELRPI.MOD2, and the one reported previously, concerns the inclusion of a model for the BWR emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). This model and its computer implementation, the ECCRPI subroutine, account for various emergency injection modes, for both intact and rubblized geometries. Other changes to MELRPI deal with an improved model for canister wall oxidation, rubble bed modeling, and numerical integration of system equations. A complete documentation of the entire MELRPI.MOD2 code is also given, including an input guide, list of subroutines, sample input/output and program listing

  7. Iceland's meltdown: the rise and fall of international banking in the North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Wade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how rapid privatization and liberalization of Iceland's small local banks around 2000, combined with well-developed crony relations among the elite, enabled a small group of financiers to leverage government-guaranteed deposits into a vast wave of mergers and acquisitions abroad, and redistribute enough of the profits back home to make the economy boom. Negative policy feedback loops were systematically undermined. The incoming left-wing government, with IMF support, has managed to protect the bulk of the population from the worst of the effects.

  8. Forever young: SIRT3 a shield against mitochondrial meltdown, aging, and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad eKincaid

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction, fasting, and exercise have long been recognized for their neuroprotective and lifespan-extending properties; however, the underlying mechanisms of these phenomena remain elusive. Such extraordinary benefits might be linked to the activation of sirtuins. In mammals, the sirtuin family has seven members (SIRT1-7, which diverge in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, enzymatic activity and targets. SIRT1, SIRT2, and SIRT3 have deacetylase activity. Their dependence on NAD+ directly links their activity to the metabolic status of the cell. High NAD+ levels convey neuroprotective effects, possibly via activation of sirtuin family members. Mitochondrial sirtuin 3 (SIRT3 has received much attention for its role in metabolism and aging. Specific small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in Sirt3 are linked to increased human lifespan. SIRT3 mediates the adaptation of increased energy demand during caloric restriction, fasting and exercise to increased production of energy equivalents. SIRT3 deacetylates and activates mitochondrial enzymes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation, amino acid metabolism, the electron transport chain, and antioxidant defenses. As a result, the mitochondrial energy metabolism increases. In addition, SIRT3 prevents apoptosis by lowering reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibiting components of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Mitochondrial deficits associated with aging and neurodegeneration might therefore be slowed or even prevented by SIRT3 activation. In addition, upregulating SIRT3 activity by dietary supplementation of sirtuin activating compounds might promote the beneficial effects of this enzyme. The goal of this review is to summarize emerging data supporting a neuroprotective action of SIRT3 against Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.

  9. Software concepts for the build-up of complex systems - selection and realization taking as example a program system for calculation of hypothetical core meltdown accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuermann, W.

    1994-10-01

    Development and application of simulation systems for the analysis of complex processes require on the one hand and detailed engineering knowledge of the plant and the processes to be simulated and on the other hand a detailled knowledge about software engineering, numerics and data structures. The cooperation of specialists of both areas will become easier if it is possible to reduce the complexicity of the problems to be solved in a way that the analyses will not be disturbed and the communication between different disciplines will not become unnecessarily complicated. One solution to reduce the complexity is to consider computer science as an engineering discipline which provides mainly abstract elements and to allow engineers to build application systems based on these abstract elements. The principle of abstraction leads through the processes of modularisation and the solution of the interface problem to an almost problem independent system architecture where the elements of the system (modules, model components and models) operate only on those data assigned to them. In addition the development of abstract data types allows the formal description of the relations and interactions between system elements. This work describes how these ideas can be concretized to build complex systems which allow reliable and effective problem solutions. These ideas were applied successfully during the design, realization and application of the code system KESS, which allows the analysis of core melt down accidents in pressurized water reactors. (orig.) [de

  10. The Glaring Socioeconomic Meltdown in Post-Soviet Ukraine, Moldova, and Belarus: A Distorted Mindset in Search of a Way Out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesea Ghedrovici

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cultural and historical values and assumptions deeply imprint all aspects of people’s lives, including their role in social, economic, and political transformation. Many of the former Soviet states are still going through a painful metamorphosis on a confusing path toward acceptance of freedom and democratic values. The idea we wish to highlight there is the impact of the Soviet moral and psychological legacy on the socioeconomic transition now under way in the East European countries that once were republics of the Soviet Union. It is important to shed light on the reasons why, after 20 years of formal independence, the region is still struggling to find its way forward.

  11. Investigations in Germany of the barrier effect of reactor concrete against propagation molten corium in the case of a hypothetical core meltdown accident of a LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peehs, M.; Skokan, A.; Reimann, M.

    1978-01-01

    The tempeature dependent properties of basaltic and limestone concrete as needed for predicting ''Corium''-melt propagation in concrete (elongation behaviour, specific heat and degradation enthalpy, thermal diffusivity and conductivity) are determined experimentally together with the chemical and physical reactions occurring in heated concrete. The determined oxidation potential of - 335 kJ/Mol for molten ''Corium'' interacting with the concrete is accordance with the observed H 2 -generation due to the melt internal oxidation of Zr, Cr and Fe. The liquefaction temperature of the different concretes investigated are about 1300 - 1400 0 C. The relatively high degradation enthalpy of basaltic and limestone concrete is the reason for the barrier effect of concrete against propagating molten Corium. (author)

  12. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy

  13. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy.

  14. The Three Mile Island Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Emeral

    1980-01-01

    For the past decade, education has been experiencing meltdown, explosions, radiation leaks, heat pollution, and management crises, just like the Three Mile Island disaster. This article offers suggestions on how to deal with these problems. (Author/LD)

  15. Oxidation during reflood of reactor core with melting cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.; Allison, C.M.; Davis, K.L. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Models were recently developed and incorporated into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for calculating the oxidation of fuel rods during cladding meltdown and reflood. Experiments have shown that a period of intense oxidation may occur when a hot partially oxidized reactor core is reflooded. This paper offers an explanation of the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes that cause this intense period of oxidation. Models for the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes are developed. The models are assessed by simulating a severe fuel damage experiment that involved reflood. The models for cladding meltdown and oxidation were found to improve calculation of the temperature and oxidation of fuel rods during the period in which hot fuel rods are reflooded.

  16. Uus plaat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Uutest plaatidest "Zuccero", Lanny Kravitz "Baptism", Alanis Morissette "So-Called Chaos", ABBA "The ABBA Story", Ash "Meltdown", Alya "They Died for Beuty", "Cafe del Moar. The Best of Jose Padilla, "Blue Note Revisited", Dingo "Dingomania"

  17. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  18. The role of 'financial myths' in financial crises

    OpenAIRE

    Eric S. Rosengren

    2011-01-01

    Remarks by Eric S. Rosengren, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, at the Boston University conference on The State of Financial Reform (panel on Lessons Learned from the Global Financial Meltdown), February 28, 2011, Boston, Massachusetts

  19. Three Mile Island Accident Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Three Mile Island Accident Data consists of mostly upper air and wind observations immediately following the nuclear meltdown occurring on March 28, 1979, near...

  20. Effect of resistant starch and aging conditions on the physicochemical properties of frozen soy yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Rahil; Khomeiri, Morteza; Kashaninejad, Mahdi; Mazaheri-Tehrani, Mostafa; Aalami, Mehran

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of resistant starch concentration (0, 1, 2 %), aging time (2, 13, 24 h) and aging temperature (2, 4, 6 °C) on the physicochemical properties of frozen soy yogurt. The results showed that resistant starch increased viscosity because of its water binding properties. Resistant starch also increased foam stability, fat destabilization, and hardness, but it decreased overrun and meltdown rate. Viscosity, hardness and fat destabilization increased as aging time increased. An increase in aging temperature decreased viscosity, overrun, hardness and fat destabilization of frozen yoghurt, but increased the meltdown rate.

  1. Assessment of uncertainties in core melt phenomenology and their impact on risk at the Z/IP facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, W.T.; Ludewig, H.; Bari, R.A.; Meyer, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of core meltdown accidents in the Z/IP facilities has been performed. Containment event trees have been developed to relate the progression of a given accident to various potential containment building failure modes. An extensive uncertainty analysis related to core melt phenomenology has been performed. A major conclusion of the study is that large variations in parameters associated with major phenomenological uncertainties have a relatively minor impact on risk when external initiators are considered. This is due to the inherent capability fo the Z/IP containment buildings to contain a wide range of core meltdown accidents. 12 references, 2 tables

  2. Brookhaven lecture series No. 227: The Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.

    1986-01-01

    This lecture discusses the events leading to, during, and following the Chernobyl Reactor number 4 accident. A description of the light water cooled, graphite moderated reactor, the reactor site conditions leading to meltdown is presented. The emission of radioactive effluents and the biological radiation effects is also discussed. (FI)

  3. Pojehali, hüüab "Jääaeg 2" / Tiit Tuumalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuumalu, Tiit, 1971-

    2006-01-01

    Täispikk animafilm "Jääaeg 2 : Suur sula" ("Ice Age 2 : The Meltdown") : režissöör Carlos Sandanha : eestikeelse dublaazhi režissöör Peeter Simm : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Peeter Simm dublaazhi tegemisest

  4. Slam Dunk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herek, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    There's nothing like a worldwide financial meltdown to kick-start an alumni association's career networking offerings. In 2009, the Northwestern University alumni board provided clear direction to its regional affiliates and to the full-time staff working at the Evanston, Illinois, campus: Develop ways to purposefully connect alumni with each…

  5. A Steady Hand in Uncertain Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Frank

    2009-01-01

    TIAA-CREF, the financial services company that manages retirement portfolios for professionals in academia and other select fields, avoided the heavy losses other financial firms incurred during last fall's financial meltdown. Thus far, the indicators reflect TIAA-CREF's prudent, disciplined investment strategies. From Sept. 30 to Dec. 31, 2008,…

  6. 60 Dividend Is Relevant: A Restatement (Pp. 60-72)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... and the private sector. Also, it has technological support (software) for its aggressive retail banking, apart from its electronic banking services. During the turbulent global financial melt-down, its revenue grew by 40% and total assets by 31.5% but profitability declined by 65.7% (First Bank, 2008, 2009).

  7. Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies.

  8. Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies

  9. Exploring Fiscal Policy at Zero Interest Rates in Intermediate Macroeconomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Srikanth; Sedgley, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Since the financial meltdown of 2007, advanced macroeconomic theory has delved more deeply into the question of the appropriate fiscal policy when the nominal interest rate is close to or at zero percent. Such analysis is typically conducted with the aid of New Keynesian Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium models. The policy implications are,…

  10. European community light water reactor safety research projects. Experimental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Research programs on light water reactor safety currently carried out in the European Community are presented. They cover: accident conditions (LOCA, ECCS, core meltdown, external influences, etc...), fault and accident prevention and means of mitigation, normal operation conditions, on and off site implications and equipment under severe accident conditions, and miscellaneous subjects

  11. Leading the Way to the Third Industrial Revolution. Addressing the Triple Threat of the Global Financial Crisis, Energy Crisis, and Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifkin, J.; Da Graca Carvalho, M.; Consoli, A.; Bonifacio, M.

    2008-01-01

    We are at a precarious point in history. We are facing the real prospect of an economic meltdown on the scale of the Great Depression. The credit crisis is compounded by the global energy crisis and the climate change crisis, creating a potential cataclysm for civilization. There is a way out: we need to radically overhaul the way we use energy in our society

  12. Staying Up in a Down Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    The fundraising landscape has been blistered by stock-market meltdowns and a financial sector that has repeatedly erupted in flames. In turn, the environment for development has turned icy, cooled by frozen credit markets and chilly consumer confidence. It is ragged, unstable terrain. Fundraisers, the ground moving beneath them, are unsure of…

  13. Africa's 'Recovery': Economic Growth, Governance and Social Protest

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reality behind the alleged recovery of Africa from the 2008/09 global financial meltdown, which has been well advertised by multilateral financial agencies, needs investigation, partly because the institutions' political agenda appears to be to further integrate the continent into a highly volatile world economy, as well as ...

  14. Corporate Governance: Insider Information, the Bane of Financial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The finding is that the insider information possessed by the manager informed the manipulation of firms, securities, risky business, terms, prices, etc, for their benefit to the detriment of investors and therefore caused the financial melt-down. Finally, the major recommendation is that corporate governance needs reforms for ...

  15. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARO S.O

    production, global economic melt-down and consequently increased cost of conventional raw materials for animal feed. Also, the conversion of the available conventional livestock ingredients to bio-fuels - a new vogue in our contemporary world to reduce cost on fossil fuels, has further pushed the cost of conventional feed.

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Essien, IA. Vol 14, No 1-2 (2009) - Articles Rebranding Nigerian Arts In The Twilight Of Economic Meltdown Abstract. ISSN: 1118-5570. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL ...

  17. From strategy to e-strategy: lessons from two success stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinides, Efthymios

    2006-01-01

    The article presents the results of research on the strategy of two internet corporations who survived the high-tech meltdown and became major online players and trendsetters in their industries. These two cases highlight the idiosyncracies of the virtual environment as a commercial platform and

  18. The Chornobyl accident and cognitive functioning: a follow-up study of infant evacuees at age 19 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taormina, D.P.; Rozenblatt, S.; Guey, L.T.; Gluzman, S.F.; Carlson, G.A.; Havenaar, J.M.; Zakhozha, V.; Kotov, R.; Bromet, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. The cognitive and academic outcomes of infants exposed to radiation after the meltdown at Chornobyl have been intensely debated. Western-based investigations indicate that no adverse effects occurred, but local studies reported increased cognitive impairments in exposed compared with

  19. 1/54 CROSS-BORDER JURISDICTION AND ASSISTANCE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Tanya du Plessis

    consequences of globalisation and the (inevitable) economic meltdown caused by the convergence of ..... 53 Galbraith v Grimshaw [1910] AC 508, in which a garnishee order obtained by judgment creditor was held to have ..... The consequences of the Russian Revolution were to haunt the law reports for many years after.

  20. Multilingualism as Utopia: Fashioning Non-Racial Selves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Christopher; Williams, Quentin

    2017-01-01

    The challenge of contemporary South Africa is that of building a (post)nation of postracial equity in a fragmented world of a globalized ethical, economic and ecological meltdown. In this paper, we seek to explore the idea of multilingualism as a technology in the conceptualization of alternative, competing futures. We suggest that multilingualism…

  1. Harnessing the Power of Collaborative Relationships to Improve National Preparedness and Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    a major earthquake and tsunami in Japan followed by a nuclear meltdown, a recession at home, and political paralysis in Washington over the budget...getting sustained results because it requires a genuine connection with co-workers; you can’t fake it and expect to get results. (Regine & Lewin, 2000

  2. Teaching "Business" Ethics: Affecting Change through Self-Regulation and Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Bianco, Amy; Tucker, Mary; Rosado Feger, Ana; Barnett, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Most young college graduates have witnessed a cascade of unethical and, indeed, unlawful business behavior from insider trading to credit card meltdown and governance misbehavior, to give a few examples. Yet, while college students indicate that ethical training is essential and should be expected as part of one's college education, there is much…

  3. A Community Treatment Model for Adolescents Who Sexually Harm: Diverting Youth from Criminal Justice to Therapeutic Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Russ

    2013-01-01

    The costs of treating youth who sexually harm others can exceed $200,000 Australian (US$220,000) per annum when they are placed in a residential type facility in either Australia or North America. Following the financial meltdown of the past two years, North American based residential-style programs have found themselves under increasing financial…

  4. "Jääaeg 2" : tiiger Diego kurvastas Marko Matveret / Jaanus Kulli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kulli, Jaanus, 1955-

    2006-01-01

    Täispikk animafilm "Jääaeg 2 : Suur sula" ("Ice Age 2 : The Meltdown") : režissöör Carlos Sandanha : eestikeelse dublaazhi režissöör Peeter Simm : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Filmi dubleerimisest dubleerijate kommentaaridega

  5. Secondary School Student's Attitude towards Consumer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Disciplinary Journal , Ethiopia. Vol. 4 (2) April, 2010. ISSN 1994-9057 (Print). ISSN 2070-0083 (Online). Secondary School Student's Attitude towards Consumer ... home and shopping situation. For instance in Nigeria, with the present – meltdown of the ...

  6. Royal Ahold : A Failure of Corporate Governance and an Accounting Scandal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A.; DeJong, D.V.; Mertens, G.M.H.; Roosenboom, P.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Royal Ahold (Koninklijke Ahold NV) was one of the major success stories in the 1990s and is one of the major failures, suffering a complete meltdown, in 2003.We investigate the strategy, accounting transparency and corporate governance of Ahold; elements which jointly drive the firm s performance

  7. Assessment of accident energetics in LMFBR core-disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauske, H.K.

    1977-01-01

    An assessment of accident energetics in LMFBR core-disruptive accidents is given with emphasis on the generic issues of energetic recriticality and energetic fuel-coolant interaction events. Application of a few general behavior principles to the oxide-fueled system suggests that such events are highly unlikely following a postulated core meltdown event

  8. Testing Technology: A Sandia technology bulletin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, B.; Floyd, H.L.; Doran, L. [eds.

    1994-08-01

    Inside this issue is a farewell to Testing Technology message from technical advisor, Ruth David. Also included are articles on: Testing the I-40 bridge over the Rio Grande, simulated reactor meltdown studies, an inexpensive monitor for testing integrated circuits, testing of antihelicoptor mines, and quality assurance on aircraft inspection.

  9. Fukushima : The Geo-Trauma of a Futural Wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolphijn, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/265015464; Cole, David; Bradley, Joff

    2016-01-01

    The enduring effects of the March 2011 tsunami and nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan are explored in this paper through the notions of “geo-trauma” in the authors’ work and geophilosophy in Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophy. At the fulcrum of the 2011 global

  10. Impact of Global Financial Crisis on Nigerian Stock Market

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    crisis, and foreign investment crisis has a negative significant impact on the Nigerian stock market. Based on ... economic meltdown; the government should implement discriminatory income tax policy for companies .... boom in 2006, direct and portfolio investment recorded a growth rate of 126.6 percent and 11.48 percent ...

  11. Incident at university research facility - melt down of gas chromatograph evaporation block and failure of a passive safety barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2014-01-01

    Two incidents are described highlighting the importance of process hazard analysis in university laboratories. In the first incident, an online gas chromatograph (GC) was being developed. A complete meltdown of the heating blog was experienced during testing because the PC had failed to turn off...

  12. Keynesian, Monetarist and Supply-Side Policies: An Old Debate Gets New Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederjohn, M. Scott; Wood, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Debates over how to promote a healthy economy are pervasive once more, after decades when it seemed such debates had been put to rest. The market meltdown of 2008 ended a long string of years in which monetary policy reigned supreme. Monetary policy is the regulation of money and the banking system to influence economic variables. Its adherents,…

  13. Potentials of the television in reinventing the Nigerian tourism industry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the potentiality of the television medium in reinventing the tourism industry in Nigeria. In the wake of the recent global economic meltdown which started in the United States of America and has spread across the world, there is an emerging consensus that sustainable economic growth and development

  14. Pedagogy of Refuge: Education in a Time of Dispossession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Juliet Christine

    2013-01-01

    Despite its chequered history in relation to human rights issues, South Africa has been playing host to peoples displaced and dispossessed by geographies of anger and war, poverty, economic meltdown and other human rights atrocities. Perceiving South Africa as a sanctuary, there has been a steady wave of immigrants, asylum seekers and refugees…

  15. Sustainable Cities, Sustainable Minds, Sustainable Schools: Pop-Up-Farm as a Connecting Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that modern education is premised upon urban industrial society, and that this has been conceived around a false notion of progress which perpetuates fracture between people and planet. If education maintains this illusion of progress whilst ignoring the reality of environmental meltdown it serves no reliable purpose in…

  16. An indirect effect of biological invasions: the effect of zebra mussel fouling on parasitisation of unionid mussels by bitterling fish

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrtílek, Milan; Reichard, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 696, č. 1 (2012), s. 205-214 ISSN 0018-8158 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Non-native species * Coevolution * Invasional meltdown * Host-parasite relationship * Aquatic ecosystems Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.985, year: 2012

  17. Does Europe Need a Comprehensive Energy Policy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, R.S.J.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear meltdown in Fukushima has given renewed momentum to the anti-nuclear power movement across Europe. However, the degree of momentum varies greatly from country to country, and considering the geographically widespread consequences of a nuclear accident, it hardly appears optimal for one

  18. Progress report on R + D activities in 1980 of the Institut fuer Material- und Festkoerperforschung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The activities of IMF in the following fields are discussed: 1) Project Schneller Brueter (core, cladding, and structural materials; safety analyses; instrumentation; core monitoring.) 2) Project Nukleare Sicherheit (fuel element behaviour during accidents; core meltdown) 3) Project Wiederaufarbeitung und Abfallbehandlung (reprocessing and waste treatment) 4) Fusion technology 5) Innovation research. (RW) [de

  19. CNE (central nuclear en Embalse): probabilistic safety study. Loss-of-coolant accidents. Analysis through events sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layral, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform for the Embalse nuclear power plant, a probabilistic evaluation of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) to identify the risks associated with them and to determine their acceptability in accordance with norms. This study includes all ruptures in the primary system that produce the automatic activation of 'emergency core cooling system'. Three starting events were selected for the probabilistic evaluation: 100% rupture of an input collector; 5% rupture of an input collector; 1.2% rupture of an input collector. At this stage the evaluation is focussed on the identification and quantization of the main failure sequences that follow a LOCA and lead to an uncontrolled reactor state or 'core meltdown'. The most important contribution to the core meltdown due to LOCA is the failure of supplies that are required for the emergency core cooling system. (Author)

  20. Laboratory studies of the meltfront propagation in a borax core-catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Werle, H.

    1980-08-01

    A series of seven laboratory experiments concerning the meltdown of a borax core catcher have been performed. By the selection of the simulant materials the most important thermophysical properties of the core catcher materials were taken into account. Fission product heating of the molten core masses was simulated by electrolytically heating of the molten region. The experiments reveal interesting details of the phenomena to be expected during melt-down of a borax core catcher, especially on the flow pattern, the mixing processes of molten materials and the layer formation the melt. The most interesting result is that the ratio of downward to sideward melting rate is heavily reduced by high melting barriers and that a cubic structure of barriers will not equalize downward and sideward melting rates. A super 8 film is available as additional information. (orig.) [de

  1. LSA Large Area Silicon Sheet Task. Continuous Liquid Feed Czochralski Growth. [for solar cell fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegl, G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of equipment and processes to demonstrate continuous growth of crystals by the Czochralski method suitable for producing single silicon crystals for use in solar cells is presented. The growth of at least 150 kg of mono silicon crystal, 150 mm in diameter is continuous from one growth container. A furnace with continuous liquid replenishment of the growth crucible, accomplished by a meltdown system with a continuous solid silicon feed mechanism and a liquid transfer system, with associated automatic feedback controls is discussed. Due to the silicon monoxide build up in the furnace and its retarding effect on crystal growth the furnace conversion for operation in the low pressure range is described. Development of systems for continuous solid recharging of the meltdown chamber for various forms of poly silicon is described.

  2. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation

  3. An Evaluation of the Arctic - Will it Become an Area of Cooperation or Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Implications of Global Warming ,” Foreign Affairs 87, No. 2, (March – April 2008): 63. 33 Huebert, “The Newly Emerging Arctic Security Environment,” 22...www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11331904. 113 Scott G. Borgerson, “Arctic Meltdown Subtitle: The Economic and Security Implications of Global Warming ...with regard to articles relating to land based sources of pollution that are called a “backdoor Kyoto Protocol ;” and a belief the convention will

  4. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  5. Russia’s Economy: Signs of Progress and Retreat on the Transitional Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    depreciated the ruble by 70 percent, from 6 rubles per dollar in 1998 to 21 rubles per dollar after depreciation. Since the hyperinflation and “meltdown...diminish U.S. influence. Indeed, this issue applies as well to Russian transac- tions with Ukraine and other European trading partners, where the...Burden, San Francisco, CA: ICS Press, 1990. ———, “The Economic Resurgence of Russia, Ukraine and Kazakstan,” paper presented at National Bank of

  6. Effect of resistant starch and aging conditions on the physicochemical properties of frozen soy yogurt

    OpenAIRE

    Rezaei, Rahil; Khomeiri, Morteza; Kashaninejad, Mahdi; Mazaheri-Tehrani, Mostafa; Aalami, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of resistant starch concentration (0, 1, 2 %), aging time (2, 13, 24 h) and aging temperature (2, 4, 6 °C) on the physicochemical properties of frozen soy yogurt. The results showed that resistant starch increased viscosity because of its water binding properties. Resistant starch also increased foam stability, fat destabilization, and hardness, but it decreased overrun and meltdown rate. Viscosity, hardness and fat destabilization increased as aging...

  7. A Proposed United States Grand Strategy for 2015-2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    healthy society…The financial meltdown also undermined an important element of America’s “soft power,” namely, its reputation for competence and probity...helping to further solidify their position in the global marketplace; from Brazil in agribusiness and offshore energy exploration; Russia in energy...and Parent point out, “Holding on to exposed and expensive commitments simply for the sake of one’s reputation is a greater geopolitical gamble than

  8. Three Mile Island - The hour-by-hour account of what really happened

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, M.

    1980-01-01

    An hour-by-hour account is given of the progression of events leading up to and during the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor. The emergency procedures followed, the evacuation of local residents and the decisions taken as the possibility of a meltdown became apparent are recorded in detail together with aspects of the media coverage and the problems of communication. (U.K.)

  9. The Financial Crisis and White Collar Crime - Legislative and Policy Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Ryder, N.; Turksen, U.; Tucker, J.

    2017-01-01

    In September 2007, the collapse of the United States (US) sub-prime mortgage market resulted in the global meltdown of the financial markets. This in turn led to the collapse of many international financial institutions including Northern Rock, Bradford and Bingley, American Insurance Group, Freddy Mac, Fannie Mae and Lehman Brothers. The G20 countries responded with a plethora of financial stimulus packages aimed at combating the largest global financial problem since the Wall Street Crash i...

  10. Neurohumoral brain dynamics of social group formation. Implications for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, W J

    1997-01-15

    Brains are dynamic systems in which learning tends towards isolation by increasing specialization of cognitive skills. Induction of social skills for cooperative behavior requires "unlearning" in social contexts. A hypothesis is proposed by which oxytocin and related neuropeptides play a key role in meltdown of prior learning in preparation for new learning. This has implications for clinical management of disorders of the socialization processes in children.

  11. Preparedness and resilience: the hallmarks of response and recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Kumerasan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Great East Japan Earthquake struck the north-eastern coast of Honshu on 11 March 2011. With a magnitude of 9.0, it was the largest earthquake ever recorded in Japan. It triggered the largest recorded tsunami in Japan which devastated the lifelines, transportation and communication systems in the Tohoku region. The tsunami caused nuclear accidents and meltdowns of three reactors in Fukushima.

  12. Evaluation of results of Phase B of the German Risk Study for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, B.; Hahn, L.; Sailer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The expert opinion summarizes and discusses the intermediate and the final results of Phase B of the German Risk Study. Emphasis is placed on systems analyses and event scenarios, core melt-down scenarios and effects on the containment, failure of the containment and resulting source terms, radioactivity transport and consequences of accidents, multi-system emergencies and external disturbances, accident management and means of mitigation of damage. (DG) [de

  13. Properties of frozen dairy desserts processed by microfluidization of their mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D W; White, C H; Watson, C E

    2003-04-01

    Sensory properties and rate of meltdown of nonfat (0% fat) and low-fat (2% fat) vanilla ice creams processed either by conventional valve homogenization or microfluidization of their mixes were compared with each other and to ice cream (10% fat) processed by conventional valve homogenization. Mixes for frozen dairy desserts containing 0, 2, and 10% fat were manufactured. Some of the nonfat and low-fat ice cream mixes were processed by microfluidization at 50, 100, 150, and 200 MPa, and the remaining nonfat and low-fat ice cream mixes and all of the ice cream mix were processed by conventional valve homogenization at 13.8 MPa, first stage, and 3.4 MPa, second stage. The finished frozen and hardened products were evaluated at d 1 and 45 for meltdown rate and for flavor and body and texture by preference testing. Nonfat and low-fat ice creams that usually had a slower meltdown were produced when processing their mixes by microfluidization instead of by conventional valve homogenization. Sensory scores for the ice cream were significantly higher than sensory scores for the nonfat and low-fat ice creams, but the sensory scores for the conventional valve homogenized controls for the nonfat ice cream and low-fat ice cream were not significantly different from the sensory scores for the nonfat ice cream and low-fat ice cream processed by microfluidization of the mixes, respectively. Microfluidization produced nonfat and low-fat ice creams that usually had a slower meltdown without affecting sensory properties.

  14. Radiological consequence analysis for upgradation of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 from 9 to 10 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Raza, S.S.

    1993-12-01

    Radiological consequence analysis has been carried out for upgradation of PARR-I from 9 to 10 MW. A hypothetical loss of coolant accident resulting in core meltdown and release of fission products to the atmosphere has been analyzed. Whole body and thyroid doses have been calculated as a function of time and distance from the containment building. Based on these dose estimates, boundaries of exclusion and low population zones are assessed. (author)

  15. CHAOS, STRATEGY, AND ACTION: HOW NOT TO FIDDLE WHILE ROME BURNS

    OpenAIRE

    FRED PHILLIPS; YU-SHAN SU

    2013-01-01

    The US financial meltdown has changed companies' situations not just fundamentally but pervasively. Institutions and channels of supply and communication have disappeared or become unreliable; we are literally managing in chaos, and traditional notions of strategy, planning, and implementation must be (temporarily, it is to be hoped) discarded. This presentation draws on classic management theory, newer ideas, and experiences from technology companies to outline principles for managing for su...

  16. Does Europe need a comprehensive energy policy?

    OpenAIRE

    Egenhofer, Christian; Behrens, Arno; Tol, Richard S. J.; Berthélemy, Michel; Lévêque, François; Jansen, Jaap C.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear meltdown in Fukushima has given renewed momentum to the anti-nuclear power movement across Europe. However, the degree of momentum varies greatly from country to country, and considering the geographically widespread consequences of a nuclear accident, it hardly appears optimal for one country to ban nuclear power while multiple nuclear power plants are still active in neighbouring countries. Even beyond the nuclear power dilemma, the economic and political externalities associate...

  17. 日本の地域社会と原子力発電所 -福井県大飯町を事例にして-

    OpenAIRE

    小松, 秀雄; Hideo, KOMATSU

    2012-01-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear was caused by the huge tsunami of the Great East Japan Earthquake that hit on March 11, 2011.The nuclear reactors were led to meltdown and hydrogen explosion, resulting in the release of large amounts of radioactive materials into the air. Many of the residents in nearby areas were forced to evacuate and are unable to return to their hometowns even today. After careful consideration of these results of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear accident, ...

  18. Micro-organisms and nuclear waste: a neglected problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, Don.

    1989-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of bacteria in nuclear waste disposal. A description is given of how bacteria colonised the Three Mile Island Nuclear Reactor soon after meltdown, demonstrating the ability of some bacteria to operate under extreme conditions. Work is also described indicating that microbial corrosion of metal canisters can occur. Thus the author recommends that studies of nuclear waste disposal should take into account the interrelations between geology, geochemistry and microbiology. (U.K.)

  19. Does invader like invader? Feeding preferences of an alien Ponto-Caspian goby towards indigenous and non-indigenous amphipod prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Błońska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When non-native species appear in a new ecosystem, it may sufficiently affect native communities i.a. through interactions with native as well as other alien species. The „invasional meltdown“ hypothesis states that the presence of non-indigenous species facilitates the introduction and establishment of the other non-native species. A series of laboratory experiments was conducted to test the occurence of the invasional meltdown phenomenon within the invasive Ponto-Caspian community. Preferences of an alien Ponto-Caspian racer goby, Babka gymnotrachelus, towards amphipod preys of the same origin (Dikerogammarus villosus, Pontogammarus robustoides or a prey species native to the resident community (Gammarus fossarum were verified. Additionally, we tested the profitability of native and invasive prey for fish in a growth experiment. Accordingly with the invasional meltdown hypothesis, we hypothesized that the racer goby would prefer Ponto-Caspian amphipods and that prey would be more beneficial than native ones, which should result in higher growth rate. We found that the racer goby always selected the native G. fossarum, regardless of the prey mobility, presence of shelters and waterborne chemical cues. Thus, the fish choice was based on the assessment of prey quality during a direct contact with amphipods. The growth experiment indicated that the racer goby grew better on the native gammarid compared to the Ponto-Caspian species. The outcome of our study does not support the invasional meltdown hypothesis within the goby – gammarids predator prey system, as the non-native prey species were neither prefered nor more profitable food for the alien predator. Thus, we found no evidence for facilitation of establishement between the studied taxa.

  20. Generation IV sodium fast reactor. Feedback reactivity coefficients to optimise safe natural core behaviour during accident transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaetta, Alain; Bernardin, Bruno; Vanier, Marc; Tommasi, Jean; Varaine, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    One of the key research goals for Generation IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) is to improve their safety levels, particularly by ensuring robust core behaviour during accident conditions. A dedicated approach called COCONS has been developed to reach these objectives. This paper discusses this approach which focuses on the design of naturally safe core. It can be broken down into three stages: The first stage involves defining the role of feedback reactivity coefficients applicable during accident transients, such as unprotected reactivity insertion transients (UTOP) or unprotected loss-of-cooling-flow transients (ULOF). The parametric study has revealed the impact of the Doppler effect on UTOP and sodium temperature coefficient which is directly related to the sodium void effect for ULOF. The second stage is to define optimised ranges for these reactivity coefficients to avoid any core damage by fuel meltdown or sodium boiling. Conclusions differ greatly depending on the fuel type, e.g. oxide, metal or carbide. Fuel temperature margins before fuel meltdown and average fuel temperatures play a very important role. The third stage involves recommending several core concepts that are capable of achieving these idealistic ranges. Several new oxide fuel subassembly designs are suggested in view of reducing the maximum fuel temperature and increasing margins to fuel meltdown. Ceramic carbide fuel seems to be a very promising choice from a reactor physics viewpoint. Combined with moderator material in the core or used with the new fuel 'plate' subassembly concept, ceramic carbide fuel seems capable of achieving safe natural behaviour during either a UTOP or ULOF transient. The COCONS approach appears to be a useful tool in terms of recommending new SFR core options and comparing overall performance levels with reactor safety levels. Final optimization will require more general comparisons, taking into account all the main Generation IV goals i.e. economic

  1. Use of decision trees for evaluating severe accident management strategies in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclerar Engineering; Lee, Yongjin; Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). School of Energy Systems Engineering

    2016-07-15

    Accident management strategies are defined to innovative actions taken by plant operators to prevent core damage or to maintain the sound containment integrity. Such actions minimize the chance of offsite radioactive substance leaks that lead to and intensify core damage under power plant accident conditions. Accident management extends the concept of Defense in Depth against core meltdown accidents. In pressurized water reactors, emergency operating procedures are performed to extend the core cooling time. The effectiveness of Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) became an important issue. Severe accident management strategies are evaluated with a methodology utilizing the decision tree technique.

  2. Results from DEMONA aerosol experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzleiter, T.; Wolf, L.; Schoeck, W.

    1987-01-01

    In the DEMONA experiments the behavior of aerosols released into a large dry PWR containment during a core meltdown accident was investigated by means of a 640 m 3 model containment. After performance of eight experiments with quasi-single-compartment containment geometry and one multi-compartment experiment, the DEMONA project is being completed by evaluating and recalculating the measured results. Up to now, good agreement between experiment and model calculations was achieved only for simple test conditions. Adequate modeling of more complicated test conditions requires additional analytical efforts

  3. A three-dimensional radiation image display on a real space image created via photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Ozawa, S.; Tanifuji, Y.; Torii, T.

    2018-03-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc., went into meltdown after the occurrence of a large tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. The radiation distribution measurements inside the FDNPS buildings are indispensable to execute decommissioning tasks in the reactor buildings. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction method for radioactive substances using a compact Compton camera. Moreover, we succeeded in visually recognizing the position of radioactive substances in real space by the integration of 3D radiation images and the 3D photo-model created using photogrammetry.

  4. Risk reduction of core-melt accidents in advaned CAPRA burner cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Struwe, D.; Eigemann, M.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the CAPRA Program (Consommation Accrue de Plutonium dans les RApides) the feasibility of fast reactors is investigated to burn plutonium and also to destruct minor actinides. The design of CAPRA cores shows significant differences compared to conventional cores. Especially the high Pu-enrichment has an important influence on the core melt-down behavior and the associated recriticality risk. To cope with this risk, inherent design features and special measures/devices are investigated for their potential of early fuel discharge to reduce the criticality of the reactor core. An assessment of such measures/devices is given and experimental needs are formulated. 11 refs., 5 figs

  5. Chernobyl: recovery operations and the entombment of Reactor 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalziel, S.P.C.

    1988-01-01

    The immediate actions taken following the accident at the Chernobyl-number 4 reactor in April 1986 are described. These included actions to put out the fires, initial medical aid and the dropping of sand, lead, dolomite and boron onto the reactor from helicopters. Following this the chamber below the damaged reactor core was filled with concrete to prevent any further explosions or meltdown. The reactor was subsequently entombed in steel and concrete. The evacuation of the surrounding area is also mentioned. (U.K.)

  6. Nuclear power a reference handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Harry R

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century, nuclear power has been identified as a viable alternative to traditional energy sources to stem global climate change, and condemned as risky to human health and environmentally irresponsible. Do the advantages of nuclear energy outweigh the risks, especially in light of the meltdown at the Fukushima plant in 2011? This guide provides both a comprehensive overview of this critical and controversial technology, presenting reference tools that include important facts and statistics, biographical profiles, a chronology, and a glossary. It covers major controversies and proposed solutions in detail and contains contributions by experts and important stakeholders that provide invaluable perspective on the topic.

  7. The nature of reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domaratzki, Z.; Campbell, F.R.; Atchison, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Reactor accidents are events which result in the release of radioactive material from a nuclear power plant due to the failure of one or more critical components of that plant. The failures, depending on their number and type, can result in releases whose consequences range from negligible to catastrophic. By way of examples, this paper describes four specific accidents which cover this range of consequence: failure of a reactor control system, loss of coolant, loss of coolant with impaired containment, and reactor core meltdown. For each a possible sequence of events and an estimate of the expected frequency are presented

  8. Arguments against nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, L.

    1991-01-01

    The arguments put forward are: data from risk studies concerning the frequency of occurrence of core meltdown in LWR type reactors, the frequency of containment failures and resulting off-site emissions, in-plant accident management, and the hazard of hydrogen explosions. Yet unresolved problems are stated to be: the presentation of results of the German Risk Study (part DRS-B), the way accident management is dealt with, the evaluation standards applied to safety deficits, the hydrogen problem, the biological effects of low-dose radiation, the qualification of radwaste repositories, the information policy of public authorities, and the regime of governmental control and supervision. (HP) [de

  9. Australia-Indonesia Relations: Getting Beyond East Timor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    revoked the AMS. The East Timor crisis caused a near meltdown of relations between Australia and Indonesia. R E L A T I O N S P O S T – E A S T T I M O...between Australia and Indonesia had grown by leaps and bounds until it leveled off in the financial crisis . From 1988 to 1998 trade rose from A$1.2 billion...reports for his less-than-exemplary role in the East Timor crisis —raises the possibility of a leader who has criticized Australia in the past. The

  10. TwinRec - combined recycling and energetic utilisation of waste materials - results obtained in Japan's first industrial-size plant; TwinRec - Kombinierte stoffliche und energetische Verwertung von Abfaellen - Resultate von der ersten kommerziellen Grossanlage in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, C.; Buergin, M.; Wilke, W.S.; Spielmann, D.; Selinger, A.

    2000-07-01

    EBARA developed the TwinRec processes, which is an innovative combination of two existing technologies: TIF combustion (Twin Internally Revolving Fluidized Bed) and MELTOX combined combustion and ash meltdown. 70 TIF plants have been constructed in Japan and Europe since 1978, and three MELTOX systems have been installed since 1990. [German] EBARA entwickelte das TwinRec-Verfahren als innovative Kombination zweier bestehender Technologien: - die Wirbelschichtverbrennung TIF (Twin Internally Revolving Fluidized Bed), und - die kombinierte Verbrennungs- und Ascheschmelztechnologie MELTOX. Seit 1978 sind 70 TIF-Anlagen in Japan und Europa gebaut, seit 1990 drei MELTOX-Systeme installiert worden. (orig.)

  11. Europe after Fukushima. German perspectives on the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temple, Samuel; Uekoetter, Frank; Kersten, Jens; Vogt, Markus

    2012-01-01

    One year after the reactor meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, this volume of RCC Perspectives takes stock of its impact and possible legacy in Europe as part of the Rachel Carson Center's research focus on natural disasters and cultures of risk. While Europe may have been spared radioactive fallout, political and cultural fallout has been significant. Are we witnessing the beginning of the end of the nuclear era? Or beginning of a new one, glimpsed in the shade of authoritarian regimes?

  12. Accident at Harrisburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    The course of events during the accident on 28 March 1979 at Three Mile Island-2 Reactor at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, is described in detail. The effects (in the environment and within the safety containment) are described. The following points are then discussed: the possibility of a comparable accident occurring in the nuclear power stations in the German Federal Republic; the possibility of any point having been overlooked in the design of nuclear power stations in the Federal Republic; whether previous risk analyses are still valid; and how near the Three Mile Island reactor was to a core meltdown. Some conclusions are drawn. (U.K.)

  13. Passive decay heat removal by natural air convection after severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbacher, F.J.; Neitzel, H.J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Institut fur Angewandte Thermo- und Fluiddynamik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Cheng, X. [Technische Universitaet Karlsruhe Institut fur Stroemungslehre und Stroemungsmaschinen, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    The composite containment proposed by the Research Center Karlsruhe and the Technical University Karlsruhe is to cope with severe accidents. It pursues the goal to restrict the consequences of core meltdown accidents to the reactor plant. One essential of this new containment concept is its potential to remove the decay heat by natural air convection and thermal radiation in a passive way. To investigate the coolability of such a passive cooling system and the physical phenomena involved, experimental investigations are carried out at the PASCO test facility. Additionally, numerical calculations are performed by using different codes. A satisfying agreement between experimental data and numerical results is obtained.

  14. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1972-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures

  15. LMFBR fuel assembly design for HCDA fuel dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacko, Robert E.; Tilbrook, Roger W.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor having an upper axial blanket region disposed in a plurality of zones within the fuel assembly. The characterization of a zone is dependent on the height of the axial blanket region with respect to the active fuel region. The net effect of having a plurality of zones is to establish a dispersal flow path for the molten materials resulting during a core meltdown accident. Upward flowing molten material can escape from the core region and/or fuel assembly without solidifying on the surface of fuel rods due to the heat sink represented by blanket region pellets.

  16. Papers presented as part of the status report of the Nuclear Safety Research Project of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Center on 23 March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueper, R.

    1994-05-01

    The ten papers deal with the state of safety requirements on future LWR plants and with nuclear safety research with regard to fast reactors and future PWR plants. In particular, passive after-heat removal, core disruptive accidents, and actinide burning in fast reactors are analysed. For PWR type plants the fuel element behaviour in the event of accidents, hydrogen distribution and hydrogen fires, and the origin and effects of steam explosions on the reactor pressure vessel and the containment are examined. Core meltdown cooling systems are suggested. (DG) [de

  17. Small scale studies of production of fissium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, O.; Rydberg, J.

    1983-02-01

    A small scale study concerning the production and analysis of fission product aerosols formed at various temperatures as a function of the chemical composition of the fissium/corium mixture at the source is presented. CsOH, CsJ and Te are the main aerosol components to be expected. The thermodynamic characterization of occuring Te-iodides and other phases is of great importance for reactor core meltdown chemistry and for the evaluation of the aerosol transport tests. Elemental iodine seems not to be released in significant amounts in reducing atmosphere. Analysis data concerning elements, phases, themral analysis and gases are presented. (G.B.)

  18. Simulation of LOF accidents with directly electrical heated UO2 pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexas, A.

    1976-01-01

    The behavior of directly electrical heated UO 2 pins has been investigated under loss of coolant conditions. Two types of hypothetical accidents have been simulated, first, a LOF accident without power excursion (LOF accident) and second, a LOF accident with subsequent power excursion (LOF-TOP accident). A high-speed film shows the sequence of events for two characteristic experiments. In consequence of the high-speed film analysis as well as the metallographical evaluation statements are given in respect to the cladding meltdown process, the fuel melt fraction and the energy input from the beginning of a power transient to the beginning of the molten fuel ejections

  19. Apparatus for controlling nuclear core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, and dispersing reactor debris assumed to flow from the core area in the unlikely event of an accident causing core meltdown. The apparatus includes a plurality of horizontally disposed vertically spaced plates, having depressions to contain debris in controlled amounts, and a plurality of holes therein which provide natural circulation cooling and a path for debris to continue flowing downward to the plate beneath. The uppermost plates may also include generally vertical sections which form annular-like flow areas which assist the natural circulation cooling

  20. Adding prefilters to French containment venting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, M.V. (EdF, Villeurbanne (France))

    1992-11-01

    The sand-bed filters installed on all French Pressurized Water Reactors were intended to retain the source term of radioactivity for 24h after the beginning of a core meltdown. But because of its size the sand filter is outside the containment and therefore the source term, which may be inside the sand filter, could produce very high radiation levels on site. To solve this problem a prefilter has been designed. This is to be located inside the containment and aims to retain the source term there. (author).

  1. Major risks and financial guarantees provided by the State in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassard, Guy

    2012-01-01

    France's system for indemnifying damage from natural catastrophe is exemplary, whether for floods, storms, or subsidence. However, France is not equipped with the financial capacity to deal with the damage resulting from an exceptional disaster, such as an earthquake on the Mediterranean coast, or a nuclear meltdown. Major catastrophes could be a significant risk to the financial stability of the State today, because the State is in fact the ultimate insurer of its citizens and its institutions. It would be wise to built up reserves in order to enhance the financial resources of the State and to provide a uniform guarantee covering major risks, whatever the cause of the damage may be. (author)

  2. ATHENA-2D: A computer code for simulation of hypothetical recriticality accidents in a thermal neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1995-01-01

    In a damaged light water reactor core (as in the aftermath of a Three-Mile-Island-like core meltdown), water reflood is performed to carry off decay heat. The severely degraded geometry of the fuel debris bed may increase core reactivity with water reflood. Sufficient boron poisoning of the reflood water is therefore very important. One hypothetical accident is the reintroduction of cooling water that is insufficiently borated, resulting in the damaged reactor attaining criticality in this uncontrolled configuration. The goal in simulating this accident is the prediction of the energy release from the resulting transient

  3. Use of PSA for improving the safety of French PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.M.; Chambon, J.L.

    1994-06-01

    Two French PWR Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies were conducted for the standardized PWR series of 900 and 1300 MWe. Both PSA 900 and PSA 1300 are level 1 PSAs, that means their objective is the evaluation of core meltdown frequency. These studies have some specific features, in particular the treatment of shutdown conditions, the treatment of long term post-accidental situations, and a wide use of French experience feedback. The PSAs are used for safety improvements of the French PWRs. Following the PSA results, several modifications to plants concerning the dominant sequences were decided. (R.P.). 2 refs., 4 figs

  4. Normal accidents living with high-risk technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Perrow, Charles

    1984-01-01

    Normal Accidents analyzes the social side of technological risk. Charles Perrow argues that the conventional engineering approach to ensuring safety--building in more warnings and safeguards--fails because systems complexity makes failures inevitable. He asserts that typical precautions, by adding to complexity, may help create new categories of accidents. (At Chernobyl, tests of a new safety system helped produce the meltdown and subsequent fire.) By recognizing two dimensions of risk--complex versus linear interactions, and tight versus loose coupling--this book provides a powerful framework for analyzing risks and the organizations that insist we run them.

  5. Current position on severe accident phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    The phenomena addressed in this lecture are: in-vessel and ex-vessel hydrogen generation; in-vessel and in-containment natural circulation, steam explosions, direct containment heating, core-concrete interaction; debris coolability, containment strength/failure. The following events were modeled: axial and radial power distribution, two-phase level in the core, steam generation in covered section, decay heat generation, convection to gas, cladding oxidation, cold ballooning and rupture, natural circulation between the core and upper plenum, hydrogen generation, core meltdown, reflooding. Differences between PWR and BWR type reactors

  6. Radioactivity inspection of Taiwan for food products imported from Japan after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Huang-Sheng; Huang, Ping-Ji; Wuu, Jyi-Lan; Wang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-11-01

    The 3-11 Earthquake occurred in Japan last year had greatly damaged the lives and properties and also caused the core meltdown accident in the Fukushima nuclear power plant followed by the leakage of radioactive materials into biosphere. In order to protect against the detriment of radiation from foods which were imported from Japan, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) in Taiwan started to conduct radioactivity inspection of food products from Japan after the accident. A total of about 20,000 samples had been tested from March 24 2011 to March 31 2012. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IRSN-ANCCLI partnership. Work session on Complementary safety assessments - November 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachaume, Jean-Luc; Lheureux, Yves; Sene, Monique; Sene, Raymond; Jorel, Martial; Lavarenne, Caroline; Rousseau, Jean-Marie; Rebour, Vincent; Baumont, David; Dupuy, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    After an overview by the ASN of complementary safety assessments and an assessment of 'post-Fukushima' inspections of basic nuclear installations, the contributions (Power Point presentations) of this seminar proposed: the opinion of the Gravelines CLI (local information commission) on the Gravelines complementary safety assessment report, an analysis and discussion by the GSIEN on reports of complementary assessment of safety of nuclear installations with respect to the Fukushima accident, an analysis by the IRSN of complementary safety assessments performed by operators, the IRSN approach to analyze complementary safety assessments, reports on installation conditions, external flooding and seismic hazard, 'meltdown prevention' aspects in the management of accidental situations in EDF reactors

  8. Europe after Fukushima. German perspectives on the future of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, Samuel (ed.); Uekoetter, Frank [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society; Kersten, Jens [Munich Univ. (Germany). Chair of Public Law and Governance; Vogt, Markus [Munich Univ. (Germany). Chair in Christian Social Ehtics

    2012-07-01

    One year after the reactor meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, this volume of RCC Perspectives takes stock of its impact and possible legacy in Europe as part of the Rachel Carson Center's research focus on natural disasters and cultures of risk. While Europe may have been spared radioactive fallout, political and cultural fallout has been significant. Are we witnessing the beginning of the end of the nuclear era? Or beginning of a new one, glimpsed in the shade of authoritarian regimes?.

  9. Fabrication of uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite experimental-fuel-element specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzer, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    A method has been developed for fabricating uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite fuel-element specimens for reactor-core-meltdown studies. The method involves milling and blending the raw materials and densifying the resulting blend by conventional graphite-die hot-pressing techniques. It can be used to fabricate specimens with good physical integrity and material dispersion, with densities of greater than 90% of the theoretical density, and with a uranium carbide particle size of less than 10 μm

  10. Business models and people management in the Indian IT industry from people to profits

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    The global impact of so-called 'offshoring', including of information technology (IT) and related services, continues to be a topic of great interest to academics, practitioners and policy makers. The Indian IT industry has sustained high levels of growth in revenues and employment since the late 1980s. Even following the global financial crisis and meltdown in 2008, the industry has reported growth, albeit at a lower rate. Furthermore, the high rates of technological change and increased competition has forced businesses and managers to be innovative and create new business models.

  11. Overcoming Recession through Effective Business Communication Approaches (A Study in Indian Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi MISHRA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available No business activity can be completed without effective business communication network. The stage of economic turmoil is the most important time for any organization to regroup its strategy. At this juncture, strong, transparent and constant internal and external communication networks play a vital role. The global meltdown is a blessing in disguise for the organizations to invigorate their business communication network. The present paper aims to study multifarious approaches of Business Communication applied by Indian Organizations to combat the turbulent period of recession in a successful manner.

  12. Studies on melt-water-structure interaction during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Okkonen, T.J.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Andersson, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nucl. Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Results of a series of studies, on melt-water-structure interactions which occur during the progression of a core melt-down accident, are described. The emphasis is on the in-vessel interactions and the studies are both experimental and analytical. Since, the studies performed resulted in papers published in proceedings of the technical meetings, and in journals, copies of a set of selected papers are attached to provide details. A summary of the results obtained is provided for the reader who does not, or cannot, venture into the perusal of the attached papers. (au).

  13. Teaching of severe accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants of Tokyo Electric Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo

    2011-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and accompanied tsunami brought about the severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. For 'No more Fukushima', twelve teaching of the accident was pointed out as follows: 1) natural disasters and external events shall be taken into consideration, 2) severe accident shall be included into safety regulation, 3) all possibility of hydrogen explosion shall be excluded, 4) diversity of safety important component and equipment shall be added with sufficient period of outage, 5) siting of multiple units at the same site shall be avoided at quake-prone country like Japan, 6) accident response environment for operators shall be improved, 7) accident convergence termination system shall be established so as to concentrate technical experience and knowledge, 8) off-site center shall be improved, 9) resident evacuation, consumption limit of food, radiation exposure and soil contamination limit shall be decided openly, 10) nuclear regulation and prevention of disaster shall be conducted by unitary organization to gain public trust, 11) fostering of safety culture among relevant enterprises shall be more encouraged and 12) nuclear industry shall develop reactor such as with no core meltdown or no evacuation and environmental contamination even if reactor core would be meltdown. (T. Tanaka)

  14. Users' manual of the LOGIC1 program library for modeling of instrument and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Oikawa, Tetsukuni; Abe, Kiyoharu; Chiba, Takemi.

    1984-09-01

    Accident analysis codes of nuclear power plants usually need models for instrument and control systems to simulate the actuation of active components such as Engineered Safety Features. As a standardized tool for the modeling of those instrument and control systems, a computer program library LOGIC1 has been developed. This library has two functions. One is to memorize the information of the modeled instrument and control systems, and the other is to execute logical operation and determine success/failure of the active components at each step of the transient analyzed. Using LOGIC1 program library, not only automatic control logics but also operator intervention and component degradation can be modeled. LOGIC1 is separate from the thermal-hydraulic analysis codes, which can provide the information on the instrument and control system function. The causal relation among component failures and accident sequences obtained from fault tree and event tree analysis respectively can be directly reflected on the transient analysis. Such a modeling is especially important in the analysis of the core meltdown accident sequence where a lot of operations of safety related systems should be considered. LOGIC1 is being applied to the THALES code system which is under development at JAERI for the analysis of core meltdown accidents. (author)

  15. Poison and diluent system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, W.G.; Ravets, J.M.; Preble, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    A system to prevent supercriticality in nuclear power plants in the unlikely event of a core destructive accident terminating in the nuclear core meltdown is described. The system dilutes and poisons the molten core to maintain subcriticality, and is useful in mobile nuclear power plants, or in nuclear plants subject to seismic disturbances, where the orientation of the nuclear reactor after the accident is unknown. It is also applicable to alleviate the consequences of loss of coolant flow accidents from any cause. Aside from preventing supercriticality, the system serves the dual purpose of acting as a biological shield and/or structural member that reduces the deleterious effects of accidental core impaction, without compromising power plant weight and size constraints. A borated material, with a melting point greater than the fuel melting point, is inserted in the pressure vessel behind an inner wall. In the unlikely event of a core meltdown, the molten fuel melts through the inner wall and is diluted and poisoned by the borated material. In the event the molten fuel melts through the pressure vessel, additional borated material is provided to continue diluting and poisoning

  16. Uranium Dioxides and Debris Fragments Released to the Environment with Cesium-Rich Microparticles from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Asumi; Imoto, Junpei; Suetake, Mizuki; Komiya, Tatsuki; Furuki, Genki; Ikehara, Ryohei; Yamasaki, Shinya; Law, Gareth T W; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Grambow, Bernd; Ewing, Rodney C; Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    2018-03-06

    Trace U was released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) during the meltdowns, but the speciation of the released components of the nuclear fuel remains unknown. We report, for the first time, the atomic-scale characteristics of nanofragments of the nuclear fuels that were released from the FDNPP into the environment. Nanofragments of an intrinsic U-phase were discovered to be closely associated with radioactive cesium-rich microparticles (CsMPs) in paddy soils collected ∼4 km from the FDNPP. The nanoscale fuel fragments were either encapsulated by or attached to CsMPs and occurred in two different forms: (i) UO 2+X nanocrystals of ∼70 nm size, which are embedded into magnetite associated with Tc and Mo on the surface and (ii) Isometric (U,Zr)O 2+X nanocrystals of ∼200 nm size, with the U/(U+Zr) molar ratio ranging from 0.14 to 0.91, with intrinsic pores (∼6 nm), indicating the entrapment of vapors or fission-product gases during crystallization. These results document the heterogeneous physical and chemical properties of debris at the nanoscale, which is a mixture of melted fuel and reactor materials, reflecting the complex thermal processes within the FDNPP reactor during meltdown. Still CsMPs are an important medium for the transport of debris fragments into the environment in a respirable form.

  17. Atucha I nuclear power plant: Probabilistic safety study. Loss-of-coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The plant response to the group of events 'large coolant loss' in order to evaluate the associated risk is analyzed. The event that covers all events of similar sequence due to its evolution features, being also the most demanded, is selected as starting event. The representative event is the 'guillotine type rupture of cold primary branch'. An annual occurrence frequency of 10/year is assumed for this event. The safety systems, when the event occurs, must assure the reactor shutdown and the core cooling, creating a heat sink to remove the decay heat. The annual frequency of core meltdown due to great loss of coolant is obtained multiplying the annual frequency of the starting event by the probability of failure of involved safety systems. By means of failure trees, the following is obtained: a) probability of failure to demand of the boron injection shutdown system = 4 x 10 -2 ; b) probability of failure to demand of the high pressure safety injection = 3 x 10 -3 ; c) probability of emergency cooling system failure = 4.4 x 10 -2 . Therefore, the three possible sequences of core meltdown have the following frequencies: λ 1 = 4 x 10 -6 /year λ 2 = 3 x 10 -7 /year λ 3 = 4.4 x 10 -6 /year. (Author)

  18. Preventing another Chernobyl: codes, practices, and the role of new technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Preventative steps to prevent and mitigate the consequences of a nuclear accident are considered. The national and international legislation now available is mentioned elsewhere in the book. This chapter discusses the role of codes of conduct and personal agreements which could also prevent nuclear accidents. It is suggested that a radical departure from existing nuclear technology is needed. In particular some definite goals and objectives are suggested. The first is that there should be no meltdowns - all reactors must be physically incapable of core meltdown or explosion under any circumstances. This would mean no huge emergency evacuation plans, no need for expensive emergency core cooling systems. No spiralling cost overruns, no nuclear waste problem, no more huge reactors too big for national electrical systems, no military complications, no intractable decommissionings and no quality control problems are also given as goals. Some of these goals could be achieved with inherently safe reactor designs, much smaller reactors and factory assembly, rather than on-site construction. Other suggestions are also made to achieve the proposed new nuclear technology. (U.K.)

  19. Treatment of EBR-I NaK mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory and subsequent land disposal at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Buzzell, J. A.; Holzemer, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Sodium/potassium (NaK) liquid metal coolant, contaminated with fission products from the core meltdown of Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and classified as a mixed waste, has been deactivated and converted to a contact-handled, low-level waste at Argonne's Sodium Component Maintenance Shop and land disposed at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Treatment of the EBR-I NaK involved converting the sodium and potassium to its respective hydroxide via reaction with air and water, followed by conversion to its respective carbonate via reaction with carbon dioxide. The resultant aqueous carbonate solution was solidified in 55-gallon drums. Challenges in the NaK treatment involved processing a mixed waste which was incompletely characterized and difficult to handle. The NaK was highly radioactive, i.e. up to 4.5 R/hr on contact with the mixed waste drums. In addition, the potential existed for plutonium and toxic characteristic metals to be present in the NaK, resultant from the location of the partial core meltdown of EBR-I in 1955. Moreover, the NaK was susceptible to degradation after more than 40 years of storage in unmonitored conditions. Such degradation raised the possibility of energetic exothermic reactions between the liquid NaK and its crust, which could have consisted of potassium superoxide as well as hydrated sodium/potassium hydroxides

  20. Treatment of EBR-I NaK mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory and subsequent land disposal at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Buzzell, J. A.; Holzemer, M. J.

    1998-02-03

    Sodium/potassium (NaK) liquid metal coolant, contaminated with fission products from the core meltdown of Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and classified as a mixed waste, has been deactivated and converted to a contact-handled, low-level waste at Argonne's Sodium Component Maintenance Shop and land disposed at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Treatment of the EBR-I NaK involved converting the sodium and potassium to its respective hydroxide via reaction with air and water, followed by conversion to its respective carbonate via reaction with carbon dioxide. The resultant aqueous carbonate solution was solidified in 55-gallon drums. Challenges in the NaK treatment involved processing a mixed waste which was incompletely characterized and difficult to handle. The NaK was highly radioactive, i.e. up to 4.5 R/hr on contact with the mixed waste drums. In addition, the potential existed for plutonium and toxic characteristic metals to be present in the NaK, resultant from the location of the partial core meltdown of EBR-I in 1955. Moreover, the NaK was susceptible to degradation after more than 40 years of storage in unmonitored conditions. Such degradation raised the possibility of energetic exothermic reactions between the liquid NaK and its crust, which could have consisted of potassium superoxide as well as hydrated sodium/potassium hydroxides.

  1. MELPROG/TRAC: update and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henninger, R.J.; Kelly, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The first complete, coupled, and mechanistic analysis of a core meltdown sequence has been made with MELPROG-PWR/MOD1 and MELPROG/TRAC. The sequence analyzed was a station blackout accident for the Surry plant. Through vessel failure, all important aspects of the meltdown sequence were calculated. This version of MELPROG permits a full two-dimensional treatment of the in-vessel phenomena. Natural circulation can thus be modeled. Comparison to one-dimensional MELPROG and MARCH calculations shows that natural circulation reduces the rate of core heating, but increases the rate of heating of upper plenum structures and primary piping. This increased heating can inhibit fission product deposition and may lead to an early failure of the primary system. Because of uncertainty, sensitivity studies were performed to assess the relative importance of modeling assumptions. Changes in the modeling of the initial fuel rod melting and relocation were found to vary the hydrogen source by a factor of 2 and alter the timing of key events. These results imply that accurate and mechanistic modeling is important for severe accident sequence analysis

  2. A status report on the integral fast reactor fuels and safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor (ALMR) concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The IFR program is specifically responsible for the irradiation performance, advanced core design, safety analysis, and development of the fuel cycle for the US Department of Energy's ALMR program. The basic elements of the IFR concept are (a) metallic fuel, (b) liquid-sodium cooling, (c) modular, pool-type reactor configuration, (d) an integral fuel cycle based upon pyrometallurgical processing. The most significant safety aspects of the IFR program result from its unique fuel design, a ternary alloy of uranium, plutonium, and zirconium. This fuel is based on experience gained through > 25 yr operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) with a uranium alloy metallic fuel. The ultimate criteria for fuel pin design is the overall integrity at the target burnup. The probability of core meltdown is remote; however, a theoretical possibility of core meltdown remains. The next major step in the IFR development program will be a full-scale pyroprocessing demonstration to be carried out in conjunction with EBR-II. The IFR fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing will also have a dramatic impact on waste management options and on actinide recycling

  3. MELMRK 2. 0: A description of computer models and results of code testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittman, R.S. (ed.) (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Denny, V.; Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Atlos, CA (United States))

    1992-05-31

    An advanced version of the MELMRK computer code has been developed that provides detailed models for conservation of mass, momentum, and thermal energy within relocating streams of molten metallics during meltdown of Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor assemblies. In addition to a mechanistic treatment of transport phenomena within a relocating stream, MELMRK 2.0 retains the MOD1 capability for real-time coupling of the in-depth thermal response of participating assembly heat structure and, further, augments this capability with models for self-heating of relocating melt owing to steam oxidation of metallics and fission product decay power. As was the case for MELMRK 1.0, the MOD2 version offers state-of-the-art numerics for solving coupled sets of nonlinear differential equations. Principal features include application of multi-dimensional Newton-Raphson techniques to accelerate convergence behavior and direct matrix inversion to advance primitive variables from one iterate to the next. Additionally, MELMRK 2.0 provides logical event flags for managing the broad range of code options available for treating such features as (1) coexisting flow regimes, (2) dynamic transitions between flow regimes, and (3) linkages between heatup and relocation code modules. The purpose of this report is to provide a detailed description of the MELMRK 2.0 computer models for melt relocation. Also included are illustrative results for code testing, as well as an integrated calculation for meltdown of a Mark 31a assembly.

  4. MELMRK 2.0: A description of computer models and results of code testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittman, R.S. [ed.] [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Denny, V.; Mertol, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Los Atlos, CA (United States)

    1992-05-31

    An advanced version of the MELMRK computer code has been developed that provides detailed models for conservation of mass, momentum, and thermal energy within relocating streams of molten metallics during meltdown of Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor assemblies. In addition to a mechanistic treatment of transport phenomena within a relocating stream, MELMRK 2.0 retains the MOD1 capability for real-time coupling of the in-depth thermal response of participating assembly heat structure and, further, augments this capability with models for self-heating of relocating melt owing to steam oxidation of metallics and fission product decay power. As was the case for MELMRK 1.0, the MOD2 version offers state-of-the-art numerics for solving coupled sets of nonlinear differential equations. Principal features include application of multi-dimensional Newton-Raphson techniques to accelerate convergence behavior and direct matrix inversion to advance primitive variables from one iterate to the next. Additionally, MELMRK 2.0 provides logical event flags for managing the broad range of code options available for treating such features as (1) coexisting flow regimes, (2) dynamic transitions between flow regimes, and (3) linkages between heatup and relocation code modules. The purpose of this report is to provide a detailed description of the MELMRK 2.0 computer models for melt relocation. Also included are illustrative results for code testing, as well as an integrated calculation for meltdown of a Mark 31a assembly.

  5. X-ray fluorescence microtomography of SiC shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ice, G.E.; Chung, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nagedolfeizi, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    TRISCO coated fuel particles contain a small kernel of nuclear fuel encapsulated by alternating layers of C and SiC. The TRISCO coated fuel particle is used in an advanced fuel designed for passive containment of the radioactive isotopes. The SiC layer provides the primary barrier for radioactive elements in the kernel. The effectiveness of this barrier layer under adverse conditions is critical to containment. The authors have begun the study of SiC shells from TRISCO fuel. They are using the fluorescent microprobe beamline 10.3.1. The shells under evaluation include some which have been cycled through a simulated core melt-down. The C buffer layers and nuclear kernels of the coated fuel have been removed by laser drilling through the SiC and then exposing the particle to acid. Elements of interest include Ru, Sb, Cs, Ce and Eu. The radial distribution of these elements in the SiC shells can be attributed to diffusion of elements in the kernel during the melt-down. Other elements in the shells originate during the fabrication of the TRISCO particles.

  6. The potential application of rice bran wax oleogel to replace solid fat and enhance unsaturated fat content in ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulim Botega, Daniele C; Marangoni, Alejandro G; Smith, Alexandra K; Goff, H Douglas

    2013-09-01

    The development of structure in ice cream, characterized by its smooth texture and resistance to collapse during melting, depends, in part, on the presence of solid fat during the whipping and freezing steps. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential application of 10% rice bran wax (RBW) oleogel, comprised 90% high-oleic sunflower oil and 10% RBW, to replace solid fat in ice cream. A commercial blend of 80% saturated mono- and diglycerides and 20% polysorbate 80 was used as the emulsifier. Standard ice cream measurements, cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to evaluate the formation of structure in ice cream. RBW oleogel produced higher levels of overrun when compared to a liquid oil ice cream sample, creating a lighter sample with good texture and appearance. However, those results were not associated with higher meltdown resistance. Microscopy revealed larger aggregation of RBW oleogel fat droplets at the air cell interface and distortion of the shape of air cells and fat droplets. Although the RBW oleogel did not develop sufficient structure in ice cream to maintain shape during meltdown when a mono- and diglycerides and polysorbate 80 blend was used as the emulsifier, micro- and ultrastructure investigations suggested that RBW oleogel did induce formation of a fat globule network in ice cream, suggesting that further optimization could lead to an alternative to saturated fat sources for ice cream applications. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Technical bases for estimating fission product behavior during LWR accidents. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The objective of this report is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the public with a description of the best technical information currently available for estimating the release of radioactive material during postulated reactor accidents, and to identify where gaps exist in our knowledge. This report focuses on those low probability-high consequence accidents involving severe damage to the reactor core and core meltdown that dominate the risk to the public. Furthermore, in this report particular emphasis is placed on the accident behavior of radioactive iodine, as (1) radioiodine is predicted to be a major contributor to public exposure, (2) current regulatory accident analysis procedures focus on iodine, and (3) several technical issues have been raised recently about the magnitude of iodine release. The generation, transport, and attenuation of aerosols were also investigated in some detail to assess their effect on fission product release estimates and to determine the performance of engineered safety features under accident conditions exceeding their design bases

  8. Fukushima. Five years on - FAQs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    On 11 March 2011, at 2:46 p.m. local time (6.46 a.m. CET), an earthquake measuring 9 on the Richter scale hit the east coast of Japan. The quake caused a tsunami, with waves as high as 38 metres, which led to large-scale flooding and destruction of roads, the power supply and other infrastructure along Japan's eastern seaboard. The earthquake and tsunami also struck several nuclear power plants. Fukushima Daiichi sustained the worst damage, triggering a chain of events which led to core meltdown, major hydrogen explosions and massive releases of radiation. Below, the Oeko-Institut answers the key questions about the disaster's timeline, latest assessments of the events, and the current situation in Fukushima.

  9. Research and experience report 2008. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2008. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-04-15

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reviews research into regulatory safety and the work done during 2008. In the area of reactor safety, research - in addition to research into materials - was concentrated primarily on safety and reliability analyses. ENSI supports projects looking at ageing mechanisms such as fatigue, corrosion, embrittlement and the development of cracks under a range of environmental conditions. Topics such as the interaction between core meltdown and water and concrete as well as the development of methods and computer codes are covered. In the area of transport and waste management, ENSI is focussing its efforts on research into the geological strata suitable for the final storage of highly radioactive, long-lived waste. Human and organisational factors and safety culture now account for an increasing part of the work of this regulatory body. Appendices present an overview of work done, international activities, publications and the basic principles of the new ENSI guidelines.

  10. Major risks and financial guarantees provided by the State in France; Les risques majeurs et la garantie financiere de l'Etat en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brassard, Guy [92 - Boulogne-Billancourt, (France)

    2012-01-15

    France's system for indemnifying damage from natural catastrophe is exemplary, whether for floods, storms, or subsidence. However, France is not equipped with the financial capacity to deal with the damage resulting from an exceptional disaster, such as an earthquake on the Mediterranean coast, or a nuclear meltdown. Major catastrophes could be a significant risk to the financial stability of the State today, because the State is in fact the ultimate insurer of its citizens and its institutions. It would be wise to built up reserves in order to enhance the financial resources of the State and to provide a uniform guarantee covering major risks, whatever the cause of the damage may be. (author)

  11. Articulations of Health and Poverty Among Women on WIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehya, Nadine A; Dutta, Mohan J

    2015-01-01

    With the global financial meltdown, the crisis of poverty has deepened in communities across the United States. This essay reports results from a culture-centered project on fostering spaces for listening to the voices of the poor in CrossRoads County, Indiana. It highlights the intersections of health and poverty as they emerge from the narratives of mothers utilizing the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Depression, humiliation, and inaccessibility to health care and healthy living outline the struggles of women as they negotiate their access to health. The articulations of agency are situated around competing cultural narratives that, on the one hand, draw on the threads of individual responsibility which resonate through mainstream discourses of poverty in the United States and, on the other hand, interrogate the structural erasure of the basic capacities of health.

  12. Severe accident analysis using MARCH 1.0 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, A.C.F.

    1987-09-01

    The description and utilization of the MARCH 1.0 computer code, which aim to analyse physical phenomena associated with core meltdown accidents in PWR type reactors, are presented. The primary system is modeled as a single volume which is partitioned into a gas (steam and hydrogen) region and a water region. March predicts blowdown from the primary system in single phase. Based on results of the probabilistic safety analysis for the Zion and Indian Point Nuclear Power Plants, the S 2 HFX sequence accident for Angra-1 reactor is studied. The S 2 HFX sequence means that the loss of coolant accident occurs through small break in primary system with bot total failures of the reactor safety system and containment in yours recirculation modes, leading the core melt and the containment failure due to overpressurization. The obtained results were considered reasonable if compared with the results obtained for the Zion and Indian Point nuclear power plants. (Author) [pt

  13. Observations on PRA and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Y.-C.; Shieh, S.-L.

    2004-01-01

    An overview on the experience of PRA and its prospective application in Taiwan's three nuclear power plants is presented. Through the PRA, plant design improvements are performed and several engineering findings are illuminated. The sensitivity study including the internal, seismic, and typhoon events are conducted to justify items that can significantly reduce core meltdown risk. Its resulted plant betterment plans are thus highlighted accordingly. For PRA application, a risk-based inspection program for allocating inspection human resources has been resulted following the importance ranking of each component. The developing risk-based regulation to rationalize technical specification and maintenance program will also be entailed. To enhance the accuracy of the PRA model and its reproducibility, several issues are considered to have high priority for improvement such as external event data and analyses, uncertainty, common mode failure, human reliability, and the relative component importance. Highlight of their significance along with some typical sensitivity analyses are discussed for further investigation. (author)

  14. Volume reduction options for the management of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Lerch, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    This paper examines volume reduction options that are now or soon will be available for low-level wastes. These wastes generally are in the form of combustible solids, noncombustible solids, and wet wastes (solid/liquid). Initially, the wastes are collected and stored onsite. Preconditioning may be required, e.g., sorting, shredding, and classifying the solids into combustible and noncombustible fractions. The volume of combustible solids can be reduced by compaction, incineration/pyrolysis, acid digestion, or molten salt combustion. Options for reducing the volume of noncombustible solids include compaction, size reduction and decontamination, meltdown-casting, dissolution and electropolishing. Burnable wet wastes (e.g., organic wastes) can be evaporated or combusted; nonburnable wet wastes can be treated by various evaporative or nonevaporative processes. All radioactive waste processing operations result in some equipment contamination and the production of additional radioactively contaminated wastes (secondary wastes). 23 figures

  15. Safety evaluation report in the matter of Offshore Power Systems Floating Nuclear Plants (1-8). Docket No. STN 50-437

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    The staff has performed an evaluation of a refractory sacrificial bed, called a core ladle, proposed by Offshore Power Systems (OPS) to be installed in Floating Nuclear Plants (FNPs) to delay the melt-through penetration of molten core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown accident. The core ladle design as proposed by OPS is in response to the staff's manufacturing license Condition 4 given in the Final Environmental Statement, Part III, NUREG-0502, dated December 1978 (FES-III). This condition requires that a pad constructed of magnesium oxide, or other equivalent refractory material, be installed in the FNP structure within the lower reactor cavity. The material must provide increased resistance to melt-through by the molten reactor core, must not react with core debris to form a large volume of gases, and must not have any deleterious effects on safety

  16. THE IMPACT OF GLOBAL AGING ON ASSET PRICES AND RETURNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Dumitru SACALĂ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have tried to model the connection between the structure of population and the financial markets, showing the possibility of a future meltdown in the financial markets, via lower savings and investments given the reaching of the baby-boom cohorts at the age of retirement. In general the research has focused on the case of more industrialized countries, where the aging phenomenon is more felt in the present. The case of Central and Eastern European countries was somehow left aside, although the issue of aging should be an important one, considering also the current state of developing CEE capital markets. Our empirical work, based on the Romanian experience, suggests also that the demographic dynamics have had a detectable impact on the domestic stock market.

  17. Uscire dalla crisi finanziaria statunitense: la politica domina l’economia nella Nuova Economia Politica.(Resolving the US Financial Crisis: Politics Dominates Economics in the New Political Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kregel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Most economists expected that the “Great Recession” produced by the financial meltdown of 2008 would usher in a resurgence of traditional Keynesian economics and a decline of what has come to be called “market fundamentalism”. By contrast, also due to the inadequate size of the 2009 stimulus package, the resurgence of support for Keynesian expenditure policies has been extremely short lived. However, the negative popular and political reaction should not have come as a surprise, at least for three reasons: the design of the Obama stimulus plan and its difference from the expenditure policies of the Roosevelt Administration; the political environment that has eviscerated fiscal policy and placed monetary policy at the centre of economic policy and produced “debt driven” growth; the difference between policies appropriate to treating an income deflation and a debt deflation.   JEL: G01, B50, N12, H12

  18. The modular pebble bed nuclear reactor - the preferred new sustainable energy source for electricity, hydrogen and potable water production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a joint project of Massachusetts Institute of technology, Nu-Tec Inc. and Proto Power. The elegant simplicity of graphite moderated pebble bed reactor is the basis for the 'generation four' nuclear power plants. High Temperature Gas Cooled (HTGC) nuclear power plant have the potential to become the preferred base load sustainable energy source for the new millennium. The great attraction of these helium cooled 'Generation Four' nuclear plant can be summarised as follows: Factory assembly line production; Modularity and ease of delivery to site; High temperature Brayton Cycle ideally suited for cogeneration of electricity, potable water and hydrogen; Capital and operating costs competitive with hydrocarbon plant; Design is inherently meltdown proof and proliferation resistant

  19. Reactor containment depressurization and filtration equipment for use in the case of a serious accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.

    1987-06-01

    A study was carried out under the aegis of the OECD into filtered vented containment systems which permit depressurization of the containment and filtration of the effluents released to the environment, in the event of a major accident with a pressurized water reactor (PWR) (or BWR or CANDU type reactors) involving core meltdown, with a view to minimizing the consequences. This paper describes the various systems examined which could possibly be used for this purpose. These comprised the French robust sand filtration system, the Swedish FILTRA system, the vacuum containment and discharge and emergency filtration system used by the CANDU plants of the Ontario-Hydro electricity company in Canada and the BWR pressure-suppression pounds. The positions of the various national authorities regarding incorporation of such systems into nuclear power plants, the design and technical principles underlying the systems, the procedures and criteria for their use and their advantages and disadvantages are examined [fr

  20. Risk of the research reactor BER II in Berlin; Risiken des Berliner Experimentierreaktors BER II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulitz, Henrik; Hoevener, Barbara; Rosen, Alex

    2015-04-20

    The research reactor BER II is sited at the periphery of Berlin in the neighborhood of residential areas. The operational license is limited until December 31, 2019. The reactor is funded by the Federal Government (90%) and the city of Berlin (10%). The stress test has shown that the reactor is not secured against an aircraft crash (airliner or fast flying military jet), meltdown with remarkable radiological consequences to the public would be the consequence. Further hazards result from the radioactive waste transport, explosions and fires. The emergency measures cannot be considered to be sufficient. The city of Berlin would not be able to fulfill the required measures in case of a radiation accident.

  1. Transient moisture migration in concrete during severe reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Shiina, Y.

    1984-01-01

    In the most severe hypothetical core heatup accidents in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors, the heatup of the concrete reactor vessel can result in gas release from degrading concrete which can ultimately lead to containment building failure. This gas release is largely affected by the moisture migration during concrete heatup. Moisture migration in concrete is also of interest in Light Water Reactors (LWR) core meltdown accidents. Therefore, the general problem of moisture migration in a heated concrete slab has been analyzed, including the effect of water evaporating close to the heated surface and recondensing in cooler regions. Results for early phases of core heatup transients are being given. Their implication on the accident progression is being discussed

  2. Soil surface decontamination and revegetation progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of work by Rockwell Hanford Operations related to large-area decontamination efforts. Rockwell has a Program Office which manages the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) efforts. Part of the program is involved with large-surface area cleanup in conjunction with surveillance and maintenance of retired sites and facilities. The other part is the decontamination and decommissioning of structures. There are 322 surplus contaminated sites and facilities for which Rockwell has responsibility on the Hanford Site. A Program Office was established for a disciplined approach to cleanup of these retired sites. There are three major projects: the first is surveillance and maintenance of the sites prior to D and D, the project under which the radiation area cleanup is contained. Another project is for contaminated-equipment volume reduction; size reduction with arc saw cut-up and volume reduction with a vacuum furnace meltdown are being used. The third major project is structural D and D

  3. Limitations of the government budget constraint: Users vs. issuers of the currency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelton Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The financial crisis and ensuing economic meltdown has led to sharp increases in the deficits and debt levels of many advanced economies. The run-up in public sector indebtedness helped to restore private sector balance sheets, laying the foundation for economic recovery in these regions. But the so-called “sovereign” debt crisis in the Eurozone has undermined the fiscal resolve that has, thus far, kept truly sovereign governments from slipping into a bona fide depression. Fearful of becoming the next Greece, governments that could allow an unlimited fiscal adjustment to restore full employment, are methodically weakening their fiscal support mechanisms and setting themselves on a path to becoming the next Japan.

  4. Investigation: revelations about Three Mile Island disaster raise doubts over nuclear plant safety: a special facing south investigation by Sue Sturgis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgis, Sue

    2009-01-01

    A series of mishaps in a reactor at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant led to the 1979 meltdown of almost half the uranium fuel and uncontrolled releases of radiation into the air and surrounding Susquehanna River. It was the single worst disaster ever to befall the U.S. nuclear power industry. Health physics technician Randall Thompson's story about what he witnessed while monitoring radiation there after the incident is being publicly disclosed for the first time. It is supported by a growing body of evidence and it contradicts the U.S. government's contention that the TMI accident posed no threat to the public. Thompson and his wife, a nuclear health physicist who also worked at TMI in the disaster's wake, warn that the government's failure to acknowledge the full scope of the disaster is leading officials to underestimate the risks posed by a new generation of nuclear power plants.

  5. Fukushima Daiichi Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jankovsky, Zachary Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Radionuclide inventories are generated to permit detailed analyses of the Fukushima Daiichi meltdowns. This is necessary information for severe accident calculations, dose calculations, and source term and consequence analyses. Inventories are calculated using SCALE6 and compared to values predicted by international researchers supporting the OECD/NEA's Benchmark Study on the Accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (BSAF). Both sets of inventory information are acceptable for best-estimate analyses of the Fukushima reactors. Consistent nuclear information for severe accident codes, including radionuclide class masses and core decay powers, are also derived from the SCALE6 analyses. Key nuclide activity ratios are calculated as functions of burnup and nuclear data in order to explore the utility for nuclear forensics and support future decommissioning efforts.

  6. Der Vision atomtechnischer Verheißungen gefolgt: Von der Euphorie zu ersten Protesten – die zivile Nutzung der Kernkraft in Deutschland seit den 1950er Jahren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleitsmann, Rolf-Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the 1950s, the nuclear age was announced and propagated worldwide as a future blessing for mankind. “Atoms for peace” was the promising slogan, indicating that Western industrial nations denying the atomic salvation would be seriously threatening their own and the whole West’s economic prosperity. West Germany heavily embraced this technological utopia and relied on the development of nuclear technology since the 1950s. Despite continuous grassroot protest especially in West Germany, this resulted in a path dependency of a technical momentum (Thomas P. Hughes in the system of the large-scale energy production until today, which only might have come to an end as a result of Fukushima’s super meltdown.

  7. Safety-related LWR research. Annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    The main topics in this annual report 1989 are phenomena of heavy fuel damage and single aspects of a core meltdown accident. The examined single aspects refer to aerosol behavior and filter engineering and to methods for assessment and minimization of the radiological consequences of reactor accidents. Different contributions to selected, safety-related problems of an advanced pressurized-water reactor complete the topic spectrum. The annual report 1989 describes the progress of the research work wich was carried out in the area of safety research by institutes and departments of the KfK, and on behalf of the KfK by external institutions. The individual contributions represent the status of work at the end of the year under review, 1989. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Next nuclear gamble: transportation and storage of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnikoff, M.

    1983-01-01

    Accidents during transport of nuclear waste are more threatening - though less likely - than a reactor meltdown because transportation accidents could occur in the middle of a populous city, affecting more people and property than a plant accident, according to the Council on Economic Priorities, a non-profit public service research organization. Transportation, as presently practiced, is unsafe. Shipping containers, called casks, are poorly designed and constructed, CEP says. The problem needs attention because the number of casks filled with nuclear waste on the nation's highways could increase a hundred times during the next 15 years under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, which calls for storage areas. Recommendations, both technical and regulatory, for reducing the risks are presented

  9. The why of things: causality in science, medicine, and life

    CERN Document Server

    Rabins, Peter V.

    2013-01-01

    Why was there a meltdown at the Fukushima power plant? Why do some people get cancer and not others? Why is global warming happening? Why does one person get depressed in the face of life's vicissitudes while another finds resilience? Questions like these -- questions of causality -- form the basis of modern scientific inquiry, posing profound intellectual and methodological challenges for researchers in the physical, natural, biomedical, and social sciences. In this groundbreaking book, noted psychiatrist and author Peter Rabins offers a conceptual framework for analyzing daunting questions of causality. Navigating a lively intellectual voyage between the shoals of strict reductionism and relativism, Rabins maps a three-facet model of causality and applies it to a variety of questions in science, medicine, economics, and more. Throughout this book, Rabins situates his argument within relevant scientific contexts, such as quantum mechanics, cybernetics, chaos theory, and epigenetics. A renowned communicator o...

  10. A synopsis of experimental activities on small-break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, D.

    1984-01-01

    Through reactor safety studies like WASH 1400 or the ''Deutsche Risiko-Studie'' the attention has turned from large break loss of coolant accidents to small breaks because of the high contribution of this type of accidents to core meltdown. But only after the TMI-2 accident were also the main activities in the experimental fields shifted world-wide to the small break LOCAs. Since TMI numerous research programs have either been finished or are underway. This review paper presents: a classification of the various types of transients according to break size; a discussion of major physical phenomena associated with a small break LOCA, and a description of a few selected research programs and the most important results achieved. (author)

  11. Transient dissolution of a steel structure in an aluminum melt pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Yang, B.C.; Cho, D.H.; Tan, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model is developed to describe the process of transient dissolution of the interior surface of a reactor bottom head in a pool of molten aluminum resulting from a severe core meltdown accident. The model accounts for the transient heat conduction in the steel structure, the mass transfer due to dissolution, and the time variations of the bulk pool temperature and concentration. Results indicate that over the range of accident conditions considered in the study, the bulk pool always attains a saturated state while the interface temperature approaches an asymptotic value. Once this saturated state is achieved, no further dissolution would take place. For a given pool inventory, the critical time for achieving the saturated state is found to be a function of the Nusselt number and the dissolution coefficient. On the other hand, the fraction of the steel structure that is dissolved before reaching the saturated state is a function of the Nusselt number alone

  12. Support for major hypotheses in invasion biology is uneven and declining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Jeschke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Several major hypotheses have been proposed to explain and predict biological invasions, but the general applicability of these hypotheses is largely unknown, as most of them have not been evaluated using a standard approach across taxonomic groups and habitats. We offer such an evaluation for six selected leading hypotheses. Our global literature review reveals that those hypotheses that consider interactions of exotic invaders with their new environment (invasional meltdown, novel weapons, enemy release are better supported by empirical evidence than other hypotheses (biotic resistance, island susceptibility, tens rule. We also show that empirical support for the six hypotheses has declined over time, and that support differs among taxonomic groups and habitats. Our results have implications for basic and applied research, policy making, and invasive species management, as their effectiveness depends on sound hypotheses.

  13. Preliminary design of a borax internal core-catcher for a gas cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1976-09-01

    Preliminary thermal calculations show that a core-catcher appears to be feasible, which is able to cope with the complete meltdown of the core and blankets of a 1,000 MWe GCFR. This core-catcher is based on borax (Na 2 B 4 O 7 ) as dissolving material of the oxide fuel and of the fission products occuring in oxide form. The borax is contained in steel boxes forming a 2.1 meter thick slab on the base of the reactor cavity inside the prestressed concrete reactor vessel, just underneath the reactor core. The fission products are dispersed in the pool formed by the liquid borax. The heat power density in the pool is conveniently reduced and the resulting heat fluxes at the borders of the pool can be safely carried away through the PCRV liner and its water cooling system. (orig.) [de

  14. Adding prefilters to French containment venting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, M.V. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Boissieu, P. de

    1995-12-31

    To avoid the need for extra biological shielding round the sand-bed filters in its Pressurized Water Reactor containment venting systems, Electricite de France is installing prefilters. The sand-bed filters filters installed on all French PWRs were intended to retain the source term of radioactivity for 24 hours after the beginning of a core meltdown. But because of its size the sand filter is outside the containment and therefore the source term, which may be inside the sand filter, could produce very high radiation levels on site. To solve this problem a prefilter has been designed. This is to be located inside the containment and aims to retain the source term there. (Author).

  15. Analysis of articles in weekly magazines on scientific issues related to Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Kazumi; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2012-01-01

    The large area was polluted by the radioactive fallout released after the nuclear fuel meltdown of Fukushima first nuclear plant of Tokyo electric power company. The news media that reported the accident were required to have scientific knowledge on the structure of the nuclear reactor and the physics and health issues of the radioactivity. In this paper, we focus on how the weekly magazines reported this critical accident. The weekly magazines are not regarded as a neutral news media. Rather, their articles in general strongly reflect the editorial opinions. In this sense, the weekly magazines are 'biased media'. So, there are many points to discuss from the view point of the science communication. We analyze the articles appeared in the seven major weekly magazines published during the first half year after the earthquake. We found that the differences in the scientific literacy between magazines are reflected, for example, in selection of the experts who made comments in articles. (author)

  16. Safety principles and requirements for designing MHTGR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Li Cheng

    1994-01-01

    A high inherent safety for the MHTGR is characterized by the fact that the limited temperature for fuel elements of approx. 1600 deg C will not be exceeded under any imaginary accident conditions. The core melt-down accident therefore does not occur at all. For the nuclear plant design, however, extensive use of the inherent/passive safety features must be made and the safety principles must be met. Of course, the minimum safety requirements to a safety level at least shall be equivalent to that of current LWR. In the paper two aspects are discussed: design features of the MHTGR nuclear power plant, and the optimization of inherent/passive safety features. Finally, the principal design basis accidents to be analysed in the design phase are briefly presented. 8 refs

  17. Measures for removing hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baukal, W.; Koehling, A.; Langer, G.; Poeschel, E.

    1984-01-01

    Basis for the investigation is a 1300-MW-PWR. The evolution of hydrogen was studied in design-basis and three hypothetical accident scenarios, the loss-of-coolant accident, the failure of emergency cooling system and core meltdown. It was shown that in the case of release rates of 4m 3 H 2 /h, the known post-accident hydrogen removal systems can be used and at medium rates up to 80 m 3 H 2 /h recombines of nuclear and non-nuclear industries are suitable under certain conditions. In the case of larger release rates it appears useful to apply a small recombiner of the type of the post-accident hydrogen removal system combined with an other hydrogen countermeasures. Recommendations are being made for the installation of an accident-proof hydrogen measuring system. (DG) [de

  18. Urban agriculture in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Clemence Mosha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Botswana, a middle-income country, is experiencing a sluggish economic growth and a rapid urbanisation which has brought in its wake high unemployment, poverty and food insecurity. This has led some people to engage in subsistence and commercial urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA to address these problems. However, in spite of its known advantages, uptake of UPA has been low for a number of reasons including: high GDP before the economic meltdown of recent years; a harsh climate; lack of water; poor access to land; and over-reliance on generous government handouts. Nevertheless, the extent of its practice and its contribution to food security – albeit modest – shows that it is a sector that needs to be encouraged and supported. Both central and local government can play a big role by providing land and infrastructure, and also by implementing an enabling policy and regulatory environment which promotes small- and medium-scale urban food production.

  19. Efficacy of Policy Response to the Financial and Economic Crisis (A Case Study of the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazeem O Salaam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This piece of work seeks to perform detailed review and analysis of those factors that precipitated global financial and economic crises in 2008 with a focus on the United Kingdom economy. Impacts of the crises from both micro and macro economy perspectives are also analysed in conjunction with the sudden change in government policies from less rigid fiscal prudence, price stability, unsupportive employment policies as well as weak financial services supervision to unconventional stiff fiscal and monetary policies as well as hard core financial regulations with a primary aim to cleaning up the economic and the financial mess that characterised the meltdown. To finalise this work, it is concluded that efficiency of policy actions to address the economic menace to a large extent, helped British Economy to get out of the crisis despite that all the measures adopted were not considered to be perfect in its entirety. Other potential areas of study are also identified.

  20. Selected source term topics. Report to CSNI by an OECD/NEA Group of experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    CSNI Report 136 summarizes the results of the work performed by the Group of Experts on the Source Term and Environmental Consequences (PWG4) during the period extending from 1983 and 1986. This report is complementary to Part 1, 'Technical Status of the Source Term' of CSNI Report 135, 'Report to CSNI on Source Term Assessment, Containment atmosphere control systems, and accident consequences'; it considers in detail a number of very specific issues thought to be important in the source term area. It consists of: an executive summary (prepared by the Chairman of the Group), a section on conclusions and recommendations, and five technical chapters (fission product chemistry in the primary circuit of a LWR during severe accidents; resuspension/re-entrainment of aerosols in LWRs following a meltdown accident; iodine chemistry under severe accident conditions; effects of combustion, steam explosions and pressurized melt ejection on fission product behaviour; radionuclide removal by pool scrubbing), a technical annex and two appendices

  1. Core catchers for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, Micheal; Gardner, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    A core catcher for containing nuclear core debris in the event of a breach in the reactor pressure vessel caused by a core meltdown is described. It has a multilayer sandwich construction comprising a middle layer of interlocking tongue-and-groove jointed refractory (e.g. zirconia) tiles or bricks sandwiched between inner and outer steel plates in the form of domes. The refractory bricks are fixed against movement relative to each other and the inner and outer steel plates by means of refractory cement. The inner steel plate is sacrificial in the event that it comes into contact with molten nuclear material but gives the sandwich construction greater shock resistance during normal operational service. The outer steel plate provides the main structural support for the core catcher. (author)

  2. LSA Large Area Silicon Sheet Task Continuous Liquid Feed Czochralski Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegl, G.

    1979-01-01

    A process for the continuous growth of crystals by the Czochralski method, suitable for producing single silicon crystals for use in solar cells was studied. Continuous growth is the growth of 100 Kg of single silicon crystals, 10 cm in diameter, from one container. A furnace with continuous liquid replenishment of the growth crucible, accomplished by a melt-down system and a liquid transfer mechanism, with associated automatic feedback controls was developed. Elements of the transfer system were further developed and tested during actual transfer runs. Considerable simplification of the heating element of the transfer tube was achieved. Accuracy and reliability of the temperature sensor, which is part of the power input control system for the transfer tube, was improved. Electrical and thermal effectiveness were increased while assembly of the transfer tube system was further simplified.

  3. Method for consequence calculations for severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, F.

    1988-01-01

    This report was commissioned by the Swedish State Power Board. The report contains a calculation of radiation doses in the surroundings caused by a theoretical core meltdown accident at Ringhals reactor No 3/4. The accident sequence chosen for the calcualtions was a release caused by total power failure. The calculations were made by means of the PLUCON4 code. A decontamination factor of 500 is used to account for the scrubber effect. Meteorological data for two years from the Ringhals meteorological tower were analysed to find representative weather situations. As typical weather, Pasquill D, was chosen with a wind speed of 10 m/s, and as extreme weather, Pasquill E, with a wind speed of 2 m/s. 19 refs. (author)

  4. Bank capitalization and market share in the Nigeria deposit banks(1986-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikpefan Ochei Ailemen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of shareholders’ fund on bank performance (market share in the Nigerian deposit banks (1986-2006. The study captured performance (market share and employed cross sectional and time series of bank data obtained from Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN.The formulated models were estimated using ordinary least square regression method. The study found a strong relationship between bank capital funds and bank deposits, loans and advances (proxies for market concentration. The result shows that shareholders’ fund and total assets of the banks have positive and significant impact in influencing the level of total deposits. The implication of this study, among others, is that adequate shareholders fund can serve as a veritable stimulant in strengthening the performance of Nigeria commercial banks and also heighten the confidence of customers especially in this era of global economic melt-down that has taken its toll in the Nigerian financial system

  5. Research and experience report 2008. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reviews research into regulatory safety and the work done during 2008. In the area of reactor safety, research - in addition to research into materials - was concentrated primarily on safety and reliability analyses. ENSI supports projects looking at ageing mechanisms such as fatigue, corrosion, embrittlement and the development of cracks under a range of environmental conditions. Topics such as the interaction between core meltdown and water and concrete as well as the development of methods and computer codes are covered. In the area of transport and waste management, ENSI is focussing its efforts on research into the geological strata suitable for the final storage of highly radioactive, long-lived waste. Human and organisational factors and safety culture now account for an increasing part of the work of this regulatory body. Appendices present an overview of work done, international activities, publications and the basic principles of the new ENSI guidelines

  6. Some consideration on reviewing of WWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Heki

    1993-01-01

    The main points of NPP safety are to prevent core melt-down and to mitigate the divergence of radioactive materials to the atmosphere in general. However, destroying of the reactor building may cause damages of various mechanical and other components and piping systems, and these failures may proceed to LOCA and other critical failures of safety related items. The main items that are considered in view of upgrading the existing WWER type reactors are: buildings, emergency power supply systems, anchoring devices and concrete structures, mechanical components, water storage, piping support, civil engineering structure. This pipe describes the method for improving seismic capacity of the operating NPPs and to keep their safety under seismic conditions

  7. Numerical calculation of transient field effects in quenching superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwerg, Nikolai; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    The maximum obtainable magnetic induction of accelerator magnets, relying on normal conducting cables and iron poles, is limited to around 2 T because of ohmic losses and iron saturation. Using superconducting cables, and employing permeable materials merely to reduce the fringe field, this limit can be exceeded and fields of more than 10 T can be obtained. A quench denotes the sudden transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state. The drastic increase in electrical resistivity causes ohmic heating. The dissipated heat yields a temperature rise in the coil and causes the quench to propagate. The resulting high voltages and excessive temperatures can result in an irreversible damage of the magnet - to the extend of a cable melt-down. The quench behavior of a magnet depends on numerous factors, e.g. the magnet design, the applied magnet protection measures, the external electrical network, electrical and thermal material properties, and induced eddy current losses. The analysis and optimizat...

  8. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap-Yan Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow were evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.

  9. Thermodynamic Data to Model the Interaction Between Coolant and Fuel in Gen IV Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinsdale, Alan; Gisby, John; Davies, Hugh; Konings, Rudy; Benes, Ondrej

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of nuclear fuels in various environments is vital to the design and safe operation of nuclear reactors. While this is true if the reactor is operating within its design specification, it is even more so if accidents occur and the fuel is exposed to unexpected temperatures, pressures or chemical environments. It is clearly hazardous and costly to explore all such scenarios experimentally and therefore it is necessary to undertake modelling where possible using well-grounded theoretical approaches. This paper will show examples of where calculations of chemical and phase equilibria have been applied successfully to the long term storage of nuclear waste, phase formation during core meltdown and prediction of fission product release into the atmosphere. It will also highlight the development of thermodynamic data carried out during the European Metrology Research Project Metrofission required to model the potential interaction between the coolant, nuclear fuel, containment materials and atmosphere of a sodium cooled fast reactor. (authors)

  10. Experimental studies on helium release and stratification within the AIHMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, Aneesh; Agrawal, Nilesh; Raghavan, V.; Das, Sarit K.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is generated during core meltdown accidents in nuclear power plants. The study of hydrogen release and mixing within the containment is an important area of safety research. An experimental setup called the AERB-IIT Madras Hydrogen Mixing Studies (AIHMS) facility is setup at IIT Madras to study the distribution of helium (an inert surrogate to hydrogen) subsequent to release as a jet. The present paper gives details of the design, fabrication and instrumentation of the AIHMS facility. It then compares the features of the facility with respect to other facilities existing for hydrogen mitigation studies. Then it gives details of the experiments on concentration build-up studies as a result of injection of gases (air and helium) performed in this experimental facility. (author)

  11. Is vented containment the correct approach to improved radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriz, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The design is briefly described of the so-called filtered venting containment system (FVCS) which should reduce radioactive leakage in case of fuel melting. The system is intended for BWR's manufactured by ASEA-ATOM. The original containment of the MARK II type was provided with an additional diaphragm which ruptures at a pressure of 650 kPa. The mixture of air and steam is directed to chambers filled with fine gravel where radioactive iodine and cesium condense. Recent studies of meltdown accidents show, however, that the release of iodine and of aerosols will be significantly lower than assumed by the FVCS project which is thus exposed to criticism. It is envisaged, nevertheless, that the Barseback nuclear power plant will be equipped with the FVCS by the end of 1985. (Ha)

  12. Fukushima. Five years on - FAQs; 5 Jahre Fukushima - Fragen und Antworten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-03-15

    On 11 March 2011, at 2:46 p.m. local time (6.46 a.m. CET), an earthquake measuring 9 on the Richter scale hit the east coast of Japan. The quake caused a tsunami, with waves as high as 38 metres, which led to large-scale flooding and destruction of roads, the power supply and other infrastructure along Japan's eastern seaboard. The earthquake and tsunami also struck several nuclear power plants. Fukushima Daiichi sustained the worst damage, triggering a chain of events which led to core meltdown, major hydrogen explosions and massive releases of radiation. Below, the Oeko-Institut answers the key questions about the disaster's timeline, latest assessments of the events, and the current situation in Fukushima.

  13. Radiation monitoring complete change by an unprecedented nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Tomomi

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Company that was triggered by the tsunami generated from the Great East Japan Earthquake led to a series of disasters up to meltdown and melt-through. A large amount of discharge of radioactive substances to the environment due to the disasters marked a sea change in the situation of radiation monitoring in Japan to date. The Japanese Government took the following actions. (1) Establishment of government-led monitoring system through the setup of the Monitoring Coordination Council, (2) Decision on 'Comprehensive Monitoring Program' that implements unified comprehensive radiation monitoring and publishes the results, and (3) Law establishment for radiation monitoring by stipulating immediate implementation systems and implementation points as well as budgetary backup for this purpose. This paper describes the plans to monitor the environment, public facilities, aquatic environment, agricultural land, food, etc., as well as the future challenges. (O.A.)

  14. Simulating single-event burnout of n-channel power MOSFET's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.H.; Hohl, J.H.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Galloway, K.F.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy ions are ubiquitous in a space environment. Single-event burnout of power MOSFET's is a sudden catastrophic failure mechanism that is initiated by the passage of a heavy ion through the device structure. The passage of the heavy ion generates a current filament that locally turns on a parasitic n-p-n transistor inherent to the power MOSFET. Subsequent high currents and high voltage in the device induce second breakdown of the parasitic bipolar transistor and hence meltdown of the device. This paper presents a model that can be used for simulating the burnout mechanism in order to gain insight into the significant device parameters that most influence the single-event burnout susceptibility of n-channel power MOSFET's

  15. Concluding colloquium of the Nuclear Safety Project (PNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    The main points of the report are: environmental loads due to nuclear power stations and fuel reprocessing plants, behaviour of the system during reactor faults, extent of damage for the largest hypothetical reactor accidents and its dependence on time, assessment of the consequences of large hypothetical accidents and safety-related assessment of nuclear plants. The contributions relate particularly to the dynamic stresses on reactor components, behaviour of fuel elements in accidents, core melt-down accidents in LWR's and retention, behaviour and effects of released radionuclides from nuclear plants. Up-dating contributions concern the course, the effects and the analysis of the Chernobyl reactor accident. One contribution each is concerned with the development of waste air filters, the soil/plant transfer of actinides and the description of an FDWR. (DG) [de

  16. Measuring Public Acceptance of Nuclear Technology with Big data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Seugkook

    2015-01-01

    Surveys can be conducted only on people in specific region and time interval, and it may be misleading to generalize the results to represent the attitude of the public. For example, opinions of a person living in metropolitan area, far from the dangers of nuclear reactors and enjoying cheap electricity produced by the reactors, and a person living in proximity of nuclear power plants, subject to tremendous damage should nuclear meltdown occur, certainly differs for the topic of nuclear generation. To conclude, big data is a useful tool to measure the public acceptance of nuclear technology efficiently (i.e., saves cost, time, and effort of measurement and analysis) and this research was able to provide a case for using big data to analyze public acceptance of nuclear technology. Finally, the analysis identified opinion leaders, which allows target-marketing when policy is executed

  17. Consequence analysis and probabilistic safety analysis of Angra-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, A.C.F.

    1987-07-01

    A methodology for determining the environmental consequences in the site of nuclear power plants, is presented. The methodology obtains as final result the 'S' site matrix, which represents the probabilities of health damage. Two types of healt damages were analysed: the early fatalities and injury. The damages are calculated from the determination of radiation doses which the population in surrounding of the site could be submitted, in the case of severe accident with the core meltdown. The accidents are defined from an initial event, leading to the failure of reactor containment. The results presented the same magnitude order when they were compared with ones obtained in studies of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The Angra-1 was adopted as reference reactor and the CRAC-2 computer code was used. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Definition of containment failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cybulskis, P.

    1982-01-01

    Core meltdown accidents of the types considered in probabilistic risk assessments (PRA's) have been predicted to lead to pressures that will challenge the integrity of containment structures. Review of a number of PRA's indicates considerable variation in the predicted probability of containment failure as a function of pressure. Since the results of PRA's are sensitive to the prediction of the occurrence and the timing of containment failure, better understanding of realistic containment capabilities and a more consistent approach to the definition of containment failure pressures are required. Additionally, since the size and location of the failure can also significantly influence the prediction of reactor accident risk, further understanding of likely failure modes is required. The thresholds and modes of containment failure may not be independent

  19. Fukushima nuclear accident and the social responsibility of science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Five months had passed since Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident occurred but still there was no knowing when the accident ended. Released radioactivity seemed to be greater than one million terra Bq and if there occurred an explosive rupture of containment vessel due to the failure of containment vent or occurrence of steam explosion, the amount of released radioactivity might amount to be at least equivalent to or surpass that of Chernobyl NPP accident. There existed still a risk that overheating and meltdown of nuclear fuels might reoccur with loss of cooling due to a possible giant aftershock. This article described total views on significant disaster that the accident brought about on many neighboring residents or wide range of people. After a general discussion about what was social responsibility of scientists, social responsibility of scientists for Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident was discussed. Responsibility of omission was also argued. (T. Tanaka)

  20. Uscire dalla crisi finanziaria statunitense: la politica domina l’economia nella Nuova Economia Politica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAN KREGEL

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most economists expected that the “Great Recession” produced by the financial meltdown of 2008 would usher in a resurgence of traditional Keynesian economics and a decline of what has come to be called “market fundamentalism”. By contrast, also due to the inadequate size of the 2009 stimulus package, the resurgence of support for Keynesian expenditure policies has been extremely short lived. However, the negative popular and political reaction should not have come as a surprise, at least for three reasons: the design of the Obama stimulus plan and its difference from the expenditure policies of the Roosevelt Administration; the political environment that has eviscerated fiscal policy and placed monetary policy at the centre of economic policy and produced “debt driven” growth; the difference between policies appropriate to treating an income deflation and a debt deflation.

  1. Application of nanofluids to mitigation of severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Kune Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the pivotal thermohydrodynamic and neutronic characteristics of nanofluids as an alternative coolant for boiling water reactors (BWRs) during the abnormal operation including, but not necessarily limited to, severe accident involving meltdown as well as potentially melt-through of the reactor core material. Results indicate that the benefit of utilizing nanoparticles in the BWR working fluid appears to be minimal during the nominal operation since the nanoparticles tend to carry over to the turbine and condenser lending themselves to erosion and fouling concerns. Good news, on the other hand, is that exploitation of nanofluids during the decay heat removal condition in case of an accident is promising indeed because of their high thermal conductivity and their neutron poisoning effect. Thermohydrodynamic and neutronic investigations are in progress to streamline the nanoparticles and to optimize their concentration during the abnormal operation beyond the conventional design basis extending to severe accident. (author)

  2. Twenty-five years of environmental radionuclide concentrations near a nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles; Kreeger, Danielle; Patrick, Ruth; Palms, John

    2015-05-01

    The areas in and along a 262-km length of the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania were monitored for the presence of radioactive materials. This study began two months after the 1979 Three Mile Island (TMI) partial reactor meltdown; it spanned the next 25 y. Monitoring points included stations at the PPL Susquehanna and TMI nuclear power plants. Monthly gamma measurements document concentrations of radionuclides from natural and anthropogenic sources. During this study, various series of gamma-emitting radionuclide concentration measurements were made in many general categories of animals, plants, and other inorganic matter. Sampling began in 1979 before the first start-up of the PPL Susquehanna power plant. Although all species were not continuously monitored for the entire period, an extensive database was compiled. In 1986, the ongoing measurements detected fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. These data may be used in support of dose or environmental transport calculations.

  3. Low cost Czochralski crystal growing technology. Near implementation of the flat plate photovoltaic cost reduction of the low cost solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, E. G.

    1980-01-01

    Equipment developed for the manufacture of over 100 kg of silicon ingot from one crucible by rechanging from another crucible is described. Attempts were made to eliminate the cost of raising the furnace temperature to 250 C above the melting point of silicon by using an RF coil to melt polycrystalline silicon rod as a means of rechanging the crucible. Microprocessor control of the straight growth process was developed and domonstrated for both 4 inch and 6 inch diameter. Both meltdown and melt stabilization processes were achieved using operator prompting through the microprocessor. The use of the RF work coil in poly rod melting as a heat sink in the accelerated growth process was unsuccessful. The total design concept for fabrication and interfacing of the total cold crucible system was completed.

  4. Investigation of the failure of a reactor pressure vessel by plastic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmer, H.; Ritter, B.

    1994-01-01

    A possible consequence of a core meltdown accident in a pressurized water reactor is the failure of the reactor pressure vessel under high internal pressure. With the aid of the finite element program ABAQUS and using a material model of the thermo-plasticity for large deformation, the failure of the reactor pressure vessel due to plastic instability was examined. It was apparent from the finite element calculations that solely due to reduction in strength of the material, even for internal wall temperatures clearly below the core melt; of about 2000 C, the critical internal pressure can fall to values which are lower than the working pressure. With the aid of simplified geometry, a lower limit for the pressure at failure of the reactor pressure vessel can be calculated. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Decontamination of radionuclides after Fukushima 1st NPPs accidents. Toward an early return of evacuated local residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Over a year has passed since the disastrous earthquake and Tsunami taking place in East Japan on March 1, 2011, followed by the meltdown of the reactor core of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants leaving hydrogen-explosions of the reactor buildings and resulting emission of a large amount of radioactive materials. Meanwhile, Japanese government specified the nuclear evacuation zones from the standpoint of protecting local residents from exposure on one hand, and made legislative preparations and necessary organizational reforms including reinforcement on the other hand. Decontamination activities have been continued on some areas tentatively to find effective methods. This report presents the remediation efforts done by the Ministry of the Environment in light of early return of the evacuated inhabitants. (S. Ohno)

  6. Institut fuer Radiochemie: Results of R and D work in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    The Radiochemistry Institute of KfK participates in the following projects: Reprocessing and waste treatment, fast breeder reactor, nuclear safety, safeguards, nuclear fusion. Other activities include research work on solids and materials, and in the field of water technology. The work accomplished in 1984 is explained in several contributions, the main topics being: Release and behaviour of fission products in sodium-cooled systems, analytic methods and in-line instrumentation within the framework of waste reprocessing techniques, Kr-85 separation from radioactive waste, fission product separation and tritium enrichment for waste disposal, fission product release during core meltdown, lithium silicates as fertile material for fusion reactors, water desolination with the CARIX process and other water purification methods. (RB) [de

  7. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Tedeschi

    Full Text Available We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  8. Should nuclear liability limits be removed. Yes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, L.

    1985-01-01

    Arguing in favor of unlimited liability in the event of a nuclear accident, the author cites a mathematical probability of a core meltdown in the US as 45% during the next 20 years. The liability insurance carried by the nuclear industry is less than for large hotels and industrial parks, and is only a small fraction of the potential costs of damage and compensation. If nuclear technology is safe, limits are not needed. If liability is limited, it removes the incentive to improve safety and sends inaccurate price signals to utilities choosing among competing technologies. There is also the ethical aspect of shifting liability costs from ratepayers and stockholders to accident victims and general taxpayers. There are other ways to finance nuclear risks, such as a sinking fund, the removal of the nuclear exclusion in property insurance policies, and annual retrospective assessments per reactors

  9. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Gabriele; Mazloumian, Amin; Gallegati, Mauro; Helbing, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  10. Safety of nuclear reactors - Part A - unsteady state temperature history mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shayeb, M.; Yusoff, M.Z.; Boosroh, M.H.; Ideris, F.; Hasmady Abu Hassan, S.; Bondok, A.

    2004-01-01

    A nuclear reactor structure under abnormal operations of near meltdown will be exposed to a tremendous amount of heat flux in addition to the stress field applied under normal operation. Temperature encountered in such case is assumed to be beyond 1000 Celsius degrees. A 2-dimensional mathematical model based on finite difference methods, has been developed for the fire resistance calculation of a concrete-filled square steel column with respect to its temperature history. Effects due to nuclear radiation and mechanical vibrations will be explored in a later future model. The temperature rise in each element can be derived from its heat balance by applying the parabolic unsteady state, partial differential equation and numerical solution into the steel region. Calculation of the temperature of the elementary regions needs to satisfy the symmetry conditions and the relevant material properties. The developed mathematical model is capable to predict the temperature history in the column and on the surface with respect to time. (authors)

  11. Forest-fire model as a supercritical dynamic model in financial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deokjae; Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Jeho; Kahng, B.

    2015-02-01

    Recently large-scale cascading failures in complex systems have garnered substantial attention. Such extreme events have been treated as an integral part of self-organized criticality (SOC). Recent empirical work has suggested that some extreme events systematically deviate from the SOC paradigm, requiring a different theoretical framework. We shed additional theoretical light on this possibility by studying financial crisis. We build our model of financial crisis on the well-known forest fire model in scale-free networks. Our analysis shows a nontrivial scaling feature indicating supercritical behavior, which is independent of system size. Extreme events in the supercritical state result from bursting of a fat bubble, seeds of which are sown by a protracted period of a benign financial environment with few shocks. Our findings suggest that policymakers can control the magnitude of financial meltdowns by keeping the economy operating within reasonable duration of a benign environment.

  12. Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-09-01

    This decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D&D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

  13. Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-09-01

    This decontamination and decommissioning (D D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

  14. Behavior of an indigenously fabricated transferred arc plasma furnace for smelting studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, K. MANDAL; R, K. DISHWAR; O, P. SINHA

    2018-03-01

    The utilization of industrial solid waste for metal recovery requires high-temperature tools due to the presence of silica and alumina, which is reducible at high temperature. In a plasma arc furnace, transferred arc plasma furnace (TAP) can meet all requirements, but the disadvantage of this technology is the high cost. For performing experiments in the laboratory, the TAP was fabricated indigenously in a laboratory based on the different inputs provided in the literature for the furnace design and fabrication. The observed parameters such as arc length, energy consumption, graphite electrode consumption, noise level as well as lining erosion were characterized for this fabricated furnace. The nitrogen plasma increased by around 200 K (200 °C) melt temperature and noise levels decreased by ∼10 dB compared to a normal arc. Hydrogen plasma offered 100 K (100 °C) higher melt temperature with ∼5 dB higher sound level than nitrogen plasma. Nitrogen plasma arc melting showed lower electrode and energy consumption than normal arc melting, whereas hydrogen plasma showed lower energy consumption and higher electrode consumption in comparison to nitrogen plasma. The higher plasma arc temperature resulted in a shorter meltdown time than normal arc with smoother arcing. Hydrogen plasma permitted more heats, reduced meltdown time, and lower energy consumption, but with increased graphite consumption and crucible wear. The present study showed that the fabricated arc plasma is better than the normal arc furnace with respect to temperature generation, energy consumption, and environmental friendliness. Therefore, it could be used effectively for smelting-reduction studies.

  15. Effects of Emulsifier, Overrun and Dasher Speed on Ice Cream Microstructure and Melting Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Maya M; Hartel, Richard W

    2018-03-01

    Ice cream is a multiphase frozen food containing ice crystals, air cells, fat globules, and partially coalesced fat globule clusters dispersed in an unfrozen serum phase (sugars, proteins, and stabilizers). This microstructure is responsible for ice cream's melting characteristics. By varying both formulation (emulsifier content and overrun) and processing conditions (dasher speed), the effects of different microstructural elements, particularly air cells and fat globule clusters, on ice cream melt-down properties were studied. Factors that caused an increase in shear stress within the freezer, namely increasing dasher speed and overrun, caused a decrease in air cell size and an increase in extent of fat destabilization. Increasing emulsifier content, especially of polysorbate 80, caused an increase in extent of fat destabilization. Both overrun and fat destabilization influenced drip-through rates. Ice creams with a combination of low overrun and low fat destabilization had the highest drip-through rates. Further, the amount of remnant foam left on the screen increased with reduced drip-through rates. These results provide a better understanding of the effects of microstructure components and their interactions on drip-through rate. Manipulating operating and formulation parameters in ice cream manufacture influences the microstructure (air cells, ice crystals, and fat globule clusters). This work provides guidance on which parameters have most effect on air cell size and fat globule cluster formation. Further, the structural characteristics that reduce melt-down rate were determined. Ice cream manufacturers will use these results to tailor their products for the desired quality attributes. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. An Entry Point of the Emergency Response Robot for Management of Severe Accident of the Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jaiwan; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, from the view point of DID (defense-in depth), we discuss the entry point of the nuclear emergency response robot to cope with a nuclear disaster. A Japanese nuclear disaster preparedness robot system was developed, after the JCO criticality accident in 1999, to cope with INES (International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale) Level 3 serious incidents. INES Level 3 means the loss of DID (defense-in-depth) functions. It also indicates that ESF (engineered safety features) and ECCS (emergency core cooling system) resources, which are used to prevent serious incidents from escalating to severe accidents (core melt-down), have been almost exhausted. In the unit 1 reactor accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, escalation from INES Level 1 (Out of Limiting Condition for Operation) to INES Level 5 (serious core melting-down) took less than two hours. Major facts are briefly described here in based on data gathered immediately after the tsunami over Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Ο 15:35 on March 11, 2nd tsunami arrived. - 15:37, SBO (station black out) Ο 15:42, Interprets as a SBO (INES Level 1) - Loss of DC power for Instrumentation (Unknown of reactor water level) Ο 16:36, Loss of ECCS function (INELS Level 5) (Entry into a BDBA status) The Moni ROBO-A robot of the Japan Nuclear Safety Technology Center (NUSTEC) was a nuclear disaster preparedness robot developed after the JCO criticality accident. It was the only robot that had been steadily maintained and was available at the time of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. However, it was not helpful in mitigating the accident because it is assumed to have arrived at J-Village after the accident had been escalated to INES Level 5 or higher. Based on the paper by S. Kawatsuma of JAEA and response data gathered immediately after the tsunami, it is estimated that the NUSTEC's Moni ROBO-A arrived at J-Village after the designed entry point for INES Level 3

  17. The risk of a major nuclear accident: calculation and perception of probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, Francois

    2013-07-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi, Japan, occurred on 11 March 2011. This nuclear disaster, the third on such a scale, left a lasting mark in the minds of hundreds of millions of people. Much as Three Mile Island or Chernobyl, yet another place will be permanently associated with a nuclear power plant which went out of control. Fukushima Daiichi revived the issue of the hazards of civil nuclear power, stirring up all the associated passion and emotion. The whole of this paper is devoted to the risk of a major nuclear accident. By this we mean a failure initiating core meltdown, a situation in which the fuel rods melt and mix with the metal in their cladding. Such accidents are classified as at least level 5 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The Three Mile Island accident, which occurred in 1979 in the United States, reached this level of severity. The explosion of reactor 4 at the Chernobyl plant in Ukraine in 1986 and the recent accident in Japan were classified as class 7, the highest grade on this logarithmic scale. The main difference between the top two levels and level 5 relates to a significant or major release of radioactive material to the environment. In the event of a level-5 accident, damage is restricted to the inside of the plant, whereas, in the case of level-7 accidents, huge areas of land, above or below the surface, and/or sea may be contaminated. Before the meltdown of reactors 1, 2 and 3 at Fukushima Daiichi, eight major accidents affecting nuclear power plants had occurred worldwide. This is a high figure compared with the one calculated by the experts. Observations in the field do not appear to fit the results of the probabilistic models of nuclear accidents produced since the 1970's. Oddly enough the number of major accidents is closer to the risk as perceived by the general public. In general we tend to overestimate any risk relating to rare, fearsome accidents. What are we to make of this divergence? How are we to reconcile

  18. Fukushima Nuclear Accident, the Third International Severe Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashad, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Japan is the world's third largest power user. Japan's last remaining nuclear reactor shutdown on Saturday 4 Th of May 2012 leaving the country entirely nuclear free. All of 50 of the nation's operable reactors (not counting for the four crippled reactors at Fukushima) are now offline. Before last year's Fukushima nuclear disaster, the country obtained 30% of its energy from nuclear plants, and had planned to produce up to 50% of its power from nuclear sources by 2030. Japan declared states of emergency for five nuclear reactors at two power plants after the units lost cooling ability in the aftermath of Friday 11 March 2011 powerful earthquake. Thousands of (14000) residents were immediately evacuated as workers struggled to get the reactors under control to prevent meltdowns. On March 11 Th, 2011, Japan experienced a sever earthquake resulting in the shutdown of multiple reactors. At Fukushima Daiichi site, the earthquake caused the loss of normal Ac power. In addition it appeals that the ensuing tsunami caused the loss of emergency Ac power at the site. Subsequent events caused damage to fuel and radiological releases offsite. The spent fuel problem is a wild card in the potentially catastrophic failure of Fukushima power plant. Since the Friday's 9.0 earthquake, the plant has been wracked by repeated explosions in three different reactors. Nuclear experts emphasized there are significant differences between the unfolding nuclear crisis at Fukushima and the events leading up to the Chernobyl disaster in 1986. The Chernobyl reactor exploded during a power surge while it was in operation and released a major cloud of radiation because the reactor had no containment structure around to. At Fukushima, each reactor has shutdown and is inside a 20 cm-thick steel pressure vessel that is designed to contain a meltdown. The pressure vessels themselves are surrounded by steel-lined, reinforced concrete shells. Chernobyl disaster was classified 7 on the International

  19. Parent perceptions of the quality of life of pet dogs living with neuro-typically developing and neuro-atypically developing children: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Hannah F.; Mills, Daniel S.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing scientific and societal recognition of the role that pet dogs can play in healthy development of children; both those who are neuro-typically developing and those who live with a neuro-developmental disorder, such as autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, little attention has been paid to how living with children positively and negatively affects quality of life of a pet dog. In this exploratory study we conducted semi-structured interviews with parents of neuro-typically developing children (n = 18) and those with a neuro-developmental disorder (n = 18) who owned a pet dog, until no new factors were identified. Living with children brought potentially positive benefits to the dog’s life including: imposition of a routine, participation in recreational activities and the development of a strong bond between the child and the dog. The importance of maintaining a routine was particularly prevalent in families with children with neuro-developmental disorders. Potential negative factors included having to cope with child meltdowns and tantrums, over stimulation from child visitors, harsh contact and rough and tumble play with the child. The regularity and intensity of meltdowns and tantrums was particularly evident in responses from parents with children with a neuro-developmental disorder. However, child visitors and rough play and contact were mentioned similarly across the groups. Protective factors included having a safe haven for the dog to escape to, parent’s awareness of stress signs and child education in dog-interaction. Parents were also asked to complete a stress response scale to provide an initial quantitative comparison of stress responses between dogs living with the two family-types. Parents with neuro-typically developing children more frequently observed their dog rapidly running away from a situation and less frequently observed their dog widening their eyes, than parents with children with a neuro

  20. Parent perceptions of the quality of life of pet dogs living with neuro-typically developing and neuro-atypically developing children: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sophie S; Wright, Hannah F; Mills, Daniel S

    2017-01-01

    There is growing scientific and societal recognition of the role that pet dogs can play in healthy development of children; both those who are neuro-typically developing and those who live with a neuro-developmental disorder, such as autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, little attention has been paid to how living with children positively and negatively affects quality of life of a pet dog. In this exploratory study we conducted semi-structured interviews with parents of neuro-typically developing children (n = 18) and those with a neuro-developmental disorder (n = 18) who owned a pet dog, until no new factors were identified. Living with children brought potentially positive benefits to the dog's life including: imposition of a routine, participation in recreational activities and the development of a strong bond between the child and the dog. The importance of maintaining a routine was particularly prevalent in families with children with neuro-developmental disorders. Potential negative factors included having to cope with child meltdowns and tantrums, over stimulation from child visitors, harsh contact and rough and tumble play with the child. The regularity and intensity of meltdowns and tantrums was particularly evident in responses from parents with children with a neuro-developmental disorder. However, child visitors and rough play and contact were mentioned similarly across the groups. Protective factors included having a safe haven for the dog to escape to, parent's awareness of stress signs and child education in dog-interaction. Parents were also asked to complete a stress response scale to provide an initial quantitative comparison of stress responses between dogs living with the two family-types. Parents with neuro-typically developing children more frequently observed their dog rapidly running away from a situation and less frequently observed their dog widening their eyes, than parents with children with a neuro

  1. Parent perceptions of the quality of life of pet dogs living with neuro-typically developing and neuro-atypically developing children: An exploratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie S Hall

    Full Text Available There is growing scientific and societal recognition of the role that pet dogs can play in healthy development of children; both those who are neuro-typically developing and those who live with a neuro-developmental disorder, such as autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, little attention has been paid to how living with children positively and negatively affects quality of life of a pet dog. In this exploratory study we conducted semi-structured interviews with parents of neuro-typically developing children (n = 18 and those with a neuro-developmental disorder (n = 18 who owned a pet dog, until no new factors were identified. Living with children brought potentially positive benefits to the dog's life including: imposition of a routine, participation in recreational activities and the development of a strong bond between the child and the dog. The importance of maintaining a routine was particularly prevalent in families with children with neuro-developmental disorders. Potential negative factors included having to cope with child meltdowns and tantrums, over stimulation from child visitors, harsh contact and rough and tumble play with the child. The regularity and intensity of meltdowns and tantrums was particularly evident in responses from parents with children with a neuro-developmental disorder. However, child visitors and rough play and contact were mentioned similarly across the groups. Protective factors included having a safe haven for the dog to escape to, parent's awareness of stress signs and child education in dog-interaction. Parents were also asked to complete a stress response scale to provide an initial quantitative comparison of stress responses between dogs living with the two family-types. Parents with neuro-typically developing children more frequently observed their dog rapidly running away from a situation and less frequently observed their dog widening their eyes, than parents with children with a

  2. Mechanical Properties and Morphological Changes of Poly(lactic acid)/Polycarbonate/Poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) Blend Through Reactive Processing—Effects of Fabrication Processes—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzawa, Takeshi; Tokumitsu, Katsuhisa

    The mechanical properties of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/polycarbonate (PC) blend were improved considerably by addition of both poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) and dicumyl peroxide (DCP) as a radical coupling agent for PLA and PBAT. In this work, the authors aimed to grasp meltdown properties of PLA/PBAT with/without DCP by (1) clarifying the effect of addition of DCP on the melt viscoelatsic properties of PLA/PBAT, and make this ternary system more suitable by (2) optimizing additive contents and (3) investigating the effect of fabrication processes on mechanical properties and morphologies of the blends. The growth curves of G' and G'' for PLA/PBAT (70/30) (wt/wt) with/without DCP measured by a rheometer suggested that branching and cross-linking structures were formed by hetero-and/or homogeneous radical coupling reactions. The elongation at break of the ternary reactive blend with DCP 0.30 phr (PLA/PBAT/PC blend with DCP) increased up to 160%, which was much better than that with other DCP contents. Moreover, the value of standard deviation for the ternary reactive blend was smaller. Furthermore, PLA/PBAT/PC ternary polymer blends were prepared through a twin-screw extruder with an L/D ratio of 75, and their physical and meltdown properties were investigated. The domain size of the reactive blend with an L/D ratio of 75 was smaller than that of 45, however, the impact strength of the blend with an L/D ratio of 75 decreased with increasing rotation speed of the extruder. Moreover, the MFR of the blend increased with increasing rotation speed of the extruder as well. As the MFR of PC prepared under same condition of blending did not change, so this suggested that PLA/PBAT components of the ternary blends were degraded in higher shear rate. As a result, the impact strength of the ternary blends decreased as well.

  3. Structure and experimental program for SNEAK 12 - an assembly for fast breeder safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, F.

    1979-01-01

    The critical assembly SNEAK 12 and its foreseen experimental program have the main purpose to check the validity of neutron physics calculational methods used in the analysis of accidental situations of fast breeder reactors. In the investigation of accidental courses configurations have to be considered, which are caused by assembly deformation and meltdown and which are characterized by irregular fuel and structural material arrangements with cavities and empty channels. The reactivity differences between the unperturbed core and a series of perturbed configurations have to be determined. The individual configurations have to be chosen in such a way, that the calculational methods for the different aspects of the accident sequence (formation of cavities and channels, relocation of fissile and fertile material and steel) can be tested one by one. Two different cores are foreseen: SNEAK 12A as a one-zone core with enriched uranium fuel and SNEAK 12B with a central test zone with plutonium-uranium mixed-oxide fuel surrounded by a driver zone of enriched uranium. The report describes these cores and their assemblies, and the experimental program is outlined

  4. Severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) for German NPPs; Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGS) fuer deutsche KKW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Martin; Tietsch, Wolfgang [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The US NRC declared in consequence of the Three Mile Island accident the severe accident management to be an unresolved safety issue. In the following years worldwide the development of generic management guidelines was started aimed to implement preventive measures to prevent core damage and mitigation measures to reduce the accident consequences into the emergency manuals of nuclear power plants. The PWROG (pressurized water reactor owners group) SAMGs were developed by Westinghouse that are meanwhile implemented in US NPPs but also in Europe, incl. reactors with VVER, KWU or Framatome design. The authors describe the concept of the emergency manuals implemented in German NPPs and the differences to the SAMG concept. SAMGs include a complete strategy to minimize the consequences of severe accidents, independent of the plant status, including the risk of component failures. Measures to bring the meltdown to an end have not priority. The implementation of SAMGs into the German emergency manuals needs clear criteria for the transition from preventive measures (aimed to stabilize the reactor) to mitigation measures (minimization of fission product release). Several examples are discussed.

  5. The double edged sword: The demographic consequences of the evolution of self-fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Awad, Diala; Billiard, Sylvain

    2017-05-01

    Phylogenies indicate that the transition from outcrossing to selfing is frequent, with selfing populations being more prone to extinction. The rates of transition to selfing and extinction, acting on different timescales, could explain the observed distributions of extant selfing species among taxa. However, phylogenetic and theoretical studies consider these mechanisms independently, that is transitions do not cause extinction. Here, we theoretically explore the demographic consequences of the evolution of self-fertilization. Deleterious mutations and mutations modifying the selfing rate are recurrently introduced and the number of offspring depends on individual fitness, allowing for a demographic feedback. We show that mutational meltdowns can be triggered in populations evolving near strict selfing. Populations having survived a demographic crash are more stable than ancestral outcrossing populations once deleterious mutations are purged. The relatively rapid time-scales at which extinctions occur indicate that during evolutionary transitions the accumulation of deleterious mutations may not be the cause of extinctions observed on longer time scales, but could lead to the underestimation of transition rates from outcrossing to selfing. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Radioactivity inspection of Taiwan for food products imported from Japan after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Huang-Sheng; Huang, Ping-Ji; Wuu, Jyi-Lan; Wang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-01-01

    The 3–11 Earthquake occurred in Japan last year had greatly damaged the lives and properties and also caused the core meltdown accident in the Fukushima nuclear power plant followed by the leakage of radioactive materials into biosphere. In order to protect against the detriment of radiation from foods which were imported from Japan, the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) in Taiwan started to conduct radioactivity inspection of food products from Japan after the accident. A total of about 20,000 samples had been tested from March 24 2011 to March 31 2012. - Highlights: • About 20,000 food products imported from Japan were tested by low-background HPGe detectors. • In total, 46 food products had been found to be contaminated by I-131, Cs-134 or Cs-137, however, the radiation levels were all below the limit of Taiwanese regulations. • The measurement techniques described in this study can be used as a fast screening tool to ensure safety of food supplied

  7. What happened at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants. Verification of effects of earthquake and resulting tsunami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    At 14:46 on March 11, 2011, the Tohoku District-off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake occurred. The magnitude of this earthquake was 9.0, the largest in Japan's recorded history, and afterwards enormous tsunami struck the Pacific coast of Tohoku District. This great earthquake and resulting tsunami struck the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) of Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), whose cooling function was lost and suffered a severe nuclear accident. This article described the mechanism and safety measure of BWR type NPPs and verified how the great earthquake and resulting tsunami affected NPPs. Progression of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi NPPs was outlined. Damage by the earthquake could not be fully inspected but might not be significant to safety systems. However, the earthquake of longer duration time as much as about 250 sec caused failure of breaker or lightening arrester and also damage on electric facility such as transmission line insulator. Tsunami or inundation height was as high as O.P. (Onahama Pile) +11.5-15.5 m for Unit 1-4 reactor area while designed as O.P. +5.7 m, which caused blackout (power outage) and a reactor core meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi NPPs. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Development of compact Compton camera for 3D image reconstruction of radioactive contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Terasaka, Y.; Ozawa, S.; Nakamura Miyamura, H.; Kaburagi, M.; Tanifuji, Y.; Kawabata, K.; Torii, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings, Inc., went into meltdown after the large tsunami caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. Very large amounts of radionuclides were released from the damaged plant. Radiation distribution measurements inside FDNPS buildings are indispensable to execute decommissioning tasks in the reactor buildings. We have developed a compact Compton camera to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination inside the FDNPS buildings three-dimensionally (3D). The total weight of the Compton camera is lower than 1.0 kg. The gamma-ray sensor of the Compton camera employs Ce-doped GAGG (Gd3Al2Ga3O12) scintillators coupled with a multi-pixel photon counter. Angular correction of the detection efficiency of the Compton camera was conducted. Moreover, we developed a 3D back-projection method using the multi-angle data measured with the Compton camera. We successfully observed 3D radiation images resulting from the two 137Cs radioactive sources, and the image of the 9.2 MBq source appeared stronger than that of the 2.7 MBq source.

  9. Toward a Mechanistic Source Term in Advanced Reactors: A Review of Past U.S. SFR Incidents, Experiments, and Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, Matthew; Brunett, Acacia J.; Grabaskas, David

    2016-04-17

    In 2015, as part of a Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP) effort for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs), Argonne National Laboratory investigated the current state of knowledge of source term development for a metal-fueled, pool-type SFR. This paper provides a summary of past domestic metal-fueled SFR incidents and experiments and highlights information relevant to source term estimations that were gathered as part of the RTDP effort. The incidents described in this paper include fuel pin failures at the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) facility in July of 1959, the Fermi I meltdown that occurred in October of 1966, and the repeated melting of a fuel element within an experimental capsule at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) from November 1967 to May 1968. The experiments described in this paper include the Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach tests that were performed at EBR-II in 1985 and a series of severe transient overpower tests conducted at the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) in the mid-1980s.

  10. Alternate approaches to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    For the US nuclear power industry to expand, a greatly increased portion of the public must come to share the industry's confidence in reactor safety. Major obstacles to establishing this confidence are frequent incidents with potential safety implications and a lack of incontrovertible proof that the risk of a major accident is very low. The most important step toward overcoming these obstacles would be for each utility to operate, maintain, and evaluate its reactors according to far higher standards. With improvements in reliability and safety margins, existing plants would be a stimulus for building new ones rather than an impediment. If changes to the operation of existing plants and improvements to the design of future ones were inadequate, the only hope for a revival of the nuclear industry would be an alternative reactor so obviously safe that risk would no longer be an issue. Three possible concepts are the modular high-temperature gas reactor, the process inherent ultimate safety reactor, and the liquid-metal fast reactor. All three have inherent safety features that should make a meltdown essentially impossible. They cannot know just how great the advantage of these alternate reactors would be, but the benefits of developing one or more of the concepts appear great

  11. Lessons from Japan: Resilience after Tokyo and Fukushima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. Spencer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 1995 Japan experienced the world’s first major terrorist attack using chemical weapons by a little-known religious cult called Aum Shinrikyo. The attack on the Tokyo subway, which killed 13 people, was the first lethal case of a non-state actor using a chemical agent against a civilian population. In March 2011, following a 9.0 magnitude earthquake in Japan, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor experienced a full meltdown releasing radiation into the surrounding area. The seemingly unhurried government reaction provided conflicting information to Japanese citizens, slowing evacuation and protective actions. Government failure is cited as a significant factor in the severity of the nuclear disaster in three investigations conducted after the incident. This article defines resilience and raises the question of whether the U.S. government has the ability to address the issues raised by the two case studies. There are four primary lessons of these two case studies from Japan: Trust is essential; two-way communications are vital; someone or something will always unexpectedly fail to act appropriately, while others will provide surprising support and; finally, recovery is long-term.

  12. International standard problem ISP37: VANAM M3 - A Multi compartment aerosol depletion test with hygroscopic aerosol material: comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firnhaber, M.; Kanzleiter, T.F.; Schwarz, S.; Weber, G.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the results and assessment of the 'open' ISP37, which deals with the containment thermal-hydraulics and aerosol behavior during an unmitigated severe LWR accident with core melt-down and steam and aerosol release into the containment. Representatives of 22 organizations participated to the ISP37 using the codes CONTAIN, FIPLOC, MELCOR, RALOC, FUMO, MACRES, REMOVAL etc. The containment and aerosol behavior experiment VANAM M3 was selected as experimental comparison basis. The main phenomena investigated are the thermal behavior of a multi-compartment containment, e.g. pressure, temperature and the distribution and depletion of a soluble aerosol. The ISP37 has demonstrated that the codes used could calculate the thermal-hydraulic containment behavior in general with sufficient accuracy. But with respect to the needs of aerosol behavior analysis the accuracies, both analytical and experimental as well, for specific thermal-hydraulic variables should be improved. Although large progress has been made in the simulation of aerosol behavior in multi-compartment geometries the calculated local aerosol concentrations scatter widely. However, the aerosol source term to the environment is overestimated in general. The largest uncertainty concerning the aerosol results is caused by a limited number of thermal hydraulic variables like relative humidity, volume condensation rate and atmospheric flow rate. In some codes also a solubility model is missing

  13. A study of the evaporation of heterogeneous water droplets under active heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Maxim; Legros, Jean Claude; Strizhak, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Using high-speed video registration tools with a sample rate of 102-104 frames per second (fps), we studied the patterns in the evaporation of water droplets containing 1 and 2 mm individual metallic inclusions in a high-temperature gas environment. The materials of choice for the inclusions were steels (AISI 1080 carbon steel and AISI type 316L stainless steel) and pure nickel. We established the lifetimes τh of the liquid droplets under study with a controlled increase in the gas environment temperature up to 900 K. We also considered the physical aspects behind the τh distribution in the experiments conducted and specified the conditions for more effective cooling of metallic inclusions. Following the experimental research findings, a method was devised for effective reactor vessel cooling to avoid a meltdown at a nuclear power plant. The optimization of heat and mass transfer modes was performed within the framework of the strategic plan for the development of National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University as one of the world-leading universities.

  14. Structural integrity investigation for RPV with various cooling water levels under pressurized melting pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The strategy denoted as in-vessel retention (IVR is widely used in severe accident (SA management by most advanced nuclear power plants. The essence of IVR mitigation is to provide long-term external water cooling in maintaining the reactor pressure vessel (RPV integrity. Actually, the traditional IVR concept assumed that RPV was fully submerged into the water flooding, and the melting pool was depressurized during the SA. The above assumptions weren't seriously challenged until the occurrence of Fukushima accident on 2011, suggesting the structural behavior had not been appropriately assessed. Therefore, the paper tries to address the structure-related issue on determining whether RPV safety can be maintained or not with the effect of various water levels and internal pressures created from core meltdown accident. In achieving it, the RPV structural behaviors are numerically investigated in terms of several field parameters, such as temperature, deformation, stress, plastic strain, creep strain, and total damage. Due to the presence of high temperature melt on the inside and water cooling on the outside, the RPV failure is governed by the failure mechanisms of creep, thermal-plasticity and plasticity. The creep and plastic damages are interacted with each other, which further accelerate the failure process. Through detailed investigation, it is found that the internal pressure as well as water levels plays an important role in determining the RPV failure time, mode and site.

  15. A Culture-Sensitive Agent in Kirman's Ant Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Heng; Liou, Wen-Ching; Chen, Ting-Yu

    The global financial crisis brought a serious collapse involving a "systemic" meltdown. Internet technology and globalization have increased the chances for interaction between countries and people. The global economy has become more complex than ever before. Mark Buchanan [12] indicated that agent-based computer models will prevent another financial crisis and has been particularly influential in contributing insights. There are two reasons why culture-sensitive agent on the financial market has become so important. Therefore, the aim of this article is to establish a culture-sensitive agent and forecast the process of change regarding herding behavior in the financial market. We based our study on the Kirman's Ant Model[4,5] and Hofstede's Natational Culture[11] to establish our culture-sensitive agent based model. Kirman's Ant Model is quite famous and describes financial market herding behavior from the expectations of the future of financial investors. Hofstede's cultural consequence used the staff of IBM in 72 different countries to understand the cultural difference. As a result, this paper focuses on one of the five dimensions of culture from Hofstede: individualism versus collectivism and creates a culture-sensitive agent and predicts the process of change regarding herding behavior in the financial market. To conclude, this study will be of importance in explaining the herding behavior with cultural factors, as well as in providing researchers with a clearer understanding of how herding beliefs of people about different cultures relate to their finance market strategies.

  16. Accident source terms for light-water nuclear power plants using high-burnup or MOX fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salay, Michael (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Gauntt, Randall O.; Lee, Richard Y. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Representative accident source terms patterned after the NUREG-1465 Source Term have been developed for high burnup fuel in BWRs and PWRs and for MOX fuel in a PWR with an ice-condenser containment. These source terms have been derived using nonparametric order statistics to develop distributions for the timing of radionuclide release during four accident phases and for release fractions of nine chemical classes of radionuclides as calculated with the MELCOR 1.8.5 accident analysis computer code. The accident phases are those defined in the NUREG-1465 Source Term - gap release, in-vessel release, ex-vessel release, and late in-vessel release. Important differences among the accident source terms derived here and the NUREG-1465 Source Term are not attributable to either fuel burnup or use of MOX fuel. Rather, differences among the source terms are due predominantly to improved understanding of the physics of core meltdown accidents. Heat losses from the degrading reactor core prolong the process of in-vessel release of radionuclides. Improved understanding of the chemistries of tellurium and cesium under reactor accidents changes the predicted behavior characteristics of these radioactive elements relative to what was assumed in the derivation of the NUREG-1465 Source Term. An additional radionuclide chemical class has been defined to account for release of cesium as cesium molybdate which enhances molybdenum release relative to other metallic fission products.

  17. Fuel performance computer code simulation of steady-state and transient regimes of the stainless steel fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza

    2014-01-01

    The immediate cause of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in March 2011 was the meltdown of the reactor core. During this process, the zirconium cladding of the fuel reacts with water, producing a large amount of hydrogen. This hydrogen, combined with volatile radioactive materials leaked from the containment vessel and entered the building of the reactor, resulting in explosions. In the past, stainless steel was used as the coating in many pressurized water reactors (PWR) under irradiation and their performance was excellent, however, the stainless steel was replaced by a zirconium-based alloy as a coating material mainly due to its lower section shock-absorbing neutrons. Today, the stainless steel finish appears again as a possible solution for security issues related to the explosion and hydrogen production. The objective of this thesis is to discuss the performance under irradiation of fuel rods using stainless steel as a coating material. The results showed that stainless steel rods exhibit lower temperatures and higher fuel pellet width of the gap - coating the coated rods Zircaloy and this gap does not close during the irradiation. The thermal performance of the two fuel rods is very similar, and the penalty of increased absorption of neutrons due to the use of stainless steel can be offset by the combination of a small increase in the enrichment of U- 235 and changes in the size of the spacing between the fuel rods. (author)

  18. National radiological emergency response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Rosa, Alumanda M.

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident occurred on March 11, 2011, when two natural disasters of unprecedented strengths, an earthquake with magnitude 9 followed one hour later by a powerful tsunami struck northeastern Japan and felled the external power supply and the emergency diesel generators of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, resulting in a loss of coolant accident. There were core meltdowns in three nuclear reactors with the release of radioactivity estimated to be 1/10 of what was released to the environment during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in April 1986. The Fukushima nuclear accident tested the capability of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) in responding to such radiological emergency as a nuclear power plant accident. The PNRI and NDRRMC activated the RADPLAN for possible radiological emergency. The emergency response was calibrated to the status of the nuclear reactors on site and the environmental monitoring undertaken around the site and off-site, including the marine environment. This orchestrated effort enabled the PNRI and the national agencies concerned to reassure the public that the nuclear accident does not have a significant impact on the Philippines, both on the health and safety of the people and on the safety of the environment. National actions taken during the accident will be presented. The role played by the International Atomic Energy Agency as the central UN agency for nuclear matters will be discussed. (author)

  19. The five traps of performance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likierman, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Evaluating a company's performance often entails wading through a thicket of numbers produced by a few simple metrics, writes the author, and senior executives leave measurement to those whose specialty is spreadsheets. To take ownership of performance assessment, those executives should find qualitative, forward-looking measures that will help them avoid five common traps: Measuring against yourself. Find data from outside the company, and reward relative, rather than absolute, performance. Enterprise Rent-A-Car uses a service quality index to measure customers' repeat purchase intentions. Looking backward. Use measures that lead rather than lag the profits in your business. Humana, a health insurer, found that the sickest 10% of its patients account for 80% of its costs; now it offers customers incentives for early screening. Putting your faith in numbers. The soft drinks company Britvic evaluates its executive coaching program not by trying to assign it an ROI number but by tracking participants' careers for a year. Gaming your metrics. The law firm Clifford Chance replaced its single, easy-to-game metric of billable hours with seven criteria on which to base bonuses. Sticking to your numbers too long. Be precise about what you want to assess and explicit about what metrics are assessing it. Such clarity would have helped investors interpret the AAA ratings involved in the financial meltdown. Really good assessment will combine finance managers' relative independence with line managers' expertise.

  20. Laser-heating and Radiance Spectrometry for the Study of Nuclear Materials in Conditions Simulating a Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Dario; Soldi, Luca; Mastromarino, Sara; Boboridis, Kostantinos; Robba, Davide; Vlahovic, Luka; Konings, Rudy

    2017-12-14

    Major and severe accidents have occurred three times in nuclear power plants (NPPs), at Three Mile Island (USA, 1979), Chernobyl (former USSR, 1986) and Fukushima (Japan, 2011). Research on the causes, dynamics, and consequences of these mishaps has been performed in a few laboratories worldwide in the last three decades. Common goals of such research activities are: the prevention of these kinds of accidents, both in existing and potential new nuclear power plants; the minimization of their eventual consequences; and ultimately, a full understanding of the real risks connected with NPPs. At the European Commission Joint Research Centre's Institute for Transuranium Elements, a laser-heating and fast radiance spectro-pyrometry facility is used for the laboratory simulation, on a small scale, of NPP core meltdown, the most common type of severe accident (SA) that can occur in a nuclear reactor as a consequence of a failure of the cooling system. This simulation tool permits fast and effective high-temperature measurements on real nuclear materials, such as plutonium and minor actinide-containing fission fuel samples. In this respect, and in its capability to produce large amount of data concerning materials under extreme conditions, the current experimental approach is certainly unique. For current and future concepts of NPP, example results are presented on the melting behavior of some different types of nuclear fuels: uranium-plutonium oxides, carbides, and nitrides. Results on the high-temperature interaction of oxide fuels with containment materials are also briefly shown.

  1. Fuel performance computer code simulation of steady-state and transient regimes of the stainless steel fuel rods; Simulacao com programas computacionais de desempenho do combustivel em regimes permanente e transiente de varetas combustiveis de aco inoxidavel austenitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza

    2014-07-01

    The immediate cause of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in March 2011 was the meltdown of the reactor core. During this process, the zirconium cladding of the fuel reacts with water, producing a large amount of hydrogen. This hydrogen, combined with volatile radioactive materials leaked from the containment vessel and entered the building of the reactor, resulting in explosions. In the past, stainless steel was used as the coating in many pressurized water reactors (PWR) under irradiation and their performance was excellent, however, the stainless steel was replaced by a zirconium-based alloy as a coating material mainly due to its lower section shock-absorbing neutrons. Today, the stainless steel finish appears again as a possible solution for security issues related to the explosion and hydrogen production. The objective of this thesis is to discuss the performance under irradiation of fuel rods using stainless steel as a coating material. The results showed that stainless steel rods exhibit lower temperatures and higher fuel pellet width of the gap - coating the coated rods Zircaloy and this gap does not close during the irradiation. The thermal performance of the two fuel rods is very similar, and the penalty of increased absorption of neutrons due to the use of stainless steel can be offset by the combination of a small increase in the enrichment of U- 235 and changes in the size of the spacing between the fuel rods. (author)

  2. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Schwarz, C.E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments have been performed with non-reactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies have been performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non-entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model. However heat transfer data for fluid pairs which are found to entrain (water-oil), believed to be characteristic of molten reactor core-concrete conditions, were measured to be up to two orders of magnitude greater than surface renewal predictions and are calculated by a simple entrainment heat transfer model

  3. Overview of plant specific source terms and their impact on risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desaedeleer, G.

    2004-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assesment and safety assessment focuses on systems and measures to prevent core meltdown, and it integrates many aspects of design and operation. It provides mapping of initiating event, frequencies onto plant damage state and through plant systems analysis, utilizes fault tree and event tree logic models, may include 'external event' analysis such as fire, flood, wind, seismic events. Percent contribution of sequences to the core damage frequency are shown for the following plants, taken as examples ZION, EDISON, OCONEE 3, SEABROOK, SIZEWELL B, MILLSTONE 3, RINGHALS 2. The presentation includes comparison of the following initiating event frequencies: loss of off-site power; small LOCA; large LOCA, steam generator tube rupture; loss of feedwater; turbine trip; reactor trip. Consequence analysis deals with: dispersion and depletion of radioactivity in the atmosphere, health effects, factors in the off-site emergency plan analyzed with codes that address the weather conditions; provision of mapping of source terms; risk diagram for early fatalities and for latent cancer fatalities

  4. Safety characteristics of small heat producing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1987-10-01

    The primary objectives of protection in nuclear power plants are the possibility to shut the reactor down in case of emergency and keep it subcritical in the long run, the existence of a heat sink for post-decay heat removal in order to avoid overheating, let alone core meltdown, and the containment of radioactivity within the barriers designed for this purpose, thus preventing significant activity release. In principle, these objectives can be met in various ways, namely by active, passive or inherent technical safeguards systems. In practice, a mixture of these approaches is employed in almost all cases. What matters in the end is the assessment of the overall concept, not of some outstanding feature. Inherent characteristics are easier to achieve in small reactors. However, also in this case, inherent safety does not mean absolute safety. If inherent safety characteristics were all encompassing, they would have to include self-healing effects. However, inanimate matter is incapable of such self-organization. Consequently, inherent characteristics in nuclear technology by definition should include the increased use of dissipative processes in the thermal part of the plant. (author)

  5. Volume reduction options for the management of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Lerch, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Volume reduction options that are now or soon will be available for low-level wastes are examined. These wastes generally are in the form of combustible solids, noncombustible solids, and wet wastes (solid/liquid). Initially, the wastes are collected and stored onsite. Preconditioning may be required, e.g., sorting, shredding, and classifying the solids into combustible and noncombustible fractions. The volume of combustible solids can be reduced by compaction, incineration/pyrolysis, acid digestion, or molten salt combustion. Options for reducing the volume of noncombustible solids include compaction, size reduction and decontamination, meltdown-casting, dissolution and electropolishing. Burnable wet wastes (e.g., organic wastes) can be evaporated or combusted; nonburnable wet wastes can be treated by various evaporative or nonevaporative processes. All radioactive waste processing operations result in some equipment contamination and the production of additional radioactively contaminated wastes (secondary wastes). The additional waste quantities must be considered in evaluating performance and overall volume reduction factors for the various systems. In the selection of an optimum waste management plan for a given facility, other important factors (e.g., relative stability of the waste product form) should be considered along with the savings accrued due to volume reduction

  6. Overview of experimental studies on vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Yamano, Norihiro; Maruyama, Yu; Kudo, Tamotsu; Sugimoto, Jun

    1994-12-01

    Experimental studies of vapor explosions were overviewed and currently available knowledge was summarized with emphasis on the large scale experiments. Since 1970s, quite a few large scale experiments have been performed, which have included several types such as pin geometry experiments simulating the early stages of severe accidents in nuclear reactors, and melt-coolant interaction experiments with drop/jet geometry or stratified geometry simulating the phenomena expected to take place after a large scale core melt-down. According to previous experimental results, following facts are clarified ; spontaneous explosions are not likely with saturated coolant and/or with high pressures ; the energy conversion ratio in large scale systems is in the range 0.1∼several percents ; if the coolant is sodium generally benign interaction is expected compared with the case of water coolant ; etc. Recently, accompanied with the development of numerical simulation codes for vapor explosions, considerable efforts are devoted into premixing experiments and one dimensional geometry experiments oriented to provide data for the comparison with numerical simulations. (author) 87 refs

  7. Impact of Zr metal and coking reactions on the fission product aerosol release during MCCI [Molten Core Concrete Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Davis, R.E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1987-01-01

    During a core meltdown accident in a light water reactor, molten core materials (corium) could leave the reactor vessel and interact with concrete. In this paper, the impact of the zirconium content of the corium pool and the coking reaction on the release of fission products during Molten Core Concrete Interactions (MCCI) are quantified using CORCON/MOD2 and VANESA computer codes. Detailed calculations show that the total aerosol generation is proportional to the zirconium content of the corium pool. Among the twelve fission product groups treated by the VANESA code, CsI, CsO 2 and Nb 2 O 5 are completely released over the course of the core/concrete interaction, while an insignificant quantity of Mo, Ru and ZrO 2 are predicted to be released. The release of BaO, SrO and CeO 2 increase with increased Zr content, while the releases of Te and La 2 O 3 are relatively unaffected by the Zr content of the corium pool. The impact of the coking reaction on the radiological releases is estimated to be significant; while the impact of the coking reaction on the aerosol production is insignificant

  8. Impact of Zr metal and coking reactions on the ex-vessel source term predictions of CORCON/VANESA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Davis, R.E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1987-01-01

    During a core meltdown accident in a LWR, molten core materials (corium) could leave the reactor vessel and interact with concrete. In this paper, the impact of the zirconium content of the corium pool and the coking reaction on the release of fission products are quantified using CORCON/Mod2 and VANESA computer codes. Detailed calculations show that the total aerosol generation is proportional to the zirconium content of the corium pool. Among the twelve fission product groups treated by the VANESA code, CsI, Cs 2 O and Nb 2 O 5 are completely released over the course of the core/concrete interaction, while an insignificant quantity of Mo, Ru and ZrO 2 are predicted to be released. The release of BaO, SrO and Ce 2 O increase, while the releases of Te and La 2 O 3 are relatively unaffected by the Zr content of the corium pool. The impact of the coking reaction on the radionuclide release and aerosol production was found to be insignificant

  9. Minding the Cyber-Physical Gap: Model-Based Analysis and Mitigation of Systemic Perception-Induced Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Mordecai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cyber-physical gap (CPG is the difference between the ‘real’ state of the world and the way the system perceives it. This discrepancy often stems from the limitations of sensing and data collection technologies and capabilities, and is inevitable at some degree in any cyber-physical system (CPS. Ignoring or misrepresenting such limitations during system modeling, specification, design, and analysis can potentially result in systemic misconceptions, disrupted functionality and performance, system failure, severe damage, and potential detrimental impacts on the system and its environment. We propose CPG-Aware Modeling & Engineering (CPGAME, a conceptual model-based approach to capturing, explaining, and mitigating the CPG. CPGAME enhances the systems engineer’s ability to cope with CPGs, mitigate them by design, and prevent erroneous decisions and actions. We demonstrate CPGAME by applying it for modeling and analysis of the 1979 Three Miles Island 2 nuclear accident, and show how its meltdown could be mitigated. We use ISO-19450:2015—Object Process Methodology as our conceptual modeling framework.

  10. Researches in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souchet, Y.

    2009-01-01

    This article comprises three parts: 1 - some general considerations aiming at explaining the main motivations of safety researches, and at briefly presenting the important role of some organisations in the international conciliation, and the most common approach used in safety researches (analytical experiments, calculation codes, global experiments); 2 - an overview of some of the main safety problems that are the object of worldwide research programs (natural disasters, industrial disasters, criticality, human and organisational factors, fuel behaviour in accidental situation, serious accidents: core meltdown, corium spreading, failure of the confinement building, radioactive releases). Considering the huge number of research topics, this part cannot be exhaustive and many topics are not approached; 3 - the presentation of two research programs addressing very different problems: the evaluation of accidental releases in the case of a serious accident (behaviour of iodine and B 4 C, air infiltration, fission products release) and the propagation of a fire in a facility (PRISME program). These two programs belong to an international framework involving several partners from countries involved in nuclear energy usage. (J.S.)

  11. A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitrich, L. W.

    1998-01-01

    The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop

  12. Web-based automation of green building rating index and life cycle cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzaib Khan, Jam; Zakaria, Rozana; Aminuddin, Eeydzah; IzieAdiana Abidin, Nur; Sahamir, Shaza Rina; Ahmad, Rosli; Nafis Abas, Darul

    2018-04-01

    Sudden decline in financial markets and economic meltdown has slow down adaptation and lowered interest of investors towards green certified buildings due to their higher initial costs. Similarly, it is essential to fetch investor’s attention towards more development of green buildings through automated tools for the construction projects. Though, historical dearth is found on the automation of green building rating tools that brings up an essential gap to develop an automated analog computerized programming tool. This paper present a proposed research aim to develop an integrated web-based automated analog computerized programming that applies green building rating assessment tool, green technology and life cycle cost analysis. It also emphasizes to identify variables of MyCrest and LCC to be integrated and developed in a framework then transformed into automated analog computerized programming. A mix methodology of qualitative and quantitative survey and its development portray the planned to carry MyCrest-LCC integration to an automated level. In this study, the preliminary literature review enriches better understanding of Green Building Rating Tools (GBRT) integration to LCC. The outcome of this research is a pave way for future researchers to integrate other efficient tool and parameters that contributes towards green buildings and future agendas.

  13. Recriticality, a Key Phenomenon to Investigate in Core Disruptive Accident Scenarios of Current and Future Fast Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Rineiski, A.; Flad, M.; Kriventsev, V.; Gabrielli, F.; Morita, K.

    2012-01-01

    Final comments and conclusions: • Modern plants, should have performed better under Fukushima type event. • In future fast reactor systems significantly higher active and passive safety features are installed, which should cope with events like Fukushima. • One important lesson: put a focus on rare initiators, accident routes and consequences that are neither expected nor have been observed, events that are categorized under ‘black swans’. • Importance of severe accident research demonstrated - both analytically and experimentally for assessing and interpreting accident scenarios and developments. Precondition for developing preventive & mitigative safety measures. Passive safety measures are in the focus of advanced design options and must work under conditions of multiple loads and aggravating events. • Fast reactor systems behavior as the SFR under severe accident conditions: – In fast spectrum systems as the SFR the core is not in its neutronically most reactive configuration and SFRs may be loaded with MAs for waste management; – Recriticalities have a high probability because of the higher enrichment levels; – Short time scales have to be envisioned for core melt-down; – Decay heat levels might be significantly higher, if MA bearing fuel is involved. • Improve design by measures for prevention and/or mitigation of recriticalities; – High reliability of simulations required for proof; • Assessment of fuel relocated on peripheral structures; • Preventive/mitigating measures should not replace containment measures

  14. SIMBATH 1976-1992, seventeen years of experimental investigation of key issues concerned with severe reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, A.; Peppler, W.; Will, H.

    1994-01-01

    The course of the initiating phase of severe fast reactor accidents is determined by early material motion. In simulation experiments (SIMBATH, simulation experiments in fuel element mock-ups with thermite) the behavior of single pin, 7 pin, 19 pin, 37 pin bundles undergoing meltdown was investigated. Thermite (Al + Fe 2 O 3 ) filled tubes were used to simulate fuel rods, while exothermal heat of the thermite reaction simulated the nuclear heat. The energy of 3.4 kJ per centimeter of pin length resulted in melting temperature of about 3200 K. SIMBATH is an out-of-pile experimental program with non-radioactive materials which provided the possibility to perform numerous experiments. The x-ray high speed photography used in the test enabled to visualise material motion and relocation qualitatively, and furthermore to gain quantitative results by additionally installed photodiodes. The results of the experiment serve as a database to evaluate physical phenomena relevant to be modelled by computer codes (SIMMER) and to verify the codes. The experiments were carried out either in stagnant sodium with an axial temperature gradient, or in flowing sodium, simulating unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) or unprotected transient overpower accidents (UTOP) conditions, respectively

  15. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800 0 C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm 2 ), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction

  16. Less Government is Good Government? Deregulation as an Undermining Principle of Financial Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Engartner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Since liberalization became the dominant global narrative the stock response to market shortcomings has been to “slim down” the state and deregulate. In most countries the slogan of “less government is good government” has become a constitutive feature of economic policy since the 1980s. Markets lie at the heart of every successful economy, and despite not necessarily working well on their own, the economic policy of deregulation has been one of the most persistent currents in the global economy. Based as it is on classical liberalism and – at least in its origins and leanings – neoclassical theory, deregulation aims to minimize the influence of the state. But in the context of the current financial and economic meltdown – the worst economic dislocation since the Great Crash of 1929-32 – “downsizing” the state causes growing turmoil. Global networking has made financial markets much more volatile and therefore much more susceptible to crisis.

  17. Post-accident heat removal research: A state of the art review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.; Schulenberg, T.

    1983-11-01

    For a realistic assessment of the consequence of extremely unlikely reactor accidents resulting in core degradation or core meltdown key questions are how to remove the decay heat from the reactor system and how to retain the radioactive core debris within the containment. Usually, this complex of questions is referred to as Post-Accident Heat Removal (PAHR). In this article the research work on PAHR performed by various institutions during the last decade has been reviewed. The main results have been summarized under the chapter headings ''Accident Scenarios,'' - ''Core Debris Accommodation Concepts,'' and ''PAHR Topics.'' Particular emphasis has been placed on the presentation of the following problems: characteristics and coolability of solid core debris in the vector vessel, heat removal from molten pools of core material, and core-melt interaction with structural materials. Some unresolved or insufficiently answered questions relating to special ''PAHR Topics'' have been mentioned or discussed at the end of the particular Chapter. Problem areas of major uncertainty have been identified and listed at the end of the review article. They include the following subjects: formation of debris beds and bed characteristics, post dryout behaviour of particle beds, long-term availability and proper location of heat sinks, creep rupture of structures under high thermal loads. (orig.) [de

  18. Effects of an alien ant invasion on abundance, behavior, and reproductive success of endemic island birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Naomi E; O'Dowd, Dennis J; Green, Peter T; Nally, Ralph Mac

    2008-10-01

    Biological invaders can reconfigure ecological networks in communities, which changes community structure, composition, and ecosystem function. We investigated whether impacts caused by the introduced yellow crazy ant (Anoplolepis gracilipes), a pantropical invader rapidly expanding its range, extend to higher-order consumers by comparing counts, behaviors, and nesting success of endemic forest birds in ant-invaded and uninvaded rainforest on Christmas Island (Indian Ocean). Point counts and direct behavioral observations showed that ant invasion altered abundances and behaviors of the bird species we examined: the Island Thrush (Turdus poliocephalus erythropleurus), Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps indica natalis), and Christmas Island White-eye (Zosterops natalis). The thrush, which frequents the forest floor, altered its foraging and reproductive behaviors in ant-invaded forest, where nest-site location changed, and nest success and juvenile counts were lower. Counts of the dove, which forages exclusively on the forest floor, were 9-14 times lower in ant-invaded forest. In contrast, counts and foraging success of the white-eye, a generalist feeder in the understory and canopy, were higher in ant-invaded forest, where mutualism between the ant and honeydew-secreting scale insects increased the abundance of scale-insect prey. These complex outcomes involved the interplay of direct interference by ants and altered resource availability and habitat structure caused indirectly by ant invasion. Ecological meltdown, rapidly unleashed by ant invasion, extended to these endemic forest birds and may affect key ecosystem processes, including seed dispersal.

  19. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denning, R. S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  20. Four-fluid model of PWR degraded cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearing, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the new two-dimensional, four-fluid fluid dynamics and heat transfer (FLUIDS) module of the MELPROG code. MELPROG is designed to give an integrated, mechanistic treatment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) core meltdown accidents from accident initiation to vessel melt-through. The code has a modular data storage and transfer structure, with each module providing the others with boundary conditions at each computational time step. Thus the FLUIDS module receives mass and energy source terms from the fuel pin module, the structures module, and the debris bed module, and radiation energy source terms from the radiation module. MELPROG, which models the reactor vessel, is also designed to model the vessel as a component in the TRAC/PF1 networking solution of a PWR reactor coolant system (RCS). The coupling between TRAC and MELPROG is implicit in the fluid dynamics of the reactor coolant (liquid water and steam) allowing an accurate simulation of the coupling between the vessel and the rest of the RCS during an accident. This paper deals specifically with the numerical model of fluid dynamics and heat transfer within the reactor vessel, which allows a much more realistic simulation (with less restrictive assumptions on physical behavior) of the accident than has been possible before

  1. Taking the moral hazard out of banking: the next fundamental step in financial reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Masera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The path between financial meltdown and moral hazard in banking is, at best, narrow and impervious. During the financial crisis, public support became the standard response to save the banks in difficulty, heightening and broadening the moral hazard issue: subordinated/senior debt holders and large depositors were bailed out and equity holders were partially sheltered. In the Eurozone, the implicit promise to bail-out governments in difficulty has encouraged SIFIs and other financial operators to speculate on the yield differential between sovereigns and the ECB money market interest rates. The policy framework proposed here is two-pronged: the EFSF should evolve to permit more flexible and wide-ranging interventions, and be able to manage sovereign debt restructuring; with respect to SIFIs, very early corporate, market and supervisory responses are suggested. Intervention of supervisory authorities with mandatory (special powers would occur before the threshold of non-viability and, on a gone-concern basis, in terms of a European resolution procedure.

  2. The physics of Wall Street a brief history of predicting the unpredictable

    CERN Document Server

    Weatherall, James Owen

    2013-01-01

    After the economic meltdown of 2008, Warren Buffett famously warned, “beware of geeks bearing formulas.” But as James Weatherall demonstrates, not all geeks are created equal. While many of the mathematicians and software engineers on Wall Street failed when their abstractions turned ugly in practice, a special breed of physicists has a much deeper history of revolutionizing finance. Taking us from fin-de-siècle Paris to Rat Pack-era Las Vegas, from wartime government labs to Yippie communes on the Pacific coast, Weatherall shows how physicists successfully brought their science to bear on some of the thorniest problems in economics, from options pricing to bubbles. The crisis was partly a failure of mathematical modeling. But even more, it was a failure of some very sophisticated financial institutions to think like physicists. Models—whether in science or finance—have limitations; they break down under certain conditions. And in 2008, sophisticated models fell into the hands of people who didn’t...

  3. Assessment of Mass Fraction and Melting Temperature for the Application of Limestone Concrete and Siliceous Concrete to Nuclear Reactor Basemat Considering Molten Core–Concrete Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojae Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe accident scenarios in nuclear reactors, such as nuclear meltdown, reveal that an extremely hot molten core may fall into the nuclear reactor cavity and seriously affect the safety of the nuclear containment vessel due to the chain reaction caused by the reaction between the molten core and concrete. This paper reports on research focused on the type and amount of vapor produced during the reaction between a high-temperature molten core and concrete, as well as on the erosion rate of concrete and the heat transfer characteristics at its vicinity. This study identifies the mass fraction and melting temperature as the most influential properties of concrete necessary for a safety analysis conducted in relation to the thermal interaction between the molten core and the basemat concrete. The types of concrete that are actually used in nuclear reactor cavities were investigated. The H2O content in concrete required for the computation of the relative amount of gases generated by the chemical reaction of the vapor, the quantity of CO2 necessary for computing the cooling speed of the molten core, and the melting temperature of concrete are evaluated experimentally for the molten core–concrete interaction analysis.

  4. Uso de la familia léxica de sovereignty en los discursos de la Presidencia del Banco Central Europeo (2003-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Morales

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The financial crisis stemming from the US subprime mortgage meltdown represented a setback for the European economy that still affects many European countries. The European Central Bank (ECB, a key monetary policy institution, is one of the major actors shaping European neoliberal financial discourse. An earlier lexicometric analysis of a corpus of speeches delivered by ECB presidents between 2003 and 2016 revealed a high specificity index for the term sovereignty in certain years. This article aims to analyze how the ECB justifies transferring, inter alia, financial and national sovereignty to the European Union and its institutions and what the ECB refers to when utilizing this highly symbolic concept from public discourse. Ultimately, this work aims to determine how the ECB, “Europe’s illicit emperor” (Bouchard 2013, frames its discourse of economic domination. Consequently, this article quantitatively (using Lexico 3.6 and qualitatively analyses the various forms in this lexical family (sovereignty, sovereignties, sovereign, sovereigns to assess how they have evolved over time in the speeches given by ECB presidents. It adopts a methodology steeped in the theory and practice of discourse analysis, studying the contexts in which the selected terms appear in order to shed light on the implications of these changing backdrops

  5. Macroeconomic Dynamics and Financial Crisis in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Olusegun Olowe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work as an empirical economics assessment examined the role of domestic macroeconomic policies with emphasis on the management of the impact of macroeconomic variables on the global financial crisis in Nigeria.. It applies VAR framework on annual time series data from 1969 to 2009. The paper opines that the Nigerian economy is far from converging towards a sustainable equilibrium in the short run. The paper suggests that attitudinal change, monetary and fiscal policies could be used to address the Nigerian version of the global financial crisis. However, the right mix of these policies to avoid conflicts in the light of dampening effects of the global financial melt-down as well as the possible effects of the global financial crisis and macroeconomic fluctuations on economic development in Nigeria is of relevance..The direction and magnitude of relevant policy to stimulate increased government intervention, it was observed that there is the need for comparative dynamics of economies in order to return to the path of sustainable growth and development

  6. Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident, details of accident event and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamana, Hajimu

    2011-01-01

    Due to the massive earthquake and devastating Tsunami happened on March 11th, 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered serious loss of core cooling function. It led to extensive core meltdowns of three units, and to serious building failures caused by hydrogen explosion which as generated from the severe accident process. As a result, massive amount of radioactive nuclides were released to the atmosphere resulting in the large regional contamination and radiation exposure to the public. The restoration of the plants is ongoing, and the accomplishment of cold shut down of three units is expected before the end of January 2012. Discussions on the possible measures to be taken after the completion of current restoration program, has been started under the frame of Atomic Energy Commission. It will draw a roadmap for further restoration and clean-up, including removal of spent fuels, inner inspection of the damaged cores, as well as removal of damaged fuels and debris. This paper reviews the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, in terms of the technical details of accident process, current status, and future prospect of restoration. (author)

  7. Models for describing the behaviour of light water reactors in serious accidents for the programs SCDAP/RELAP5, ATHLET/SA, CATHARE/ICARE, MELCOR etc.. First technical report on BMFT-sponsored research project 1500 831 7: Comparative assessment of different computer codes for severe accident analysis, contribution to the ATHLET/CD code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmeier, U.; Unger, H.

    1992-01-01

    Within the scope of the project BMFT No. 15008317 entitled ''Comparative Assessment of Different Computer Codws for Severe Accident Analysis, Contribution to the ATHLET/SA-Code Development'' the codes ATHLET/SA, CATHARE/ICARE, MELCOR and SCDAP/RELAP5 are investigated. Emphasis is put on a comparison and an assessment of the governing modelling features implemented and operating in the codes under consideration. The codes are evaluated and compared on the base of selected experiments (especially the CORA experimental program of the Karlsruhe Research Center) and relevant severe accident scenarios. The present report is a reference study dealing with the governing models implemented in the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5, ATHLET/SA, CATHARE/ICARE, MELCOR, KESS-III, MAAP and MELPROG/TRAC. Emphaisis is laid on the following models (molstly implemented in form of modules in the respective codes) dealing with: - thermal hydraulics; - heat generation and heat structures; - Radiation heat transfer; - mechanical (rod) behaviour; - core heatup, meltdown and relocation; - chemical reaction; - fission product release and transport; - material properties; - specific components. (orig.) [de

  8. Summary of NRC LWR safety research programs on fuel behavior, metallurgy/materials and operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.

    1979-09-01

    The NRC light-water reactor safety-research program is part of the NRC regulatory program for ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. This paper summarizes the results of NRC-sponsored research into fuel behavior, metallurgy and materials, and operational safety. The fuel behavior research program provides a detailed understanding of the response of nuclear fuel assemblies to postulated off-normal or accident conditions. Fuel behavior research includes studies of basic fuel rod properties, in-reactor tests, computer code development, fission product release and fuel meltdown. The metallurgy and materials research program provides independent confirmation of the safe design of reactor vessels and piping. This program includes studies on fracture mechanics, irradiation embrittlement, stress corrosion, crack growth, and nondestructive examination. The operational safety research provides direct assistance to NRC officials concerned with the operational and operational-safety aspects of nuclear power plants. The topics currently being addressed include qualification testing evaluation, fire protection, human factors, and noise diagnostics

  9. “Wer jetzt kein Haus hat, baut sich keines mehr”. Notes on Bruce O’Neill’s "The Space of Boredom"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Tudorie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bruce O’Neill describes homeless men and women in Bucharest who could not navigate the downward spiral which followed the meltdown of the state-run economy after 1989. Deprived of the culturally treasured anchors of work, home, and family, and unable to participate in anything recognizably meaningful, these individuals are forced into a position of malignant contemplation, even when busy surviving. It is an experience of paralyzed restlessness which resonates with the ruins they zigzag through. The Space of Boredom captures this landscape convincingly, and in elegant prose. The book moves effortlessly from the discussion of scholarly works in a number of fields, to observation of sometimes cinematic quality. It is well argued, abundantly researched, and clear about its theoretical assumptions. If some questions remain to be answered, at least to this reader, this may be an artifact of background. Assumptions, including important ones about the nature of affects, and about boredom itself, may not be shared. Some questions of this kind will be raised in the following.

  10. What nuclear industry after Fukushima?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power experienced a fast growth during the 70's and 80's, but a quasi-stagnation during the 90's. Since the beginning of the 21. century, a so-called renaissance could be witnessed, fuelled by concerns about energy security of supply, volatility of oil and gas prices, fear of an incoming 'peak oil', and, last but not least, the threat of global climate change due to the anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse effect gases. Then, on March 11 2011, a monster earthquake followed by a violent tsunami triggered an accident which all but destroyed four nuclear reactors on the Fukushima-Daiichi site, on the east coast of Honshu, the main Japanese island. There was meltdown in three reactor cores, hydrogen explosions which blew off the upper structures of four reactor buildings, and massive radioactive contamination of a spread of land north-west of the site as well as radioactive releases to the ocean. This accident triggered reactions of various intensities throughout the world, awakening the fears, and questions raised 25 years before by the Chernobyl accident. But the tsunami did not make the fundamentals of the renaissance disappear. After a pause, to fully learn lessons from the accident, the renaissance is likely to start again, all the much since the 'third generation' nuclear plants would have survived unscathed the Fukushima earthquake and tsunami. (author)

  11. What nuclear industry after Fukushima?; Quel nucleaire apres Fukushima?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barre, Bertrand [Institut national des sciences et techniques nucleaires, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear power experienced a fast growth during the 70's and 80's, but a quasi-stagnation during the 90's. Since the beginning of the 21. century, a so-called renaissance could be witnessed, fuelled by concerns about energy security of supply, volatility of oil and gas prices, fear of an incoming 'peak oil', and, last but not least, the threat of global climate change due to the anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse effect gases. Then, on March 11 2011, a monster earthquake followed by a violent tsunami triggered an accident which all but destroyed four nuclear reactors on the Fukushima-Daiichi site, on the east coast of Honshu, the main Japanese island. There was meltdown in three reactor cores, hydrogen explosions which blew off the upper structures of four reactor buildings, and massive radioactive contamination of a spread of land north-west of the site as well as radioactive releases to the ocean. This accident triggered reactions of various intensities throughout the world, awakening the fears, and questions raised 25 years before by the Chernobyl accident. But the tsunami did not make the fundamentals of the renaissance disappear. After a pause, to fully learn lessons from the accident, the renaissance is likely to start again, all the much since the 'third generation' nuclear plants would have survived unscathed the Fukushima earthquake and tsunami. (author)

  12. Consideration of BORAX-type reactivity accidents applied to research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Meignen, Renaud; Bourgois, Thierry; Biaut, Guillaume; Mireau, Jean-Pierre; Natta, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Most of the research reactors discussed in this document are pool-type reactors in which the reactor vessel and some of the reactor coolant systems are located in a pool of water. These reactors generally use fuel in plate assemblies formed by a compact layer of uranium (or U 3 Si 2 ) and aluminium particles, sandwiched between two thin layers of aluminium serving as cladding. The fuel melting process begins at 660 deg. C when the aluminium melts, while the uranium (or U 3 Si 2 ) particles may remain solid. The accident that occurred in the American SL-1 reactor in 1961, together with tests carried out in the United States as of 1954 in the BORAX-1 reactor and then, in 1962, in the SPERT-1 reactor, showed that a sudden substantial addition of reactivity in this type of reactor could lead to explosive mechanisms caused by degradation, or even fast meltdown, of part of the reactor core. This is what is known as a 'BORAX-type' accident. The aim of this document is first to briefly recall the circumstances of the SL-1 reactor accident, the lessons learned, how this operational feedback has been factored into the design of various research reactors around the world and, second, to describe the approach taken by France with regard to this type of accident and how, led by IRSN, this approach has evolved in the last decade. (authors)

  13. Missiles caused by severe pressurized-water reactor accidients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    1995-01-01

    For future pressurized-water reactors, which should be designed against core-meltdown accidents, missiles generated inside the containment present a severe problem for its integrity. The masses and geometries of the missiles, as well as their velocities, may vary to a great extent. Therefore a reliable proof of the containment integrity is very difficult. In this article the potential sources of missiles are discussed, and the conclusion was reached that the generation of heavy missiles must be prevented. Steam explosions must not damage the reactor vessel head. Thus fragments of the head cannot become missiles that endanger the containment shell. Furthermore, during a melt-through failure of the reactor vessel under high pressure, the resulting forces must not catapult the whole vessel against the containment shell. Only missiles caused by hydrogen explosions may be tolerable, but shielding structures that protect the containment shell may be required. Further investigations are necessary. Finally, measures are described showing that the generation of heavy missiles can indeed be prevented. Investigations are currently being carried out that will confirm the strength of the reactor vessel head. In addition, a device for retaining the fragments of a failing reactor vessel is discussed

  14. On the improvement of the response capability of the control room operator in a pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant in a severe earthquake through the use of emergency response guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent probabilistic risk assessment studies indicate that potential accidents initiated by large earthquakes are among the major contributors to public risk from nuclear power plants. During a severe earthquake, the symptoms presented to operators may be unreliable and may endanger the validity of actions in emergency response guidelines (ERGs). The objective of the present study is to improve the operator capability of responding to seismic damage through the use of ERGS. The methods used are to deterministically identify the possible weakness of ERGs, given a severe earthquake, and to probabilistically evaluate those identified weaknesses. Several cases are postulated. Each of them contains system failures with or without indicator failures and leads the core to meltdown conditions if the operator follows the ERGs strictly without any deviation. The likelihood of each case is estimated. A LISP program is developed to estimate the plant seismic risk with which the relative risk contribution of each postulated case is estimated. As a result, ten cases are postulated and possible remedies for each case are discussed. The likelihood of each case is estimated to be not negligible. The identified indicator failures should be considered in future refinement of the ERGS. The development of an expert system to provide remedial procedures should be considered after a more thorough study in which many more cases are postulated

  15. Evolutionary ecology of virus emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, John J

    2017-02-01

    The cross-species transmission of viruses into new host populations, termed virus emergence, is a significant issue in public health, agriculture, wildlife management, and related fields. Virus emergence requires overlap between host populations, alterations in virus genetics to permit infection of new hosts, and adaptation to novel hosts such that between-host transmission is sustainable, all of which are the purview of the fields of ecology and evolution. A firm understanding of the ecology of viruses and how they evolve is required for understanding how and why viruses emerge. In this paper, I address the evolutionary mechanisms of virus emergence and how they relate to virus ecology. I argue that, while virus acquisition of the ability to infect new hosts is not difficult, limited evolutionary trajectories to sustained virus between-host transmission and the combined effects of mutational meltdown, bottlenecking, demographic stochasticity, density dependence, and genetic erosion in ecological sinks limit most emergence events to dead-end spillover infections. Despite the relative rarity of pandemic emerging viruses, the potential of viruses to search evolutionary space and find means to spread epidemically and the consequences of pandemic viruses that do emerge necessitate sustained attention to virus research, surveillance, prophylaxis, and treatment. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. In-situ Blockage Monitoring of Sensing Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijaz Ahmed Mangi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A reactor vessel level monitoring system measures the water level in a reactor during normal operation and abnormal conditions. A drop in the water level can expose nuclear fuel, which may lead to fuel meltdown and radiation spread in accident conditions. A level monitoring system mainly consists of a sensing line and pressure transmitter. Over a period of time boron sediments or other impurities can clog the line which may degrade the accuracy of the monitoring system. The aim of this study is to determine blockage in a sensing line using the energy of the composite signal. An equivalent Pi circuit model is used to simulate blockages in the sensing line and the system's response is examined under different blockage levels. Composite signals obtained from the model and plant's unblocked and blocked channels are decomposed into six levels of details and approximations using a wavelet filter bank. The percentage of energy is calculated at each level for approximations. It is observed that the percentage of energy reduces as the blockage level in the sensing line increases. The results of the model and operational data are well correlated. Thus, in our opinion variation in the energy levels of approximations can be used as an index to determine the presence and degree of blockage in a sensing line.

  17. The changing face of Hanford security 1990--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thielman, J.

    1995-01-01

    The meltdown of the Cold War was a shock to the systems built to cope with it. At the DOE's Hanford Site in Washington State, a world-class safeguards and security system was suddenly out of step with the times. The level of protection for nuclear and classified materials was exceptional. But the cost was high and the defense facilities that funded security were closing down. The defense mission had created an umbrella of security over the sprawling Hanford Site. Helicopters designed to ferry special response teams to any trouble spot on the 1,456 square-kilometer site made the umbrella analogy almost literally true. Facilities were grouped into areas, fenced off like a military base, and entrance required a badge check for everyone. Within the fence, additional rings of protection were set up around security interests or targets. The security was effective, but costly to operate and inconvenient for employees and visitors alike. Moreover, the umbrella meant that virtually all employees needed a security clearance just to get to work, whether they worked on classified or unclassified projects. Clearly, some fundamental rethinking of safeguards and security was needed. The effort to meet that challenge is the story of transition at Hanford and documented here

  18. Pectin from Citrus Canning Wastewater as Potential Fat Replacer in Ice Cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pectin had been recovered from canning wastewater produced by chemical treatment of segment membrane during preparation of canned citrus in our previous research. The purpose of this study was to characterize the extracted pectin from canning wastewater, and to evaluate its application as a fat alternative to replace fat in ice cream. The monosaccharide composition and rheological properties of the pectin were determined. The influences of fat reduction and pectin addition on the physicochemical, rheological and sensory properties of low-fat ice cream were determined. The rheological results showed that pectin solutions were typical pseudoplastic fluids. The addition of pectin in ice cream can cause an increase in viscosity, overrun, and hardness, and a decrease in meltdown of the ice cream. When 0.72% pectin (w/w is incorporated into ice cream, a prototype product of ice cream with 45% lower fat content compared to the control was made. Results indicated that their qualities such as appearance, flavor, and taste were not significantly different. The low-fat ice cream had higher smoothness scores and lower mouth-coating scores. Hence, pectin extracted from citrus canning wastewater can be potentially used as fat replacer in ice cream, which benefits both the environment and the food industry.

  19. Moral Education, Mindfulness, and Social Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Hyland

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there have recently been indications in U.K. educational policy and practice of a movement away from the dominance of economic capital and employability as primary goals of education and toward social capital with an emphasis on the affective domain and greater concerns with personal and social well-being, the prevailing instrumentalist and economistic function of learning still reigns supreme. Moreover, even though the neo-liberal hegemony and associated materialistic culture have been severely dented following the 2008 financial meltdown and current global economic recession, there are few signs of any marked trends away from selfish capitalism. This article suggests ways of foregrounding social capital through programs that incorporate “mindfulness”—non-judgmental present moment attention and awareness drawn from Buddhist traditions—as a means of rejuvenating the affective domain of learning concerned with emotions and values. The analysis will also address the recent challenge to what has been (mistakenly in my view called a “therapeutic turn” in education claimed by critics who suggest that learning is or should be about intellectual-cognitive matters not feelings or emotional development. In the process, the links between mindfulness, the affective domain, and social engagement will be explored as ways of developing the social values that support community well-being and trust.

  20. Never be allowable for those responsible for 3.11 Fukushima nuclear accident not to be aware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Hidekatsu

    2013-01-01

    The author repeatedly asked at Diet whether safety of Japanese aged Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) could be assured and whether it could be allowable for NPPs to construct in earthquake country of Japan judging from present state of Japanese science and technology level. Diet written inquiry for government was also prepared. Fukushima accident could be imagined and prevented if countermeasures against all power losses were prepared following the alert given when loss of external power due to collapse of transmission iron tower by land slide was observed in April 2005 and 'pull tide' and 'push tide' occurred at the Giant Tsunami of Chile Earthquake in May 1960. Responsibility of not responding to the alert should be taken by TEPCO and successive Cabinets. Lack of such adequate measures for severe accident should be also responsible for TEPCO and Cabinet. Response after all power losses should be firstly focused on depressurization of pressure vessel and seawater injection via hydrant line so as to prevent meltdown and contamination. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Ever vigilant: maternal support of participation in daily life for boys with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Elizabeth

    2010-02-01

    This study presents emergent findings from a qualitative study of caregivers' well-being that illuminates why caregivers of children with autism are often found to be more stressed by their caregiving than caregivers of children with other disabilities. Nine mothers with diverse backgrounds whose sons had autism spectrum disorders participated. Data were gathered through intensive interviewing and analyzed using a deductive interpretive approach. Mothers characterized their caregiving as vigilance rather than burden. Yet, this vigilance was highly fatiguing. Mothers intensely attended to their children's activities. This intense focus promoted participation in self-care, leisure, and social activities, and prevented frustration and behavioral meltdowns. Mothers also performed "forensic analyses" to understand the root cause of participation problems. This parenting was intensive because mothers oversaw the children's activities at all times even during periods when mothers of typical children could take breaks. The children's continuing participation problems included limited self-care skills, difficulties in problem solving in novel situations, and lack of leisure skills. This intense vigilance may be a key factor in maternal health issues, such as anxiety and depression. While these problems fall within the scope of occupational therapy's expertise, it appears that many of these issues were not addressed by the current service-delivery models, leaving families to continue to struggle and the children to lack the skills for independent living as adults.

  2. The changing face of Hanford security 1990--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielman, J.

    1995-12-01

    The meltdown of the Cold War was a shock to the systems built to cope with it. At the DOE`s Hanford Site in Washington State, a world-class safeguards and security system was suddenly out of step with the times. The level of protection for nuclear and classified materials was exceptional. But the cost was high and the defense facilities that funded security were closing down. The defense mission had created an umbrella of security over the sprawling Hanford Site. Helicopters designed to ferry special response teams to any trouble spot on the 1,456 square-kilometer site made the umbrella analogy almost literally true. Facilities were grouped into areas, fenced off like a military base, and entrance required a badge check for everyone. Within the fence, additional rings of protection were set up around security interests or targets. The security was effective, but costly to operate and inconvenient for employees and visitors alike. Moreover, the umbrella meant that virtually all employees needed a security clearance just to get to work, whether they worked on classified or unclassified projects. Clearly, some fundamental rethinking of safeguards and security was needed. The effort to meet that challenge is the story of transition at Hanford and documented here.

  3. Exploratory study of molten core material/concrete interactions, July 1975--March 1977. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.; Dahlgren, D.A.; Muir, J.F.; Murfin, W.D.

    1978-02-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between high-temperature molten materials and structural concrete is described. The experimental efforts focused on the interaction of melts of reactor core materials weighing 12 to 200 kg at temperatures 1700 to 2800/sup 0/C with calcareous and basaltic concrete representative of that found in existing light-water nuclear reactors. Observations concerning the rate and mode of melt penetration into concrete, the nature and generation rate of gases liberated during the interaction, and heat transfer from the melt to the concrete are described. Concrete erosion is shown to be primarily a melting process with little contribution from mechanical spallation. Water and carbon dioxide thermally released from the concrete are extensively reduced to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Heat transfer from the melt to the concrete is shown to be dependent on gas generation rate and crucible geometry. Interpretation of results from the interaction experiments is supported by separate studies of the thermal decomposition of concretes, response of bulk concrete to intense heat fluxes (28 to 280 W/cm/sup 2/), and heat transfer from molten materials to decomposing solids. The experimental results are compared to assumptions made in previous analytic studies of core meltdown accidents in light-water nuclear reactors. A preliminary computer code, INTER, which models and extrapolates results of the experimental program is described. The code allows estimation of the effect of physical parameters on the nature of the melt/concrete interaction.

  4. Partisan amplification of risk: American perceptions of nuclear energy risk in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Sara K.; Cacciatore, Michael A.; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A.; Runge, Kristin; Su, Leona Y.; Kim, Jiyoun; Xenos, Michael; Corley, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This study examines risk perceptions toward nuclear power before and after the Fukushima Daiichi disaster using nationally representative survey samples of American adults. Scope: On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 8.4 earthquake, the largest in the nation's history, occurred off the coast of Japan. The earthquake produced a devastating tsunami that flooded areas of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant and resulted in a loss of power to the plant's cooling system. In the weeks that followed, the world watched as Japanese and international nuclear power safety experts scrambled to contain the damage and prevent a full meltdown. Although the Fukushima Daiichi disaster was heavily covered in media, there is little empirical research on how this coverage impacted audience risk perceptions. Our analysis goes beyond examining aggregate risk perceptions, instead focusing on how specific sub-populations responded to the disaster. Conclusion: We found that ideological groups responded differently to the events in Japan. In particular, risk perceptions among conservatives decreased following the incident. Moreover, we found that media use exacerbated these effects. We discuss possible explanations for these findings. - Highlights: • We explored American risk perceptions of nuclear energy pre- and post-Fukushima. • Impacts of the disaster endured, likely due to relatively high media coverage. • Conservatives who paid more attention to media perceived less risk post-Fukushima. • Media coverage can serve to polarize opinions instead of mainstreaming them

  5. Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

    2012-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

  6. Invasional interference due to similar inter- and intraspecific competition between invaders may affect management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschert, Emily Sofia Jalics; Shea, Katriona

    2012-07-01

    As the number of biological invasions increases, the potential for invader-invader interactions also rises. The effect of multiple invaders can be superadditive (invasional meltdown), additive, or subadditive (invasional interference); which of these situations occurs has critical implications for prioritization of management efforts. Carduus nutans and C. acanthoides, two congeneric invasive weeds, have a striking, segregated distribution in central Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Possible hypotheses for this pattern include invasion history and chance, direct competition, or negative interactions mediated by other species, such as shared pollinators. To explore the role of resource competition in generating this pattern, we conducted three related experiments using a response-surface design throughout the life cycles of two cohorts. Although these species have similar niche requirements, we found no differential response to competition between conspecifics vs. congeners. The response to combined density was relatively weak for both species. While direct competitive interactions do not explain the segregated distributional patterns of these two species, we predict that invasions of either species singly, or both species together, would have similar impacts. When prioritizing which areas to target to prevent the spread of one of the species, it is better to focus on areas as yet unaffected by its congener; where the congener is already present, invasional interference makes it unlikely that the net effect will change.

  7. Effects of Magnetite Aggregate and Steel Powder on Thermal Conductivity and Porosity in Concrete for Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among many engineering advantages in concrete, low thermal conductivity is an attractive property. Concrete has been widely used for nuclear vessels and plant facilities for its excellent radiation shielding. The heat isolation through low thermal conductivity is actually positive for nuclear power plant concrete; however the property may cause adverse effect when fires and melt-down occur in nuclear vessel since cooling down from outer surface is almost impossible due to very low thermal conductivity. If concrete containing atomic reactor has higher thermal conductivity, the explosion risk of conductive may be partially reduced. This paper presents high thermally conductive concrete development. For the work, magnetite with varying replacements of normal aggregates and steel powder of 1.5% of volume are considered, and the equivalent thermal conductivity is evaluated. Only when the replacement ratio goes up to 30%, thermal conductivity increases rapidly to 2.5 times. Addition of steel powder is evaluated to be effective by 1.08~1.15 times. In order to evaluate the improvement of thermal conductivity, several models like ACI, DEMM, and MEM are studied, and their results are compared with test results. In the present work, the effects of steel powder and magnetite aggregate are studied not only for strength development but also for thermal behavior based on porosity.

  8. Reflections on the value concept in accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Buys

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent meltdown in global finances and the reasons for it may make people doubtful about the stewardship function of accounting. In the global financial markets, there is a great fascination with the reality that accounting values intend to reflect. However, what many people considered valuable is now suddenly of no value. The question can therefore be asked what is meant by the value concept as a foundation to modern-day accountancy. “Value” is a concept that is open to different interpretations, based on the needs, perspectives and personal values of the interpreter. This article aims to reflect on the value concept from an accounting perspective in analysing the fundamental quali-tative perspectives and how these perspectives might affect the quantitative value measurements, as reported in the financial statements. From a quantitative perspective, accounttancy aims to measure and report the monetary values of items. However, there is a move towards a mixed valuation model with many financial statements, including both historical cost and value-based accounting information. The article concludes that this questionable development opens up many additional and subjective interpretations of accounting value measurement and reporting. Both valuation measurement methods have merit when considered in the overall purpose of accounting information. However, subjective value-based mea-surements may cast a shadow of doubt on the reliability and comparability requirements of accounting value information.

  9. Outlook of the accident at Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plants and issues concerning radioactive materials in environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) affected by a great earthquake finally suffered reactor core meltdown with loss of all cooling capability and discharged a large amount of radioactive materials to the environment. Local areas in the northwest direction from NPPs were highly contaminated with radioactive materials. In order to reduce radiation exposure, several kinds of decontamination works had been tested in contaminated areas of primary school and kindergarten or residential houses with no evacuation. Radiation mini-hotspots were scattered. Contaminated soils and rubbles having cesium of high concentration in the order of several ten or hundreds kBq/kg were accumulated in large amounts of radioactive wastes and their disposal became a big issue. Related safety guidelines were proposed based on radioactive waste disposal for nuclear facilities as well as radiation dose control of neighboring residents and disposal workers, which would not be applicable to current state of Fukushima in a high radiation background. Establishment of new radiation protection rule was highly needed to deal with this emergency based on reality within and outside the Fukushima NPPs. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Kunugita, Naoki; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no death or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious disease. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. (author)

  11. Developing Fully Coupled Dynamical Reactor Core Isolation System Models in RELAP-7 for Extended Station Black-Out Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-04-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup water to the reactor vessel for core cooling when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. It was one of the very few safety systems still available during the Fukushima Daiichi accidents after the tsunamis hit the plants and the system successfully delayed the core meltdown for a few days for unit 2 & 3. Therefore, detailed models for RCIC system components are indispensable to understand extended station black-out accidents (SBO) for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the new generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, major components to simulate the RCIC system have been developed. This paper describes the models for those components such as turbine, pump, and wet well. Selected individual component test simulations and a simplified SBO simulation up to but before core damage is presented. The successful implementation of the simplified RCIC and wet well models paves the way to further improve the models for safety analysis by including more detailed physical processes in the near future.

  12. Posttest examination of the VVER-1000 fuel rod bundle CORA-W2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepold, L.

    1995-06-01

    The bundle meltdown experiment CORA-W2, representing the behavior of a Russian type VVER-1000 fuel element, with one B 4 C/stainless steel absorber rod was selected by the OECD/CSNI as International Standard Problem (ISP-36). The experimental results of CORA-W2 serve as data base for comparison with analytical predictions of the high-temperature material behavior by various code systems. The first part of the experimental results is described in KfK 5363 (1994), the second part is documented in this report which contains the destructive post-test examination results. The metallographical and analytical (SEM/EDX) post-test examinations were performed in Germany and Russia and are summarized in five individual contributions. The upper half of the bundle is completely oxidized, the lower half has kept the fuel rods relatively intact. The post-test examination results show the strong impact of the B 4 C absorber rod and the stainless steel grid spacers on the ''low-temperature'' bundle damage initiation and progression. The B 4 C absorber rod completely disappeared in the upper half of the bundle. The multicomponent melts relocated and formed coolant channel blockages on solidification with a maximum extent of about 30% in the lower part of the bundle. At temperatures above the melting point of the ZrNb1 cladding extensive fuel dissolution occurred. (orig.) [de

  13. FUKUSHIMA – 25 YEARS AFTER CHERNOBYL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grzesik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers health risk of Japanese population and neighboring countries being the consequence of the major accident (level 7 on INES scale in Fukushima Dai-ichi I nuclear power station. On March 11 an earthquake of magnitude 9 on Richter scale, off the Pacific coast of the Japanese main land, caused a massive tsunami that crippled the cooling systems at the nuclear plant. That led to reactor meltdowns, hydrogen explosions, and major release of radioactive material into the air. To enable a better understanding of the different and severe consequences of the accident, the article describes the physical background of functioning of nuclear reactors, the hypothetical reasons of damages and interference of their operations, the mechanism of releasing radioactive pollutants into the atmosphere and the consequences for the population living in the area, on which radioactive fallout is observed The accident in Fukushima is remarkable because for the first time considerable amounts of plutonium isotope 239Pu were released into the environment. The author presents his negative opinion concerning the prospect that nuclear power stations will be 100% failure-free and will be totally safe for human population. The Fukushima nuclear disaster is the third major accident known in the history of nuclear power plants caused or enabled by man. Attention is also paid to phenomenon of lobbing pro existence and development of nuclear power. It is motivated by selfish corporation interest in which representatives of scientific community, industrial corporations and military bodies play a significant role.

  14. Impacts modeling using the SPH particulate method. Case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debord, R.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is the modeling of the impact of melted metal on the reactor vessel head in the case of a core-meltdown accident. Modeling using the classical finite-element method alone is not sufficient but requires a coupling with particulate methods in order to take into account the behaviour of the corium. After a general introduction about particulate methods, the Nabor and SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) methods are described. Then, the theoretical and numerical reliability of the SPH method is determined using simple cases. In particular, the number of neighbours significantly influences the preciseness of calculations. Also, the mesh of the structure must be adapted to the mesh of the fluid in order to reduce the edge effects. Finally, this study has shown that the values of artificial velocity coefficients used in the simulation of the BERDA test performed by the FZK Karlsruhe (Germany) are not correct. The domain of use of these coefficients was precised during a low speed impact. (J.S.)

  15. Seasonal variation in the fate of seeds under contrasting logging regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Fleury

    Full Text Available Seed predators and dispersers may drive the speed and structure of forest regeneration in natural ecosystems. Rodents and ants prey upon and disperse seeds, yet empirical studies on the magnitude of these effects are lacking. Here, we examined the role of ants and rodents on seed predation in 4 plant species in a successional gradient on a tropical rainforest island. We found that (1 seeds are mostly consumed rather than dispersed; (2 rates of seed predation vary by habitat, season, and species; (3 seed size, shape, and hardness do not affect the probability of being depredated. Rodents were responsible for 70% of seed predation and were negligible (0.14% seed dispersers, whereas ants were responsible for only 2% of seed predation and for no dispersal. We detected seasonal and habitat effects on seed loss, with higher seed predation occurring during the wet season and in old-growth forests. In the absence of predators regulating seed-consumer populations, the densities of these resilient animals explode to the detriment of natural regeneration and may reduce diversity and carrying capacity for consumers and eventually lead to ecological meltdown.

  16. Investigation of molten fuel coolant interaction phenomena using real time X-ray imaging of simulated woods metal-water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Kumar Acharya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In liquid metal fast breeder reactors, postulated failures of the plant protection system may lead to serious unprotected accidental consequences. Unprotected transients are generically categorized as transient overpower accidents and transient under cooling accidents. In both cases, core meltdown may occur and this can lead to a molten fuel coolant interaction (MFCI. The understanding of MFCI phenomena is essential for study of debris coolability and characteristics during post-accident heat removal. Sodium is used as coolant in liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Viewing inside sodium at elevated temperature is impossible because of its opaqueness. In the present study, a methodology to depict MFCI phenomena using a flat panel detector based imaging system (i.e., real time radiography is brought out using a woods metal-water experimental facility which simulates the UO2-Na interaction. The developed imaging system can capture attributes of the MFCI process like jet breakup length, jet front velocity, fragmented particle size, and a profile of the debris bed using digital image processing methods like image filtering, segmentation, and edge detection. This paper describes the MFCI process and developed imaging methodology to capture MFCI attributes which are directly related to the safe aspects of a sodium fast reactor.

  17. Development of a research simulator for the study of human factors and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, R.; Shibuya, S.

    1999-01-01

    A research simulator of nuclear power plant for Human Factors was developed. It simulates the behaviors of the 1100MWe BWR nuclear power plant and has almost same functions ant scope of the simulation as a full-scope training simulator. Physical models installed in the system enable us to execute experiments with multi-malfunction scenario. A severe accident simulation package replaces the running simulation code when the maximum core temperature exceeds 1200 deg C and the core approaches meltdown conditions. The central control panel was simulated by soft panels, indicator and operational switches on the panels by computer graphics, displayed on 22 console boxes containing CRT. The introduction of soft panels and EWSs connected with LAN accomplished flexibility and extendibility. Some experiments by using the simulator were executed and the system has been improved based on the experience from the experiments. It is important to evaluate the effectiveness of any new system by using an actual plant size research simulator before its practical application to keep steady and safe operation of nuclear power plants. (author)

  18. SSFI and SSOMI new method of evaluating design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolson, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The NRC has developed a new inspection method which has proven its effectiveness in evaluating design organizations. The new method is used in two types of NRC inspections, Safety System Functional Inspection (SSFI), and Safety System Outage Modification Inspection (SSOMI). The SSFI/SSOMI audits were developed following an event which brought a nuclear power plant close to a core meltdown. That event was caused by a series of problems which would not have been found using conventional methods. The SSFI and SSOMI audits involve intense technical evaluation of a nuclear system to determine wheter the system will function as designed. The SSFI/SSOMI method normally uses eight to fifteen engineers with different fields of expertise to evaluate a system, or a change to a system in the case of a SSOMI. The effectiveness of each engineer's input is amplified in a series of open, questioning, free-wheeling, brainstorming-type team meetings. During the team meetings, all aspects of the audit are controlled by a consensus of the team members. The findings from these new methods are surprisingly consistent, regardless of which organization is audited or which organization performs the audit. This consistency implies a widespread generic weakness in the manner design is being performed. This paper addresses generic findings and recommends increased use of these new methods to evaluate design organizations. These audit methods can be readily used to evaluate any process or system. (orig.)

  19. HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

    2005-02-01

    Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway.

  20. Financialisation, oil and the Great Recession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gkanoutas-Leventis, Angelos; Nesvetailova, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the role of world oil price hike of 2007–08 in serving to transform the financial and banking crisis into what is commonly referred to the Great Recession. Existing literature on the global crisis of 2007–09 tends to view it as a financial or banking phenomenon, with analyses focusing mainly on state policies, governance mechanisms and market dynamics in transforming the banking crisis of 2007–08 into the economic recession of 2008-12/13 Although often attributing the global meltdown to wider phenomenon of financialisation, rarely do existing perspectives delve into the role of the commodity sector in the global credit crunch. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap, by inquiring into the role played by oil as a financial asset class in the political economy of the global crisis. - Highlights: • We study the oil price and its effects on the Great Recession. • We approach oil as a financial asset class. • We observe the transformation of oil through deregulation.

  1. Analyzing Malaysians’ perception of risk in developing radiological and nuclear crisis communication framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, AHA., E-mail: amyhamijah@nm.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Hassan, H., E-mail: asfa@nm.gov.my; Ramanathan, B.; Jumat, AH. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Jaafar, NNH.; Abdullah, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bandar Baru Bangi 43650, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Crisis communication is an indicator of a sustaining public normalcy that serves to control and decrease any untoward situations during disasters’ meltdown. Prior findings highlighted that 25.85 percent of arising organizational disputes can be resolved using public announcements and an enhancement of public awareness through avoiding related dissatisfactions, disorders and untoward circumstances during radiation and nuclear emergencies. Hence, in this paper, we are interrogating Malaysians on their perception of risk regarding to radiation and nuclear disasters and emergencies. The principal aim is to identify the relationship between the IAEA’s initiated risk perception characteristics and the content of the respective public acceptance reports. Those relationships are described and analyzed into a network diagram using the ATLAS.ti software consisting of Clustering and C-Coefficient analyses. This diagram identifies the main variables relating to significant characteristics of risk perception. Future studies should further evaluate the intensity of public opinion against the suggested constructs of executing a thorough and structured risk management mechanism, to advance public trust as well as crisis communication.

  2. Retrospective view of fast reactor safety: EBR-I to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    An early concern in fast reactor safety was that the positive Doppler coefficient of fissile material was a significant effect and was responsible for the positive temperature coefficient of EBR-1, which led to meltdown of the core. Another primary concern for early, metal-fueled fast reactors was the possibility of gravity collapse of the molten core. As reactors became larger, it became apparent that this process would lead to unacceptably large energy releases, providing an incentive for more detailed modeling. As fast reactor safety developed, the importance of reactivity effects other than gravity fuel slumping became evident. For the TOP accident, fuel motion modeling as embodied in such codes as EPIC and PLUTO2 showed that if pin failure occurred at or near the top of the core, consistent with higher clad temperatures, a benign outcome was assured. As the newer codes tended to given more benign results for the initiation phase of CDA's, more attention has been focused on the transition to extensive gradual core melting. 12 refs

  3. Risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Every plan contains risk. To proceed without planning some means of managing that risk is to court failure. The basic logic of risk is explained. It consists in identifying a threshold where some corrective action is necessary, the probability of exceeding that threshold, and the attendant cost should the undesired outcome occur. This is the probable cost of failure. Various risk categories in dentistry are identified, including lack of liquidity; poor quality; equipment or procedure failures; employee slips; competitive environments; new regulations; unreliable suppliers, partners, and patients; and threats to one's reputation. It is prudent to make investments in risk management to the extent that the cost of managing the risk is less than the probable loss due to risk failure and when risk management strategies can be matched to type of risk. Four risk management strategies are discussed: insurance, reducing the probability of failure, reducing the costs of failure, and learning. A risk management accounting of the financial meltdown of October 2008 is provided.

  4. Reality Television, The Hills and the Limits of the Immaterial Labour Thesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Mary Virginia Hearn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper will examine the immaterial labour thesis as proposed by Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri through a case study of reality television production practices, specifically those of the MTV program, The Hills. Because immaterial labour is rooted in individual intelligence, affect, and social communicative capacities, Hardt and Negri contend that economic value in the form of labour power can no longer be adequately measured and quantified and that this immeasurability contains revolutionary potential. But, given the current global economic meltdown, and the persistent and very material suffering of people all over the globe, how legitimate and responsible are these claims? Drawing from interviews with reality television workers and the work of George Caffentzis, Massimo de Angelis, David Harvie and others, this paper will test the limits of the immaterial labour thesis, arguing that, rather than disappearing, capital continues to impose measurement systems to determine socially necessary labour time no matter how diffuse or social that labour might be, and that this imposition continues to produce the alienation and exploitation of many for the benefit of a few.

  5. Is nuclear energy safe for workers and the public. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, J.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Dr. McKenzie says a national energy policy does exist, being based on synthetic fuels from coal and nuclear energy to meet future demands, and based on a complete lack of attention to conservation. In meeting energy demands for the future, he feels the opportunity still exists to create the scenario that will require meaningful jobs in the process, jobs requiring less capital and less energy. On the risks of nuclear energy, Dr. McKenzie discusses the funding, research, and results of the Atomic Energy Commission's safety program. He airs his views on WASH-1400, the study by Professor Norman Rasmussen, dealing with the possibilities of reactor core meltdowns. He thinks a worse problem resulting from nuclear power plants is that of waste disposal and cites AEC's poor record of managing these wastes in Kansas and elsewhere. In concluding, Dr. McKenzie says: (1) nuclear power may not be the best thing in the world, maybe we should look at other alternatives; (2) conservation is most important, and creates jobs at the same time if handled correctly; (3) AFL-C10 should sponsor a study on energy systems investigating its employment potential, net energy, economic factors, and capital requirements; and (4) construction of nuclear and coal plants will create jobs, but building solar plants will create jobs with fewer restraints on the environment. A panel discussion follows this, the third paper, on nuclear safety for workers and the public

  6. Observations on the Chernobyl Disaster and LNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworowski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident was probably the worst possible catastrophe of a nuclear power station. It was the only such catastrophe since the advent of nuclear power 55 years ago. It resulted in a total meltdown of the reactor core, a vast emission of radionuclides, and early deaths of only 31 persons. Its enormous political, economic, social and psychological impact was mainly due to deeply rooted fear of radiation induced by the linear non-threshold hypothesis (LNT) assumption. It was a historic event that provided invaluable lessons for nuclear industry and risk philosophy. One of them is demonstration that counted per electricity units produced, early Chernobyl fatalities amounted to 0.86 death/GWe-year), and they were 47 times lower than from hydroelectric stations (∼40 deaths/GWe-year). The accident demonstrated that using the LNT assumption as a basis for protection measures and radiation dose limitations was counterproductive, and lead to sufferings and pauperization of millions of inhabitants of contaminated areas. The projections of thousands of late cancer deaths based on LNT, are in conflict with observations that in comparison with general population of Russia, a 15% to 30% deficit of solid cancer mortality was found among the Russian emergency workers, and a 5% deficit solid cancer incidence among the population of most contaminated areas. PMID:20585443

  7. Observations on the Chernobyl Disaster and LNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworowski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-28

    The Chernobyl accident was probably the worst possible catastrophe of a nuclear power station. It was the only such catastrophe since the advent of nuclear power 55 years ago. It resulted in a total meltdown of the reactor core, a vast emission of radionuclides, and early deaths of only 31 persons. Its enormous political, economic, social and psychological impact was mainly due to deeply rooted fear of radiation induced by the linear non-threshold hypothesis (LNT) assumption. It was a historic event that provided invaluable lessons for nuclear industry and risk philosophy. One of them is demonstration that counted per electricity units produced, early Chernobyl fatalities amounted to 0.86 death/GWe-year), and they were 47 times lower than from hydroelectric stations ( approximately 40 deaths/GWe-year). The accident demonstrated that using the LNT assumption as a basis for protection measures and radiation dose limitations was counterproductive, and lead to sufferings and pauperization of millions of inhabitants of contaminated areas. The projections of thousands of late cancer deaths based on LNT, are in conflict with observations that in comparison with general population of Russia, a 15% to 30% deficit of solid cancer mortality was found among the Russian emergency workers, and a 5% deficit solid cancer incidence among the population of most contaminated areas.

  8. Security, justice and the energy crossroads: Assessing the implications of the nuclear phase-out in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehner, Robert; McCauley, Darren

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear melt-down in Fukushima resulted in diverging energy policy decisions across the world where Germany decided to opt out of nuclear electricity production. Yet, the government’s decision-making framework for energy policy decisions does not accurately reflect important drivers for the strategy change. This paper presents the Energy Crossroads framework as a more comprehensive tool to analyse the drivers and impacts of the nuclear phase-out. 20 expert interviews were performed across business participants as well as policy makers in the national and international energy context. Results show that Germany has adopted an environmental justice, rather than energy security, stance in their nuclear phase out policy, with significant long-term consequences. - Highlights: • We develop the Energy Crossroads framework as a means to analyse the Energiewende. • The strategy's short and medium term concerns focus on the security of supply. • Long term goals are driven by aspects of environmental justice. • Targeted development of national FiTs is needed alongside a functioning carbon market.

  9. Economic electricity generation at a higher safety level. The European pressurized water reactor (EPR) waiting for the start of construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Leverenz, R.

    2000-01-01

    The EPR is a modern nuclear power plant whose design characteristics were developed in an evolutionary process from the successful N4 plants operated in France and convoy plants run in Germany. It constitutes another step in the safety concept in which measures are taken to manage even severe accidents, core meltdown included. The consequences of such accidents remain restricted to the interior of the plant, thus obviating the need for emergency protection measures for the vicinity of a nuclear power plant. In addition to these features, special attention was devoted to competitive electricity generation. Optimization of all plant parameters, from higher efficiency and increased availability to improved fuel utilization, results in clear competitiveness with all other techniques of electricity generation. With the completion of the optimization phase after the basic design phase, the EPR has now reached a level of maturity which allows its construction to be started. Industry has done its job of developing a promising reactor and preserving know-how in nuclear technology. It is now up to politics to pave the way for the implementation of this reactor concept within the framework of a sustainable long-term energy policy so that know-how may continue to be preserved and the nuclear option may remain open also to future generations. (orig.) [de

  10. Long-range dependence in returns and volatility of global gold market amid financial crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omane-Adjepong, Maurice; Boako, Gideon

    2017-04-01

    Using sampled historical daily gold market data from 07-03-1985 to 06-01-2015, and building on a related work by Bentes (2016), this paper examines the presence of long-range dependence (LRD) in the world's gold market returns and volatility, accounting for structural breaks. The sampled gold market data was divided into subsamples based on four global crises: the September 1992 collapse of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM), the Asian financial crisis of mid-1997, the Subprime meltdown of 2007, and the recent European sovereign debt crisis, which hit the world's market with varying effects. LRD test was carried-out on the full-sample and subsample periods using three semiparametric methods-before and after adjusting for structural breaks. The results show insignificant evidence of LRD in gold returns. However, very diminutive evidence is found for periods characterized by financial/economic shocks, with no significant detections for post-shock periods. Collectively, this is indicative that the gold market is less speculative, and hence could be somehow less risky for hedging and portfolio diversification.

  11. Analyzing Malaysians' perception of risk in developing radiological and nuclear crisis communication framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, AHA.; Hassan, H.; Ramanathan, B.; Jumat, AH.; Jaafar, NNH.; Abdullah, A.

    2015-04-01

    Crisis communication is an indicator of a sustaining public normalcy that serves to control and decrease any untoward situations during disasters' meltdown. Prior findings highlighted that 25.85 percent of arising organizational disputes can be resolved using public announcements and an enhancement of public awareness through avoiding related dissatisfactions, disorders and untoward circumstances during radiation and nuclear emergencies. Hence, in this paper, we are interrogating Malaysians on their perception of risk regarding to radiation and nuclear disasters and emergencies. The principal aim is to identify the relationship between the IAEA's initiated risk perception characteristics and the content of the respective public acceptance reports. Those relationships are described and analyzed into a network diagram using the ATLAS.ti software consisting of Clustering and C-Coefficient analyses. This diagram identifies the main variables relating to significant characteristics of risk perception. Future studies should further evaluate the intensity of public opinion against the suggested constructs of executing a thorough and structured risk management mechanism, to advance public trust as well as crisis communication.

  12. Analyzing Malaysians’ perception of risk in developing radiological and nuclear crisis communication framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, AHA.; Hassan, H.; Ramanathan, B.; Jumat, AH.; Jaafar, NNH.; Abdullah, A.

    2015-01-01

    Crisis communication is an indicator of a sustaining public normalcy that serves to control and decrease any untoward situations during disasters’ meltdown. Prior findings highlighted that 25.85 percent of arising organizational disputes can be resolved using public announcements and an enhancement of public awareness through avoiding related dissatisfactions, disorders and untoward circumstances during radiation and nuclear emergencies. Hence, in this paper, we are interrogating Malaysians on their perception of risk regarding to radiation and nuclear disasters and emergencies. The principal aim is to identify the relationship between the IAEA’s initiated risk perception characteristics and the content of the respective public acceptance reports. Those relationships are described and analyzed into a network diagram using the ATLAS.ti software consisting of Clustering and C-Coefficient analyses. This diagram identifies the main variables relating to significant characteristics of risk perception. Future studies should further evaluate the intensity of public opinion against the suggested constructs of executing a thorough and structured risk management mechanism, to advance public trust as well as crisis communication

  13. Radiobiological Implications of Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Personalized Medical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Hisanori; Yokoya, Akinari; Taki, Yasuyuki; Prise, Kevin M

    2017-05-01

    On March 11, 2011, a devastating earthquake and subsequent tsunami caused serious damage to areas of the Pacific coast in Fukushima prefecture and prompted fears among the residents about a possible meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant reactors. As of 2017, over six years have passed since the Fukushima nuclear crisis and yet the full ramifications of the biological exposures to this accidental release of radioactive substances remain unclear. Furthermore, although several genetic studies have determined that the variation in radiation sensitivity among different individuals is wider than expected, personalized medical approaches for Fukushima victims have seemed to be insufficient. In this commentary, we discuss radiobiological issues arising from low-dose radiation exposure, from the cell-based to the population level. We also introduce the scientific utility of the Integrative Japanese Genome Variation Database (iJGVD), an online database released by the Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University that covered the whole genome sequences of 2,049 healthy individuals in the northeastern part of Japan in 2016. Here we propose a personalized radiation risk assessment and medical approach, which considers the genetic variation of radiation sensitivity among individuals, for next-step developments in radiological protection.

  14. NGL markets in North America: 1999--2005 competitive threats and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippe, D.

    1999-01-01

    Gas processing contracts are structured in two basic ways. Gas plants are typically operated on a strict margin basis, on a percentage-of-proceeds basis, or on a keep-whole basis. Based on straight margins, percentage-of-proceeds or keep-whole contracts, gas processing profitability was weaker in 1998, than at any time during the past 10 years. No matter how gas processing profitability was measured, 1998 was the worst year in the history of gas processing since 1985. The economic disaster of 1998 prompted many gas plant operators to reevaluate their long-term participation in the industry. This paper reviews the root causes that resulted in the gas processing industry's economic meltdown in 1998. Trends in crude oil prices and natural gas prices determine the fundamental profitability for gas processing. Trends in ethylene production and ethylene industry profit margins determine the levels of demand for ethane and propane. This paper also highlights the prospects for recovery in profit margins, improvement in per gallon values and the potential for growth in total demand NGL and production

  15. Identification of a structural chromosomal rearrangement in the karyotype of a root vole from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadzhafova, R.S.; Bulatova, N.Sh.; Kozlovskii, A.I.; Ryabov, I.N.

    1994-01-01

    Karyological studies of rodents within a 30-km radius of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant revealed one female root vole (Microtus oeconomus) with an abnormal karyotype. The use of C, G, and AgNOR banding methods allowed determination that morphological changes in two nonhomologous autosomes, which were accompanied by rearrangements in distribution of G bands, heterochromatin, and NOR, are the result of a reciprocal translocation. Chromosomal aberrations were probably inherited or appeared in embryogenesis, since none of the analyzed cells of the studied vole had a normal karyotype. It is important to note that this rearrangement was detected five years after the meltdown. Both breaks and reunions of the chromosomes that participate in this rearrangement are probably located in regions that are not important for functioning of these chromosomes. Thus, it can be supposed that the detected rearrangement did not influence the viability of the vole. This karyotype was compared to a standard karyotype of a root vole from another area of the species range. The heteromorphism of the first pair of chromosomes in both voles, which was detected for the first time, is probably normal for the karyotype of M. oeconomus and is not linked with any radiation-induced intrachromosomal aberrations

  16. Release fraction of PWR after severe accidents. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; El-Messeiry, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Fission fragments and gases are emitted after accidents as a result of core meltdown and core concrete interactions. These aerosols are transported and fill the reactor containment. With increasing the pressure above pressure design bases, a failure of containment may occur and subsequently these aerosols will release into the external environment leading to a source term of radioactivity that affects the safety of workers and public. The amount of aerosol which escapes to the environment can be described by the release fraction which is defined as the total accumulated aerosol which initially enters the containment. The factors that affect the release fraction is studied, and the aerosol dynamics equation is used to model the release of aerosol to the outside atmosphere. These factors are containment pressure, failure time,break area, the size of aerosol particle. It found that early failure time and higher pressure increase the release fraction, also the release faction is affected by the area and the aerosol particle size. 7 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Isotopic signature and nano-texture of cesium-rich micro-particles: Release of uranium and fission products from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Junpei; Ochiai, Asumi; Furuki, Genki; Suetake, Mizuki; Ikehara, Ryohei; Horie, Kenji; Takehara, Mami; Yamasaki, Shinya; Nanba, Kenji; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Law, Gareth T W; Grambow, Bernd; Ewing, Rodney C; Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    2017-07-14

    Highly radioactive cesium-rich microparticles (CsMPs) released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) provide nano-scale chemical fingerprints of the 2011 tragedy. U, Cs, Ba, Rb, K, and Ca isotopic ratios were determined on three CsMPs (3.79-780 Bq) collected within ~10 km from the FDNPP to determine the CsMPs' origin and mechanism of formation. Apart from crystalline Fe-pollucite, CsFeSi 2 O 6  · nH 2 O, CsMPs are comprised mainly of Zn-Fe-oxide nanoparticles in a SiO 2 glass matrix (up to ~30 wt% of Cs and ~1 wt% of U mainly associated with Zn-Fe-oxide). The 235 U/ 238 U values in two CsMPs: 0.030 (±0.005) and 0.029 (±0.003), are consistent with that of enriched nuclear fuel. The values are higher than the average burnup estimated by the ORIGEN code and lower than non-irradiated fuel, suggesting non-uniform volatilization of U from melted fuels with different levels of burnup, followed by sorption onto Zn-Fe-oxides. The nano-scale texture and isotopic analyses provide a partial record of the chemical reactions that occurred in the fuel during meltdown. Also, the CsMPs were an important medium of transport for the released radionuclides in a respirable form.

  18. Advice about the safety aspects of the fuel cycle in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    The Commissie Reactorveiligheid has carried out a study to investigate the rate of release in radioactivity if the installed nuclear power is increased to 35000 MW(e) with BWR and PWR type reactors. A description is given of the structure, organization and responsibilities of the several authorities concerned with the legal aspects, licensing procedures, reactor commissioning and inspection. A description is given of each stage of the fuel cycle as located in the Netherlands. The possibility of released radioactivity is summarized, and guidelines to prevent, minimize or regulate the release of radioactivity are presented. Special attention is given to the nuclear power plant itself, where external effects with regard to the possible release of radioactivity are discussed, such as flooding, sabotage, earthquakes, aircraft collisions, chemical explosions, hurricanes and accidents which can occur during operation of the power plant, or design-basis accidents within the reactor core or inside the reactor building, such as core meltdown, cooling pipe rupture, containment rupture, spent fuel element pool, containers with fuel elements and radioactive waste tanks. Guidelines are given for the physical protection of the nuclear power plant, transport of nuclear materials, and administration of nuclear materials

  19. On the prediction of the reactor vessel integrity under severe accident loadings (RPVSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, R. E-mail: maeule@irs.fzk.de; Devos, J.; Caroli, C.; Solomos, G.; Ennis, P.J.; Kalkhof, D

    2001-11-01

    In order to allow more reliable predictions on the lower head response under core melt-down conditions, the temperature distribution has been analysed including the natural convection in the corium pool. Furthermore, the mechanical models and the failure criteria have been improved based on the RUPTHER and FASTHER experiments where typical temperature gradients are simulated. Lower head local melting as well as corium crust development has been addressed in the CORVIS experiments studying the contact between an alumina/iron thermite and a thick steel plate. The upper head loading by corium impact due to a postulated in-vessel steam explosion has been investigated by the BERDA experiments. Similarity rules were considered such that the results can be directly converted to reactor conditions. Based on these investigations admissible steam explosion energy releases are determined which the upper head can carry. If these limits are not exceeded the reactor containment cannot be endangered by broken head fragments. To provide the necessary basic data, mechanical material tests have been performed.

  20. Science as a Contact Sport: Inside the Battle to Save Earth's Climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Stephen H.; Arthus-Bertrand, Yann; Flannery, Tim; Charrier, Liliane

    2011-01-01

    It has been nearly four decades since scientists first realized that global warming posed a potential threat to our planet. Why, if we knew of the threats way back in the Carter Administration, cannot we act decisively to limit greenhouse gases, deforestation, and catastrophic warming trends? Why are we still addicted to fossil fuels? Have we all just been fiddling for 40 years as the world burns around us? The author, part of the Nobel Prize-winning team that shared the accolade with Al Gore in 2007, had a front-row seat at this unfolding environmental meltdown. Piecing together events like a detective story, the author reveals that as expert consensus grew, well-informed activists warned of dangerous changes no one knew how to predict precisely - and special interests seized on that very uncertainty to block any effective response. He persuasively outlines a plan to avert the building threat and develop a positive, practical policy that will bring climate change back under our control, help the economy with a new generation of green energy jobs and productivity, and reduce the dependence on unreliable exporters of oil - and thus ensure a future for ourselves and our planet that is as rich with promise as our past

  1. Review of the current understanding of the potential for containment failure from in-vessel steam explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    A group of experts was convened to review the current understanding of the potential for containment failure from in-vessel steam explosions during core meltdown accidents in LWRs. The Steam Explosion Review Group (SERG) was requested to provide assessments of: (1) the conditional probability of containment failure due to a steam explosion, (2) a Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) report entitled ''An Uncertainty Study of PWR Steam Explosions,'' NUREG/CR-3369, (3) a SNL proposed steam explosion research program. This report summarizes the results of the deliberations of the review group. It also presents the detailed response of each individual member to each of the issues. The consensus of the SERG is that the occurrence of a steam explosion of sufficient energetics which could lead to alpha-mode containment failure has a low probability. The SERG members disagreed with the methodology used in NUREG/CR-3369 for the purpose of establishing the uncertainty in the probability of containment failure by a steam explosion. A consensus was reached among SERG members on the need for a continuing steam explosion research program which would improve our understanding of certain aspects of steam explosion phenomenology

  2. Radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity

  3. Analysis of Survey Results of the Public's Perceptions of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwon [Korea Nuclear Energy Foundation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    In the 1970s when the two oil shocks occurred, nuclear energy was recognized as an economic and reliable source of electricity, and the nuclear power industry smoothly developed without much difficulty in the selection of reactor sites, etc. Amid such favorable circumstances, the government and nuclear energy companies gave short shrift to ensuring the public's correct understanding of nuclear energy. The perception of nuclear energy began to deteriorate in the latter half of the 1980s. With the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor no. 2 in the U. S. in 1979 and the melt-down of Chernobyl nuclear power came to the fore. In addition, the changes in the political and social environment wrought by the democratization movement made the continued development of the nuclear energy industry very difficult. The government had no choice but to seek peoples due to a number of factors including the emergence of a new social atmosphere in which individual freedom and human rights were emphasized over material abundance; increased opposition to nuclear energy by environmental groups that appeared during the course of democratization; antipathy against the previous authoritarian governments; and the people's increased demands for the right to know, etc. The nuclear energy industry also could not conduct its business, including the securing of sites for power plants and nuclear waste, without the people's concurrence.

  4. Analysis of Survey Results of the Public's Perceptions of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dongwon

    2008-01-01

    In the 1970s when the two oil shocks occurred, nuclear energy was recognized as an economic and reliable source of electricity, and the nuclear power industry smoothly developed without much difficulty in the selection of reactor sites, etc. Amid such favorable circumstances, the government and nuclear energy companies gave short shrift to ensuring the public's correct understanding of nuclear energy. The perception of nuclear energy began to deteriorate in the latter half of the 1980s. With the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor no. 2 in the U. S. in 1979 and the melt-down of Chernobyl nuclear power came to the fore. In addition, the changes in the political and social environment wrought by the democratization movement made the continued development of the nuclear energy industry very difficult. The government had no choice but to seek peoples due to a number of factors including the emergence of a new social atmosphere in which individual freedom and human rights were emphasized over material abundance; increased opposition to nuclear energy by environmental groups that appeared during the course of democratization; antipathy against the previous authoritarian governments; and the people's increased demands for the right to know, etc. The nuclear energy industry also could not conduct its business, including the securing of sites for power plants and nuclear waste, without the people's concurrence

  5. Obstacles to the Growth of Alternative Tourism in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athena Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the midst of the recent economic melt-down in Greece, economists are discussing the potential of tourism to pull the country out of its current woes. More than 16 million tourists visit the country annually whereas the sector contributes 15% to the nation's Gross Domestic Product and offers employment to 16% of the work force (Hellenic Statistical Authority, 2010. Concurrently, mass tourism has also caused a rise in pollution, a depletion of water supplies, desertification, rural emigration to urban centers, erosion of coastal areas and a drop in hygienic standards, all of which have had serious economic costs and caused residents to protest the industry’s mode of expansion. To that purpose, alternative types of tourism such as agrotourism and ecotourism have been defined as overarching objectives that complement the strategy for growth and employment. However, a closer look at the spots mostly known for alternative tourism activities shows the parallel emergence of other socio-economic developments that have slowly eroded Greek rural life and intensified the economic disparities between the local social classes. A closer evaluation of the damaging side effects casts doubt on the potential of alternative tourism as practiced today to inject growth into a stagnating economy.

  6. Nuclear energy–Any solution for sustainability and climate protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mez, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    For the future of nuclear power it will be decisive whether or not nuclear fission technologies offer a sustainable solution to global energy problems. The impressive expansion of nuclear reactors in the 1960s and 1970 slowed down after the meltdown in Harrisburg and the nuclear explosion in Chernobyl. Since the end of the 1980s installed nuclear capacity has stagnated, and in Europe declined. However, a nuclear revival or renaissance has been predicted for 30 years. This article reviews global scenarios and national nuclear programmes and analyses problems in the nuclear industry. Special attention is given to nuclear power and global warming and the nexus between nuclear power and nuclear proliferation. - Highlights: ► The status of nuclear programmes in the world is examined. ► Nuclear power has taken a nose-dive in Western industrialised countries. ► The nuclear renaissance has been announced since 1981 but never materialised. ► Share of nuclear power is 15.7% of global electricity but only 2.3% of global FEC. ► Nuclear energy is no sustainable solution and cannot avoid global warming.

  7. Regenerative medicine: then and now – an update of recent history into future possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polykandriotis, E; Popescu, L M; Horch, R E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The fields of tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RegMed) are yet to bring about the anticipated therapeutic revolution. After two decades of extremely high expectations and often disappointing returns both in the medical as well as in the financial arena, this scientific field reflects the sense of a new era and suggests the feeling of making a fresh start although many scientists are probably seeking reorientation. Much of research was industry driven, so that especially in the aftermath of the recent financial meltdown in the last 2 years we have witnessed a biotech asset yard sale. Despite any monetary shortcomings, from a technological point of view there have been great leaps that are yet to find their way to the patient. RegMed is definitely bound to play a major role in our life because it embodies one of the primordial dreams of mankind, such as: everlasting youth, flying, remote communication and setting foot on the moon. The Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine has been at the frontier of these developments in TE and RegMed from its beginning and reflects recent scientific advances in both fields. Therefore this review tries to look at RegMed through the keyhole of history which might just be like looking ‘back to the future’. PMID:20825521

  8. Regenerative medicine: then and now--an update of recent history into future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polykandriotis, E; Popescu, L M; Horch, R E

    2010-10-01

    The fields of tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RegMed) are yet to bring about the anticipated therapeutic revolution. After two decades of extremely high expectations and often disappointing returns both in the medical as well as in the financial arena, this scientific field reflects the sense of a new era and suggests the feeling of making a fresh start although many scientists are probably seeking reorientation. Much of research was industry driven, so that especially in the aftermath of the recent financial meltdown in the last 2 years we have witnessed a biotech asset yard sale. Despite any monetary shortcomings, from a technological point of view there have been great leaps that are yet to find their way to the patient. RegMed is definitely bound to play a major role in our life because it embodies one of the primordial dreams of mankind, such as: everlasting youth, flying, remote communication and setting foot on the moon. The Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine has been at the frontier of these developments in TE and RegMed from its beginning and reflects recent scientific advances in both fields. Therefore this review tries to look at RegMed through the keyhole of history which might just be like looking 'back to the future'. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Ethylcellulose-coated polyolefin separators for lithium-ion batteries with improved safety performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ming; Tang, Haolin; Wang, Yadong; Pan, Mu

    2014-01-30

    With the widely use in portable electronic devices and electric vehicles, the safety of lithium-ion battery has raised serious concerns, in which the thermal stability of separator plays an essential role in preventing thermal runaway reactions. The novelty of this work is to coat commercialized polyethylene (PE) separator and trilayer polypropylene/polyethylene/polypropylene (PP/PE/PP) separator with ethylcellulose (EC), a thermally stable and renewable biomass. The formation of the EC layer with high porosity is through a simple dipping and extracting process. The effects of the EC layer on thermal shrinkage, electrolyte wettability and cell performance are investigated. After coating, the thermal shrinkage of PE separator at shutdown and meltdown point is reduced from 20% to 9% and 42% to 23% respectively, while the drop of OCV under increasing temperature is also postponed from 130°C to 160°C. The electrolyte wettability of pristine trilayer PP/PE/PP separator is greatly improved, leading to increased capacity retention from 28% to 99% of the cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Policy on global warming: fiddling while the globe burns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Del

    2009-08-01

    To assess the extent that the health consequences of global warming and the responses to it take due account of its impact on poverty and inequality. Reviewing the relevant literature on global warming, proposed solutions and the impact. To date, too little attention has been paid to the health consequences arising from the increased poverty and inequality that global warming will bring. When these are combined with issues arising from the economic melt-down, food shortages, peak oil, etc. we are heading for a global public health crisis of immeasurable magnitude. Solutions lie in rethinking the global economic system that we have relied upon over the past several decades and the global institutions that have led and fed off that global system - the IMF, the World Bank and so on. Public health practitioners need to look and act globally more often. They need to better recognise the links between global warming and the global financial crisis. How the latter is dealt with will determine whether the former can be resolved. It is in this global political economy arena that future action in public health lies.

  11. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and four accident investigation commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Takuji; Noguchi, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Kondo, Kaori

    2012-01-01

    Tokyo Electric Power Co. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused discharge of a large amount of radioactive materials into the atmosphere and outflow of contaminated water into the ocean by reactor core melt (meltdown) and harsh accident accompanied by a hydrogen explosion (severe accident). At reviewing a future nuclear power policy, it was extremely important to investigate this accident for inspection of cause investigation and correspondence, and further analyze the background of the accident. For this purpose, accident investigation commission was established in national Diet, government, private enterprise, Tokyo Electric Power Co. This report summarized outlines of these four accident investigation reports that were already announced and compared about main points at issue such as direct cause of accident, measures before accidents (against earthquake, tsunami and severe accident), correspondence at the time of accident (inside nuclear power plant emergency response and residents' evacuation), and proposals and problems. Four reports clarified deficiency, clumsiness and a lot of problems to be improved for preventive measures of a enterprise and the government (administration) against accidents, accident correspondence, disaster prevention and others. In other words, four reports were placed with the starting point to solve these concrete problems steadily. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Fukushima Daiichi accidents and their influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Kondo, Kaori; Kotera, Shoichi

    2011-01-01

    The Tohoku District-off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake and resulting tsunamis occurred in March 11, 2011 and then damaged facilities and equipments of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants (NPPs). It caused reactor accidents leading to the station blackout, meltdown and discharge of a large amount of radioactive materials to the environment. Long time might be required to settle the situation and many neighboring residents were obliged to live in evacuation shelters. Due to outages of the NPPs and others, countermeasures of power demand and supply sides had been taken for stable supply. Health hazards against radioactive polluted agricultural, forestry and fishery products had been concerned and the products having radioactivity greater than concentration limits had been rejected from the market. Decontamination of contaminated soils and others had become an urgent measure to ease people's fear of environmental contamination. Financial compensation related to the damage caused by the nuclear accident was also an important issue. This report was compiled from the open information until about the middle of June. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Development of two-dimensional velocity field measurement using particle tracking velocimetry on neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Y.; Mishima, K.; Suzuki, T.; Matsubayashi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The structures of liquid metal two-phase flow are investigated for analyzing the core meltdown accident of fast reactor. The experiments of high-density ratio two-phase flow for lead-bismuth molten metal and nitrogen gases are conducted to understand in detail. The liquid phase velocity distributions of lead-bismuth molten metal are measured by neutron radiography using Au-Cd tracer particles. The liquid phase velocity distributions are obtained usually by using particle image velocimetry (PIV) on the neutron radiography. The PIV, however is difficult to get the velocity vector distribution quantitatively. An image of neutron radiography is divided into two images of the bubbles and the tracer particles each in particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), which distinguishes tracer contents in the bubble from them in the liquid phase. The locations of tracer particles in the liquid phase are possible to determine by particle mask correlation method, in which the bubble images are separated from the tracer images by Σ-scaling method. The particle tracking velocimetry give a full detail of the velocity vector distributions of the liquid phase in two-phase flow, in comparison with the PIV method. (M. Suetake)

  14. Medical response to a major radiologic emergency: a primer for medical and public health practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbarst, Anthony B; Wiley, Albert L; Nemhauser, Jeffrey B; Christensen, Doran M; Hendee, William R

    2010-03-01

    There are several types of serious nuclear or radiologic emergencies that would require a specialized medical response. Four scenarios of great public health, economic, and psychologic impact are the detonation of a nuclear weapon, the meltdown of a nuclear reactor, the explosion of a large radiologic dispersal device ("dirty bomb"), or the surreptitious placement of a radiation exposure device in a public area of high population density. With any of these, medical facilities that remain functional may have to deal with large numbers of ill, wounded, and probably contaminated people. Special care and/or handling will be needed for those with trauma, blast injuries, or thermal burns as well as significant radiation exposures or contamination. In addition, radiologists, nuclear medicine specialists, and radiation oncologists will be called on to perform a number of diverse and critically important tasks, including advising political and public health leaders, interfacing with the media, managing essential resources, and, of course, providing medical care. This article describes the medical responses needed following a radiologic or nuclear incident, including the symptoms of and specific treatments for acute radiation syndrome and other early health effects. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.09090330/-/DC1. (c) RSNA, 2010

  15. Enhanced Wettability and Thermal Stability of a Novel Polyethylene Terephthalate-Based Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride) Nanofiber Hybrid Membrane for the Separator of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhong; Nagaishi, Tomoki; Shi, Jian; Lee, Hoik; Wong, Pok Yin; Sui, Jianhua; Hyodo, Kenji; Kim, Ick Soo

    2017-08-09

    In this study, a novel membrane for the separator in a lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery was proposed via a mechanically pressed process with a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofiber subject and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) microfiber support. Important physical properties, such as surface morphology, wettability, and heat stability were considered for the PET-reinforced PVDF nanofiber (PRPN) hybrid separator. Images of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the PRPN hybrid separator had a homogeneous pore size and high porosity. It can wet out in battery electrolytes completely and quickly, satisfying wettability requirements. Moreover, the electrolyte uptake was higher than that of dry-laid and wet-laid nonwovens. For heat stability, no shrink occurred even when the heating temperature reached 135 °C, demonstrating thermal and dimensional stability. Moreover, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the PRPN hybrid separator possessed a shutdown temperature of 131 °C, which is the same as conventional separators. Also, the meltdown temperature reached 252 °C, which is higher than the shutdown temperature, and thus can protect against internal cell shorts. The proposed PRPN hybrid separator is a strong candidate material for utilization in Li-ion batteries.

  16. Pectin from Citrus Canning Wastewater as Potential Fat Replacer in Ice Cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Jianle; Li, Junhui; Wei, Chaoyang; Ye, Xingqian; Shi, John; Chen, Shiguo

    2018-04-17

    Pectin had been recovered from canning wastewater produced by chemical treatment of segment membrane during preparation of canned citrus in our previous research. The purpose of this study was to characterize the extracted pectin from canning wastewater, and to evaluate its application as a fat alternative to replace fat in ice cream. The monosaccharide composition and rheological properties of the pectin were determined. The influences of fat reduction and pectin addition on the physicochemical, rheological and sensory properties of low-fat ice cream were determined. The rheological results showed that pectin solutions were typical pseudoplastic fluids. The addition of pectin in ice cream can cause an increase in viscosity, overrun, and hardness, and a decrease in meltdown of the ice cream. When 0.72% pectin ( w / w ) is incorporated into ice cream, a prototype product of ice cream with 45% lower fat content compared to the control was made. Results indicated that their qualities such as appearance, flavor, and taste were not significantly different. The low-fat ice cream had higher smoothness scores and lower mouth-coating scores. Hence, pectin extracted from citrus canning wastewater can be potentially used as fat replacer in ice cream, which benefits both the environment and the food industry.

  17. Physicochemical and sensory properties of ice-cream formulated with virgin coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, S Y; Leong, S K; Henna Lu, F S

    2010-12-01

    The substitution of milk fat with virgin coconut oil (VCO) was used to produce nutritious ice cream with pleasant coconut flavor and aroma. Three formulations were developed whereby formulation VCO4, VCO8 and VCO12 was substituted with 4%, 8% and 12% of VCO, respectively. The physicochemical properties of ice creams analyzed include overrun, meltdown, pH, titratable acidity, total solid, protein and fat content. The fatty acids profile of VCO formulated ice creams and their stabilities over 3 and 6 weeks storage were studied respectively using gas chromatography (GC). Qualitative descriptive analysis (QDA) and consumer affective test were performed among the trained and untrained panelists. Significant differences (p ice cream formulations were observed except titratable acidity. Increased VCO content in ice cream formulations lowered the melting resistance of ice cream. For GC analysis, the major fatty acid identified was lauric acid. Upon storage time, the concentration of unsaturated fatty acid decreased but the concentration of saturated fatty acid increased. The result of QDA showed that formulation VCO4, VCO8 and VCO12 were significantly (p ice cream. Formulation VCO12 was highly accepted by panelists in terms of the acceptance level of appearance, aroma, texture, flavor and overall acceptability. Hence, it has a potential marketable value.

  18. Effect of okra cell wall and polysaccharide on physical properties and stability of ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuennan, Pilapa; Sajjaanantakul, Tanaboon; Goff, H Douglas

    2014-08-01

    Stabilizers are used in ice cream to increase mix viscosity, promote smooth texture, and improve frozen stability. In this study, the effects of varying concentrations (0.00%, 0.15%, 0.30%, and 0.45%) of okra cell wall (OKW) and its corresponding water-soluble polysaccharide (OKP) on the physical characteristics of ice cream were determined. Ice cream mix viscosity was measured as well as overrun, meltdown, and consumer acceptability. Ice recrystallization was determined after ice cream was subjected to temperature cycling in the range of -10 to -20 °C for 10 cycles. Mix viscosity increased significantly as the concentrations of OKW and OKP increased. The addition of either OKW or OKP at 0.15% to 0.45% significantly improved the melting resistance of ice cream. OKW and OKP at 0.15% did not affect sensory perception score for flavor, texture, and overall liking of the ice cream. OKW and OKP (0.15%) reduced ice crystal growth to 107% and 87%, respectively, as compared to 132% for the control (0.00%). Thus, our results suggested the potential use of OKW and OKP at 0.15% as a stabilizer to control ice cream quality and retard ice recrystallization. OKP, however, at 0.15% exhibited greater effect on viscosity increase and on ice recrystallization inhibition than OKW. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Effect of Encapsulation on Viability of Bifidobacterium longum CFR815j and Physiochemical Properties of Ice Cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Ankita; Achi, Sajan C; Halami, Prakash M

    2018-06-01

    The health beneficial attributes of bifidobacteria and its safe association with the host gut has increased its significance as a probiotic. However delivering probiotic bifidobacteria with Minimum Biological Value (MBV) through product has always been a challenge. In the present study, an attempt was made to maintain the viability of native isolate of Bifidobacterium longum CFR 815j and deliver through ice-cream. B. longum CFR815j was microencapsulated in alginate starch capsules by emulsification followed by evaluation of bead stability in simulated gastrointestinal conditions. After incorporation in ice-cream, the effect on chemical properties, sensory parameters and meltdown characteristics of the product were also evaluated. Survival studies of B. longum revealed higher counts than 10 7 in the product which is essential for probiotic bacteria to exhibit beneficial effect. Further, all the properties of this ice-cream were comparable to the regular ice-cream. Our studies conclude that encapsulation was able to maintain the requisite MBV of bifidobacteria in ice-cream without affecting the sensory characteristics.

  20. Detection of contaminated metallurgical scrap at borders: a proposal for an 'investigation level'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    refractory wear in blast furnaces with 60 Co sources mounted at different depth in the linings. After meltdown the resulting activity concentration is typically around several hundred Bq/kg, which is well below the Exemption Level according to the International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of 10 kBq/kg. Such rejects are not only costly, but may seriously impede the free movement of goods. Several unnecessary alarms per day at a border would render the monitoring system useless in practice. Furthermore there is an economic restriction for the costs of border monitoring systems, in view of the very large number of units required to effectively cover a country. In contrast to the situation at steel plants, where every significant radioactive contamination of scrap should be detected to avoid meltdown of a source, the procedure at borders has to be based on a compromise. Derived from results obtained within a large scale pilot study on border monitoring systems (ITRAP), reported in a separate paper of this workshop, it is planned to propose, within the above mentioned Safety Guide, a recommended 'investigation level' at borders, i.e. a measured radiation level above which a scrap transport should be stopped and closely investigated, as a dose rate near the vehicle in the range of 0.3 μSv/h. This value, which is approximately equivalent to three times natural background, is supported by the fact that additional quality assurance measurements will generally be carried out by the industry. It is intended to eventually obtain international agreement between the Member States on this procedure. (author)

  1. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lori Braase

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: • Give “priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools.” • Give “special technical emphasis and funding priority…to activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors.” • Report “to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020.” Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and

  2. U.S. energy security: problems and policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toman, M.A

    2002-12-15

    The reemergence of concern about energy security in the wake of the September 2001 terror attacks amplified a theme that was already present in U.S. energy policy debates. Energy security was a central theme in the Bush administration energy policy report released by Vice President Cheney in the spring of 2001. World oil prices rose from about 10 dollar a barrel in 1998 to more than 30 dollar a barrel in late 2000. Prices trended down through most of 2001 to below 20 dollar a barrel, although the combined effect of improving economic conditions, OPEC supply cuts, and Middle East conflict (both actual and potential) have recently brought prices back into the dollar 25 per barrel neighborhood. In 2000 the United States imported almost 60 percent of the petroleum it consumed; imports from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) made up about a quarter of total U.S. consumption. In previous energy security debates in the U.S., most of the attention has been on international oil markets and geopolitics. This time, even before September 11, the energy security debate had a much larger domestic component. The 2001 ''electricity market meltdown'' in California raised large concerns there and nationwide about the causes and consequences of electricity shortages and price volatility. The concerns run so deep that they are likely to have a significant effect on the ongoing debate about restructuring of the power sector though the nature of that effect remains to be determined. Similarly, periods of sharply rising motor fuels prices over the past few years increases well beyond what would be implied just by crude oil price volatility have led to concerns about the effects on households and commerce. All of these concerns are only amplified by worries about attacks on critical energy infrastructure. (author)

  3. Ecosystem and human health assessment to define environmental management strategies: The case of long-term human impacts on an Arctic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseenko, T I; Voinov, A A; Megorsky, V V; Gashkina, N A; Kudriavtseva, L P; Vandish, O I; Sharov, A N; Sharova, Yu; Koroleva, I N

    2006-10-01

    There are rich deposits of mineral and fossil natural resources in the Arctic, which make this region very attractive for extracting industries. Their operations have immediate and vast consequences for ecological systems, which are particularly vulnerable in this region. We are developing a management strategy for Arctic watersheds impacted by industrial production. The case study is Lake Imandra watershed (Murmansk oblast, Russia) that has exceptionally high levels of economic development and large numbers of people living there. We track the impacts of toxic pollution on ecosystem health and then--human health. Three periods are identified: (a) natural, pre-industrial state; (b) disturbed, under rapid economic development; and (c) partial recovery, during recent economic meltdown. The ecosystem is shown to transform into a qualitatively new state, which is still different from the original natural state, even after toxic loadings have substantially decreased. Fish disease where analyzed to produce and integral evaluation of ecosystem health. Accumulation of heavy metals in fish is correlated with etiology of many diseases. Dose-effect relationships are between integral water quality indices and ecosystem health indicators clearly demonstrates that existing water quality standards adopted in Russia are inadequate for Arctic regions. Health was also poor for people drinking water from the Lake. Transport of heavy metals from drinking water, into human organs, and their effect on liver and kidney diseases shows the close connection between ecosystem and human health. A management system is outlined that is based on feedback from indices of ecosystem and human health and control over economic production and/or the amount of toxic loading produced. We argue that prospects for implementation of such a system are quite bleak at this time, and that more likely we will see a continued depopulation of these Northern regions.

  4. Facilitation and competition among invasive plants: a field experiment with alligatorweed and water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wundrow, Emily J; Carrillo, Juli; Gabler, Christopher A; Horn, Katherine C; Siemann, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystems that are heavily invaded by an exotic species often contain abundant populations of other invasive species. This may reflect shared responses to a common factor, but may also reflect positive interactions among these exotic species. Armand Bayou (Pasadena, TX) is one such ecosystem where multiple species of invasive aquatic plants are common. We used this system to investigate whether presence of one exotic species made subsequent invasions by other exotic species more likely, less likely, or if it had no effect. We performed an experiment in which we selectively removed exotic rooted and/or floating aquatic plant species and tracked subsequent colonization and growth of native and invasive species. This allowed us to quantify how presence or absence of one plant functional group influenced the likelihood of successful invasion by members of the other functional group. We found that presence of alligatorweed (rooted plant) decreased establishment of new water hyacinth (free-floating plant) patches but increased growth of hyacinth in established patches, with an overall net positive effect on success of water hyacinth. Water hyacinth presence had no effect on establishment of alligatorweed but decreased growth of existing alligatorweed patches, with an overall net negative effect on success of alligatorweed. Moreover, observational data showed positive correlations between hyacinth and alligatorweed with hyacinth, on average, more abundant. The negative effect of hyacinth on alligatorweed growth implies competition, not strong mutual facilitation (invasional meltdown), is occurring in this system. Removal of hyacinth may increase alligatorweed invasion through release from competition. However, removal of alligatorweed may have more complex effects on hyacinth patch dynamics because there were strong opposing effects on establishment versus growth. The mix of positive and negative interactions between floating and rooted aquatic plants may influence local

  5. EVALUATION OF CORROSION COST OF CRUDE OIL PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADESANYA A.O.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil production industry as the hub of Nigeria Economy is not immune to the global financial meltdown being experienced world over which have resulted in a continual fall of oil price. This has necessitated the need to reduce cost of production. One of the major costs of production is corrosion cost, hence, its evaluation. This research work outlined the basic principles of corrosion prevention, monitoring and inspection and attempted to describe ways in which these measures may be adopted in the context of oil production. A wide range of facilities are used in crude oil production making it difficult to evaluate precisely the extent of corrosion and its cost implication. In this study, cost of corrosion per barrel was determined and the annualized value of corrosion cost was also determined using the principles of engineering economy and results analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results showed that among the corrosion prevention methods identified, the use of chemical treatment gave the highest cost contribution (81% of the total cost of prevention while coating added 19%. Cleaning pigging and cathodic protection gave no cost. The contribution of corrosion maintenance methods are 60% for repairs and 40% for replacement. Also among the corrosion monitoring and inspection identified, NDT gave the highest cost contribution of 41% of the total cost, followed by coating survey (34%. Cathodic protection survey and crude analysis gives the lowest cost contribution of 19% and 6% respectively. Corrosion control cost per barrel was found to be 77 cent/barrel. The significance of this cost was not much due to high price of crude oil in the international market. But the effect of corrosion in crude oil processing takes its toll on crude oil production (i.e. deferment.

  6. CNE (Embalse nuclear power plant): probabilistic safety study. Electric power supply. Events sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, N.

    1987-01-01

    The plant response to the occurrence of the starting event 'total loss of electric power supply to class IV and class III' is analyzed. This involves the study of automatical actions of safety and process systems as well as the operator actions. The probabilistic evaluation of starting event frequency is performed through fault-tree techniques. The frequency of occurrence 'loss of electric power supply to class IV (λIV = 0.56/year) and the probability of failure to demand of 'reserve' generating groups (Pd III 6.79 x 10 -3 ) contribute to the mentioned frequency. As soon as the starting event occurs, the reactor power must be reduced to 0%, the fuel must be cooled through the thermo siphon and decay heat has to be removed. The events sequence analysis leads to the conclusion that the non shutting down of the reactor with any of the shutdown systems is 'incredible' (10 -6 /year). In all cases the fuel is cooled by building the thermo siphon except when a substantial inventory loss exist due to a closure failure of some valve of pressure and inventory control system. The order of magnitude of the failure of decay heat removal through the steam generators is 4 x 10 -4 . This removal would be assured by the emergency water system. Therefore, the frequency of the sequence of possible core meltdown, when the reactor does not shut down is: λ = 5 x 10 -9 /year and for the failure of heat removal: λ = 2 x 10 -6 /year. (Author)

  7. Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-29

    This fourth edition of the IEA Medium-Term Oil Market Report (MTOMR) confronts an economic landscape unrecognisable from that seen at the time of the release of the summer 2008 edition. Crude prices are now 55% lower as financial and economic meltdown have slashed demand, with worldwide contraction in oil use at levels not seen since the early 1980s. But how long will the downturn last, and what is the likely profile of global and regional demand recovery when economic rebound eventually takes root? Has almost a decade of rising prices and costs changed the demand-side blueprint and forced the world onto a lower oil intensity path for the period through 2014? Equally importantly, the report identifies the impact that weaker demand, low prices and a credit squeeze are having on supply-side investment - in upstream OPEC/non-OPEC supply, biofuels capacity and refining infrastructure alike. The 2009 edition of the MTOMR also delves into the issues of diversifying FSU crude exports, evolving crude and product qualities, the importance of petrochemical markets and perceptions on oil price formation in the down-cycle. Two demand scenarios are presented based on differing economic growth assumptions, with a lower non-OPEC supply scenario also accompanying the lower GDP case. Summary oil balances highlight how OPEC spare capacity could develop during 2008-2014. This year, the MTOMR also consolidates analysis of future crude availability and trade flows, refining capacity and oil products supply implications under one cover. The MTOMR remains required reading for policy makers, market analysts, industry participants and anyone with an interest in oil market trends. It contains detailed statistical appendices and a wealth of insightful graphics. Alongside its monthly sister publication, the Oil Market Report, the MTOMR is a cornerstone of the IEA commitment to enhancing oil market transparency.

  8. Abundance in Capital: Global Risk Sharing and Insurance in a Changing Financial Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Gero; Schaper, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Insurance has played a viable role in the hedging of homeowners and commercial risks around the world. Countries that have significant penetration in insurance have in addition performed better after large regional or over-regional catastrophic losses. Insurance has hence increased the resilience of western societies. This is opposed to emerging or developing markets with low insurance penetration which have suffered significant drawbacks in their development after large catastrophic events. Examples include the recent Typhoon(s) in the Philippines and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. This presentation will provide insights into the opportunities, views and risk management features a global reinsurance company must assume in order to hedge and mitigate risk across the world. During the past year, an unprecedented amount of new capital has been entering the insurance market, looking for profitable investments outside the much wider capital market. Catastrophe insurance is seen as a valuable alternative to investing in assets that that have shown low returns and high correlation in the recent financial meltdown. The new capital is mostly deployed - or competing with already deployed capital - in the US where insurance penetration is already high. This is opposed to more than half of the world including all developing and most emerging countries which have low insurance penetration and often lack infrastructure hindering new capital to be deployed effectively. What is needed to overcome this obvious deficiency in capital supply and demand? One reason why it is difficult to deploy capital in developing countries is the lack of available exposure information and catastrophe models. This presentation sheds light on the potential science needs of our market and gives an overview of what is being done at Montpelier, a global reinsurance company, to understand catastrophe risk around the globe.

  9. Modelling of procecces in catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve a high degree of safety in nuclear power plants and prevent possible accident scenarios, their consequences are calculated and analysed with numeric codes. One of the most important part of nuclear safety research of hazardous incidents are development and validation of these numeric models, which are implemented into accident codes. The severe hydrogen release during a core meltdown is one of the considered scenario of performed accident analyses. One of the most important measure for the elimination of the hydrogen is catalytic recombiners. Converting the hydrogen with the atmospheric oxygen to water vapor in an exothermic reaction will prevent possible detonation of the hydrogen/air atmosphere. Within the dissertation the recombiner simulation REKO-DIREKT was developed and validated by an extensive experimental database. The performance of recombiners with regard to the conversion of the hydrogen and the temperature development is modelled. The REKO-DIREKT program is unique and has made significant revolution in research of hydrogen safety. For the first time it has been possible to show the performance of the recombiner so great in detail by using REKO-DIREKT. In the future engineers of nuclear power plants will have opportunity to have precise forecasts about the process of the possible accidents with hydrogen release. Also with presence of water vapor or with oxygen depletion which are included in the model. The major discussion of the hydrogen ignition at hot catalyst steel plates can be evaluated in the future with REKO-DIREKT more reliably than the existing used models. (orig.)

  10. Developing a Nuclear Global Health Workforce Amid the Increasing Threat of a Nuclear Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Frederick M; Dallas, Cham E

    2016-02-01

    This study argues that any nuclear weapon exchange or major nuclear plant meltdown, in the categories of human systems failure and conflict-based crises, will immediately provoke an unprecedented public health emergency of international concern. Notwithstanding nuclear triage and management plans and technical monitoring standards within the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization (WHO), the capacity to rapidly deploy a robust professional workforce with the internal coordination and collaboration capabilities required for large-scale nuclear crises is profoundly lacking. A similar dilemma, evident in the early stages of the Ebola epidemic, was eventually managed by using worldwide infectious disease experts from the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network and multiple multidisciplinary WHO-supported foreign medical teams. This success has led the WHO to propose the development of a Global Health Workforce. A strategic format is proposed for nuclear preparedness and response that builds and expands on the current model for infectious disease outbreak currently under consideration. This study proposes the inclusion of a nuclear global health workforce under the technical expertise of the International Atomic Energy Agency and WHO's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network leadership and supported by the International Health Regulations Treaty. Rationales are set forth for the development, structure, and function of a nuclear workforce based on health outcomes research that define the unique health, health systems, and public health challenges of a nuclear crisis. Recent research supports that life-saving opportunities are possible, but only if a rapidly deployed and robust multidisciplinary response component exists.

  11. Rough terrain motion planning for actively reconfigurable mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Michael

    2015-02-05

    In the aftermath of the Tohoku earthquake and the nuclear meltdown at the power plant of Fukushima Daiichi in 2011, reconfigurable robots like the iRobot Packbot were deployed. Instead of humans, the robots were used to investigate contaminated areas. Other incidents are the two major earthquakes in Northern Italy in May 2012. Besides many casualties, a large number of historical buildings was severely damaged. Due to the imminent danger of collapse, it was too dangerous for rescue personnel to enter many of the buildings. Therefore, the sites were inspected by reconfigurable robots, which are able to traverse the rubble and debris of the partially destroyed buildings. This thesis develops a navigation system enabling wheeled and tracked robots to safely traverse rough terrain and challenging structures. It consists of a planning mechanism and a controller. The focus of this thesis, however, is on the contribution to motion planning. The planning scheme employs a hierarchical approach to motion planning for actively reconfigurable robots in rough environments. Using a map of the environment the algorithm estimates the traversability under the consideration of uncertainties. Based on this analysis, an initial path search determines an approximate solution with respect to the robot's operating limits.Subsequently, a detailed planning step refines the initial path where it is required. The refinement step considers the robot's actuators and stability in addition to the quantities of the first search. Determining the robot-terrain interaction is very important in rough terrain. This thesis presents two path refinement approaches: a deterministic and a randomized approach. The experimental evaluation investigates the separate components of the planning scheme, the robot-terrain interaction for instance.In simulation as well as in real world experiments the evaluation demonstrates the necessity of such a planning algorithm in rough terrain and it provides

  12. Experimental investigation on Heat Transfer Performance of Annular Flow Path Heat Pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Guk; Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Mochizuki et al. was suggested the passive cooling system to spent nuclear fuel pool. Detail analysis of various heat pipe design cases was studied to determine the heat pipes cooling performance. Wang et al. suggested the concept PRHRS of MSR using sodium heat pipes, and the transient performance of high temperature sodium heat pipe was numerically simulated in the case of MSR accident. The meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants alarmed to the dangers of station blackout (SBO) accident. After the SBO accident, passive decay heat removal systems have been investigated to prevent the severe accidents. Mochizuki et al. suggested the heat pipes cooling system using loop heat pipes for decay heat removal cooling and analysis of heat pipe thermal resistance for boiling water reactor (BWR). The decay heat removal systems for pressurized water reactor (PWR) were suggested using natural convection mechanisms and modification of PWR design. Our group suggested the concept of a hybrid heat pipe with control rod as Passive IN-core Cooling System (PINCs) for decay heat removal for advanced nuclear power plant. Hybrid heat pipe is the combination of the heat pipe and control rod. In the present research, the main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure to the heat transfer performance of heat pipe containing neutron absorber material, B 4 C. The main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure in heat pipe to the heat transfer performance with annular flow path. ABS pellet was used instead of B 4 C pellet as cylindrical structures. The thermal performances of each heat pipes were measured experimentally. Among them, concentric heat pipe showed the best performance compared with others. 1. Annular evaporation section heat pipe and annular flow path heat pipe showed heat transfer degradation. 2. AHP also had annular vapor space and contact cooling surface per unit volume of vapor was increased. Heat transfer coefficient of

  13. Emotional consequences of nuclear power plant disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, Evelyn J

    2014-02-01

    The emotional consequences of nuclear power plant disasters include depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and medically unexplained somatic symptoms. These effects are often long term and associated with fears about developing cancer. Research on disasters involving radiation, particularly evidence from Chernobyl, indicates that mothers of young children and cleanup workers are the highest risk groups. The emotional consequences occur independently of the actual exposure received. In contrast, studies of children raised in the shadows of the Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl accidents suggest that although their self-rated health is less satisfactory than that of their peers, their emotional, academic, and psychosocial development is comparable. The importance of the psychological impact is underscored by its chronicity and by several studies showing that poor mental health is associated with physical health conditions, early mortality, disability, and overuse of medical services. Given the established increase in mental health problems following TMI and Chernobyl, it is likely that the same pattern will occur in residents and evacuees affected by the Fukushima meltdowns. Preliminary data from Fukushima indeed suggest that workers and mothers of young children are at risk of depression, anxiety, psychosomatic, and post-traumatic symptoms both as a direct result of their fears about radiation exposure and an indirect result of societal stigma. Thus, it is important that non-mental health providers learn to recognize and manage psychological symptoms and that medical programs be designed to reduce stigma and alleviate psychological suffering by integrating psychiatric and medical treatment within the walls of their clinics.Introduction of Emotional Consequences of Nuclear Power Plant Disasters (Video 2:15, http://links.lww.com/HP/A34).

  14. What makes great boards great.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Jeffrey A

    2002-09-01

    In the wake of meltdowns at WorldCom, Tyco, and Enron, enormous attention has been focused on the companies' boards. It seems inconceivable that business disasters of such magnitude could happen without gross or even criminal negligence on the part of board members. And yet a close examination of those boards reveals no broad pattern of incompetence or corruption. In fact, they followed most of the accepted standards for board operations: Members showed up for meetings; they had money invested in the company; audit committees, compensation committees, and codes of ethics were in place; the boards weren't too small or too big, nor were they dominated by insiders. In other words, they passed the tests that would normally be applied to determine whether a board of directors was likely to do a good job. And that's precisely what's so scary, according to corporate governance expert Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, who suggests that it's time for some new thinking about how corporate boards operate and are evaluated. He proposes thinking not only about how to structure the board's work but also about how to manage it as a social system. Good boards are, very simply, high-functioning work groups. They're distinguished by a climate of respect, trust, and candor among board members and between the board and management. Information is shared openly and on time; emergent political factions are quickly eliminated. Members feel free to challenge one another's assumptions and conclusions, and management encourages lively discussion of strategic issues. Directors feel a responsibility to contribute meaningfully to the board's performance. In addition, good boards assess their own performance, both collectively and individually.

  15. Rethinking trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Roderick M

    2009-06-01

    Will we ever learn? We'd barely recovered from Enron and WorldCom before we faced the subprime mortgage meltdown and more scandals that shook our trust in businesspeople. Which raises the question: Do we trust too much? In this article, Stanford professor and social psychologist Kramer explores the reasons we trust so easily--and, often, so unwisely. He explains that genetics and childhood learning make us predisposed to trust and that it's been a good survival mechanism. That said, our willingness to trust makes us vulnerable. Our sense of trust kicks in on remarkably simple cues, such as when people look like us or are part of our social group. We also rely on third parties to verify the character of others, sometimes to our detriment (as the victims of Bernard Madoff learned). Add in our illusions of invulnerability and our tendencies to see what we want to see and to overestimate our own judgment, and the bottom line is that we're often easily fooled. We need to develop tempered trust. For those who trust too much, that means reading cues better; for the distrustful, it means developing more receptive behaviors. Everyone should start with small acts of trust that encourage reciprocity and build up. Having a hedge against potential abuses also helps. Hollywood scriptwriters, for instance, register their treatments with the Writers Guild of America to prevent their ideas from being stolen by the executives they pitch. To attract the right relationships, people must strongly signal their own honesty, proactively allay concerns, and, if their trust is abused, retaliate. Trusting individuals in certain roles, which essentially means trusting the system that selects and trains them, also works but isn't foolproof. And don't count on due diligence alone for protection; constant vigilance is needed to make sure the landscape hasn't changed.

  16. ADAM: An Accident Diagnostic,Analysis and Management System - Applications to Severe Accident Simulation and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavisca, M.J.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Esmaili, H.; Schulz, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Accident Diagnostic, Analysis and Management (ADAM) computer code has been developed as a tool for on-line applications to accident diagnostics, simulation, management and training. ADAM's severe accident simulation capabilities incorporate a balance of mechanistic, phenomenologically based models with simple parametric approaches for elements including (but not limited to) thermal hydraulics; heat transfer; fuel heatup, meltdown, and relocation; fission product release and transport; combustible gas generation and combustion; and core-concrete interaction. The overall model is defined by a relatively coarse spatial nodalization of the reactor coolant and containment systems and is advanced explicitly in time. The result is to enable much faster than real time (i.e., 100 to 1000 times faster than real time on a personal computer) applications to on-line investigations and/or accident management training. Other features of the simulation module include provision for activation of water injection, including the Engineered Safety Features, as well as other mechanisms for the assessment of accident management and recovery strategies and the evaluation of PSA success criteria. The accident diagnostics module of ADAM uses on-line access to selected plant parameters (as measured by plant sensors) to compute the thermodynamic state of the plant, and to predict various margins to safety (e.g., times to pressure vessel saturation and steam generator dryout). Rule-based logic is employed to classify the measured data as belonging to one of a number of likely scenarios based on symptoms, and a number of 'alarms' are generated to signal the state of the reactor and containment. This paper will address the features and limitations of ADAM with particular focus on accident simulation and management. (authors)

  17. Altered molecular profile in thyroid cancers from patients affected by the Three Mile Island nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, David; Russo, Mariano; Houser, Kenneth; Crist, Henry; Derr, Jonathan B; Walter, Vonn; Warrick, Joshua I; Sheldon, Kathryn E; Broach, James; Bann, Darrin V

    2017-07-01

    In 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant experienced a partial meltdown with release of radioactive material. The effects of the accident on thyroid cancer (TC) in the surrounding population remain unclear. Radiation-induced TCs have a lower incidence of single nucleotide oncogenic driver mutations and higher incidence of gene fusions. We used next generation sequencing (NGS) to identify molecular signatures of radiation-induced TC in a cohort of TC patients residing near TMI during the time of the accident. Case series. We identified 44 patients who developed papillary thyroid carcinoma between 1974 and 2014. Patients who developed TC between 1984 and 1996 were at risk for radiation-induced TC, patients who developed TC before 1984 or after 1996 were the control group. We used targeted NGS of paired tumor and normal tissue from each patient to identify single nucleotide oncogenic driver mutations. Oncogenic gene fusions were identified using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We identified 15 patients in the at-risk group and 29 patients in the control group. BRAF V600E mutations were identified in 53% patients in the at-risk group and 83% patients in the control group. The proportion of patients with BRAF mutations in the at-risk group was significantly lower than predicted by the The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort. Gene fusion or somatic copy number alteration drivers were identified in 33% tumors in the at-risk group and 14% of tumors in the control group. Findings were consistent with observations from other radiation-exposed populations. These data raise the possibility that radiation released from TMI may have altered the molecular profile of TC in the population surrounding TMI. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:S1-S9, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Emotion regulation in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrea C; Hardan, Antonio Y; Podell, Rebecca W; Phillips, Jennifer M; Gross, James J

    2015-02-01

    Emotion dysregulation is not a formal criterion for the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, parents and clinicians have long noted the importance of emotional problems in individuals with ASD (e.g. tantrums and "meltdowns"). In this study, 21 high-functioning children and adolescents with ASD and 22 age and gender group-matched typically developing (TD) controls completed a Reactivity and Regulation Situation Task. This task assesses emotional reactivity and spontaneous use of emotion regulation strategies (problem solving, cognitive reappraisal, avoidance, distraction, venting, suppression, and relaxation) in the context of age-appropriate ambiguous and potentially threatening negative scenarios. After the concept of cognitive reappraisal was explained, the scenarios were presented again to participants, and they were prompted to use this strategy. Results indicated that individuals with ASD exhibited the same level of reactivity to negative stimuli as TD participants. Furthermore, youth with ASD had a different emotion regulation profile than TD individuals, characterized by a less frequent use of cognitive reappraisal and more frequent use of suppression. When prompted to use cognitive reappraisal, participants with ASD were less able to implement reappraisal, but benefitted from this strategy when they were able to generate a reappraisal. Findings from this study suggest that cognitive reappraisal strategies may be useful to children and adolescents with ASD. Therefore, the development of treatment programs that focus on enhancing the use of adaptive forms of emotion regulation might decrease emotional problems and optimize long-term outcomes in youth with ASD. © 2014 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. Test Specification of A1-1 Test for OECD-ATLAS Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Moon, Sang-Ki; Lee, Seung-Wook; Choi, Ki-Yong; Song, Chul-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    In the OECD-ATLAS project, design extension conditions (DECs) such as a station blackout (SBO) and a total loss of feed water (TLOFW) will be experimentally investigated to meet the international interests in the multiple high-risk DECs raised after the Fukushima accident. The proposed test matrix for the OECD-ATLAS project is summarized in Table 1.. In this study, detailed specification of the first test named as A1-1 in the OECD-ATLAS project was described. The target scenario of the A1-1 test is a prolonged SBO with delayed supply of turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater to only SG number 2 (SG-2). A SBO is one of the most important DECs in that without any proper operator actions, a total loss of heat sink leads to core uncover, to core damage, and ultimately a core melt-down scenario under high pressure. Due to this safety importance, a SBO is considered to be a base test item of the OECD-ATLAS project. A detailed specification of the first test named as A1-1 in the OECD-ATLAS project was described. The target scenario of the A1-1 test is a prolonged SBO with delayed supply of turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater to only SG-2 in order to consider an accident mitigation measure. The pre-test analysis using MARS code was performed with an aim of setting up the detailed test procedures for A1-1 test and also gaining the physical insights for a prolonged SBO transient. In the A1-1 test, a prolonged SBO transient will be simulated with two temporal phases: Phase (I) for conservative SBO transient without supply of turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater and Phase (II) for asymmetric cooling via single trained supply of turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater

  1. RAMA Containment group final report January 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    1985-01-01

    In the present investigation the MAAP (Modular Accident Analysis Program) program, which was developed by FAI, has been employed to analyse the containment response to severe reactor accidents involving core meltdown and vessel failure. All of the twelve Swedish reactors, 9 BWRs and 3 PWRs, have been included in the study. In order to apply the MAAP code to the BWRs it was necessary to develop five new versions of the code. This development was carried out by FAI (Fauske and Associates Inc.). For the important cases of total blackout and LOCAs the MAAP code seems to give a reasonable description of the accident progressions, and the predicted times to containment failure were approximately 2 days for all of the plants. With regard to the more complicated cases, which for instance include starts and stops of emergency cooling systems, only a limited number of cases have been studied. The experience from this analysis is that certain sequences can be analysed with MAAP, but that further development of the code is necessary in order to cover all cases of interest for accident management analysis. Thus, our versions of the MAAP code still need improvements and very qualified personnel are, in fact, needed in order too interpret the results properly. It was found that the early design of Swedish BWRs with a wetwell below the reactor vessel was a favourable one from the severe accident point of view. With regard to the newer designs, F1, F2, F3 and O3, which have a dry pedestal compartment below the reactor vessel, it was suggested that before a possible reactor vessel failure this compartment should be flooded by water in order to avoid an early rupture of the containment. (author)

  2. High temperature investigation of the solid/liquid transition in the PuO2-UO2-ZrO2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaini, A.; Guéneau, C.; Gossé, S.; Sundman, B.; Manara, D.; Smith, A. L.; Bottomley, D.; Lajarge, P.; Ernstberger, M.; Hodaj, F.

    2015-12-01

    The solid/liquid transitions in the quaternary U-Pu-Zr-O system are of great interest for the analysis of core meltdown accidents in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) fuelled with uranium-dioxide and MOX. During a severe accident the Zr-based cladding can become completely oxidised due to the interaction with the oxide fuel and the water coolant. In this framework, the present analysis is focused on the pseudo-ternary system UO2-PuO2-ZrO2. The melting/solidification behaviour of five pseudo-ternary and one pseudo-binary ((PuO2)0.50(ZrO2)0.50) compositions have been investigated experimentally by a laser heating method under pre-set atmospheres. The effects of an oxidising or reducing atmosphere on the observed melting/freezing temperatures, as well as the amount of UO2 in the sample, have been clearly identified for the different compositions. The oxygen-to-metal ratio is a key parameter affecting the melting/freezing temperature because of incongruent vaporisation effects. In parallel, a detailed thermodynamic model for the UO2-PuO2-ZrO2 system has been developed using the CALPHAD method, and thermodynamic calculations have been performed to interpret the present laser heating results, as well as the high temperature behaviour of the cubic (Pu,U,Zr)O2±x-c mixed oxide phase. A good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data points. This work enables an improved understanding of the major factors relevant to severe accident in nuclear reactors.

  3. Bigger is better: characteristics of round gobies forming an invasion front in the Danube river.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Brandner

    Full Text Available Few studies have systematically investigated differences in performance, morphology and parasitic load of invaders at different stages of an invasion. This study analyzed phenotype-environment correlations in a fish invasion from initial absence until establishment in the headwater reach of the second largest European river, the Danube. Here, the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus formed 73% of the fish abundance and 58% of the fish biomass in rip-rap bank habitats after establishment. The time from invasion until establishment was only about two years, indicating rapid expansion. Founder populations from the invasion front were different from longer established round goby populations in demography, morphology, feeding behaviour, sex ratio and parasitic load, indicating that plasticity in these traits determines invasion success. Competitive ability was mostly dependent on growth/size-related traits rather than on fecundity. As revealed by stable isotope analyses, specimens at the invasion front had a higher trophic position in the food web and seem to benefit from lower food competition. Somatic performance seems to be more important than investment in reproduction during the early stages of the invasion process and upstream-directed range expansion is not caused by out-migrating weak or juvenile individuals that were forced to leave high density areas due to high competition. This mechanism might be true for downstream introductions via drift. Greater abundance and densities of acanthocephalan endoparasites were observed at the invasion front, which contradicts the expectation that invasion success is determined by lower parasitic pressure in newly invaded areas. Overall, the pronounced changes in fish and invertebrate communities with a dominance of alien species suggest invasional meltdown and a shift of the upper Danube River towards a novel ecosystem with species that have greater resistance to goby predation. This seems to contribute to

  4. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control reactivity during a postulated core melt down accident in Generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevacova, K.

    2010-01-01

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B 4 C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic point of view. Concerning B 4 C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B 4 C - UO 2 system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, a volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B 4 C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu 2 O 3 or HfO 2 as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO 2 , first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 - UO 2 system, the Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 - UO 2 mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author) [fr

  5. Econocomics: Teaching Translation of Economic and Financial Texts through Comics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Falco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Comics have commonly be seen as a popular genre, having the main purpose of entertaining people. Recent research has shown that comic books and graphic novels can also deal with serious topics and, as a consequence, be used for educational purposes (Babic 2013. This paper describes the results of a study focusing on the use of comic books for the didactics of economic (Goodwin 2012 and of economic translation, in a classroom of MA students in specialized translation. It shows how the translation of comics dealing with economic and financial topics can be a hard task for university students in specialized translation. As a matter of fact, the blending of different registers, the informal one in the characters’ balloons and the formal one in the narrative frames, as well as the interaction of words and images, may cause significant troubles to students as comics entail different translation strategies (Zanettin 2008 as well as intercultural competences. The paper illustrates the results of two case studies. The first one focuses on some parallel texts, including samples from the English source text and their Italian translations, and comments on the decisions made by professionals in order to manage translation problems. The second case study describes the problems encountered by a group of MA students in specialized translation, who were asked to translate, from American English to Italian, a frame taken from The Economic Meltdown Funnies, a comic book co-published by Jobs with Justice and the Institute for Policy Studies’ Program on Inequality and the Common Good. In both cases, the analysis was carried out using a methodology inspired to the contributions from visual grammar (Kress and Leeuwen 2006, cognitive linguistics (Evans and Green 2006 and functionalist approaches to translation (Nord 2007.

  6. A review of phenomenological modeling of in-vessel core degradation in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that after the degraded-core accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in March, 1979, the interest in better understanding of severe accidents leading to potential radionuclide release into the environment was revived. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the nuclear industry, the nuclear technical community, and the electric utilities all established separate programs to reassess the technical basis for evaluating the consequences of severe accidents at nuclear power reactors. Severe core damage accidents may involve substantial melting of the reactor core. A characteristic accident sequence leading to severe core damage could be one in which a combination of system failures result both in loss of water from the reactor coolant system (RCS) and in the malfunctioning of the emergency core cooling system. In such an event, the loss of coolant inventory would gradually result in core uncovery and subsequent heat-up and damage to the fuel rods. The severe accidents in reactor cores can be initiated by tow major classes of operational malfunctions: reactivity insertion malfunctions (RIMs); and core uncovery malfunctions (CUMs). The Chernobyl accident belongs to the first class, and the TMI accident belongs to the latter. The reactivity insertion malfunction may be sustained within a small fraction of a second; however, it can result in substantial power increase and fuel damages. In case of core uncovery malfunctions, the reactor core power may remain within the design limits (decay heat power); however, the accident starts due to absence of a core cooling mechanism. In the case of delayed operation (partial performance) of the emergency core cooling system, core damage may be arrested as occurred in the TMI-2 accident. Moreover, if coolant flow is not restored in time, complete meltdown of the reactor core and subsequent vessel breach could result

  7. Topological data analysis of financial time series: Landscapes of crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidea, Marian; Katz, Yuri

    2018-02-01

    We explore the evolution of daily returns of four major US stock market indices during the technology crash of 2000, and the financial crisis of 2007-2009. Our methodology is based on topological data analysis (TDA). We use persistence homology to detect and quantify topological patterns that appear in multidimensional time series. Using a sliding window, we extract time-dependent point cloud data sets, to which we associate a topological space. We detect transient loops that appear in this space, and we measure their persistence. This is encoded in real-valued functions referred to as a 'persistence landscapes'. We quantify the temporal changes in persistence landscapes via their Lp-norms. We test this procedure on multidimensional time series generated by various non-linear and non-equilibrium models. We find that, in the vicinity of financial meltdowns, the Lp-norms exhibit strong growth prior to the primary peak, which ascends during a crash. Remarkably, the average spectral density at low frequencies of the time series of Lp-norms of the persistence landscapes demonstrates a strong rising trend for 250 trading days prior to either dotcom crash on 03/10/2000, or to the Lehman bankruptcy on 09/15/2008. Our study suggests that TDA provides a new type of econometric analysis, which complements the standard statistical measures. The method can be used to detect early warning signals of imminent market crashes. We believe that this approach can be used beyond the analysis of financial time series presented here.

  8. E-dustrial revolution continues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverty-Wilson, K.

    2001-01-01

    The widespread use of sophisticated electronic tools to monitor data flow and to transact business is alive and well in the oilpatch despite the recent melt-down of dot com companies. By way of illustration the article cites the Alberta government's VIPIR (Volumetric and Infrastructure Petroleum Information Registry) project, which uses state-of-the-art software to gather data from all well sites. This data will assist in the accurate determination of royalties due to the province, and allow spotting of errors almost instantaneously, while reducing the reporting burden on companies. An electronic transfer system will also speed processes of land lease management, bids and transfers, by allowing transactions to be completed on-line. The province is also working on a system called the 'Alberta SuperNet' which will bring high-speed internet access to over 40 towns, villages and remote areas of the province. Concurrently, the National Energy Board is looking at a system that will allow electronic filing of applications. Electronic information transfer systems are also challenging the time -honored SCADA systems. The new systems allow readings to be transmitted daily and alarms to be sounded when problems occur, cutting back on costs by negating operator visits to sites that are running smoothly. The most immediate problem preventing the petroleum industry to truly becoming an e-industry is the lack of standardized software in use by oil, gas, supplier and service companies. Nevertheless, Alberta is said to be leading the world in oil and gas application of structured data management, and it is only a matter of time before industry-specific standards in e-communication will be developed. In the meantime, it is well to remember, that e-business is about business, not technology. Its core function is communication and the connecting of people to information and knowledge, enabling them to work smarter, faster and with greater profitability

  9. Survival and Effect of Exopolysaccharide-Producing Lactobacillus plantarum YW11 on the Physicochemical Properties of Ice Cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice cream was prepared with exopolysaccharide (EPS-producing Lactobacillus plantarum YW11 by direct inoculation (DI, addition of pre-fermented skim milk (FSM, or addition of the lyophilized powder of the YW11 strain (LP into the ice cream mix. After 4 weeks of storage, viable counts of the YW11 strain decreased in all groups by 0.8–1.61 log cfu/g. Furthermore, ice cream made using the LP method showed the highest survival rate. The ice cream processing and storage conditions also affected the YW11 strain’s tolerance to acid and bile, with a decrease in survival rate of 38.8–63.2% and 10.8–51.8%, respectively. The degree of impact on the viability of strain YW11 was hardening>aging>freezing>storage (p<0.05. The YW11 strain produced a ropy EPS (up to 4.84 mg/g in the ice cream mix made using the DI and FSM methods; it was present as a fine porous matrix as observed by Cryo-SEM. Formation of the EPS together with changes in the pH of the ice cream mix caused increased viscosity (up to 131.0 mPa·s, overrun and meltdown, decreased destabilization of fat, and firmness of ice cream. Hydrocarbons, ketones, and benzenes were found to be the major volatiles in the fermented ice cream samples, which also had decreased levels of dodecane, characterized by the smell of dirt.

  10. Say no to fossil fuels and yes to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghava Chari, S.

    2011-01-01

    Mistaken notion and wrongful fear of nuclear energy based on the horrors of the second world war bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima and accidents at Chernobyl and Three mile island and lately the Fukushima nuclear plant meltdown to earthquake and and tsunami have developed antagonism to nuclear energy (NE) and clouded its usefulness as a practical, clean, environment friendly and affordable alternate source of energy. Such antagonism has slowed down research on NE and its adoption on a much wider scale, the crying need of the day. There is a motivated disinformation campaign against nuclear energy in India as witnessed from the ongoing agitation at Kudankulam in Tamil Nadu and Jaitapur in Maharashtra. In fact nuclear energy is the only practical alternative energy source to meet the ever increasing energy needs of the world particularly the developing nations, and to save the world from the greenhouse ill effects of massive carbon dioxide and other emissions from burning fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas. Emissions from fossil fuel burning including radioactive emissions are hundreds of times more in weight and volume and far more hazardous than from an equal capacity nuclear plant. In fact there are no greenhouse gases (CO 2 ), acid rain gases (SO 2 ) or carcinogen emissions (NO x ) from nuclear plants. The accident rates and severity of accidents owing to nuclear plants is much lower as compared to fossil fuel power generation. Last but not the least NE offers economic freedom from the clutches of the few monopolistic oil producing countries, which charge exorbitant oil prices and cripple the finances of developing nations. (author)

  11. Using narratives to understand the motivational factors and experience of being a self-initiated academic expatriate in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinashe T. Harry

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A growing movement of foreign nationals is settling in South Africa. Given this, there is a need to understand not only those factors influencing foreign nationals to settle in South Africa but also their lived experiences as a basis for individual career development. Research purpose: To investigate the expatriation motivational factors and experiences of selfinitiated academic expatriates in South Africa. Motivation for the study: Calls have been made within the careers literature for more empirical focus on understanding career development using some of the neglected sample groups. Research approach, design and method: The interpretive paradigm was adopted to understand the main purpose of the study. Guided by study objectives, unstructured interviews were conducted using a sample of foreign academics working in South Africa (n = 25. Main findings: Individual stories and narratives highlighted that academics relocated for the following reasons: (1 individual preference, (2 economic meltdown and (3 political conditions. Furthermore, the lived experiences of the expatriates reflected discrimination within the workplace and the community of residences in South Africa. Practical and managerial implications: Research findings indicate that the human resources (HR function can come up with interventions that positively influence the lived experience and career development of foreign academics working in South Africa. Contribution: The expatriate experience framed in this study provides a picture of the career development processes of neglected sample groups in the extant literature. Such an understanding is key in advancing literature and proposing interventions. All this is important given the global trend on labour and skills movement added to the role South Africa plays in the international arena.

  12. A preliminary study on the cultural differences between Korean and Japanese organizations in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, Ingyu; Do, Giang

    2012-01-01

    The meltdowns of the Chernobyl and Fukushima I nuclear reactors are fundamentally linked to their organizational characteristics, as they caused severe social and economic disruptions with equally significant environmental and health related impacts. This shows that we have to find practical solutions to reactor safety from various organizational standpoints by introducing a systematic approach to the issue of organizational deficiencies and human errors. We posit that one of the fundamental causes of organizational deficiencies can be derived from an organizational culture. An organizational culture has both formal and informal types. Generally, organizational culture refers to the common beliefs, values, norms, symbols, and language systems that organizational members use when they add meaning to their organizational behavior within their specific organizations. The purpose of this study is threefold. First, we are interested in finding internal contradictions between Korean organizational culture and U.S.-derived organizational safety mechanisms applied to the operation of Korean NPPs (Nuclear Power Plants). We want to discern safety related problems that are thought to have occurred routinely within the parameters of Korean NPPs owing to the use of U.S. safety mechanisms. Second, we compare the Korean and Japanese organizational culture in NPP mainly on safety and comfort cultures in order to cope with the cultural problems. Third, we want to propose an alternative model of safety mechanisms that are more appropriate for Korean organizational culture, using a system dynamic model that we devised based on empirical observations from the NPPs and factors drawn from the extant literature as compared with Japanese organizational culture

  13. Isotopes in the Garden a Narrative of the Atomic Age and its Legacy in the Global Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Thomas Joseph

    The following is a narrative, which explores the age of nuclear enlightenment--or the Atomic Age--and its physical ramifications within the landscape. This era--starting with the discovery of radioactivity in 1898 and continuing through today--began with a belief in progress towards a brighter tomorrow, but ended in destructive actions that will continue to decay within our soils and bones for millions of years into the future. Following the stories of key people, such as Marie Curie, Robert Oppenheimer, and Edward Teller, this thesis tells a story, which even though it is historically recent, it is unknown to people of the millennial generation--those born from the early 1980s through the early 2000s. To tell the story, the thesis draws upon science, politics, history, and pop-culture and employs a specific representation technique that draws from mid-twentieth century movie animation. Based upon the author's own experiences, the thesis argues that the millennial generation is less informed of, less motivated by, or less interested in the legacies of the Atomic Age. Ultimately, the thesis seeks to remedy this detachment from this historically relevant narrative. To do this, the thesis explores the physical ramifications of nuclear ingenuity over the last 120 years, which has resulted in the unintentional and global spread of radioactive isotopes via atmospheric nuclear weapons testing and nuclear meltdowns. This radioactive debris has become embedded within our earth's crust, plants, animals, and bodies, where it will decay for millions of years into the future. This paper hopes to engage the readers with this reality and transform their perspective of this age from a distant past to an imminent present and future.

  14. Effect of Chemical Additives in Sump on Boric Acid Solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hu; Kim, Young Soo; No, Hee Cheon

    2007-01-01

    Boric acid precipitation, which happens in the pressurized water reactor core during post-LOCA long-term cooling period, could adhere to fuel rod surfaces and, as a result, block the fuel assembly cooling channels. Deposition of boric acid and other impurities on the fuel rods will increase thermal resistance, and then induce fuel temperature to exceed its safety limit, finally causes reactor core damage or meltdown. Therefore, recently, the boric acid precipitation issue was raised by NRC when nuclear power plants in USA, for example, Waterford EPU, applied for power uprate licenses. NRC highlighted boric acid precipitation as a generic issue due to non-conservatism in vendor's model in 2005. Also the Westinghouse Owners Group held meetings to discuss the methodology to avoid boric acid precipitation in the current PWR nuclear power plants. Until now there is no database for evaluating the properties of a boric acid-water mixture, together with chemical additives, such as Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH), Tri-sodium Phosphate (Na 3 PO 4 ) and fiberglass, being added from the containment sump, when the concentration is close to the solubility limit. Therefore, this study investigated boric acid solubility when boric acid is mixed with NaOH, Na 3 PO 4 and other chemical additives. Another purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between boric acid solubility and the effects of chemical additives, boric acid volatility, boiling phenomenon, etc. The empirical equation of boric acid solubility in the mixture solution is deduced from experiment results and chemical dynamics theories

  15. The effect of Arctic sea-ice extent on the absorbed (net solar flux at the surface, based on ISCCP-D2 cloud data for 1983–2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Matsoukas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the effect of the Arctic sea ice on the absorbed (net solar flux using a radiative transfer model. Ice and cloud input data to the model come from satellite observations, processed by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP and span the period July 1983–June 2007. The sea-ice effect on the solar radiation fluctuates seasonally with the solar flux and decreases interannually in synchronisation with the decreasing sea-ice extent. A disappearance of the Arctic ice cap during the sunlit period of the year would radically reduce the local albedo and cause an annually averaged 19.7 W m−2 increase in absorbed solar flux at the Arctic Ocean surface, or equivalently an annually averaged 0.55 W m−2 increase on the planetary scale. In the clear-sky scenario these numbers increase to 34.9 and 0.97 W m−2, respectively. A meltdown only in September, with all other months unaffected, increases the Arctic annually averaged solar absorption by 0.32 W m−2. We examined the net solar flux trends for the Arctic Ocean and found that the areas absorbing the solar flux more rapidly are the North Chukchi and Kara Seas, Baffin and Hudson Bays, and Davis Strait. The sensitivity of the Arctic absorbed solar flux on sea-ice extent and cloud amount was assessed. Although sea ice and cloud affect jointly the solar flux, we found little evidence of strong non-linearities.

  16. U.S. energy security: problems and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, M.A.

    2002-12-01

    The reemergence of concern about energy security in the wake of the September 2001 terror attacks amplified a theme that was already present in U.S. energy policy debates. Energy security was a central theme in the Bush administration energy policy report released by Vice President Cheney in the spring of 2001. World oil prices rose from about 10 dollar a barrel in 1998 to more than 30 dollar a barrel in late 2000. Prices trended down through most of 2001 to below 20 dollar a barrel, although the combined effect of improving economic conditions, OPEC supply cuts, and Middle East conflict (both actual and potential) have recently brought prices back into the dollar 25 per barrel neighborhood. In 2000 the United States imported almost 60 percent of the petroleum it consumed; imports from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) made up about a quarter of total U.S. consumption. In previous energy security debates in the U.S., most of the attention has been on international oil markets and geopolitics. This time, even before September 11, the energy security debate had a much larger domestic component. The 2001 ''electricity market meltdown'' in California raised large concerns there and nationwide about the causes and consequences of electricity shortages and price volatility. The concerns run so deep that they are likely to have a significant effect on the ongoing debate about restructuring of the power sector though the nature of that effect remains to be determined. Similarly, periods of sharply rising motor fuels prices over the past few years increases well beyond what would be implied just by crude oil price volatility have led to concerns about the effects on households and commerce. All of these concerns are only amplified by worries about attacks on critical energy infrastructure. (author)

  17. Should autism be considered a canary bird telling that Homo sapiens may be on its way to extinction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Albert Christophersen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been a dramatic enhancement of the reported incidence of autism in different parts of the world over the last 30 years. This can apparently not be explained only as a result of improved diagnosis and reporting, but may also reflect a real change. The causes of this change are unknown, but if we shall follow T.C. Chamberlin's principle of multiple working hypotheses, we need to take into consideration the possibility that it partly may reflect an enhancement of the average frequency of responsible alleles in large populations. If this hypothesis is correct, it means that the average germline mutation rate must now be much higher in the populations concerned, compared with the natural mutation rate in hominid ancestors before the agricultural and industrial revolutions. This is compatible with the high prevalence of impaired human semen quality in several countries and also with what is known about high levels of total exposure to several different unnatural chemical mutagens, plus some natural ones at unnaturally high levels. Moreover, dietary deficiency conditions that may lead to enhancement of mutation rates are also very widespread, affecting billions of people. However, the natural mutation rate in hominids has been found to be so high that there is apparently no tolerance for further enhancement of the germline mutation rate before the Eigen error threshold will be exceeded and our species will go extinct because of mutational meltdown. This threat, if real, should be considered far more serious than any disease causing the death only of individual patients. It should therefore be considered the first and highest priority of the best biomedical scientists in the world, of research-funding agencies and of all medical doctors to try to stop the express train carrying all humankind as passengers on board before it arrives at the end station of our civilization.

  18. Experiments and analyses on melt-structure-water interactions during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seghal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Green, J.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Okkonen, T.O.; Dinh, A.T. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-04-01

    This report is the final report for the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI). It describes results of analytical and experimental studies concerning MSWI during the course of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in a LWR. Emphasis has been placed on phenomena which govern vessel failure mode and timing and the mechanisms and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets. It was found that: 2-D effects significantly diminished the focusing effect of an overlying metallic layer on top of an oxide melt pool. This result improves the feasibility of in-vessel retention of a melt pool through external cooling of the lower head; phenomena related to hole ablation and melt discharge, in the event of vessel failure, are affected significantly by crust formation; the jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from liquid to solid temperature; film boiling was investigated by developing a two-phase flow model and inserting it in a multi-D fluid dynamics code. It was concluded that the thickness of the film on the surface of a melt jet would be small and that the effects of the film on the process should not be large. This conclusion is contrary to the modeling employed in some other codes. The computer codes were developed and validated against the data obtained in the MSWI Project. The melt vessel interaction thermal analysis code describes the process of melt pool formation and convection and the resulting vessel thermal loadings. In addition, several innovative models were developed to describe the melt-water interaction process. The code MELT-3D treats the melt jet as a collection of particles whose movement is described with a three-dimensional Eulerian formulation. The model (SIPHRA) tracks the melt jet with an additional equation, using the

  19. Development of optical monitor of alpha radiations based on CR-39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshirao, Pranav M; Shin, Jae Won; Vyas, Chirag K; Kulkarni, Atul D; Kim, Hojoong; Kim, Taesung; Hong, Seung-Woo; Manchanda, Vijay K

    2013-11-01

    Fukushima accident has highlighted the need to intensify efforts to develop sensitive detectors to monitor the release of alpha emitting radionuclides in the environment caused by the meltdown of the discharged spent fuel. Conventionally, proportional counting, scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry are employed to assay the alpha emitting radionuclides but these techniques are difficult to be configured for online operations. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) offer an alternative off line sensitive technique to measure alpha emitters as well as fissile radionuclides at ultra-trace level in the environment. Recently, our group has reported the first ever attempt to use reflectance based fiber optic sensor (FOS) to quantify the alpha radiations emitted from (232)Th. In the present work, an effort has been made to develop an online FOS to monitor alpha radiations emitted from (241)Am source employing CR-39 as detector. Here, we report the optical response of CR-39 (on exposure to alpha radiations) employing techniques such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Reflectance Spectroscopy. In the present work GEANT4 simulation of transport of alpha particles in the detector has also been carried out. Simulation includes validation test wherein the projected ranges of alpha particles in the air, polystyrene and CR-39 were calculated and were found to agree with the literature values. An attempt has been further made to compute the fluence as a function of the incidence angle and incidence energy of alphas. There was an excellent correlation in experimentally observed track density with the simulated fluence. The present work offers a novel approach to design an online CR-39 based fiber optic sensor (CRFOS) to measure the release of nanogram quantity of (241)Am in the environment. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. New set of convective heat transfer coefficients established for pools and validated against CLARA experiments for application to corium pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, B.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new set of 2D convective heat transfer correlations is proposed. • It takes into account different horizontal and lateral superficial velocities. • It is based on previously established correlations. • It is validated against recent CLARA experiments. • It has to be implemented in a 0D MCCI (molten core concrete interaction) code. - Abstract: During an hypothetical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) or Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) severe accident with core meltdown and vessel failure, corium would fall directly on the concrete reactor pit basemat if no water is present. The high temperature of the corium pool maintained by the residual power would lead to the erosion of the concrete walls and basemat of this reactor pit. The thermal decomposition of concrete will lead to the release of a significant amount of gases that will modify the corium pool thermal hydraulics. In particular, it will affect heat transfers between the corium pool and the concrete which determine the reactor pit ablation kinetics. A new set of convective heat transfer coefficients in a pool with different lateral and horizontal superficial gas velocities is modeled and validated against the recent CLARA experimental program. 155 tests of this program, in two size configurations and a high range of investigated viscosity, have been used to validate the model. Then, a method to define different lateral and horizontal superficial gas velocities in a 0D code is proposed together with a discussion about the possible viscosity in the reactor case when the pool is semi-solid. This model is going to be implemented in the 0D ASTEC/MEDICIS code in order to determine the impact of the convective heat transfer in the concrete ablation by corium

  1. Assessment of target markets for deployment of modular HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, M.; Hamilton, C.; Venneri, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Industry Alliance (NIA) consists of 16 companies and organizations that support development and deployment of modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (modular HTGRs or MHRs). These companies include reactor vendors, utilities, potential industrial end users of MHR process steam/heat, nuclear graphite vendors, and companies with design, technology development, regulatory licensing, and other HTGR subject matter expertise. The NIA has been investigating potential markets for MHRs in both North America and globally as part of its business plan development. MHRs have inherent, melt-down proof safety with high-temperature capability and high utilization of the nuclear heat for production of electricity and process heat. These features allow MHRs to be located within close proximity to the public and industrial end users, and in locations with very limited or no availability of cooling water as the ultimate heat sink. This paper provides a summary of recent NIA target market assessments, including selected markets which currently utilize high value oil and expensive liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuels for process heat and electricity generation on a large scale (e.g., Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Japan, and Korea). Results show that significant markets exist today for economical deployment of steam-cycle MHRs for electricity and process heat, especially in countries/regions that utilize expensive (or heavily subsidized) fossil fuels for energy needs. Low natural gas prices in North America presently inhibit expansion of any nuclear technology, but MHRs should be economically competitive by the 2030 - 2040 time frame, when natural gas prices are projected to be in the $7 to $10 per MMBtu price range. There is also good market potential for higher temperature MHR applications, including nuclear steel manufacturing, production of synthetic fuels, and hydrogen production. (author)

  2. Pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces: Effects of radius of curvature and edge angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Gao, C.

    1996-01-01

    Transient pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water is of interest for assessing the coolability of the lower head of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) pressure vessel following a core meltdown accident. Here, quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of radius of curvature and edge angle on pool boiling from downwards-facing surfaces in saturated power. The experiments employed two, 20-mm-thick copper test sections that had the same diameter (75 mm) but different surface radii (148 and 218.5 mm) and vapor release (or edge) angles (14.68 and 9.88 deg). The effect of surface area on pool boiling was determined by comparing the present results with the results for a copper section that was of the same thickness but had a surface radius of 148 mm and was less than one-half the surface area. The maximum heat flux (q MHF ) was highest at the lowermost position and decreased with increased local inclination on the surface. Both local and surface average q MHF were representative of quasi-steady-state critical heat flux. The high edge angle reduced vapor accumulation, which enhanced surface coolability and shortened its quenching time. For an edge angle of 9.88 deg, increasing the surface area (or surface radius) insignificantly affected the local q MHF near the edge of the copper section but lowered it everywhere else by ∼10%. For the same surface area, the larger edge angle (or smaller surface radius) increased q MHF by as much as 40%

  3. Response of an ESBWR to an accident like Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena G, C. A.; Salazar S, E.

    2014-10-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident occurred on March 11, 2011 was caused by an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the seismic scale, damaging the nuclear power plant (NPP) containing 6 nuclear reactors of boiling water, some of whom suffered a meltdown due to failure in the cooling systems of these. Electrical wiring was damaged and emergency diesel generators stopped with the arrival of the tsunami, caused by the earthquake. The presence of many critical systems in flood areas provided that a cascade of technological failures occurred, culminating in the complete loss of control over the central and reactors. This had important political consequences and several countries have revised their nuclear programs, considering dangerous and unworkable to the nuclear energy to meet the specific energy needs of each country. However, progress in the design of new reactors raise the possibility of continuing to use nuclear energy for much safer than before. The NPP of Fukushima contained BWR reactors of the first commercial generation designed in the 50. The new passive safety systems raise the idea of simplifying the systems, lowering costs while they are safer systems. New designs meet a these needs in both BWRs and PWRs. In this paper the response of an ESBWR reactor to similar conditions to those suffered by the reactors of Fukushima NPP during the accident is analyzed. In this new reactor of III + generation, the recirculation pumps are removed and emergency cooling systems that can maintain the stable core for several hours without electricity are used. To analyze the responses of this new reactor the simulator with basic principles that IAEA makes available to from Member States was used to better understand and analyze the performance of this type of reactors. (Author)

  4. Response of an ESBWR to an accident like Fukushima; Respuesta de un reactor ESBWR a un accidente tipo Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena G, C. A. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Salazar S, E., E-mail: carlos.pena.guerreo@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, 62250 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Fukushima nuclear accident occurred on March 11, 2011 was caused by an earthquake measuring 9.0 on the seismic scale, damaging the nuclear power plant (NPP) containing 6 nuclear reactors of boiling water, some of whom suffered a meltdown due to failure in the cooling systems of these. Electrical wiring was damaged and emergency diesel generators stopped with the arrival of the tsunami, caused by the earthquake. The presence of many critical systems in flood areas provided that a cascade of technological failures occurred, culminating in the complete loss of control over the central and reactors. This had important political consequences and several countries have revised their nuclear programs, considering dangerous and unworkable to the nuclear energy to meet the specific energy needs of each country. However, progress in the design of new reactors raise the possibility of continuing to use nuclear energy for much safer than before. The NPP of Fukushima contained BWR reactors of the first commercial generation designed in the 50. The new passive safety systems raise the idea of simplifying the systems, lowering costs while they are safer systems. New designs meet a these needs in both BWRs and PWRs. In this paper the response of an ESBWR reactor to similar conditions to those suffered by the reactors of Fukushima NPP during the accident is analyzed. In this new reactor of III + generation, the recirculation pumps are removed and emergency cooling systems that can maintain the stable core for several hours without electricity are used. To analyze the responses of this new reactor the simulator with basic principles that IAEA makes available to from Member States was used to better understand and analyze the performance of this type of reactors. (Author)

  5. Children of Chernobyl: A psycho-social empowerment project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this research has been to design and implement a social action project, using a Freirian Methodology for popular mental health among the victims of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear meltown disaster living in Belarus. Although Chernobyl is in the Ukraine, only 35 kilometers from Kiev, 70% of the 50 million curies of radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown fell on the Republic of Belarus. This continues to directly affect 2.4 million of the total population of 10 million people. These people, 800,000 of whom are children, still live in the radiated zones. They live with the knowledge that the food, the water, and the ground are slowly poisoning them through continued and ongoing exposure to radiation. While there has been some significant research on the medical effects of the disaster in the Ukraine, much more research needs to be done in Belarus. Very little research or treatment has responded to the emotional, mental health and psychosocial impacts of the disaster on individuals, families and communities. Following the introduction to the problem, a rationale for a new paradigm in Mental Health Treatment is presented in a chapter titled Liberation Psychology'. This chapter integrates fields of psychology, psychotherapy, social work, education, and community organization from a Freirian perspective. The Social Action Project is outlined and described in specific detail. The Social Action Project has led to medical, computer and school supplies being sent to Belarus. Workshops and training have been designed and implemented. Texts and manuals have been translated and published. Further, there is documentation of a joint conceptualization and design of this Children of Chernobyl' project with signed letters of agreement and a report of a fact finding mission to Belaraus. The Social Action Project is then evaluated with Future Planning discussed in the conclusion.

  6. Courage and selflessness in professional actions: but are they enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder-Collins, J K

    2013-06-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 caused considerable loss of life, destruction of livelihood and infrastructure. Linked to this event but not its cause, was the meltdown and radioactive contamination of the environment from Fukishima Dai-ichi power plant. This disaster, in turn, led to the enforced evacuation of populations at risk. Japanese nurses, physicians, paramedical staff and faculty from nearby universities all volunteered to staff decontamination centres for evacuees and survivors. This commentary critically reflects on the insights provided in this issue by Noto, Kitamiya, Itaki, Urushizaka & Yamabe (pp. 196-200) on the role of nurses in the Fukishima Dai-ichi disaster, extending that critique to evidence that has emerged through official and unofficial sources. Disaster planning is not a popular subject for societies in general nor is it a finite art or process. Civil authorities often work under restricted or reducing budgets and resources while serving increasing demands. Disaster planning requires multidisciplinary skills sets to be able to work across the many different departments, agencies, interest groups and budgets. Planners need to think outside the box, allocate resources and training to a level that justifies known and/or projected threats in preparing first responders with the correct tools, training and time to practise skills they may never be called upon to use. Disasters will always happen be they natural or man-made. To rely on the courage and selflessness of professionals is not enough. Training and learning from previous disasters can help in responsible planning. © 2013 The Author. International Nursing Review © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Engineering study for a melting, casting, rolling and fabrication facility for recycled contaminated stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-01

    This Preliminary Report is prepared to study the facilities required for recycling contaminated stainless steel scrap into plate which will be fabricated into boxes suitable for the storage of contaminated wastes and rubble. The study is based upon the underlying premise that the most cost effective way to produce stainless steel is to use the same processes employed by companies now in production of high quality stainless steel. Therefore, the method selected for this study for the production of stainless steel plate from scrap is conventional process using an Electric Arc Furnace for meltdown to hot metal, a Continuous Caster for production of cast slabs, and a Reversing Hot Mill for rolling the slabs into plate. The fabrication of boxes from the plate utilizes standard Shears, Punch Presses and welding equipment with Robotic Manipulators. This Study presumes that all process fumes, building dusts and vapors will be cycled through a baghouse and a nuclear grade HEPA filter facility prior to discharge. Also, all process waste water will be evaporated into the hot flue gas stream from the furnace utilizing a quench tank; so there will be no liquid discharges from the facility and all vapors will be processed through a HEPA filter. Even though HEPA filters are used today in controlling radioactive contamination from nuclear facilities there is a sparsity of data concerning radioactivity levels and composition of waste that may be collected from contaminated scrap steel processing. This report suggests some solutions to these problems but it is recommended that additional study must be given to these environmental problems.

  8. Parameters affecting of Akkuyu's safety assessment for severe core damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavun, Yusuf; Karasulu, Muzaffer

    2015-07-01

    We have looked at all past core meltdowns (Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents) and postulated the fourth one might be taking place in the future most probably in a newly built reactors anywhere of the earth in any type of NPP. The probability of this observation is high considering the nature of the machine and human interaction. Operation experience is a very significant parameter as well as the safety culture of the host nation. The concerns is not just a lack of experience with industry with the new comers, but also the infrastructure and established institutions who will be dealing with the Emergencies. Lack of trained and educated Emergency Response Organizations (ERO) is a major concern. The culture on simple fire drills even makes the difference when a severe condition occurs in the industry. The study assumes the fourth event will be taking place at the Akkuyu NGS and works backwards as required by the "what went wrong " scenarios and comes up with interesting results. The differences studied in depth to determine the impact to the severe accidents. The all four design have now core catchers. We have looked at the operator errors'like in TMI); Operator errors combined with design deficiencies(like in Chernobyl) and natural disasters( like in Fukushima) and found operator errors to be more probable event on the Akkuyu's postulated next incident. With respect to experiences of the operators we do not have any data except for long and successful operating history of the Soviet design reactors up until the Chernobyl incident. Since the Akkuyu will be built, own and operated by the Russians we have found no alarming concerns at the moment. At the moment, there is no body be able to operate those units in Turkey. Turkey is planning to build the required manpower during the transition period. The resolution of the observed parameters lies to work and educate, train of the host nation and exercise together.

  9. Engineering study for a melting, casting, rolling and fabrication facility for recycled contaminated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Preliminary Report is prepared to study the facilities required for recycling contaminated stainless steel scrap into plate which will be fabricated into boxes suitable for the storage of contaminated wastes and rubble. The study is based upon the underlying premise that the most cost effective way to produce stainless steel is to use the same processes employed by companies now in production of high quality stainless steel. Therefore, the method selected for this study for the production of stainless steel plate from scrap is conventional process using an Electric Arc Furnace for meltdown to hot metal, a Continuous Caster for production of cast slabs, and a Reversing Hot Mill for rolling the slabs into plate. The fabrication of boxes from the plate utilizes standard Shears, Punch Presses and welding equipment with Robotic Manipulators. This Study presumes that all process fumes, building dusts and vapors will be cycled through a baghouse and a nuclear grade HEPA filter facility prior to discharge. Also, all process waste water will be evaporated into the hot flue gas stream from the furnace utilizing a quench tank; so there will be no liquid discharges from the facility and all vapors will be processed through a HEPA filter. Even though HEPA filters are used today in controlling radioactive contamination from nuclear facilities there is a sparsity of data concerning radioactivity levels and composition of waste that may be collected from contaminated scrap steel processing. This report suggests some solutions to these problems but it is recommended that additional study must be given to these environmental problems

  10. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster: a brief report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Roopaksh; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi is a series of equipment failures, nuclear meltdown and release of radioactive materials at the Fukushima -1 nuclear power plant, following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. The plant comprises six separate boiling water reactors originally designed by general electric and maintained by the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). The Fukushima disaster is the building may be causing isolated, uncontrolled nuclear chain reaction. TEPCO confirmed its concern about the accuracy of high iodine and chlorine report by formally retracting the report which eliminated both the exceptionally high iodine-134 and chlorine-38 levels as proof of criticality. Reports of 13 observation of neutron beams 1.5 km. 'southwest of the plant's no. 1 and 2 reactors' from 13 to 16 March raised the possibility the nuclear fission could have occurred after the initial scraming of the reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. 16 March reports that fuel rods in the spent fuel pool at unit 4 could have been exposed to air appeared to indicate the fission may have occurred in that fuel pool. Later reports of exceptionally high iodine-134 levels appeared to confirm this theory because very high levels of iodine-134 would be indicative of fission reactions. The same report also showed high measurements of chlorine-38, which some nuclear experts used to calculate that fission must be occurring in unit 1. Despite TEPCO suggesting the iodine-134 report was inaccurate, the IAEA appeared to accept the chlorine-based analysis as a valid theory suggesting fission when it stated at a press conference that Melted fuel in the no. 1 reactor as of September 2011, there were no deaths or serious injuries due to direct radiation. Cancer deaths due to accumulated radiation exposure cannot be ruled out and according to one expert, might be in the order of 100 cases. (author)

  11. Crisis and Correspondence: Style in the Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Hvattum

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In his manifesto 'Das Kunstwerk der Zukunft' (1850, Richard Wagner characterised the nineteenth century as a time of crisis. Echoing Saint-Simon, he defined this crisis as a discrepancy between the spirit of the age and the actual, historical conditions. Evoking some of the most potent concepts of modern thinking—Zeitgeist, genius, and the Gesamtkunstwerk—Wagner outlined an aesthetic theory by which the artwork (including architecture simultaneously reflects and shapes its context, serving both as a mirror of its age and an agent of change.      Wagner’s seemingly paradoxical notion of art provides an apt introduction to historicist thinking. Obsessed with the idea of correspondence (or the lack of it between art and its times, nineteenth-century thinkers such as Heinrich Hübsch, Carl Bötticher and Gottfried Semper all responded to the perceived crisis. While Hübsch and Bötticher sought to alleviate the crisis by redefining this correspondence for a modern world, Semper presented a far more radical alternative. Not only did he see the current crisis as inevitable; he welcomed it as a necessary dissolution of an old order, out of which a new architecture could emerge. He thus anticipated modernists, such as Sigfried Giedion, for whom historicism was a necessary melt-down; an apocalypse, preparing for the advent of modernism. In this essay, I propose that crisis and style are intrinsically linked in modern thinking. To look closely at this coupling may throw new light not only on historicism but also on the noticeable unease with which the notion of style is treated in contemporary architectural history.

  12. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. II. Three examples: Mercury, Io, and Kepler-10 b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Efroimsky, Michael, E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil [US Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    In Efroimsky and Makarov (Paper I), we derived from the first principles a formula for the tidal heating rate in a homogeneous sphere, compared it with the previously used formulae, and noted the differences. Now we present case studies: Mercury, Kepler-10 b, and a triaxial Io. A sharp frequency dependence of k {sub 2}/Q near spin-orbit resonances yields a sharp dependence of k {sub 2}/Q (and, therefore, of tidal heating) upon the spin rate. Thereby physical libration plays a major role in tidal heating of synchronously rotating planets. The magnitude of libration in the spin rate being defined by the planet's triaxiality, the latter becomes a factor determining the dissipation rate. Other parameters equal, a strongly triaxial synchronized body generates more heat than a similar body of a more symmetrical shape. After an initially triaxial object melts and loses its triaxiality, dissipation becomes less intensive; the body can solidify, with the tidal bulge becoming a new figure with triaxiality lower than the original. We derive approximate expressions for the dissipation rate in a Maxwell planet with the Maxwell time longer than the inverse tidal frequency. The expressions derived pertain to the 1:1 and 3:2 resonances and a nonresonant case; so they are applicable to most close-in super-Earths detected. In these planets, the heating outside synchronism is weakly dependent on the eccentricity and obliquity, provided both these parameters's values are moderate. According to our calculation, Kepler-10 b could hardly survive the intensive tidal heating without being synchronized, circularized, and reshaped through a complete or partial melt-down.

  13. One Year After Fukushima: Lessons for a Safer Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flory, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi was a wake-up call for many. It reminded that nuclear accidents can happen, they do happen. Our common goal, in the Agency as well as in the wider international community, is that nuclear accidents become less and less likely. Our goal is also that, would an accident happen, all measures for minimizing its consequences would be available, exercised, effective. Every nuclear incident carries its lessons. These allow for a continuous strengthening of nuclear safety. Unfortunately, the most profound structural or cultural changes need exceptional events to make their way into our minds, into our culture, and into everyday implementation. On 11 March 2011 a huge earthquake and tsunami left more than 20,000 people dead or missing in eastern Japan. Amidst widespread destruction, the tsunami slammed into Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, disabling cooling systems and leading to fuel meltdowns in three of the six units. The accident was a jolt to the nuclear industry, regulators and governments. It was triggered by a massive force of nature, but it was existing weaknesses regarding defence against natural hazards, regulatory oversight, accident management and emergency response that allowed it to unfold as it did. The IAEA responded to the accident by activating its Incident and Emergency Centre and by organizing specialized expert missions to Japan to gain an understanding of the accident and to provide assistance and expert advice. The Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety organised by the IAEA in Vienna in June 2011 adopted a Ministerial Declaration which requested the Director General, inter alia, to prepare a draft IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety

  14. Zebra mussel beds: an effective feeding ground for Ponto-Caspian gobies or suitable shelter for their prey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Kobak

    2016-11-01

    , contributing to an invasional meltdown in the Ponto-Caspian invasive community.

  15. The Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqua, M.; Stueck, R.

    2012-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, the Tohoku earthquake and the subsequent tsunami hit the Japanese east coast, causing more than 15,000 fatalities. To this date, 3,000 people are still missing. The Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP was the nuclear installation that was most affected by the tsunami. The earthquake cut off the NPP from the national grid. About 45 minutes later, the tsunami flooded units 1-4 and led to core meltdown events with large releases for units 1, 2 and 3. Unit 4 had been in refuelling outage at that time and lost the cooling of the spent fuel pool for several days. Considerable hydrogen explosions occurred in units 1, 3 and 4. Shortly after the accident, TEPCO started to mitigate the consequences of the accident by providing external cooling to the reactors and by removing the radioactive debris from the site. Great emphasis was laid on effective radiation protection measures for the clean-up workers. Thus, up to now there has been no fatality due to the radiation caused by the Fukushima accident. The main steps of the accident sequences are described, taking into account the latest findings of investigations performed by TEPCO or on behalf of the regulatory body. The presentation focuses on the description of the status of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant and the future steps for cleaning-up the site. In the presentation, the major phases of the roadmap that TEPCO has developed for the clean-up are highlighted. The risks associated with the current plant status and the clean-up phases are described. Abstract the content of the manuscript in a few lines.

  16. The bungling giant : Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, I.J.

    2003-01-01

    From 1980-1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be 'passively' or 'inherently' safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, 'piecemeal social engineering.' Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  17. Models for the Configuration and Integrity of Partially Oxidized Fuel Rod Cladding at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Models were designed to resolve deficiencies in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 calculations of the configuration and integrity of hot, partially oxidized cladding. These models are expected to improve the calculations of several important aspects of fuel rod behavior. First, an improved mapping was established from a compilation of PIE results from severe fuel damage tests of the configuration of melted metallic cladding that is retained by an oxide layer. The improved mapping accounts for the relocation of melted cladding in the circumferential direction. Then, rules based on PIE results were established for calculating the effect of cladding that has relocated from above on the oxidation and integrity of the lower intact cladding upon which it solidifies. Next, three different methods were identified for calculating the extent of dissolution of the oxidic part of the cladding due to its contact with the metallic part. The extent of dissolution effects the stress and thus the integrity of the oxidic part of the cladding. Then, an empirical equation was presented for calculating the stress in the oxidic part of the cladding and evaluating its integrity based on this calculated stress. This empirical equation replaces the current criterion for loss of integrity which is based on temperature and extent of oxidation. Finally, a new rule based on theoretical and experimental results was established for identifying the regions of a fuel rod with oxidation of both the inside and outside surfaces of the cladding. The implementation of these models is expected to eliminate the tendency of the SCDAP/RELAP5 code to overpredict the extent of oxidation of the upper part of fuel rods and to underpredict the extent of oxidation of the lower part of fuel rods and the part with a high concentration of relocated material. This report is a revision and reissue of the report entitled, Improvements in Modeling of Cladding Oxidation and Meltdown.

  18. Special national report of the Slovak Republic compiled under the convention on nuclear safety. April 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    A Special safety report of the Slovak Republic in 2012 is presented. An account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (0) Introduction; (0.1) Purpose of the report; (0.2) Brief description of the site characteristics and units; (1) Executive summary; (2) External events; (2.1) Seismic; (2.2) Flooding; (2.3) Extreme weather conditions; (3) Design issues; (3.1) Loss of electrical power; (3.2) Loss of the decay heat removal capability/ultimate heat sink; (3.3) Loss of the primary ultimate heat sink, combined with station black out (see stress tests specifications); (4) Severe accident management; (4.1) Organization and arrangements of the licensee to manage accidents; (4.2) Accident management measures in place at the various stages of a scenario of loss of the core cooling function; (4.3) Maintaining the containment integrity after occurrence of significant fuel damage (up to core meltdown) in the reactor core; (4.4) Accident management measures to restrict the radioactive releases; (5) National organizations (regulator, technical support organizations, operator, government); (5.1) Legislative and regulatory framework; (6) Emergency preparedness and response and post--accident management (off-site); (6.1) Implementation of legislation in the field of emergency preparedness; (7) International cooperation; (7.1) Conventions and communications; (7.2) Cooperation with the international organizations; (7.3) Providing feedback including occurrences at nuclear installations of other nuclear power plants abroad.

  19. France: Reflections on the assessment of passive shutdown systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudrand, O.

    2015-01-01

    Passive shutdown systems (PSS) have been envisaged in the past project EFR developed in the 90’s. In practice, passive devices would have not replaced active shutdown systems. The PSS were proposed as a supplementary provision against core meltdown accident. The objective was to enhance the reliability of the emergency shutdown function by adding a completely independent and diversified “third shutdown system” (two active shutdown systems were envisaged in the basic design). In this frame, their efficiency was required essentially in case of postulated failure of the two active shutdown systems. It is to be noted that this approach is consistent with the required independence of the defense-in-depth levels. The IRSN considers that the shutdown system (I&C plus absorber rods and dedicated subassemblies) is of particular importance due to core physics typical of LMFRs. In relation to this, specific technical capabilities should be proven: - fast actuation and fall-down to cope with fast reactivity transients, - effectiveness under earthquake loading (insertion capability in case of core deformation), - actuation of the system in case of local subassembly fault (requires enhancement of detection for large cores), - effectiveness in case of partial core degradation In addition the shutdown system is needed to compensate for the positive coolant void effect (local or global void effect). Formally, the deterministic safety assessment of PSS should not be different from the one applied to active systems. But several questions arose when applying the standard assessment methods: - When a safety function is performed by active and passive systems, should the single failure criterion be applied to passive systems? - What kind of uncertainties should be explored in the performance analysis? - Are the qualification procedures different from those applicable to active systems? - How to ensure the sustainability of the performance of the PSS? Regarding the last point

  20. The influence of trait-emotional intelligence on authentic leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Kotzé

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Authentic leadership is a relatively new construct that has recently gained increasing attention resulting from challenges faced by organisations relating to ethical meltdowns, corruption and fraud. Research purpose: This study seeks to explore the relationship between components of emotional intelligence and authentic leadership. Motivation for the study: Several authors called for more empirical investigations into the antecedents of authentic leadership. Despite the important role that emotions play in leadership, empirical studies were lacking about the influence of different components of emotional intelligence to authentic leadership. Research design, approach and method: Data were collected, using questionnaires obtained from 341 full-time employed applicants to MBA and leadership programmes in a South African Business School. Relationships between variables were analysed, using Pearson product-moment correlations and stepwise multiple regression. Main findings: The results indicated that emotional intelligence has positive statistically significant associations with authentic leadership. Specifically, those who scored high on all the emotional intelligence components also scored high on authentic leadership. In addition, the emotional intelligence component of empathy was a statistically significant predictor of authentic leadership. Practical/managerial implications: Initial findings suggest the potential value of recognising and developing the emotional intelligence of leaders to enable them to lead their organisations authentically to desired, successful outcomes. As empathy has been shown to be the most important emotional intelligence predictor of authentic leadership, leaders need to understand when subordinates perceive a leader as displaying empathic emotion. Contribution: This study contributes to the literature and empirical research on the antecedents of authentic leadership.

  1. IEC Information Bulletin, No. 39, First Quarter 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    On 28 March, the Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) conducted its first Full Response Exercise of 2012. Over 30 staff members from the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security and the Division of Public Information participated. The IEC was activated into full response mode at approximately 9 a.m. This full response lasted most of the day and led up to a 'lessons learned' discussion at the end of the day. Florian Baciu, the IEC Response System Coordinator, noted: ''Although many of the participants were involved in the IAEA response to the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, this exercise gave them the opportunity to practice procedures which they had not used since then. In addition, we had several staff members relatively new to the IAEA's Incident and Emergency System among the participants.'' Hilaire Mansoux, one of the Emergency Response Managers for the exercise, stated: ''The scenario was quite complex, requiring a good flow of information.'' The IEC staff had developed a scenario in which a meltdown and resulting release of radioactive materials to the environment from a nuclear power plant in a Member State was caused by a criminal act. All outside organizations were represented by the IEC staff in a simulation cell, which periodically contributed information using telephone calls, faxes, emails and messages through the IAEA's Unified System for Information Exchange in Incidents and Emergencies (USIE). The tasks of the IAEA in the area of emergency response were expanded through the mandate given by Member States following the events at Fukushima Daiichi last year. In the area of communication and information dissemination, the IAEA was also given, among other tasks, the mandate to assess emergency situations by providing 'analysis of available information and prognosis of possible scenarios'. Together with other matters, the assessment aspect was addressed in this full response exercise.

  2. Some quality attributes of low fat ice cream substituted with hulless barley flour and barley ß-glucan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Haleem, Amal M H; Awad, R A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate some quality attributes of low fat ice cream (LFIC) substituted with hulless barley flour (HBF) and barley ß-glucan (BBG). The methodology included in this paper is based on adding HBF (1, 2, 3 and 4 %) as a partial substitution of skim milk powder (SMP) and BBG (0.40 %) as a complete substitution of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC). All mixes and resultant ice cream samples were evaluated for their physicochemical properties as well as the sensory quality attributes.The results indicated that substitution of SMP with HBF significantly increased total solids (TS), fat and crude fiber, while crude protein and ash significantly decreased in ice cream mixes. BBG exhibited the same manner of control. Specific gravity was gradually increased with adding HBFand BBG in the mixes and therefore the overrun percent was significantly changed in the resultant ice cream. Adding HBF in ice cream formula led to significant decrease in acidity with higher freezing point and the product showed higher ability to meltdown. BBG treatment showed the same trend of control. Values of flow time and viscosity significantly increased with increasing HBF in the ice cream mixes, but these values significantly decreased in BBG mix. The time required to freeze ice cream mixes was decreased with increasing the ratio of HBF but, increased in BBG treatment. The substitution of SMP with 1 and 2 % HBF significantly (P ≤ 0.05) enhanced sensory attributes of ice cream samples. While, BBG treatment achieved mild score and acceptability.

  3. Effect of CMC and arabic gum in the manufacture of jackfruit velva (Artocarpus heterophyllus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudhistira, B.; Riyadi, N. H.; Pangestika, A. D.; Pertiwi, S. R.

    2018-03-01

    Velva is one type of frozen dessert which is made from fruit/vegetable with ice cream maker, low fat and high fiber content. Jackfruit is a raw material for the manufacture of velva because of the high fiber content of 2.31 gr. The use of a stabilizers combination of CMC and arabic gum in the manufacture of velva will provide a better gel mix than single use. The purpose of this research is to know the influence of variation of CMC and arabic gum stabilizer on the characteristics (physical, chemical, and sensory) of jackfruit velva (Artocarpus heterophyllus) and determine variations in the most appropriate combinations of stabilizers to produce jackfruit velva with the best quality. This research applied Completely Randomized Design consist of one factor which is the combination of CMC and arabic gum levels in the making of jackfruit velva with two replicates and two replications of the analysis. The data obtained then analyzed statistically using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), when there is a significant difference, then followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test (DMRT) at significance level of 0.05. The results of this study concluded that the jackfruit velva with the addition of various concentrations of CMC and arabic gum is significantly affecting the taste, texture and overall parameters, but no significant difference on the color and flavor parameters of jackfruit velva. Based on the results of physical characteristics, chemical and sensory jackfruit velva with the addition of a stabilizing concentration of CMC and arabic gum 1: 1 result in best jackfruit velva. The best jackfruit velva with stabilizing the concentration of CMC and arabic gum 1: 1 contains a water content of 61.95%, dietary fiber 2.231%, total dissolved solids 20.38 °Brix, overrun 19.709%, meltdown 28.215 minutes. As for the color attribute score 3.72; Taste 4; flavor 3.60; Texture 3.68, and overall 3.88.

  4. Endurance test report of rubber sealing materials for the containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Watanabe, K.; Hanashima, K.

    2015-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear power plant accident such as a core meltdown and a cooling system failure, the containment contains radioactive materials released from the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the activity of the radioactive materials and the effects of radiation in the vicinity of the plant. Since high sealing performance and high pressure resistance are required of the containment, a silicone or EPDM rubber gasket with high heat and radiation resistance is used for the sealing of the sealing boundary of the containment. In recent years, it has been shown that a large amount of steam is released into the containment in the case of a severe accident. Consequently, radiation resistance at high temperature as well as steam resistance is required of the rubber gasket placed at the sealing boundary. However, the steam resistance of silicone rubber is not necessarily as good as that of EPDM rubber. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sealing characteristics of rubber gaskets in such a degrading environment in a severe accident. O. Kato et al. [1] conducted a study on the degradation status of rubber gaskets and their application limits at high temperature. However, few studies have evaluated rubber gaskets in high-temperature radiation and steam environments. In this study, we degraded silicone rubber and EPDM rubber used for the containment in the high-temperature radiation and steam environments expected to occur in a severe accident and evaluated the useful life of the rubber as a sealing material by estimating the change in its performance as a sealing material from the change in permanent compressive strain in the rubber. (author)

  5. State of the art and perspectives for French reliability studies in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.; Gachot, B.; Greppo, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    In the nuclear field, safety reliability methods are fully developing. The applications, which are a part of the system analysis, deal now with accidents - as was demonstrated by WASH-1400 - without neglecting the development of data collecting which is an essential element. International cooperation and exchanges are very fruitful and very open. In France, the builders (mainly FRAMATOME and GAAA) and power plant operators (Electricite de France), and of course safety authorities have developed on common bases numerous studies on reactors being ordered and being built. Joint teams carry out various researches in close cooperation. The application areas include the system analysis to evaluate the system performances and set up operating rules to be applied in the event of the partial unavailability of those systems. The studies dealt with emergency systems and their auxiliaries. Corresponding methods for the analysis of complex systems have been developed as was needed. As far as accidents are concerned, an important point is the systematic search for possible accident initiators, and a method based on the barrier concept and the operation of systems protecting the barriers is being developed, at the same time as the evaluation of accident sequences. Such studies could be used to check system performances, and even to design homogeneously circuits with increased reliability. Accident assessment after evaluation will give a classification by order of importance and will lead to more consistent safety designs. Future studies, always in close cooperation, will deal mainly with: an improved conception of safety tending toward a final technical allocation (such as the probability of core melt-down for the reactor); a refined methodology to meet with this allocation, with a search for common modes of failure, test and maintenance optimization, and the rational decrease of risks and consequences of human errors; the pursuing of present actions for reliability data and

  6. Recycling of rare metals from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, Frank; Dabruck, Jan Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The German Government decided in 2011 to phase out nuclear power. Thus, 17 power reactors will be shut down within the next 11 years and to be decommissioned. An interesting question is, in which extent rare metals of strategic economic importance can be recycled within the scope of decommissioning. To be named are valuable bulk metals like copper, aluminium and lead, but also rare metals like indium, niobium, vanadium, cobalt, or tin and rare earth metals. Due to high requirements in terms of material technology, materials found in nuclear reactor components are of particular importance when it comes to recycling. These include components of the primary cooling system (RPV-internals, control rods and grid-structures) components for process control systems and components from the non-nuclear part of reactors (pumps, valves, heat exchangers or boilers). Especially the radiologically controlled melt-down of metals is used as an alternative to free release or disposal. This process has some serious disadvantages, thus it seems to be appropriate optimizing the decommissioning process regarding recycling of valuable metals. The work schedule for pre-investigation is outlined for 18 months and can be summarized as follows: - Requesting design, operational and material data, - Data from a sample facility: detailed specification of used components, substances contained and data from related activation calculations, fluence-values and contamination, - Setting up a database to assign non-ferrous metals and components with additional data like activation and decay time possibly needed, concentration, distribution, total mass, aggregate state, state of chemical bonding and recyclability, - Determining the activation distribution to evaluate if a components is recyclable at all, thus: preparation of an MCNP-model, simulation of n-fluence and application of variance-reduction methods to optimize activation calculations, - Classification of recyclability considering the following

  7. Influence of the Shape of Tube break on the Aerosol retention during severe accident SGTR secuences: An experimental investigation under the International Artist2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, L. E.; Delgado Tardaguila, R.

    2010-07-01

    The potential radioactive release to the environment in case of meltdown sequences with steam generator tube ruptures, turns this type of by-pass sequences into an indispensable scenario to model when assessing PWR risk. Despite the recent investigation effort conducted through international projects, like EU-SGTR (Auvinen et al, 2005) and ARTIST (Guntay et al, 2004), the existing data are still scarce and need to be extended to build up a sound database on which to develop further understanding and modelling capabilities. In the case of the lack of water in the secondary side, some radioactive retention is still feasible given the huge amount of structural surfaces available on the particles pathway through towards the environment (tube surfaces, dryers, separators, etc.). Beyond any doubt, the break stage is highly relevant not just because of its own retention capability but also because of its capability of affecting properties of aerosols as important as their size distribution. Nonetheless, the amount of aerosols scrubbed in a dry break stage is a function of some boundary conditions, like the particle size and nature, the gas flow rate and the form of the tube breach. CIEMAT, in collaboration with other ARTIST2 partners and under the sponsorship of the Spanish Nuclear Council (CSN), has launched an experimental program to address some of these issues. The expected final outcome will be a more thorough CIEMAT SGTR database, which supplements the one under construction at PSI, who is actually running the ARTIST projects. This paper presents the experimental Ciemat Artist2 Aerosol Test (CAAT2) campaign with particular emphasis on the effect of breach shape on aerosol retention. In addition, the update of the SGTR-PECA facility of the LASS (Laboratory of Analysis of Safety Systems) at CIEMAT, will be shortly described. In order to illustrate the type of information expected from this second experimental phase at CIEMAT, the results from the first fish-mouth test

  8. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escorcia O, D.; Salazar S, E.

    2016-09-01

    events, such as containment damage, nuclear meltdown, failure trip of the Rcic system or hydrogen generation, among others. (Author)

  9. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor; Analisis del accidente de la planta nucleoelectrica de Fukushima Daiichi en un reactor tipo ABWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escorcia O, D. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Salazar S, E., E-mail: daniel.escorcia.ortiz@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, 62250 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    events, such as containment damage, nuclear meltdown, failure trip of the Rcic system or hydrogen generation, among others. (Author)

  10. Surface renewal model for heat transfer calculation between a porous solid wall and an internally heated bubbling pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This work has been performed in the frame of the study of severe accident of LWR involving core meltdown and failure of the reactor vessel with molten corium relocation in the reactor pit. One of the main issue in nuclear safety is the estimation of the time when the reactor cavity may fail due to the erosion of the basemat since it would lead to the contamination of the groundwater. The calculation of the basemat erosion velocity requires the knowledge of the heat transfer between the corium pool and the concrete. Due to the gas release (mainly CO 2 and H 2 O) resulting from the concrete erosion, two-phase flow heat transfers occur during molten core concrete interaction (MCCI). Two-phase flow heat transfer between a porous horizontal wall and an internally heated bubbling pool has been already extensively investigated on the experimental side by several authors (Kutateladze and Malenkov, Duignan et al, Bonnet et al, Bilbao y Leon et al). The effect of various parameters such as the physical properties of the fluid or the pool aspect ratio has been studied so that many experimental data are available. From dimensional analysis (Kutateladze-Malenkov, Bonnet et al) or theoretical approach (Konsetov) and from these experimental data, heat transfer correlations have been proposed based on usual non-dimensional groups as Nu, Pr, Ra, etc. Today, the most widely used correlation in MCCI study are those proposed by Konsetov and by Kutateladze and Malenkov. Comparisons of the results of these correlations with available experimental data show that not all tendencies are well reproduced. The main purpose of this paper is to present an alternative heat transfer correlation that can be used in MCCI study. This correlation has been proposed by Deckwer in the frame of the study of heat transfer in bubble column reactors dedicated to chemical engineering. This correlation has been deduced from a theoretical analysis based on a surface renewal

  11. Parameters affecting of Akkuyu’s safety assessment for severe core damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavun Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have looked at all past core meltdowns (Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents and postulated the fourth one might be taking place in the future most probably in a newly built reactors anywhere of the earth in any type of NPP. The probability of this observation is high considering the nature of the machine and human interaction. Operation experience is a very significant parameter as well as the safety culture of the host nation. The concerns is not just a lack of experience with industry with the new comers, but also the infrastructure and established institutions who will be dealing with the Emergencies. Lack of trained and educated Emergency Response Organizations (ERO is a major concern. The culture on simple fire drills even makes the difference when a severe condition occurs in the industry. The study assumes the fourth event will be taking place at the Akkuyu NGS and works backwards as required by the “what went wrong ” scenarios and comes up with interesting results. The differences studied in depth to determine the impact to the severe accidents. The all four design have now core catchers. We have looked at the operator errors’like in TMI; Operator errors combined with design deficiencies(like in Chernobyl and natural disasters( like in Fukushima and found operator errors to be more probable event on the Akkuyu’s postulated next incident. With respect to experiences of the operators we do not have any data except for long and successful operating history of the Soviet design reactors up until the Chernobyl incident. Since the Akkuyu will be built, own and operated by the Russians we have found no alarming concerns at the moment. At the moment, there is no body be able to operate those units in Turkey. Turkey is planning to build the required manpower during the transition period. The resolution of the observed parameters lies to work and educate, train of the host nation and exercise together.

  12. Thermogenic effect of an acute ingestion of a weight loss supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tranchina Christopher P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of a weight loss supplement on resting oxygen uptake (VO2, respiratory quotient (RQ, caloric expenditure (kcal, heart rate (HR, and blood pressure (BP in healthy and physically active individuals. Methods Ten subjects (5 male, 5 female; 20.2 ± 1.2 y; 172.2 ± 8.9 cm; 71.5 ± 17.2 kg; 17.3 ± 2.6% body fat underwent two testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects reported to the Human Performance Laboratory after at least 3-h post-absorptive state and were provided either 3 capsules of the weight loss supplement (SUP, commercially marketed as Meltdown® or 3 capsules of a placebo (P. Subjects then rested in a semi-recumbent position for three hours. VO2 and HR were determined every 5 min during the first 30 min and every 10 min during the next 150 min. BP was determined every 15 min during the first 30 min and every 30 min thereafter. The profile of mood states was assessed every 30 min. Results Area under the curve analysis revealed a significant 28.9% difference in VO2 between SUP and P for the three hour study period. In addition, a significant difference in energy expenditure was also seen between SUP (1.28 ± 0.33 kcal·min-1 and P (1.00 ± 0.32 kcal·min-1. A trend (p = 0.06 towards a greater utilization of stored fat as an energy source was also demonstrated (0.78 ± 0.23 kcal·min-1 and 0.50 ± 0.38 kcal·min-1 in P and SUP, respectively. Significant elevations in HR were seen during hours two and three of the study, and significantly higher average systolic BP was observed between SUP (118.0 ± 7.3 mmHg and P (111.4 ± 8.2 mmHg. No significant differences were seen in diastolic blood pressure at any time point. Significant increases in tension and confusion were seen in SUP. Conclusion Results indicate a significant increase in energy expenditure in young, healthy individuals following an acute

  13. The third update of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Station accident. September 1 through November 30, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibutani, Yu

    2011-01-01

    This article provides the third update of the Fukushima Daiichi accident that occurred on March 11, 2011. In the report of the first update of the Fukushima Daiichi accident on March 11 through May 31, the situation was reported on both on-site and off-site of the Fukushima Daiichi, including; failed cooldown of decay heat and meltdown of stricken reactors; emergency evacuation of local residents, radioactive contamination, spread of biased rumors by the information closure by government, regional cooperation with China, Taiwan and Korea, and visit of IAEA investigation team to Japan. The report of the second update on June 1 through August 31 reported the issues of, harsh public criticism against government and electric power companies, results of the public opinion poll, a sort of gentlemen's agreements between nuclear power companies and local governments which would be peculiar tradition in Japan, the first revision of the road map to cold shutdown of stricken reactors, and submission of report on Fukushima Daiichi accident to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This article provides the third update from September 1 through November 30, particularly on the issues of the second revision of the road map where the “cold shutdown” state should be reached before the end of 2011, the overview of governmental organization on the overall energy and nuclear policy, and the establishment of the nuclear disaster response headquarters (HQ) in the Prime Minister's Office. The HQ in collaboration with Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) decided the framework of road map plans, provision of various assistance and compensation for the residents affected by the nuclear incident, redefinition by the Nuclear Safety Commission for evacuation areas, recovery process of radioactive decontaminated areas, investigation and verification of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, reorganization of TEPCO management and financial system, establishment of damage compensation scheme

  14. The Future of Nuclear Power in the Light of European Energy Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweickardt, Hans E.

    2014-01-01

    1. Energy policy post-Fukushima: • Following the initial shock: differentiated development, no cohesive European policy; • EU: Nuclear Power (NP) remains important in the context of climate policy; • Bulk of European countries: Keep or even expand share of NP (UK, Eastern Europe); • Germany and Switzerland (CH): Exit from NP, in Germany based on previously fixed shutdown deadlines for every facility, in CH based on exclusion of new builds. 2. Switzerland's focus: • Current CH electricity supply: twin pillars of NP + hydro power; high sustainability. • Federal Council's new energy strategy and its consequences: Strain on economy and companies due to market distortion and high renovation costs; plus growing environmental stress, dependency on imports and social inequality due to artificially high electricity prices. 3. Future of nuclear power in Switzerland: Conceivable possibilities: • Short-term: Relatively rapid ban on nuclear power (but poss. with back-door research/no ban on thinking about the technology); • Medium-term: Ban on new facilities but old plants continue to operate; • Long-term: Re-entry/new start, poss. even sanctioned by politicians, on the following grounds: rather new facilities than old, good for the climate, costeffectiveness, energy security. 4. A new look for nuclear power? HTR technology of particular interest due to the following benefits: • Disposal (less waste, recycling); • Technical controllability, core meltdown impossible; • Manageable dimensions (particularly important in CH); • Financial feasibility. Whether NP will remain on the agenda, and which technology wins through also depends heavily on external factors: climate policy, cost-effectiveness/financial feasibility, readiness for market, change in value, trends in other energy sources. 5. Summary: Future of NP difficult to predict. If technology is mature and launched on the market within a reasonable time frame, the potential is there

  15. Radioactive strontium removal from seawater and groundwater with adsorptive fibers prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shun-ichi; Kono, Michitaka; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko

    2015-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and the tsunami that followed caused the meltdown of three reactors of the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (NPS), resulting in the emission of radionuclides such as cesium-137 and strontium-90 to the environment. Radioactive strontium was detected in seawater and groundwater at concentrations of 1.8 × 10 2 and 5.5 × 10 5 Bq/L, respectively, on October 7th 2014. Nonradioactive strontium dissolves at a concentration of 8 mg/L in seawater. No adsorbent can distinguish radioactive strontium from nonradioactive strontium; therefore, the adsorbent must collect both ions which coexist with other alkaline-earth metal ions such as magnesium and calcium ions. Inorganic compounds and chelate-forming resins are candidate adsorbents for strontium removal. However, it is difficult to use these adsorbents to process a large volume of water contaminated with radionuclides because of their granule and bead forms. We have prepared two kinds of adsorptive fiber by radiation-induced graft polymerization and subsequent chemical modifications: (1) sodium-titanate-impregnated fiber (ST fiber) and (2) iminodiacetate-group-immobilized fiber (IDA fiber). The preparation scheme of the ST fiber consisted of four steps. First, a commercially available 6-nylon fiber was irradiated with γ-rays to produce radicals. Second, sodium styrene sulfate was graft-polymerized onto the irradiated fiber. Third, a titanium species [Ti(OH) 2 2+ ] was bound to the sulfonic acid group of the grafted polymer chain. Finally, the titanium species was converted into sodium titanate with sodium hydroxide, and the resulting precipitate was impregnated onto the fiber. On the other hand, the IDA fiber was prepared as follows. An epoxy-group-containing vinyl monomer, glycidyl methacrylate, was graft-polymerized onto a previously γ-ray-irradiated 6-nylon fiber. Subsequently, the epoxy group was converted into an iminodiacetate group as a chelate-forming group by a

  16. Modeling and analysis of selected organization for economic cooperation and development PKL-3 station blackout experiments using TRACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Mukin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of tests dedicated to station blackout (SBO accident scenarios have been recently performed at the Primärkreislauf-Versuchsanlage (primary coolant loop test facility; PKL facility in the framework of the OECD/NEA PKL-3 project. These investigations address current safety issues related to beyond design basis accident transients with significant core heat up. This work presents a detailed analysis using the best estimate thermal–hydraulic code TRACE (v5.0 Patch4 of different SBO scenarios conducted at the PKL facility; failures of high- and low-pressure safety injection systems together with steam generator (SG feedwater supply are considered, thus calling for adequate accident management actions and timely implementation of alternative emergency cooling procedures to prevent core meltdown. The presented analysis evaluates the capability of the applied TRACE model of the PKL facility to correctly capture the sequences of events in the different SBO scenarios, namely the SBO tests H2.1, H2.2 run 1 and H2.2 run 2, including symmetric or asymmetric secondary side depressurization, primary side depressurization, accumulator (ACC injection in the cold legs and secondary side feeding with mobile pump and/or primary side emergency core coolant injection from the fuel pool cooling pump. This study is focused specifically on the prediction of the core exit temperature, which drives the execution of the most relevant accident management actions. This work presents, in particular, the key improvements made to the TRACE model that helped to improve the code predictions, including the modeling of dynamical heat losses, the nodalization of SGs' heat exchanger tubes and the ACCs. Another relevant aspect of this work is to evaluate how well the model simulations of the three different scenarios qualitatively and quantitatively capture the trends and results exhibited by the actual experiments. For instance, how the number of SGs considered for

  17. The great East Japan earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluke, R.

    2011-06-15

    'Full text:' More formally called the Tohoku-Chihou-Taiheiyo-Oki Earthquake of March 11, 2011, it was the ensuing tsunami that caused the most death and destruction to the north-east coastal region of Japan. It is also what caused the multiple meltdowns at Fukushima Dai-ichi. Reactor Unit 1, ironically, was scheduled to be permanently shut down for decommissioning just two weeks later. The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant has a tsunami protection barrier designed for the worst recorded tsunami in that area since 1896 - to a height of 5.7 m. The plant itself is on an elevated grade of about 10 m. The tsunami, reported to be 14-15 m, caused inundation of the entire site with at least four metres of seawater. The seawater flooded the turbine building and damaged electrical equipment including the emergency diesel generators, leaving the entire six-unit nuclear power plan without any source of AC power, known as the 'station blackout scenario'. There are numerous reports available on-line at various sites. The Japanese Government report is frank and forthcoming on the causes and the lessons learned, and the lAEA Mission report is in-depth and well presented, not only as a factual account of the events but as a unified source of the conclusions and lessons learned. Photos of the catastrophe are available at the TEPCO web site: http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/index-e.html. In this edition of the Bulletin there is a 'layman's' description of CANDU and BWR design in terms of the fundamental safety principles - Control, Cool and Contain as well as a description of how these principles were met, or not met at Fukushima Dai-ichi. Also, an excerpt from the IAEA Expert Mission is included. We 'technocrats' sometimes forget about the human aspects of a nuclear disaster. An essay by Dr. Michael Edwards is included entitled 'Psychology, Philosophy and Nuclear Science'. Other references to the events appear throughout this

  18. The great East Japan earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, R.

    2011-01-01

    'Full text:' More formally called the Tohoku-Chihou-Taiheiyo-Oki Earthquake of March 11, 2011, it was the ensuing tsunami that caused the most death and destruction to the north-east coastal region of Japan. It is also what caused the multiple meltdowns at Fukushima Dai-ichi. Reactor Unit 1, ironically, was scheduled to be permanently shut down for decommissioning just two weeks later. The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant has a tsunami protection barrier designed for the worst recorded tsunami in that area since 1896 - to a height of 5.7 m. The plant itself is on an elevated grade of about 10 m. The tsunami, reported to be 14-15 m, caused inundation of the entire site with at least four metres of seawater. The seawater flooded the turbine building and damaged electrical equipment including the emergency diesel generators, leaving the entire six-unit nuclear power plan without any source of AC power, known as the 'station blackout scenario'. There are numerous reports available on-line at various sites. The Japanese Government report is frank and forthcoming on the causes and the lessons learned, and the lAEA Mission report is in-depth and well presented, not only as a factual account of the events but as a unified source of the conclusions and lessons learned. Photos of the catastrophe are available at the TEPCO web site: http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/index-e.html. In this edition of the Bulletin there is a 'layman's' description of CANDU and BWR design in terms of the fundamental safety principles - Control, Cool and Contain as well as a description of how these principles were met, or not met at Fukushima Dai-ichi. Also, an excerpt from the IAEA Expert Mission is included. We 'technocrats' sometimes forget about the human aspects of a nuclear disaster. An essay by Dr. Michael Edwards is included entitled 'Psychology, Philosophy and Nuclear Science'. Other references to the events appear throughout this edition.(author)

  19. The Safety Assessment of Long term Interim Storage at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchan, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sellafield site comprises a wide range of nuclear facilities, including operating facilities associated with the Magnox reprocessing programme, the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) and a range of waste treatment plants. The operational life of some of the site facilities currently extends to 2120, requiring the retrieval, treatment, consolidation and safe extended storage of a variety of radioactive materials. Sellafield has utilised its existing safety assessment processes to inform and prioritise studies into beyond design basis events and resilience evaluation required following Fukushima by UK regulators and industry bodies such as WANO. There are significant differences between NPPs, for which the ENSREG 'stress tests' were originally intended, and the Sellafield site which is instead centered around two reprocessing facilities (Magnox and THORP), with a supporting infrastructure of waste processing and storage facilities, coupled with a legacy of high hazard older facilities. In the former case the consequences of a catastrophic failure are promptly realised, leading to significant problems such as fuel failure / meltdown in AGRs and LWRs respectively in the event of complete loss of cooling. At Sellafield, the processes are carried out at comparatively low temperatures and pressures with relatively low rates of change following any loss of cooling. Instead the consequences of catastrophic failure at Sellafield are more directly related to the very large inventories of radioactive materials, including high level liquid wastes and unprocessed fuels, present in specific plants and to the condition of the ageing assets, holding legacy wastes. The paper will consider how a number of analysis techniques have been used to establish a safety case for fault and accident conditions, i.e. design basis analysis (DBA), probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) and severe accident analysis (SAA) DBA is focused on the key safety measures for those initiating faults

  20. Ch. 37, Inertial Fusion Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and renewable energy (including biofuels) are the only energy sources capable of satisfying the Earth's need for power for the next century and beyond without the negative environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Substantially increasing the use of nuclear fission and renewable energy now could help reduce dependency on fossil fuels, but nuclear fusion has the potential of becoming the ultimate base-load energy source. Fusion is an attractive fuel source because it is virtually inexhaustible, widely available, and lacks proliferation concerns. It also has a greatly reduced waste impact, and no danger of runaway reactions or meltdowns. The substantial environmental, commercial, and security benefits of fusion continue to motivate the research needed to make fusion power a reality. Replicating the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to meet Earth's energy needs has been a long-sought scientific and engineering challenge. In fact, this technological challenge is arguably the most difficult ever undertaken. Even after roughly 60 years of worldwide research, much more remains to be learned. the magnitude of the task has caused some to declare that fusion is 20 years away, and always will be. This glib criticism ignores the enormous progress that has occurred during those decades, progress inboth scientific understanding and essential technologies that has enabled experiments producing significant amounts of fusion energy. For example, more than 15 megawatts of fusion power was produced in a pulse of about half a second. Practical fusion power plants will need to produce higher powers averaged over much longer periods of time. In addition, the most efficient experiments to date have required using about 50% more energy than the resulting fusion reaction generated. That is, there was no net energy gain, which is essential if fusion energy is to be a viable source of electricity. The simplest fusion fuels, the heavy isotopes of

  1. Fukushima after the Great East Japan Earthquake: lessons for developing responsive and resilient health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Shingo; Ahmed, Shahira; Goto, Rei; Inui, Thomas S; Atun, Rifat; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2017-06-01

    On 11 March 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake, followed by a tsunami and nuclear-reactor meltdowns, produced one of the most severe disasters in the history of Japan. The adverse impact of this 'triple disaster' on the health of local populations and the health system was substantial. In this study we examine population-level health indicator changes that accompanied the disaster, and discuss options for re-designing Fukushima's health system, and by extension that of Japan, to enhance its responsiveness and resilience to current and future shocks. We used country-level (Japan-average) or prefecture-level data (2005-2014) available from the portal site of Official Statistics of Japan for Fukushima, Miyagi, and Iwate, the prefectures that were most affected by the disaster, to compare trends before (2005-2010) and after (2011-2014) the 'disaster'. We made time-trend line plots to describe changes over time in age-adjusted cause-specific mortality rates in each prefecture. All three prefectures, and in particular Fukushima, had lower socio-economic indicators, an older population, lower productivity and gross domestic product per capita, and less higher-level industry than the Japan average. All three prefectures were 'medically underserved', with fewer physicians, nurses, ambulance calls and clinics per 100 000 residents than the Japan average. Even before the disaster, age-adjusted all-cause mortality in Fukushima was in general higher than the national rates. After the triple disaster we found that the mortality rate due to myocardial infarction increased substantially in Fukushima while it decreased nationwide. Compared to Japan average, spikes in mortality due to lung disease (all three prefectures), stroke (Iwate and Miyagi), and all-cause mortality (Miyagi and Fukushima) were also observed post-disaster. The cause-specific mortality rate from cancer followed similar trends in all three prefectures to those in Japan as a whole. Although we found a sharp

  2. CERN: Energy amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Even under the heavy burden of responsibility as CERN's Director General from 1989-3 the fertile mind of Carlo Rubbia the scientist was never still. A long-time Rubbia 'hobby' has been the search for new sources of nuclear energy, exploiting knowledge and skills from high energy physics. An initial objective was to adopt heavy ion techniques to induce controlled thermonuclear fusion, but in 1994 this quest changed direction. Putting the problems of thermonuclear fusion aside, Rubbia began to explore an alternative route to energy production through controlled nuclear fission. The idea is to use a particle accelerator producing neutrons by spallation (interaction of particles with a target) to feed a fuel/moderator assembly where the neutrons multiply by fission chain reactions. If the energy liberated becomes substantially greater than that needed to drive the accelerator, the process has a net gain and becomes selfsupporting. Hence the name ''Energy Amplifier'' (EA). Similar systems for energy production or for nuclear waste incineration have been proposed at Los Alamos and in Japan and Russia, but appear to require the prior development of innovative linear accelerators. For Rubbia's Amplifier, the requisite accelerator is a reasonable extrapolation of an existing cyclotron such that at the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute. Moreover, the EA would require fuel rods very similar to those of conventional reactors, rather than demand-ing new technology using liquid fuel loops (molten salts) with on-line separation of radioactive products. Unlike a reactor, the EA's fission reaction is not self-sustaining: it is sub-critical and needs a continuous supply of neutrons from the accelerator. This makes Chernobyl-type meltdowns unlikely: if the accelerator stops, the reaction stops too. Another major advantage is that the old dream of using thorium as a fuel is now made possible. Thorium is not itself fissile, but under neutron

  3. Radioactive cesium removal from seawater using adsorptive fibers prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shota; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu; Kikuchi, Takahiro; Morimoto, Yasutomi

    2015-01-01

    The meltdown of three reactors of the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (NPS) caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11th 2011 resulted in the emission of radionuclides such as cesium-137 and strontium-90 to the environment. For example, radioactive cesium exceeding the legal discharge limit (90 Bq/L, 2×10 -13 M) was detected in the seawater of the seawater-intake area of the NPS at the end of September 2014. Adsorbents with a high selectivity for cesium ions over other alkali metal ions such as sodium and potassium ions are required for cesium removal from seawater because sodium and potassium ions dissolve respectively at much higher concentrations of 5×10 -1 and 1×10 -2 M than cesium ions (2×10 -9 M). In addition, the simple operations of the immersion in seawater and the recovery of the adsorbents from seawater are desirable at decontamination sites. We prepared a cobalt-ferrocyanide-impregnated fiber capable of specifically capturing cesium ions in seawater by radiation-induced graft polymerization and chemical modifications. First, a commercially available 6-nylon fiber was irradiated with γ-rays. Second, an epoxy-group-containing vinyl monomer, glycidyl methacrylate, was graft-polymerized onto the γ-ray-irradiated nylon fiber. Third, the epoxy ring of the grafted polymer chain was reacted with triethylenediamine to obtain an anion-exchange fiber. Fourth, ferrocyanide ions, [Fe(CN) 6 ] 4 - , were bound to the anion-exchange group of the polymer chains. Finally, the ferrocyanide-ion-bound-fiber was placed in contact with cobalt chloride to precipitate insoluble cobalt ferrocyanide onto the polymer chains. Insoluble cobalt ferrocyanide was immobilized at the periphery of the fiber. However, the impregnation structure remains unclear. Here, we clarified the structure of insoluble cobalt ferrocyanide impregnated onto the polymer chain grafted onto the fiber to ensure the chemical and physical stability of the adsorptive fiber in

  4. OECD workshop on ex-vessel debris coolability - summary and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    The meeting organised in Karlsruhe was complementary to the OECD Workshop on In-Vessel Core Debris Retention and Coolability held in Garching, Germany in March 1998. The objectives of the Workshop were to: - exchange information on past, present and planned R and D activities in the area of ex-vessel debris coolability, and promote collaboration among the experts; - review the present situation and identify areas where knowledge is adequate for plant application; - address major uncertainties and identify remaining issues relevant to reactor safety; - discuss future orientations of work; - propose conclusions and recommendations to the CSNI. The Workshop had four main sessions, some of them divided into sub-sessions: Session A: Special Modes of Corium Discharge into the Containment; Session B: Phenomena to Achieve Coolability (B1: Natural Convection Heat Transfer with Bubbling, B2: Characteristics of Particle Beds, B3: Spreading, B4: Fragmentation and Quenching, B5: Flooding); Session C: Material Properties and Thermochemistry (C1: Properties, C2: Thermochemistry); Session D: Reactor Application. The Session Chairmen summaries are attached (Annex II). Each session and the meeting itself were concluded by a general discussion. Throughout the presentations of the papers and the discussions, the focus was on the application to the full size plant. This report presents the conclusions and recommendations after evaluation of the presentations and discussions. They are generally listed in the sequence of the meltdown process. (1) The conditions of melt release at vessel failure may vary according to the variations of core melt-down in the RPV. Relevant scenarios and bounding melt release conditions, such as melt dispersal into the containment as one extreme or jet impingement as another extreme release mode, should be quantified in order to plan and assess different management procedures or countermeasures for accident mitigation. (2) The phase diagrams and physical

  5. A probabilistic safety assessment of the standard French 900MWe pressurized water reactor. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    To situate the probabilistic safety assessment of standardized 900 MWe units made by the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN), it is necessary to consider the importance and possible utilization of a study of this type. At the present time, the safety of nuclear installations essentially depends on the application of the defence in-depth approach. The design arrangements adopted are justified by the operating organization on the basis of deterministic studies of a limited number of conventional situations with corresponding safety margins. These conventional situations are grouped in categories by frequency, it being accepted that the greater the consequences the lesser the frequency must be. However in the framework of the analysis performed under the control of the French safety authority, the importance was rapidly recognized of setting an overall reference objective. By 1977, on the occasion of appraisal of the fundamental safety options of the standardized 1300 MWe units, the Central Service for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (SCSIN) set the following global probabilistic objective: 'Generally speaking, the design of installations including a pressurized water nuclear reactor must be such that the global probability of the nuclear unit being the origin of unacceptable consequences does not exceed 10 -6 per year...' Probabilistic analyses making reference to this global objective gradually began to supplement the deterministic approach, both for examining external hazards to be considered in the design basis and for examining the possible need for additional means of countering the failure of doubled systems in application of the deterministic single-failure criterion. A new step has been taken in France by carrying out two level 1 probabilistic safety assessments (calculation of the annual probability of core meltdown), one for the 900 MWe series by the IPSN and the other for the 1300 MWe series by Electricite de France. The objective of

  6. Research and development with regard to severe accidents in pressurised water reactors: Summary and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document reviews the current state of research on severe accidents in France and other countries. It aims to provide an objective vision, and one that's as exhaustive as possible, for this innovative field of research. It will help in identifying R and D requirements and categorising them hierarchically. Obviously, the resulting prioritisation must be completed by a rigorous examination of needs in terms of safety analyses for various risks and physical phenomena, especially in relation to Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments. PSA-2 should be sufficiently advanced so as not to obscure physical phenomena that, if not properly understood, might result in substantial uncertainty. It should be noted that neither the safety analyses nor PSA-2 are presented in this document. This report describes the physical phenomena liable to occur during a severe accident, in the reactor vessel and the containment. It presents accident sequences and methods for limiting impact. The corresponding scenarios are detailed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 deals with in-vessel accident progression, examining core degradation (3.1), corium behaviour in the lower head (3.2), vessel rupture (3.3) and high-pressure core meltdown (3.4). Chapter 4 focuses on phenomena liable to induce early containment failure, namely direct containment heating (4.1), hydrogen risk (4.2) and steam explosions (4.3). The phenomenon that could lead to a late containment failure, namely molten core-concrete interaction, is discussed in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 focuses on problems related to in-vessel and ex-vessel corium retention and cooling, namely in-vessel retention by flooding the primary circuit or the reactor pit (6.1), cooling of the corium under water during the corium-concrete interaction (6.2), corium spreading (6.3) and ex-vessel core catchers (6.4). Chapter 7 relates to the release and transport of fission products (FP), addressing the themes of in-vessel FP release (7.1) and ex-vessel FP release (7.3), FP

  7. Comprehensive nuclear science and engineering for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiie, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Japan's nuclear policy and long-term nuclear program are illuminated. It is noted, that Japan's basic stance towards the peaceful use of nuclear science and engineering must be established. Japan, one of the advanced nations in the field of science and engineering, must take the initiative in cooperating with Kazakhstan, Russia, the US, Europe, Asia, and other regions/countries concerned for common national interests. In particular. the cooperative activities with Kazakhstan are as follows: As part of a safety study regarding severe accidents in light-water reactors, the 'COTELS project' using a molten material behavior test device, LAVA, at the National Nuclear Center (NNC) in Kazakhstan is now under way. This test is being conducted to clarify the interaction between debris and water or concrete on the assumption that a pressure vessel is destroyed after the meltdown of a reactor core and molten materials (debris) falls to the bottom of a containment vessel. This COTELS project, one of the earliest joint research projects being conducted by Japan and Kazakhstan, began in 1995 and was completed in 1999. A project for testing debris cooling capability in a pressure vessel has also started. Also, in the field of fast reactor development, the 'EAGLE project' began progress in 1998 to utilize experimental facilities including an impulse graphite reactor (IGR) at the NNC. A new experimental facility recently went into operation for this project. The objective of this joint project is to provide a dear perspective on the safety characteristics of a fast reactor core under severe accident conditions. The inherent safety features of core materials expelled from the core without recriticality in the course of core melting will be investigated in a series of experiments. Safety issues are major concerns as well as economic efficiency, effective use of natural resources, nuclear non-proliferation, and the reduction of environmental burdens for the development of fast

  8. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H

    1999-08-01

    This report is the final report for the work performed in 1998 in the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI), under the auspices of the APRI Project, jointly funded by SKI, HSK, USNRC and the Swedish and Finnish power companies. The present report describes results of advanced analytical and experimental studies concerning melt-water-structure interactions during the course of a hypothetical severe core meltdown accident in a light water reactor (LWR). Emphasis has been placed on phenomena and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets, melt spreading and coolability, and thermal and mechanical loadings of a pressure vessel during melt-vessel interaction. Many of the investigations performed in support of this project have produced papers which have been published in the proceedings of technical meetings. A short summary of the results achieved in these papers is provided in this overview. Both experimental and analytical studies were performed to improve knowledge about phenomena of melt-structure-water interactions. We believe that significant technical advances have been achieved during the course of these studies. It was found that: the solidification has a strong effect on the drop deformation and breakup. Initially appearing at the drop surface and, later, thickening inwards, the solid crust layer dampens the instability waves on the drop surface and, therefore, hinders drop deformation and breakup. The drop thermal properties also affect the thermal behavior of the drop and, therefore, have impact on its deformation behavior. The jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters, e.g. the Weber number, but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from the liquidus to the solidus temperature. Additionally, the crust formed on the surface of the melt jet will also reduce the propensity

  9. Tracing Fukushima Radionuclides in the Northern Hemisphere -An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Punam; Ballard, Sally; Nelson, Roger

    2013-04-01

    A massive 9.0 earthquake and ensuing tsunami struck the northern coast of the Honshu-island, Japan on March 11, 2011 and severely damaged the electric system of the Fukushima- Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The structural damage to the plant disabled the reactor's cooling systems. Subsequent fires, a hydrogen explosion and possible partial core meltdowns released radioactive fission products into the atmosphere. The atmospheric release from the crippled Fukushima NPP started on March 12, 2011 with a maximum release phase from March 14 to 17. The radioactivity released was dominated by volatile fission products including isotopes of the noble gases xenon (Xe-133) and krypton (Kr-85); iodine (I-131,I-132); cesium (Cs-134,Cs-136,Cs-137); and tellurium (Te-132). The non-volatile radionuclides such as isotopes of strontium and plutonium are believed to have remained largely inside the reactor, although there is evidence of plutonium release into the environment. Global air monitoring across the northern hemisphere was increased following the first reports of atmospheric releases. According to the source term, declared by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) of Japan), approximately 160 PBq (1 PBq (Peta Becquerel = 10^15 Bq)) of I-131 and 15 PBq of Cs-137 (or 770 PBq "iodine-131 equivalent"), were released into the atmosphere. The 770 PBq figure is about 15% of the Chernobyl release of 5200 PBq of "iodine-131 equivalent". For the assessment of contamination after the accident and to track the transport time of the contaminated air mass released from the Fukushima NPP across the globe, several model calculations were performed by various research groups. All model calculations suggested long-range transport of radionuclides from the damaged Fukushima NPP towards the North American Continent to Europe and to Central Asia. As a result, an elevated level of Fukushima radionuclides were detected in air, rain, milk, and vegetation samples across the northern

  10. Research and experience report 2012. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) acts upon the basis of the latest developments in science and technology. ENSI supports and coordinates safety research, the results of which influence directly its Guidelines, individual decisions and resources. Research projects also serve training purposes and maintain competence within ENSI and its experts. The research in fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the graded approach to barriers used for the confinement of radioactive materials. Based on test results from accidents involving a loss of coolant ENSI instructed the operators of Swiss nuclear power plants to review whether they were relevant to their own facilities. Ageing mechanisms affecting structural materials are crucial to the long-term operation of nuclear power plants. Specialised thematic databases are being created in order to facilitate a systematic analysis of relevant operating experience from numerous countries. In addition to damage that may result from events within nuclear power plants, the safety analyses also reflect external events. ENSI supports international projects conducting complex experiments and simulations of aircraft accidents and earthquakes. It is involved in some projects relating to flood risks. The effect of operator behaviour on accidents in nuclear power plants is the focus point of research into human factors which identifies and analyses certain operator errors influencing negatively the course of an accident. Proposals to improve accident procedures were developed. This research area also focuses on the influence of the control room layout on the performance of operating staff. System behaviour and accident sequences in nuclear power plants are analysed in conditions ranging from normal operations through to accidents resulting in core melt-down. The results are used for the quantitative evaluation of the plant risk in probabilistic safety analyses. Applied research in radiological protection ranges

  11. One Year After Fukushima, Nuclear Safety Is Stronger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear power is safer than it was a year ago as the nuclear industry, regulators and governments act on the lessons of Fukushima, but that safety must never be taken for granted, said Yukiya Amano, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Speaking ahead of the first anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March, Amano said a culture of constant vigilance and improvement was vital to ensure that the benefits of nuclear power could be harnessed as safely as humanly possible. 'Nuclear safety is stronger than it was a year ago', he said. 'Fukushima Daiichi was a very serious accident, but we know what went wrong and we have a clear course of action to tackle those causes - not only in Japan, but anywhere in the world. 'Now we have to keep up the momentum. Complacency can kill'. On 11 March 2011 a huge earthquake and tsunami left more than 20 000 people dead or missing in eastern Japan. Amidst widespread destruction, the tsunami slammed into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, disabling cooling systems and leading to fuel meltdowns in three of the six Units. The accident was a jolt to the nuclear industry, regulators and governments. It was triggered by a massive force of nature, but it was existing weaknesses of design regarding defence against natural hazards, regulatory oversight, accident management and emergency response that allowed it to unfold as it did. For example: The nuclear regulator was not sufficiently independent, allowing weak oversight of the operator, TEPCO, and regulatory requirements fell short of international best practice; Not enough attention was paid to guarding against possible extreme events at the Fukushima Daiichi site, leaving critical safety functions such as cooling systems vulnerable to the tsunami; Training to respond to serious accidents was inadequate, as were mitigation measures to prevent hydrogen explosions and protect the venting system; and Accident command lines

  12. IRSN's viewpoint on the safety and radiation protection of French nuclear power plants in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    however be tempered by the persistence, or even the increase in unanticipated events and operating difficulties, caused essentially by human factors, organizational aspects and certain shortcomings in terms of operating rigour. Although the responsiveness of the operators enabled the consequences of such events to be limited, this responsiveness nevertheless has its limits and particular attention shall be paid to the effects of the corrective actions engaged by EDF in the areas of organization, operating practices and human competence. Among the generic anomalies discovered on nuclear power plants (NPPs), that relating to the clogging of steam generators strongly mobilized the IRSN, and continues to do so because of the associated risks. Progressing in nuclear safety involves taking into account experience feedback and new knowledge resulting from research into safety. The studies and implementation of the necessary modifications are sometimes of considerable scale and extend over several years. Milestones were crossed in the implementation of significant improvements for safety in 2007. Among these the IRSN has noted in particular the installation of hydrogen recombiners that are designed to reduce the risk of hydrogen emission in the reactor containment in a severe accident situation (core meltdown) for all the reactors of the fleet, and the installation of new filtration systems for the recirculation of the water collected in the sumps of the reactor building in an accident situation (loss of primary coolant). Furthermore, in 2007 the IRSN delivered the conclusions from its analysis of the measures proposed by EDF to better protect the power plants against the risks of external flooding. Lastly, two new fuel management systems were put in place on NPPs in 2007: 'MOX Parity' management on 900 MWe reactors, and 'ALCADE' management on 1450 MWe reactors. Optimising the management of reloaded fuel aims essentially at improving the economic performance of reactors. It does

  13. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    At present nuclear power accounts for approximately 17% of total electricity generation worldwide. Given continuing population growth and the needs of the third world and developing countries to improve their economic performance and standard of living, energy demand is expected to continue to grow through the 21st century. The proportion of energy supplied as electricity is also expected to continue to increase. Although fossil fuelled electricity generation is the option preferred by several countries for the short term, there are rising concerns over climatic consequences caused by extended burning of fossil fuels as a result of the demands of a fast expanding world population. In this situation nuclear electricity will become more and more important and the known reserves of uranium would be consumed quite quickly by thermal reactors. It would be possible to sustain a large nuclear programme only by introducing fast reactors. One can conclude that there are strategic reasons for pursuing the development of fast breeder reactors. It will become desirable essential, to have this technology available for introduction. The experience of the various prototypes presently in operation has confirmed the operability and benign characteristics of the LMFR and has given ground for confidence in the future. Current fast reactor designs offer very large margins of safety and by virtue of redundant and diverse safety systems the potential for an energetic core disruptive accident or for fast reactor core meltdown has been essentially eliminated. Several international forums reviewed the current trends in the fast reactor development. The view was reaffirmed that fast breeder reactors still remain the most practical tool for effective utilization of uranium resources for the future energy needs. Achievement of competitiveness with LMRs is still the first priority condition for the future deployment of this type of reactor. The recycling of plutonium into LMFBRs would allow

  14. A computational approach to achieve situational awareness from limited observations of a complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Jason

    At the start of the 21st century, the topic of complexity remains a formidable challenge in engineering, science and other aspects of our world. It seems that when disaster strikes it is because some complex and unforeseen interaction causes the unfortunate outcome. Why did the financial system of the world meltdown in 2008--2009? Why are global temperatures on the rise? These questions and other ones like them are difficult to answer because they pertain to contexts that require lengthy descriptions. In other words, these contexts are complex. But we as human beings are able to observe and recognize this thing we call 'complexity'. Furthermore, we recognize that there are certain elements of a context that form a system of complex interactions---i.e., a complex system. Many researchers have even noted similarities between seemingly disparate complex systems. Do sub-atomic systems bear resemblance to weather patterns? Or do human-based economic systems bear resemblance to macroscopic flows? Where do we draw the line in their resemblance? These are the kinds of questions that are asked in complex systems research. And the ability to recognize complexity is not only limited to analytic research. Rather, there are many known examples of humans who, not only observe and recognize but also, operate complex systems. How do they do it? Is there something superhuman about these people or is there something common to human anatomy that makes it possible to fly a plane? Or to drive a bus? Or to operate a nuclear power plant? Or to play Chopin's etudes on the piano? In each of these examples, a human being operates a complex system of machinery, whether it is a plane, a bus, a nuclear power plant or a piano. What is the common thread running through these abilities? The study of situational awareness (SA) examines how people do these types of remarkable feats. It is not a bottom-up science though because it relies on finding general principles running through a host of varied

  15. Dietary supplement increases plasma norepinephrine, lipolysis, and metabolic rate in resistance trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling Brian K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary supplements targeting fat loss and increased thermogenesis are prevalent within the sport nutrition/weight loss market. While some isolated ingredients have been reported to be efficacious when used at high dosages, in particular in animal models and/or via intravenous delivery, little objective evidence is available pertaining to the efficacy of a finished product taken by human subjects in oral form. Moreover, many ingredients function as stimulants, leading to increased hemodynamic responses. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of a finished dietary supplement on plasma catecholamine concentration, markers of lipolysis, metabolic rate, and hemodynamics. Methods Ten resistance trained men (age = 27 ± 4 yrs; BMI = 25 ± 3 kg· m-2; body fat = 9 ± 3%; mean ± SD ingested a dietary supplement (Meltdown®, Vital Pharmaceuticals or a placebo, in a random order, double blind cross-over design, with one week separating conditions. Fasting blood samples were collected before, and at 30, 60, and 90 minutes post ingestion and were assayed for epinephrine (EPI, norepinephrine (NE, glycerol, and free fatty acids (FFA. Area under the curve (AUC was calculated for all variables. Gas samples were collected from 30–60 minutes post ingestion for measurement of metabolic rate. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded at all blood collection times. Results AUC was greater for the dietary supplement compared to the placebo for NE (1332 ± 128 pg·mL-1·90 min-1 vs. 1003 ± 133 pg·mL-1·90 min-1; p = 0.03, glycerol (44 ± 3 μg·mL-1·90 min-1 vs. 26 ± 2 μg·mL-1·90 min-1; p -1·90 min-1 vs. 0.88 ± 0.12 mmol·L-1·90 min-1; p = 0.0003. No difference between conditions was noted for EPI AUC (p > 0.05. For all variables, values were highest at 90 minutes post ingestion. Total kilocalorie expenditure during the 30 minute collection period was 29.6% greater (p = 0.02 for the dietary supplement (35 ± 3

  16. Numerical calculation of transient field effects in quenching superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerg, Juljan Nikolai

    2010-07-01

    The maximum obtainable magnetic induction of accelerator magnets, relying on normal conducting cables and iron poles, is limited to around 2 T because of ohmic losses and iron saturation. Using superconducting cables, and employing permeable materials merely to reduce the fringe field, this limit can be exceeded and fields of more than 10 T can be obtained. A quench denotes the sudden transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state. The drastic increase in electrical resistivity causes ohmic heating. The dissipated heat yields a temperature rise in the coil and causes the quench to propagate. The resulting high voltages and excessive temperatures can result in an irreversible damage of the magnet - to the extend of a cable melt-down. The quench behavior of a magnet depends on numerous factors, e.g. the magnet design, the applied magnet protection measures, the external electrical network, electrical and thermal material properties, and induced eddy current losses. The analysis and optimization of the quench behavior is an integral part of the construction of any superconducting magnet. The dissertation is divided in three complementary parts, i.e. the thesis, the detailed treatment and the appendix. In the thesis the quench process in superconducting accelerator magnets is studied. At first, we give an overview over features of accelerator magnets and physical phenomena occurring during a quench. For all relevant effects numerical models are introduced and adapted. The different models are weakly coupled in the quench algorithm and solved by means of an adaptive time-stepping method. This allows to resolve the variation of material properties as well as time constants. The quench model is validated by means of measurement data from magnets of the Large Hadron Collider. In a second step, we show results of protection studies for future accelerator magnets. The thesis ends with a summary of the results and a critical outlook on aspects which could

  17. Research and experience report 2012. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2012. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) acts upon the basis of the latest developments in science and technology. ENSI supports and coordinates safety research, the results of which influence directly its Guidelines, individual decisions and resources. Research projects also serve training purposes and maintain competence within ENSI and its experts. The research in fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the graded approach to barriers used for the confinement of radioactive materials. Based on test results from accidents involving a loss of coolant ENSI instructed the operators of Swiss nuclear power plants to review whether they were relevant to their own facilities. Ageing mechanisms affecting structural materials are crucial to the long-term operation of nuclear power plants. Specialised thematic databases are being created in order to facilitate a systematic analysis of relevant operating experience from numerous countries. In addition to damage that may result from events within nuclear power plants, the safety analyses also reflect external events. ENSI supports international projects conducting complex experiments and simulations of aircraft accidents and earthquakes. It is involved in some projects relating to flood risks. The effect of operator behaviour on accidents in nuclear power plants is the focus point of research into human factors which identifies and analyses certain operator errors influencing negatively the course of an accident. Proposals to improve accident procedures were developed. This research area also focuses on the influence of the control room layout on the performance of operating staff. System behaviour and accident sequences in nuclear power plants are analysed in conditions ranging from normal operations through to accidents resulting in core melt-down. The results are used for the quantitative evaluation of the plant risk in probabilistic safety analyses. Applied research in radiological protection ranges

  18. Macroprudential Policy: A Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ebrahimi Kahou

    2016-05-01

    , that require banks to hold more capital in good economic times so that they can use it as a buffer in case of a downturn. Another important macroprudential tool is to identify how much each bank contributes to systemic risk. This would entail identifying the banks that pose a greater threat to stability and having them hold extra capital. Assigning proper capital requirements is, however, not as straightforward as it may seem as the risk of the banking system changes when capital requirements change. One study has shown that when properly done such a requirement can reduce by one-quarter the probability of a financial crisis. Implementing macroprudential policy in Canada faces some challenges. With both housing prices and the level of Canadians’ personal debt high, sudden corrections to the financial system can create problems. Also, the interconnections between Canadian and foreign banks could result in the former being much more greatly influenced by financial-crisis spillover from the latter, something Canada generally avoided during the 2007 economic meltdown. There’s no consensus as yet on the objectives of macroprudential policy. However, it is a necessary complement to microprudential policy and provides a means of managing systemic risk with the goal of greater global financial stability.

  19. Studies in Swedish Energy Opinion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Soeren; Hedberg, Per

    2012-07-01

    the 1970s, energy production was politicized big time in the industrialized world. The birth of the environmental movement, the oil crises in 1973 - 74 and the beginning conflict surrounding civilian nuclear power, put energy issues center stage on the political agenda. Energy policies - especially related to the development of nuclear power - came to dominate election campaigns, like in Sweden in 1976 or be the subject of referendums, like in Austria in 1978 or in Sweden in 1980. Critical voices toward the peaceful use of nuclear power - having started in America before being exported to Europe - gained real strength and public support all over the Western world by the nuclear accident at the Three Mile Island plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 1979. The energy genie was out of the bottle and out to stay. Fueled by the nuclear meltdowns in Chernobyl in 1986 and in Fukushima in 2011 and supplemented by conflicts over how to reduce the use of oil and coal, how to sensibly exploit the waste gas reserves, and how to develop renewable energy sources based on sun, wind and waves – have made all kinds of energy issues the focal point of political contentions ever since the early 1970s. In Sweden, as in many other countries, energy policies - often with nuclear power in the center - have been one of the most fought-over policy areas during the last thirty-forty years. And the contentious character of energy policies is not limited to the elite level of politics - to politicians, to media pundits or to lobbyists. It is also manifest among ordinary citizens. Energy issues - nuclear power and wind power in particular - are highly polarizing among voters as well. Given this historic background, starting in the 1970s, it was rather natural that energy questions - featuring most prominently questions related to nuclear power - would be important parts of the voter surveys performed by the Swedish National Elections Studies (SNES) at the Univ. of Gothenburg. The first book

  20. Investigation on Melt-Structure-Water Interactions (MSWI) during severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Yang, Z.L.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Bui, V.A.; Haraldsson, H.O.; Li, H.X.; Konovakhin, M.; Paladino, D.; Leung, W.H [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1999-08-01

    This report is the final report for the work performed in 1998 in the research project Melt Structure Water Interactions (MSWI), under the auspices of the APRI Project, jointly funded by SKI, HSK, USNRC and the Swedish and Finnish power companies. The present report describes results of advanced analytical and experimental studies concerning melt-water-structure interactions during the course of a hypothetical severe core meltdown accident in a light water reactor (LWR). Emphasis has been placed on phenomena and properties which govern the fragmentation and breakup of melt jets and droplets, melt spreading and coolability, and thermal and mechanical loadings of a pressure vessel during melt-vessel interaction. Many of the investigations performed in support of this project have produced papers which have been published in the proceedings of technical meetings. A short summary of the results achieved in these papers is provided in this overview. Both experimental and analytical studies were performed to improve knowledge about phenomena of melt-structure-water interactions. We believe that significant technical advances have been achieved during the course of these studies. It was found that: the solidification has a strong effect on the drop deformation and breakup. Initially appearing at the drop surface and, later, thickening inwards, the solid crust layer dampens the instability waves on the drop surface and, therefore, hinders drop deformation and breakup. The drop thermal properties also affect the thermal behavior of the drop and, therefore, have impact on its deformation behavior. The jet fragmentation process is a function of many related phenomena. The fragmentation rate depends not only on the traditional parameters, e.g. the Weber number, but also on the melt physical properties, which change as the melt cools down from the liquidus to the solidus temperature. Additionally, the crust formed on the surface of the melt jet will also reduce the propensity